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Sample records for adducts biological effects

  1. Photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yun-bo

    1988-03-01

    This thesis consists of three main parts and totally eight chapters. In Part I, The author will present studies on the photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, specifically, the wavelength dependencies for the photoreversals of thymidine-HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4, 5', 8-trimenthylpsoralen) monoadducts and diadduct and the same adducts incorporated in DNA helices and the wavelength dependecies for the photocrossslinking of thymidine-HMT monoadducts in double-stranded helices. In Part II, The author will report some biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, i.e., the effects on double-stranded DNA stability, DNA structure, and transcription by E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases. Finally, The author will focus on the applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry to investigation of protein-DNA interaction during transcription, which includes the interaction of E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases with DNA in elongation complexes arrested at specific psoralen-DNA adduct sites as revealed by DNase I footprinting experiments. 123 refs., 52 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Effect of turmeric and curcumin on BP-DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, M A; Chacko, M C; Annapurna, V V; Krishnaswamy, K

    1993-03-01

    Many human cancers that are widely prevalent today can be prevented through modifications in life-styles, of which diet appears to be an important agent. Several dietary constituents modulate the process of carcinogenesis and prevent genotoxicity. Many plant constituents including turmeric appear to be potent antimutagens and antioxidants. Therefore the modulatory effects of turmeric and curcumin on the levels of benzo[a]pyrene induced DNA adducts in the livers of rats were studied by the newly developed 32P-postlabelling assay method. Turmeric when fed at 0.1, 0.5 and 3% and the active principle of turmeric (curcumin) when fed at a level of 0.03% in the diet for 4 weeks significantly reduced the level of BP-DNA adducts including the major adduct dG-N2-BP, formed within 24 h in response to a single i.p. injection of benzo[a]pyrene. The significance of these effects in terms of the potential anticarcinogenic effects of turmeric is discussed. Further, these results strengthen the various other biological effects of turmeric which have direct relevance to anticarcinogenesis and chemoprevention.

  3. Chemistry and Biology of Aflatoxin-DNA Adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Michael P.; Banerjee, Surajit; Brown, Kyle L.; Egli, Martin (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-27

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal contaminant of stored rice, wheat, corn, and other grainstuffs, and peanuts. This is of concern to human health because it produces the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}), which is genotoxic and is implicated in the etiology of liver cancer. AFB{sub 1} is oxidized in vivo by cytochrome P450 to form aflatoxin B{sub 1} epoxide, which forms an N7-dG adduct (AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG) in DNA. The latter rearranges to a formamidopyrimidine (AFB{sub 1}-FAPY) derivative that equilibrates between {alpha} and {beta} anomers of the deoxyribose. In DNA, both the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts intercalate above the 5'-face of the damaged guanine. Each produces G {yields} T transversions in Escherichia coli, but the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct is more mutagenic. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) provides a model for understanding error-prone bypass of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts. It bypasses the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct, but it conducts error-prone replication past the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct, including mis-insertion of dATP, consistent with the G {yields} T mutations characteristic of AFB{sub 1} mutagenesis in E. coli. Crystallographic analyses of a series of binary and ternary complexes with the Dpo4 polymerase revealed differing orientations of the N7-C8 bond of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct as compared to the N{sup 5}-C8 bond in the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct, and differential accommodation of the intercalated AFB{sub 1} moieties within the active site. These may modulate AFB{sub 1} lesion bypass by this polymerase.

  4. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. PURPOSE......: To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized...... into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint...

  5. Structure and Oxidation of Pyrrole Adducts Formed between Aflatoxin B2aand Biological Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Blake R; Selim, Mustafa I

    2017-06-19

    Aflatoxin B 2a has been shown to bind to proteins through a dialdehyde intermediate under physiological conditions. The proposed structure of this adduct has been published showing a Schiff base interaction, but adequate verification using structural elucidation instrumental techniques has not been performed. In this work, we synthesized the aflatoxin B 2a amino acid adduct under alkaline conditions, and the formation of a new product was determined using high performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The resulting accurate mass was used to generate a novel proposed chemical structure of the adduct in which the dialdehyde forms a pyrrole ring with primary amines rather than the previously proposed Schiff base interaction. The pyrrole structure was confirmed using 1 H, 13 C, correlation spectroscopy, heteronuclear single quantum correlation, and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation NMR and tandem mass spectrometry. Reaction kinetics show that the reaction is overall second order and that the rate increases as pH increases. Additionally, this study shows for the first time that aflatoxin B 2a dialdehyde forms adducts with phosphatidylethanolamines and does so through pyrrole ring formation, which makes it the first aflatoxin-lipid adduct to be structurally identified. Furthermore, oxidation of the pyrrole adduct produced a product that was 16 m/z heavier. When the aflatoxin B 2a -lysine (ε) adduct was oxidized, it gave a product with an accurate mass, mass fragmentation pattern, and 1 H NMR spectrum that match aflatoxin B 1 -lysine, which suggest the transformation of the pyrrole ring to a pyrrolin-2-one ring. These data give new insight into the fate and chemical properties of biological adducts formed from aflatoxin B 2a as well as possible interferences with known aflatoxin B 1 exposure biomarkers.

  6. Effect of external electric field on Cyclodextrin-Alcohol adducts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of external electric fields on the interaction energy between cyclodextrin and alcohol was analyzed in the light of density functional theory (DFT) and density functional reactivity theory (DFRT). Stability of the cyclodextrin-alcohol adducts was measured in terms of DFT based reactivity descriptor, global hardness, ...

  7. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts as a common biological biomarker of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingsu; Zhao, Yuewei; Von Tungeln, Linda S; Doerge, Daniel R; Lin, Ge; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2013-09-16

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) classified riddelliine, a tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the NTP 12th Report on Carcinogens in 2011. We previously determined that four DNA adducts were formed in rats dosed with riddelliine. The structures of the four DNA adducts were elucidated as (i) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dG-3 and DHP-dG-4) as the predominant adducts; and (ii) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dA-3 and DHP-dA-4 adducts). In this study, we selected a nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxide, riddelliine N-oxide, and nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (riddelliine, retrorsine, monocrotaline, lycopsamine, retronecine, lasiocarpine, heliotrine, clivorine, and senkirkine) for study in animals. Seven of the nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, with the exception of lycopsamine and retronecine, are liver carcinogens. At 8-10 weeks of age, female F344 rats were orally gavaged for 3 consecutive days with 4.5 and 24 μmol/kg body weight test article in 0.5 mL of 10% DMSO in water. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, the rats were sacrificed, livers were removed, and liver DNA was isolated for DNA adduct analysis. DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4 adducts were formed in the liver of rats treated with the individual seven hepatocarcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and riddelliine N-oxide. These DNA adducts were not formed in the liver of rats administered retronecine, the nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, or vehicle control. These results indicate that this set of DNA adducts, DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4, is a common biological biomarker of

  8. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Bjørkheim, André; Rolstad, Linn E; Hölmich, Per; Bahr, Roald; Andersen, Thor Einar

    2017-11-01

    The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint testing before and after the intervention. Per-protocol analyses were performed, and 12 players were excluded due to low compliance (<67% of sessions completed). The main outcome was eccentric hip adduction strength (N·m/kg). Between-group analyses revealed a significantly greater increase in eccentric hip adduction strength of 0.29 Nm/kg (8.9%; P = .01) in favor of the group performing the Copenhagen adduction exercise, whereas no within-group change was noted in the group that used the standard FIFA 11+ program (-0.02 N·m/kg [-0.7%]; P = .69). Including the Copenhagen adduction exercise in the FIFA 11+ program increases eccentric hip adduction strength, while the standard FIFA 11+ program does not. Registration: Registration: ISRCTN13731446 (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry).

  9. Effect of Laterally Wedged Insoles on the External Knee Adduction Moment across Different Reference Frames.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Biomechanical effects of laterally wedged insoles are assessed by reduction in the knee adduction moment. However, the degree of reduction may vary depending on the reference frame with which it is calculated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of reference frame on the reduction in the knee adduction moment by laterally wedged insoles.Twenty-nine healthy participants performed gait trials with a laterally wedged insole and with a flat insole as a control. The knee adduction moment, including the first and second peaks and the angular impulse, were calculated using four different reference frames: the femoral frame, tibial frame, laboratory frame and the Joint Coordinate System.There were significant effects of reference frame on the knee adduction moment first and second peaks (P < 0.001 for both variables, while the effect was not significant for the angular impulse (P = 0.84. No significant interaction between the gait condition and reference frame was found in either of the knee adduction moment variables (P = 0.99 for all variables, indicating that the effects of laterally wedged insole on the knee adduction moments were similar across the four reference frames. On the other hand, the average percent changes ranged from 9% to 16% for the first peak, from 16% to 18% for the second peak and from 17% to 21% for the angular impulse when using the different reference frames.The effects of laterally wedged insole on the reduction in the knee adduction moment were similar across the reference frames. On the other hand, Researchers need to recognize that when the percent change was used as the parameter of the efficacy of laterally wedged insole, the choice of reference frame may influence the interpretation of how laterally wedged insoles affect the knee adduction moment.

  10. Protective effects of selenium against DNA adducts formation in Inuit environmentally exposed to PCBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravoori, Srivani; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Pereg, Daria; Robertson, Larry W; Ayotte, Pierre; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2012-01-01

    Dietary habits that expose populations to potential toxicants as well as protective agents simultaneously is a realistic scenario where a meaningful assessment of the interactions and net benefit or damage can be made. A group of Inuit from Salluit, Northern Canada are exposed to high levels of PCBs and selenium, both present in the Inuit traditional foods such as blubber from sea mammals and fatty fish. Blood samples were collected from 83 Inuit, 22–70 years old. Blood selenium and PCB levels were determined previously and ranged from 227 to 2,069 µg/L and 1.7 to 143 µg/L, respectively. DNA isolated from white blood cells were analyzed by modified 32P-postlabeling adductomics technology that detects a multitude of highly polar to lipophilic adducts. The levels of 8-oxodG adducts ranged from 470 to 7,400 adducts/109 nucleotides. Other as yet unidentified polar adducts showed a 30 to 800–fold inter-individual variability. Adduct levels were negatively associated with PCB and selenium levels. The subjects were classified into high and low ratio groups, with respect to selenium/PCB. In the high ratio group, the coefficient of selenium is significantly negatively correlated with 8-oxodG (r = −0.38, p = 0.014) and total adducts (r = −0.41, p = 0.009) while there was no correlation within the low selenium/PCB group. This study suggests increasing selenium has mitigating effect in reducing DNA adducts and therefore, possible negative effects of PCB were not rendered. A protective effect of selenium is highlighted. PMID:19735942

  11. VIDEO-ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ADAPTED SHOES ON KNEE ADDUCTION MOMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Yu. Aksenov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The effect of different footwear profiles on knee adduction moment have not been fully studied. Methods. Fifteen healthy volunteer subjects, age 25.3 (±2.73, undertook a series of gait laboratory trials with adapted shoes. Kinematic and kinetic data were collect using 16 Oqus 3+ cameras and the walking speed was controlled using timing gates. High street shoes were adapted to include five different heel heights (varying from a 1.5 cm to 5.5 cm heels, two heel profile conditions (curved and semi-curved heels, three varying apex angles (10, 15, and 20 degrees, and barefoot and 3CR footwear conditions. The baseline shoe had no heel curve, a heel height of 3.5cm, an apex position of 62.5% of the shoe length, an apex angle of 15 deg, and a rigid forepart of the shoe. Results. The shoe with 5.5 cm heel height significantly increased the mean knee adduction moment during 50%–100% of the stance phase compared to the 1.5 cm heel (p = 0.008. The high heel shoe also significantly increased knee adduction impulse (area under the curve versus the 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 cm heels, and the 10° toe angle and barefoot condition. Ten degrees of toe angle reduced mean knee adduction moment during 0%–50% of the stance phase versus 20° and significantly reduced mean knee adduction moment during the late stance phase versus 15° and 20° toe angle footwear conditions. Walking with the curved heel for the healthy subjects increased mean knee adduction moment during 0%–50% of the stance phase compared to the heel without curvature (p < 0.0009. Conclusion. Further study is required to investigate those changes in patients with high risk of knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Effect of Nanoemitters on Suppressing the Formation of Metal Adduct Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Guan, Qi-Yuan; Wang, Jiang; Jiang, Xiao-Xiao; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Xia, Xing-Hua; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-02-07

    In the work, we showed that the use of nanoemitters (tip dimension metal adduction to peptide or protein ions as well as improve the matrix tolerance of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The proton-enriched smaller initial droplets are supposed to have played a significant role in suppressing the formation of metal adduct ions in nanoemitters. The proton-enrichment effect in the nanoemitters is related to both the exclusion-enrichment effect (EEE) and the ion concentration polarization effect (ICP effect), which permit the molecular ions to be regulated to protonated ones. Smaller initial charged droplets generated from nanoemitters need less fission steps to release the gas-phase ions; thus, the enrichment effect of salt was not as significant as that of microemitters (tip dimension >1 μm), resulting in the disappearing of salt cluster peaks in high mass-to-charge (m/z) region. The use of nanoemitters demonstrates a novel method for tuning the distribution of the metal-adducted ions to be in a controlled manner. This method is also characterized by ease of use and high efficiency in eliminating the formation of adduct ions, and no pretreatment such as desalting is needed even in the presence of salt at millimole concentration.

  13. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1973-01-01

    Following an introduction into the field of cellular radiation effect considering the most important experimental results, the biological significance of the colony formation ability is brought out. The inactivation concept of stem cells does not only prove to be good, according to the present results, in the interpretation of the pathogenesis of acute radiation effects on moult tissue, it also enables chronicle radiation injuries to be interpreted through changes in the fibrous part of the organs. Radiation therapy of tumours can also be explained to a large extent by the radiation effect on the unlimited reproductiveness of tumour cells. The more or less similar dose effect curves for healthy and tumour tissue in practice lead to intermittent irradiation. The dependence of the intermittent doses and intervals on factors such as Elkind recovery, synchronisation, redistribution, reoxygenation, repopulation and regeneration are reviewed. (ORU/LH) [de

  14. Effect of external electric field on Cyclodextrin-Alcohol adducts: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 6. Effect of external electric field on Cyclodextrin-Alcohol adducts: A DFT study. Kundan Baruah Pradip Kr Bhattacharyya. Regular Articles Volume 127 Issue 6 June 2015 pp 1109-1117 ... Keywords. Membrane; electric field; DFT; reactivity descriptor; MHP.

  15. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  16. Modelling knee flexion effects on joint power absorption and adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Tatsumi, Ichiroh; Sarashina, Eri; Sparrow, W A; Begg, Rezaul K

    2015-12-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is commonly associated with ageing and long-term walking. In this study the effects of flexing motions on knee kinetics during stance were simulated. Extended knees do not facilitate efficient loading. It was therefore, hypothesised that knee flexion would promote power absorption and negative work, while possibly reducing knee adduction moment. Three-dimensional (3D) position and ground reaction forces were collected from the right lower limb stance phase of one healthy young male subject. 3D position was sampled at 100 Hz using three Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) motion analysis camera units, set up around an eight metre walkway. Force plates (AMTI) recorded ground reaction forces for inverse dynamics calculations. The Visual 3D (C-motion) 'Landmark' function was used to change knee joint positions to simulate three knee flexion angles during static standing. Effects of the flexion angles on joint kinetics during the stance phase were then modelled. The static modelling showed that each 2.7° increment in knee flexion angle produced 2.74°-2.76° increments in knee flexion during stance. Increased peak extension moment was 6.61 Nm per 2.7° of increased knee flexion. Knee flexion enhanced peak power absorption and negative work, while decreasing adduction moment. Excessive knee extension impairs quadriceps' power absorption and reduces eccentric muscle activity, potentially leading to knee osteoarthritis. A more flexed knee is accompanied by reduced adduction moment. Research is required to determine the optimum knee flexion to prevent further damage to knee-joint structures affected by osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of real-time biofeedback on peak knee adduction moment in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis: Is direct feedback effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosie E; van den Noort, Josien C; van der Esch, Martin; Booij, Marjolein J; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-07-13

    Gait modifications can reduce the knee adduction moment, a representation of knee loading. Reduced loading may help to slow progression of medial knee osteoarthritis. We aimed to investigate the response of patients with medial knee osteoarthritis to direct feedback on the knee adduction moment as a method for modifying the gait pattern, before and after training with specific gait modifications. Forty patients with medial knee osteoarthritis underwent 3D gait analysis on an instrumented-treadmill, while receiving real-time feedback on the peak knee adduction moment. Patients were trained with three different modifications; toe-in, wider steps and medial thrust gait. The response to real-time feedback on the knee adduction moment was measured before and after training. To evaluate the short term retention effect, we measured the changes without feedback. We also evaluated the effects on the knee flexion moment and at the hip and ankle joints. With direct feedback on the knee adduction moment, patients were initially unable to reduce the knee adduction moment. After training with specific modifications, peak knee adduction moment was reduced by 14% in response to direct feedback. Without feedback a 9% reduction in peak knee adduction moment was maintained. Hip moments were not increased with modified gait, but small increases in ankle adduction moment and knee flexion moment were observed. Real-time biofeedback directly on the knee adduction moment is a promising option for encouraging gait modifications to reduce knee loading, however only when combined with specific instructions on how to modify the gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulation of the effect of prenatal PAH exposure on PAH-DNA adducts in cord blood by plasma antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Susan; Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Schleicher, Rosemary L; Camann, David; Tang, Deliang; Perera, Frederica P

    2009-08-01

    The fetus is more susceptible than the adult to the effects of certain carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Nutritional factors, including antioxidants, have been shown to have a protective effect on carcinogen-DNA adducts and cancer risk in adults. We investigated whether the effect of prenatal airborne PAH exposure, measured by personal air monitoring during pregnancy, on the level of PAH-DNA adducts in a baby's cord blood is modified by the concentration of micronutrients in maternal and cord blood. The micronutrients examined were: retinol (vitamin A), alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol (vitamin E), and carotenoids. With the use of multiple linear regression, we found a significant interaction between prenatal PAH exposure and cord blood concentration of alpha-tocopherol and carotenoids in predicting the concentration of PAH adducts in cord blood. The association between PAH exposure and PAH adducts was much stronger among those with low alpha-tocopherol (beta = 0.15; P = 0.001) and among those with low carotenoids (beta = 0.16; P < 0.001) compared with babies with high levels of these micronutrients (among those with high alpha-tocopherol: beta = 0.05; P = 0.165; among those with high carotenoids: beta = 0.06; P = 0.111). These results suggest a protective effect of micronutrients on the DNA damage and potential cancer risk associated with prenatal PAH exposure.

  19. Environmental air pollution and DNA adducts in Copenhagen bus drivers - effect of GSTM1 and NAT2 genotypes on adduct level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Sabro; de Pater, Nettie; Okkels, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The lymphocyte bulky PAH-DNA adduct levels have been studied in persons occupationally exposed to ambient air pollution. The exposure group consisted of 90 healthy, nonsmoking bus drivers from the Copenhagen area, divided into three exposure groups according to driving area, and 60 rural controls...... (smokers and non-smokers). PAH-DNA adducts were determined by 32P-postlabelling with the butanol enrichment procedure. The bus drivers answered a comprehensive questionnaire on passive smoking, residential area, diet and other potential confounding variables. A significantly higher adduct level...... was observed in bus drivers working in central Copenhagen (1.214 fmol/microg DNA, n = 49) compared with both those driving in the dormitory (median: 0.507 fmol/microg DNA, P = 0.046, n = 16) and suburban (median: 0.585 fmol/microg DNA, P = 0.041, n = 25) areas. All three groups had higher adduct levels than...

  20. Effects of Lateral Heel Wedges and Lateral Forefoot Wedge on the Knee Adduction Moment in Healthy Male Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shamsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Lateral wedged insoles have been designed to decrease the force applied on the medial knee compartment. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of laterally wedged insoles regarding to the placement of the wedge under the sole (under the heel or under the forefoot on the knee adduction moment and the ground reaction forces. Material & Methods: In this pretest-posttest study, three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 20 healthy men between 18-30 years old. Knee adduction moment and ground reaction forces were compared among following three types of insoles: a flat insole, a 6˚ laterally inclined heel wedged insole and a 6˚ laterally- inclined forefoot wedged insole. Results: there was no difference between three conditions (flat insole (9.72±1.501, lateral heel wedge (9.866±2.141 and lateral forefoot wedge (9.952±1.986 in peak knee adduction moment (P>0.05. Ground reaction forces and spatiotemporal parameters of gait were not affected by any types of these insoles (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the current finding, placement of the lateral wedge under the sole, that is, under the heel or under the forefoot has no effect on the efficacy of these insoles on the adduction moment of the knee and ground reaction forces.

  1. Isolevuglandin adducts in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Robert G; Bi, Wenzhao

    2015-06-20

    A diverse family of lipid-derived levulinaldehydes, isolevuglandins (isoLGs), is produced by rearrangement of endoperoxide intermediates generated through both cyclooxygenase (COX) and free radical-induced cyclooxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their phospholipid esters. The formation and reactions of isoLGs with other biomolecules has been linked to alcoholic liver disease, Alzheimer's disease, age-related macular degeneration, atherosclerosis, cardiac arythmias, cancer, end-stage renal disease, glaucoma, inflammation of allergies and infection, mitochondrial dysfunction, multiple sclerosis, and thrombosis. This review chronicles progress in understanding the chemistry of isoLGs, detecting their production in vivo and understanding their biological consequences. IsoLGs have never been isolated from biological sources, because they form adducts with primary amino groups of other biomolecules within seconds. Chemical synthesis enabled investigation of isoLG chemistry and detection of isoLG adducts present in vivo. The first peptide mapping and sequencing of an isoLG-modified protein present in human retina identified the modification of a specific lysyl residue of the sterol C27-hydroxylase Cyp27A1. This residue is preferentially modified by iso[4]LGE2 in vitro, causing loss of function. Adduction of less than one equivalent of isoLG can induce COX-associated oligomerization of the amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. Adduction of isoLGE2 to phosphatidylethanolamines causes gain of function, converting them into proinflammatory isoLGE2-PE agonists that foster monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Among the remaining questions on the biochemistry of isoLGs are the dependence of biological activity on isoLG isomer structure, the structures and mechanism of isoLG-derived protein-protein and DNA-protein cross-link formation, and its biological consequences.

  2. SYNTHESIS AND PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF BUTADIENE AND CYCLOPENTADIENE ADDUCTS OF METHANDROSTENOLONE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAZEL SHAMSA

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the reactivity of methandrostenolone or [(17b-17-hydroxy-17-methylandrosta-1, 4-diene-3-one], as a dienophil in a Diels-Alder type cycloaddition reaction was investigated. The purpose of this approach was to investigate whether the 1-dehydro position of methandrostenolone 1 undergoes a cycloaddition reaction with dienes, such as 1, 3 butadiene or cyclopentadiene, and to investigate the biological behavior of the reaction adducts, i.e, compound 3 {(17b-17-hydroxy-17-methyl androsta [1a, 2a] cyclohex 3’, 4-diene-3-one} and compound 4 {(17b-17-hydroxy-17-methyl androsta [1a, 2a] cyclohex (2’,5’ methylene 3’, 4-diene-3-one}, relative to compound 1. The results indicated that thedDiels-Alder reactionddid notpproceed under the usual circumstances of high pressure and temperature, but could proceed in the presence of a Lewis acid (AlCl3. The structures of compounds 3 and 4 were confirmed by spectroscopic methods. The androgenic behavior of compounds 3 and 4 in comparison to compound 1 in the apomorphine test indicated that both compounds were almost devoid of androgenic activity, but prevented apomorphine mediated penile erection in male rats in a similar manner as cyproterone acetate.

  3. The effects of exposure route on DNA adduct formation and cellular proliferation by 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, D K; Schoonhoven, R; Ito, N; Swenberg, J A

    1996-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) induces high incidences of tumors at multiple sites in mice and rats when administered chronically by gavage. The animal tumor data are being used to predict human risk from potential exposure to TCP in drinking water. Risk assessment may be affected by differences in the route of exposure. Gavage administration, which results in high bolus concentrations compared to drinking water exposure, may quantitatively affect toxicokinetics, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity. We have examined the effects of TCP exposure by the two routes on the formation of DNA adducts and the induction of cellular proliferation. Male B6C3F1 mice were administered [14C]TCP for 1 week by gavage or in drinking water at the low dose (6 mg/kg) used in the NTP carcinogenesis bioassay. Two target organs (forestomach and liver) and two nontarget organs (glandular stomach and kidney) were examined for DNA adduct formation. Adducts were hydrolyzed from DNA, isolated by HPLC, and quantitated by measuring HPLC fractions for radioactivity. In the forestomach, liver, and kidney, gavage administration of TCP resulted in 1.4-to 2.4-fold greater yields of the major DNA adduct, previously identified as S-[1-(hydroxymethyl)-2-(N7-guanyl)ethyl]glutathione. Significant differences in cell proliferation, as determined by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into DNA, were also observed for the two routes. Gavage administration of TCP for 2 weeks resulted in up to a threefold greater cell proliferation rate relative to administration in drinking water. Our findings of exposure-related differences in TCP-induced DNA adduct formation and cell proliferation suggest that a risk assessment based on the existing gavage study may overestimate human risk.

  4. Hyphenating the curtius rearrangement with Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts: synthesis of biologically active acyloins and vicinal aminoalcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarante, Giovanni W.; Cavallaro, Mayra; Coelho, Fernando, E-mail: coelho@iqm.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Sintese de Produtos Naturais e Farmacos

    2011-07-01

    Using Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts as substrates, the Curtius rearrangement was performed in a sequence that allowed the synthesis of several hydroxy-ketones (acyloins) with great structural diversity and in good overall yields. These acyloins in turn were easily transformed into 1,2-anti aminoalcohols through a highly diastereoselective reductive amination step. The synthetic utility of these approaches was exemplified by performing the syntheses of (+-)-bupropion, a drug used to treat the abstinence syndrome of smoker and (+-)-spisulosine, a potent anti-tumoral compound originally isolated from a marine source. (author)

  5. [Hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of human exposure to selected xenobiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Bożena

    2015-06-12

    In the living and working environments more and more new substances of anthropogenic origin exerting toxic properties appear. Simultaneously, the evaluation of human exposure is assessed. For many years adducts of hemoglobin (Hb) have been useful markers of the exposure of humans to various xenobiotics. These adducts are also termed biologically effective dose biomarkers. This paper focuses on a review of literature, mainly from the years 2010-2014, which refers to the hemoglobin adducts of toxic compounds with electrophilic properties. In the interactions of xenobiotics with hemoglobin, groups such as thiol, amino, carboxyl and hydroxyl of this hemoprotein are involved. These combinations occur most often in the reaction of xenobiotics with an N-terminal amino group of valine in Hb, imidazole nitrogen of histidine and cysteine sulfhydryl β93. Hb adducts are characterized by high availability, a long period of occurrence (up to 120 days) in the circulatory system, and high durability, and they have contact with all cells of the body. The measurement of hemoglobin adducts can be potentially used in the assessment of exposure to many xenobiotics such as acrylamide; substances present in tobacco smoke, e.g. benzo(α)pyrene and benzanthracene, ethylene oxide, aryl amines; and substances used on a large scale in industry such as glycidol and naphthalene and its derivatives. Recently the possibility of determination of hemoglobin adducts with estrogen metabolites has been postulated as indicators informing about heightened risk of breast cancer. Protein adducts are used as an alternative to DNA adducts for different classes of electrophilic substances.

  6. Effects of thiourea and ammonium bicarbonate on the formation and stability of bifunctional cisplatin-DNA adducts : consequences for the accurate quantification of adducts in (cellular) DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.J.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, H.C.M. van; Dijt, F.J.; Velde-Visser, S.D. van der; Berends, F.; Baan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Cisplatin reacts with DNA by forming mainly bifunctional adducts via reactive monofunctional intermediates. When freshly platinated DNA was postincubated with thiourea (10 mM, at 23 or 37°C) for periods of up to 24 h, followed by determination of mono- and diadducts, a rapid initial decrease was

  7. Effect of fullerene tris-adducts on the photovoltaic performance of P3HT:fullerene ternary blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunbum; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kang, Tae Eui; Cho, Chul-Hee; Park, Sunhee; Yoon, Sung Cheol; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2013-05-22

    Fullerene tris-adducts have the potential of achieving high open-circuit voltages (V(OC)) in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs), because their lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level is higher than those of fullerene mono- and bis-adducts. However, no successful examples of the use of fullerene tris-adducts as electron acceptors have been reported. Herein, we developed a ternary-blend approach for the use of fullerene tris-adducts to fully exploit the merit of their high LUMO level. The compound o-xylenyl C60 tris-adduct (OXCTA) was used as a ternary acceptor in the model system of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the electron donor and the two soluble fullerene acceptors of OXCTA and fullerene monoadduct (o-xylenyl C60 monoadduct (OXCMA), phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), or indene-C60 monoadduct (ICMA)). To explore the effect of OXCTA in ternary-blend PSC devices, the photovoltaic behavior of the device was investigated in terms of the weight fraction of OXCTA (W(OXCTA)). When W(OXCTA) is small (P3HT and the fullerene monoadduct, leading to simultaneous enhancement in both V(OC) and short-circuit current (J(SC)). For example, the ternary PSC devices of P3HT:(OXCMA:OXCTA) with W(OXCTA) of 0.1 and 0.3 exhibited power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 3.91% and 3.96%, respectively, which were significantly higher than the 3.61% provided by the P3HT:OXCMA device. Interestingly, for W(OXCTA) > 0.7, both V(OC) and PCE of the ternary-blend PSCs exhibited nonlinear compositional dependence on W(OXCTA). We noted that the nonlinear compositional trend of P3HT:(OXCMA:OXCTA) was significantly different from that of P3HT:(OXCMA:o-xylenyl C60 bis-adduct (OXCBA)) ternary-blend PSC devices. The fundamental reasons for the differences between the photovoltaic trends of the two different ternary-blend systems were investigated systemically by comparing their optical, electrical, and morphological properties.

  8. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in rat spermatozoa and its effect on fetal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooser, S.T.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, C.M. van; Waalkens-Berendsen, I.D.H.; Smits-van Prooije, A.E.; Snoeij, N.J.; Baan, R.A.; Fichtinger-Schepman, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of males to some genotoxic chemicals causes DNA damage in spermatozoa resulting in embryotoxicity and developmental defects in their offspring. This study demonstrates that cisplatin-DNA adducts could be measured in spermatozoa following treatment with the antineoplastic drug, cisplatin.

  9. Effect of external electric field on Cyclodextrin-Alcohol adducts: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Membrane; electric field; DFT; reactivity descriptor; MHP. 1. Introduction. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are natural ... for membrane preparations, which are used extensively in separation science offering a good choice .... culated BSSE corrected gas phase interaction energies in adducts (figure 1) are found to be −33.737, ...

  10. Efficient synthesis of 16 aromatic Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts: Biological evaluation on Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Cláudio G L; de Assis, Priscila A C; Silva, Fábio P L; Sousa, Suervy C O; de Andrade, Natália G; Barbosa, Ticiano P; Nerís, Patrícia L N; Segundo, Luiz V G; Anjos, Italo C; Carvalho, Gabriel A U; Rocha, Gerd B; Oliveira, Márcia R; Vasconcellos, Mário L A A

    2010-12-01

    Sixteen aromatic Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts (MBHA) 1-16 were efficiently synthesized in a one step Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction (MBHR) involving commercial aldehydes with methyl acrylate or acrylonitrile (81-100% yields) without the formation of side products on DABCO catalysis and at low temperature (0°C). The toxicities of these compounds were assessed against promastigote form of Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi. The low synthetic cost of these MBHA, green synthetic protocols, easy one-step synthesis from commercially available and cheap reagents as well as the very good antileishmanial activity obtained for 14 and 16 (IC₅₀ values of 6.88μgmL⁻¹ and 11.06μgmL⁻¹ respectively on L. amazonensis; 9.58μgmL⁻¹ and 14.34μgmL⁻¹ respectively on L. chagasi) indicates that these MBHA can be a novel and promising class of anti-parasitic compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatau, B.D.; Garba, N.N.; Yusuf, A.M.; Yamusa, Y. A.; Musa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In earlier studies, researchers aimed a single particle at the nucleus of the cell where DNA is located. Eighty percent of the cells shot through the nucleus survived. This contradicts the belief that if radiation slams through the nucleus, the cell will die. But the bad news is that the surviving cells contained mutations. Cells have a great capacity to repair DNA, but they cannot do it perfectly. The damage left behind in these studies from a single particle of alpha radiation doubled the damage that is already there. This proved, beyond a shadow of doubt, those there biological effects occur as a result of exposure to radiation, Radiation is harmful to living tissue because of its ionizing power in matter. This ionization can damage living cells directly, by breaking the chemical bonds of important biological molecules (particularly DNA), or indirectly, by creating chemical radicals from water molecules in the cells, which can then attack the biological molecules chemically. At some extent these molecules are repaired by natural biological processes, however, the effectiveness of this repair depends on the extent of the damage. The interaction of ionizing with the human body, arising either from external sources outside the body or from internal contamination of the body by radioactive materials, leads to the biological effects which may later show up as a clinical symptoms. Basically, this formed the baseline of this research to serve as a yardstick for creating awareness about radiation and its resulting effects.

  12. Biological effects of hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Biological effects of hyperthermia and application of hyperthermia to cancer therapy were outlined. As to independent effects of hyperthermia, heat sensitivity of cancer cells, targets of hyperthermia, thermal tolerance of cancer cells, effects of pH on hyperthermic cell survival, effects of hyperthermia on normal tissues, and possibility of clinical application of hyperthermia were described. Combined effect of hyperthermia and x-irradiation to enhance radiosensitivity of cancer cells, its mechanism, effects of oxygen on cancer cells treated with hyperthermia and irradiation, and therapeutic ratio of combined hyperthermia and irradiation were also described. Finally, sensitizers were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  13. Effect of combined actions of hip adduction/abduction on the force generation and maintenance of pelvic floor muscles in healthy women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda C Amorim

    Full Text Available Pelvic floor muscle (PFM force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation. Twenty healthy, nulliparous women were evaluated using two strain-gauge dynamometers (one cylinder-like inside the vaginal cavity, and the other measuring hip adduction/abduction forces around both thighs while performing three different tasks: (a isolated PFM contraction; (b PFM contraction combined with hip adduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force; and (c PFM contraction combined with hip abduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force. Data were sampled at 100Hz and subtracted from the offset if existent. We calculated a gradient between the isolated PFM contraction and each hip condition (Δ Adduction and Δ Abduction for all variables: Maximum force (N, instant of maximum-force occurrence (s, mean force in an 8-second window (N, and PFM force loss (N.s. We compared both conditions gradients in 30% and 50% by paired t-tests. All variables did not differ between hip conditions both in 30% and 50% of maximum hip force (p>.05. PFM contraction combined with isometric hip abduction did not increase vaginal force in healthy and nulliparous women compared to PFM contraction combined with isometric hip adduction. Therefore, so far, the use of hip adduction or abduction in PFM training and treatments are not justified for improving PFM strength and endurance.

  14. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  15. The effects of low-dose Nepsilon-(carboxymethyllysine (CML and Nepsilon-(carboxyethyllysine (CEL, two main glycation free adducts considered as potential uremic toxins, on endothelial progenitor cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jinzhou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs dysfunction plays a key role in this pathogenesis. Uremic retention toxins have been reported to be in associated with EPC dysfunction. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs free adducts, including Nepsilon-(carboxymethyllysine (CML and Nepsilon-(carboxyethyllysine (CEL, are formed by physiological proteolysis of AGEs and released into plasma for urinary excretion. They are retained in CKD patients and are considered to be potential uremic toxins. Though AGEs have been demonstrated to impair EPC function in various ways, the effect of AGE free adducts on EPC function has not been studied. Thus, we examined the role of CML and CEL in the regulation of growth-factor-dependent function in cultured human EPCs and the mechanisms by which they may affect EPC function. Methods Late outgrowth EPCs were incubated with different concentrations of CML or CEL for up to 72 hours. Cell proliferation was determined using WST-1 and BrdU assays. Cell apoptosis was tested with annexin V staining. Migration and tube formation assays were used to evaluate EPC function. Results Though CML and CEL were determined to have anti-proliferative effects on EPCs, cells treated with concentrations of CML and CEL in the range found in CKD patients had no observable impairment on migration or tube formation. CML and CEL did not induce EPC apoptosis. The reduced growth response was accompanied by significantly less phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Conclusions Our study revealed that CML and CEL at uremic concentrations have low biological toxicity when separately tested. The biologic effects of AGE free adducts on the cardiovascular system merit further study.

  16. Biological effects of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiu, Toshiaki; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ishida, Yuka [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (JP)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Although the occasion to be exposed to neutrons is rare in our life, except for nuclear accidents like in the critical accident at Tokai-mura in 1999, countermeasures against accident should be always prepared. In the Tokai-mura accident, residents received less than 21 mSv of neutrons and gamma rays. The cancer risks and fetal effects of low doses of neutrons were matters of concern among residents. The purpose of this program is to investigate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for leukemias, and thereby to assess risks of neutrons. Animal experiments are planed to obtain the following RBEs: (1) RBE for the induction of leukemias in mice and (2) RBE for effects on fetuses. Cyclotron fast neutrons (10 MeV) and electrostatic accelerator-derived neutrons (2 MeV) are used for exposure in this program. Furthermore, cytological and cytogenetic analyses will be performed. (author)

  17. Chemistry and Chemical Equilibrium Dynamics of BMAA and Its Carbamate Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Parga, Pedro; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, V V

    2018-01-01

    Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been demonstrated to contribute to the onset of the ALS/Parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC) and is implicated in the progression of other neurodegenerative diseases. While the role of BMAA in these diseases is still debated, one of the suggested mechanisms involves the activation of excitatory glutamate receptors. In particular, the excitatory effects of BMAA are shown to be dependent on the presence of bicarbonate ions, which in turn forms carbamate adducts in physiological conditions. The formation of carbamate adducts from BMAA and bicarbonate is similar to the formation of carbamate adducts from non-proteinogenic amino acids. Structural, chemical, and biological information related to non-proteinogenic amino acids provide insight into the formation of and possible neurological action of BMAA. This article reviews the carbamate formation of BMAA in the presence of bicarbonate ions, with a particular focus on how the chemical equilibrium of BMAA carbamate adducts may affect the molecular mechanism of its function. Highlights of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based studies on the equilibrium process between free BMAA and its adducts are presented. The role of divalent metals on the equilibrium process is also explored. The formation and the equilibrium process of carbamate adducts of BMAA may answer questions on their neuroactive potency and provide strong motivation for further investigations into other toxic mechanisms.

  18. Combined effects of a valgus knee brace and lateral wedge foot orthotic on the external knee adduction moment in patients with varus gonarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Rebecca F; Birmingham, Trevor B; Dombroski, Colin E; Walsh, Robert F; Leitch, Kristyn M; Jenkyn, Thomas R; Giffin, J Robert

    2013-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a custom-fit valgus knee brace and custom-made lateral wedge foot orthotic will have greatest effects on decreasing the external knee adduction moment during gait when used concurrently. Proof-of-concept, single test session, crossover trial. Biomechanics laboratory within a tertiary care center. Patients (n=16) with varus alignment and knee osteoarthritis (OA) primarily affecting the medial compartment of the tibiofemoral joint (varus gonarthrosis). Custom-fit valgus knee brace and custom-made full-length lateral wedge foot orthotic. Amounts of valgus angulation and wedge height were tailored to each patient to ensure comfort. The external knee adduction moment (% body weight [BW]*height [Ht]), frontal plane lever arm (cm), and ground reaction force (N/kg), determined from 3-dimensional gait analysis completed under 4 randomized conditions: (1) control (no knee brace, no foot orthotic), (2) knee brace, (3) foot orthotic, and (4) knee brace and foot orthotic. The reduction in knee adduction moment was greatest when concurrently using the knee brace and foot orthotic (effect sizes ranged from 0.3 to 0.4). The mean decrease in first peak knee adduction moment compared with control was .36% BW*Ht (95% confidence interval [CI], -.66 to -.07). This was accompanied by a mean decrease in frontal plane lever arm of .59cm (95% CI, -.94 to -.25). These findings suggest that using a custom-fit knee brace and custom-made foot orthotic concurrently can produce a greater overall reduction in the knee adduction moment, through combined effects in decreasing the frontal plane lever arm. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of changes in glutathione levels through exogenous agents on intracellular cysteine content and protein adduct formation in chronic alcohol-treated VL17A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Mathan; Haridoss, Madhumitha; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Clemens, Dahn; Dey, Aparajita

    2017-02-01

    Alcohol-mediated liver injury is associated with changes in the level of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). It is interesting to investigate if the changes in intracellular GSH level through exogenous agents affect the intracellular cysteine content and the protein adduct formation indicative of oxidative insult in chronic alcohol treated liver cells. In VL-17A cells treated with 2 mM N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or 0.1 mM ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) plus 100 mM ethanol, an increase in cysteine concentration which was accompanied by decreases in hydroxynonenal (HNE) and glutathionylated protein adducts were observed. Pretreatment of 100 mM ethanol treated VL-17A cells with 0.4 mM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or 1 mM diethyl maleate (DEM) had opposite effects. Thus, altered GSH level through exogenous agents may either potentiate or ameliorate chronic alcohol-mediated protein adduct formation and change the cysteine level in chronic alcohol treated VL-17A cells. The gene expression of non-treated and ethanol-treated hepatocytes in 2 microarray datasets was also compared to locate differentially expressed genes involved in cysteine metabolism. The study demonstrates that increased protein adducts formation and changes in cysteine concentration occur under chronic alcohol condition in liver cells which may increase alcohol-mediated oxidative injury.

  20. Matrix effects in biological mass spectrometry imaging: identification and compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Stevens, Susan L; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model to examine matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization MSI (nano-DESI MSI). This is achieved by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) species to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard supplied at a constant rate with the nano-DESI solvent. The use of MCAO model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain enables immediate comparison of matrix effects within one ion image. Furthermore, significant differences in sodium and potassium concentrations in the ischemic region in comparison with the healthy tissue allowed us to distinguish between two types of matrix effects. Specifically, we discuss matrix effects originating from variations in alkali metal concentrations and matrix effects originating from variations in the molecular composition of the tissue. Compensation for both types of matrix effects was achieved by normalizing the signals corresponding to endogenous PC to the signals of the standards. This approach, which does not introduce any complexity in sample preparation, efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  1. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejourne, Michele.

    1977-01-01

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man [fr

  2. Effects of ethylene oxide and ethylene inhalation on DNA adducts, apurinic/apyrimidinic sites and expression of base excision DNA repair genes in rat brain, spleen, and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Asakura, Shoji; Li, Yutai; Kosyk, Oksana; Koc, Hasan; Nakamura, Jun; Upton, Patricia B; Swenberg, James A

    2005-09-28

    -oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Mpg, AP endonuclease (Ape), polymerase beta (Pol beta) and alkylguanine methyltransferase were increased by 20-100% in livers of rats exposed to EO for 20 days. The only effects of ET on BER gene expression were observed in brain, where Ape and Pol beta expression were increased by less than 20% after 20 days of exposure to 3000 ppm. These data suggest that DNA damage induced by exposure to EO is repaired without accumulation of AP sites and is associated with biologically insignificant changes in BER gene expression in target organs. We conclude that accumulation of AP sites is not a likely primary mechanism for mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of EO.

  3. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samad, Ubair Abdus [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Center of excellence for research in engineering materials (CEREM), Advance Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Rawaiz [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Alam, Mohammad Asif [Center of excellence for research in engineering materials (CEREM), Advance Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Othman, Othman Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Deanship of Graduate Studies, The Saudi Electric University, P. O. Box 93499, Riyadh 11673 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Zahrani, Saeed M. [Center of excellence for research in engineering materials (CEREM), Advance Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); SABIC Polymer Research Center (SPRC) and department of chemical engineering, college of engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-05-22

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  4. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  5. Biology of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.; Pucheault, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present trends in biology of ionizing radiation are reviewed. The following topics are investigated: interaction of ionizing radiations with matter; the radiolysis of water and aqueous solutions; properties of the free radicals intervening in the couples O 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O/H 2 ; radiation chemistry of biological compounds; biological effects of ionizing radiations; biochemical mechanisms involving free radicals as intermediates; applications (biotechnological applications, origins of life) [fr

  6. Characterization of model peptide adducts with reactive metabolites of naphthalene by mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie T Pham

    Full Text Available Naphthalene is a volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon generated during combustion and is a ubiquitous chemical in the environment. Short term exposures of rodents to air concentrations less than the current OSHA standard yielded necrotic lesions in the airways and nasal epithelium of the mouse, and in the nasal epithelium of the rat. The cytotoxic effects of naphthalene have been correlated with the formation of covalent protein adducts after the generation of reactive metabolites, but there is little information about the specific sites of adduction or on the amino acid targets of these metabolites. To better understand the chemical species produced when naphthalene metabolites react with proteins and peptides, we studied the formation and structure of the resulting adducts from the incubation of model peptides with naphthalene epoxide, naphthalene diol epoxide, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 1,4-naphthoquinone using high resolution mass spectrometry. Identification of the binding sites, relative rates of depletion of the unadducted peptide, and selectivity of binding to amino acid residues were determined. Adduction occurred on the cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues, and on the N-terminus. Monoadduct formation occurred in 39 of the 48 reactions. In reactions with the naphthoquinones, diadducts were observed, and in one case, a triadduct was detected. The results from this model peptide study will assist in data interpretation from ongoing work to detect peptide adducts in vivo as markers of biologic effect.

  7. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  8. Red wine consumption is inversely associated with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-DNA adduct levels in prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Bock, Cathryn H; Nock, Nora L; Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Levin, Albert M; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Savera, Adnan T; Takahashi, Satoru; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Tang, Deliang

    2011-10-01

    In humans, genetic variation and dietary factors may alter the biological effects of exposure to 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), one of the major heterocyclic amines generated from cooking meats at high temperatures that has carcinogenic potential through the formation of DNA adducts. Previously, we reported grilled red meat consumption associated with PhIP-DNA adduct levels in human prostate. In this study, we expanded our investigation to estimate the associations between beverage consumption and PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate for 391 prostate cancer cases. Of the 15 beverages analyzed, red wine consumption had the strongest association with PhIP-DNA adduct levels showing an inverse correlation in both tumor (P = 0.006) and nontumor (P = 0.002) prostate cells. Red wine consumption was significantly lower in African American compared with white cases, but PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate did not vary by race. In African Americans compared with whites, however, associations between red wine consumption and PhIP-DNA adduct levels were not as strong as associations with specific (e.g., SULT1A1 and UGT1A10 genotypes) and nonspecific (e.g., African ancestry) genetic variation. In a multivariable model, the covariate for red wine consumption explained a comparable percentage (13%-16%) of the variation in PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate across the two racial groups, but the aforementioned genetic factors explained 33% of the PhIP-DNA adduct variation in African American cases, whereas only 19% of the PhIP-DNA adduct variation in whites. We conclude that red wine consumption may counteract biological effects of PhIP exposure in human prostate, but genetic factors may play an even larger role, particularly in African Americans.

  9. Red Wine Consumption is inversely associated with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-DNA Adduct Levels in Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Bock, Cathryn H.; Nock, Nora L.; Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Levin, Albert M.; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Savera, Adnan T.; Takahashi, Satoru; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Tang, Deliang

    2011-01-01

    In humans, genetic variation and dietary factors may alter the biologic effects of exposure to 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), one of the major heterocyclic amines generated from cooking meats at high temperatures that has carcinogenic potential through the formation of DNA adducts. Previously, we reported grilled red meat consumption associated with PhIP-DNA adduct levels in human prostate. In the present study, we expanded our investigation to estimate the associations between beverage consumption and PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate for 391 prostate cancer cases. Of the 15 beverages analyzed, red wine consumption had the strongest association with PhIP-DNA adduct levels showing an inverse correlation in both tumor (p=0.006) and non-tumor (p=0.002) prostate cells. Red wine consumption differed significantly between African-American and white cases, but PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate did not vary by race. In African Americans compared with whites, however, associations between red wine consumption and PhIP-DNA adduct levels were not as strong as associations with specific (e.g., SULT1A1 and UGT1A10 genotypes) and non-specific (e.g., African ancestry) genetic variation. In a multivariable model, the covariate for red wine consumption explained a comparable percentage (13-16%) of the variation in PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate across the two racial groups, but the aforementioned genetic factors explained 33% of the PhIP-DNA adduct variation in African-American cases, while only 19% of the PhIPDNA adduct variation in whites. We conclude that red wine consumption may counteract biologic effects of PhIP exposure in human prostate, but genetic factors may play an even larger role, particularly in African Americans. PMID:21846795

  10. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed [pt

  11. The biologically effective dose in inhalation nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Schinwald, Anja; Murphy, Fiona; Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Poland, Craig

    2013-03-19

    In all branches of toxicology, the biologically effective dose (BED) is the fraction of the total dose of a toxin that actually drives any toxic effect. Knowledge of the BED has a number of applications including in building structure-activity relationships, the selection of metrics, the design of safe particles, and the determination of when a nanoparticle (NP) can be considered to be "new" for regulatory purposes. In particle toxicology, we define the BED as "the entity within any dose of particles in tissue that drives a critical pathophysiogically relevant form of toxicity (e.g., oxidative stress, inflammation, genotoxicity, or proliferation) or a process that leads to it." In conventional chemical toxicology, researchers generally use the mass as the metric to describe dose (such as mass per unit tissue or cells in culture) because of its convenience. Concentration, calculated from mass, may also figure in any description of dose. In the case of a nanoparticle dose, researchers use either the mass or the surface area. The mass of nanoparticles is not the only driver of their activity: the surfaces of insoluble particles interact with biological systems, and soluble nanoparticles can release factors that interact with these systems. Nanoparticle shape can modify activity. In this Account, we describe the current knowledge of the BED as it pertains to different NP types. Soluble toxins released by NPs represent one potential indicator of BED for wholly or partially soluble NPs composed of copper or zinc. Rapid dissolution of these NPs into their toxic ions in the acidic environment of the macrophage phagolysosome causes those ions to accumulate, which leads to lysosome destabilization and inflammation. In contrast, soluble NPs that release low toxicity ions, such as magnesium oxide NPs, are not inflammogenic. For insoluble NPs, ζ potential can serve as a BED measurement because the exposure of the particle surface to the acidic milieu of the phagolysosome and

  12. Synthesis and In Vitro Anti Leishmania amazonensis Biological Screening of Morita-Baylis-Hillman Adducts Prepared from Eugenol, Thymol and Carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Francisco José Seixas; Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da Franca; de Oliveira, Ramon Guerra; Lima Junior, Claudio Gabriel; Rocha, Juliana da Câmara; Keesen, Tatjana Souza Lima; de Oliveira, Marcia Rosa; Silva, Fábio Pedrosa Lins; Vasconcellos, Mário Luiz Araújo de Almeida

    2016-11-08

    Leishmaniasis represents a series of severe neglected tropical diseases caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania and is widely distributed around the world. Here, we present the syntheses of Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts (MBHAs) prepared from eugenol, thymol and carvacrol, and their bioevaluation against promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis . The new MBHAs are prepared in two steps from essential oils in moderate to good yields and present IC 50 values in the range of 22.30-4.71 μM. Moreover, the selectivity index to the most potent compound is very high (SIrb > 84.92), far better than that of Glucantime ® (SIrb 1.39) and amphotericin B (SIrb = 22.34). Conformational analysis were carried out at the M062X//6-31+G(d,p) level of theory to corroborate a hypothesis about the nitroaromatic bioreduction mechanism.

  13. Synthesis and In Vitro Anti Leishmania amazonensis Biological Screening of Morita-Baylis-Hillman Adducts Prepared from Eugenol, Thymol and Carvacrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Seixas Xavier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis represents a series of severe neglected tropical diseases caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania and is widely distributed around the world. Here, we present the syntheses of Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts (MBHAs prepared from eugenol, thymol and carvacrol, and their bioevaluation against promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. The new MBHAs are prepared in two steps from essential oils in moderate to good yields and present IC50 values in the range of 22.30–4.71 μM. Moreover, the selectivity index to the most potent compound is very high (SIrb > 84.92, far better than that of Glucantime® (SIrb 1.39 and amphotericin B (SIrb = 22.34. Conformational analysis were carried out at the M062X//6-31+G(d,p level of theory to corroborate a hypothesis about the nitroaromatic bioreduction mechanism.

  14. DNA adducts as molecular dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucier, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that DNA adducts play an important role in the actions of many pulmonary carcinogens. During the last ten years sensitive methods (antibodies and 32 P-postlabeling) have been developed that permit detection of DNA adducts in tissues of animals or humans exposed to low levels of some genotoxic carcinogens. This capability has led to approaches designed to more reliably estimate the shape of the dose-response curve in the low dose region for a few carcinogens. Moreover, dosimetry comparisions can, in some cases, be made between animals and humans which help in judging the adequacy of animal models for human risk assessments. There are several points that need to be considered in the evaluation of DNA adducts as a molecular dosimeter. For example, DNA adduct formation is only one of many events that are needed for tumor development and some potent carcinogens do not form DNA adducts; i.e., TCDD. Other issues that need to be considered are DNA adduct heterogeneity, DNA repair, relationship of DNA adducts to somatic mutation and cell specificity in DNA adduct formation and persistence. Molecular epidemiology studies often require quantitation of adducts in cells such as lymphocytes which may or may not be reliable surrogates for adduct concentrations in target issues. In summary, accurate quantitation of low levels of DNA adducts may provide data useful in species to species extrapolation of risk including the development of more meaningful human monitoring programs

  15. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, E.

    1993-01-01

    In this generally intelligible article, the author describes at first the physical fundamentals of electromagnetic fields and their basic biological significance and effects for animals and human beings before dealing with the discussion regarding limiting values and dangers. The article treats possible connections with leukaemia as well as ith melatonine production more detailed. (vhe) [de

  16. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  17. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  18. Sustained induction of cytochrome P4501A1 in human hepatoma cells by co-exposure to benzo[a]pyrene and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole underlies the synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gábelová, Alena, E-mail: alena.gabelova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Poláková, Veronika [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Prochazka, Gabriela [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kretová, Miroslava; Poloncová, Katarína; Regendová, Eva; Luciaková, Katarína [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Segerbäck, Dan [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    To gain a deeper insight into the potential interactions between individual aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture, several benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) binary mixtures were studied. The biological activity of the binary mixtures was investigated in the HepG2 and WB-F344 liver cell lines and the Chinese hamster V79 cell line that stably expresses the human cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1). In the V79 cells, binary mixtures, in contrast to individual carcinogens, caused a significant decrease in the levels of micronuclei, DNA adducts and gene mutations, but not in cell survival. Similarly, a lower frequency of micronuclei and levels of DNA adducts were found in rat liver WB-F344 cells treated with a binary mixture, regardless of the exposure time. The observed antagonism between B[a]P and DBC may be due to an inhibition of Cyp1a1 expression because cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC showed a decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA levels. In human liver HepG2 cells exposed to binary mixtures for 2 h, a reduction in micronuclei frequency was also found. However, after a 24 h treatment, synergism between B[a]P and DBC was determined based on DNA adduct formation. Accordingly, the up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression was detected in HepG2 cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC. Our results show significant differences in the response of human and rat cells to B[a]P:DBC mixtures and stress the need to use multiple experimental systems when evaluating the potential risk of environmental pollutants. Our data also indicate that an increased expression of CYP1A1 results in a synergistic effect of B[a]P and DBC in human cells. As humans are exposed to a plethora of noxious chemicals, our results have important implications for human carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • B[a]P:DBC mixtures were less genotoxic in V79MZh1A1 cells than B[a]P and DBC alone. • An antagonism between B[a]P and DBC was determined in rat liver WB-F344 cells. • The inhibition of CYP1a1 expression by B[a]P:DBC mixture

  19. Partitioning of knee joint internal forces in gait is dictated by the knee adduction angle and not by the knee adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2014-05-07

    Medial knee osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease. Surgical and conservative interventions are performed to manage its progression via reduction of load on the medial compartment or equivalently its surrogate measure, the external adduction moment. However, some studies have questioned a correlation between the medial load and adduction moment. Using a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity driven by kinematics-kinetics of asymptomatic subjects at gait midstance, we aim here to quantify the relative effects of changes in the knee adduction angle versus changes in the adduction moment on the joint response and medial/lateral load partitioning. The reference adduction rotation of 1.6° is altered by ±1.5° to 3.1° and 0.1° or the knee reference adduction moment of 17Nm is varied by ±50% to 25.5Nm and 8.5Nm. Quadriceps, hamstrings and tibiofemoral contact forces substantially increased as adduction angle dropped and diminished as it increased. The medial/lateral ratio of contact forces slightly altered by changes in the adduction moment but a larger adduction rotation hugely increased this ratio from 8.8 to a 90 while in contrast a smaller adduction rotation yielded a more uniform distribution. If the aim in an intervention is to diminish the medial contact force and medial/lateral load ratio, a drop of 1.5° in adduction angle is much more effective (causing respectively 12% and 80% decreases) than a reduction of 50% in the adduction moment (causing respectively 4% and 13% decreases). Substantial role of changes in adduction angle is due to the associated alterations in joint nonlinear passive resistance. These findings explain the poor correlation between knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral compartment loading during gait suggesting that the internal load partitioning is dictated by the joint adduction angle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cobb, George P.; Maul, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  1. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  2. 78 FR 46260 - Sorbitan Monooleate Ethylene Oxide Adduct; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Monooleate Ethylene Oxide Adduct; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance AGENCY: Environmental...-ethanediyl) derivs., (Z)- (CAS Reg. No 9005-65-6) (also known as ``sorbitan monooleate ethylene oxide adduct... residues of sorbitan monooleate ethylene oxide adduct. DATES: This regulation is effective July 31, 2013...

  3. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Sapkota

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease.

  4. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  5. Adduct Formation in ESI/MS by Mobile Phase Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruve, Anneli; Kaupmees, Karl

    2017-05-01

    Adduct formation is a common ionization method in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). However, this process is poorly understood and complicated to control. We demonstrate possibilities to control adduct formation via mobile phase additives in ESI positive mode for 17 oxygen and nitrogen bases. Mobile phase additives were found to be a very effective measure for manipulating the formation efficiencies of adducts. An appropriate choice of additive may increase sensitivity by up to three orders of magnitude. In general, sodium adduct [M + Na] + and protonated molecule [M + H] + formation efficiencies were found to be in good correlation; however, the former were significantly more influenced by mobile phase properties. Although the highest formation efficiencies for both species were observed in water/acetonitrile mixtures not containing additives, the repeatability of the formation efficiencies was found to be improved by additives. It is concluded that mobile phase additives are powerful, yet not limiting factors, for altering adduct formation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Reflex vocal fold adduction in the porcine model: the effects of stimuli delivered to various sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeong-Soo; Hundal, Jagdeep S; Sasaki, Clarence T; Abdelmessih, Mikhail W; Kelleher, Stephen P

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a panel of sensory nerves capable of eliciting an evoked glottic closure reflex (GCR) and to quantify the glottic closing force (GCF) of these responses in a porcine model. In 5 pigs, the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (iSLN) and the trigeminal, pharyngeal plexus, glossopharyngeal, radial, and intercostal nerves were surgically isolated and electrically stimulated. During stimulation of each nerve, the GCR was detected by laryngeal electromyography and the GCF was measured with a pressure transducer. The only nerve that elicited the GCR in the 5 pigs was the iSLN. The average GCF was 288.9 mm Hg. This study demonstrates that the only afferent nerve that elicits the GCR in pigs is the iSLN, and that it should remain the focus of research for the rehabilitation of patients with absent or defective reflex vocal fold adduction.

  7. The biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards of radiations to man are briefly covered in this paper. The natural background sources of radiations are stated and their resulting doses are compared to those received voluntarily by man. The basis of how radiations cause biological damage is given and the resulting somatic effects are shown for varying magnitude of dose. Risk estimates are given for cancer induction and genetic effects are briefly discussed. Finally four case studies of radiation damage to humans are examined exemplifying the symptoms of large doses of radiations [af

  8. Trapping of a Cross-link Formed by a Major Purine Adduct of a Metabolite of the Carcinogen N-Nitrosomorpholine by Inorganic and Biological Reductants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koissi, Niangoran; Fishbein, James C.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroperoxy-N-nitrosomorpholine in buffered aqueous media in the presence of calf thymus DNA was treated with a phosphine reductant to generate the transient α-hydroxynitrosamine and subsequent diazonium ion that alkylated the DNA, as previously reported. Subsequent addition of hydride donors, for 30 min, followed by acid hydrolysis of the mixture allowed detection and quantification of 6-(2-(2-((9H-purin-6-yl)amino)ethoxy)ethoxy)-9H-purin-2-amine, the reduced cross-link formed from deposition, via the diazonium ion, of a 3-oxa-pentanal fragment on O6-Gua, and condensation with N6-Ade, presumably in the vicinity. Decreasing temperature of the reactions and decreasing pH modestly increased the yields of trapped crosslink. Among three borohydride reductants, NaNCBH3 is superior, being ∼4 times more effective on a molar basis, as opposed to a hydride equivalent basis, than NaBH4 or Na(AcO)3BH. For trapping with NaNCBH3, it is deduced that the reaction likely occurs with the iminium ion that is in protonic equilibrium with its conjugate base imine. In an experiment in which the hydroperoxide was decomposed and NaNCBH3 was introduced after various times, the amount of cross-link was observed to increase, nearly linearly, by about four-fold over one week. These data indicate that there are a minimum of 2 populations of cross-links, one that forms rapidly, in minutes, and another that grows in with time, over days. Reduced nicotinamide co-factors and ascorbate are observed to effect reduction (over 3 days) of the cross-links confirming the possibility that otherwise reversible cross-links might be immortalized under biological conditions. PMID:23587048

  9. Biological effectiveness of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, M.; Silini, G.

    1980-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that fast neutron RBE values generally increase with decreasing neutron doses. This finding reflects the existence of a difference in the shape between the functional dependences of the effect on dose produced by neutrons and by the reference radiation. The most common interpretation of this difference assumes a linear dose-effect relationship for neutrons and a linear plus quadratic relationship for X - or gamma-rays. In radiation protection the assumption of linearity is taken to be valid throughout the whole dose region of interest and is essential for the validity of the extrapolation to low doses of the risk estimates obtained at higher dose levels. On the other hand, the same trend of the RBE versus neutron dose would still be observed, if the biological effect induced by neutrons would be less than proportional to the dose. However, in this latter case the risks of neutron irradiation estimated from data at higher doses would no longer be safely utilized at lower dose levels. The results of various experiments with fast neutrons on different biological systems are examined in an attempt to throw some light on this aspect of radiation protection. It appears that in some cases linear non-threshold dose-effect relationships may not fit experimental series obtained with neutrons at relatively low doses. (H.K.)

  10. Biological effects of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, L.; Martins, B.; Dutrillaux, B.

    1991-01-01

    The usual definitions of biological dose and biological dosimetry do not fit in case of particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The dose corresponds to an average value which is not representative of the highly localized energy transfer due to heavy ions. Fortunately, up to now, a biological dosimetry following an exposure to high LET particles is necessary only for cosmonauts. In radiotherapy applications, one exactly knows the nature and energy of incident particle beams. The quality requirements for a good biodosimeter include reliable relation between dose and effect, weak sensitivity to individual variations, reliability and stability of acquired informations against the time delay between exposure and measurements. Nothing is better than the human lymphocyte to be used for measurements that fulfil these requirements. In the case of a manned spaceship, the irradiation dose corresponds to a wide range of radiation (protons, neutrons, heavy ions), and making a dosimetry as well as defining it are of current concern. As yet, there exist two possible definitions, which reduce the dose either to a proton or to a neutron equivalent one. However, such an approximation is not a faithful representation of the irradiation effects and in particular, the long-term effects may be quite different. In the future, it is reasonable to expect an evolution towards technics that enable identifying irradiated cells and quantifying precisely their radiation damage in order to reconstruct the spectrum of particles received by a given cosmonaut in a given time. Let us emphasize that the radiation hazards due to a short stay in space are quite minor, but in the case of a travel to Mars, they cannot be neglected [fr

  11. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  12. Effect of multiple adduct fullerenes on microstructure and phase behavior of P3HT:fullerene blend films for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Anne A Y; Reynolds, Luke X; Bruno, Annalisa; MacLachlan, Andrew; King, Simon P; Faist, Mark A; Pires, Ellis; Macdonald, J Emyr; Stingelin, Natalie; Haque, Saif A; Nelson, Jenny

    2012-05-22

    The bis and tris adducts of [6,6]phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) offer lower reduction potentials than PCBM and are therefore expected to offer larger open-circuit voltages and more efficient energy conversion when blended with conjugated polymers in photovoltaic devices in place of PCBM. However, poor photovoltaic device performances are commonly observed when PCBM is replaced with higher-adduct fullerenes. In this work, we use transmission electron microscopy (TEM), steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to probe the microstructural properties of blend films of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) with the bis and tris adducts of PCBM. TEM and PL indicate that, in as-spun blend films, fullerenes become less soluble in P3HT as the number of adducts increases. PL indicates that upon annealing crystallization leads to phase separation in P3HT:PCBM samples only. DSC studies indicate that the interactions between P3HT and the fullerene become weaker with higher-adduct fullerenes and that all systems exhibit eutectic phase behavior with a eutectic composition being shifted to higher molar fullerene content for higher-adduct fullerenes. We propose two different mechanisms of microstructure development for PCBM and higher-adduct fullerenes. P3HT:PCBM blends, phase segregation is the result of crystallization of either one or both components and is facilitated by thermal treatments. In contrast, for blends containing higher adducts, the phase separation is due to a partial demixing of the amorphous phases. We rationalize the lower photocurrent generation by the higher-adduct fullerene blends in terms of film microstructure.

  13. Mutagenicity of acrolein and acrolein-induced DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-yu; Zhu, Mao-xiang; Xie, Jian-ping

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein mutagenicity relies on DNA adduct formation. Reaction of acrolein with deoxyguanosine generates alpha-hydroxy-1, N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (alpha-HOPdG) and gamma-hydroxy-1, N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (gamma-HOPdG) adducts. These two DNA adducts behave differently in mutagenicity. gamma-HOPdG is the major DNA adduct and it can lead to interstrand DNA-DNA and DNA-peptide/protein cross-links, which may induce strong mutagenicity; however, gamma-HOPdG can be repaired by some DNA polymerases complex and lessen its mutagenic effects. alpha-HOPdG is formed much less than gamma-HOPdG, but difficult to be repaired, which contributes to accumulation in vivo. Results of acrolein mutagenicity studies haven't been confirmed, which is mainly due to the conflicting mutagenicity data of the major acrolein adduct (gamma-HOPdG). The minor alpha-HOPdG is mutagenic in both in vitro and in vivo test systems. The role of alpha-HOPdG in acrolein mutagenicity needs further investigation. The inconsistent result of acrolein mutagenicity can be attributed, at least partially, to a variety of acrolein-DNA adducts formation and their repair in diverse detection systems. Recent results of detection of acrolein-DNA adduct in human lung tissues and analysis of P53 mutation spectra in acrolein-treated cells may shed some light on mechanisms of acrolein mutagenicity. These aspects are covered in this mini review.

  14. Morita-Baylis-Hillman Adducts Display Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Modulating Inflammatory Mediator Expression in RAW264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia V. Faheina-Martins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory response plays an important role not only in the normal physiology but also in pathologies such as cancers. The Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts (MBHA are a novel group of synthetic molecules that have demonstrated many biological activities against some parasitic cells such as Plasmodium falciparum, Leishmania amazonensis, and Leishmania chagasi, and antimitotic activity against sea urchin embryonic cells was also related. However, little is known about the mechanisms induced by MBHA in inflammatory process and its relation with anticancer activity. The present work investigated the cytotoxicity of three MBHA derivatives (A2CN, A3CN, and A4CN, on human colorectal adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells, and their anti-inflammatory activities were examined in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, being these derivatives potentially cytotoxic to HT-29 cells. Coincubation with A2CN, A3CN, or A4CN and LPS in RAW264.7 cells inhibited NO production, as well as the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS was also repressed. The mRNA expressions of IL-1β and IL-6 were significantly downregulated by such MBHA compounds in RAW264.7 cells, but only A2CN was able to inhibit the COX-2 gene expression. We also showed that MBHA compounds decreased almost to zero the production of IL-1β and IL-6. These findings display that such MBHA compounds exhibit anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities.

  15. Morita-Baylis-Hillman Adducts Display Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Modulating Inflammatory Mediator Expression in RAW264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheina-Martins, Glaucia V; Leite, Jacqueline Alves; Dantas, Bruna Braga; Lima-Júnior, Cláudio G; Vasconcellos, Mário L A A; Rodrigues-Mascarenhas, Sandra; Araújo, Demetrius A M

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory response plays an important role not only in the normal physiology but also in pathologies such as cancers. The Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts (MBHA) are a novel group of synthetic molecules that have demonstrated many biological activities against some parasitic cells such as Plasmodium falciparum , Leishmania amazonensis , and Leishmania chagasi , and antimitotic activity against sea urchin embryonic cells was also related. However, little is known about the mechanisms induced by MBHA in inflammatory process and its relation with anticancer activity. The present work investigated the cytotoxicity of three MBHA derivatives (A2CN, A3CN, and A4CN), on human colorectal adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells, and their anti-inflammatory activities were examined in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, being these derivatives potentially cytotoxic to HT-29 cells. Coincubation with A2CN, A3CN, or A4CN and LPS in RAW264.7 cells inhibited NO production, as well as the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also repressed. The mRNA expressions of IL-1 β and IL-6 were significantly downregulated by such MBHA compounds in RAW264.7 cells, but only A2CN was able to inhibit the COX-2 gene expression. We also showed that MBHA compounds decreased almost to zero the production of IL-1 β and IL-6. These findings display that such MBHA compounds exhibit anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities.

  16. PAH-DNA adducts in cord blood and fetal and child development in a Chinese cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, D.L.; Li, T.Y.; Liu, J.J.; Chen, Y.H.; Qu, L.R.; Perera, F. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). Dept. for Environmental Health Science

    2006-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important class of toxic pollutants released by fossil fuel combustion. Other pollutants include metals and particulate matter. PAH-DNA adducts, or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) adducts as their proxy, provide a chemical-specific measure of individual biologically effective doses that have been associated with increased risk of cancer and adverse birth outcomes. In the present study we examined the relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and fetal and child growth and development in Tongliang, China, where a seasonally operated coal-fired power plant was the major pollution source. In a cohort of 150 nonsmoking women and their newborns enrolled between 4 March 2002 and 19 June 2002, BaP-DNA adducts were measured in maternal and umbilical cord blood obtained at delivery. High PAH-DNA adduct levels (above the median of detectable adduct level) were associated with decreased birth head circumference (p = 0.057) and reduced children's weight at 18 months, 24 months, and 30 months of age (p {lt} 0.05), after controlling for potential confounders. In addition, in separate models, longer duration of prenatal exposure was associated with reduced birth length (p = 0.033) and reduced children's height at 18 (p = 0.001), 24 (p {lt} 0.001), and 30 months of age (p {lt} 0.001). The findings suggest that exposure to elevated levels of PAHS, with the Tongliang power plant being a significant source, is associated with reduced fetal and child growth in this population.

  17. Biological Effects after Prenatal Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    2004-01-01

    A Task Group of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has finished a report Biological Effects after Prenatal Irradiation (Embryo and Fetus) which has been approved by the Main Commission and Will be Published. Some new important scientific data shall be discussed in this contribution. During the preimplantation period lethality of the mammalian embryo is the dominating radiation effect. However, in mouse strains with genetic predispositions it has been shown that also malformations can be caused. This effect is genetically determined and its mechanisms is different from the induction of malformations during major organogenesis. Radiation exposures during this prenatal period leads ato an increase of genomic instability of cells in the normal appearing fetuses. These radiation effects can be transmitted to the next generation. A renewed analysis of individuals with severe mental retardation after exposures during the 8th to 15th week post conception in Hiroshima and Nagasaki gives evidence that a threshold dose exists for this effect around 300 mGy. This is supported by a number of experimental animal data which have been obtained from cellular and molecular investigations during the brain development. The data show the high radiosensitivity of the developing brain but also the various compensatory mechanisms and the enormous plasticity of these processes. The radiosensitivity varies strongly during the prenatal development. The highest sensitivity is found during the early and mid fetal period which is coinciding with weeks 8-15 post conception in humans. The lowest doses causing persistent damage are in the range of 100 to 300 mGy. For intelligence quotient scores a linear dose response model provides a satisfactory fit. From the experimental data it can be concluded that the fetal stage is most sensitive to the carcinogenic effect in comparison to the other prenatal stages. Such as clear situation cannot be obtained from the

  18. Base sequence effects on DNA replication influenced by bulky adducts. Final report, March 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.

    1997-05-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are environmental pollutants that are present in air, food, and water. While PAH compounds are chemically inert and are sparingly soluble in aqueous solutions, in living cells they are metabolized to a variety of oxygenated derivatives, including the high mutagenic and tumorigenic diol epoxide derivatives. The diol epoxides of the sterically hindered fjord region compound benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]PhDE) are among the most powerful tumorigenic compounds in animal model test systems. In this project, site-specifically modified oligonucleotides containing single B[c]PhDE-N{sup 6}-dA lesions derived from the reactions of the 1S,2R,3R,4S and 1R,2S,3S,4R diol epoxides of B[c]PhDE with dA residues were synthesized. The replication of DNA catalyzed by a prokaryotic DNA polymerase (the exonuclease-free Klenow fragment E. Coli Po1 I) in the vicinity of the lesion at base-specific sites on B[c]PhDE-modified template strands was investigated in detail. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for the insertion of single deoxynucleotide triphosphates into growing DNA (primer) strands using the modified dA* and the bases just before and after the dA* residue as templates, depend markedly on the stereochemistry of the B[c]PhDE-modified dA residues. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which bulky PAH-DNA adducts affect normal DNA replication.

  19. Proteomic profiling of acrolein adducts in human lung epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Page C.; Deng, Bin; Hondal, Robert J.; Matthews, Dwight E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Acrolein (2,3-propenal) is a major indoor and outdoor air pollutant originating largely from tobacco smoke or organic combustion. Given its high reactivity, the adverse effects of inhaled acrolein are likely due to direct interactions with the airway epithelium, resulting in altered epithelial function, but only limited information exists to date regarding the primary direct cellular targets for acrolein. Here, we describe a global proteomics approach to characterize the spectrum of airway epithelial protein targets for Michael adduction in acrolein-exposed bronchial epithelial (HBE1) cells, based on biotin hydrazide labeling and avidin purification of biotinylated proteins or peptides for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Identified protein targets included a number of stress proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, and several key proteins involved in redox signaling, including thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione S-transferase π. Because of the central role of thioredoxin reductase in cellular redox regulation, additional LC-MS/MS characterization was performed on purified mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase to identify the specific site of acrolein adduction, revealing the catalytic selenocysteine residue as the target responsible for enzyme inactivation. Our findings indicate that these approaches are useful in characterizing major protein targets for acrolein, and will enhance mechanistic understanding of the impact of acrolein on cell biology. PMID:21704744

  20. Linking the generation of DNA adducts to lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, Marcello; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Bruzzone, Marco; Peluso, Marco E M

    2017-09-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. DNA adducts are considered a reliable biomarker that reflects carcinogen exposure to tobacco smoke, but the central question is what is the relationship of DNA adducts and cancer? Therefore, we investigated this relationship by a meta-analysis of twenty-two studies with bronchial adducts for a total of 1091 subjects, 887 lung cancer cases and 204 apparently healthy individuals with no evidence of lung cancer. Our study shows that these adducts are significantly associated to increase lung cancer risk. The value of Mean Ratio lung-cancer (MR) of bronchial adducts resulting from the random effects model was 2.64, 95% C.I. 2.00-3.50, in overall lung cancer cases as compared to controls. The significant difference, with lung cancer patients having significant higher levels of bronchial adducts than controls, persisted after stratification for smoking habits. The MR lung-cancer value between lung cancer patients and controls for smokers was 2.03, 95% C.I. 1.42-2.91, for ex-smokers 3.27, 95% C.I. 1.49-7.18, and for non-smokers was 3.81, 95% C.I. 1.85-7.85. Next, we found that the generation of bronchial adducts is significantly related to inhalation exposure to tobacco smoke carcinogens confirming its association with volatile carcinogens. The MR smoking estimate of bronchial adducts resulting from meta-regression was 2.28, 95% Confidence Interval (C.I.) 1.10-4.73, in overall smokers in respect to non-smokers. The present work provides strengthening of the hypothesis that bronchial adducts are not simply relate to exposure, but are a cause of chemical-induced lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by bento(a)pyrene ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schults, Marten A.; Chiu, Roland K.; Nagle, Peter; Kleinjans, J C; van Schooten, Frederik Jan; Godschalk, Roger W.

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification

  2. Biological effectiveness of fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, M.S.; Saigusa, S.; Kimura, I.

    1992-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to the uranium fission neutrons with different energy spectra, and the effects of changing pattern of energy spectrum on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were studied by analyzing dose-response relationship of chromosome aberrations. When the contribution of contaminated gamma-rays was subtracted, the efficiency of chromosomal response to the neutron dose was found to be refractory to the difference in the energy spectrum while the mean energy ranged from 2 MeV to 27 keV. This chromosomal refractoriness to energy spectrum may be explained by the similarity of energy spectrum for kerma contribution; most of the doses being given by neutrons with energy above 50 keV. Small doses given by short tracks may be less efficient. A comparison of these observations with chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of A-bomb survivors leads to somewhat higher estimate of neutron dose in Hiroshima than the estimate by the recently revised dosimetry system, DS86. (author)

  3. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  4. Comparison of EMG activity on abdominal muscles during plank exercise with unilateral and bilateral additional isometric hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Eui-Ryong; Jung, In-Gui; Seo, Eun-Young; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise on the abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy young men participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to monitor the activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), the internal oblique (IO), and the external oblique (EO) muscles. The participants performed three types of plank exercise; the standard plank exercise, the plank exercise with bilateral isometric hip adduction, and the plank exercise with unilateral isometric hip adduction. All abdominal muscle activity was significantly increased during the plank exercise combined with the bilateral and unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the standard plank exercise (pmuscle activity was significantly increased during the unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the bilateral isometric hip adduction (pabdominal muscle activity. In particular, the unilateral isometric hip adduction is a more beneficial exercise than the bilateral isometric hip adduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantification of biologically effective environmental UV irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    To determine the impact of environmental UV radiation on human health and ecosystems demands monitoring systems that weight the spectral irradiance according to the biological responses under consideration. In general, there are three different approaches to quantify a biologically effective solar irradiance: (i) weighted spectroradiometry where the biologically weighted radiometric quantities are derived from spectral data by multiplication with an action spectrum of a relevant photobiological reaction, e.g. erythema, DNA damage, skin cancer, reduced productivity of terrestrial plants and aquatic foodweb; (ii) wavelength integrating chemical-based or physical dosimetric systems with spectral sensitivities similar to a biological response curve; and (iii) biological dosimeters that directly weight the incident UV components of sunlight in relation to the effectiveness of the different wavelengths and to interactions between them. Most biological dosimeters, such as bacteria, bacteriophages, or biomolecules, are based on the UV sensitivity of DNA. If precisely characterized, biological dosimeters are applicable as field and personal dosimeters.

  6. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde

    2006-01-01

    ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 60Co c-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose...... has a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Conclusion: We have produced the first measurements of the biological consequences of antiproton irradiation. These data substantiate theoretical predictions of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation within the Bragg peak, and suggest...

  7. Biological monitoring the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of coke oven workers in relation to smoking and genetic polymorphisms for GSTM1 GSTT1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Asten, J.G. van; Vogel, N. de; Bruijntjes-Rozier, T.C.D.M.; Schouten, T.; Cramers, P.; Maas, L.; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Schooten, F.-J. van; Hopmans, P.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Human exposure is often demonstrated by increased internal levels of PAH metabolites and of markers for early biological effects, like DNA adducts and cytogenetic aberrations. Objective:

  8. Mass spectrometric analysis of sulfur mustard-induced biomolecular adducts: Are DNA adducts suitable biomarkers of exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubel, Tabea; Bürkle, Alexander; Mangerich, Aswin

    2017-12-23

    The bi-functional chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM), whose release in asymmetric conflicts or terrorist attacks represents a realistic threat, induces several kinds of biomolecular adducts, including highly toxic DNA adducts. Isotope dilution liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS) is considered the gold standard for highly accurate, precise, specific and sensitive quantification of DNA adducts in general. Recently, a number of LC-MS/MS approaches have been established to analyze SM-induced protein and DNA adducts in cell culture and rodent animal models. As DNA adducts are mechanism-based biomarkers for SM exposure, results from such studies provide a deeper understanding of the etiology of SM-induced pathologies, especially of long-term effects such as cancer formation. As a result, medical treatment of SM-exposed individuals might be improved. Yet, despite the progress that has been made during the last years, there is still a need for advanced methods of ID-LC-MS/MS for the detection and quantitation of SM adducts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  10. Acute and sub-acute effects of repetitive kicking on hip adduction torque in injury-free elite youth soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per

    2014-01-01

    strength, concerning isometric hip adduction, abduction and flexion torque of the kicking leg and the supporting leg. Ten injury-free male elite soccer players, mean ± s age of 15.8 ± 0.4 years participated. All players underwent a specific 20 min kicking drill session, comprising 45 kicks. The players...

  11. THE EFFECT OF ROUTE OF ADMINISTRATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS ON DNA ADDUCTION AND CYTOGENETIC DAMAGE IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES OF MICE AND RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were designed to investigate how the route of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mice and rats affects the induction of cytogenetic endpoints and DNA adduction. Both mice and rats were exposed to 100 mg/kg of benz[a]anthracene (B[a]A), benzo[b]fl...

  12. Effects of footwear on the knee adduction moment in medial knee osteoarthritis: classification criteria for flat flexible vs stable supportive shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, K L; Bennell, K L; Wrigley, T V; Metcalf, B R; Kasza, J; Hinman, R S

    2017-02-01

    To validate simple criteria that distinguish flat flexible from stable supportive walking shoes by comparing their effects on the knee adduction moment (KAM) in people with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a cross-sectional biomechanical study. We proposed five criteria to differentiate flat flexible from stable supportive shoes, and selected three pairs of shoes representing each class for biomechanical testing. 28 participants aged ≥50 years with symptomatic medial knee OA underwent gait analysis barefoot and wearing each of the six selected shoes, in random order. Differences in the peak KAM, KAM impulse and peak knee flexion moment (KFM) across test conditions were evaluated with a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Immediate changes in walking pain between conditions were also compared. Increases in KAM from barefoot were lower with each of the three flat flexible shoe styles (peak KAM: 6.1-8.9%; KAM impulse: 2.4-5.1%) compared to their stable supportive counterparts (peak KAM: 11.6-15.1%; KAM impulse 10.5-13.2%). There was a significant main effect for footwear class on peak KAM and KAM impulse, whereby stable supportive shoes increased the KAM significantly more than flat flexible shoes (P shoes for people with medial knee OA to minimise knee loading. Future research should evaluate whether wearing shoes based on these criteria translates to improvements in knee OA symptoms and/or slows structural disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative Error-Free and Error-Prone Translesion Synthesis of N(2)-2'-Deoxyguanosine Adducts Formed by Mitomycin C and Its Metabolite, 2,7-Diaminomitosene, in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Arindam; Surugihalli, Chaitra; Pande, Paritosh; Champeil, Elise; Basu, Ashis K

    2016-05-16

    Mitomycin C (MC) is a cytotoxic and mutagenic antitumor agent that alkylates DNA upon reductive activation. 2,7-Diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM) is a major metabolite of MC in tumor cells, which also alkylates DNA. MC forms seven DNA adducts, including monoadducts and inter- and intrastrand cross-links, whereas 2,7-DAM forms two monoadducts. Herein, the biological effects of the dG-N(2) adducts formed by MC and 2,7-DAM have been compared by constructing single-stranded plasmids containing these adducts and replicating them in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Translesion synthesis (TLS) efficiencies of dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM were 38 ± 3 and 27 ± 3%, respectively, compared to that of a control plasmid. This indicates that both adducts block DNA synthesis and that dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM is a stronger replication block than dG-N(2)-MC. TLS of each adducted construct was reduced upon siRNA knockdown of pol η, pol κ, or pol ζ. For both adducts, the most significant reduction occurred with knockdown of pol κ, which suggests that pol κ plays a major role in TLS of these dG-N(2) adducts. Analysis of the progeny showed that both adducts were mutagenic, and the mutation frequencies (MF) of dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM were 18 ± 3 and 10 ± 1%, respectively. For both adducts, the major type of mutation was G → T transversions. Knockdown of pol η and pol ζ reduced the MF of dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM, whereas knockdown of pol κ increased the MF of these adducts. This suggests that pol κ predominantly carries out error-free TLS, whereas pol η and pol ζ are involved in error-prone TLS. The largest reduction in MF by 78 and 80%, respectively, for dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM constructs occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down. This result strongly suggests that, unlike pol κ, these three TLS polymerases cooperatively perform the error-prone TLS of these adducts.

  14. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  15. Biological effects of nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotz, G.

    1975-01-01

    After a brief survey about the main radiobiological effects caused by ionizing radiation, human symptoms after irradiation and incorporation are shown. The special radiotoxic effect of radionuclides which are chemically associated with metabolism-specific elements such as calcium and potassium is shown and methods of treatment are indicated. (ORU) [de

  16. Biological effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the proceedings of a conference organised jointly by Friends of the Earth (U.K.) and Greenpeace (International). The aim of the conference was to discuss the effects of low level radiation, particularly on man, within the terms of dose/risk relationships. The topics discussed included: sources of radiation, radiation discharges from nuclear establishments, predictive modelling of radiation hazards, radiation effects at Hiroshima, low dose effects and ICRP dose limits, variation in sensitivity to radiation, and the link between childhood cancer and nuclear power. (U.K.)

  17. Immediate and short-term effects of real-time knee adduction moment feedback on the peak and cumulative knee load during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brennan; Gordon, Keith E; Chang, Alison H

    2018-01-01

    The peak external knee adduction moment (pKAM), KAM impulse, and peak knee flexion moment (pKFM) during gait are important loading variables in medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. We evaluated the effects of gait modification, using real-time pKAM visual feedback, on pKAM, KAM impulse, and pKFM; and whether participants could maintain the KAM-reducing gait after feedback removal. Eleven healthy individuals performed a series of walking trials on a split-belt instrumented treadmill under four conditions of Baseline, Feedback, No Feedback Early, and No Feedback Late. Guided by real-time feedback of pKAM, they modified their gait patterns to lower pKAM by 20%. Three-dimensional joint kinematics/kinetics during each walking condition were recorded by a 12-camera motion capture system and the instrumented treadmill. Change in each knee loading parameter from baseline across conditions was assessed using one-way repeated-measures analysis-of-variances. In the feedback limb, successful 20% reductions from baseline in pKAM and KAM impulse were achieved across all three conditions. There was a trend for concomitant pKFM increases, partially attenuating the beneficial effects of pKAM reduction. A carry-over effect of KAM reduction in the non-feedback limb was noted. The altered gait patterns were participant-specific and multi-modal; each participant reported a combination of two to three gait modification strategies used for pKAM reduction. Toe-in and medial foot contact were the most reported strategies. The findings support the real-time pKAM visual feedback as a tool for individualized gait modification to reduce knee load. Future studies to evaluate its effectiveness in persons with or at risk for medial knee osteoarthritis is warranted. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:397-404, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. DNA-nicotine adduction of lung and liver of mice exposed to passive smoking studied by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Qin; Sun Hongfang; Shi Jingyuan; Liu Yuanfang; Wang Jianjun; Lu Xiangyang; Li Kun; Zhao Qiang

    1997-01-01

    The author presents the measurement of adduction of mice lung or liver DNA with nicotine by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Mice were exposed in a toxicity infecting chamber filled up with cigarette smoke for a period of time of simulate the exposure of mice to passive smoking. The dose of nicotine inhaled by mice was determined. The results of AMS showed, when the dose of inhaled nicotine ranged from 33 μg/kg to 330 μg/kg, the adducts number of lung DNA was 10 3 -10 4 adducts/10 12 nucleotides, and the adducts increased linearly with increasing dose of nicotine; the adducts number of liver DNA reached to 10 4 -10 5 adducts/10 12 nucleotides, when the dose of nicotine ranged from 99 μg/kg to 330 μg/kg, and the adducts increased vigorously as dose of nicotine increased. Comparing the DNA adducts levels of the same nicotine dose, liver DNA adducts were more than lung DNA adducts. This study also suggested that the other components of cigarette smoke have synergic effect on the formation of nicotine derived DNA adducts

  19. γIrradiation induced formation of PCB-solvent adducts in aliphatic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, F.; Milot, S.; Gagne, N.

    1990-01-01

    γIrradiation induced formation of PCB-solvent adducts was investigated as a model for PCB residues in irradiated food. Formation of cyclohexyl adducts of PCBs was found to be significant when pure PCB congeners and Aroclor mixture were irradiated in cyclohexane and cyclohexene. Reaction pathways were investigated, and the effects of oxygen and electron scavenger were studied

  20. Biological effects of prenatal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    1997-01-01

    After large releases of radionuclides, exposure of the embryo or fetus can take place by external irradiation or uptake of radionuclies. The embryo and fetus are radiosensitive throughout prenatal development. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend on the development stage. During the preimplantation period (one to 10 days postconception, p.c.) a radiation exposure of at least 0.2 Gy can cause the death of the embryo. Malformations are only observed in rare cases when genetic predisposition exist. Macroscopic, anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis (two to eight weeks p.c.). A radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy is a doubling dose for the malformation risks as extrapolated from experiments with rodents. The human embryo may be more radioresistant. During early fetogenesis (8-15 weeks p.c.) a high radiosensitivity exists for the developmental of the brain. Radiation doses of 1.0 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 40% of the exposed fetuses. It must be taken into account that a radiation exposure during the fetal period can also induce cancer. It is generally assumed that the risk exists at about the same level as for children. (Author)

  1. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  2. Effectiveness of Biologic Factors in Shoulder Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, Dimitrios; Aryaei, Ashkan; Vasilakakos, Theofanis; Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder pathology can cause significant pain, discomfort, and loss of function that all interfere with activities of daily living and may lead to poor quality of life. Primary osteoarthritis and rotator cuff diseases with its sequalae are the main culprits. Management of shoulder disorders using biological factors gained an increasing interest over the last years. This interest reveals the need of effective treatments for shoulder degenerative disorders, and highlights the importance of a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the rapidly increasing knowledge in the field. This study will describe most of the available biology-based strategies that have been recently developed, focusing on their effectiveness in animal and clinical studies. Data from in vitro work will also be briefly presented; in order to further elucidate newly acquired knowledge regarding mechanisms of tissue degeneration and repair that would probably drive translational work in the next decade. The role of platelet rich-plasma, growth factors, stem cells and other alternative treatments will be described in an evidence-based approach, in an attempt to provide guidelines for their clinical application. Finally, certain challenges that biologic treatments face today will be described as an initiative for future strategies. The application of different growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells appears as promising approaches for enhancing biologic repair. However, data from clinical studies are still limited, and future studies need to improve understanding of the repair process in cellular and molecular level and evaluate the effectiveness of biologic factors in the management of shoulder disorders.

  3. Chemical and biological studies of the major DNA adduct of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), cis-[Pt(NH3)2/d(GpG)/], built into a specific site in a viral genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, L.J.; Pinto, A.L.; Lippard, S.J.; Essigmann, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A duplex Escherichia coli bacteriophage M13 genome was constructed containing a single cis-[Pt(NH 3 ) 2 /d(GpG)/] intrastrand cross-link, the major DNA adduct of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). The duplex dodecamer d(AGAAGGCCTAGA) x d(TCTAGGCCTTCT) was ligated into the HincII site of M13mp18 to produce an insertion mutant containing a unique StuI restriction enzyme cleavage site. A genome with a 12-base gap in the minus strand was created by hybridizing HincII-linearized M13mp18 duplex DNA with the single-stranded circular DNA of the 12-base insertion mutant. Characterization by pH-dependent 1 H NMR spectroscopy established that platinum binds to the N7 positions of the adjacent guanosines. The platinated oligonucleotide was phosphorylated in the presence of [γ- 32 P]ATP with bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase and incorporated into the 12-base gap of the heteroduplex, thus situating the adduct specifically within the StuI site in the minus strand of the genome. The site of incorporation of the dodecamer was mapped to the expected 36-base region delimited by the recognition sites of XbaI and HindIII. Gradient denaturing gel electrophoresis of a 289-base-pair fragment encompassing the site of adduction revealed that the presence of the cis-[Pt(NH 3 ) 2 /d)GpG)/] cross-link induces localized weakening of the DNA double helix. Comparative studies revealed no difference in survival between platinated and unmodified double-stranded genomes. In contrast, survival of the single-stranded platinated genome was only 10-12% that of the corresponding unmodified single-stranded genome, indicating that the solitary cis-[Pt(NH 3 ) 2 /d(GpG)/] cross-link is lethal to the single-stranded bacteriophage

  4. DNA adducts: Mass spectrometry methods and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, P.B.; Brown, K.; Tompkins, E.; Emms, V.L.; Jones, D.J.L.; Singh, R.; Phillips, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of DNA adducts is widely used for the monitoring of exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. Knowledge of the nature and amounts of DNA adducts formed in vivo also gives valuable information regarding the mutational effects that may result from particular exposures. The power of mass spectrometry (MS) to achieve qualitative and quantitative analyses of human DNA adducts has increased greatly in recent years with the development of improved chromatographic interfaces and ionisation sources. Adducts have been detected on nucleic acid bases, 2'-deoxynucleosides or 2'-deoxynucleotides, with LC-MS/MS being the favoured technique for many of these analyses. Our current applications of this technique include the determination of N7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-guanine, which was postulated to be found as a DNA repair product in urine following exposure to acrylamide, and of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine, as markers of oxidative damage in human lymphocyte DNA. Higher sensitivity (with a detection limit of 1-10 adducts/10 12 nucleotides) may be achieved by the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), although this requires the presence of certain isotopes, such as [ 14 C], in the material being analysed. In order to make this technique more amenable for studies of human exposure to environmental carcinogens, new postlabelling techniques, incorporating [ 14 C] into specific DNA adducts after formation, are being developed. It is expected that combining the use of advanced MS techniques with existing 32 P-postlabelling and immunochemical methodologies will contribute greatly to the understanding of the burden of human exposure to environmental carcinogens

  5. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  6. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy

  7. Estimation of Biological Effects of Tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umata, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear fusion technology is expected to create new energy in the future. However, nuclear fusion requires a large amount of tritium as a fuel, leading to concern about the exposure of radiation workers to tritium beta radiation. Furthermore, countermeasures for tritium-polluted water produced in decommissioning of the reactor at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station may potentially cause health problems in radiation workers. Although, internal exposure to tritium at a low dose/low dose rate can be assumed, biological effect of tritium exposure is not negligible, because tritiated water (HTO) intake to the body via the mouth/inhalation/skin would lead to homogeneous distribution throughout the whole body. Furthermore, organically-bound tritium (OBT) stays in the body as parts of the molecules that comprise living organisms resulting in long-term exposure, and the chemical form of tritium should be considered. To evaluate the biological effect of tritium, the effect should be compared with that of other radiation types. Many studies have examined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium. Hence, we report the RBE, which was obtained with radiation carcinogenesis classified as a stochastic effect, and serves as a reference for cancer risk. We also introduce the outline of the tritium experiment and the principle of a recently developed animal experimental system using transgenic mouse to detect the biological influence of radiation exposure at a low dose/low dose rate.

  8. Distribution of DNA adducts in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to diesel exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.A.; Wolff, R.K.; Harkema, J.R.; Mauderly, J.L.; Henderson, R.F.; Griffith, W.C.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    Diesel exhaust, Inhaled chronically at high concentrations, induced tumors that were located exclusively In the peripheral lung of rats. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in the level of DNA adducts among the regions of the respiratory tract paralleled the site of tumors. Groups of male F344/N rats were exposed 7 h/day, 5 day/wk for 12 wk to diesel engine exhaust at a soot concentration of 10 mg/m 3 or were sham-exposed to air. Respiratory tract tissues were dissected and DNA was isolated from the dissected samples and analyzed for the presence of adducts using the 32 P-postlabeling assay. The highest level of total DNA adducts occurred In peripheral lung tissue (∼ 18 adducts per 10 9 bases). About 1/4 to 1/5 the level of DNA adducts was detected in the nasal tissues as in peripheral lung. There were less than 3 adducts per 10 9 bases n each of the regions of the major conducting airways (.e., trachea, bronchi, axial airway). The data from this study indicate that higher levels of total DNA adducts were present In tissues where exhaust-induced tumors were located. These data suggest that DNA adduct levels in discrete locations of the respiratory tract may be good measures of the 'effective dose' of carcinogenic compounds. (author)

  9. Effect of hairpin loop structure on reactivity, sequence preference and adduct orientation of a DNA-interactive pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) antitumour agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, David E; Vassoler, Higia; Jackson, Paul J M; James, Colin H; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2015-04-07

    The pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are a family of covalent-binding DNA-interactive minor-groove binding agents with a thermodynamic preference for binding to 5'-Pu-G-Pu-3' sequences (Pu = Purine) but a kinetic preference for 5'-Py-G-Py-3' (Py = Pyrimidine). Using HPLC/MS methodology and a range of designed hairpin-forming oligonucleotides, the kinetics of reaction of a C8-bis-pyrrole pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) conjugate (GWL-78, 2) with sixteen isomeric oligonucleotides has been evaluated, each containing a single PBD binding site in one of two locations. The PBD-binding base-pair triplets were designed to include every possible combination of A and T bases adjacent to the covalently-reacting guanine, with the set of hairpins consisting of isomeric pairs containing the same sequence in the hairpin stem but with either hexaethylene glycol (HEG) or TTT loops. The PBD 2 reacted most rapidly with TGT and TGA sequences, with the possibility that adducts might form in both the 3'- and 5'-directions with some sequences according to modelling studies. A faster reaction rate was observed for all hairpins containing the HEG loop except one (Seq 10) when the PBD binding triplets were located either near the loop or adjacent to the 5'-end. Modelling studies have suggested that this difference in reactivity could be due to the structural flexibility of the HEG loop allowing both A-ring-3' and A-ring-5' adducts to form, while a TTT loop should favour only A-ring-5' adducts due to steric considerations. These findings contrast with the results reported by Nguyen and Wilson for the interaction of non-covalent DNA-binding molecules with DNA hairpins, where the loop structure was found to have little effect on interaction in the main stem of the hairpin.

  10. Redshift or adduct stabilization -- a computational study of hydrogen bonding in adducts of protonated carboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Solveig Gaarn; Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    changes and the redshift favor the Z OH group, matching the results of NBO and AIM calculations. This reflects that the thermochemistry of adduct formation is not a good measure of the hydrogen bond strength in charged adducts, and that the ionic interactions in the E and Z adducts of protonated...

  11. Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum)-induced DNA adducts in mouse tissues are different from the adduct induced by the activated form of the Bracken carcinogen ptaquiloside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, R N; O'Connor, P J; Prakash, A S; Shahin, M; Povey, A C

    2001-02-23

    Following treatment with bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) extract and bracken spores a number of DNA adducts were detected by (32)P-postlabeling. Three of these adducts have been described previously (Povey et al., Br. J. Cancer (1996) 74, 1342-1348) and in this study, using a slightly different protocol, four new adducts, with higher chromatographic mobility, were detected at levels ranging from 50 to 230% of those previously described. When DNA was treated in vitro with activated ptaquiloside (APT) and analysed by butanol extraction or nuclease P1 treatment, only one adduct was detected by (32)P-postlabeling. This adduct was not present in the DNA from mice treated with bracken fern or spores, suggesting either that bracken contains genotoxins other than ptaquiloside or that the metabolism of ptaquiloside produces genotoxins not reflected by activated ptaquiloside. However, as the ATP-derived adduct has been detected previously in ileal DNA of bracken-fed calves, species-specific differences in the metabolism of bracken genotoxins may exist, thereby leading to differences in their biological outcomes. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Quantitation of DNA Adducts Induced by 1,3-Butadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Villalta, Peter W.; Wickramaratne, Susith; Swenberg, James; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Human exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) present in automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and forest fires is of great concern because of its potent carcinogenicity. The adverse health effects of BD are mediated by its epoxide metabolites such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), which covalently modify genomic DNA to form promutagenic nucleobase adducts. Because of their direct role in cancer, BD-DNA adducts can be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of BD exposure. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was developed for accurate, sensitive, and precise quantification of EB-induced N-7-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl) guanine (EB-GII) DNA adducts in vivo. In our approach, EB-GII adducts are selectively released from DNA backbone by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by ultrafiltration, offline HPLC purification, and isotope dilution nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 analysis on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Following method validation, EB-GII lesions were quantified in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells treated with micromolar concentrations of EB and in liver tissues of rats exposed to sub-ppm concentrations of BD (0.5-1.5 ppm). EB-GII concentrations increased linearly from 1.15 ± 0.23 to 10.11 ± 0.45 adducts per 106 nucleotides in HT1080 cells treated with 0.5-10 μM DEB. EB-GII concentrations in DNA of laboratory rats exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ppm BD were 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.33 ± 0.08, and 0.50 ± 0.04 adducts per 106 nucleotides, respectively. We also used the new method to determine the in vivo half-life of EB-GII adducts in rat liver DNA (2.20 ± 0.12 d) and to detect EB-GII in human blood DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first application of nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 Orbitrap methodology to quantitative analysis of DNA adducts in vivo.

  13. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  14. Biologic effects of electromagnetic radiation and microwave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Hua

    2002-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation and microwave exist mankind's environment widely. People realize they disserve authors' health when authors make use of them. Electromagnetic radiation is one of the major physic factors which injure people's health. A review of the biologic mechanism about electromagnetic radiation and microwave, their harmful effects to human body, problems in authors' research and the prospect

  15. The relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Alsner, Jan; Bassler, Niels

    2016-01-01

    of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of antiprotons near the end of range. We have performed the first-ever direct measurement of the RBE of antiprotons both at rest and in flight. Materials and methods: Experimental data were generated on the RBE of an antiproton beam entering a tissue-like target...

  16. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.

    1991-03-01

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  17. Lunar biological effects and the magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The debate about how far the Moon causes biological effects has continued for two millennia. Pliny the Elder argued for lunar power "penetrating all things", including plants, fish, animals and humans. He also linked the Moon with tides, confirmed mathematically by Newton. A review of modern studies of biological effects, especially from plants and animals, confirms the pervasive nature of this lunar force. However calculations from physics and other arguments refute the supposed mechanisms of gravity and light. Recent space exploration allows a new approach with evidence of electromagnetic fields associated with the Earth's magnetotail at full moon during the night, and similar, but more limited, effects from the Moon's wake on the magnetosphere at new moon during the day. The disturbance of the magnetotail is perhaps shown by measurements of electric fields of up to 16V/m compared with the usual effects on some sensitive organisms. Similar intensities found in sferics, geomagnetic storms, aurora disturbance, sensations of a 'presence' and pre-seismic electromagnetic radiation are known to affect animals and 10-20% of the human population. There is now evidence for mechanisms such as calcium flux, melatonin disruption, magnetite and cryptochromes. Both environmental and receptor variations explain confounding factors and inconsistencies in the evidence. Electromagnetic effects might also account for some evolutionary changes. Further research on lunar biological effects, such as acute myocardial infarction, could help the development of strategies to reduce adverse effects for people sensitive to geomagnetic disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of DNA Adducts as Biomarkers of Exposure to Acrylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larguinho, Miguel Angelo Rodrigues

    The main objective of this thesis was the development of a gold nanoparticle-based methodology for detection of DNA adducts as biomarkers, to try and overcome existing drawbacks in currently employed techniques. For this objective to be achieved, the experimental work was divided in three components: sample preparation, method of detection and development of a model for exposure to acrylamide. Different techniques were employed and combined for de-complexation and purification of DNA samples (including ultrasonic energy, nuclease digestion and chromatography), resulting in a complete protocol for sample treatment, prior to detection. The detection of alkylated nucleotides using gold nanoparticles was performed by two distinct methodologies: mass spectrometry and colorimetric detection. In mass spectrometry, gold nanoparticles were employed for laser desorption/ionisation instead of the organic matrix. Identification of nucleotides was possible by fingerprint, however no specific mass signals were denoted when using gold nanoparticles to analyse biological samples. An alternate method using the colorimetric properties of gold nanoparticles was employed for detection. This method inspired in the non-cross-linking assay allowed the identification of glycidamide-guanine adducts and DNA adducts generated in vitro. For the development of a model of exposure, two different aquatic organisms were studies: a goldfish and a mussel. Organisms were exposed to waterborne acrylamide, after which mortality was recorded and effect concentrations were estimated. In goldfish, both genotoxicity and metabolic alterations were assessed and revealed dose-effect relationships of acrylamide. Histopathological alterations were verified primarily in pancreatic cells, but also in hepatocytes. Mussels showed higher effect concentrations than goldfish. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, biotransformation and neurotoxicity were analysed after prolonged exposure, showing mild oxidative stress in

  19. Acetaminophen protein adducts: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G Randall

    2009-01-01

    Significant controversy surrounds the clinical and legal implications of 3-para cysteinyl acetaminophen, the protein degradation product of acetaminophen protein adducts. Versions of this test have been used for several years in animal research to help understand acetaminophen toxicity. As human research papers have appeared, the allegation has been made that the presence of 3-para cysteinyl acetaminophen in a patient with hepatic injury proves causal association of acetaminophen with the injury. It has also been suggested that quantitative adduct assays can guide the management of acute overdose or repeated supra-therapeutic use of acetaminophen by determining the need for initiating therapy and the timing of the end of therapy. The purpose of this review is to discuss the nature of this molecule and the detection assay, the animal research linking it with injury, and to evaluate the human research--specifically the evidence regarding causality and clinical utility. At the current time there is inadequate evidence for the test alone to prove causal association between acetaminophen and hepatic injury. Also, since quantitative 3-para cysteinyl acetaminophen assays parallel other markers of liver injury, it is not clear that assays alone will guide therapy unless quantitative assay markers can be shown to precede other markers (in elevation or decline) or provide more specificity than the Rumack-Matthew risk categorization nomogram. These advantages have not been demonstrated.

  20. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death an...

  1. The fate of H atom adducts to 3'-uridine monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Zhang, Ru Bo; Eriksson, Leif A

    2010-07-29

    The stabilities of the adducts deriving from H free radical addition to the O2, O4, and C5 positions of 3'-uridine monophosphate (3'UMP) are studied by the hybrid density functional B3LYP approach. Upon H atom addition at the O2 position, a concerted low-barrier proton-transfer process will initially occur, followed by the potential ruptures of the N-glycosidic or beta-phosphate bonds. The rupture barriers are strongly influenced by the rotational configuration of the phosphate group at the 3' terminal, and are influenced by bulk solvation effects. The O4-H adduct has the highest thermal stability, as the localization of the unpaired electron does not enable cleavage of either the C1'-N1 or the C3'-O(P) bonds. For the most stable adduct, with H atom added to the C5 position, the rate-controlled step is the H2'a abstraction by the C6 radical site, after which the subsequent strand rupture reactions proceed with low barriers. The main unpaired electron densities are presented for the transient species. Combined with previous results, it is concluded that the H atom adducts are more facile to drive the strand scission rather than N-glycosidic bond ruptures within the nucleic acid bases.

  2. Electromagnetic effects - From cell biology to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Richard H W; Monsees, Thomas; Ozkucur, Nurdan

    2009-01-01

    In this review we compile and discuss the published plethora of cell biological effects which are ascribed to electric fields (EF), magnetic fields (MF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF). In recent years, a change in paradigm took place concerning the endogenously produced static EF of cells and tissues. Here, modern molecular biology could link the action of ion transporters and ion channels to the "electric" action of cells and tissues. Also, sensing of these mainly EF could be demonstrated in studies of cell migration and wound healing. The triggers exerted by ion concentrations and concomitant electric field gradients have been traced along signaling cascades till gene expression changes in the nucleus. Far more enigmatic is the way of action of static MF which come in most cases from outside (e.g. earth magnetic field). All systems in an organism from the molecular to the organ level are more or less in motion. Thus, in living tissue we mostly find alternating fields as well as combination of EF and MF normally in the range of extremely low-frequency EMF. Because a bewildering array of model systems and clinical devices exits in the EMF field we concentrate on cell biological findings and look for basic principles in the EF, MF and EMF action. As an outlook for future research topics, this review tries to link areas of EF, MF and EMF research to thermodynamics and quantum physics, approaches that will produce novel insights into cell biology.

  3. THz waves: biological effects, industrial and medical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutaz, J.L.; Garet, F.; Le Drean, Y.; Zhadobov, M.; Veyret, B.; Mounaix, P.; Caumes, J.P.; Gallot, G.; Gian Piero, Gallerano; Mouret, G.; Guilpin, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Following the debates about body scanners installed in airports for passengers security control, the non-ionizing radiations (NIR) section of the French radiation protection society (SFR) has organized a conference day to take stock of the present day knowledge about the physical aspects and the biological effects of this frequency range as well as about their medical, and industrial applications (both civil and military). This document gathers the slides of the available presentations: 1 - introduction and general considerations about THz waves, the THz physical phenomenon among NIR (J.L. Coutaz); 2 - interaction of millimeter waves with living material: from dosimetry to biological impacts (Y. Le Drean and M. Zhadobov); 3 - Tera-Hertz: standards and recommendations (B. Veyret); 4 - THz spectro-imaging technique: status and perspectives (P. Mounaix); 5 - THz technology: seeing the invisible? (J.P. Caumes); 6 - Tera-Hertz: biological and medical applications (G. Gallot); 7 - Biological applications of THz radiation: a review of events and a glance to the future (G.P. Gallerano); 8 - Industrial and military applications - liquids and solids detection in the THz domain (F. Garet); 9 - THz radiation and its civil and military applications - gas detection and quantifying (G. Mouret); 10 - Body scanners and civil aviation security (J.C. Guilpin, presentation not available). (J.S.)

  4. DNA bulky adducts in a Mediterranean population correlate with environmental ozone concentration, an indicator of photochemical smog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Domenico; Saieva, Calogero; Grechi, Daniele; Masala, Giovanna; Zanna, Ines; Barbaro, Antongiulio; Decarli, Adriano; Munnia, Armelle; Peluso, Marco

    2004-03-01

    Ozone (O(3)), the major oxidant component in photochemical smog, mostly derives from photolysis of nitrogen dioxide. O(3) may have biologic effects directly and/or via free radicals reacting with other primary pollutants and has been reported to influence daily mortality and to increase lung cancer risk. Although DNA damage may be caused by ozone itself, only other photochemical reaction products (as oxidised polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) may form bulky DNA adducts, a reliable biomarker of genotoxic damage and cancer risk, showing a seasonal trend. In a large series consisting of 320 residents in the metropolitan area of Florence, Italy, enrolled in a prospective study for the period 1993-1998 (206 randomly sampled volunteers, 114 traffic-exposed workers), we investigated the correlation between individual levels of DNA bulky adducts and a cumulative O(3) exposure score. The average O(3) concentrations were calculated for different time windows (0-5 to 0-90 days) prior to blood drawing for each participant, based on daily measurements provided by the local monitoring system. Significant correlations between DNA adduct levels and O3 cumulative exposure scores in the last 2-8 weeks before enrollment emerged in never smokers. Correlations were highest in the subgroup of never smokers residing in the urban area and not occupationally exposed to vehicle traffic pollution, with peak values for average concentrations 4-6 weeks before enrollment (r = 0.34). Our current findings indicate that DNA adduct formation may be modulated by individual characteristics and by the cumulative exposure to environmental levels of ozone in the last 4-6 weeks, possibly through ozone-associated reactive pollutants. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Biological effects of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    For a long time, radiation, biological research concentrated on the diagnosis and the effect chains to be taken into consideration in the case of acute and chronic radiation effects due to intensive irradiation. Approximately at the beginning of the Thirties, the research results of the geneticist Mueller and the radiation-biologists Oliver and Timofeef-Ressovsky brought a fundamental change in the way of looking at things in radiation biology. From the results then obtained it can be deduced that even the smallest quantities of radiation can cause effects. Basically, two processes leading to different radiation reactions have to be recognized: 1) A change in the genetical code, especially by direct irradiation of the nucleus. The effects thus arising are called stochastic effects. 2) A change of the cell in total by inactivation of the cell division or by cell death. These are called non-stochastic effects. Here, a threshold dose is existent. In these cases, the degree of the effects depends on the quantity of the dose. Therefore, the stochastic effects are paid special attention when determining radiation effects with low doses. Here, the emphasis of the research was moved from the genetic effects to the generation of somatic effects, especially the generation of malign neoformations and the shortening of the life connected with them. In the generation of malign neoformations by ionising radiation, probably only the transformation of a single cell is necessary, however only then when ionising radiation is absorbed in the nucleus several times (multi-hit theory). This leads to the assumption that the induction of malignant neoformations possesses a linear quadratic function, at least in the region of medium doses. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Biological effects on the source of geoneutrinos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik Thorleif

    2013-01-01

    its bulk earth value of similar to 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine...... in solid clay-sized material. Overall, geoneutrino data constrain the masses of mantle chemical and isotopic domains recognized by studies of mantle-derived rocks and show the extent of recycling into the mantle over geological time....

  7. Imidazolidinone adducts of peptides and hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San George, R.C.; Hoberman, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    Acetaldehyde reacts selectively with the terminal amino groups of the α and β chains of hemoglobin to form stable adducts, the structures of which, based on 13 C NMR studies, are proposed to be diastereomeric 2-methyl imidazolidin-4-ones. In this scheme, acetaldelhyde forms a reversible Schiff base with the α-amino groups of the polypeptide chains which cyclize with the amide nitrogen of the first peptide bond to form the stable imidazolidinone adducts. In support of this mechanism, the authors found that in following the reaction of the peptide val-gly-gly with [1,2- 13 C] acetaldehyde, 13 C NMR resonances attributed to a Schiff base (δ = 170 ppm) were observed which slowly disappeared prior to appearance of resonances from a pair of stable adducts (δ = 70 and 71 ppm) believed to be the diastereomeric imidazolidinones. Schiff base formation appeared to limit the overall rate. Tetraglycine reacted in a similar manner but with a resonance from a single stable adduct observed representing the enantiomeric imidazolidinone adducts of this peptide. Peptides with proline in position 2 should be incapable of forming imidazolidinones, and the authors found that ala-pro-gly did in fact fail to form a stable adduct with acetaldehyde. The 2-methyl imidazolidin-4-one adducts of hemoglobin may be useful in determining the contribution of the amino terminal groups to the structure and functional properties of hemoglobins

  8. Hydrogen abstraction reactions by amide electron adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.; Sevilla, C.L.; Swarts, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron reactions with a number of peptide model compounds (amides and N-acetylamino acids) in aqueous glasses at low temperature have been investigated using ESR spectroscopy. The radicals produced by electron attachment to amides, RC(OD)NDR', are found to act as hydrogen abstracting agents. For example, the propionamide electron adduct is found to abstract from its parent propionamide. Electron adducts of other amides investigated show similar behavior except for acetamide electron adduct which does not abstract from its parent compound, but does abstract from other amides. The tendency toward abstraction for amide electron adducts are compared to electron adducts of several carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and esters. The comparison suggests the hydrogen abstraction tendency of the various deuterated electron adducts (DEAs) to be in the following order: aldehyde DEA > acid DEA = approximately ester DEA > ketone DEA > amide DEA. In basic glasses the hydrogen abstraction ability of the amide electron adducts is maintained until the concentration of base is increased sufficiently to convert the DEA to its anionic form, RC(O - )ND 2 . In this form the hydrogen abstracting ability of the radical is greatly diminished. Similar results were found for the ester and carboxylic acid DEA's tested. (author)

  9. Mutagenic replication in human cell extracts of DNA containing site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene adducts.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, D C; Veaute, X; Kunkel, T A; Fuchs, R P

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the effects of site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts on the efficiency and frameshift fidelity of bidirectional replication of double-stranded DNA in a human cell extract. Plasmid vectors were constructed containing the simian virus 40 origin of replication and single AAF adducts at one of three guanines in the Nar I sequence GGCGCC in a lacZ reporter gene. The presence of an AAF adduct diminishes replication efficiency in HeLa cell extracts by 70-80%. Replicati...

  10. Bystander effect: Biological endpoints and microarray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad [Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Vermont, 302 Rowell Building, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States) and DNA Microarray Facility, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)]. E-mail: mchaudhr@uvm.edu

    2006-05-11

    In cell populations exposed to ionizing radiation, the biological effects occur in a much larger proportion of cells than are estimated to be traversed by radiation. It has been suggested that irradiated cells are capable of providing signals to the neighboring unirradiated cells resulting in damage to these cells. This phenomenon is termed the bystander effect. The bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. Because the bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it could have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. The nature of the bystander effect signal and how it impacts the unirradiated cells remains to be elucidated. Examination of the changes in gene expression could provide clues to understanding the bystander effect and could define the signaling pathways involved in sustaining damage to these cells. The microarray technology serves as a tool to gain insight into the molecular pathways leading to bystander effect. Using medium from irradiated normal human diploid lung fibroblasts as a model system we examined gene expression alterations in bystander cells. The microarray data revealed that the radiation-induced gene expression profile in irradiated cells is different from unirradiated bystander cells suggesting that the pathways leading to biological effects in the bystander cells are different from the directly irradiated cells. The genes known to be responsive to ionizing radiation were observed in irradiated cells. Several genes were upregulated in cells receiving media from irradiated cells. Surprisingly no genes were found to be downregulated in these cells. A number of genes belonging to extracellular signaling, growth factors and several receptors were identified in bystander cells. Interestingly 15 genes involved in the cell communication processes were found to be upregulated. The induction of receptors and the cell

  11. Bystander effect: Biological endpoints and microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    In cell populations exposed to ionizing radiation, the biological effects occur in a much larger proportion of cells than are estimated to be traversed by radiation. It has been suggested that irradiated cells are capable of providing signals to the neighboring unirradiated cells resulting in damage to these cells. This phenomenon is termed the bystander effect. The bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. Because the bystander effect is relevant to carcinogenesis, it could have significant implications for risk estimation for radiation exposure. The nature of the bystander effect signal and how it impacts the unirradiated cells remains to be elucidated. Examination of the changes in gene expression could provide clues to understanding the bystander effect and could define the signaling pathways involved in sustaining damage to these cells. The microarray technology serves as a tool to gain insight into the molecular pathways leading to bystander effect. Using medium from irradiated normal human diploid lung fibroblasts as a model system we examined gene expression alterations in bystander cells. The microarray data revealed that the radiation-induced gene expression profile in irradiated cells is different from unirradiated bystander cells suggesting that the pathways leading to biological effects in the bystander cells are different from the directly irradiated cells. The genes known to be responsive to ionizing radiation were observed in irradiated cells. Several genes were upregulated in cells receiving media from irradiated cells. Surprisingly no genes were found to be downregulated in these cells. A number of genes belonging to extracellular signaling, growth factors and several receptors were identified in bystander cells. Interestingly 15 genes involved in the cell communication processes were found to be upregulated. The induction of receptors and the cell

  12. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  13. Enzymology of repair of DNA adducts produced by N-nitroso compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.; Cao, E.H.; Delihas, N.C.

    1983-01-01

    The biological effects of DNA adducts depend on their nature, and on their half-lives relative to the rates of DNA replication and transcription. Their half-lives are determined by the rates of spontaneous decay, such as depurination, and the rates of enzymatic repair of the adducts or their decay products. The principle modes of repair of methylating and ethylating agents are by glycosylase catalyzed depurination of 7-alkylguanine and 3-alkyladenine and by the dealkalation of O/sup 6/-alkylguanine. Repair by dealkylation cannot be detected by the standard methods used to measure DNA repair, but it is easy to estimate the acceptor activity in cell extracts by measuring the transfer of radioactive O/sup 6/-alkyl groups in an exogenous DNA to protein. In extracts of cells treated with alkylating agents the activity is depressed because the endogenous DNA is rapidly dealkylated, using up the acceptor activity. In many cell types the decrease in activity is followed by an increase to the normal constitutive level. In other cells there is no such adaptive response. Differences in constitutive levels of methyl accepting activity in extracts of human lymphocytes and on the acceptor activity in lung macrophages from smokers (low activity) and non-smokers (high activity) have been observed. 46 references.

  14. Biological effects of electrical and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault de Boesinghe, L. de

    1979-01-01

    A review is made by the author of the literature about the biological effects of electrical and magnetic fields. A distinction is made between the observations made on man and the experience on animals. The results do not allow to reach a uniform conclusion. The used methodology is furthermore often open for discussion. One fundamental question remains: is there or not a threshold value. The question may be asked if objective modifications would not better come out in the light of systematical programs studies. This review of the literature gives results which anyway justify a systematic study of this subject. (author)

  15. Effects of Pesticides on Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergul Belge Kurutas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of pesticid both in Turkey and other contries is widespread in order to combat against many pests which cause economical damages. However, pesticides in human pass through skin, respiratory or digestive systems and is metabolized by monooxygenase system dependent upon cytocrome P450 in liver. They also give rise to severe decreases cytochrome P450 and amount of "hem" enzyme activites of glucose-6-phosphatase, pyrophosphatase by stimulating lipid peroxidation on hepatic microsomes. In this study effects of pesticides on biological systems will be presented in genaral terms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(3.000: 215-228

  16. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  17. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  18. Side chain effect on electronic structure of spin-coated films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester and its bis-adduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaike, Kouki; Kanai, Kaname; Ouchi, Yukio; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Electronic structure of spin-coated films of PCBM and bis-PCBM was investigated. ► Ionization energy and electron affinity of bis-PCBM are smaller than those of PCBM. ► Electron donation from the side chain to C 60 -backbone raises the HOMO and LUMO. ► Open circuit voltages of PCBM-based solar cells relates to electron affinities. - Abstract: We investigated the electronic structure of spin-coated films of two soluble fullerenes; [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and its bis-adduct (bis-PCBM) using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations. The ionization energy and electron affinity of spin-coated films of bis-PCBM were determined to be 6.01 eV and 3.4 eV, respectively. Analysis of electron density suggested the stronger electron donation from the two side chains to fullerene-backbone in a bis-PCBM molecule, compared with PCBM. The electron donation raises the energies of the frontier orbitals of bis-PCBM, which mainly consist of π-orbitals of fullerene-backbone. As a result, the ionization energy and electron affinity of bis-PCBM are smaller than those of PCBM. Moreover, we also concluded that the larger open circuit voltage observed for bis-PCBM based organic photovoltaics was explained by the higher-lying unoccupied molecular orbital of bis-PCBM

  19. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Daneshvar, Bahram; Autrup, Herman

    2003-01-01

    supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver........ The DNA-adduct level measured by 32P-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  20. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.

    2003-01-01

    supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver........ The DNA-adduct level measured by P-32-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  1. Biological radiation effects of Radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    In order to contribute to the knowledge on the effects of radon and its decay products, the aim of this investigation is to study the biological effects of radon using Drosophila melanogaster throught the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) and the analysis of some adaptative factors exposing larvaes to controlled radon atmosphers, considering that this insect could be used as biological monitor. Using the somatic mutation test a mutagenic effect was observed proportional to radon concentration, into an interval of 1 ± 0.3 to 111 ± 7.4 KBq/m 3 equivalent to doses under 0.0106 Gy. The correlation analysis gives a linear (r=0.80) relationship with a positive slope of 0.2217. The same happens when gamma rays are used in the interval of 1 to 20 Gy, given a linear dose-dependent effect (r=0.878) is obtained; nevetheless the slop is smaller (m=0.003) than for radon. Analysing the results of adaptative factors of the nine exposed generations, it was found that probably radon exposition induced dominant lethals during gametogenesis or/and a selection of the more component gamets of the treated individuals in larval state. It was reflected in the significant decrease on fecundity of the generation exposed. Nevertheless the laying eggs had an increase in egg-to-adult viability and the develop velocity was higher than in control for 3 KBq/m 3 , this suggest that radon concentrations used were able to induce repair mechanisms. These data agree with the Hormesis hypothesis that says: low doses have positive effects on health. It was not possible to obtain a dose-effect relationship except with the develop velocity where it was found a dose-effect inverse proportion. In conclusion, Drosophila melanogaster could be a good system to obtain in vivo damaged induction concentration dependent of radon and its decay products, as well as to study the effects in an exposed population by the analysis of adaptative factors. (Author)

  2. Effects of individualized assignments on biology achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    A pretest-posttest, randomized, two groups, experimental, factorial design compared effects of detailed and nondetailed assignments on biology achievement over seven and a half months. Detailed assignments (favoring field independence and induction) employed block diagrams and stepwise directions. Nondetailed assignments (favoring field dependence and deduction) virtually lacked these. The accessible population was 101 tenth grade preparatory school male students. The 95 students enrolled in first year biology constituted the sample. Two by three ANOVA was done on residualized posttest score means of the students. Totally, the detailed students achieved significantly higher than the nondetailed students. This significantly higher achievement was only true of detailed students in the middle thirds of the deviation intelligence quotient (DIQ) range and of the grade point average (G.P.A.) range after the breakdown into upper, middle, and lower thirds of intellectual capability (ability and achievement). The upper third detailed DIQ grouping indirectly achieved higher than its peers, whereas the lower detailed DIQ third achieved lower than its peers. Thus, high capability students apparently benefit from flow and block diagrams, inductions, field independence, and high structure, whereas low capability students may be hindered by these.

  3. Honeydew honey: biological effects on skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Simona; Calabrese, Giorgio; Ranzato, Elia

    2017-11-01

    Honey is a natural product well known by humankind and now reconsidered for its use as topical agent for wound and burn treatments. Floral honey is made by honeybees from the nectar of blossoms, while honeydew honey is prepared from secretions of plants or excretions of plant-sucking insects. Chemical composition is different between blossom and honeydew honeys and there is very few information about the biological properties of honeydew honey. So, this study was specifically designed to explore the potential wound healing effects of the honeydew honey. We used in vitro scratch wound healing model consisting of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Data showed that honeydew honeys is able to increase wound closure by acting both on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Based on our findings, honeydew honey has the potential to be useful for clinical settings.

  4. Food irradiation and its biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Alok; Nanjappa, C.; Chauhan, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation of foods drew attention mostly in 1960s for disinfestation of food grains, spices and sprout inhibition in mainly potato and onion. γ-irradiation at 0.25 to 1 kGy dosage levels are usually used for irradiating grains, legumes, spices and sprout-prone vegetables. Irradiation of foods with in permissible dosage levels of 0.25 to 5 kGy is usually considered fairly safe from human consumption point of view not withstanding usual health concerns about its usage in foods. Irradiation of foods, in mostly solid or semi-solid form, at 5 kGy levels of γ-irradiation can achieve radicidation or, radiation equivalent of pasteurization and, if γ-irradiation is used at 10 kGy, it can achieve radappertization or, radiation equivalent of thermal commercial sterilization. However, the food industry uses γ-irradiation at 0.25 to 2 kGy only for mostly disinfestation of food grains/legumes, spices, sprout inhibition in potato and onion and, for surface sanitation of frozen fish, poultry and meat. Exposure to irradiation creates free radicals in foods that are capable of destroying some of the spoilage and pathogenic microflora but the same can also damage vitamins and enzymes besides creating some new harmful new chemical species, called unique radiolytic products (URPs), by combining with certain chemicals that a food may be laced with (like pesticides/fungicides). Exposure to high-energy electron beams are also known to create deleterious biological effects which may even lead to detection of trace amounts of radioactivity in the food. Some possible causes delineated for such harmful biological effects of irradiation include: irradiation induced vitamin deficiencies, the inactivity of enzymes in the foods, DNA damage and toxic radiolytic products in the foods. Irradiation, a non-thermal food preservation technique, has a role in salvaging enormous post harvest losses (25-30%) in developing economies to increase the per capita availability of foods. (author)

  5. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  6. Kinetics of formation of specific styrene oxide adducts in double-stranded DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koskinen, M.; Vodičková, L.; Vodička, Pavel; Warner, S. C.; Hemminki, K.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 2 (2001), s. 111-124 ISSN 0009-2797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA313/99/1460 Grant - others:EU(XC) QLK4-1999-01368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : biomonitoring * DNA adducts Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.706, year: 2001

  7. 32P-Postlabelling/HPLC analysis of various styrene-induced DNA adducts in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koskinen, M.; Vodička, Pavel; Vodičková, L.; Hemminki, K.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2001), s. 175-189 ISSN 1354-750X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA313/99/1460 Grant - others:GA-(EU) QLK4-1999-01368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : DNA adducts Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.118, year: 2001

  8. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  9. 1,3-Butadiene-Induced Adenine DNA Adducts Are Genotoxic but Only Weakly Mutagenic When Replicated in Escherichia coli of Various Repair and Replication Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shiou-Chi; Seneviratne, Uthpala I; Wu, Jie; Tretyakova, Natalia; Essigmann, John M

    2017-05-15

    The adverse effects of the human carcinogen 1,3-butadiene (BD) are believed to be mediated by its DNA-reactive metabolites such as 3,4-epoxybut-1-ene (EB) and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB). The specific DNA adducts responsible for toxic and mutagenic effects of BD, however, have yet to be identified. Recent in vitro polymerase bypass studies of BD-induced adenine (BD-dA) adducts show that DEB-induced N 6 ,N 6 -DHB-dA (DHB = 2,3-dihydroxybutan-1,4-diyl) and 1,N 6 -γ-HMHP-dA (HMHP = 2-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethylpropan-1,3-diyl) adducts block replicative DNA polymerases but are bypassed by human polymerases η and κ, leading to point mutations and deletions. In contrast, EB-induced N 6 -HB-dA (HB = 2-hydroxy-3-buten-1-yl) does not block DNA synthesis and is nonmutagenic. In the present study, we employed a newly established in vivo lesion-induced mutagenesis/genotoxicity assay via next-generation sequencing to evaluate the in vivo biological consequences of S-N 6 -HB-dA, R,R-N 6 ,N 6 -DHB-dA, S,S-N 6 ,N 6 -DHB-dA, and R,S-1,N 6 -γ-HMHP-dA. In addition, the effects of AlkB-mediated direct reversal repair, MutM and MutY catalyzed base excision repair, and DinB translesion synthesis on the BD-dA adducts in bacterial cells were investigated. BD-dA adducts showed the expected inhibition of DNA replication in vivo but were not substantively mutagenic in any of the genetic environments investigated. This result is in contrast with previous in vitro observations and opens the possibility that E. coli repair and bypass systems other than the ones studied here are able to minimize the mutagenic properties of BD-dA adducts.

  10. Dosimetry and biological effects of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on two types of cellular damage: cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations induced by irradiation with X rays, gamma rays and fast neutrons of different energies. A prerequisite for the performance of radiobiological experiments is the determination of the absorbed dose with a sufficient degree of accuracy and precision. Basic concepts of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and practical aspects of neutron dosimetry for biomedical purposes are discussed. Information on the relative neutron sensitivity of GM counters and on the effective point of measurement of ionization chambers for dosimetry of neutron and photon beams under free-in-air conditions and inside phantoms which are used to simulate the biological objects is presented. Different methods for neutron dosimetry are compared and the experimental techniques used for the investigations of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations induced by ionizing radiation of different qualities are presented. Dose-effect relations for induction cell inactivation and chromsome aberrations in three cultured cell lines for different radiation qualities are presented. (Auth.)

  11. Biomarkers in natural fish populations indicate adverse biological effects of offshore oil production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Balk

    Full Text Available Despite the growing awareness of the necessity of a sustainable development, the global economy continues to depend largely on the consumption of non-renewable energy resources. One such energy resource is fossil oil extracted from the seabed at offshore oil platforms. This type of oil production causes continuous environmental pollution from drilling waste, discharge of large amounts of produced water, and accidental spills.Samples from natural populations of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua in two North Sea areas with extensive oil production were investigated. Exposure to and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were demonstrated, and biomarker analyses revealed adverse biological effects, including induction of biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress, altered fatty acid composition, and genotoxicity. Genotoxicity was reflected by a hepatic DNA adduct pattern typical for exposure to a mixture of PAHs. Control material was collected from a North Sea area without oil production and from remote Icelandic waters. The difference between the two control areas indicates significant background pollution in the North Sea.It is most remarkable to obtain biomarker responses in natural fish populations in the open sea that are similar to the biomarker responses in fish from highly polluted areas close to a point source. Risk assessment of various threats to the marine fish populations in the North Sea, such as overfishing, global warming, and eutrophication, should also take into account the ecologically relevant impact of offshore oil production.

  12. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts are common toxicological biomarkers of pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Xia, Qingsu; Woodling, Kellie; Lin, Ge; Fu, Peter P

    2017-10-01

    There are 660 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and PA N-oxides present in the plants, with approximately half being possible carcinogens. We previously reported that a set of four PA-derived DNA adducts is formed in the liver of rats administered a series of hepatocarcinogenic PAs and a PA N-oxide. Based on our findings, we hypothesized that this set of DNA adducts is a common biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. In this study, we determined that rat liver microsomal metabolism of five hepatocarcinogenic PAs (lasiocarpine, retrorsine, riddelliine, monocrotaline, and heliotrine) and their corresponding PA N-oxides produced the same set of DNA adducts. Among these compounds, lasiocarpine N-oxide, retrorsine N-oxide, monocrotaline N-oxide, and heliotrine N-oxide are for first time shown to be able to produce these DNA adducts. These results further support the role of these DNA adducts as potential common biomarkers of PA-induced liver tumor initiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts are common toxicological biomarkers of pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo He

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There are 660 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs and PA N-oxides present in the plants, with approximately half being possible carcinogens. We previously reported that a set of four PA-derived DNA adducts is formed in the liver of rats administered a series of hepatocarcinogenic PAs and a PA N-oxide. Based on our findings, we hypothesized that this set of DNA adducts is a common biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. In this study, we determined that rat liver microsomal metabolism of five hepatocarcinogenic PAs (lasiocarpine, retrorsine, riddelliine, monocrotaline, and heliotrine and their corresponding PA N-oxides produced the same set of DNA adducts. Among these compounds, lasiocarpine N-oxide, retrorsine N-oxide, monocrotaline N-oxide, and heliotrine N-oxide are for first time shown to be able to produce these DNA adducts. These results further support the role of these DNA adducts as potential common biomarkers of PA-induced liver tumor initiation.

  14. E. Biological effects of radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report firstly summarises information on the biological hazards of radiation and their relation to radiation dose, and hence estimates the biological risks associated with nuclear power production. Secondly, it describes the basis and present status of radiation protection standards in the nuclear power industry

  15. Discovery of a Significant Acetone•Hydroperoxy Adduct Chaperone Effect and Its Impact on the Determination of Room Temperature Rate Constants for Acetonylperoxy/Hydroperoxy Self-Reactions and Cross Reaction Via Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In order to model the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere in regions containing acetone properly, the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy/hydroperoxy self-reactions and cross reaction have been studied over a wide temperature range using Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy. We report here the determination of different rate constants for the acetonylperoxy chemistry that we obtained at 298 K compared to currently accepted values. A considerable increase in the observed HO2 self-reaction rate constant due to rate enhancement via the chaperone effect from the reaction between HO2 and the (CH3)2CO•HO2 hydrogen-bonded adduct, even at room temperature, was discovered that was previously ignored. Correct determination of the acetonylperoxy and hydroperoxy kinetics must include this dependence of the HO2 self-reaction rate on acetone concentration. Via excimer laser flash photolysis to create the radical reactants, HO2 absorption was monitored in the infrared by diode laser wavelength modulation detection simultaneously with CH3C(O)CH2O2absorption monitored in the ultraviolet at 300 nm as a function of time. Resulting decay curves were fit concurrently first over a short time scale to obtain the rate constants minimizing subsequent product reactions. Modeling/fitting with a complete reaction scheme was then performed to refine the rate constants and test their veracity. Experiments were carried out over a variety of concentrations of acetone and methanol. Although no effect due to methanol concentration was found at room temperature, the rate constant for the hydroperoxy self-reaction was found to increase linearly with acetone concentration which is interpreted as the adduct being formed and resulting in a chaperone mechanism that enhances the self-reaction rate: (CH3)2CO·HO2 + HO2 → H2O2 + O2 + (CH3)2CO Including this effect, the resulting room temperature rate constants for the cross reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction were found to be 2-3 times smaller than

  16. Accounting for biological effectiveness in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) presents a practical problem to radiological protection when attempts are made to ensure that the assessed risks from different types of radiation and different modes of exposure to radiation are commensurate with one another. Unfortunately, the theoretical understanding of RBE is still in the stage of competing explanations and hypotheses. Furthermore, the division of the concept of dose equivalent into a set of concepts for risk assessment and another set for measurement and control has introduced conflicting requirements of a practical nature that are difficult to resolve. Many of those working in radiobiology and radiation protection have perceived the need to increase the quality factors for photon and neutron radiations. It may be more reasonable to change the quality factors for neutrons than for other radiations. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods for accommodating such changes within the dose-equivalent concepts are to be examined. The method of accommodating such a change that has the least practical disadvantages is to increase the quality factors for all secondary particles produced in tissue by neutron radiations by a constant factor. The only disadvantage would be the perception that the quality factors for these secondary particles were not treated in a consistent fashion for all types of ionising radiation. (author)

  17. Repair of furocoumarin adducts in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolan, M.E.; Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    DNA repair was studied in cultured mammalian cells treated with the furocoumarins 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), aminomethyl trioxsalen, or angelicin and irradiated with near UV light. The amount of DNA cross-linked by 8-MOP in normal human cells decreased by about one-half in 24 hours after treatment; no decrease was observed in xeroderma pigmentosum cells, group A. At present, it is not known to what extent this decrease represents complete repair events at the sites of cross-links. Furocoumarin adducts elicited excision repair in normal human and monkey cells but not in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. This excision repair resembled in several aspects that elicited by pyrimidine dimers, formed in DNA by irradiation with 254-nm UV light; however, it appeared that for at least 8-MOP and aminomethyl trioxsalen, removal of adducts was not as efficient as was the removal of pyrimidine dimers. A comparison was also made of repair in the 172-base-pair repetitive alpha-DNA component of monkey cells to repair in the bulk of the genome. Although repair elicited by pyrimidine dimers in alpha-DNA was the same as in the bulk DNA, that following treatment of cells with either aminomethyl trioxsalen or angelicin and near UV was markedly deficient in alpha-DNA. This deficiency reflected the removal of fewer adducts from alpha-DNA after the same initial adduct frequencies. These results could mean that each furocoumarin may produce several structurally distinct adducts to DNA in cells and that the capacity of cellular repair systems to remove these various adducts may vary greatly

  18. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  19. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain....

  20. Protective effects of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon: removal of O(6)-methylguanine DNA adducts, p53 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase downregulation and apoptotic induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Shaonly; Swamy, Viswanath; Suresh, D; Rajkumar, M; Rana, Basabi; Rana, Ajay; Chatterjee, Malay

    2008-02-29

    Previous studies have shown that dietary micronutrient vanadium can protect neoplastic development induced by chemical carcinogens. Current investigation is an attempt to evaluate the role of vanadium (4.27 micro mol/l) in inhibiting 1,2 dimethyhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg body weight) induced rat colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the effect of vanadium against the formation of DMH-induced O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-Meg) DNA adduct, a potent cytotoxic and mutagenic agent for colon cancer. Supplementation of vanadium significantly reduced the hepatic (Pvanadium's potency in limiting the initiation event of colon carcinogenesis. Removal of initiated and damaged precancerous cells by apoptosis can prevent tumorigenesis and further malignancy. DNA fragmentation study revealed the vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction in colon tumors. The increased value of apoptotic index (AI) (62.27%; Pvanadium. This paralleled the nuclear immunoexpression of p53. A significant positive correlation between p53 immunoexpression and AI (P=0.0026, r=0.83, r(2)=0.69) links its association with vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction. Vanadium treatment also abated the mRNA expression of iNOS (54.03%), reflecting its protective effect against nitric oxide-mediated genotoxicity and colon tumorigenesis. These studies cumulatively provide strong evidence for the inhibitory actions of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon.

  1. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janene Pierce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor (WT blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM, in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2 is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path.

  2. Lewis acid adducts of [PCl2N]3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heston, Amy J; Panzner, Matthew J; Youngs, Wiley J; Tessier, Claire A

    2005-09-19

    Reaction of aluminum trichloride or gallium trichloride with the extremely weak base hexachlorotriphosphazene gives adducts in which the group 13 element is bound to a phosphazene nitrogen atom. In solution, the adducts exhibit fluxional behavior. The phosphazene ring of the adducts is distorted into a slight chair conformation.

  3. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side...

  4. 129I Moessbauer spectroscopic study of metallocene-iodine adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Satoru; Sakai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masanobu; Maeda, Yutaka

    1994-01-01

    A 129 I Moessbauer spectroscopic study of iodine adducts of ferrocenophane, biruthenocene, and osmocene is reported. The spectra show the existence of iodine bonded to the central metals of metallocenes in addition to triiodide anions. The valence state of iron in the ferrocenophane-iodine adduct is the same as those of ruthenium and osmium in their adducts. (orig.)

  5. DNA Adducts aand Human Atherosclerotis Lesions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strejc, Přemysl; Boubelík, O.; Stávková, Zdena; Chvátalová, Irena; Šrám, Radim

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2001), s. 662 ISSN 0008-5472. [Annual Meeting of Proceedings /92./. 24.03.2001-28.03.2001, New Orleans] R&D Projects: GA MZd NM10 Keywords : DNA adducts * LDL cholesterol Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  6. New adducts of Lapachol with primary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Mirelly D.F.; Litivack-Junior, Jose T.; Antunes, Roberto V.; Silva, Tania M.S.; Camara, Celso A., E-mail: ccelso@dq.ufrpe.b [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    New adducts of lapachol with neat primary aliphatic amines were obtained in a solvent-free reaction in good to reasonable yields (52 to 88%), at room temperature. The new compounds containing a phenazine moiety were obtained from suitable functionalized aminoalkyl compounds, including ethanolamine, 3-propanolamine, 2-methoxy-ethylamine, 3-methoxy-propylamine, n-butylamine and 2-phenetylamine. (author)

  7. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  8. NITRO MUSK ADDUCTS OF RAINBOW TROUT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow trout and other fish species can serve as 'sentinel' species for the assessment of ecological status and the presence of certain environmental contaminants. As such they act as bioindicators of exposure. Here we present seminal data regarding dose-response and toxicokinetics of trout hemoglobin adduct formation from exposure to nitro musks that are frequently used as fragrance ingredients in formulations of personal care products. Hemoglobin adducts serve as biomarkers of exposure of the sentinel species as we have shown in previous studies of hemoglobin adducts formed in trout and environmental carp exposed to musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK). Gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NICI-MS) employing selected ion monitoring is used to measure 4-amino-MX (4-AMX), 2-amino-MX (2-AMX), and 2-amino-MK (2-AMK) released by alkaline hydrolysis from the sulfinamide adducts of hemoglobin. Dose-response and toxicokinetics were investigated using this sensitive method for analysis of these metabolites. In the dose-response investigation, the concentrations of 4-AMX and 2-2AMX are observed to pass through a maximum at 0.10 mg/g. In the case of 2-AMK, the adduct concentration is almost the same at dosages in the range of 0.030 to 0.10 mg/g. For toxicokinetics, the concentration of the metabolites in the Hb reaches a maximum in the 3-day sample after administration of MX or MK. Further elimination of the metabo

  9. Differential protein adduction by seven organophosphorus pesticides in both brain and thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Wayne G; Tarhoni, Mabruka; Rathbone, Alexandra J; Ray, David E

    2007-04-01

    There is a need for mechanistic understanding of the lasting ill health reported in several studies of workers exposed to organophosphorus (OP) pesticide. Although the acute toxicity is largely explicable by acetylcholinesterase inhibition and the lasting effects of frank poisoning by direct excitotoxicity or indirect consequences of the cholinergic syndrome, effects at lower levels of exposure would not be predicted from these mechanisms. Similarly, reversible interactions with nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in adults would not predict continuing ill health. Many OP pesticides produce protein adduction, and the lasting nature of this makes it a candidate mechanism for the production of continuing ill health. We found significant adduction of partially characterized protein targets in both rat brain and thymus by azamethiphos, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, diazinon-oxon, dichlorvos and malaoxon, in vitro and pirimiphos-methyl in vivo. The diversity in the adduction pattern seen across these agents at low dose levels means that any longer term effects of adduction would be specific to specific organophosphates, rather than generic. This presents a challenge to epidemiology, as most exposures are to different agents over time. However, some adducted proteins are also expressed in blood, notably albumin, and so may provide exposure measures to increase the power of future epidemiological studies.

  10. On the metabolism and the biological effect of transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalev, Yu.I.; Zalikin, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the metabolic behaviour and the biological effects of 237 Np, 241 Am, 244 Cm, and 252 Cf in rats and dogs with particular emphasis being placed on the tumour and non-tumour late effects. (author)

  11. Inhibition of nicotine-DNA adduct formation by polyphenolic compounds in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yan; Wang Haifang; Sun Hongfang; Li Hongli

    2004-01-01

    Nicotine[3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine], a major alkaloid in tobacco products, has proven to be a potential genotoxic compound. Some polyphenolic compounds can suppress the DNA adduction, and hence act as the potential inhibitors of carcinogenesis. In this study, the inhibitory effects of three polyphenolic compounds, curcumin (diferuloylmethane), resveratrol (trans-3, 5, 4-trihydroxystilbene) and tea polyphenols, on the nicotine-DNA adduction have been investigated in vitro using radiolabelled nicotine and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) technique. Also, the inhibition mechanism of these chemopreventive agents in regard to the activity of the biotransformation enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP450), cytochrome b 5 (CYb 5 ) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), has been studied. The results demonstrated that these three polyphenols induced marked dose-dependent decrease in nicotine-DNA adducts as compared with the controls. The elimination rate of adducts reached above 46% at the highest dose for all the three agents with 51.6% for resveratrol. Correspondingly, three polyphenols all suppressed CYP450 and CYb 5 , whereas curcumin and resveratrol induced GST. The authors may arrive at a point that the three polyphenols are beneficial to prevent the nicotine adduct formation, and thus may be used to block the potential carcinogenesis induced by nicotine. (authors)

  12. Formation, Repair, and Genotoxic Properties of Bulky DNA Adducts Formed from Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Peterson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 4-(Methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK and N′-nitrosonornicotine (NNN are tobacco-specific nitrosamines present in tobacco products and smoke. Both compounds are carcinogenic in laboratory animals, generating tumors at sites comparable to those observed in smokers. These Group 1 human carcinogens are metabolized to reactive intermediates that alkylate DNA. This paper focuses on the DNA pyridyloxobutylation pathway which is common to both compounds. This DNA route generates 7-[4-(3-pyridyl-4-oxobut-1-yl]-2′-deoxyguanosine, O2-[4-(3-pyridyl-4-oxobut-1-yl]-2′-deoxycytosine, O2-[4-(3-pyridyl-4-oxobut-1-yl]-2′-deoxythymidine, and O6-[4-(3-pyridyl-4-oxobut-1-yl]-2′-deoxyguanosine as well as unstable adducts which dealkylate to release 4-hydroxy-1-{3-pyridyl-1-butanone or depyriminidate/depurinate to generate abasic sites. There are multiple repair pathways responsible for protecting against the genotoxic effects of these adducts, including adduct reversal as well as base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Data indicate that several DNA adducts contribute to the overall mutagenic properties of pyridyloxobutylating agents. Which adducts contribute to the carcinogenic properties of this pathway are likely to depend on the biochemistry of the target tissue.

  13. Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in controlling Gonometa podorcarpi in conifer ... gilvoides as a potential biological control agent for G. podocarpi. Field and laboratory studies further established that P. .... version for windows (SPSS, 2002). Results. Gonometa podocarpi was present in.

  14. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  15. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-01-01

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  16. The long persistence of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts in vivo: kinetic study following single and multiple exposures in male ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Xue, Junyi; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P; Lin, Ge

    2017-02-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants are widespread in the world and the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Our previous studies demonstrated that PA-derived DNA adducts can potentially be a common biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. In order to validate the use of these PA-derived DNA adducts as a biomarker, it is necessary to understand the basic kinetics of the PA-derived DNA adducts formed in vivo. In this study, we studied the dose-dependent response and kinetics of PA-derived DNA adduct formation and removal in male ICR mice orally administered with a single dose (40 mg/kg) or multiple doses (10 mg/kg/day) of retrorsine, a representative carcinogenic PA. In the single-dose exposure, the PA-derived DNA adducts exhibited dose-dependent linearity and persisted for up to 4 weeks. The removal of the adducts following a single-dose exposure to retrorsine was biphasic with half-lives of 9 h (t 1/2α ) and 301 h (~12.5 days, t 1/2β ). In the 8-week multiple exposure study, a marked accumulation of PA-derived DNA adducts without attaining a steady state was observed. The removal of adducts after the multiple exposure also demonstrated a biphasic pattern but with much extended half-lives of 176 h (~7.33 days, t 1/2α ) and 1736 h (~72.3 days, t 1/2β ). The lifetime of PA-derived DNA adducts was more than 8 weeks following the multiple-dose treatment. The significant persistence of PA-derived DNA adducts in vivo supports their role in serving as a biomarker of PA exposure.

  17. Is Reintroduction Biology an Effective Applied Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gemma; Canessa, Stefano; Clarke, Rohan H; Ingwersen, Dean; Armstrong, Doug P; Seddon, Philip J; Ewen, John G

    2017-11-01

    Reintroduction biology is a field of scientific research that aims to inform translocations of endangered species. We review two decades of published literature to evaluate whether reintroduction science is evolving in its decision-support role, as called for by advocates of evidence-based conservation. Reintroduction research increasingly addresses a priori hypotheses, but remains largely focused on short-term population establishment. Similarly, studies that directly assist decisions by explicitly comparing alternative management actions remain a minority. A small set of case studies demonstrate full integration of research in the reintroduction decision process. We encourage the use of tools that embed research in decision-making, particularly the explicit consideration of multiple management alternatives because this is the crux of any management decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK)

  19. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  20. Placebo Effects: Biological, Clinical and Ethical Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    For many years, placebos have been conceptualised by their inert content and their use as controls in clinical trials and treatments in clinical practice. Recent research demonstrates that placebo effects are genuine psychobiological phenomenon attributable to the overall therapeutic context, and that placebo effects can be robust in both laboratory and clinical settings. Evidence has also emerged that placebo effects can exist in clinical practice, even if no placebo is given. Further promotion and integration of laboratory and clinical research will allow advances in the ethical harnessing of placebo mechanisms that are inherent in routine clinical care and the potential use of treatments to primarily promote placebo effects. PMID:20171404

  1. UV-visible and Raman investigations of matrix isolated adducts between metal vapors of chromium and benzene: selective photo-irradiations effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalibart, M.; Derouault, J.

    1989-03-01

    The UV-visible absorption and the Raman spectra of chromium vapors trapped either in Ar-benzene mixtures or in neat benzene have been investigated. The data give evidence for the formation of the well-known dibenzene chromium sandwich complex but show also the formation of benzene complexes with the dimer Cr2 and with the cluster Cr3 photo-irradiations effects have been studied.

  2. Biological effects of water reservoir radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation damage to fresh water fishes at early stages of ontogenesis is revealed only during the spawn incubation in a solution with 10 -5 to 10 -3 Cu/l radioactivity and at relatively high dosages exceeding 500-1000 rad. Damaging effect of a fission product mixture of 9, 30 and 100 day age as well as of several separate radionuclides on embryogenesis of freshwater fishes depends mainly on fish species, concentration, toxicity, chemical form of radionuclides in the residence medium, on peculiarities of metabolism between the aqueous medium and an organism, stage of the embryo development by the moment of radiation effect and duration of this effect

  3. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  4. The relationship between prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH-DNA adducts in cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw A; Perera, Frederica P; Tang, Deliang; Rauh, Virginia; Majewska, Renata; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Stigter, Laura; Spengler, John; Camann, David; Jacek, Ryszard

    2013-07-01

    In a birth cohort study, we have assessed the dose-response relationship between individual measurements of prenatal airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure and specific PAH-DNA adducts in cord blood adjusted for maternal blood adducts and season of birth. The study uses data from an earlier established birth cohort of children in Krakow. The final analysis included 362 pregnant women who gave birth to term babies and had complete data on personal exposure in the second trimester of pregnancy to eight airborne PAHs including benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), as well as DNA adducts, both in maternal and cord blood. The relation between cord blood PAH-DNA adducts and airborne prenatal PAH exposure was non-linear. Although cord blood PAH-DNA adducts were significantly associated with the B[a]P exposure categorized by tertiles (non-parametric trend z=3.50, P<0.001), the relationship between B[a]P and maternal blood adducts was insignificant (z=1.63, P=0.103). Based on the multivariable linear regression model, we estimated the effect of the prenatal airborne B[a]P on the level of cord blood adducts. In total, 14.8% of cord blood adducts variance was attributed to the level of maternal adducts and 3% to a higher prenatal B[a] exposure above 5.70 ng/m(3). The calculated fetal/maternal blood adduct ratio (FMR) linearly increased with B[a]P exposure (z=1.99, P=0.047) and was highest at B[a]P concentrations exceeding 5.70 ng/m(3). In conclusion, the results support other findings that transplacental exposure to B[a]P from maternal inhalation produces DNA damage in the developing fetus. It also confirms the heightened fetal susceptibility to prenatal PAH exposure that should be a matter of public health concern, particularly in the highly polluted areas, because DNA adducts represent a pro-carcinogenic alteration in DNA. The continuation of this birth cohort study will assess the possible health effects of fetal DNA damage on the health of children and help in

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) AND PAH-DNA ADDUCTS IN CORD BLOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica P.; Tang, Deliang; Rauh, Virginia; Majewska, Renata; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Stigter, Laura; Spengler, John; Camann, David; Jacek, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    In a birth cohort study, we have assessed the dose-response relationship between individual measurements of prenatal airborne PAH exposure and specific PAH-DNA adducts in cord blood adjusted for maternal blood adducts and season of birth. The study uses data from an earlier established birth cohort of children in Krakow. The final analysis included 362 pregnant women who gave birth to term babies and had complete data on personal exposure in the second trimester of pregnancy to eight airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) including benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), as well as DNA adducts, both in maternal and cord blood. The relation between cord blood PAH-DNA adducts and airborne prenatal PAH exposure was non-linear. While cord blood PAH-DNA adducts were significantly associated with the B[a]P exposure categorized by tertiles (nonparametric trend z = 3.50, p < 0.001), the relationship between B[a]P and maternal blood adducts was insignificant (z = 1.63, p = 0.103). Based on the multivariable linear regression model we estimated the effect of the prenatal airborne B[a]P on the level of cord blood adducts. In total, 14.8% of cord blood adducts variance was attributed to the level of maternal adducts and 3% to a higher prenatal B[a] exposure above 5.70 ng/m3. The calculated fetal/maternal blood adducts ratio (FMR) linearly increased with the B[a]P exposure (z = 1.99, p = 0.047) and was highest at B[a]P concentrations exceeding 5.70 ng/m3. In conclusion, the results support other findings that transplacental exposure to B[a[P from maternal inhalation produces DNA damage in the developing fetus. It also confirms the heightened fetal susceptibility to prenatal PAH exposure that should be a matter of public health concern particularly in the highly polluted areas because DNA adducts represent a pro-carcinogenic alteration in DNA The continuation of this birth cohort study will assess the possible health effects of fetal DNA damage on health of children and help in

  6. Mutagenic replication in human cell extracts of DNA containing site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D C; Veaute, X; Kunkel, T A; Fuchs, R P

    1994-08-02

    We have analyzed the effects of site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts on the efficiency and frameshift fidelity of bidirectional replication of double-stranded DNA in a human cell extract. Plasmid vectors were constructed containing the simian virus 40 origin of replication and single AAF adducts at one of three guanines in the Nar I sequence GGCGCC in a lacZ reporter gene. The presence of an AAF adduct diminishes replication efficiency in HeLa cell extracts by 70-80%. Replication product analyses reveal unique termination sites with each damaged vector, suggesting that when the replication fork encounters an AAF adduct, it often stops before incorporation opposite the adduct. We also observed a higher proportion of products representing replication of the undamaged strand compared to the damaged strand. This suggests that the undamaged strand is replicated more readily, either by uncoupling the first fork to encounter the lesion or by replication using the fork arriving from the other direction. Also included among replication products are covalently closed monomer-length molecules resistant to cleavage at the AAF-modified Nar I site. This resistance is characteristic of substrates containing the AAF adduct, suggesting that translesion bypass had occurred. Transformation of Escherichia coli cells with the replicated damaged DNA yielded lacZ alpha revertant frequencies significantly above values obtained with undamaged DNA or with damaged DNA not replicated in vitro. This increase was only seen with the substrate modified at the third guanine position. Analysis of mutant DNA demonstrated the loss of a GC dinucleotide at the Nar I sequence. Generation of this position-dependent AAF-induced frameshift error in a human replication system is consistent with previous observations in E. coli suggesting that, after incorporation of dCMP opposite modified guanine in the third position, realignment of the template-primer occurs to form an intermediate with two

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of an N2-guanine adduct derived from the tumorigen dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in DNA: impact of adduct stereochemistry, size, and local DNA sequence on solution conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Fabián A; Liu, Zhi; Lin, Chin H; Ding, Shuang; Cai, Yuqin; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2014-03-25

    The dimensions and arrangements of aromatic rings (topology) in adducts derived from the reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) diol epoxide metabolites with DNA influence the distortions and stabilities of double-stranded DNA, and hence their recognition and processing by the human nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is a highly tumorigenic six-ring PAH, which contains a nonplanar and aromatic fjord region that is absent in the structurally related bay region five-ring PAH benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The PAH diol epoxide-DNA adducts formed include the stereoisomeric 14S and 14R trans-anti-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG and the stereochemically analogous 10S- and 10R-B[a]P-N(2)-dG (B[a]P-dG) guanine adducts. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution studies of the 14S-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG adduct in DNA have not yet been presented. Here we have investigated the 14S-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG adduct in two different sequence contexts using NMR methods with distance-restrained molecular dynamics simulations. In duplexes with dC opposite the adduct deleted, a well-resolved base-displaced intercalative adduct conformation can be observed. In full duplexes, in contrast to the intercalated 14R stereoisomeric adduct, the bulky DB[a,l]P residue in the 14S adduct is positioned in a greatly widened and distorted minor groove, with significant disruptions and distortions of base pairing at the lesion site and two 5'-side adjacent base pairs. These unique structural features are significantly different from those of the stereochemically analogous but smaller B[a]P-dG adduct. The greater size and different topology of the DB[a,l]P aromatic ring system lead to greater structurally destabilizing DNA distortions that are partially compensated by stabilizing DB[a,l]P-DNA van der Waals interactions, whose combined effects impact the NER response to the adduct. These structural results broaden our understanding of the structure-function relationship in NER.

  8. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Solomon, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 10 6 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10 -6 PYR -1 WLM -1 ). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  9. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.

    2003-01-01

    supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver.......The effect of high dietary intake of animal fat and an increased fat energy intake on colon and liver genotoxicity and on markers of oxidative damage and antioxidative defence in colon, liver and plasma was investigated in Big Blue rats. The rats were fed ad libitum with semi-synthetic feed...

  10. The biological effects of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Michael D; Zisk, Abigail

    2014-04-01

    Trauma in childhood is a psychosocial, medical, and public policy problem with serious consequences for its victims and for society. Chronic interpersonal violence in children is common worldwide. Developmental traumatology, the systemic investigation of the psychiatric and psychobiological effects of chronic overwhelming stress on the developing child, provides a framework and principles when empirically examining the neurobiological effects of pediatric trauma. This article focuses on peer-reviewed literature on the neurobiological sequelae of childhood trauma in children and in adults with histories of childhood trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of human butyrylcholinesterase-nerve gas adducts by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis after in gel chymotryptic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Kouichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2006-06-21

    To verify the exposure to nerve gas, a method for detecting human butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)-nerve gas adduct was developed using LC-electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Purified human serum BuChE was incubated with sarin, soman or VX, and the adduct was purified by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and digested in gel by treatment with chymotrypsin. The resulting peptide mixture was subjected to LC-ESI-MS. From the chymotryptic digest of untreated human BuChE, one peak corresponding to the peptide fragment containing the active center serine residue was detected on the extracted ion chromatogram at m/z 948.5, and the sequence was ascertained to be "GESAGAASVSL" by MS/MS analysis. From the chymotryptic digest of the human BuChE-sarin adduct, a singly charged peptide peak was detected on the extracted ion chromatogram at m/z 1,069.5, and the sequence was ascertained to be "GEXAGAASVSL" by MS/MS analysis (X denotes isopropylmethylphosphonylated serine). The difference in molecular weight (120.0 Da) between the active center peptide fragments corresponding to the untreated BuChE and BuChE-sarin adduct was assumed to be derived from the addition of an isopropyl methylphosphonyl moiety to the serine residue. The formation of human BuChE adducts with soman, VX and an aged soman adduct was confirmed by detecting the respective active center peptide fragments using LC-ESI-MS. To apply the established method to an actual biological sample, human serum was incubated with VX, and the adduct was purified by procainamide affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. After chymotryptic in gel digestion, the ethylphosphonylated active center peptide fragment could be detected, and the structure of the residue was ascertained by LC-ESI-MS analysis.

  12. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    A strong and persistent effect of plant-derived foods on the prevention of lifestyle diseases has emerged from observational studies. Several groups of constituents in plants have been identified as potentially health promoting in animal studies, including cholesterol-lowering factors, antioxidants...

  13. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    , providing 600hairspg fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit...... and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes....... No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL...

  14. Biological and therapeutical effects of Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deetjen, P. [Institute of Physiologie and Balneologie, University of Innsbruck (Austria)

    1998-12-31

    In spas with a somewhat elevated Radon{sup 222} (Rn) activity (between 300 and 3000 Bq/l), the empirical medicine ended - in all parts of the world - with the same list of indications. It mainly includes the more painful rheumatic diseases such as deformation or degeneration of the joints and non bacterial inflammation of muscles, tendons or joints; Morbus Bechterew and other diseases of the vertebral column like spondylosis, spondylarthrosis or osteochondrosis. While informer times these effects were seldom documented in an objective manner, in recent years several prospective randomized double-blind studies proved the pain reducing efficacy of Radon therapy in patients with cervical pain syndromes, with chronic polyarthritis or with Morbus Bechterew. Studies in experimental animal models have accumulated remarkable data in organs, tissue and cultured cells that provide a rationale to explain the observed effects of Radon therapy in patients. (author)

  15. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragsted, Lars O; Krath, Britta; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Vogel, Ulla B; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bo Jensen, Per; Loft, Steffen; Rasmussen, Salka E; Sandstrom, The late BrittMarie; Pedersen, Anette

    2006-02-01

    A strong and persistent effect of plant-derived foods on the prevention of lifestyle diseases has emerged from observational studies. Several groups of constituents in plants have been identified as potentially health promoting in animal studies, including cholesterol-lowering factors, antioxidants, enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers, providing 600 g fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes. No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, but does not affect sex hormones. In conclusion, it has been shown that total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, markers of peripheral lipid oxidation, and erythrocyte GPX1 activity are affected by high intakes of fruit and vegetables. This finding provides support for a protective role of dietary fruit and vegetables against CVD.

  16. Palytoxin and Analogs: Biological and Ecological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Ramos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PTX is a potent marine toxin that was originally found in soft corals from tropical areas of the Pacific Ocean. Soon after, its occurrence was observed in numerous other marine organisms from the same ecological region. More recently, several analogs of PTX were discovered, remarkably all from species of the dinoflagellate genus Ostreopsis. Since these dinoflagellates are also found in other tropical and even in temperate regions, the formerly unsuspected broad distribution of these toxins was revealed. Toxicological studies with these compounds shows repeatedly low LD50 values in different mammals, revealing an acute toxic effect on several organs, as demonstrated by different routes of exposure. Bioassays tested for some marine invertebrates and evidences from environmental populations exposed to the toxins also give indications of the high impact that these compounds may have on natural food webs. The recognition of its wide distribution coupled with the poisoning effects that these toxins can have on animals and especially on humans have concerned the scientific community. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the effects of PTX and its analogs on different organisms, exposing the impact that these toxins may have in coastal ecosystems.

  17. NanoLC/ESI+ HRMS3 quantitation of DNA adducts induced by 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Villalta, Peter W; Wickramaratne, Susith; Swenberg, James; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Human exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) present in automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and forest fires is of great concern because of its potent carcinogenicity. The adverse health effects of BD are mediated by its epoxide metabolites such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), which covalently modify genomic DNA to form promutagenic nucleobase adducts. Because of their direct role in cancer, BD-DNA adducts can be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of BD exposure. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was developed for accurate, sensitive, and precise quantification of EB-induced N-7-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl) guanine (EB-GII) DNA adducts in vivo. In our approach, EB-GII adducts are selectively released from DNA backbone by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by ultrafiltration, offline HPLC purification, and isotope dilution nanoLC/ESI(+)-HRMS(3) analysis on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Following method validation, EB-GII lesions were quantified in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells treated with micromolar concentrations of EB and in liver tissues of rats exposed to sub-ppm concentrations of BD (0.5-1.5 ppm). EB-GII concentrations increased linearly from 1.15 ± 0.23 to 10.11 ± 0.45 adducts per 10(8) nucleotides in HT1080 cells treated with 0.5-10 μM EB. EB-GII concentrations in DNA of laboratory rats exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ppm BD were 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.33 ± 0.08, and 0.50 ± 0.04 adducts per 10(8) nucleotides, respectively [corrected]. We also used the new method to determine the in vivo half-life of EB-GII adducts in rat liver DNA (2.20 ± 0.12 d) and to detect EB-GII in human blood DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first application of nanoLC/ESI(+)-HRMS(3) Orbitrap methodology to quantitative analysis of DNA adducts in vivo.

  18. Biological Effects of Stellar Collapse Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, J. I.

    1996-02-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  19. Overview on extraction kinetics of metal adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.; Daoud, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A overview of extraction kinetics solvent extraction of metal adducts is given. A kinetic regime, diffusional regime, and mixed diffusional-kinetic regime are analysed. The practical applications of kinetics of solvent extraction processes in connection with technical processes and counter-current modelling is discussed. Kinetic studies are essential for the development of new processes and the knowledge of factors governing the mass transfer and mechanism of extraction of metal ions is of major importance in the design, operation, control and optimization of reactors in chemical industry. 23 refs

  20. Nanosilver – Harmful effects of biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanosilver, also identified as colloidal silver, has been known and used for ages to combat diseases or prolong food freshness. It usually occurs in the form of a suspension consisting of particles of size < 100 nm. Due to its specific properties, silver nanoparticles are used in many technologies to produce medical devices, textiles, conductive materials or photovoltaic cells. The growing popularity of nanosilver applications increases the number of people occupationally exposed to this substance. Potential exposure routes for silver nanoparticles are through dermal, oral and inhalation pathways. Silver nanoparticles may be absorbed through the lungs, intestine, and through the skin into circulation and thus may reach such organs as the liver, kidney, spleen, brain, heart and testes. Nanosilver may cause mild eyes and skin irritations. It can also act as a mild skin allergen. Inhalation of silver nanoparticles mainly affects the lungs and liver. It has been demonstrated that silver nanoparticles may be genotoxic to mammalian cells. There are some alarming reports on the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on reproduction of experimental animals. Exposure to silver nanoparticles may exert a neurotoxic effect and affect cognitive functions, causing the impairment of short-term and working memory. Maximum admissible concentration (MAC for the inhalable fraction of silver of 0.05 mg/m3 is currently binding in Poland. In light of toxicological studies of silver nanoparticles it seems reasonable to update the hygiene standards for silver with nanoparticles as a separate fraction. Med Pr 2014;65(6:831–845

  1. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  2. Biological effect of radiation on human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  3. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  4. Biologic and physical fractionation effects of random geometric errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, Marcel; Witte, Marnix; van der Geer, Joris; Schneider, Christoph; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: We are developing a system to model the effect of random and systematic geometric errors on radiotherapy delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate biologic and physical fractionation effects of random geometric errors and respiration motion and compare the resulting dose

  5. Nontargeted Identification of Reactive Metabolite Protein Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeming, Michael G; Donald, William A; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2017-06-06

    Metabolic bioactivation of many different chemicals results in the formation of highly reactive compounds (chemically reactive metabolites, CRMs) that can lead to toxicity via binding to macromolecular targets (e.g., proteins or DNA). There is a need to develop robust, rapid, and nontargeted analytical techniques to determine the identity of the protein targets of CRMs and their sites of modification. Here, we introduce a nontargeted methodology capable of determining both the identity of a CRM formed from an administered compound as well as the protein targets modified by the reactive metabolite in a single experiment without prior information. Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) and 13 C 6 -APAP were incubated with rat liver microsomes, which are known to bioactivate APAP to the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Global tryptic digestion followed by liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) analysis was used to locate "twin" ion peaks of peptides adducted by NAPQI and for shotgun proteomics via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). By the development of blended data analytics software called Xenophile, the identity of the amino acid residue that was adducted can be established, which eliminates the need for specific parametrization of protein database search algorithms. This combination of experimental design and data analysis software allows the identity of a CRM, the protein target, and the amino acid residues that are modified to be rapidly established directly from experimental data. Xenophile is freely available from https://github.com/mgleeming/Xenophile .

  6. The biologic effects of cigarette smoke on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobus, Samantha L; Warren, Graham W

    2014-12-01

    Smoking is one of the largest preventable risk factors for developing cancer, and continued smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased toxicity, recurrence, risk of second primary cancer, and mortality. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains thousands of chemicals, including many known carcinogens. The carcinogenic effects of CS are well established, but relatively little work has been done to evaluate the effects of CS on cancer cells. In this review of the literature, the authors demonstrate that CS induces a more malignant tumor phenotype by increasing proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis and by activating prosurvival cellular pathways. Significant work is needed to understand the biologic effect of CS on cancer biology, including the development of model systems and the identification of critical biologic mediators of CS-induced changes in cancer cell physiology. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  7. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  8. O6-pyridyloxobutylguanine adducts contribute to the mutagenic properties of pyridyloxobutylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijal, Renée S; Loktionova, Natalia A; Vu, Choua C; Pegg, Anthony E; Peterson, Lisa A

    2005-10-01

    The tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are potent carcinogens in animal models and likely human carcinogens. Both NNK and NNN can be activated to a pyridyloxobutylating agent. This alkylating agent contributes to the carcinogenic effects of NNK and NNN via the formation of miscoding DNA adducts. One of these adducts, O6-[4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)butyl]guanine (O6-pobG) has been characterized as a mutagenic adduct which is a substrate for the repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). Repair of O6-alkylguanine adducts by AGT protects cells from the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of alkylating agents and is likely to play a similar role in shielding cells from the adverse effects of pyridyloxobutylating agents. Therefore, we examined the mutagenicity of the model pyridyloxobutylating agent, 4-(acetoxymethylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNKOAc), in Salmonella typhimurium YG7108 expressing hAGT. Expression of hAGT protected cells from NNKOAc-induced mutagenicity. Interestingly, hAGT did not shield cells from the toxicity of this agent. To confirm that the repair of O6-pobG was increased in the bacteria expressing hAGT, we measured levels of this adduct in NNKOAc-treated cultures. The levels of O6-pobG were lower in DNA from bacteria expressing hAGT. This work establishes an important role for O6-pobG in mediating the mutagenic, and possibly carcinogenic, effects of pyridyloxobutylating compounds.

  9. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  10. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  11. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  12. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) -463G->A reduces MPO activity and DNA adduct levels in bronchoalveolar lavages of smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schooten, Frederik J; Boots, Agnes W; Knaapen, Ad M; Godschalk, Roger W L; Maas, Lou M; Borm, Paul J A; Drent, Marjolein; Jacobs, Jan A

    2004-05-01

    The myeloperoxidase (MPO) -463G-->A genetic polymorphism is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, but the underlying mechanism is not yet elucidated. Therefore, the impact of this polymorphism on MPO activity and lipophilic DNA adducts was studied in respectively bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and cells, from 106 smoking Caucasian lung patients. MPO activity was determined spectrophotometrically, aromatic DNA adducts by (32)P-postlabeling and MPO genotypes by RFLP analysis. Frequencies of MPO -463AA (13%), MPO -463AG (36%), and MPO -463GG (51%) were in line with earlier observations. MPO activity/neutrophil was lower in MPO -463AA (median 0.04 pU/cell) than in MPO -463AG (median 0.07 pU/cell) and MPO -463GG (median 0.14 pU/cell; P = 0.059) individuals. DNA adducts in BAL cells were measured in 11 MPO -463AA subjects and equal numbers of MPO -463AG and MPO -463GG subjects matched for smoking, age, gender, and clinical diagnosis. DNA adduct levels in MPO -463AA individuals (median 0.62 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) were lower than in MPO -463AG (median 1.51 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) and MPO -463GG (median 3.26 adducts/10(8) nucleotides; P = 0.003) subjects. Overall, no significant correlation was observed between amount of inhaled tar/day and DNA adduct levels. However, correlations improved considerably on grouping according to the MPO genotype; MPO -463AA subjects were the least responsive (R(2) = 0.73, slope = 0.4, P = 0.01) followed by MPO -463AG subjects (R(2) = 0.70, slope = 1.3, P = 0.01) and MPO -463GG patients (R(2) = 0.67, slope = 2.8, P = 0.02). These data demonstrate that MPO -463AA/AG genotypes are associated with (a) reduced MPO activity in BAL fluid and (b) reduced smoking-related DNA adduct levels in BAL cells in a gene-dose manner. These data provide a plausible biological explanation for the reduced risk for lung cancer as observed in MPO -463AA/AG compared with MPO -463GG subjects.

  13. Formation of a Hydroxymethylfurfural-Cysteine Adduct and Its Absorption and Cytotoxicity in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianzhu; Zou, Yueyu; Huang, Caihuan; Lan, Ping; Zheng, Jie; Ou, Shiyi

    2017-11-15

    Adducts of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)-amino acids are formed during food processing and digestion; the elimination capacity of in vitro intestinal digests of biscuits, instant noodles, and potato crisps for HMF is 652, 727, and 540 μg/g, respectively. However, the safety of these adducts is unknown. In this study, an HMF-cysteine adduct named 1-dicysteinethioacetal-5-hydroxymehtylfurfural (DCH), which was found to be produced in the gastrointestinal tract after HMF intake, was prepared to test its effect toward Caco-2 cells. Compared with HMF, the adduct displayed lower cytotoxicity against Caco-2 cells with an IC 50 value of 31.26 mM versus 14.95 mM (HMF). The DCH did not induce cell apoptosis, whereas HMF significantly increased the apoptosis rate after incubation at concentrations of 16, 32, and 48 mM for 72 h. DCH showed an absorption rate considerably lower than that of HMF by Caco-2 cells. Lower absorption of DCH may result in lower toxicity compared with HMF against Caco-2 cells. Intracellular transformation of DCH has been observed.

  14. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grün, Rebecca; Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael; Zink, Klemens; Durante, Marco; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam

  15. [Molluscicidal effects of nano-silver biological molluscicide and niclosamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang, Xiao-yuan; Wang, Jiang-jie; He, Zong-gui; Chen, Geng-xin; Ding, Lei; Dai, Jian-jun; Yang, Xiao-hong

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the molluscicidal effect of a novel nano-silver biological molluscicide in the field and its toxicity to other aquatic organisms. A marshland of the Qiupu River was selected as the study site. Four 1 m3 pools were excavated. Four groups, including 300 g/m3 and 600 g/m3 nano-silver biological molluscicide groups, a 2 g/m3 50% niclosamide group, and a natural water (control) group were assigned to the four pools which had 100 Oncomelania hupensis snails and 100 crucian seedlings. The molluscicidal effects and toxicity to the aquatic organisms were observed. The snail death rates were 100% and crucian seedling death rates were 6% in the 600 g/m3 nano-silver biological molluscicide group and 300 g/m3 nano-silver biological molluscicide group in 7 days and 14 days. The snail death rate was 100% in the niclosamide group in 7 days, and the crucian seedling death rate was 100% in the niclosamide group in 3 days. The snail death rates were 7% and 14% in the control group in 7 and 14 days respectively, and the crucian seedling death rate was 22% in the control group. The novel nano-silver biological molluscicide possesses an excellent molluscicidal capability and non-toxicity to the other aquatic organisms. Therefore, it may become a new, efficient and environment-friendly bio-molluscicide for extensive application.

  16. Effects of marine reserves on the reproductive biology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We tested the effects of marine reserve status on the reproductive biology and recruitment rates of two commonly exploited (Helcion concolor, Scutellastra longicosta) and two rarely exploited (Cellana capensis, Scutellastra granularis) limpet species using two reserve and two non-reserve sites on the south coast of South ...

  17. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. © 2013 The Authors.Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nutrigenetic Effect of Moringa oleifera Seed Meal on the Biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrigenetic Effect of Moringa oleifera Seed Meal on the Biological Growth Programme of Young Broiler Chickens. ... Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  19. Biological effects in intramuscular 239Pu administration during chelatotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyakov, E.G.; Nifatov, A.P.; Bazhin, A.G.; Lyubchanskij, Eh.R.

    1988-01-01

    Durable (up to 64 days) application of complexones (Ca and Zn DTPA) in the case of intramuscular administration of 239 Pu large amounts in rats is studied. The results of studying the biological effect proving considerable decrease of the average lifespan of rats are given

  20. Biocatalytic Reductions of Baylis - Hillman Adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Walton; W Conerly; Y Pompeu; B Sullivan; J Stewart

    2011-12-31

    Baylis-Hillman adducts are highly useful synthetic intermediates; to enhance their value further, we sought enantiocomplementary alkene reductases to introduce chirality. Two solutions emerged: (1) a wild-type protein from Pichia stipitis (OYE 2.6), whose performance significantly outstrips that of the standard enzyme (Saccharomyces pastorianus OYE1), and (2) a series of OYE1 mutants at position 116 (Trp in the wild-type enzyme). To understand how mutations could lead to inverted enantioselectivity, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the Trp116Ile OYE1 variant complexed with a cyclopentenone substrate. This revealed key protein-ligand interactions that control the orientation of substrate binding above the FMN cofactor.

  1. Examining the nature of retrocausal effects in biology and psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossbridge, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Multiple laboratories have reported physiological and psychological changes associated with future events that are designed to be unpredictable by normal sensory means. Such phenomena seem to be examples of retrocausality at the macroscopic level. Here I will discuss the characteristics of seemingly retrocausal effects in biology and psychology, specifically examining a biological and a psychological form of precognition, predictive anticipatory activity (PAA) and implicit precognition. The aim of this examination is to offer an analysis of the constraints posed by the characteristics of macroscopic retrocausal effects. Such constraints are critical to assessing any physical theory that purports to explain these effects. Following a brief introduction to recent research on PAA and implicit precognition, I will describe what I believe we have learned so far about the nature of these effects, and conclude with a testable, yet embryonic, model of macroscopic retrocausal phenomena.

  2. New insights into the chemistry of fac-[Ru(CO)₃]²⁺ fragments in biologically relevant conditions: the CO releasing activity of [Ru(CO)₃Cl₂(1,3-thiazole)], and the X-ray crystal structure of its adduct with lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M F A; Seixas, J D; Coelho, A C; Mukhopadhyay, A; Reis, P M; Romão, M J; Romão, C C; Santos-Silva, T

    2012-12-01

    Complexes of the general formula fac-[Ru(CO)(3)L(3)](2+), namely CORM-2 and CORM-3, have been successfully used as experimental CO releasing molecules (CO-RMs) but their mechanism of action and delivery of CO remain unclear. The well characterized complex [Ru(CO)(3)Cl(2)(1,3-thiazole)] (1) is now studied as a potential model CO-RM of the same family of complexes using LC-MS, FTIR, and UV-vis spectroscopy, together with X-ray crystallography. The chemistry of [Ru(CO)(3)Cl(2)(1,3-thiazole)] is very similar to that of CORM-3: it only releases residual amounts of CO to the headspace of a solution in PBS7.4 and produces marginal increase of COHb after long incubation in whole blood. 1 also reacts with lysozyme to form Ru adducts. The crystallographic model of the lysozyme-Ru adducts shows only mono-carbonyl Ru species. [Ru(H(2)O)(4)(CO)] is found covalently bound to a histidine (His15) and to two aspartates (Asp18 and Asp119) at the protein surface. The CO release silence of both 1 and CORM-3 and their rapid formation of protein-Ru(CO)(x)(H(2)O)(y) (x=1,2) adducts, support our hypothesis that fac-[Ru(CO)(3)L(3)] CO-RMs deliver CO in vivo through the decay of their adducts with plasma proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness and versatility of biological prosthesis in transplanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; De Werra, Edoardo; Sandri, Giovanni Battista Levi; Ferraro, Daniele; Burocchi, Mirco; Tortorelli, Giovanni; Guglielmo, Nicola; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-02-24

    To emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of prosthesis, and good tolerance by patients with incisional hernia (IH). From December 2001 to February 2016, 270 liver transplantations were performed at San Camillo Hospital. IH occurred in 78 patients (28.8%). IH usually appeared early within the first year post-orthotopic liver transplantation. In the first era, fascial defect was repaired by primary closure for defects smaller than 2.5 cm or with synthetic mesh for greater defects. Recently, we started using biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien). We present a series of five transplanted patients submitted to surgery for abdominal wall defect correction repaired with biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien). In our cases, the use of biological prosthesis (Permacol™, Covidien) have proven to be effective and versatile in repairing hernia defects of different kinds; patients did not suffer infections of the prosthesis and no recurrence was observed. Furthermore, the prosthesis remains intact even in the years after surgery. The cases that we presented show that the use of biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien) in transplanted patients may be safe and effective, being careful in the management of perioperative immunosuppression and renal and graft function, although the cost of the product itself has been the main limiting factor and there is need for prospective studies for further evaluations.

  4. Individuals with varus thrust do not increase knee adduction when running with body borne load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyler N; Kaplan, Jonathan T; Cameron, Sarah E; Seymore, Kayla D; Ramsay, John W

    2018-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common occupational hazard for service members. This study quantified how body borne load impacts knee biomechanics for participants who do and do not present varus thrust (range of knee adduction motion exhibited from heel strike to mid-stance (0-51%)) during over-ground running. Eighteen (9 varus thrust and 9 control) military personnel had knee biomechanics recorded when running with three load conditions (light, ∼6 kg, medium, 15% BW, and heavy, 30% BW). Subject-based means for knee biomechanics were calculated and submitted to a RM ANOVA to test the main effects and possible interactions between load and varus thrust group. The varus thrust group exhibited greater varus thrust (p = .001) and peak stance (PS, 0-100%) knee adduction (p = .009) posture compared to the control group with the light load, but not for the medium (p = .741 and p = .825) or heavy loads (p = .142 and p = .429). With the heavy load, varus thrust group reduced varus thrust (p = .023), whereas, the control group increased varus thrust (p = .037) compared to the light load, and increased PS knee adduction moment compared to light (p = .006) and medium loads (p = .031). The varus thrust group, however, exhibited no significant difference in knee adduction moment between any load (p = .174). With the addition of body borne load, varus thrust participants exhibited a significant reduction in knee biomechanics related to OA; whereas, control participants adopted knee biomechanics, including greater varus thrust and knee adduction moment, related to the development of OA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differences in micronucleus frequency and acrylamide adduct levels with hemoglobin between vegetarians and non-vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Natalia; Frostne, Cecilia; Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne; Tareke, Eden; Bergman, Rolf; Haghdoost, Siamak; Paulsson, Birgit; Törnqvist, Margareta; Segerbäck, Dan; Jenssen, Dag; Grawé, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nutrients and food constituents can prevent or contribute to genotoxicity. In this study, the possible influence of a vegetarian/non-vegetarian diet on genotoxic effects was investigated in 58 non-smoking healthy vegetarians (V) and non-vegetarians (NV), age 21-37 years from the Stockholm area in Sweden. Physical activity and dietary habits were similar in both groups, with the exception of the intake of meat and fish. Using flow cytometry, we determined the formation of micronuclei (MN) in transferrin-positive immature peripheral blood reticulocytes (Trf-Ret) (Total: n = 53; V: n = 27; NV: n = 26). Dietary exposure to acrylamide was measured through hemoglobin (Hb) adducts in peripheral erythrocytes (Total: n = 53; V: n = 29; NV: n = 24). Hb adducts of both acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide were monitored as a measure of the corresponding in vivo doses. Our data demonstrated that compared with the non-vegetarians, the vegetarians exhibited lower frequencies of MN (fMN) in the Trf-Ret (p vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Furthermore, there were no significant relationships between the adduct levels and fMN in the individuals. The ratio of the Hb adduct levels from glycidamide and acrylamide, however, showed a significant difference (p vegetarian diet might be beneficial in lowering genomic instability in healthy individuals. The measured Hb adduct levels indicate that the total intake of acrylamide does not differ between the two studied groups and does not contribute to the observed difference in fMN, although an influence of the diet on the metabolic rates of acrylamide was indicated. In addition, the observed significant difference in the background fMN in the two groups demonstrated that the MN analysis method has a sensitivity applicable to the biomonitoring of human lifestyle factors.

  6. Formation of Hydroxymethyl DNA Adducts in Rats Orally Exposed to Stable Isotope Labeled Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun; Gul, Husamettin; Upton, Patricia B.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Swenberg, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Methanol is a large volume industrial chemical and widely used solvent and fuel additive. Methanol’s well known toxicity and use in a wide spectrum of applications has raised long-standing environmental issues over its safety, including its carcinogenicity. Methanol has not been listed as a carcinogen by any regulatory agency; however, there are debates about its carcinogenic potential. Formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol, has been proposed to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of methanol. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen and actively targets DNA and protein, causing diverse DNA and protein damage. However, formaldehyde-induced DNA adducts arising from the metabolism of methanol have not been reported previously, largely due to the absence of suitable DNA biomarkers and the inability to differentiate what was due to methanol compared with the substantial background of endogenous formaldehyde. Recently, we developed a unique approach combining highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods and exposure to stable isotope labeled chemicals to simultaneously quantify formaldehyde-specific endogenous and exogenous DNA adducts. In this study, rats were exposed daily to 500 or 2000 mg/kg [13CD4]-methanol by gavage for 5 days. Our data demonstrate that labeled formaldehyde arising from [13CD4]-methanol induced hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in multiple tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The results also demonstrated that the number of exogenous DNA adducts was lower than the number of endogenous hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in all tissues of rats administered 500 mg/kg per day for 5 days, a lethal dose to humans, even after incorporating an average factor of 4 for reduced metabolism due to isotope effects of deuterium-labeled methanol into account. PMID:22157354

  7. Probenecid, an inhibitor of transmembrane organic anion transporters, alters tissue distribution of DNA adducts in 1-hydroxymethylpyrene-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Müller, Carolin; Bakhiya, Nadiya; Donath, Claudia; Frank, Heinz; Seidel, Albrecht; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2009-07-28

    1-Methylpyrene (1-MP), an abundant alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is activated by side-chain hydroxylation to 1-hydroxymethylpyrene (1-HMP) and subsequent sulfo-conjugation to electrophilic 1-sulfooxymethylpyrene (1-SMP). In rats, this activation mainly occurs in liver. 1-SMP may react with hepatic DNA or be exported into the blood circulation to reach other tissues, in particular kidneys. Findings with recombinant cell lines suggest that renal 1-SMP uptake proceeds via organic anion transporters (OATs). Here, we tested the hypothesis that probenecid, a characteristic OAT inhibitor, interferes with kidney damage brought about by 1-SMP formed in rats. 1-HMP was administered intraperitoneally to 30 rats, half of which were co-treated with probenecid. The tissue distribution of DNA adducts was analyzed using (32)P-postlabeling and isotope dilution LC-MS/MS for the detection of the adducts N(2)-(1-methylpyrenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine and N(6)-(1-methylpyrenyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine. In rats treated solely with 1-HMP, adduct levels in kidney tissue were about 3-fold and 8-fold higher than those in liver and lung, respectively. After co-treatment with probenecid, hepatic and pulmonary adduct levels were 12-fold and 4-fold elevated, respectively, whereas renal adduct levels were slightly lower compared to those of rats receiving 1-HMP alone. Moreover, serum levels of 1-SMP were increased 23-fold in animals pre-treated with probenecid. The differential effects on hepatic and pulmonary adduct levels suggest that not only renal OATs, but also additional anion transporters, e.g. those mediating the hepatic export of 1-SMP into the bile, were inhibited. Thus, transmembrane transport proteins play a crucial role in the distribution of reactive phase II metabolites, and thereby in tissue allocation of DNA adducts.

  8. Exposure to meat-derived carcinogens and bulky DNA adduct levels in normal-appearing colon mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vikki; Brunetti, Vanessa; Peacock, Sarah; Massey, Thomas E; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Ashbury, Janet E; Vanner, Stephen J; King, Will D

    2017-09-01

    Meat consumption is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. This research investigated the relationship between meat-derived carcinogen exposure and bulky DNA adduct levels, a biomarker of DNA damage, in colon mucosa. Least squares regression was used to examine the relationship between meat-derived carcinogen exposure (PhIP and meat mutagenicity) and bulky DNA adduct levels in normal-appearing colon tissue measured using 32 P-postlabelling among 202 patients undergoing a screening colonoscopy. Gene-diet interactions between carcinogen exposure and genetic factors relevant to biotransformation and DNA repair were also examined. Genotyping was conducting using the MassARRAY ® iPLEX ® Gold SNP Genotyping assay. PhIP and higher meat mutagenicity exposures were not associated with levels of bulky DNA adducts in colon mucosa. The XPC polymorphism (rs2228001) was found to associate with bulky DNA adduct levels, whereby genotypes conferring lower DNA repair activity were associated with higher DNA adduct levels than the normal activity genotype. Among individuals with genotypes associated with lower DNA repair (XPD, rs13181 and rs1799179) or detoxification activity (GSTP1, rs1695), higher PhIP or meat mutagenicity exposures were associated with higher DNA adduct levels. Significant interactions between the XPC polymorphism (rs2228000) and both dietary PhIP and meat mutagenicity on DNA adduct levels was observed, but associations were inconsistent with the a priori hypothesized direction of effect. Exposure to meat-derived carcinogens may be associated with increased DNA damage occurring directly in the colon among genetically susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Non Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Adducts of Freons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Walther; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Feng, Gang; Spada, Lorenzo; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2014-06-01

    The complexation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with atmospheric water and pollutants of the atmosphere affects their reactivity and it seems to accelerate, for example, the decomposition rate of freons in the atmosphere [1]. For this reason we characterized shapes, stabilities, nature of the non-covalent interactions, structures and internal dynamics of a number of complexes of CFCs with water and of their dimers or oligomers by rotational spectroscopy. It has been found that hydrogenated CFCs form adducts with other molecules through weak hydrogen bonds (WHBs). Their C-H groups can act as proton donors, enhanced by the electron withdrawing of the halogen atoms, interacting with the electron rich regions of the partner molecules [2]. Also in adducts or oligomers of hydrogenated CFCs the monomer units are held together by nets of WHBs [3]. When CFCs are perhalogenated, the positive electrostatic region ("σ-hole") can interact electrostatically with negative sites of another, or of the same molecular entity, giving rise, according to IUPAC, to the so called halogen bond (HaB). However, it has been observed that when the perhalogenated CFCs has a Π electron system, a lone pair•••Π interaction (Bürgi-Dunitz) is favoured [4]. We describe here the HaBs that CF4 and CF3Cl form with a variety of partner molecules such as water, ammonia, dimethyl ether, etc. Important spectroscopic features outline strong dynamics effects taking place in this kind of complex. References [1] V. Vaida, H. G. Kjaergaard, K. J. Feierabend, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 22 (2003) 203. [2] See, for example: W. Caminati, S. Melandri, A. Maris, P. Ottaviani, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45 (2006) 2438. [3] G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, I. Cacelli, L. Carbonaro, G. Prampolini, W. Caminati, Chem. Commun. 50 (2014) 171. [4] Q. Gou, G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, W. Caminati, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 52 11888.

  10. Study of the effects of radon in three biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A.; Brena, M.; Rosa, M.E. De la; Villalobos P, R.

    2002-01-01

    The radon and its decay products are responsible of the 3/4 parts of the exposure of the persons to the environmental radiation. The discovery at the end of XIX Century of the illnesses, mainly of cancer, which appeared in the presence of radon, lead to an accelerated growing of the radon studies: monitoring, dosimetry, effects on the persons, etc. Several epidemiological studies of radon in miners and population in general have been realized; advancing in the knowledge about the concentration-lung cancer risk relationship, but with discrepancies in the results depending on the concentration levels. Therefor, studies which consuming time, efforts and money go on doing. The research of the radon effects in biological systems different to human, allows to realize studies in less time, in controlled conditions and generally at lower cost, generating information about the alpha radiation effects in the cellular field. Therefor it was decided to study the response of three biological systems exposed to radon: an unicellular bacteria Escherichia Coli which was exposed directly to alpha particles from an electrodeposited source for determining the sensitivity limit of the chose technique. A plant, Tradescantia, for studying the cytogenetic effect of the system exposed to controlled concentrations of radon. An insect, Drosophila Melanogaster, for studying the genetic effects and the accumulated effects in several generations exposed to radon. In this work the experimental settlements are presented for the expositions of the systems and the biological results commenting the importance of these. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of radiobiological effects in 3 distinct biological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, J.; Costa, P.; Cunha, L.; Metello, L.F.; Carvalho, A.P.; Vasconcelos, V.; Genesio, P.; Ponte, F.; Costa, P.S.; Crespo, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The present work aims at sharing the process of development of advanced biological models to study radiobiological effects. Recognizing several known limitations and difficulties of the current monolayer cellular models, as well as the increasing difficulties to use advanced biological models, our group has been developing advanced biological alternative models, namely three-dimensional cell cultures and a less explored animal model (the Zebra fish - Danio rerio - which allows the access to inter-generational data, while characterized by a great genetic homology towards the humans). These 3 models (monolayer cellular model, three-dimensional cell cultures and zebra fish) were externally irradiated with 100 mGy, 500 mGy or 1 Gy. The consequences of that irradiation were studied using cellular and molecular tests. Our previous experimental studies with 100 mGy external gamma irradiation of HepG2 monolayer cells showed a slight increase in the proliferation rate 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post irradiation. These results also pointed into the presence of certain bystander effects 72 h post irradiation, constituting the starting point for the need of a more accurate analysis realized with this work. At this stage, we continue focused on the acute biological effects. Obtained results, namely MTT and clonogenic assays for evaluating cellular metabolic activity and proliferation in the in vitro models, as well as proteomics for the evaluation of in vivo effects will be presented, discussed and explained. Several hypotheses will be presented and defended based on the facts previously demonstrated. This work aims at sharing the actual state and the results already available from this medium-term project, building the proof of the added value on applying these advanced models, while demonstrating the strongest and weakest points from all of them (so allowing the comparison between them and to base the subsequent choice for research groups starting

  12. Biological effects of transuranium elements in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported from life span studies of the biological effects of the transuranium elements ( 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and 242 Cm) on laboratory animals following inhalation, skin absorption, or injection in various chemical forms. The dose levels at which major biological effects have been observed in experimental animals are discussed relative to the maximum permissible lung burden of 0.016 μCi for occupational exposures. Lung cancer has been observed at dose levels equivalent to about 100 times the maximum permissible lung burden. Current experiments directed towards determining whether health effects will occur at lower levels and the mechanisms by which α emitters induce cancer are reviewed. (U.S.)

  13. Radiolabelled substrates for studying biological effects of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A programme of coordinated isotopic tracer-aided investigations of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture, initiated in 1973, was reviewed. The current status of representative investigations from the point of view of techniques and priorities was assessed. Such investigations involved radioactive substrates for studying DNA injury and its repair; 14 C-labelled acetylcholine as substrate for measuring enzyme inhibition due to the presence of, or exposure to, anticholinesteratic contaminants; radioactive substrates as indication of side-effects in non-target organisms and of their comparative susceptibilities; radioactive substrates as indicators of persistence or biodegradability of trace contaminants of soil or water; and labelled pools for studying the biological side-effects of trace contaminants. Priorities were identified

  14. DNA adduct measurements in zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, Pallas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, J.; Gallois, J.; Pelhuet, L.; Devier, M.H.; Budzinski, H.; Pottier, D.; Andre, V.; Cachot, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine PAH accumulation and bulky DNA adduct formation in the digestive gland of zebra mussels exposed in their habitat or in controlled laboratory conditions to complex mixture of PAH. DNA adducts were measured using a 32 P-postlabelling protocol with nuclease P1 enrichment adapted from Reddy and Randerath [Reddy, M.V., Randerath, K., 1986. Nuclease P1-mediated enhancement of sensitivity of 32 P-postlabelling test for structurally diverse DNA adducts. Carcinogenesis 7, 1543-1551]. Specimens collected in the upper part of the Seine estuary were shown to accumulate higher levels of PAH (up to 1.6 μg g -1 dry weight) in comparison to individuals from the reference site (0.053 μg g -1 dry weight). The former exhibited elevated levels of DNA adducts (up to 4.0/10 8 nucleotides) and higher diversity of individual adducts with five distinct spots being specifically detected in individuals originating from the Seine estuary. Zebra mussels exposed for 5 days to 0.01% (v/v) of organic extract of sediment from the Seine estuary were shown to accumulate high amounts of PAH (up to 138 μg g -1 dry weight) but exhibited relatively low levels of DNA adducts. Exposure to benzo[a]pyrene led to a dose-dependent accumulation of B[a]P (up to 7063 μg g -1 dry weight) and a clear induction of DNA adduct formation in the digestive gland of mussels (up to 1.13/10 8 nucleotides). Comparisons with other bivalves exposed to the same model PAH, revealed similar levels of adducts and comparable adduct profiles with a main adduct spot and a second faint one. This study clearly demonstrated that zebra mussels are able to biotransform B[a]P and probably other PAH into reactive metabolites with DNA-binding activity. This work also demonstrated the applicability of the nuclease P1 enhanced 32 P-postlabelling method for bulky adduct detection in the digestive gland of zebra mussels. DNA adduct measurement in zebra mussels could be a suitable biomarker to monitor

  15. DNA adduct measurements in zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, Pallas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Goff, J. [GRECAN, UPRES EA-1772, University of Caen, Caen (France); Gallois, J. [Laboratory F. Duncombe, Conseil General du Calvados, Caen (France); Pelhuet, L. [LPTC, UMR-5472 CNRS, University Bordeaux I, Bordeaux (France); Devier, M.H. [LPTC, UMR-5472 CNRS, University Bordeaux I, Bordeaux (France); Budzinski, H. [LPTC, UMR-5472 CNRS, University Bordeaux I, Bordeaux (France); Pottier, D. [GRECAN, UPRES EA-1772, University of Caen, Caen (France); Andre, V. [GRECAN, UPRES EA-1772, University of Caen, Caen (France); Cachot, J. [LEMA, UPRES EA-3222, IFRMP 23, University of Le Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, B.P. 540, 76058 Le Havre Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jerome.cachot@univ-lehavre.fr

    2006-08-12

    The purpose of this study was to examine PAH accumulation and bulky DNA adduct formation in the digestive gland of zebra mussels exposed in their habitat or in controlled laboratory conditions to complex mixture of PAH. DNA adducts were measured using a {sup 32}P-postlabelling protocol with nuclease P1 enrichment adapted from Reddy and Randerath [Reddy, M.V., Randerath, K., 1986. Nuclease P1-mediated enhancement of sensitivity of {sup 32}P-postlabelling test for structurally diverse DNA adducts. Carcinogenesis 7, 1543-1551]. Specimens collected in the upper part of the Seine estuary were shown to accumulate higher levels of PAH (up to 1.6 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight) in comparison to individuals from the reference site (0.053 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight). The former exhibited elevated levels of DNA adducts (up to 4.0/10{sup 8} nucleotides) and higher diversity of individual adducts with five distinct spots being specifically detected in individuals originating from the Seine estuary. Zebra mussels exposed for 5 days to 0.01% (v/v) of organic extract of sediment from the Seine estuary were shown to accumulate high amounts of PAH (up to 138 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight) but exhibited relatively low levels of DNA adducts. Exposure to benzo[a]pyrene led to a dose-dependent accumulation of B[a]P (up to 7063 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight) and a clear induction of DNA adduct formation in the digestive gland of mussels (up to 1.13/10{sup 8} nucleotides). Comparisons with other bivalves exposed to the same model PAH, revealed similar levels of adducts and comparable adduct profiles with a main adduct spot and a second faint one. This study clearly demonstrated that zebra mussels are able to biotransform B[a]P and probably other PAH into reactive metabolites with DNA-binding activity. This work also demonstrated the applicability of the nuclease P1 enhanced {sup 32}P-postlabelling method for bulky adduct detection in the digestive gland of zebra mussels. DNA adduct measurement in

  16. Quantitation of acrolein-protein adducts: potential biomarker of acrolein exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Jianling; Kaphalia, Bhupendra; Ansari, G A S; Khan, M Firoze

    2004-03-26

    Acrolein, an alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde, is a ubiquitous environmental toxic pollutant. Because of potential human exposure, there is a need for a sensitive, reliable, and specific method to monitor acrolein exposure. Acrolein is a potent electrophile and reacts with proteins mainly through Michael addition reaction, leading to acrolein-protein adducts (APA). The present study aimed to develop a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for the quantitation of APA in biological samples. Antibody to acrolein-keyhole limpet hemocyanin adduct was raised in rabbits, and the specificity of the antibody was determined by ELISA using acrolein-albumin adduct (AAA) or native albumin. A dose-dependent response was observed with AAA, but no immunoreactivity with native albumin. Further, lack of cross-reactivity of anti-acrolein antibody with formaldehyde-, malondialdehyde-, or 4-hydroxynonenal-albumin adducts indicates its specificity for acrolein. For the competitive ELISA, 1:16,000 diluted antisera was used with varying concentrations of AAA, which provided a linear detection range between 250 and 10,000 pg. To test the efficacy of the method for possible use as a biomarker of acrolein exposure, SD rats were orally administered 1 or 7 doses of 9.2 mg/kg/d acrolein. APA levels, quantitated in the serum, showed significantly greater formation (32% and 58% after 1 and 7 doses, respectively) in acrolein-treated rats as compared to the controls. Western blot analyses of APA in the sera from acrolein-treated rats showed APA bands (especially 29, 31, and 100 kD) with greater intensity in comparison to controls, further supporting our ELISA results. These results suggest that quantitation of APA has potential to be used as biomarker of acrolein exposure and eventually for molecular dosimetry and risk assessment.

  17. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabro Nielsen, P.

    1996-12-31

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the {sup 32}P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG).

  18. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabro Nielsen, P.

    1996-01-01

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the 32 P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG)

  19. [Biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, when Adey discovered that extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) may affect the calcium ions efflux from various cells, bioeffects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) have become the subject of growing interest and numerous research projects. At present, the fact that NIR exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on different physiological cellular parameters is rather unquestionable. At the same time, some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to EMF is potentially harmful even if its intensity is very low. It has been proved that thermal factors are not responsible for these effects, therefore nowadays, they are called 'non-thermal effects'. Our paper deals with three different aspects of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation, bioelectromagnetism, electromagnetobiology and electromagnetic bioinformation. Firstly, we describe how EMF and photons can be produced within a living cell, how biological cycles are controlled, and what are the features of endogenous electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, we discuss various facets of external EMF interactions with living matter, focusing on extremely-low-frequencies, radio- and microwaves. Possible mechanisms of these interactions are also mentioned. Finally, we present a short overview of current theories which explain how electromagnetic couplings may control an open and dissipative structure, namely the living organism. The theory of electromagnetic bioinformation seems to explain how different physiological processes are triggered and controlled, as well as how long-range interactions may possibly occur within the complex biological system. The review points out that the presented research data must be assessed very carefully since its evaluation is crucial to set the proper limits of EMF exposure, both occupational and environmental. The study of biological effects of non-ioinizing radiation may also contribute to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic

  20. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Formica Domenico

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited.

  1. Using lysine adducts of human serum albumin to investigate the disposition of exogenous formaldehyde in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, Luca G; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ji, Zhiying; Chen, Xi; Daniels, Sarah I; Huang, Deyin; Sanchez, Sylvia; Tang, Naijun; Sillé, Fenna C M; Iavarone, Anthony T; Williams, Evan R; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2017-02-15

    Formaldehyde is a human carcinogen that readily binds to nucleophiles, including proteins and DNA. To investigate whether exogenous formaldehyde produces adducts in extracellular fluids, we characterized modifications to human serum albumin (HSA) following incubation of whole blood, plasma, and saliva with formaldehyde at concentrations of 1, 10 and 100μM. The only HSA locus that showed the presence of formaldehyde modifications was Lys199. A N(6)-Lys adduct with added mass of 12Da, representing a putative intramolecular crosslink, was detected in biological fluids that had been incubated with formaldehyde but not in control fluids. An adduct representing N(6)-Lys formylation was detected in all fluids, but levels did not increase above control values over the tested range of formaldehyde concentrations. An adduct representing N(6)-Lys199 acetylation was also measured in all samples. We then applied the assay to repeated samples of human plasma from 6 nonsmoking volunteer subjects (from Berkeley, CA), and single samples of serum from 15 workers exposed to airborne formaldehyde at about 1.5ppm in a production facility and 15 control workers from Tianjin, China. Although all human plasma/serum samples contained basal levels of the products of N(6)-Lys formylation and acetylation, the putative crosslink product was not detected. Since the putative crosslink was observed in plasma incubated with formaldehyde at 1μM, this suggests that the endogenous concentration of formaldehyde in serum was much lower than reported in the literature. Furthermore, concentrations of the formyl adduct were not higher in workers exposed to formaldehyde at about 1.5ppm than in controls. Follow-up in vitro experiments with gaseous formaldehyde at 1.4ppm detected the putative crosslink in plasma but not whole blood. This combination of results suggests that N(6) formylation occurs within cells with subsequent release of adducted HSA to the systemic circulation. Comparing across human

  2. Oxygen effect in radiation biology: caffeine and serendipity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    The 'hit theory' developed in 1920s to explain the actions of ionizing radiation on cells and organisms was purely physical, and its limitation was its inadequacy to address the contemporary findings such as the oxygen enhancement of radiobiological damage, and the increased radio- sensitivity of dividing compared to non-dividing cells. The textbooks written prior to 1970s did not either refer at all to oxygen as a radiosensitizer, or had mentioned it only in a passing manner; yet 'oxygen effect' was emerging as the central dogma in radiation biology. The oxygen effect in radiation biology is highly interdisciplinary encompassing atomic physics (i.e. interaction of photon with matter), radiation chemistry (formation of reactive oxygen species), molecular signalling, gene expression and genetic alterations in cells (mutation, cancer) or the cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe, etc.). Cell death in higher organisms is now recognized as the precursor of possible error-free cell replacement repair. (author)

  3. Effects of UV and microwave radiation on biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielitz, J.; Boegl, W.; Stockhausen, K.; Kossel, F.

    1977-01-01

    For the present study, ten publications on the effect of UV radiation were analyzed. In vitro tests were carried out with one biological substance and seven different human or animal organs and biocytocultures. In vivo, three bacterial strains were irradiated and four irradiation experiments were carried out on mice. As to the effect of microwave radiation, eleven publications were analyzed. In vitro tests were carried out with one biological substance and three animal organs. In vivo, one bacterial strain was irradiated and eight irradiation experiments were carried out on different types of animals. The study's aim was to obtain a survey on biochemical changes of the organisms. Phenomenological changes were given only when the corresponding articles contained further investigation results. Behavioral changes were not taken into account. The results published by the authors of the original papers were compiled in a kind of dictionary. All relevant data are listed in a defined order. (orig.) [de

  4. Biological effect of nitrogen ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Shu Shizhen

    1997-10-01

    Dry seed of stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ions with various doses. The biological effect in M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam energy and dose added, but there was on significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The results indicated the seedling height reduced with the increasing of dose for ion beam. The biological effect of nitrogen ion beam on M 1 stevia was lower than that of γ-rays. (6 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  5. Electronic structure and optical properties of Eu(III) tris-β-diketonate adducts with 1,10-phenanthroline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurygin, A. V.; Korochentsev, V. V.; Cherednichenko, A. I.; Mirochnik, A. G.; Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Vovna, V. I.

    2018-03-01

    Adducts of tris-β-diketonates of the rare earth metal Eu(III) with 1,10-phenanthroline are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemistry methods. The electronic structure, peculiarities of the nature of chemical bonds, and the geometric structure of the adducts are determined. The interpretation of UV photoelectron spectra of vapors and X-ray photoelectron spectra of solid is carried out with the chosen technique. DFT/TDDFT methods make it possible to study the 1,10-phenanthroline molecule influence on the adduct electronic structure and to analyze the electronic effects of substitution of methyl groups by trifluoromethyl groups in the ligands. At transition from the tris-β-diketonate complexes to the adducts, it is observed an increase of the absorption region and a decrease in the energy gap that contributes to the efficiency growth in electronic excitation energy transfer in the ligand-metal. Moreover, phenanthroline displaces water groups, that are luminescence quenchers, from the first coordination sphere, closes coordination in the adduct, and blocks their further attachment. Both factors contribute to an increase in the luminescence intensity.

  6. Some experiments upon the biological effects of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.H.; Mottram, J.C.; Read, J.; Spear, F.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper: ''Some experiments upon the biological effects of fast neutrons'', was written by four renowned scientists of their time only 8 years after the discovery of neutrons by Chadwick. The paper describes the methods of measurement of neutron dose and a series of radiobiology experiments on chick embryo fibroblasts and the inhibition of mitosis in the bean root. The results are interesting to compare with current thinking on the radiobiology of neutrons. (UK)

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of biological effect of sulfur-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental materials related to evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of sulfur-35 are presented. Hemogenic organs are subjected to greatest influence especially in the first hours after radionuclide entry into the organism. Comparison is made of absorbed doses in blood with observed blastomogen effect of hemogenic organs. It is noted, that quantitative evaluation of relative biological efficiency of low energy beta-emitters should be performed with account of dosimetric peculiarities of the nuclides mentioned above. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  8. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury-Herard, A.; Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B.; Toledano, M.

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  9. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabella eGariboldi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1 surface topography, (2 pore size and geometry, (3 porous networks and (4 macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way, as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  10. Biological effective dose studies in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of cervix is the second most common cancer worldwide among women. Several treatments related protocols of radiotherapy have been followed over few decades in its treatment for evaluating the response. These physical doses varying on the basics of fractionation size, dose rate and total dose needed to be indicated as biological effective dose (BED) to rationalize these treatments. The curative potential of radiation therapy in the management of carcinoma of the cervix is greatly enhanced by the use of intracavitary brachytherapy. Successful brachytherapy requires the high radiation dose to be delivered to the tumor where as minimum radiation dose reach to surrounding normal tissue. Present study is aimed to evaluate biologically effective dose in patients receiving high dose-rate brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy based on tumor cell proliferation values in cancer of the cervix patients. The study includes 30 patients' data as a retrospective analysis. In addition determine extent of a dose-response relationship existing between the biological effective dose at Point A and the bladder and rectum and the clinical outcomes

  11. Comparison of ballistic impact effects between biological tissue and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongxi; Mai, Ruimin; Wu, Cheng; Han, Ruiguo; Li, Bingcang

    2018-02-01

    Gelatin is commonly used in ballistic testing as substitute for biological tissue. Comparison of ballistic impact effects produced in the gelatin and living tissue is lacking. The work in this paper was aimed to compare the typical ballistic impact effects (penetration trajectory, energy transfer, temporary cavity) caused by 4.8mm steel ball penetrating the 60kg porcine hind limbs and 10wt% gelatin. The impact event in the biological tissue was recorded by high speed flash X-ray machine at different delay time, while the event in the gelatin continuously recorded by high speed video was compared to that in the biological tissue. The collected results clearly displayed that the ballistic impact effects in the muscle and gelatin were similar for the steel ball test; as for instance, the projectile trajectory in the two targets was basically similar, the process of energy transfer was highly coincident, and the expansion of temporary cavity followed the same pattern. This study fully demonstrated that choosing gelatin as muscle simulant was reasonable. However, the maximum temporary cavity diameter in the gelatin was a little larger than that in the muscle, and the expansion period of temporary cavity was longer in the gelatin. Additionally, the temporary cavity collapse process in the two targets followed different patterns, and the collapse period in the gelatin was two times as long as that in the muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of biological cohesion on current ripple development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Jonathan; Baas, Jaco H.; Hope, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from laboratory experiments examining the role of biological cohesion, associated with Extra Polymeric Substances, on the development of current ripples. The results demonstrate the importance of biological cohesion compared to the effect of physical cohesion associated with clays in an otherwise sandy bed. FURTHER INFORMATION In fluvial and marine environments sediment transport is mainly dependent on the nature of the bed surface (rippled or flat) and the nature of cohesion in the bed. Cohesion can be either physical, as a result of the presence of clays, or biological as a result of the presence of organisms. In the case of the latter, biological cohesion occurs as a result of the presence of Extra Polymeric Substances (EPS) secreted by microorganisms. While it is known that EPS can dramatically increase the threshold of motion (Grant and Gust, 1987), comparatively little is known about the effect of EPS on ripple formation and development. The experiments described here seek to fill this gap. They also allow the effect of biological cohesion to be compared with that of physical cohesion from previous experiments (Baas et al., 2013). The experiments, which were conducted in a 10m flume at Bangor University, involved a current over a bed made of fine sand, with a median diameter of 0.148mm, and various amounts of xanthan gum, a proxy for naturally occurring EPS (Vardy et al., 2007). The hydrodynamic experimental conditions were matched very closely to those of Baas et al. (2013). The ripple dimensions were recorded through the glass side wall of the tank using time lapse photography. In the physical cohesion experiments of Baas et al. (2013) for clay contents up to 12%, the clay was very quickly winnowed out of the bed, leaving essentially clay-free ripples that developed at more or less the same rate as clean sand ripples. The resulting equilibrium ripples were essentially the same length as the clean sand ripples but reduced in height. By

  13. Biological Effects of EM Radiations from Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Ali

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct health effects could result following exposure to RF by thermal (heating effects. Recent Studies have shown that there are public fears on effects that can be caused mainly by holding mobile phones close to the body, or as a result of possible non-thermal effects from both phones and base stations.  This paper offers an overview on the biological effects of electromagnetic radiation caused by mobile phones. Exposures of individuals to RF radiation from these sources will depend upon their proximity and may be above those from mobile phone base stations, although still well below guidelines. From a review of the scientific literature, it is concluded that there were no established health effects from exposure to the RF fields from mobile phones. However, there are gaps in knowledge requiring further research, but current knowledge suggests that RF exposure to levels below the guidelines were not a risk to health.

  14. Condensed tannin-resorcinol adducts in laminating adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Hemingway; Roland E. Kreibich

    1985-01-01

    A condensed tannin-resorcinol adduct made by co-reaction of an extract from southern pine bark with resorcinol at a 2 to 1 weight ratio was used to prepare a laminating resin in which the entire amount of resorcinol normally used was replaced by this adduct. The resin was formulated into a room temperature setting adhesive that meets the basic criteria of product...

  15. Challenges in Analyzing the Biological Effects of Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Cihan Suleyman; Vang, Ole

    2016-06-09

    The suggested health effects (e.g., disease prevention) of dietary bioactive compounds such as resveratrol are challenging to prove in comparison to man-made drugs developed for therapeutic purposes. Dietary bioactive compounds have multiple cellular targets and therefore have a variety of biological effects. Extrapolating the biological effects of dietary compounds from in vitro and in vivo animal experiments to humans may lead to over- or under-estimation of the effect and role of these compounds. The present paper will discuss a few of these challenges and suggest directions for future research. Questions we address include: (1) Is the combinatorial effect of resveratrol and other compounds real? (2) What are the real and relevant doses of resveratrol after administration? and (3) Is it possible to estimate the preventive effect of resveratrol by clinical trials using standard experimental designs? The examples concerning resveratrol taken from the scientific literature are mainly from 2010 and later. The challenges pointed out in this review are similar to most naturally occurring bioactive compounds.

  16. A mini-review on Biginelli adducts with notable pharmacological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo de Fátima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the disclosure of Biginelli reaction by the chemist Pietro Biginelli, functionalized 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H-ones/thiones (DHPMs have emerged as prototypes for the design of compounds with a broad variety of biological activities. This mini-review describes over 100 Biginelli adducts demonstrated to be promising anticancer, inhibitors of calcium channel, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant agents. Thus, this compilation presents the most notable in vitro and in vivo results for such fascinating class of organic compounds.

  17. Biological effects of ionizing radiation - changing worker attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.; Schenley, C.

    1989-01-01

    Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Radiation Protection Training Special Interest Group has taken an innovative approach to providing DOE contractors with radiation worker training material information. Newly-hired radiation workers may be afraid to work near radiation and long-term radiation workers may become indifferent to the biological hazard of radiation. Commercially available training material is often presented at an inappropriate technical level or in an uninteresting style. These training problems have been addressed in the DOE system through development of a training videotape and supporting material package entitled Understanding Ionizing Radiation and its Biological Effects. The training package, developed and distributed by TRADE specifically to meet the needs of DOE contractor facilities, contains the videotape and accompanying paper supporting materials designed to assist the instructor. Learning objectives, presentation suggestion for the instructor, trainee worksheets, guided discussion questions, and trainee self-evaluation sheets are included in the training package. DOE contractors have agreed that incorporating this training module into radiation worker training programs enhances the quality of the training and increase worker understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation

  18. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li+-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Zhen Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li+ and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well as the CO2 capacity of the chelated ILs obtained were investigated. For example, the CO2 capacity of PEG150MeBu2N increased steadily from 0.10 to 0.66 (mol CO2 absorbed per mol of base through the formation of zwitterionic adducts being stabilized by Li+.

  19. Diverse biological effects of electromagnetic-treated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabhai, Montarop; Chumseng, Suchintana; Yoohat, Kirana; Srila, Witsanu

    2014-07-01

    The effects of water treated with an electromagnetic field (EMF) were investigated on two biological systems, humans and plants. Purified de-ionised water was treated by (1) boiling, (2) exposure to microwave radiation, and (3) low frequency electromagnetic oscillation molecular resonance effect technology (MRET), before being used to prepare media for culturing human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three healthy females. Our results indicated that PBMC culture in MRET-activated medium showed significantly less oxidative metabolism when compared to media prepared from other types of water. As for the effects on soybean, our results indicated that both MRET- and microwave-treated water greatly enhanced the length of the root. These results suggested that electromagnetic-treated water can have diverse biological effects on both animal and plant cells. Since these effects are related to the 'Memory of Water', hypothesis which has been suggested as an explanation of the action of high homeopathic dilutions, our finding warrant a further investigation on the mechanisms of various types of physically conditioned water on specific cellular activities. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effects Of Physical And Biological Cohesion On Bedforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Schindler, R.; Baas, J.; Hope, J. A.; Malarkey, J.; Paterson, D. M.; Peakall, J.; Manning, A. J.; Ye, L.; Aspden, R.; Alan, D.; Bass, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Most coastal sediments consist of complex mixtures of cohesionless sands, physically-cohesive clays and extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS) that impart biological cohesion. Yet, our ability to predict bedform dimensions in these substrates is reliant on predictions based exclusively on cohesionless sand. We present findings from the COHBED project - which explicitly examines how bedform dynamics are modified by natural cohesion. Our experimental results show that for ripples, height and length are inversely proportional to initial clay content and bedforms take longer to appear, with no ripples when clay content exceeds 18%. When clay is replaced by EPS the development time and time of first appearance of ripples both increase by two orders of magnitude, with no bedforms above 0.125% EPS. For dunes, height and length are also inversely proportional to initial substrate clay content, resulting in a transition from dunes to ripples normally associated with velocity decreases. Addition of low EPS concentrations into the substrate results in yet smaller bedforms at the same clay contents and at high EPS concentrations, biological cohesion supersedes all electrostatic bonding, and bedform size is no longer related to mud content. The contrast in physical and biological cohesion effects on bedform development result from the disparity between inter-particle electrostatic bonding of clay particles and EPS grain coating and strands that physically link sediments together, which effects winnowing rates as bedforms evolve. These findings have wide ranging implications for bedform predictions in both modern and ancient environments. Coupling of biological and morphological processes not only requires an understanding of how bedform dimensions influence biota and habitat, but also how benthic species can modify bedform dimensions. Consideration of both aspects provides a means in which fluid dynamics, sediment transport and ecosystem energetics can be linked to yield

  1. Adduct ion-targeted qualitative and quantitative analysis of polyoxypregnanes by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Jiang; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2017-10-25

    Polyoxypregnane and its glycosides (POPs) are frequently present in plants of Asclepiadaceae family, and have a variety of biological activities. There is a great need to comprehensively profile these phytochemicals and to quantify them for monitoring their contents in the herbs and the biological samples. However, POPs undergo extensive adduct ion formation in ESI-MS, which has posed a challenge for qualitative and quantitative analysis of POPs. In the present study, we took the advantage of such extensive adduct ion formation to investigate the suitability of adduct ion-targeted analysis of POPs. For the qualitative analysis, we firstly demonstrated that the sodium and ammonium adduct ion-targeted product ion scans (PIS) provided adequate MS/MS fragmentations for structural characterization of POPs. Aided with precursor ion (PI) scans, which showed high selectivity and sensitivity and improved peak assignment confidence in conjunction with full scan (FS), the informative adduct ion-targeted PIS enabled rapid POPs profiling. For the quantification, we used formic acid rather than ammonium acetate as an additive in the mobile phase to avoid simultaneous formation of sodium and ammonium adduct ions, and greatly improved reproducibility of MS response of POPs. By monitoring the solely formed sodium adduct ions [M+Na] + , a method for simultaneous quantification of 25 POPs in the dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mode was then developed and validated. Finally, the aforementioned methods were applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of POPs in the extract of a traditional Chinses medicinal herb, Marsdenia tenacissima (Roxb.) Wight et Arn., and in the plasma obtained from the rats treated with this herb. The results demonstrated that adduct ion formation could be optimized for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of POPs, and our developed PI/FS-PIS scanning and sole [M+Na] + ion monitoring significantly improved the analysis of POPs in both herbal and

  2. Correlation between electrochemical and theoretical studies on the leishmanicidal activity of twelve Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, Yen G. de; Souza, Antônio A. de; Lima-Junior, Claudio G.; Silva, Fábio P. L.; A. Filho, Edilson B.; Vasconcelos, Camila C. de; Abreu, Fabiane C. de; Goulart, Marília O. F.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic bioreduction of nitro groups plays an important role on the activity of biologically active nitroaromatic compounds. Electrochemical methods are useful tools to simulate in vivo metabolic processes. This work presents electrochemical studies in aprotic media (N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) plus tetrabutylammonium perchlorate (TBAP) 0.1 mol L-1) using cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) of twelve Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts ...

  3. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3-100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3- 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects.

  4. Assessment of the biological effects of 'strange' radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryakhin, E.A.; Tryapitsina, G.A.; Urutskoyev, L.I.; Akleyev, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The results from studies of the effects produced by electrical explosions of foils made from super pure materials in water point to the emergence of new chemical elements. An additional finding was the discharge of 'strange' radiation accompanying the transformation of chemical elements. However, currently, the mechanism involved in the interaction between 'strange' radiation and a substance or a biological entity remains obscure. Therefore, the aim of the present research is to investigate the biological effects of the 'strange' radiation. Pilot studies were performed at the RECOM RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' in April-May of 2004. The animals used in the experiment were female mice of C57Bl/6 line aged 80 days with body weight 16-18 g. The animals were exposed to radiation discharged during explosions of Ti foils in water and aqueous solutions. The cages with animals were placed at 1 m from the epicenter of the explosion. Explosions were carried out on the 19. (3 explosions), 20. (4 explosions) and 22. (3 explosions) of April, 2004 (explosions No1373 - No1382, respectively). The animals were assigned to 4 experimental groups comprised of 17-20 mice per group. The animals received experimental exposure within 1, 2 and 3 days of the experiment. In total, the experimental groups were exposed to 3, 7 and 10 explosions, respectively. In order to identify the biological reactions, the following parameters were estimated: number of nucleated cells in the bone marrow, number of CFU in the spleen after additional gamma-irradiation (6 Gy), cell composition of the bone marrow, the rate of erythrocytes with the different level of maturation in the bone marrow, the rate of erythrocytes with the micronuclei in the bone marrow, the reaction of bone marrow cells to additional gamma-irradiation (2 Gy), number of leucocytes in the peripheral blood, and cell composition of the peripheral blood. The following conclusions were drawn from these studies: 1. 'strange' radiation resulting

  5. Molecular Modeling of the Major DNA Adduct Formed from Food Mutagen Ochratoxin A in NarI Two-Base Deletion Duplexes: Impact of Sequence Context and Adduct Ionization on Conformational Preference and Mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Preetleen; Sharma, Purshotam; Manderville, Richard A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2017-08-21

    Exposure to ochratoxin A (OTA), a possible human carcinogen, leads to many different DNA mutations. As a first step toward understanding the structural basis of OTA-induced mutagenicity, the present work uses a robust computational approach and a slipped mutagenic intermediate model previously studied for C 8 -dG aromatic amine adducts to analyze the conformational features of postreplication two-base deletion DNA duplexes containing OT-dG, the major OTA lesion at the C 8 position of guanine. Specifically, a total of 960 ns of molecular dynamics simulations (excluding trial simulations) were carried out on four OT-dG ionization states in three sequence contexts within oligomers containing the NarI recognition sequence, a known hotspot for deletion mutations induced by related adducts formed from known carcinogens. Our results indicate that the structural properties and relative stability of the competing "major groove" and "stacked" conformations of OTA adducted two-base deletion duplexes depend on both the OTA ionization state and the sequence context, mainly due to conformation-dependent deviations in discrete local (hydrogen-bonding and stacking) interactions at the lesion site, as well as DNA bending. When the structural characteristics of the OT-dG adducted two-base deletion duplexes are compared to those associated with previously studied C 8 -dG adducts, a greater understanding of the effects of the nucleobase-carcinogen linkage, and size of the carcinogenic moiety on the conformational preferences of damaged DNA is obtained. Most importantly, our work predicts key structural features for OT-dG-adducted deletion DNA duplexes, which in turn allow us to develop hypotheses regarding OT-dG replication outcomes. Thus, our computational results are valuable for the design and interpretation of future biochemical studies on the potentially carcinogenic OT-dG lesion.

  6. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother-newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Autrup, Herman

    2012-01-01

    dietary variables and the biomarkers measured in maternal and fetal samples were identified. The present study suggests that maternal intake of meats with dark surface contributes to the bulky DNA adduct levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. Relationship between food preparation and bulky DNA......Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei...... (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet...

  7. TLC surface integrity affects the detection of alkali adduct ions in TLC-MALDI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Ferrazza, Ruggero; Anesi, Andrea; Guella, Graziano; Franceschi, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    Direct coupling of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allows fast and detailed characterization of a large variety of analytes. The use of this technique, however, presents great challenges in semiquantitative applications because of the complex phenomena occurring at the TLC surface. In our laboratory, we recently observed that the ion intensities of several alkali adduct ions were significantly different between the top and interior layer of the TLC plate. This indicates that the integrity of the TLC surface can have an important effect on the reproducibility of TLC- MALDI analyses. Graphical Abstract MALDI imaging reveals that surface integrity affects the detection of alkali adductions in TLC-MALDI.

  8. Recognition and repair of the CC-1065-(N3-Adenine)-DNA adduct by the UVRABC nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, M.; Lee, C.S.; Doisy, R.; Ross, L.; Needham-VanDevanter, D.R.; Hurley, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The recognition and repair of the helix-stabilizing and relatively nondistortive CC-1065-(N3-adenine)-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease has been investigated both in vivo with phi X174RFI DNA by a transfection assay and in vitro by a site-directed adduct in a 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1. CC-1065 is a potent antitumor antibiotic produced by Streptomyces zelensis which binds within the minor groove of DNA through N3 of adenine. In contrast to the helix-destabilizing and distortive modifications of DNA caused by ultraviolet light or N-acetoxy-2-(acetylamino)fluorene, CC-1065 increases the melting point of DNA and decreases the S1 nuclease activity. Using a viral DNA-Escherichia coli transfection system, the authors have found that the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes, which code for the major excision repair proteins for UV- and NAAAF-induced DNA damage, are also involved in the repair of CC-1065-DNA adducts. In contrast, the uvrD gene product, which has been found to be involved in the repair of UV damage, has no effect in repairing CC-1065-DNA adducts. Purified UVRA, UVRB, and UVRC proteins must work in concert to incise the drug-modified phi X174RFI DNA. Using a site-directed and multiple CC-1065 modified (MspI-BstNI) 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1, they have found that UVRABC nuclease incises at the eight phosphodiester bond on the 5' side of the CC-1065-DNA adduct on the drug-modified strand. The enzymes do not cut the noncovalently modified strand. The DNA sequence and/or helix-stabilizing effect of multiple adducts may determine the recognition and/or incision of the drug-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease. These results are discussed in relation to the structure of the CC-1065-DNA adduct and the effect of drug binding on local DNA structure

  9. Protein modifications by electrophilic lipoxidation products: adduct formation, chemical strategies and tandem mass spectrometry for their detection and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, Yury V; Tzeng, Shin-Chen; Huang, Lin; Maier, Claudia S

    2014-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins by electrophilic oxylipids is emerging as an important mechanism that contributes to the complexity of proteomes. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidation of biological lipids results in the formation of chemically diverse electrophilic carbonyl compounds, such as 2-alkenals and 4-hydroxy alkenals, epoxides, and eicosanoids with reactive cyclopentenone structures. These lipoxidation products are capable of modifying proteins. Originally considered solely as markers of oxidative insult, more recently the modifications of proteins by lipid peroxidation products are being recognized as a new mechanism of cell signaling with relevance to redox homeostasis, adaptive response and inflammatory resolution. The growing interest in protein modifications by reactive oxylipid species necessitates the availability of methods that are capable of detecting, identifying and characterizing these protein adducts in biological samples with high complexity. However, the efficient analysis of these chemically diverse protein adducts presents a considerable analytical challenge. We first provide an introduction into the chemistry and biological relevance of protein adductions by electrophilic lipoxidation products. We then provide an overview of tandem mass spectrometry approaches that have been developed in recent years for the interrogation of protein modifications by electrophilic oxylipid species. 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Seze, R.; Souques, M.; Aurengo, A.; Bach, V.; Burais, N.; Cesarini, J.P.; Cherin, A.; Decobert, V.; Dubois, G.; Hours, M.; Lagroye, I.; Leveque, Ph.; Libert, J.P.; Lombard, J.; Loos, N.; Mir, L.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Thuroczy, G.; Wiart, J.; Lehericy, St.; Pelletier, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Douki, Th.; Guibal, F.; Tordjman, I.; Gaillot de Saintignon, J.; Collard, J.F.; Scoretti, R.; Magne, I.; Veyret, B.; Katrib, J.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day on the biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. Sixteen presentations out of 17 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes; 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 μT magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 10 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 11 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 12 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Veyret); 13 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 14 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 15 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  11. Haemoglobin adducts of acrylonitrile and ethylene oxide in acrylonitrile workers, dependent on polymorphisms of the glutathione transferases GSTT1 and GSTM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, R; Lewalter, J; Kempkes, M; Selinski, S; Brüning, T; Bolt, H M

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-nine persons with industrial handling of low levels of acrylonitrile (AN) were studied. As part of a medical surveillance programme an extended haemoglobin adduct monitoring [N-(cyanoethyl)valine, CEV; N-(methyl)valine. MV: N-(hydroxyethyl)valine, HEV] was performed. Moreover, the genetic states of the polymorphic glutathione transferases GSTM1 and GSTT1 were assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Repetitive analyses of CEV and MV in subsequent years resulted in comparable values (means, 59.8 and 70.3 microg CEV/1 blood; 6.7 and 6.7 microg MV/1 blood). Hence, the industrial AN exposures were well below current official standards. Monitoring the haemoglobin adduct CEV appears as a suitable means of biomonitoring and medical surveillance under such exposure conditions. There was also no apparent correlation between the CEV and HEV or CEV and MV adduct levels. The MV and HEV values observed represented background levels, which apparently are not related to any occupational chemical exposure. There was no consistent effect of the genetic GSTM1 or GSTT1 state on CEV adduct levels induced by acrylonitrile exposure. Therefore, neither GSTM1 nor GSTT1 appears as a major AN metabolizing isoenzyme in humans. The low and physiological background levels of MV were also not influenced by the genetic GSTM1 state, but the MV adduct levels tended to be higher in GSTT1- individuals compared to GSTT1 + persons. With respect to the background levels of HEV adducts observed, there was no major influence of the GSTM1 state, but GST- individuals displayed adduct levels that were about 1/3 higher than those of GSTT1 + individuals. The coincidence with known differences in rates of background sister chromatid exchange between GSTT1- and GSTT1 + persons suggests that the lower ethylene oxide (EO) detoxification rate in GSTT1- persons, indicated by elevated blood protein hydroxyethyl adduct levels, leads to an increased genotoxic effect of the physiological EO background.

  12. Biologic effects of orally administered deuterium oxide on rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, K C; Verma, R

    1977-01-01

    Rats were made to drink D2O mixed water (30: 70) for 6 weeks in order to study the biological effects of orally administered D2O on the liver. Heavy water administration results in gradual decrease in the body weight whereas the liver showed marginal increase in weight throughout the experimental period. Phosphatases and dehydrogenases were analyzed biochemically. Acid phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase and adenosine triphosphatase registered fall in contrast to alkaline phosphatase, SDH and LDH, all of which showed a definite increase. Lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, estimated biochemically, gradually decreased throughout the experimental period in response to D2O feeding.

  13. Uranium: properties and biological effects after internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Tissandie, E.; Racine, R.; Ben Soussan, H.; Rouas, C.; Grignard, E.; Dublineau, I.; Gourmelon, P.; Lestaevel, P.; Gueguen, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium is a radionuclide present in the environment since the origin of the Earth. In addition to natural uranium, recent deposits from industrial or military activities are acknowledged. Uranium's toxicity is due to a combination of its chemical (heavy metal) and radiological properties (emission of ionizing radiations). Acute toxicity induces an important weight loss and signs of renal and cerebral impairment. Alterations of bone growth, modifications of the reproductive system and carcinogenic effects are also often seen. On the contrary, the biological effects of a chronic exposure to low doses are unwell known. However, results from different recent studies suggest that a chronic contamination with low levels of uranium induces subtle but significant levels. Indeed, an internal contamination of rats for several weeks leads to detection of uranium in many cerebral structures, in association with an alteration of short-term memory and an increase of anxiety level. Biological effects of uranium on the metabolisms of xenobiotics, steroid hormones and vitamin D were described in the liver, testis and kidneys. These recent scientific data suggest that uranium could participate to increase of health risks linked to environmental pollution. (authors)

  14. Review: Bioenergetic Fields and Their Biologic Effects Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Movaffaghi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available As interests in complementary and alternative medicine grows, the scientists are looking forward in researches which determine the mechanisms in which they exert their effectiveness. Some of these modalities like Yoga, Acupuncture, and especially other bio-field therapies such as none contact therapeutic touch, affects the bio-field which spreads throughout the body and into the space around it. According to physic’s law, when electricity flows throw the living tissues, like what happens in our heart and brain, biomagnetic fields are being induced in the surrounding space. Beside that moving charges like ions and free radicals which finally produce electromagnetic fields. Using very sensitive magnetometers, biomagnetic fields have been detected and get amplified up to 1000 times by meditation. This phenomenon could be the basis for most of most complementaty therapeutic approaches like therapeutic touch. On the other hand the electrical, magnetic and bio-magnetic fields have a well known application in conventional medicine. Modern research about bio-magnetism and magneto-biology suggests that in term of both aspects, the effects and the mechanisms for all the different looking modalities used in conventional medicine and complementary medicine which have commons in their fundamentals. This article reviews some of the recent works on biological effects of natural or artificial electromagnetic fields.

  15. [Placebo effect: clinical, biological and therapeutical involvements in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion, D; Mouchabac, S

    2016-02-01

    The placebo effect is an excellent model for understanding the mechanisms underlying the interaction between a subjective and complex mental activity (beliefs, expectations, hopes, learning, patient-physician relationship, socio-cultural context .) with different neural and biological systems. Initially, research on the placebo effect has focused on the mechanisms of pain and analgesia. The cognitive processes of conditioning and reward anticipation (hope of a relief) were highlighted. The involvement of different neurobiological pathways has been clearly shown: endogenous opioids, CCK, dopaminergic pathways, endocannabinoids, immunological factors... More recently, the field has open towards new perspectives: depression and anxiety, motor disorders, immune system, endocrine system. Intensive research in the field emerges because of its fundamental implications in neuroscience research but also because of the ethical, clinical and therapeutical issues. Moreover, the placebo effect is considered as a main methodological mean issue in clinical trials that allows the demonstration of the efficacy and tolerance of new drugs. In the field of psychiatry, depression is a placebo highly-sensitive disorder: placebo response rates in clinical trials are of the order of 30 % to 40 %. The identification of biological markers of placebo response, such as neuroimaging and quantitative electroencephalography may lead to develop more efficient models in clinical research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological effects and medical applications of infrared radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Ru; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 760nm and 100,000nm. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy generally employs light at red and near-infrared wavelengths (600-100nm) to modulate biological activity. Many factors, conditions, and parameters influence the therapeutic effects of IR, including fluence, irradiance, treatment timing and repetition, pulsing, and wavelength. Increasing evidence suggests that IR can carry out photostimulation and photobiomodulation effects particularly benefiting neural stimulation, wound healing, and cancer treatment. Nerve cells respond particularly well to IR, which has been proposed for a range of neurostimulation and neuromodulation applications, and recent progress in neural stimulation and regeneration are discussed in this review. The applications of IR therapy have moved on rapidly in recent years. For example, IR therapy has been developed that does not actually require an external power source, such as IR-emitting materials, and garments that can be powered by body heat alone. Another area of interest is the possible involvement of solar IR radiation in photoaging or photorejuvenation as opposites sides of the coin, and whether sunscreens should protect against solar IR? A better understanding of new developments and biological implications of IR could help us to improve therapeutic effectiveness or develop new methods of PBM using IR wavelengths. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Diastereoselective synthesis of {beta}-piperonyl-{gamma}-butyrolactones from morita-baylis-hillman adducts. highly efficient synthesis of ({+-})-yatein, ({+-})-podorhizol and ({+-})-epi-podorhizol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trazzi, Giordano; Andre, Marcelo Fabiano; Coelho, Fernando, E-mail: coelho@iqm.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Starting from a Morita-Baylis-Hillman adduct we describe a simple and very efficient method for the diastereoselective preparation of hydroxylated beta-piperonyl-g-butyrolactones. To exemplify the efficiency of this approach we also describe a highly efficient synthesis for the biologically active lignans ({+-})-yatein, ({+-})-podorhizol and ({+-})-epi-podorhizol. (author)

  18. Benzene-derived N2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-deoxyguanosine adduct: UvrABC incision and its conformation in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, Bo; Rodriguez, Ben; Yang, Yanu; Guliaev, Anton B.; Chenna, Ahmed

    2010-06-14

    Benzene, a ubiquitous human carcinogen, forms DNA adducts through its metabolites such as p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) and hydroquinone (HQ). N(2)-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-4-HOPh-dG) is the principal adduct identified in vivo by (32)P-postlabeling in cells or animals treated with p-BQ or HQ. To study its effect on repair specificity and replication fidelity, we recently synthesized defined oligonucleotides containing a site-specific adduct using phosphoramidite chemistry. We here report the repair of this adduct by Escherichia coli UvrABC complex, which performs the initial damage recognition and incision steps in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. We first showed that the p-BQ-treated plasmid was efficiently cleaved by the complex, indicating the formation of DNA lesions that are substrates for NER. Using a 40-mer substrate, we found that UvrABC incises the DNA strand containing N(2)-4-HOPh-dG in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The specificity of such repair was also compared with that of DNA glycosylases and damage-specific endonucleases of E. coli, both of which were found to have no detectable activity toward N(2)-4-HOPh-dG. To understand why this adduct is specifically recognized and processed by UvrABC, molecular modeling studies were performed. Analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories showed that stable G:C-like hydrogen bonding patterns of all three Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds are present within the N(2)-4-HOPh-G:C base pair, with the hydroxyphenyl ring at an almost planar position. In addition, N(2)-4-HOPh-dG has a tendency to form more stable stacking interactions than a normal G in B-type DNA. These conformational properties may be critical in differential recognition of this adduct by specific repair enzymes.

  19. Effects of industrial chemicals and radioactive materials in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangopadhyay, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-01-01

    Much has been written on the effects of radiation and toxic chemicals on biological systems. In this communication general considerations regarding these topics will be discussed very briefly; the major emphasis will be focused on the effects of chemicals, namely ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) on Amoeba, Advantages to the use of amoeba for studying the effects of radiation and chemicals include the following: large mononucleate unicellular organisms having a long generation time; opportunity to study cellular organelles and biochemical and genetic alterations in a single cell system; and a long cell cycle, the stages of which can be synchronized without resorting to chemical treatment or temperature shock and thereby readily permitting study at defined stages of the cell's life cycle. This, in turn, is discussed in light of current disposal methods for this type of waste and how it might be safely disposed of

  20. Microclimate effects of crop residues on biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Prueger, J. H.

    1996-03-01

    Residues from crops left on the soil surface have an impact on the microclimate, primarily temperature, within the soil and the atmosphere; but, the impact on the biological system is largely unknown. Residue is assumed to have a positive impact on the biological system in the soil and a negative impact on crop growth. This report investigates the effect of standing residue on the microclimate surrounding a cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) crop in a semi-arid environment and the effect of flat residue on the seasonal soil temperature and soil water regimes in a humid climate with a corn ( Zea mays L.) and soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production system. A study was conducted during 1987 and 1988 in a semi-arid climate at Lubbock, Texas using standing wheat stubble to shelter cotton from wind. In this study soil water, microclimatic variables, and plant growth were measured within standing stubble and bare soil during the early vegetative growth period. Air temperatures were warmer at night within the standing residue and the air more humid throughout the day. This led to a reduction in the soil water evaporation rate and an increase in the water use efficiency of the cotton plant within the stubble. Studies on corn residue with continuous corn and corn-soybean rotations with no-till, chiselplow, and moldboard plow tillage practices in central Iowa showed that the average soil temperatures in the upper soil profile were not affected by the presence of flat residue after tillage. Diurnal temperature ranges were most affected by the residue throughout the year. The largest effect of the residue on soil temperature was in the fall after harvest when no-till fields cooled more slowly than tilled fields. In the spring, surface residue decreased the soil water evaporation rate and increased the soil water storage within the soil profile covered with residue. In years with below normal rainfall, the additional stored soil water due to the surface residue was used by the

  1. Characterization of a mutagenic DNA adduct formed from 1,2-dibromoethane by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Hachey, David L; Valadez, Gerardo; Williams, Kevin M; Guengerich, F Peter; Loktionova, Natalia A; Kanugula, Sreenivas; Pegg, Anthony E

    2004-02-06

    It has been proposed that the DNA repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase increases the mutagenicity of 1,2-dibromoethane by reacting with it at its cysteine acceptor site to form a highly reactive half-mustard, which can then react with DNA (Liu, L., Pegg, A. E., Williams, K. M., and Guengerich, F. P. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 37920-37928). Incubation of Escherichia coli-expressed human alkyltransferase with 1,2-dibromoethane and single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides led to the formation of covalent transferaseoligo complexes. The order of reaction determined was Gua>Thy>Cyt>Ade. Mass spectrometry analysis of the tryptic digest of the reaction product indicated that some of the adducts led to depurination with the release of the Gly136-Arg147 peptide cross-linked to a Gua at the N7 position, with the site of reaction being the active site Cys145 as established by chromatographic retention time and the fragmentation pattern determined by tandem mass spectrometry of a synthetic peptide adduct. The alkyltransferase-mediated mutations produced by 1,2-dibromoethane were predominantly Gua to Ade transitions but, in the spectrum of such rifampicin-resistant mutations in the RpoB gene, 20% were Gua to Thy transversions. The latter are likely to have arisen from the apurinic site generated from the Gua-N7 adduct. Support exists for an additional adduct/mutagenic pathway because evidence was obtained for DNA adducts other than at the Gua N7 atom and for mutations other than those attributable to depurination. Thus, chemical and biological evidence supports the existence of at least two alkyltransferase-dependent pathways for 1,2-dibromoethane-induced mutagenicity, one involving Gua N7-alkylation by alkyltransferase-S-CH2CH2Br and depurination, plus another as yet uncharacterized system(s).

  2. Biological effect of paramecium in diffused ultrasonic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shiuh-Kuang; Huang, Yi-Cheng

    2002-04-01

    Since the cell structure or biophysical reaction includes in the interaction between ultrasound and living matter. When multi-cell creature is exposed to ultrasound, this reaction will lead the biological effect becomes complex. Therefore, in this paper, a single cell creature is chosen to study the biological effects induced by ultrasound exposure. The paramecium, which possesses many features typical of higher-order animal cells, was considered an appropriate choice for this study. The ability shown by ultrasound in promoting and/or accelerating many reactions has been shown to be a useful field. The growth phase of paramecium by using the ultrasound irradiation is an important parameter in this study. In our experiment, the exponential and stationary phases were employed. Three important factors must be taken into account when an ultrasonic biological reaction is investigated: the medium system, the bubbles' field, and the acoustic field. The medium system involves the physical parameters of the medium field. The bubbles' field includes the reacting bubble size of the liquid and the resonance frequency of the reaction bubbles. The oscillation of the cells in response to the ultrasound radiation is simulated using Rayleigh-Plesset's bubble activation theory. The resonance frequency of the unicellular creature is then calculated. The acoustic field is about using the diffuse field theory of Sabine to create a uniform sound field for the radiation experiment. The resonance frequency of the paramecium vacuole is among 0.54-1.09 MHz. When the 0.25 and 0.5 MHz frequencies of ultrasound was irradiated in the stationary phase of the paramecium, the relative growth rate was about 20% lower than that of unexposed sample. Therefore, the phenomenon of inhibition and destruction appeared during irradiation. The exponential phase of the paramecium samples appear to be different when irradiated with 1 MHz ultrasound. As can be seen in the results, the maximum relative growth

  3. Biological activity of selected plants with adaptogenic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ivanišová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine biological activity of plants with adaptogenic effect: Panax ginseng Mayer., Withania somnifera L., Eleuterococcus senticosus Rupr. et Maxim., Astragallus membranaceus Fisch. and Codonopsis pilosulae Franch. The antioxidant activity was detected by DPPH and phosphomolybdenum method, total polyphenol content with Folin – Ciocalteu reagent, flavonoids content by aluminium chloride method. The detection of antimicrobial activity was carried out by disc diffusion method against three species of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807, Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and two Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus thuringiensis CCM 19, Stapylococcus aureus subsp. aureus CCM 2461. Results showed that plants with adaptogenic effect are rich for biologically active substances. The highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was determined in the sample of Eleuterococcus senticosus (3.15 mg TEAC – Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity per g of sample and by phosphomolybdenum method in the sample of Codonopsis pilosulae (188.79 mg TEAC per g of sample. In the sample of Panax ginseng was measured the highest content of total polyphenols (8.10 mg GAE – galic acid equivalent per g of sample and flavonoids (3.41 μg QE – quercetin equivalent per g of sample. All samples also showed strong antimicrobial activity with the best results in Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera in particular for species Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807. The analyzed species of plant with high value of biological activity can be used more in the future, not only in food, but also in cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries.

  4. ALTERED IRON HOMEOSTATIS AND THE MECHANISM OF BIOLOGIC EFFECT BY PARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several features of the clinical presentation and changes in physiology and pathology following exposure to many diverse ambient air pollution particles are comparable, suggesting a common mechanism for their biological effect. We propose that a mechanism of biological effect com...

  5. Intercalating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts poison DNA religation by Vaccinia topoisomerase and act as roadblocks to digestion by exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Handy, Christopher J; Yagi, Haruhiko; Sayer, Jane M; Jerina, Donald M; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-06-20

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts pervert the execution or fidelity of enzymatic DNA transactions and cause mutations and cancer. Here, we examine the effects of intercalating PAH-DNA adducts on the religation reaction of vaccinia DNA topoisomerase, a prototypal type IB topoisomerase (TopIB), and the 3' end-resection reaction of Escherichia coli exonuclease III (ExoIII), a DNA repair enzyme. Vaccinia TopIB forms a covalent DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate at a target site 5'-C(+5)C(+4)C(+3)T(+2)T(+1)p / N(-1) in duplex DNA. The rate of the forward cleavage reaction is suppressed to varying degrees by benzo[a]pyrene (BP) or benzo[c]phenanthrene (BPh) adducts at purine bases within the 3'-G(+5)G(+4)G(+3)A(+2)A(+1)T(-1)A(-2) sequence of the nonscissile strand. We report that BP adducts at the +1 and -2 N6-deoxyadenosine (dA) positions flanking the scissile phosphodiester slow the rate of DNA religation to a greater degree than they do the cleavage rate. By increasing the cleavage equilibrium constant > or = 10-fold, the BPdA adducts, which are intercalated via the major groove, act as TopIB poisons. With respect to ExoIII, we find that (i) single BPdA adducts act as durable roadblocks to ExoIII digestion, which is halted at sites 1 and 2 nucleotides prior to the modified base; (ii) single BPhdA adducts, which also intercalate via the major groove, elicit a transient pause prior to the lesion, which is eventually resected; and (iii) BPh adducts at N2-deoxyguanosine, which intercalate via the minor groove, are durable impediments to ExoIII digestion. These results highlight the sensitivity of repair outcomes to the structure of the PAH ring system and whether intercalation occurs via the major or minor groove.

  6. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ON BRAIN TISSUE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Đinđić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to microwave radiation induces multiple organ dysfunctions, especially in CNS.The aim of this work was investigation of biological effects of microwave radiation on rats' brain and determination of increased oxidative stress as a possible pathogenetic's mechanism.Wis tar rats 3 months old were divided in experimental (4 female and 4 male animal and control group (5 female and 4 male. This experimental group was constantly exposed to a magnetic field of 5 mG. We simulated using of mobile phones 30 min every day. The source of NIR emitted MF that was similar to mobile phones at 900 MHz. The rats were killed after 2 months. Biological effects were determined by observation of individual and collective behavior and body mass changes. Lipid per oxidation was determined by measuring quantity of malondialdehyde (MDA in brain homogenate.The animals in experimental group exposed to EMF showed les weight gain. The most important observations were changing of basic behavior models and expression of aggressive or panic behavior. The content of MDA in brain tissue is singificantly higher (1.42 times in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields (3,82±0.65 vs. control 2.69±0.42 nmol/mg proteins, p<0.01.Increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation after exposition in EM fields induced disorders of function and structure of brain.

  7. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-06-30

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation.

  8. Radiation interactions with biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muhammad Torequl

    2017-05-01

    The use of radiation, especially ionizing radiation (IR), is currently attracting great attention in the field of medical sciences. However, it should be mentioned that IR has both beneficial and harmful effects in biological systems. This review aims to focus on IR-mediated physiological events in a mechanistic way. Evidence from the databases, mainly from PUBMED and SCIENCE DIRECT were considered. IR directly and/or with their lyses products (indirect) causes oxidative stresses to biological systems. These activities may be localized and systematic. Otherwise, IR-induced non-/multi-targeted effects are also evident. IR in diagnosis and cancer radiotherapy is well-known. Reactive species produced by IR are not only beneficial, but also can exert harmful effects in a biological system such as aging, genetic instability and mutagenicity, membrane lysis and cell death, alteration of enzymatic activity and metabolic events, mitochondrial dysfunction, and even cancer. Additionally, DNA adducts formation, after IR-induced DNA breakage, is a cause of blockage of DNA repair capability with an increase in cellular radiosensitivity. These may allow cellular ruin even at low IR levels. Dependent on the dose, duration of action and quality, IR plays diverse roles in biological systems.

  9. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother-newborns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Marie, E-mail: mpedersen@creal.cat [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Halldorsson, Thorhallur I., E-mail: lur@ssi.dk [Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland Reykjavik (Iceland); Center for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Autrup, Herman, E-mail: ha@mil.au.dk [School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Brouwer, Abraham, E-mail: Bram.Brouwer@bds.nl [BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Besselink, Harrie, E-mail: Harrie.Besselink@bds.nl [BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Loft, Steffen, E-mail: stl@sund.ku.dk [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Knudsen, Lisbeth E., E-mail: liek@sund.ku.dk [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2012-06-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet was estimated on the basis of maternal food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed by the end of pregnancy. Biomarkers were detected in paired blood samples through the dioxin-responsive chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX){sup Registered-Sign} bioassay, {sup 32}P-postlabelling technique and cytokinesis-block MN assay. Maternal preference for meats with dark surface were significantly associated with higher bulky DNA adducts in both maternal ({beta} 95%CI; 0.46 (0.08, 0.84)) and cord blood ({beta} 95%CI; 0.46 (0.05, 0.86)) before and after adjustment for potential confounders. No other significant associations between the 18 dietary variables and the biomarkers measured in maternal and fetal samples were identified. The present study suggests that maternal intake of meats with dark surface contributes to the bulky DNA adduct levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. Relationship between food preparation and bulky DNA adducts appear to be captured by a FFQ while potential associations for other biomarkers might be more complex or need larger sample size.

  10. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother–newborns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Marie; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I.; Autrup, Herman; Brouwer, Abraham; Besselink, Harrie; Loft, Steffen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006–2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet was estimated on the basis of maternal food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed by the end of pregnancy. Biomarkers were detected in paired blood samples through the dioxin-responsive chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) ® bioassay, 32 P-postlabelling technique and cytokinesis-block MN assay. Maternal preference for meats with dark surface were significantly associated with higher bulky DNA adducts in both maternal (β 95%CI; 0.46 (0.08, 0.84)) and cord blood (β 95%CI; 0.46 (0.05, 0.86)) before and after adjustment for potential confounders. No other significant associations between the 18 dietary variables and the biomarkers measured in maternal and fetal samples were identified. The present study suggests that maternal intake of meats with dark surface contributes to the bulky DNA adduct levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. Relationship between food preparation and bulky DNA adducts appear to be captured by a FFQ while potential associations for other biomarkers might be more complex or need larger sample size.

  11. Arsenic in the aquatic environment - speciation and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landner, L. [Swedish Environmental Research Group (MFG)

    1998-03-01

    The present report is a contribution to EC Commission`s undertaking to review existing EC provisions on the substances for which Sweden has been granted transitional provisions. The provisions imply that Sweden may maintain more stringent regulations on four substances until the end of 1998. The present report deals with speciation and biological effects of arsenic in three types of aquatic environments - marine water, estuarine or brackish water and freshwater. The similarity between arsenate and phosphate and the interference in phosphorylation reactions is discussed. It is clear that in Scandinavian inland waters the concentration of phosphorous is on average lower than in most inland waters in continental Europe. However, in most inland waters phosphorus is the limiting factor for phytoplankton development and eutrophication, which means that there is a clear risk for detrimental effects in the great majority of inland waters, also eutrophic waters 167 refs, 27 figs, 12 tabs. Exemption Substances Project (Directive 89/677/EEC)

  12. Biological interactions and human health effects of static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems will be described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecular structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary will also be presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields studied in the laboratory and in natural settings. One aspect of magnetic field effects that merits special concern is their influence on implanted medical electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers. Several extensive studies have demonstrated closure of the reed switch in pacemakers exposed to relatively weak static magnetic fields, thereby causing them to revert to an asynchronous mode of operation that is potentially hazardous. Recommendations for human exposure limits are provided

  13. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Cellulose based hybrid hydroxylated adducts for polyurethane foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pisapia, Laura; Verdolotti, Letizia; Di Mauro, Eduardo; Di Maio, Ernesto; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid flexible polyurethane foams (HPU) were synthesized by using a hybrid hydroxilated adduct (HHA) based on renewable resources. In particular the HHA was obtained by dispersing cellulose wastes in colloidal silica at room temperature, pressure and humidity. The colloidal silica was selected for its ability of modifying the cellulose structure, by inducing a certain "destructurization" of the crystalline phase, in order to allow cellulose to react with di-isocyanate for the final synthesis of the polyurethane foam. In fact, cellulose-polysilicate complexes are engaged in the reaction with the isocyanate groups. This study provides evidence of the effects of the colloidal silica on the cellulose structure, namely, a reduction of the microfiber cellulose diameter and the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polysilicate functional groups and the hydroxyl groups of the cellulose, as assessed by IR spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The HHA was added to a conventional polyol in different percentages (between 5 and 20%) to synthesize HPU in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The mixture was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Thermal analysis, optical microscopy and mechanical tests were performed on the foams. The results highlighted an improvement of thermal stability and a decrease of the cell size with respect neat polyurethane foam. Mechanical tests showed an improvement of the elastic modulus and of the damping properties with increasing HHA amount.

  15. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal : Metabolic Insights and Salinity Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welles, L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a biological process for efficient phosphate removal from wastewaters through intracellular storage of polyphosphate by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and subsequent removal of PAO from the system through wastage of sludge. In comparison

  16. Disturb or stabilise? Effects of different molecules on biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siwko, Magdalena Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The properties of biological membranes are often regulated by special molecules produced by organisms. Knowledge about the mechanisms by which these molecules affect biological membranes is a key issue in understanding living organisms. The interactions between phospholipid membranes and different

  17. Biological dosimetry by the radiation effects on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Yuko

    1994-01-01

    In cases of partial body over-exposure, the dose estimation with personal monitors or with reconstruction of exposed conditions is often impossible without considerable error. Clinical signs of irradiated skin, such as epilation or moist desquamation have been used as the indicators of doses in the radiological accidents, because each sign has the threshold dose. As hair growth is known to be sensitive to radiation, the dose-effect relationship of the delay of hair regrowth and the reduction in hair length of mice after irradiation were examined to investigate if they can be used as biological dosimeters. Hairs on the dorsal skin of 290 ICR mice (8 weeks old) were shaved and irradiated with a Sr-90/Y-90 β-ray source in the early anagen and the midanagen stages of the hair cycle. Skin doses were from 0.5 to 10 Gy. The time of hair regrowth and the hair length were examined with the scaling loupe. Dose-effect relationship of the delay of hair regrowth and reduction in hair length were both clearly dose dependent, fitting the L-Q or L function depending on the stage. Dose estimation functions were derived from the dose-effect relationship curves. The histological observations suggested that hair growth retardation caused by irradiation in midanagen might be due to the cell death and the depression of mitosis in the hair matrix cells. This dose estimation method was applied to the case who was over-exposed to X-ray on his hand and fingers. The findings showed that hair regrowth delay was a sensitive biological dosimeter in the case of partial body over-exposure, which could be applied as early as a few days after over-exposure. The method was simple and non-invasive to the exposed patient. (author)

  18. Characterization of hemoglobin-benzo[a]pyrene adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, D.A.; Myers, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    Cultures of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells were supplemented with human Hb (0.2 mM heme) and [ 3 H]BP (1 μM). After a 24-h incubation, the medium was removed and subjected to cation-exchange liquid chromatography (CM-Sepharose) to resolve hemoglobins from serum proteins in the medium. The BP-treated Hb was subjected to analysis in each of three column chromatographic systems established for isolation and characterization of human hemoglobin and its genetic and post-translationally modified variants. Results demonstrate that hemoglobin-carcinogen adducts can be resolved from native hemoglobin by established conventional and high-performance liquid chromatographic procedures, suggesting the basis for development of general approaches for isolating and characterizing hemoglobin-carcinogen adducts. The results also suggest the basis for a model system in which adducts between carcinogens and human hemoglobin are formed in cultures of mammalian cells or tissues

  19. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reduction and species conversion at a hydrophobic surface for mitochondrial cytochromes c and their cardiolipin adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranieri, Antonio; Di Rocco, Giulia; Millo, Diego; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bortolotti, Carlo A.; Lancellotti, Lidia; Borsari, Marco; Sola, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cytochrome c and its adduct with cardiolipin can be immobilized on a hydrophobic SAM. • Adsorbed cytochrome c and its adduct undergo extensive unfolding and axial ligand substitution. • An equilibrium between a six-coordinated and a five-coordinated form is observed in both cases. • The reduced five-coordinated form is stabilized by cardiolipin binding. • Immobilized cytochrome c exchanges electrons more slowly upon cardiolipin binding. - Abstract: Cytochrome c (cytc) and its adduct with cardiolipin (CL) were immobilized on a hydrophobic SAM-coated electrode surface yielding a construct which mimics the environment experienced by the complex at the inner mitochondrial membrane where it plays a role in cell apoptosis. Under these conditions, both species undergo an equilibrium between a six-coordinated His/His-ligated and a five-coordinated His/- ligated forms stable in the oxidized and in the reduced state, respectively. The thermodynamics of the oxidation-state dependent species conversion were determined by temperature-dependent diffusionless voltammetry experiments. CL binding stabilizes the immobilized reduced His/- ligated form of cytc which was found previously to catalytically reduce dioxygen. Here, this adduct is also found to show pseudoperoxidase activity, catalysing reduction of hydrogen peroxide. These effects would impart CL with an additional role in the cytc-mediated peroxidation leading to programmed cell death. Moreover, immobilized cytc exchanges electrons more slowly upon CL binding possibly due to changes in solvent reorganization effects at the protein-SAM interface

  20. Challenges in Analyzing the Biological Effects of Resveratrol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdogan, Cihan Süleyman; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The suggested health effects (e.g., disease prevention) of dietary bioactive compounds such as resveratrol are challenging to prove in comparison to man-made drugs developed for therapeutic purposes. Dietary bioactive compounds have multiple cellular targets and therefore have a variety of biolog......The suggested health effects (e.g., disease prevention) of dietary bioactive compounds such as resveratrol are challenging to prove in comparison to man-made drugs developed for therapeutic purposes. Dietary bioactive compounds have multiple cellular targets and therefore have a variety...... research. Questions we address include: (1) Is the combinatorial effect of resveratrol and other compounds real? (2) What are the real and relevant doses of resveratrol after administration? and (3) Is it possible to estimate the preventive effect of resveratrol by clinical trials using standard...... experimental designs? The examples concerning resveratrol taken from the scientific literature are mainly from 2010 and later. The challenges pointed out in this review are similar to most naturally occurring bioactive compounds...

  1. “The Biological Effects of Childhood Trauma”

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Michael D.; A.B., Abigail Zisk

    2014-01-01

    I. Synopsis Trauma in childhood is a grave psychosocial, medical, and public policy problem that has serious consequences for its victims and for society. Chronic interpersonal violence in children is common worldwide. Developmental traumatology, the systemic investigation of the psychiatric and psychobiological effects of chronic overwhelming stress on the developing child, provides a framework and principles when empirically examining the neurobiological effects of pediatric trauma. Despite the widespread prevalence of childhood trauma, less is known about trauma's biological effects in children as compared to adults with child trauma histories; and even less is known about how these pediatric mechanisms underlie trauma's short-term and long-term medical and mental health consequences. This article focuses primarily on the peer-reviewed literature on the neurobiological sequelae of childhood trauma in children and adults with histories of childhood trauma. We also review relevant studies of animal models of stress to help us better understand the psychobiological effects of trauma during development. Next, we review the neurobiology of trauma, its clinical applications and the biomarkers that may provide important tools for clinicians and researchers, both as predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms and as useful tools to monitor treatment response. Finally, we offer suggestions for future researchers. PMID:24656576

  2. Biological effects of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Montagu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol.

  3. Possible rare congenital dysinnervation disorder: congenital ptosis associated with adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Sílvia; Beselga, Diana; Campos, Sónia; Neves, Arminda; Campos, Joana; Carvalho, Sílvia; Silva, Eduardo; Castro Sousa, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Ptosis is defined as an abnormally low position of the upper eyelid margin. It can be congenital or acquired, uni or bilateral, and isolated or associated with other ocular and nonocular defects. We report a case of a female child, aged 8 years, with congenital right ptosis increased on right adduction and with left ptosis on left adduction. There was no horizontal ocular movement limitation. Apparent underaction of the right inferior oblique muscle was also present. We believe that within the possible mechanisms it is more likely that it is a congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome (CID)/congenital cranial dysinnervation disorder (CCDD).

  4. Research program on the biological effects of oil pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.T.

    1991-12-01

    A national research program on the biological effects of oil pollution (FOBO) was initiated by the Norwegian Ministry of Environment in October 1983 in the light of the increasing oil exploration and production activity in the North Sea and northern Norwegian waters. Ambitions were high and five main fields of research were suggested: Seabirds, fish (incl. salmon), marine mammals, the littoral zone and plankton. However, due to the lack of interest on the part of other potential financers, e.g. the Ministry of Fisheries and the oil companies, to participate, the four-year programme had to be limited to the following three topics: Seabirds around bruding colonies and at sea; Higher plants along the shoreline; The littoral zone. The program ran from the autumn of 1985 to the end of 1989 and this report summarizes the main results and conclusions of each project. 95 refs., 52 figs., 9 tabs

  5. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  6. The relative biological effectiveness of radiations of different quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a review of the literature relevant to the selection of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for use in arriving at values of the quality factor (Q). Emphasis is placed on response to small ( M . In a wide variety of systems, the RBE M for fast (fission) neutrons, with low doses and dose rates, appears to be of the order of 20 or more compared to moderately filtered 250 kVp x rays and 40 or more compared to higher energy gamma rays. These values, which are much larger than those observed with large doses delivered at high dose rates, are due mainly, but not entirely, to a decrease in the slope of the curve for the ow-LET reference radiation at low dose

  7. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    exposure to PM(2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and benzene has been measured in groups of 40-50 subjects. Measured biomarkers included 1-hydroxypyrene, benzene metabolites (phenylmercapturic acid (PMA) and trans-trans-muconic acid (ttMA)), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in urine, DNA strand....... With respect to exposure to PM, biomarkers of oxidative damage showed significant positive association with the individual exposure. Thus, 8-oxodG in lymphocyte DNA and markers of oxidative damage to lipids and protein in plasma associated with PM(2.5) exposure. Several types of DNA damage showed seasonal......, biological effects of air pollutants appear mainly related to oxidative stress via personal exposure and not to urban background levels. Future developments include personal time-resolved monitors for exposure to ultrafine PM and PM(2.5,) use of GPS, as well as genomics and proteomics based biomarkers....

  8. The biological effects of exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Scenarios for exposure to ionising radiation range from natural background radiation (chronic) to the explosions of atomic bombs (acute), with some medical, industrial and research exposures lying between these extremes. Biological responses to radiation that predominate at high doses incurred at high dose rates are different from those that predominate at low doses and low dose rates. Single doses from bomb explosions ranged up to many thousand mGy. Acute doses greater than about 1000 mGy cause acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Below this threshold, radiation has a variety of potential latent health effects: Change to the incidence of cancer is the most usual subject of attention but change to longevity may be the best overall measure because decreased incidences of non-cancer mortality have been observed to coincide with increased incidence of cancer mortality. Acute doses greater than 500 mGy cause increased risks of cancer and decreased life expectancy. For doses less than 100 mGy, beneficial overall health effects ('radiation hormesis') have been observed. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic exposure to natural radiation has occurred throughout evolution and is necessary for the normal life and health of current species. Dose rates greater than the present global average of about 2 mGy per year have either no discernible health effect or beneficial health effects up to several hundred mGy per year. It is clearly not credible that a single health effects model -- such as the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of risk estimation -- could fit all latent health effects. A more realistic model is suggested.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Optic Nerve Traction During Adduction in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma With Normal Intraocular Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demer, Joseph L.; Clark, Robert A.; Suh, Soh Youn; Giaconi, JoAnn A.; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Law, Simon K.; Bonelli, Laura; Coleman, Anne L.; Caprioli, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain effects of optic nerve (ON) traction in adduction, a phenomenon proposed as neuropathic in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods Seventeen patients with POAG and maximal IOP ≤ 20 mm Hg, and 31 controls underwent MRI in central gaze and 20° to 30° abduction and adduction. Optic nerve and sheath area centroids permitted computation of midorbital lengths versus minimum paths. Results Average mean deviation (±SEM) was −8.2 ± 1.2 dB in the 15 patients with POAG having interpretable perimetry. In central gaze, ON path length in POAG was significantly more redundant (104.5 ± 0.4% of geometric minimum) than in controls (102.9 ± 0.4%, P = 2.96 × 10−4). In both groups the ON became significantly straighter in adduction (28.6 ± 0.8° in POAG, 26.8 ± 1.1° in controls) than central gaze and abduction. In adduction, the ON in POAG straightened to 102.0% ± 0.2% of minimum path length versus 104.5% ± 0.4% in central gaze (P = 5.7 × 10−7), compared with controls who straightened to 101.6% ± 0.1% from 102.9% ± 0.3% in central gaze (P = 8.7 × 10−6); and globes retracted 0.73 ± 0.09 mm in POAG, but only 0.07 ± 0.08 mm in controls (P = 8.8 × 10−7). Both effects were confirmed in age-matched controls, and remained significant after correction for significant effects of age and axial globe length (P = 0.005). Conclusions Although tethering and elongation of ON and sheath are normal in adduction, adduction is associated with abnormally great globe retraction in POAG without elevated IOP. Traction in adduction may cause mechanical overloading of the ON head and peripapillary sclera, thus contributing to or resulting from the optic neuropathy of glaucoma independent of IOP. PMID:28829843

  10. Effects of biological explanations for mental disorders on clinicians’ empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Matthew S.; Ahn, Woo-kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders are increasingly understood in terms of biological mechanisms. We examined how such biological explanations of patients’ symptoms would affect mental health clinicians’ empathy—a crucial component of the relationship between treatment-providers and patients—as well as their clinical judgments and recommendations. In a series of studies, US clinicians read descriptions of potential patients whose symptoms were explained using either biological or psychosocial information. Biological explanations have been thought to make patients appear less accountable for their disorders, which could increase clinicians’ empathy. To the contrary, biological explanations evoked significantly less empathy. These results are consistent with other research and theory that has suggested that biological accounts of psychopathology can exacerbate perceptions of patients as abnormal, distinct from the rest of the population, meriting social exclusion, and even less than fully human. Although the ongoing shift toward biomedical conceptualizations has many benefits, our results reveal unintended negative consequences. PMID:25453068

  11. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442) is...

  12. [sup 129]I Moessbauer spectroscopic study of metallocene-iodine adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Satoru (Dept. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Sakai, Hiroshi (Dept. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Watanabe, Masanobu (Dept. of Chemistry, Coll. of Arts and Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Maeda, Yutaka (Research Reactor Inst., Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    A [sup 129]I Moessbauer spectroscopic study of iodine adducts of ferrocenophane, biruthenocene, and osmocene is reported. The spectra show the existence of iodine bonded to the central metals of metallocenes in addition to triiodide anions. The valence state of iron in the ferrocenophane-iodine adduct is the same as those of ruthenium and osmium in their adducts. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of estimated dietary intake of acrylamide with hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and glycidamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjellaas, Thomas; Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2007-01-01

    , a significant positive correlation was found between the AA-Hb adduct concentration and the intake of chips/snacks and crisp bread. GA-Hb adduct did not correlate with consumption of any of the main food groups. Neither AA-Hb nor GA-Hb adduct concentration correlated with total dietary intake of AA...

  14. Environmental, Dietary, Maternal, and Fetal Predictors of Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Mendez, Michelle A; Schoket, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bulky DNA adducts reflect genotoxic exposures, have been associated with lower birth weight, and may predict cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: We selected factors known or hypothesized to affect in utero adduct formation and repair and examined their associations with adduct levels in neonates....

  15. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H. [Center for Human Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E. [Center for Human Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  16. Dose-dependent reduction of 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl-derived DNA adducts in colon and liver of rats administered celecoxib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoori, Srivani; Feng Yi; Neale, Jason R.; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Hein, David W.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2008-01-01

    Colon cancer is second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Western countries. Diet and smoking, which contain aromatic and heterocyclic amines, are major risk factors for colon cancer. Colorectal cancers have a natural history of long latency and therefore provide ample opportunities for effective chemoprevention. 3,2'-Dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl (DMABP) is an experimental aromatic amine that causes cancer in rat colon and serves as an experimental model for arylamine and heterocyclic amine mutagens derived from diet and smoking. In this study, we investigated the effects of celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor on DMABP-induced DNA adduct formation in rat liver and colon. Male F-344 rats (5-week old) were provided free access to modified AIN-76A rat chow containing 0 (control), 500, 1000, or 1500 ppm celecoxib. Two weeks later, the rats received a subcutaneous injection of 100 mg/kg DMABP in peanut oil. Two days after DMABP treatment, the rats were killed and DMABP-derived adducts were analyzed in colon and liver DNA by butanol extraction-mediated 32 P-postlabeling. Two major DNA adducts, identified as dG-C8-DMABP and dG-N 2 -DMABP, were detected in liver and colon of rats treated with DMABP. These DNA adducts were diminished approximately 35-40% with 500 ppm and 65-70% with 1,000 ppm celecoxib. In the colon, no further decline in DNA adducts was observed at 1500 ppm. The same DMABP-DNA adducts also were detected in the liver and were also diminished by celecoxib treatment. The reduction in DMABP-DNA adduct levels in celecoxib-treated animals provides further support for celecoxib as a chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer

  17. In vivo biological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery: A primate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunsford, L.D.; Altschuler, E.M.; Flickinger, J.C.; Wu, A.; Martinez, A.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Single-fraction, closed skull, small-volume irradiation (radiosurgery) of intact intracranial structures requires accurate knowledge of radiation tolerance. We have developed a baboon model to assess the in vivo destructive radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery. Three baboons received a single-fraction, 150-Gy lesion of the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, or the pons using the 8-mm diameter collimator of the gamma unit. Serial standard neurodiagnostic tests (neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging, stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scan of cerebral blood flow, somatosensory and brain stem evoked potentials, and myelin basic protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid) were compared with preoperative studies. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the development of a lesion at the target site between 45 and 60 days after irradiation. Deterioration of the brain stem evoked potentials preceded imaging changes when the lesion encroached on auditory pathways. Myelin basic protein levels increased subsequent to imaging changes. Postmortem neuropathological examination confirmed a well-demarcated radionecrosis of the target volume. The baboon model appears to be an excellent method to study the in vivo biological effects of radiosurgery.

  18. Triclosan: A Widespread Environmental Toxicant with Many Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Tukey, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that has been added to personal care products, including hand soaps and cosmetics, and impregnated in numerous different materials ranging from athletic clothing to food packaging. The constant disposal of TCS into the sewage system is creating a major environmental and public health hazard. Owing to its chemical properties of bioaccumulation and resistance to degradation, TCS is widely detected in various environmental compartments in concentrations ranging from nanograms to micrograms per liter. Epidemiology studies indicate that significant levels of TCS are detected in body fluids in all human age groups. We document here the emerging evidence—from in vitro and in vivo animal studies and environmental toxicology studies—demonstrating that TCS exerts adverse effects on different biological systems through various modes of action. Considering the fact that humans are simultaneously exposed to TCS and many TCS-like chemicals, we speculate that TCS-induced adverse effects may be relevant to human health. PMID:26738475

  19. Scientific projection paper on biologic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.

    1980-01-01

    There is widespread knowledge about the effects of radiation in human populations but the studies have had some limitations which have left gaps in our knowledge. Most populations have had exposure to high doses with little information on the effect of dose rate. The characteristics of the populations have been restricted by the location of the disaster, the occupational limitations, or the basic risks associated with the under-lying disease for which radiation was given. All doses have been estimated and such values are subject to marked variability particularly when they rely on sources of data such as hospital records. The biological data although extensive have several deficits in information. Which are the sites in which cancer is produced by irradiation and what are the cell types which are produced. The sensitivity of various tissues and organs are not similar and it is important to rank them according to susceptibility. This has been done in the past but the results are not complete for all cell types and organs. The temporal patterns for tumor development, the latent period, the period of expressed excess, the life-time risks need to be defined more precisely for the cancers. Many populations have not been followed long enough to express the complete risk

  20. Biological effects of inhaled radionuclides: summary of ICRP report 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ICRP Task Group charged with evaluating the hazards associated with inhalation of plutonium and other radionuclides, enumerated the biological responses to inhaled radionuclides, identified tissues and cells at risk, derived risk coefficients for inhaled radionuclides from animal experiments for comparison with human data, and determined an equal effectiveness ratio of alpha emitters relative to beta-gamma emitters. High lung burdens of inhaled radionuclides result in profound structural and functional changes in which the pulmonary capillary endothelial cells are the most prominent cells at risk. Linear and nonlinear models used to evaluate lung cancer data from animal experiments project to risk coefficients between 0.84 and 1600 cases/10 6 animals/rad. The report concludes that the animal data support the current ICRP lung cancer risk of 2 x 10 -3 Sv -1 (400 x 10+H-+H6 rad -1 ). Comparison of risk coefficients for beta-gamma emitters with those for alpha emitters, obtained using the same models, gave an Equal Effectiveness Ratio of 30 for inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides. Thus, the experimental data support the ICRP decision to change the quality factor from 10 to 20 for alpha radiation. (H.K.)

  1. Formation of BH 3 Adducts with Pyridine-2-Methylaminophosphine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 1. Formation of BH3 Adducts with Pyridine-2-Methylaminophosphine ligands: An experimental and computational study. Harinath Adimulam Dwijendra P Kukri Bhabani S Mallik Tarun K Panda. Regular Articles Volume 128 Issue 1 January 2016 pp 53-60 ...

  2. Conformations of stereoisomeric base adducts to 4-hydroxyequilenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuang; Shapiro, Robert; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Broyde, Suse

    2003-06-01

    Exposure to estrogen through estrogen replacement therapy increases the risk of women developing cancer in hormone sensitive tissues. Premarin (Wyeth), which has been the most frequent choice for estrogen replacement therapy in the United States, contains the equine estrogens equilin and equilenin as major components. 4-Hydroxyequilenin (4-OHEN) is a phase I metabolite of both of these substances. This catechol estrogen autoxidizes to potent cytotoxic quinoids that can react with dG, dA, and dC to form unusual stereoisomeric cyclic adducts (Bolton, J. L., et al. (1998) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 11, 1113-1127). Like other bulky DNA adducts, these lesions may exhibit different susceptibilities to DNA repair and mutagenic potential, if not repaired in a structure-dependent manner. To ultimately gain insights into structure-function relationships, we computed conformations of stereoisomeric guanine, adenine, and cytosine base adducts using density functional theory. We find near mirror image conformations in stereoisomer adduct pairs for each modified base, suggesting opposite orientations with respect to the 5' --> 3' direction of the modified strand when the stereoisomer pairs are incorporated into duplex DNA. Such opposite orientations could cause stereoisomer pairs of lesions to respond differently to DNA replication and repair enzymes.

  3. Theoretical investigations on the formation of nitrobenzanthrone-DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2011-09-07

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust. The thermochemical formation cascades were calculated for six 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts employing its arylnitrenium ion as precursor using density functional theory (DFT). Clear exothermic pathways were found for four adducts, i.e., 2-(2'-deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, 2-(2'-deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone and 2-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone. All four have been observed to be formed in cell-free experimental systems. The formation of N-(2'-deoxyadenosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone is predicted to be not thermochemically viable explaining its absence in either in vitro or in vivo model systems. However, 2-(2'-deoxyadenosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, can be formed, albeit not as a major product, and is a viable candidate for an unknown adenine adduct observed experimentally. 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA), an isomer of 3-NBA, was also included in the calculations; it has a higher abundance in ambient air than 3-NBA, but a much lower genotoxic potency. Similar thermochemical profiles were obtained for the calculated 2-NBA-derived DNA adducts. This leads to the conclusion that enzymatic activation as well as the stability of its arylnitrenium ion are important determinants of 2-NBA genotoxicity.

  4. Deuteration of triborane(7) adducts with anhydrous deuterium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, A.R.; Kodama, G.

    1977-01-01

    A hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction between triborane(7) adducts and deuterium chloride is reported which involves all the hydrogen atoms in the B 3 H 7 moiety and proceeds rapidly even at low temperatures. The exchange reaction is reported to proceed much faster in dichloromethane solution than in tetrahydrofuran

  5. Formation of BH3 Adducts with Pyridine-2-Methylaminophosphine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tional theoretical (DFT) calculations were performed on the BH3 adducts 1a and 2a. The results are consistent with the experimental results. Keywords. Pyridine; Borane; DFT calculation; X-ray analysis; HOMO; LUMO. 1. Introduction. Various P-N ligands are often used in organometallic chemistry to achieve well-defined ...

  6. Aldehyde and ketone adducts of the gaseous trifluoromethyl cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Morton, T.H.

    2011-01-01

    IR spectra of CF3+ adduct ions are reported for the first time using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Carbonyl stretches of ketone conjugate acids shift less than do those of ions containing C═OCF3+ groups. Carbonyl absorptions shift in proportion to the empirical softness of the

  7. Metal-isonitrile adducts for preparing radionuclide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, A.P.; Linder, K.E.; Maheu, L.J.; Patz, M.A.; Thompson, J.S.; Tulip, T.H.; Subramanyam, V.

    1988-01-01

    An method for preparing a coordination complex of isonitrile ligand and a radioisotope of Te, Ru, Co, Pt, Re, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Nb and Ta from a non-radioactive metal adduct of the isonitrile

  8. Biological and sanitary effects of non ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugere, H.; Hours, M.; Seze, R. de; Bernier, M.; Letertre, Th.; Aurengo, A.; Burais, N.; Bedja, M.; Merckel, O.; Decat, G.; Lagroye, I.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier de Gannes, F.; Aurengo, A.; Souques, M.; Cesarini, J.P.; Lagroye, I.; Aurengo, A.; Cesarini, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this day was to encourage the collaborations, especially multidisciplinary, on the biological, clinical, epidemiological and dosimetry aspects. The different presentations are as follow: the magneto reception among animals; the health and radio frequencies foundation; expo-metry to radio frequency fields: dosemeters evaluation; the electro-optical probes as tool of hyper frequency dosimetry; characterisation of emissions produced by the low consumption fluo-compact lamps in the perspective of persons exposure; strong and weak points of epidemiology; numerical dosimetry in low frequency magnetic and/or electric field; exposure of the French population to the 50 Hz magnetic field: first results for the Ile-de-france and Rhone alpes areas; characterisation of the exposure to the very low frequency magnetic fields in the town of Champlan; measurement of the residential exposure of children to the extremely low frequency, very low frequency and radiofrequency (E.L.F., V.L.F. and R.F.) fields and modeling of the high voltage magnetic field face to the child leukemia; effects of radiofrequency signals of wireless communications on the young animals; study of combined effects of 2.45 GHz microwaves and a known mutagen on DNA by two different approaches; effects on the oxidizing stress of nervous cells exposure to an (enhanced data rates for GSM evolution) E.D.G.E. signal; is environmental epidemiology still a science; cardiac implants and exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields in occupational environment; the tanning by artificial UV radiation: norms and legislation; mobiles phones, Wi Fi and other wireless communications; effects on health of 50-60 Hz electromagnetic fields; natural and artificial ultraviolet radiations: a proved risk. (N.C.)

  9. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  10. Biological effects of radiation human health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    The biological hazards of nuclear energy usage are a growing source of public concern. The medical profession may well be expected to contribute to public debate on the issue. This document, therefore, attempts a balanced review of the known and suspected human biological consequences of exposure to different types of ionizing radiation, emphasizing in particular the nuclear industry

  11. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    1 School of Biology, University Park, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK. 2 St Katherine ... the world‟s greatest places, with enormous religious, cultural and biological significance (see. Grainger & Gilbert .... The arrows indicate years of floods, but rainfall is very patchy in these deserts and floods can occur ...

  12. Molecular dosimetry of DNA adducts in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to benzo(a)pyrene by different routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, D.; Clarius, T.M.; Wright, A.S.; Watson, W.P.

    1994-01-01

    Farm raised rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed by various routes to benzo(a)pyrene (BP) as a representative carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Following exposure of fish to the chemical by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, 32 P-postlabelling studies indicated that non-feral trout were relatively resistant to the formation of BP-DNA adducts in liver. No adducts were detected in fish exposed to single doses (20 mg/kg) of BP. Multiple exposures (e.g. 2 x 25 mg/kg) were necessary in order for adducts to be detected, indicating that induction of the metabolising enzymes required for the bioactivation of BP is necessary. These studies provided reference information on DNA adducts for comparison with data from subsequent experiments at environmentally realistic low level exposures. Two types of low level aquatic exposure were carried out. The first procedure exposed fish for 30 days to a nominally constant low level (1.2 and 0.4 μg/l) of a homogeneous dispersion of BP in water, to simulate low level aquatic environmental exposures. Following 32 P-postlabelling analysis of the liver DNA of exposed fish, BP-DNA adducts were not detected. In the second procedure, fish were exposed to a constant low level of BP (ca. 0.5 μg/l) for 15 days then to a pulse (60 μg/l) which was allowed to naturally decline (to ca. 2 μg/l) during a further 15 days. Following this exposure, significant levels of BP-DNA adducts were detected in livers of trout. The effect of dietary exposures was investigated by feeding trout a diet containing either 58 μg or 288 μg BP per day for 6 days, equivalent to total doses of 43 mg/kg and 216 mg/kg. In both cases BP-DNA adducts were detected in livers of exposed fish. The results provide useful information on the types of exposures to PAHs which may pose a genotoxic risk to fish in the environment. (orig.)

  13. 2'-Deoxythymidine Adducts from the Anti-HIV Drug Nevirapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Matilde Marques

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nevirapine (NVP is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI used against HIV-1. Currently, NVP is the most widely used anti-HIV drug in developing countries, both in combination therapy and to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Despite its efficacy against HIV, NVP produces a variety of toxic responses, including hepatotoxicity and skin rash. It is also associated with increased incidences of hepatoneoplasias in rodents. In addition, epidemiological data suggest that NNRTI use is a risk factor for non-AIDS-defining cancers in HIV-positive patients. Current evidence supports the involvement of metabolic activation to reactive electrophiles in NVP toxicity. NVP metabolism includes oxidation to 12-hydroxy-NVP; subsequent Phase II sulfonation produces an electrophilic metabolite, 12-sulfoxy-NVP, capable of reacting with DNA to yield covalent adducts. Since 2’-deoxythymidine (dT adducts from several alkylating agents are regarded as having significant mutagenic/carcinogenic potential, we investigated the formation of NVP-dT adducts under biomimetic conditions. Toward this goal, we initially prepared and characterized synthetic NVP-dT adduct standards using a palladium-mediated Buchwald-Hartwig coupling strategy. The synthetic standards enabled the identification, by LC-ESI-MS, of 12-(2'-deoxythymidin-N3-yl-nevirapine (N3-NVP-dT in the enzymatic hydrolysate of salmon testis DNA reacted with 12-mesyloxy-NVP, a synthetic surrogate for 12-sulfoxy-NVP. N3-NVP-dT, a potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA lesion, was also the only dT-specific adduct detected upon reaction of dT with 12-mesyloxy-NVP. Our data suggest that N3-NVP-dT may be formed in vivo and play a role in the hepatotoxicity and/or putative hepatocarcinogenicity of NVP.

  14. Nanogold – Biological effects and occupational exposure levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanogold has different properties and biological activity compared to metallic gold. It can be applied in many fields, such as medicine, laboratory diagnostics and electronics. Studies on laboratory animals show that nanogold can be absorbed by inhalation and ingestion. It can penetrate deep into the epidermis and dermis, but there is no evidence that it is absorbed through the skin. Gold nanoobjects accumulate mainly in the liver and spleen, but they can also reach other internal organs. Nanogold can cross the blood–brain and blood–placenta barriers. Toxicokinetics of nanogold depends on the particle size, shape and surface charge. In animals exposure to gold nanoparticles via inhalation induces slight changes in the lungs. Exposure to nanogold by the oral route does not cause adverse health effects in rodents. In animals after injection of gold nanoobjects changes in the liver and lungs were observed. Nanogold induced genotoxic effects in cells, but not in animals. No adverse effects on the fetus or reproduction were found. There are no carcinogenicity studies on gold nanoparticles. The mechanism of toxicity may be related to the interaction of gold nanoobjects with proteins and DNA, and it leads to the induction of oxidative stress and genetic material damage. The impact of nanostructures on human health has not yet been fully understood. The person, who works with nanomaterials should exercise extreme caution and apply existing recommendations on the evaluation of nanoobjects exposure. The risk assessment should be the basis for taking appropriate measures to limit potential exposure to nanometals, including nanogold. Med Pr 2017;68(4:545–556

  15. {sup 32}P-postlabeling determination of DNA adducts in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris exposed to PAH-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, P. [Laval Univ. Research Center, Quebec (Canada)]|[Ministere de l`Environnement et de la Faune du Quebec (Canada); El Adlouni, C.; Mukhopadhyay, M.J.; Nadeau, D.; Poirier, G.G. [Laval Univ. Research Center, Quebec (Canada); Viel, G. [CreaLab., Quebec (Canada)

    1995-05-01

    The importance of the search for reliable biomarkers of DNA damage in environmental health assessment is well recognized by the scientific community and regulatory agencies. Among the major biomarkers of DNA damage is the measurement of DNA adducts in target cells or tissues. Up to now, DNA adduct determinations have been directed mostly toward human exposure to toxic substances from the workplace and environment. Moreover, techniques for measuring DNA adducts, and in particular the {sup 32}P-postlabelling technique, presented also the possibility of determining DNA adduct levels in endogenous animal populations exposed to polluted environments as early warning monitors of ecotoxicity. Soil contamination is becoming a major environmental issue. Therefore, numerous contaminated sites must now be remediated to protect human health and to permit new uses of these sites as agricultural, residential, or industrial areas. Fulfillment of this task requires standardized and sensitive bioassays to carry out site evaluations and to establish scientifically defensible soil quality criteria. To that effect, the earthworm appears to be one of the best organisms for use in soil toxicity evaluation. Earthworms are probably the most relevant soil species, representing 60 to 80% of the total animal biomass in soil. Present soil bioassays focus mostly on plant species with end points like seed germination, root elongation, seedling growth and seedling emergence, and on acute toxicity evaluation (re: LC 50) on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. As yet, a standardized soil invertebrate test for teratogenic or mutagenic end points has not been developed. In this paper, we report the feasibility of DNA adduct determination by {sup 32}P-postlabelling in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris as a way to detect the presence of genotoxic substances in soils. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Porru

    Full Text Available DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028, whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006 was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001, coffee (p<0.001, cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041 and MnSOD (p = 0.009 and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008 were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different

  17. A physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model for estragole DNA binding in rat liver based on in vitro kinetic data and estragole DNA adduct formation in primary hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paini, Alicia; Punt, Ans; Viton, Florian; Scholz, Gabriele; Delatour, Thierry; Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Schilter, Benoit; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Estragole has been shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species at high-dose levels. Translation of these results into the likelihood of formation of DNA adducts, mutation, and ultimately cancer upon more realistic low-dose exposures remains a challenge. Recently we have developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for rat and human predicting bioactivation of estragole. These PBBK models, however, predict only kinetic characteristics. The present study describes the extension of the PBBK model to a so-called physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model predicting in vivo DNA adduct formation of estragole in rat liver. This PBBD model was developed using in vitro data on DNA adduct formation in rat primary hepatocytes exposed to 1'-hydroxyestragole. The model was extended by linking the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole formation predicted by the PBBK model to the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole in the in vitro experiments. The outcome of the PBBD model revealed a linear increase in DNA adduct formation with increasing estragole doses up to 100 mg/kg bw. Although DNA adduct formation of genotoxic carcinogens is generally seen as a biomarker of exposure rather than a biomarker of response, the PBBD model now developed is one step closer to the ultimate toxic effect of estragole than the PBBK model described previously. Comparison of the PBBD model outcome to available data showed that the model adequately predicts the dose-dependent level of DNA adduct formation. The PBBD model predicts DNA adduct formation at low levels of exposure up to a dose level showing to cause cancer in rodent bioassays, providing a proof of principle for modeling a toxicodynamic in vivo endpoint on the basis of solely in vitro experimental data.

  18. Immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard-adducts with DNA and proteins: Exploratory research on adducts with proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Noort, D.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, H.C.M. van; Fidder, A.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed two modes of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard adducts to DNA in human blood and skin. In the shortened mode data could be generated within 9 h after in vitro exposure of human blood to > 1 μM sulfur mustard. The sensitive mode

  19. Outcomes of medialization laryngoplasty with and without arytenoid adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joseph; Schneider, Sarah L; Curtis, James; Langenstein, Jonelyn; Courey, Mark S; Yung, Katherine C

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of medialization laryngoplasty (ML) performed alone compared to ML with arytenoid adduction (AA) on glottic gap and voice quality in unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) patients. Retrospective case series. UVFP patients treated with ML alone and ML with AA at the University of California San Francisco Voice and Swallowing Center were identified. Demographic information and history of laryngeal procedures were collected. Preoperative and postoperative examinations were digitally analyzed using ImageJ for normalized anterior and posterior glottic gap and voice samples graded with CAPE-V scores. Forty-seven patients underwent ML and 27 patients underwent ML with AA. Normalized anterior gap (AG) improved in both ML (preop: 4.4 pixel units (u), postop: 0.8 u; P < 0.001) and ML with AA groups (preop: 3.3 u, postop 0.6 u; P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in normalized AG values between treatment groups. Postoperative normalized posterior gap (PG) improved in the ML with AA group only (preop: 1.8 u, postop: 0.5 u; P = 0.01). Overall severity, roughness, and strain voice parameters had acceptable reliability for analysis. Overall severity improved in ML (preop: 54, postop: 27; P < 0.001) and ML with AA (preop: 44, postop: 24; P = 0.005). There was no statistically significant difference in any voice parameter between treatment groups. UVFP patients undergoing ML may benefit from addition of AA when a large posterior glottic gap is present. In this study, ML with AA but not ML alone resulted in statistically significant improvement in PG. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2591-2595, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  1. Biological effect of ultrasoft x-ray, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Noboru

    1985-01-01

    Biological effect on Escherichia coli by ultrasoft X-ray have been studied by comparing with that by uv light (2537 A) and by soft X-ray (40 kVp, 5 mA). Ultrasoft X-ray is aluminium characteristic X-ray (about 1.5 keV) produced by low energy electron collision on aluminium foil target and is obtained from Lea-type transmission target discharge tube. Escherichia coli used here are AB1157, AB1886 (uvrA6), JC1569 (recA), AB2470 (recB) and AB2480 (uvr rec) for inactivation experiment and WP2, WP2uvrA, WP2pKM101 and WP2uvrApKM101 for mutation induction experiment. These strains are all irradiated in buffer. Results obtained are summerized as follows : (i) inactivation by ultrasoft X-ray is located between ones by uv light and by soft X-ray, or ultrasoft X-ray gives a lethal damage that uvrA6 gene seems to contribute, and (ii) ultrasoft X-ray does not show the remarkable mutation induction like that induced by low dose irradiation of uv light or soft X-ray. (author)

  2. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, 252 Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by 60 Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use

  3. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  4. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Knudsen, H; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  5. Biological effect of hydrolyzed collagen on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneault, Audrey; Prawitt, Janne; Fabien Soulé, Véronique; Coxam, Véronique; Wittrant, Yohann

    2017-06-13

    Osteoporosis is a chronic and asymptomatic disease characterized by low bone mass and skeletal microarchitectural deterioration, increased risk of fracture, and associated comorbidities most prevalent in the elderly. Due to an increasingly aging population, osteoporosis has become a major health issue requiring innovative disease management. Proteins are important for bone by providing building blocks and by exerting specific regulatory function. This is why adequate protein intake plays a considerable role in both bone development and bone maintenance. More specifically, since an increase in the overall metabolism of collagen can lead to severe dysfunctions and a more fragile bone matrix and because orally administered collagen can be digested in the gut, cross the intestinal barrier, enter the circulation, and become available for metabolic processes in the target tissues, one may speculate that a collagen-enriched diet provides benefits for the skeleton. Collagen-derived products such as gelatin or hydrolyzed collagen (HC) are well acknowledged for their safety from a nutritional point of view; however, what is their impact on bone biology? In this manuscript, we critically review the evidence from literature for an effect of HC on bone tissues in order to determine whether HC may represent a relevant alternative in the design of future nutritional approaches to manage osteoporosis prevention.

  6. Formation of DNA adducts in mouse tissues after 1-nitropyrene administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    DNA adducts were isolated and characterized in mouse lung, liver and kidney after intratracheal instillation of [ 3 H]-1-nitropyrene (1-NP). HPLC analysis of the enzymatically digested DNA indicated the presence of multiple DNA adducts in mouse lung, liver and kidney. These results indicate that DNA adducts of 1-NP are formed in mouse lung, liver and kidney after intratracheal instillation of 1-NP; the HPLC profiles of the multiple adducts suggests that adducts may be formed via metabolic pathways that involve both nitroreduction and ring-oxidation. 6 references, 1 figure

  7. A modified microdosimetric kinetic model for relative biological effectiveness calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizheng; Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    In the heavy ion therapy, not only the distribution of physical absorbed dose, but also the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) weighted dose needs to be taken into account. The microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) can predict the RBE value of heavy ions with saturation-corrected dose-mean specific energy, which has been used in clinical treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. In the theoretical assumption of the MKM, the yield of the primary lesion is independent of the radiation quality, while the experimental data shows that DNA double strand break (DSB) yield, considered as the main primary lesion, depends on the LET of the particle. Besides, the β parameter of the MKM is constant with LET resulting from this assumption, which also differs from the experimental conclusion. In this study, a modified MKM was developed, named MMKM. Based on the experimental DSB yield of mammalian cells under the irradiation of ions with different LETs, a RBEDSB (RBE for the induction of DSB)-LET curve was fitted as the correction factor to modify the primary lesion yield in the MKM, and the variation of the primary lesion yield with LET is considered in the MMKM. Compared with the present the MKM, not only the α parameter of the MMKM for mono-energetic ions agree with the experimental data, but also the β parameter varies with LET and the variation trend of the experimental result can be reproduced on the whole. Then a spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) distribution of physical dose was simulated with Geant4 Monte Carlo code, and the biological and clinical dose distributions were calculated, under the irradiation of carbon ions. The results show that the distribution of clinical dose calculated with the MMKM is closed to the distribution with the MKM in the SOBP, while the discrepancy before and after the SOBP are both within 10%. Moreover, the MKM might overestimate the clinical dose at the distal end of the SOBP more than 5% because of its

  8. The effect of network biology on drug toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The high failure rate of drug candidates due to toxicity, during clinical trials, is a critical issue in drug discovery. Network biology has become a promising approach, in this regard, using the increasingly large amount of biological and chemical data available and combining...... biology has the opportunity to contribute to a better understanding of a drug's safety profile. The authors believe that considering a drug action and protein's function in a global physiological environment may benefit our understanding of the impact some chemicals have on human health and toxicity...

  9. Thorotrast: A Bibliography of its Diagnostic Use and Biological Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    This bibliography has been compiled primarily to support a study of Thorotrast toxicity which is being conducted in the Medical Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The limited resources of staff and time available for its compilation have dictated a practical compromise between completeness and freedom from error on the one hand and effort on the other. While neither complete nor free of error, it has been stencilled so as to be available to other groups with similar interests. Additions and corrections would be gratefully received. The chief concern of the bibliography is with the toxic effects of Thorotrast. Papers on the diagnostic use of Thorotrast have also been included, both because of their relevance to the subsequent toxic effects and because of the light they shed on the possible numbers and location of Thorotrast cases. Papers on various related topics such as ThX (Ra-224) and MsTh (Ra-228) have been included when found, but no special search for them has been made. Papers are classified under the topics shown in the Table of Contents. In many cases papers have been listed under two or more categories, but a unique classification is obviously impossible. Since a rather abrupt change in outlook on the biological significance of ionizing radiation took place with the advent of nuclear energy, papers are given separately under each topic according to publication dates 1945 and earlier, 1946 and later. Original titles (if available) are given along with their English translations. Authors' addresses are listed for papers of which reprints have been obtained by the Agency.

  10. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Lyons, Brett P; Thain, John E; Law, Robin J

    2013-09-30

    Natural and synthetic chemicals are essential to our daily lives, food supplies, health care, industries and safe sanitation. At the same time protecting marine ecosystems and seafood resources from the adverse effects of chemical contaminants remains an important issue. Since the 1970s, monitoring of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemicals using analytical chemistry has provided important spatial and temporal trend data in three important contexts; relating to human health protection from seafood contamination, addressing threats to marine top predators and finally providing essential evidence to better protect the biodiversity of commercial and non-commercial marine species. A number of regional conventions have led to controls on certain PBT chemicals over several years (termed 'legacy contaminants'; e.g. cadmium, lindane, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs] and polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]). Analytical chemistry plays a key role in evaluating to what extent such regulatory steps have been effective in leading to reduced emissions of these legacy contaminants into marine environments. In parallel, the application of biomarkers (e.g. DNA adducts, CYP1A-EROD, vitellogenin) and bioassays integrated with analytical chemistry has strengthened the evidence base to support an ecosystem approach to manage marine pollution problems. In recent years, however,the increased sensitivity of analytical chemistry, toxicity alerts and wider environmental awareness has led to a focus on emerging chemical contaminants (defined as chemicals that have been detected in the environment, but which are currently not included in regulatory monitoring programmes and whose fate and biological impacts are poorly understood). It is also known that natural chemicals (e.g. algal biotoxins) may also pose a threat to marine species and seafood quality. Hence complex mixtures of legacy contaminants, emerging chemicals and natural biotoxins in marine ecosystems represent

  11. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  12. Biological effect of magnetic field on the fermentation of wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Dobšinský

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the transformation process of matter is produced energy, which afterwards interacts with matter itself, and other forms of energy. Energy induced electromagnetic appliances may affect the processes occurring in biological systems. In our study we have evaluated the wine fermentation process of the magnetic field with different amplitudes of electromagnetic induction, the constant exposure of 30 minutes a day for 10 days. The device for inducing magnetism was constructed at the Department of Fruit Growing, Viticulture and Enology at Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra for research purposes. Essence of the device lies in the way of the management of direct current, which flows through the coil. Volume of direct current is regulated by network auto-transformer. Output of network autotransformer is rectified by two-way bridge rectifier. The coil is powered by a direct current voltage pulse. This device has a maximum value of the magnetic induction at 150 mT. At full power it must be supplied from three-phase socket with a rated current of 32 A. For our experiment, we chose wine grape variety of Hibernal, from Nitra wine region. The magnetic field induced by the electromagnetic device has an impact on the process of fermentation and sensory characteristics of a young wine. As part of the sensory profile, we noticed higher levels of residual sugar and speed up of the fermentation process and the process of purifying of the young wine. The influence of magnetic field on grape juice during the entire fermentation process and production of wine is a convenient way to improve the quality of wine without side effects or any chemical additives.

  13. Increased micronuclei and bulky DNA adducts in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.; Wichmann, J.; Autrup, H.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollution in urban environment is common and has been associated with adverse human health effects. In utero exposures that result in DNA damage may affect health later in life. Early effects of maternal and in utero exposures to traffic-related air pollution were...... for potential confounders and effect modifiers. For the first time increased bulky DNA adducts and MN in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution are found, demonstrating that these transplacental environmental exposures induce DNA damage in newborns. Given that increased DNA damage...... umbilical cords, concurrently collected at the time of planned Caesarean section. Modeled residential traffic density, a proxy measure of traffic-related air pollution exposures, was validated by indoor levels of nitrogen dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in 42 non-smoking homes. DNA adduct...

  14. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  15. Kinetics of hydroperoxy radical reactions with acetone/HO2 adduct and with acetonylperoxy radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieman, F. J.; VanDerGeest, K.; Newenhouse, E.; Watkins, K.; Noell, A. C.; Hui, A.; Sander, S. P.; Okumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with acetone and with acetonylperoxy radical, CH3C(O)CH2OO, may play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Using a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube cell and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2OO from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 215 to 298 K at 100 Torr. Rates of chemical reactions were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. (See Fig.1.) The primary reactions are rapid (reactions to form the adducts HO2-CH3OH and HO2-CH3C(O)CH3 followed by HO2 reactions with itself, the adducts (chaperone mechanisms), and acetonylperoxy radical. The equilibrium constants for adduct formation were determined in previous work.1,2 In this work, rate coefficients were determined for the acetone chaperone mechanism over the entire temperature range. (E.g., see Fig. 2.) The rate coefficients and energies obtained are very similar to those found for the methanol case.1 Rate coefficients for the CH3C(O)CH2OO/HO2 reaction were also determined over a smaller temperature range, extending the measured value beyond room temperature, and yielding an activation energy. 1. Christensen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 6948-6959. 2. Grieman et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 10527-10538. Fig.1. HO2 decay for HO2/Acetone chemistry at T = 298 K. Fig.2. Determining rate coefficient (k") for HO2/acetone chaperone effect at T = 222.5 K.

  16. Shutdown potential adjustment of modified carbene adducts as additives for lithium ion battery electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Pia; Streipert, Benjamin; Krafft, Roman; Murmann, Patrick; Wagner, Ralf; Lewis-Alleyne, Lesley; Röschenthaler, Gerd-Volker; Winter, Martin; Cekic-Laskovic, Isidora

    2017-11-01

    To improve the intrinsic safety of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) by preventing cells from a thermal runaway, we studied two carbene adduct electrolyte additives. The recently synthesized compounds (1,3-dimethylimidazolidin-2-μm-trifluoroborate (NHC-BF3) and 1,3-dimethylimidazolidin-2-μm-tetrafluorotrifluoromethylphosphate (NHC-PF4CF3)) were investigated on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC111) electrodes in Li metal and Li-ion cell setups as overcharge protection shutdown additives in 1M LiPF6 in EC:DEC (3:7, by wt.) electrolyte. By varying the NHC-ligand (-BF3, -PF5, -PF4CF3) in the molecule, the shutdown potential of the investigated carbene adduct electrolyte additives can be tailored for specific applications with different cut-off potentials. NHC-BF3 was identified as a promising candidate for the application with NMC111 electrodes up to 4.4 V vs. Li/Li+, whereas the carbene adduct NHC-PF4CF3 is ideal for the high-voltage application with the NMC-based electrode up to 4.6 V vs. Li/Li+. Next to electrochemical investigations in NMC111/Li and NMC111/graphite cells, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were performed to verify the presence of a decomposition layer on the cathode, responsible for the shutdown effect. Furthermore, it has been proven that the investigated electrolyte additives have no influence on the cell performance under normal conditions in both, Li metal and Li-ion cell setups.

  17. EMG evaluation of hip adduction exercises for soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2014-01-01

    traditional and two new hip adduction exercises. Additionally, to analyse muscle activation of gluteals and abdominals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 40 healthy male elite soccer players, training >5 h a week, participated in the study. Muscle activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured bilaterally...... for the adductor longus during eight hip adduction strengthening exercises and peak EMG was normalised (nEMG) using an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) as reference. Furthermore, muscle activation of the gluteus medius, rectus abdominis and the external abdominal obliques was analysed during...... the exercises. RESULTS: There were large differences in peak nEMG of the adductor longus between the exercises, with values ranging from 14% to 108% nEMG (pEMG results for the gluteals...

  18. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  19. Exposure of bus and taxi drivers to urban air pollutants as measured by DNA and protein adducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemminki, K.; Zhang, L.F.; Krüger, J.

    1994-01-01

    Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, lymphocyte DNA adducts, serum protein-bound PAH and hemoglobin-bound alkene adducts were analysed from 4 groups of non-smoking men: urban and suburban bus drivers, taxi drivers and suburban controls. The only differences between the groups were in DNA adducts between...... suburban bus drivers and controls, and in DNA adduct and plasma protein PAH-adducts between taxi drivers and controls....

  20. Biological effectiveness and application of heavy ions in radiation therapy described by a physical and biological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.J.; Hansen, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    A description is given of the physical basis for applying track structure theory in the determination of the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation of single- and multi-hit target systems. It will be shown that for applying the theory to biological systems the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied simultaneously in therapy. (author)

  1. PHOSPHATO AND PHOSPHONATO ADDUCTS: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamadou Birame Diop

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Two new adducts have been synthesized and studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopy. The suggested structures are discrete or of infinite chain type with a phosphate behaving as a bidentate ligand, a phosphonate acting as a monodentate ligand, the environments around the tin centre being tetrahedral or trigonal bipyramidal. In all the studied compounds, supramolecular architectures are obtained when hydrogen bonds are considered.

  2. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de [Walther-Straub-Institut Für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80336 München (Germany); Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wjiang@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  3. Dispersant additives derived from lactone modified amido-amine adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A.; Lundberg, R.D.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a lactone modified dispersant additive. It comprises one adduct of a polyolefin of 300 to 10,000 number average molecular weight substituted with at least 0.8 (e.g., from about 1 to 4) dicarboxylic acid producing moieties (preferably acid or anhydride moieties) per polyolefin molecule, an amido-amine or thioamido-amine characterized by being a reaction product of at least a polyamine and an alpha, beta-unsaturated compound.

  4. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  5. Diagnosis and dosimetry of exposure to sulfur mustard: Development of a standard operating procedure for hemoglobin adducts: Exploratory research on albumin and keratin adducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Schans, G.P. van der; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) for determination of the sulfur mustard adduct to the N-terminal valine in hemoglobin was developed. By using this SOP, it was found that the Nterminal valine adduct in globin of hairless guinea pigs and marmosets which had been exposed to sulfur mustard (0.5

  6. Diagnosis and dosimetry of exposure to sulfur mustard: Development of a standard operating procedure for mass spectrometric analysis of haemoglobin adducts - Exploratory research on albumin and keratin adducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to develop a standard operating procedure for analysis of sulfur mustard adducts to the N-terminal valine in haemoglobin and to explore adduct formation with albumin and keratin. In the first approach, gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization/mass spectrometry

  7. Retardation of experimental tumorigenesis and reduction in DNA adducts by turmeric and curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, K; Goud, V K; Sesikeran, B; Mukundan, M A; Krishna, T P

    1998-01-01

    Turmeric and its active principle curcumin have been extensively investigated for their antimutagenic and antioxidant effects in bacterial and animal systems. Because oral cancers are common in India, an experimental model of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene-induced buccal pouch tumors in Syrian Golden hamsters was used to evaluate the tumor retardation effects of turmeric and curcumin. Turmeric and/or curcumin was administered in the diet and/or applied locally for 14 weeks along with 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene. After the experimental period, the animals were sacrificed and oral pouches were examined for tumor number and size. DNA adducts were estimated by 32P postlabel assay in the cheek pouches. Neoplastic changes were graded by histopathology. The results of the study suggest that turmeric or curcumin in the diet and/or applied locally significantly reduced DNA adducts at the target site. Tumor number and tumor burden were significantly lower (p curcumin (p curcumin administered in the diet or applied as paint may have a plausible chemopreventive effect on oral precancerous lesions.

  8. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  9. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    diversification, supplementation with capsules or syrups, molecular biology and industrial food fortification still require ... It is better to increase the Zn content in cereals, the staple food in many developing countries, through Zn ..... plant and human nutrition in Turkey: a NATO science for stability project. Field Crops Research ...

  10. Effect of sulphide on enhanced biological phosphorus removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio Rincon, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    The enhanced biological removal of phosphorus (EBPR) is a popular process due to high removal efficiency, low operational costs, and the possibility of phosphorus recovery. Nevertheless, the stability of the EBPR depends on different factors such as: temperature, pH, and the presence of toxic

  11. Controlling the Biological Effects of Spermine Using a Synthetic Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vial, Laurent; Ludlow, R. Frederick; Leclaire, Julien; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Otto, Sijbren

    2006-01-01

    Polyamines play an important role in biology, yet their exact function in many processes is poorly understood. Artificial host molecules capable of sequestering polyamines could be useful tools for studying their cellular function. However, designing synthetic receptors with affinities sufficient to

  12. Filter media expansion during backwash: The effect of biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    provided by the designer or that the mechanical behaviour of the media gradually changes after being placed in the filters. A number of media tests confirmed that the biological fraction of the specific deposit on the filter media (after backwashing) is relatively high – about 50% of the total specific deposit. This led to the ...

  13. Effects of hypervitaminosis of vitamin B3 on silkworm biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The supplementary leaves were fed to silkworms from 4th to 5th instar, once a day. Therefore the silkworm larvae were fed supplementary leaves just seven times (3 times in 4th instar and 4 times in 5th instar). 2.3 Biological parameters. Post-treatment, the larval and cocoon parameters were observed. The weights of larvae ...

  14. Effects Of Advance Organizers On Students\\' Achievement In Biology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science Education is emphasized in school curriculum in order to meet the country\\'s socioeconomic needs by producing a scientifically literate populace and professionals in science and technology based careers. Biology as a science subject is expected to make a contribution towards these objective. However, the ...

  15. Biological Effects of Nuclear Explosions (BENE) Domain Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Operation TEAPOT , 1955 .......................................................................................... 11  Table 1.14 Operation PLUMBBOB...hazards to humans that would be in the contaminated area post shot. Operation TEAPOT (Table 1.13) was intended to test nuclear devices for possible...several test series to determine biological availability of radioactive materials over time 11 Table 1.13 Operation TEAPOT , 1955 Report

  16. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite, sub-elite and amateur Australian footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Ned; Hopper, Diana; Finucane, Mark; Grisbrook, Tiffany L

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that obtaining an adduction-to-abduction strength ratio of 90-100%, and an adduction strength equal to that of the uninjured side, are suitable clinical milestones for return to sport following groin injury. Little is known about hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in Australian footballers. This study aimed to compare isometric hip adduction and abduction strength profiles between preferred and non-preferred kicking legs in elite, sub-elite and amateur Australian footballers. Cross sectional study 36 elite, 19 sub-elite and 18 amateur Australian footballers, with a mean age of 24, 19 and 23 years respectively, were included. Maximal hip isometric adduction and abduction strength were measured using a hand held dynamometer with external belt fixation. There were no significant differences in isometric hip adduction (p=0.262) or abduction (p=0.934) strength, or the adduction-to-abduction ratio (p=0.163), between preferred and non-preferred kicking legs, regardless of playing level. Elite players had significantly greater isometric hip adduction and abduction strength than both sub-elite (mean difference; adduction=46.01N, pamateur players (mean difference; adduction=78.72N, p<0.001, abduction=59.11N, p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the adduction-to-abduction ratio between the playing levels (p=0.165). No significant differences were found between preferred and non-preferred kicking legs across the playing levels for isometric hip adduction, abduction or the adduction-to-abduction ratio. This may have implications for developing groin injury prediction and return to sport criteria in Australian footballers. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acetaminophen Adducts Detected in Serum of Pediatric Patients With Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Estella M; James, Laura P; Zhang, Song; Squires, Robert H

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies in patients with acute liver failure identified acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts in the serum of 12% and 19% of children and adults, respectively, with acute liver failure of indeterminate etiology. This article details the testing of APAP adducts in a subset (n = 393) of patients with varied diagnoses in the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group (PALFSG). Serum samples were available from 393 participants included in the PALFSG registry. Adduct measurement was performed using validated methods. Participants were grouped by diagnostic category as known APAP overdose, known other diagnosis, and indeterminate etiology. Demographic and clinical characteristics and participant outcomes were compared by adduct status (positive or negative) within each group. APAP adduct testing was positive in 86% of participants with known APAP overdose, 6% with other known diagnoses, and 11% with an indeterminate cause of liver failure. Adduct-positive participants were noted to have marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase coupled with total serum bilirubin that was significantly lower than adduct-negative patients. In the indeterminate group, adduct-positive patients had different outcomes than adduct-negative patients (P = 0.03); spontaneous survival was 16 of 21 (76%) in adduct-positive patients versus 75 of 169 (44%) in adduct-negative patients. Prognosis did not vary by adduct status in patients with known diagnoses. Furthermore, study is needed to understand the relation of APAP exposure, as determined by the presence of APAP adducts, to the clinical phenotype and outcomes of children with acute liver failure.

  18. Biological effects from discharge of cooling water from thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    Results are reported for a Danish project on biological effects from discharge of cooling water from thermal power plants. The purpose of the project was to provide an up-to-date knowledge of biological effects of cooling water discharge and of organization and evaluation of recipient investigations in planned and established areas. (BP)

  19. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  20. Effects of microwave heating on the thermal states of biological tissues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    calculated by using finite difference method to predict the effects of thermal physical properties on the transient temperature of biological tissues. This prediction of the temperature evolution in biological bodies can be used as an effective tool for thermal diagnostics in medical practices. Key words: Microwave heating, ...

  1. Tunability of RF-Responses by Plasmonic Dielectric Amplification Using Branched e- -Polarizable C60-Adducts on Magnetic (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    energy can lead to the formation of polarizations at the surface region. Polarizability of this particular type of NPs, as a function of the size...Soumekh, M. Synthetic Aperture Radar Signal Processing with MATLAB Algorithms ; John Wiley & Sons: New York, 1999. (16) Kong, J. A. Electromagnetic Wave...FeOx NP core, was effectively released at the light-off stage to induce the intramolecular polarization of C60-DPAF adducts. Resulting charged

  2. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic detoxification of 4-hydroxynonenal: Methodological aspects and biological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Marco; Regazzoni, Luca; Altomare, Alessandra; Degani, Genny; Carini, Marina; Vistoli, Giulio; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2017-10-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), an electrophilic end-product deriving from lipid peroxidation, undergoes a heterogeneous set of biotransformations including enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. The former mostly involve red-ox reactions on the HNE oxygenated functions (phase I metabolism) and GSH conjugations (phase II) while the latter are due to the HNE capacity to spontaneously condense with nucleophilic sites within endogenous molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids and phospholipids. The overall metabolic fate of HNE has recently attracted great interest not only because it clearly determines the HNE disposal, but especially because the generated metabolites and adducts are not inactive molecules (as initially believed) but show biological activities even more pronounced than those of the parent compound as exemplified by potent pro-inflammatory stimulus induced by GSH conjugates. Similarly, several studies revealed that the non-enzymatic reactions, initially considered as damaging processes randomly involving all endogenous nucleophilic reactants, are in fact quite selective in terms of both reactivity of the nucleophilic sites and stability of the generated adducts. Even though many formed adducts retain the expected toxic consequences, some adducts exhibit well-defined beneficial roles as documented by the protective effects of sublethal concentrations of HNE against toxic concentrations of HNE. Clearly, future investigations are required to gain a more detailed understanding of the metabolic fate of HNE as well as to identify novel targets involved in the biological activity of the HNE metabolites. These studies are and will be permitted by the continuous progress in the analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of novel HNE metabolites as well as for proteomic analyses able to offer a comprehensive picture of the HNE-induced adducted targets. On these grounds, the present review will focus on the major enzymatic and non-enzymatic HNE

  3. Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood, Maternal Fruit-and-Vegetable Consumption, and Birth Weight in a European Mother-Child Study (NewGeneris)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tobacco-smoke, airborne, and dietary exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with reduced prenatal growth. Evidence from biomarker-based studies of low-exposed populations is limited. Bulky DNA adducts in cord blood reflect the prenatal effective dose......, Kleinjans JC, Segerbäck D, Kogevinas M. 2013. Bulky DNA adducts in cord blood, maternal fruit-and-vegetable consumption, and birth weight in a European mother-child study (NewGeneris). Environ Health Perspect 121:1200-1206; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206333....

  4. Relative biological effectiveness of 160 MeV protons. II. Biological data and their interpretation in terms of microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Kellerer, A.M.; Rossi, H.H.; Lam, Y.M.P.

    1978-01-01

    The radiobiological effectiveness of 160 MeV protons was measured relative to 60 Co γ rays using Chinese hamster cells cultured in vitro. Separate experiments were performed with cells irradiated in suspension, or attached to plastic tissue culture flasks. Proton irradiations were performed in the incident plateau of the depth dose profile and with the Bragg peak spread out to cover 10 cm. In all cases the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons relative to gamma rays was 1.2 for doses in excess of about 200 rad. The attached cell experiments indicate an increasing RBE at low doses, which is consistent with the microdosimetric measurements

  5. Biological effects of exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnstroem, G.

    1992-10-01

    The biological effects of exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields are reviewed with the objective of summarizing effects directly relevant to considerations of the health and safety of exposed people

  6. Effects of abiotic stress on plants: a systems biology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Grant R; Urano, Kaoru; Delrot, Serge; Pezzotti, Mario; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2011-11-17

    The natural environment for plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and biotic stresses. Plant responses to these stresses are equally complex. Systems biology approaches facilitate a multi-targeted approach by allowing one to identify regulatory hubs in complex networks. Systems biology takes the molecular parts (transcripts, proteins and metabolites) of an organism and attempts to fit them into functional networks or models designed to describe and predict the dynamic activities of that organism in different environments. In this review, research progress in plant responses to abiotic stresses is summarized from the physiological level to the molecular level. New insights obtained from the integration of omics datasets are highlighted. Gaps in our knowledge are identified, providing additional focus areas for crop improvement research in the future.

  7. Essay writing in biology: An example of effective student learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeegers, Petrus; Giles, Lynne

    1996-12-01

    The views of first-year biology students ( N=337) on an essay writing assignment were evaluated by means of a questionnaire. The students were asked to reflect on the strategies they employed, the number and type of resources used, their areas of difficulty and to evaluate their own performance. The data were used to elucidate possible areas of discrepancy between the approach taken by the students and that suggested by the Biology Department via information in student manuals and evaluation criteria. The data were also compared to similar studies on student writing previously reported for students of psychology and history. Finally a series of recommendations is made to help staff to allow their students to develop improved writing strategies, minimise the possible difficulties encountered and allow the writing exercise to fulfil its desired outcome, that of being an integral part of the process of learning.

  8. Biological actions and effects of low-frequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, J.

    1993-01-01

    Cell culture studies have shown that low-frequency electromagnetic fields may affect cell behaviour. The fact that the corresponding field strengths are too weak to affect membrane potential, suggests that these fields trigger enzymatic reactions at the outer face of the membrane, i.e. cell-intrinsic reaction cascades and a biological modification of the affected biological system take place. These are working models and hypotheses which need to substantiated by further studies in this field. Epidemiological studies suggest that electromagnetic fields influence cancer development in man. However there is no action model indicating exposure to fields to be a genotoxic agent possible triggering a direct genetic modification which precludesr any initialization. (orig.) [de

  9. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Egyptian Journal of Biology, 2014, Vol. 16, pp 1- 16 ... oviposit in response to a particular food item early in her search if (1) this item is very suitable for her larvae, (2) ..... Vicia faba L. 42 1 0 0 0 4 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 3 0 26 0. Aphis fabae cirsiiacanthoidis Scopoli. Cirsium vulgare Ten. 7 18 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 5 0 0 0.

  10. Zinc acetylacetonate hydrate adducted with nitrogen donor ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis of zinc acetylacetonate complex adducted by nitrogen donor ligands, such as pyridine, bipyridine, and phenanthroline. The pyridine adducted complex crystallizes to monoclinic crystal structure, whereas other two adducted complexes have orthorhombic structure. Addition of nitrogen donor ligands enhances the thermal property of these complexes as that with parent metal-organic complex. Zinc acetylacetonate adducted with pyridine shows much higher volatility (106 °C), decomposition temperature (202 °C) as that with zinc acetylacetonate (136 °C, 220 °C), and other adducted complexes. All the adducted complexes are thermally stable, highly volatile and are considered to be suitable precursors for metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The formation of these complexes is confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The complexes are widely used as starting precursor materials for the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by microwave irradiation assisted coating process.

  11. Decay kinetics of nicotine/NNK-DNA adducts in vivo studied by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, H.F.; He, L.; Liu, Y.F.; Liu, K.X.; Lu, X.Y.; Wang, J.J.; Ma, H.J.; Li, K.

    2000-01-01

    The decay kinetics of nicotine-DNA adducts and NNK-DNA adducts in mice liver after single dosing was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The decay is characterized by a two-stage process. The half-lives of nicotine-DNA adducts are 1.3 d (4-24 h) and 7.0 d (1-21 d), while for NNK-DNA adducts are 0.7 d (4-24 h) and 18.0 d (1-21 d). The relatively faster decay of nicotine-DNA adducts suggests that the genotoxicity of nicotine is weaker than that of NNK. The in vitro study shows that the metabolization of nicotine is necessary for the final formation of nicotine-DNA adducts, and nicotine Δ1'(5') iminium ion is a probable metabolite species that binds to DNA molecule covalently

  12. Fast repair of oxidizing OH adducts of DNA by hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. A pulse radiolytic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jiang; Lin Weizhen; Yao Side; Lin Nianyun; Zhu Dayuan

    1999-01-01

    Using pulse radiolytic techniques, it has been demonstrated that the interactions of oxidizing OH adducts of DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA), polyA and polyG with hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives proceed via an electron transfer process (k=5-30x10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ). In addition, the rates for fast repair of OH adducts of dAMP, polyA and DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) are slower than the corresponding rates for the rest OH adducts of DNA constituents. The slower rates for repair of oxidizing OH adducts of dAMP may be the rate determining step during the interaction of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives with OH adducts of DNA containing the varieties of OH adducts of DNA constituents

  13. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  14. Predator interference effects on biological control: The "paradox" of the generalist predator revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Bhowmick, Suman; Quansah, Emmanuel; Basheer, Aladeen; Parshad, Rana D.; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    An interesting conundrum in biological control questions the efficiency of generalist predators as biological control agents. Theory suggests, generalist predators are poor agents for biological control, primarily due to mutual interference. However field evidence shows they are actually quite effective in regulating pest densities. In this work we provide a plausible answer to this paradox. We analyze a three species model, where a generalist top predator is introduced into an ecosystem as a...

  15. Biological effects of petroleum hydrocarbons: Predictions of long-term effects and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuzzo, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Biological effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on marine organisms and ecosystems are dependent on the persistence and bioavailability of specific hydrocarbons, the ability of organisms to accumulate and metabolize various hydrocarbons, the fate of metabolized products, and the interference of specific hydrocarbons with normal metabolic processes that may alter an organism's chances for survival and reproduction in the environment. In considering the long-term effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on marine ecosystems it is important to ascertain what biological effects may result in subtle ecological changes, changes in community structure and function, and possible impairment of fisheries resources. It is also important to understand which hydrocarbons persist in benthic environments and the sublethal effects that lead to reduced growth, delayed development and reduced reproductive effort, population decline and the loss of that population's function in marine communities. Only through a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the fate, transport and effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on marine ecosystems will there be a significant improvement in the ability to predict the long-term effects of oil spills and to elucidate the mechanisms of recovery

  16. Monitoring of dimethyl sulphate-induced N3-methyladenine, N7-methylguanine and O6-methylguanine DNA adducts using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadt, J.; Sýkora, D.; Nilsson, R.; Vodička, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 867, č. 1 (2008), s. 43-48 ISSN 1570-0232 Grant - others:EU(SE) 505609 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : DNA adducts Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.500, year: 2008

  17. Equilibrium and ab initio computational studies on the adduct formation of 1,3-diketonato-lithium(I), -sodium(I) and -potassium(I) with 1,10-phenanthroline and its 2,9-dimethyl derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Mori, Seiji; Ito, Yuji; Ohashi, Kousaburo; Imura, Hisanori

    2009-06-15

    Highly effective and selective synergistic extraction of Li+ has been found using 2-naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (Hnta) as an acidic chelating agent and 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmp) or 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmdpp) as a neutral ligand (denoted as L) in toluene. The synergism was ascribed to the adduct formation in the organic phase, and the composition and the formation constants of the adducts for alkali metal ions (M+) were determined by the extraction equilibrium analysis. The adducts found were M(nta)L for Li+ and Na+, while M(nta)L and M(nta)L2 for K+. To understand thermodynamics of the adduct formation with the bidentate amines, quantum chemical calculations of the 1:1 and 1:2 adduct formations with dmp and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were performed. The electronic and steric effects of the methyl groups at 2,9-positions of phen on the thermodynamic functions of adduct formation as well as the high lithium selectivity were quantitatively elucidated.

  18. Formation of S-[2-(N6-Deoxyadenosinyl)ethyl]glutathione in DNA and Replication Past the Adduct by Translesion DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgeman, Carl A; Su, Yan; Guengerich, F Peter

    2017-05-15

    1,2-Dibromoethane (DBE, ethylene dibromide) is a potent carcinogen due at least in part to its DNA cross-linking effects. DBE cross-links glutathione (GSH) to DNA, notably to sites on 2'-deoxyadenosine and 2'-deoxyguanosine ( Cmarik , J. L. , et al. ( 1991 ) J. Biol. Chem. 267 , 6672 - 6679 ). Adduction at the N6 position of 2'-deoxyadenosine (dA) had not been detected, but this is a site for the linkage of O 6 -alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase ( Chowdhury , G. , et al. ( 2013 ) Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 , 12879 - 12882 ). We identified and quantified a new adduct, S-[2-(N 6 -deoxyadenosinyl)ethyl]GSH, in calf thymus DNA using LC-MS/MS. Replication studies were performed in duplex oligonucleotides containing this adduct with human DNA polymerases (hPols) η, ι, and κ, as well as with Sulfolobus solfataricus Dpo4, Escherichia coli polymerase I Klenow fragment, and bacteriophage T7 polymerase. hPols η and ι, Dpo4, and Klenow fragment were able to bypass the adduct with only slight impedance; hPol η and ι showed increased misincorporation opposite the adduct compared to that of unmodified 2'-deoxyadenosine. LC-MS/MS analysis of full-length primer extension products by hPol η confirmed the incorporation of dC opposite S-[2-(N 6 -deoxyadenosinyl)ethyl]GSH and also showed the production of a -1 frameshift. These results reveal the significance of N 6 -dA GSH-DBE adducts in blocking replication, as well as producing mutations, by human translesion synthesis DNA polymerases.

  19. Mutagenicity of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in V79 cells expressing human SULT1A1: identification and mass spectrometric quantification of DNA adducts formed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Engst, Wolfram; Barknowitz, Gitte; Seidel, Albrecht; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-07-16

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a heterocyclic product of the Maillard reaction, is a ubiquitous food contaminant. It has demonstrated hepatocarcinogenic activity in female mice. This effect may originate from sulfo conjugation of the benzylic alcohol yielding 5-sulfooxymethylfurfural (SMF), which is prone to react with DNA via nucleophilic substitution. Indeed, we showed that HMF induces gene mutations in Chinese hamster V79 cells engineered for the expression of human (h) sulfotransferase (SULT)1A1 but not in parental V79 cells. In order to identify potential DNA adducts, we incubated DNA samples with SMF or HMF in aqueous solution. Modified DNA was digested and surveyed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for adducts that may be formed by nucleosides either via nucleophilic substitution at the electrophilic carbon atom of SMF or via imine formation with the aldehyde group present in HMF and SMF. The most abundant adducts formed from SMF, N(6)-((2-formylfuran-5-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine (N(6)-FFM-dAdo) and N(2)-((2-formylfuran-5-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-FFM-dGuo), were synthesized, purified, and characterized by (1)H NMR. Imine adducts were only detected when DNA was incubated with very high levels of HMF following reduction of the imines to corresponding secondary amines by NaBH(3)CN. Sensitive techniques based on LC-MS/MS multiple reaction monitoring for the quantification of the adducts in DNA samples were devised using isotope-labeled [(15)N(5)]N(6)-FFM-dAdo and [(13)C(10),(15)N(5)]N(2)-FFM-dGuo as internal standards. Both 5-methylfurfuryl adducts were detected in DNA from V79-hSULT1A1 treated with HMF but not in DNA from V79 control cells. Considering the lack of other known mutagenic metabolites, we hypothesize that the hepatocarcinogenic potential of HMF originates from the formation of mutagenic SMF.

  20. Acoustic Effects Accurately Predict an Extreme Case of Biological Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Truong, Son Nguyen; Müller, Rolf

    2009-07-01

    The biosonar system of bats utilizes physical baffle shapes around the sites of ultrasound emission for diffraction-based beam forming. Among these shapes, some extreme cases have evolved that include a long noseleaf protrusion (sella) in a species of horseshoe bat. We have evaluated the acoustic cost function associated with sella length with a computational physics approach and found that the extreme length can be predicted accurately from a fiducial point on this function. This suggests that some extreme cases of biological morphology can be explained from their physical function alone.

  1. Integrated Network Analysis and Effective Tools in Plant Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eFukushima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals in plant systems biology is to elucidate the genotype-phenotype relationship in plant cellular systems. Integrated network analysis that combines omics data with mathematical models has received particular attention. Here we focus on the latest cutting-edge computational advances that facilitate their combination. We highlight (1 network visualization tools, (2 pathway analyses, (3 genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, and (4 the integration of high-throughput experimental data and mathematical models. Multi-omics data that contain the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome and mathematical models are expected to integrate and expand our knowledge of complex plant metabolisms.

  2. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Bérard, Izabel; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied

  3. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batal, Mohamed [Laboratoire «Lésions des Acides Nucléiques», Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1, CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France); Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche (France); Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche (France); Bérard, Izabel [Laboratoire «Lésions des Acides Nucléiques», Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1, CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France); Cléry-Barraud, Cécile [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche (France); and others

    2013-12-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied.

  4. Correlation between Quadriceps Endurance and Adduction Moment in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hyuck Lee

    Full Text Available It is not clear whether the strength or endurance of thigh muscles (quadriceps and hamstring is positively or negatively correlated with the adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees. This study therefore assessed the relationships between the strength and endurance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and adduction moment in osteoarthritic knees and evaluated predictors of the adduction moment. The study cohort comprised 35 patients with unilateral medial osteoarthritis and varus deformity who were candidates for open wedge osteotomy. The maximal torque (60°/sec and total work (180°/sec of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and knee adduction moment were evaluated using an isokinetic testing device and gait analysis system. The total work of the quadriceps (r = 0.429, P = 0.037 and hamstring (r = 0.426, P = 0.045 muscles at 180°/sec each correlated with knee adduction moment. Preoperative varus deformity was positively correlated with adduction moment (r = 0.421, P = 0.041. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that quadriceps endurance at 180°/sec was the only factor independently associated with adduction moment (β = 0.790, P = 0.032. The adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees correlated with the endurance, but not the strength, of the quadriceps muscle. However, knee adduction moment did not correlate with the strength or endurance of the hamstring muscle.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of the Adducts of Bis(O-ethyldithiocarbonatocopper(II with Substituted Pyridines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Kour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monomeric five coordinated adducts of bis(O-ethyldithiocarbonatocopper(II of general formula [Cu(C2H5OCS22(L], [L = 2-, 3-, 4-methylpyridines and 2-, 3-, 4-ethylpyridines] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, i.r. and electronic spectroscopy, magnetic and conductivity measurements. Analytical results show that the adducts have 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The adducts were found to be paramagnetic and their magnetic moments at room temperature lie within the 1.81–1.94 B.M. range and this indicates the presence of one unpaired electron. All the adducts have distorted square pyramidal geometry.

  6. Regiochemically Controlled Synthesis of a β-4-β' [70]Fullerene Bis-Adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Maira R; Castro, Edison; Neti, Venkata S Pavan K; Dunk, Paul W; Echegoyen, Luis A

    2017-01-20

    A β-4-β' C 70 bis-adduct regioisomer and an uncommon mono-adduct β-malonate C 70 derivative were synthesized by using a Diels-Alder cycloaddition followed by an addition-elimination of bromo-ethylmalonate and a retro-Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. We also report the regioselective synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of C s -symmetric tris- and C 2v -symmetric tetra-adducts of C 70 , which are the precursors of the mono- and bis-adduct final products.

  7. Effect of Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning on Non-majors Biology Students' Understanding of Biological Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Breann M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) on non-majors college biology students' understanding of biological classification. This study addressed an area of science instruction, POGIL in the non-majors college biology laboratory, which has yet to be qualitatively and quantitatively researched. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods approach was used. Students' understanding of biological classification was measured in two areas: scores on pre and posttests (consisting of 11 multiple choice questions), and conceptions of classification as elicited in pre and post interviews and instructor reflections. Participants were Minnesota State University, Mankato students enrolled in BIOL 100 Summer Session. One section was taught with the traditional curriculum (n = 6) and the other section in the POGIL curriculum (n = 10) developed by the researcher. Three students from each section were selected to take part in pre and post interviews. There were no significant differences within each teaching method (p group may have scored higher on the posttest (M = 8.830 +/- .477 vs. M = 7.330 +/- .330; z =-1.729, p = .084) and the traditional group may have scored higher on the pretest than the posttest (M = 8.333 +/- .333 vs M = 7.333 +/- .333; z = -1.650 , p = .099). Two themes emerged after the interviews and instructor reflections: 1) After instruction students had a more extensive understanding of classification in three areas: vocabulary terms, physical characteristics, and types of evidence used to classify. Both groups extended their understanding, but only POGIL students could explain how molecular evidence is used in classification. 2) The challenges preventing students from understanding classification were: familiar animal categories and aquatic habitats, unfamiliar organisms, combining and subdividing initial groupings, and the hierarchical nature of classification. The POGIL students were the only group to

  8. Biological effects of radiation in combination with other physical, chemical or biological agents. Annex L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Annex considers the combined action of radiation with potentially important environmental conditions. Since there is a scarcity of systematic data on which an analysis of combined effects can be based, this Annex will be more hypothetical and will attempt to suggest definitions, to identify suitable methods of analysis, to select from a large amount of diffuse information the conditions and the data of importance for further consideration and to provide suggestions for future research. For humans in environmental circumstances the UNSCEAR Committee has been unable to document any clear case of synergistic interaction between radiation and other agents, which could lead to substantial modifications of the risk estimates for significant sections of the population.

  9. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  10. Gender Inequality in Biology Classes in China and Its Effects on Students' Short-Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated gender inequality in biology lessons and analysed the effects of the observed inequality on students' short-term knowledge achievement, situational interest and students' evaluation of teaching (SET). Twenty-two biology teachers and 803 7th-grade students from rural and urban classrooms in China participated in the study.…

  11. Floral biology and the effects of plant-pollinator interaction on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive biology and patterns of plant-pollinator interaction are fundamental to gene flow, diversity and evolutionary success of plants. Consequently, we examined the magnitude of insect-plant interaction based on the dynamics of breeding systems and floral biology and their effects on pollination intensity, fruit and ...

  12. Relative extents of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of nitrosamines: relevance to biological isotope effect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, G.M.; Lijinsky, W.

    1979-01-01

    Relative extents of base-catalyzed, hydrogen-deuterium exchange have been determined for a number of nitrosamines. Observed trends in the exchanges are discussed in terms of substitution, ring size and conformation. The relevance of the exchanges to deuterium isotope effects in carcinogenesis tests is discussed. Those compounds which give pronounced biological isotope effects undergo exchange only to a small extent. No biological isotope effect is found for compounds which undergo extensive exchange. (author)

  13. In vitro screening of 50 highly prescribed drugs for thiol adduct formation--comparison of potential for drug-induced toxicity and extent of adduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Ruan, Qian; He, Bing; Zhu, Mingshe; Shyu, Wen C; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2009-04-01

    Reactive metabolite formation has been associated with drug-induced liver, skin, and hematopoietic toxicity of many drugs that has resulted in serious clinical toxicity, leading to clinical development failure, black box warnings, or, in some cases, withdrawal from the market. In vitro and in vivo screening for reactive metabolite formation has been proposed and widely adopted in the pharmaceutical industry with the aim of minimizing the property and thus the risk of drug-induced toxicity (DIT). One of the most common screening methods is in vitro thiol trapping of reactive metabolites. Although it is well-documented that many hepatotoxins form thiol adducts, there is no literature describing the adduct formation potential of safer drugs that are widely used. The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the thiol adduct formation potential of 50 drugs (10 associated with DIT and 40 not associated) and document apparent differences in adduct formation between toxic and safer drugs. Dansyl glutathione was used as a trapping agent to aid the quantitation of adducts following in vitro incubation of drugs with human liver microsomes in the presence and absence of NADPH. Metabolic turnover of these drugs was also monitored by LC/UV. Overall, 15 out of the 50 drugs screened formed detectable levels of thiol adducts. There were general trends toward more positive findings in the DIT group vs the non-DIT group. These trends became more marked when the relative amount of thiol adducts was taken into account and improved further when dose and total daily reactive metabolite burdens were considered. In conclusion, there appears to be a general trend between the extent of thiol adduct formation and the potential for DIT, which would support the preclinical measurement and minimization of the property through screening of thiol adduct formation as part of an overall discovery optimization paradigm.

  14. Protection by quercetin and quercetin-rich fruit juice against induction of oxidative DNA damage and formation of BPDE-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boots, A.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of the flavonoid quercetin against the formation of oxidative DNA damage and bulky DNA adducts in human

  15. Comparison of the biological effects of MMS and Me-lex, a minor groove methylating agent: clarifying the role of N3-methyladenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Paola; Foggetti, Giorgia; Menichini, Paola; Inga, Alberto; Gold, Barry; Fronza, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    N3-methyladenine (3-mA), generated by the reaction of methylating agents with DNA, is considered a highly toxic but weakly mutagenic lesion. However, due to its intrinsic instability, some of the biological effects of the adduct can result from the formation of the corresponding depurination product [an apurinic (AP)-site]. Previously, we exploited Me-lex, i.e. {1-methyl-4-[1-methyl-4-(3-methoxysulfonylpropanamido)pyrrole-2-carboxamido]-pyrrole-2 carboxamido}propane, a minor groove equilibrium binder with selectivity for A/T rich sequences that efficiently reacts with DNA to afford 3-mA as the dominant product, to probe the biology of this lesion. Using human p53 cDNA as a target in a yeast system, a weak increase in mutagenicity was observed in the absence of Mag1 (3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase 1, mag1), the enzyme devoted to remove 3-mA from DNA. Moreover, a significant increase in mutagenicity occurred in the absence of the enzymes involved in the repair of AP-sites (AP endonucleases 1 and 2, apn1apn2). Since methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been extensively used to explore the biological effects of 3-mA, even though it produces 3-mA in low relative yield, we compared the toxicity and mutagenicity induced by MMS and Me-lex in yeast. A mutagenesis reporter plasmid was damaged in vitro by MMS and then transformed into wild-type and Translesion Synthesis (TLS) Polζ (REV3) and Polη (RAD30) deficient strains. Furthermore, a mag1rad30 double mutant strain was constructed and transformed with the DNA plasmid damaged in vitro by Me-lex. The results confirm the important role of Polζ in the mutagenic bypass of MMS and Me-lex induced lesions, with Polη contributing only towards the bypass of Me-lex induced lesions, mainly in an error-free way. Previous and present results point towards the involvement of AP-sites, derived from the depurination of 3-mA, in the observed toxicity and mutagenicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of ginsenoside compound K in human plasma by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry of lithium adducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside compound K (GCK, the main metabolite of protopanaxadiol constituents of Panax ginseng, easily produces alkali metal adduct ions during mass spectrometry particularly with lithium. Accordingly, we have developed a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method for analysis of GCK in human plasma based on formation of a lithium adduct. The analyte and paclitaxel (internal standard were extracted from 50 µL human plasma using methyl tert-butyl ether. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Phenomenex Gemini C18 column (50 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm using stepwise gradient elution with acetonitrile–water and 0.2 mmol/L lithium carbonate at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions at m/z 629→449 for the GCK-lithium adduct and m/z 860→292 for the adduct of paclitaxel. The assay was linear in the concentration range 1.00–1000 ng/mL (r2>0.9988 with intra- and inter-day precision of ±8.4% and accuracy in the range of −4.8% to 6.5%. Recovery, stability and matrix effects were all satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving administration of a single GCK 50 mg tablet to healthy Chinese volunteers.

  17. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  18. Biological methanogenesis and the CO2 greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well established that plants tend to increase net photosynthesis under increased carbon dioxide. It is also well established that a large fraction of atmospheric methane is produced by microbial metabolism of organic sediments in paddies and freshwater wetlands, where a major source of organic debris is local plant growth. As CO2 increases, it may lead to increased methane production and a resulting enhancement of the expected greenhouse warming. A rough estimate of the present rate of this biologically mediated feedback on the climate system indicates that it might account for as much as 30 percent of the observed methane increase and speed up the greenhouse forcing by as much as 15 percent.

  19. Effects of Biological Versus Psychosocial Explanations on Stigmatization of Children With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Matthew S; Rosenthal, Jessica E; Ahn, Woo-Kyoung

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have found biological conceptualizations of psychopathology to be associated with stigmatizing attitudes and prognostic pessimism. This research investigated how biological and psychosocial explanations for a child's ADHD symptoms differ in affecting laypeople's stigmatizing attitudes and prognostic beliefs. Three experiments were conducted online with U.S. adults, using vignettes that described a child with ADHD and attributed his symptoms to either biological or psychosocial causes. Dependent measures gauged social distance and expectations about the child's prognosis. Across all three studies, the biological explanation yielded more doubt about treatability but less social distance-a result that diverges from previous research with other disorders. Differences in the amount of blame ascribed to the child mediated the social distance effect. The effects of biological explanations on laypeople's views of ADHD seem to be a "double-edged sword," reducing social rejection but exacerbating perceptions of the disorder as relatively untreatable. © The Author(s) 2012.

  20. Aromatic DNA adducts in human white blood cells and skin after dermal application of coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godschalk, R.W.L.; Ostertag, J.U.; Moonen, E.J.C.; Neumann, H.A.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Schooten, F.J. van [University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology

    1998-09-01

    A group of eczema patients topically treated with coal tar (CT) ointments was used as a model population to examine the applicability of DNA adducts in white blood cell (WBC) subpopulations as a measure of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Aromatic DNA adducts were examined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling in exposed skin and WBC subsets, and urinary excretion of PAH metabolites was determined to assess the whole-body burden. The median urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene and 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene was 0.39 and 0.01 {mu}mol/mol creatinine respectively, before the dermal application of CT ointments. After treatment for 1 week, these levels increased to 139.7 and 1.18 {mu}mol/mol creatinine respectively, indicating that considerable amounts of PAHs were absorbed. Median aromatic DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in skin from 2.9 adduct/10{sup 8} nucleotides before treatment to 63.3 adducts/10{sup 8} nt after treatment with CT, in monocytes from 0.28 to 0.86 adducts/10{sup 8} nt, in lymphocytes from 0.33 to 0.89 adducts/10{sup 8} nt and in granulocytes from 0.28 to 0.54 adducts/10{sup 8} nt. A week after stopping the CT treatment, the DNA adduct levels in monocytes and granulocytes were reduced to 0.38 and 0.38 adducts/10{sup 8} nt respectively, whereas the adduct levels in lymphocytes remained enhanced. Total DNA adduct levels in skin correlated with the adduct levels in monocytes and lymphocytes. Excretion of urinary metabolites during the first week of treatment was correlated with the percentage of the skin surface treated with CT ointment and decreased within a week after the cessation of treatment. 3-Hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene excretion, correlated with the levels of DNA adducts in skin that comigrated with benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide-DNA. This study indicates that the DNA adduct levels in mononuclear WBCs can possibly be used as a surrogate for skin DNA after dermal exposure to PAHs. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Building the process-drug–side effect network to discover the relationship between biological Processes and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Side effects are unwanted responses to drug treatment and are important resources for human phenotype information. The recent development of a database on side effects, the side effect resource (SIDER), is a first step in documenting the relationship between drugs and their side effects. It is, however, insufficient to simply find the association of drugs with biological processes; that relationship is crucial because drugs that influence biological processes can have an impact on phenotype. Therefore, knowing which processes respond to drugs that influence the phenotype will enable more effective and systematic study of the effect of drugs on phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, the relationship between biological processes and side effects of drugs has not yet been systematically researched. Methods We propose 3 steps for systematically searching relationships between drugs and biological processes: enrichment scores (ES) calculations, t-score calculation, and threshold-based filtering. Subsequently, the side effect-related biological processes are found by merging the drug-biological process network and the drug-side effect network. Evaluation is conducted in 2 ways: first, by discerning the number of biological processes discovered by our method that co-occur with Gene Ontology (GO) terms in relation to effects extracted from PubMed records using a text-mining technique and second, determining whether there is improvement in performance by limiting response processes by drugs sharing the same side effect to frequent ones alone. Results The multi-level network (the process-drug-side effect network) was built by merging the drug-biological process network and the drug-side effect network. We generated a network of 74 drugs-168 side effects-2209 biological process relation resources. The preliminary results showed that the process-drug-side effect network was able to find meaningful relationships between biological processes and side effects in an

  2. Detection of Riddelliine-Derived DNA Adducts in Blood of Rats Fed Riddelliine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming W. Chou

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We have previously shown that riddelliine, a naturally occurring genotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, induces liver tumors in rats and mice through a genotoxic mechanism mediated by the formation of a set of eight 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5Hpyrrolizine ( DHP-derived DNA adducts. In this study we report the formation of these DHP-derived DNA adducts in blood DNA of rats fed riddelliine. In an adduct formation and removal experiment, male and female F344 rats (8 weeks of age were administered riddelliine by gavage at a single dose of 10.0 mg/kg body weight in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. At 8, 24, 48, and 168 hrs after dosing, the levels of DHP-derived DNA adduct in blood and liver were determined by 32P-postlabeling/HPLC. Maximum DNA adduct formation occurred at 48 hr after treatment. From 48 to 168 hours, the adduct levels in female rat blood were 4-fold greater than those in male rats. In a dose response experiment, female rats were gavaged 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg doses of riddelliine for three consecutive days and the DHPderived DNA adducts in blood DNA were assayed. The levels of the DHP-derived DNA adducts in blood of rats receiving 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg doses were 12.9 and 51.8 adducts/107 nucleotides. These results suggest that: (i leucocyte DNA can bind with DHP to form a set of DHP-derived DNA adducts generated in liver; (ii DHP-derived DNA adducts in blood can serve as a potential non-invasive biomarkers for assessing the exposure to riddelliine.

  3. An integrated strategy for biological effects monitoring in Scottish coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.A.; Dobson, J.; Richardson, L.; Hill, A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper summarises SEPA's current programme of water quality and biological effects monitoring and, using recent examples, discusses the current environmental issues affecting the condition of our coastal waters. (author)

  4. Biological assessment of effects of combined sewer overflows and storm water discharges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijklema, L.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Cuppen, J.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The biological effects of discharges from combined or separated sewer systems are difficult to assess or to predict due to variahilities in concentrations, environmental conditions, morphometry, susceptibility of organisms, seasonality and other factors. A general discussion of the problem results

  5. Professional development strategies for teaching urban biology teachers to use concept maps effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor Petgrave, Dahlia M.

    Many teachers are not adequately prepared to help urban students who have trouble understanding conceptual ideas in biology because these students have little connection to the natural world. This study explored potential professional development strategies to help urban biology teachers use concept maps effectively with various topics in the biology curriculum. A grounded theory approach was used to develop a substantive professional development model for urban biology teachers. Qualitative data were collected through 16 semi-structured interviews of professional developers experienced in working with concept maps in the urban context. An anonymous online survey was used to collect quantitative data from 56 professional developers and teachers to support the qualitative data. The participants were from New York City, recruited through the NY Biology-Chemistry Professional Development Mentor Network and the NY Biology Teachers' Association. According to the participants, map construction, classroom applications, lesson planning, action research, follow-up workshops, and the creation of learning communities are the most effective professional development strategies. The interviewees also proposed English language learning strategies such as picture maps, native word maps, and content reading materials with underlined words. This study contributes to social change by providing a professional development model to use in planning workshops for urban teachers. Urban teachers improve their own conceptual understanding of biology while learning how to implement concept mapping strategies in the classroom. Students whose teachers are better prepared to teach biology in a conceptual manner have the potential of growing into more scientifically literate citizens.

  6. Physics fundamentals and biological effects of synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prezado, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of radiation therapy is to deposit a curative dose in the tumor without exceeding the tolerances in the nearby healthy tissues. For some radioresistant tumors, like gliomas, requiring high doses for complete sterilization, the major obstacle for curative treatment with ionizing radiation remains the limited tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue. This limitation is particularly severe for brain tumors and, especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restricted. One possible solution is the development of new radiation therapy techniques exploiting radically different irradiation modes and modifying, in this way, the biological equivalent doses. This is the case of synchrotron radiation therapy (SRT). In this work the three new radiation therapy techniques under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France) will be described, namely: synchrotron stereotactic radiation therapy (SSRT), microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results in the treatment of the high grade brain tumors obtained in preclinical studies have paved the way to the clinical trials. The first patients are expected in the fall of 2010. (Author).

  7. Soil degradation effect on biological activity in Mediterranean calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Alcover-Sáez, S.; Mormeneo, S.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Soil degradation processes include erosion, organic matter decline, compaction, salinization, landslides, contamination, sealing and biodiversity decline. In the Mediterranean region the climatological and lithological conditions, together with relief on the landscape and anthropological activity are responsible for increasing desertification process. It is therefore considered to be extreme importance to be able to measure soil degradation quantitatively. We studied soil characteristics, microbiological and biochemical parameters in different calcareous soil sequences from Valencia Community (Easter Spain), in an attempt to assess the suitability of the parameters measured to reflect the state of soil degradation and the possibility of using the parameters to assess microbiological decline and soil quality. For this purpose, forest, scrubland and agricultural soil in three soil sequences were sampled in different areas. Several sensors of the soil biochemistry and microbiology related with total organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, microorganism number and enzyme activities were determined. The results show that, except microorganism number, these parameters are good indicators of a soil biological activity and soil quality. The best enzymatic activities to use like indicators were phosphatases, esterases, amino-peptidases. Thus, the enzymes test can be used as indicators of soil degradation when this degradation is related with organic matter losses. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative O2 uptake and extracellular enzymes among the soils with different degree of degradation. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  8. Integrating fluid dynamic and biologic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Endres, Jennifer; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. In previous work on biofilm growth and evolution in steady, laminar microchannel flows, it has been established that tower formation occurs around a very limited range of applied shear stresses centered on 0.6 dynes/cm2. Quantifying cell density characteristics as a function of time during biofilm formation reveals indicators of tower development hours before towers actually form and become visible. The next step in this research is to explore biological factors that might explain why this specific shear is so important. Additional studies with mutants, e.g. ica-A, that have been tied to tower formation have been conducted. The shear dependence of these mutants and their correlation to the behavior of wild type S. aureus is examined.

  9. Atheroprotective immunization with malondialdehyde-modified LDL is hapten specific and dependent on advanced MDA adducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonen, Ayelet; Hansen, Lotte; Turner, William W

    2014-01-01

    as an immunogen would be impractical for generalized use. Furthermore, when MDA is used to modify LDL, a wide variety of related MDA adducts are formed, both simple and more complex. To define the relevant epitopes that would reproduce the atheroprotective effects of immunization with MDA-LDL, we sought......Immunization with homologous malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) leads to atheroprotection in experimental models supporting the concept that a vaccine to oxidation-specific epitopes (OSEs) of oxidized LDL could limit atherogenesis. However, modification of human LDL with OSE to use...... responses. We further demonstrate that a T helper (Th) 2-biased hapten-specific humoral and cellular response is sufficient, and thus, MAA-modified homologous albumin is an equally effective immunogen. We further show that such Th2-biased humoral responses per se are not atheroprotective if they do...

  10. Bioaccumulation and biological effects in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to natural and depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, Anna, E-mail: anna.giovanetti@enea.i [ENEA, Institute of Radiation Protection, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Cozzella, Maria L. [ENEA, National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Asencio, Lisbet D. [Centro de Estudios Ambientales, Carretera a Castillo de Jagua, CP. 59350 C. Nuclear, Cienfuegos (Cuba); Sansone, Umberto [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The accumulations of both natural (U) and depleted (DU) uranium in the earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were studied to evaluate corresponding biological effects. Concentrations of metals in the experimental soil ranged from 1.86 to 600 mg kg{sup -1}. Five biological endpoints: mortality, animals' weight increasing, lysosomal membrane stability by measuring the neutral red retention time (the NRRT), histological changes and genetic effects (Comet assay) were used to evaluate biological effects in the earthworms after 7 and 28 days of exposure. No effects have been observed in terms of mortality or weight reduction. Cytotoxic and genetic effects were identified at quite low U concentrations. For some of these endpoints, in particular for genetic effects, the dose (U concentration)-effect relationships have been found to be non-linear. The results have also shown a statistically significant higher level of impact on the earthworms exposed to natural U compared to depleted U.

  11. Bioaccumulation and biological effects in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to natural and depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanetti, Anna; Fesenko, Sergey; Cozzella, Maria L.; Asencio, Lisbet D.; Sansone, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    The accumulations of both natural (U) and depleted (DU) uranium in the earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were studied to evaluate corresponding biological effects. Concentrations of metals in the experimental soil ranged from 1.86 to 600 mg kg -1 . Five biological endpoints: mortality, animals' weight increasing, lysosomal membrane stability by measuring the neutral red retention time (the NRRT), histological changes and genetic effects (Comet assay) were used to evaluate biological effects in the earthworms after 7 and 28 days of exposure. No effects have been observed in terms of mortality or weight reduction. Cytotoxic and genetic effects were identified at quite low U concentrations. For some of these endpoints, in particular for genetic effects, the dose (U concentration)-effect relationships have been found to be non-linear. The results have also shown a statistically significant higher level of impact on the earthworms exposed to natural U compared to depleted U.

  12. Fullerene–Carbene Lewis Acid–Base Adducts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaping

    2011-08-17

    The reaction between a bulky N-heterocylic carbene (NHC) and C60 leads to the formation of a thermally stable zwitterionic Lewis acid-base adduct that is connected via a C-C single bond. Low-energy absorption bands with weak oscillator strengths similar to those of n-doped fullerenes were observed for the product, consistent with a net transfer of electron density to the C60 core. Corroborating information was obtained using UV photoelectron spectroscopy, which revealed that the adduct has an ionization potential ∼1.5 eV lower than that of C60. Density functional theory calculations showed that the C-C bond is polarized, with a total charge of +0.84e located on the NHC framework and -0.84e delocalized on the C 60 cage. The combination of reactivity, characterization, and theoretical studies demonstrates that fullerenes can behave as Lewis acids that react with C-based Lewis bases and that the overall process describes n-doping via C-C bond formation. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Kinetics, mechanism and thermodynamics of bisulfite-aldehyde adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, T.M.; Boyce, S.D.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of bisulfite addition to benzaldehyde were studied at low pH in order to assess the importance of this reaction in stabilizing S(IV) in fog-, cloud-, and rainwater. Previously, the authors established that appreciable concentrations of the formaldehyde-bisulfite adduct (HMSA) are often present in fogwater. Measured HMSA concentrations in fogwater often do not fully account for observed excess S(IV) concentrations, however, so that other S(IV)-aldehyde adducts may be present. Reaction rates were determined by monitoring the disappearance of benzaldehyde by U.V. spectrophotometry under pseudo-first order conditions, (S(IV))/sub T/ >>(phi-CHO)/sub T/, in the pH range 0 - 4.4 at 25/sup 0/C. The equilibrium constant was determined by dissolving the sodium salt of the addition compound in a solution adjusted to pH 3.9, and measuring the absorbance of the equilibrated solution at 250 nm. A literature value of the extinction coefficient for benzaldehyde was used to calculate the concentration of free benzaldehyde. All solutions were prepared under an N/sub 2/ atmosphere using deoxygenated, deionized water and ionic strength was maintained at 1.0 M with sodium chloride.

  14. Biological effects under combined action of radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenchenko, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    The paper considers the manifoild factors of environmental pollution effect upon living organisms and their possible response manifested in additivity, synergism and anthogonism. Consideration is also given to the possible practical measures for improving ecological situation and decreasing the risk of anthropogenesis negative after-effects

  15. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarapultseva, E; Ustenko, K; Uskalova, D; Savina, N

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna . These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia . We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia . Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level. (paper)

  16. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  17. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide...

  18. Inert Reassessment Document for Poly(oxyethylene) adducts of mixed phytosterols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poly(oxyethy1ene) adducts of mixed phytosterols is uncategorized as to list classification status. Based upon the reasonable certainty of no harm safety finding, the List 4B classification for poly(oxyethy1ene) adducts of mixed phytosterols is affirmed.

  19. Abundance of DNA adducts of 4-oxo-2-alkenals, lipid peroxidation-derived highly reactive genotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshichika; Nuka, Erika

    2018-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and their reaction products can damage DNA to form mutagenic lesions. Among the reactive species, lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes react with nucleobases and form bulky exocyclic adducts. Many types of aldehyde-derived DNA adducts have been characterized, identified and detected in vitro and in vivo , whereas relative quantitative and pathophysiological contributions of each adduct still remain unclear. In recent years, an abundant class of DNA adducts derived from 4-oxo-2-alkenals have been identified, in addition to classic aldehyde-derived adducts. The presence of 4-oxo-2-alkenal-derived DNA adducts associated with age-related diseases has been revealed in rodents and humans. In vitro studies have demonstrated that 4-oxo-2-alkenals, as compared with other classes of lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, are highly reactive with nucleobases. It has been generally recognized that 4-oxo-2-alkenals are generated through oxidative degradation of the corresponding 4-hydroperoxy-2-alkenals, homolytic degradation products of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Our recent results have also shown an alternative pathway for the formation of 4-oxo-2-alkenals, in which 2-alkenals could undergo the metal-catalyzed autoxidation resulting in the formation of the corresponding 4-oxo-2-alkenals. This review summarizes the basis of the formation of lipid peroxidation-derived genotoxic aldehydes and their covalent adduction to nucleobases, especially focusing on the abundance of 4-oxo-2-alkenal-derived DNA adducts.

  20. Immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard adducts with keratins in the stratum corneum of human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Noort, D.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Fidder, A.; Chau, L.F.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a program to develop methods for diagnosis of exposure to chemical warfare agents, we developed immunochemical methods for detection of adducts of sulfur mustard to keratin in human skin. Three partial sequences of keratins containing glutamine or asparagine adducted with a

  1. Condensed tannin-resorcinol adducts and their use in wood-laminating adhesives: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Hemingway; R.E. Kreibich

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of a tannin extract (containing about 30% carbohydrate) from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) bark (two parts) and resorcinol (one part) at 120°C for 24 h with acetic acid catalyst gave a product containing predominantly oligomeric procyanidin-4-resorcinol adducts (39%), unreacted resorcinol (22%), carbohydrate (20%). the resorcinol adduct...

  2. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calugaru, V.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment planning in proton therapy uses a generic value for the Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) of 1.1 relative to 60 Co gamma-rays throughout the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). We have studied the variation of the RBE at three positions in the SOBP of the 76 and 201 MeV proton beams used for cancer treatment at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy in Orsay (ICPO) in two human tumor cell lines using clonogenic cell death and the incidence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as measured by pulse-field gel electrophoresis without and with endonuclease treatment to reveal clustered lesions as endpoints.The RBE for induced cell killing by the 76 MeV beam increased with depth in the SOBP. However for the 201 MeV protons it was close to that for 137 Cs gamma-rays and did not vary significantly. The incidence of DSBs and clustered lesions was higher for protons than for 137 Cs g-rays, but did not depend on the proton energy or the position in the SOBP. In the second part of our work, we have shown using cell clones made deficient for known repair genes by stable or transient shRNA transfection, that the D-NHEJ pathway determine the response to protons. The response of DNA damages created in the distal part of the 76 MeV SOBP suggests that those damages belong to the class of DNA 'complex lesions' (LMDS). It also appears that the particle fluence is a major determinant of the outcome of treatment in the distal part of the SOBP. (author)

  3. Glyphosate accumulation, translocation, and biological effects in Coffea arabica after single and multiple exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrübbers, Lars Christoph; Valverde, Bernal E.; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    In perennial crops like coffee, glyphosate drift exposure can occur multiple times during its commercial life span. Due to limited glyphosate degradation in higher plants, a potential accumulation of glyphosate could lead to increased biological effects with increased exposure frequency...... of application, however, was more important regarding biological effects than the number of applications both in the greenhouse and in the field. In the field, berry yield, the most important biological response variable, was reduced 26% by the first out of four sequential applications of glyphosate at 64 g a....... In this study, we investigated glyphosate translocation over time, and its concentration and biological effects after single and multiple simulated spray-drift exposures. Additionally, shikimic acid/glyphosate ratios were used as biomarkers for glyphosate binding to its target enzyme.Four weeks after...

  4. Effect of ozonation on the biological treatability of a textile mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, O; Dulkadiroglu, H; Kabdasli, I; Sozen, S; Babuna, F Germirli; Orhon, D

    2002-12-01

    Ozonation applied prior to biological processes, has proved to be a very effective chemical treatment step mostly for colour removal when soluble dyes are used in textile finishing operations. Its impact on biological treatability however has not been fully evaluated yet. This study evaluates the effect of ozonation on the quality of wastewater from a textile mill involving bleaching and reactive dyeing of cotton and synthetic knit fabric. The effect of ozonation on COD fractionation and kinetic coefficients defining major biological processes is emphasised. The results indicate that the extent of ozone applied greatly affects the remaining organic carbon composition in the wastewater. The relative magnitude of different COD fractions varies as a function of the ozone dose. Ozonation does not however exert a measurable impact on the rate of major biological processes.

  5. Microwave system for research biological effects on laboratory animals

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Alexei; Kruglik, Olga; Khlebopros, Rem

    2014-01-01

    This research is concerned with development of the microwave system for research the radiophysical microwave radiation effects on laboratory animals. The frequency was 1 GHz. The results obtained demonstrate the metabolic changes in mice under the electromagnetic field influence.

  6. Biological and medical effects of UV radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazena, H.

    1994-01-01

    Effecsts of UV radiation on human health are discussed. UV radiation is taken up through the skin and eyes. In the case of the eyes, the only known effects are damaging ones (e.g. cataracts). Irradiation of the skin, on the other hand, may either have a prophylactic and therapeutic effect or cause health problems if the exposure is too frequent and/or the dose too high. Positive effects are: Stimulation of the vitamin-D-3 synthesis and the autoimmune system, economisation of blood circulation, higher fitness, and the development of a UV protection system in the skin. Negative effects are: UV erythema, disturbances of the unspecific resistance and the immune system, and photocarcinogenesis. (orig.) [de

  7. Biological effects of 137Cs, incorporated into organism of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, A.S.; Strekalov, S.A.; Sokolov, A.V.; Aver'yanova, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results of investigating mutagenous and hemotoxic effects of 137 Cs on blood lymphocytes of rats are presented. 137 Cs was orally administrated into organism of rats as 270 kBq/g chloride solution. 137 Cs mutagenous effect was studied on metaphase plates of rat blood lymphocytes in course of rats lifetime experiment. It is stated that 137 Cs inducing severe disturbances of genetic material in a great quantity of blood lymphocytes, causes their total killing

  8. Investigation of the Biological Effects of Pulsed Electrical Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-30

    breakdown in artificial membranes, on the one hand , and permeability alterations in erythrocyte amebranes, the two phenomena may be related mechnistically...mechanism for the effects on osmotic fragility and hemoglobin release. Sale and Hamilton (22) considered the effect of uniform healing of the cell membranes...apply quite well to the experiments of Riemann et al. (23) ir, - hch the cell concentrations were 1% - i0%. for a step charge of Eo we have r(t) - V t

  9. Quantitation of 4,4′-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate human serum albumin adducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah G. Luna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 4,4′-Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (herein 4,4′-MDI is used in the production of polyurethane foams, elastomers, coatings, adhesives and the like for a wide range of commercial products. Occupational exposure to MDI levels above current airborne exposure limits can elicit immune mediated hypersensitivity reactions such as occupational asthma in sensitive individuals. To accurately determine exposure, there has been increasing interest in developing analytical methods to measure internal biomarkers of exposure to MDI. Previous investigators have reported methodologies for measuring MDI diamine metabolites and MDI-Lysine (4,4′-MDI-Lys adducts. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultra performance liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ID/MS/MS quantitation method via a signature peptide approach to enable biomonitoring of 4,4′-MDI adducted to human serum albumin (HSA in plasma. A murine, anti-4,4′-MDI monoclonal IgM antibody was bound to magnetic beads and utilized for enrichment of the MDI adducted HSA. Following enrichment, trypsin digestion was performed to generate the expected 414 site (primary site of adduction 4,4′-MDI-adducted HSA signature peptide that was quantified by UPLC-ID/MS/MS. An Agilent 6530 UPLC/quadrupole time of flight MS (QTOF system was utilized for intact adducted protein analysis and an Agilent 6490 UPLC/MS/MS system operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM mode was utilized for quantification of the adducted signature peptide biomarker both for in chemico and worker serum samples. Worker serum samples were initially screened utilizing the previously developed 4,4′-MDI-Lys amino acid method and results showed that 12 samples were identified as quantifiable for 4,4′-MDI-Lys adducts. The signature peptide adduct approach was applied to the 12 worker samples identified as quantifiable for 4,4′-MDI-Lys adducts. Results indicated no positive results

  10. Effects of Biologic Agents in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Amyloidosis Treated with Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Nozawa, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Yoko; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to examine the safety and effects of therapy with biologics on the prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis on hemodialysis (HD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of reactive AA amyloidosis participated in the study. The survival was calculated from the date of HD initiation until the time of death, or up to end of June 2015 for the patients who were still alive. HD initiation was according to the program of HD initiation for systemic amyloidosis patients associated with RA. Results Ten patients had been treated with biologics before HD initiation for a mean of 28.2 months (biologic group), while 18 had not (non-biologic group). HD was initiated in patients with similar characteristics except for the tender joint count, swollen joint count, and disease activity score (DAS)28-C-reactive protein (CRP). History of biologics showed that etanercept was frequently used for 8 patients as the first biologic. There was no significant difference in the mortality rate according to a Kaplan-Meier analysis (p=0.939) and or associated risk of death in an age-adjusted Cox proportional hazards model (p=0.758) between both groups. Infections were significantly more frequent causes of death in the biologic group than in the non-biologic group (p=0.021). However, treatment with biologics improved the DAS28-CRP score (p=0.004). Conclusion Under the limited conditions of AA amyloidosis treated with HD, the use of biologics might affect infection and thus may not improve the prognosis. Strict infection control is necessary for the use of biologics with HD to improve the prognosis. PMID:27725536

  11. Investigating the Effect of Biological Crusts on Some Biological Properties of Soil (Case Study: Qare Qir Rangelands of Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kakeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical and biological soil crusts are the principal types of soil crusts. Physical and biological soil crusts are distributed in arid, semi-arid and sub-humid regions which constitute over 40% of the earth terrestrial surface. Biological soil crusts (BSCs result from an intimate association between soil particles and cyanobacteria, algae, fungi, lichens and mosses in different proportions which live on the surface, or in the immediately uppermost millimeters of soil. Some of the functions that BSCs influences include: water absorption and retention, nutrient retention, Carbon and nitrogen fixation, biological activate and hydrologic Status. BSCs are important from the ecological view point and their effects on the environment, especially in rangeland, and desert ecosystems and this caused which researchers have a special attention to this component of the ecosystems more than before. Materials and Methods: This study carried out in the Qara Qir rangelands of Golestan province, northeast of Iran (37º15′ - 37º23′ N &54º33′ -54º39′ E, to investigate the effects of BSCs on some of soil biological properties. Four sites including with and without BSCs cover were selected. Soil biological properties such as microbial populations, soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, as well as, other effective properties such asorganic carbon percent, total nitrogen, electrical conductivity, and available water content were measured in depths of 0-5 and 5-15 cm of soil with four replications. The gathered data were analyzed by nested plot, and the mean values were compared by Duncan test. Results and Discussion: The results showed that organic carbon and water content were higher at the surface under BSCs, followed by 5-15 cm soils under BSCs. Both soil depths of uncrusted soils showed substantially lower organic carbon and water content than the BSC-covered soils. Total nitrogen was far higher in BSC-encrusted surface

  12. Aging of biological matrices and its effect on bioanalytical method performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Merbel, Nico C.; de Vries, R.

    2013-01-01

    Apart from the well-known matrix effects that can occur in ESI LC-MS, biological matrices may have other effects influencing the quantitative reliability of bioanalytical methods. In this paper, six case studies are presented that show the effect that aging, that is the change in properties and

  13. Examining the effects of students' classroom expectations on undergraduate biology course reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kristi Lyn

    In this dissertation, I perform and compare three studies of introductory biology students' classroom expectations -- what students expect to be the nature of the knowledge that they are learning, what they think they should be (or are) doing in order to learn, and what they think they should be (or are) doing in order to be successful. Previous work has shown that expectations can impact how students approach learning, yet biology education researchers have been reluctant to acknowledge or address the effects of student expectations on curricular reform (NRC, 2012). Most research in biology education reform has focused on students' conceptual understandings of biology and the efficacy of specific changes to content and pedagogy. The current research is lacking a deeper understanding of how students perceive the classroom environment and how those perceptions can shape students' interactions with the content and pedagogy. For present and future reforms in biology to reach their full potential, I argue that biology education should actively address the different ways students think about and approach learning in biology classes. The first study uses a Likert-scale instrument, adapted from the Maryland Physics Expectations Survey (Redish, Saul, & Steinberg, 1998). This new survey, the Maryland Biology Expectations Survey (MBEX) documents two critical results in biology classrooms: (i) certain student-centered pedagogical contexts can produce favorable changes in students' expectations, and (ii) more traditional classroom contexts appear to produce negative epistemological effects. The second study utilizes a modified version of the MBEX and focuses on students' interdisciplinary views. This study documents that: (i) biology students have both discipline-specific and context-specific classroom expectations, (ii) students respond more favorably to interdisciplinary content in the biology courses we surveyed (as opposed to biology content introduced into the physics

  14. Electrical and Biological Effects of Transmission Lines: A Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1989-06-01

    This review describes the electrical properties of a-c and d-c transmission lines and the resulting effects on plants, animals, and people. Methods used by BPA to mitigate undesirable effects are also discussed. Although much of the information in this review pertains to high-voltage transmission lines, information on distribution lines and electrical appliances is included. The electrical properties discussed are electric and magnetic fields and corona: first for alternating-current (a-c) lines, then for direct current (d-c).

  15. Some features of irradiated chitosan and its biological effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Le; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Luan, Le Quang; Hanh, Truong Thi; Man, Nguyen Tan; Ha, Pham Thi Le; Thuy, Tran Thi [Nuclear Research Institute, VAEC, Dalat (Viet Nam); Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Preparation of chitosan oligomer by radiation degradation was carried out on the gamma Co-60 source. The radiation degradation yield (G{sub d}) of the chitosan was found to be of 1.03. The oligochitosan with 50% of dp>8 fraction was obtained by irradiating the 10% (w/v) chitosan solution in 5% acetic acid at 45 kGy for the chitosan having the initial viscometric average molecular weight, Mv=60,000. Irradiated chitosan showed higher antifungal effect than that of unirradiated one. Furthermore, the irradiated chitosan also showed the growth-promotion effect for plants. (author)

  16. Some features of irradiated chitosan and its biological effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, Le; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Luan, Le Quang; Hanh, Truong Thi; Man, Nguyen Tan; Ha, Pham Thi Le; Thuy, Tran Thi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of chitosan oligomer by radiation degradation was carried out on the gamma Co-60 source. The radiation degradation yield (G d ) of the chitosan was found to be of 1.03. The oligochitosan with 50% of dp>8 fraction was obtained by irradiating the 10% (w/v) chitosan solution in 5% acetic acid at 45 kGy for the chitosan having the initial viscometric average molecular weight, Mv=60,000. Irradiated chitosan showed higher antifungal effect than that of unirradiated one. Furthermore, the irradiated chitosan also showed the growth-promotion effect for plants. (author)

  17. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Myungkoo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-12-06

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7β, 8α-dihydoxy-9α, l0α-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[α]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, (-)-trans-, (+)-cis- and (-)-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( ~25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant π-π stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G2 or G3 (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N2-dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[α]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N2-dG.

  18. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Myungkoo.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7β, 8α-dihydoxy-9α, l0α-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[α]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, (-)-trans-, (+)-cis- and (-)-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( ∼ 25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant π-π stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G 2 or G 3 (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N 2 -dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[α]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N 2 -dG

  19. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Maharashtra state of India. In order to manage this obnoxious weed in an ecologically safe and effective manner, therefore, we are searching for plants with an antagonistic potential via the mechanism of allelopathy. Here we evaluate the allelopathic potential of shoot leachates of selected plant species in order to assess ...

  20. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    2007). They induce shoot regeneration from Passiflora leaves, cotyledonary explants of Brassica campestris and shoot tip explants of Cucumis sativus. Polyamines have stimulatory effects on phytohormonal signalling, endogenous growth and synergism (Jang et al. 2002). They are essential factors for cell viability, protein.

  1. Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Widespread defoliation of plantation forests by insect pests causes economic losses worldwide. Successful pest outbreak management requires knowledge of effective pest management options. Currently, such knowledge is inadequate for Gonometa podocarpi an indigenous pest that has devastated conifer plantations in ...

  2. Nanoscaled biological gated field effect transistors for cytogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Andersen, Karsten Brandt

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is the study of chromosome structure and function, and is often used in cancer diagnosis, as many chromosome abnormalities are linked to the onset of cancer. A novel label free detection method for chromosomal translocation analysis using nanoscaled field effect transistors...

  3. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    plants were toxic to adult moths and also prevent hatching of the eggs of S. cerealella.. Keywords: mortality ... These plants have been reported to be effective in protecting cowpea seeds from infestation by cowpea ... eggs of S. cerealella were introduced into 10g of treated wheat grains using the above concentrations.

  4. Delayed biological effects of incorporated sulfur-35 in combination with IOS-4876

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, O.V.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of some delayed effects of sulfur-35 single administration to mongree white rats males is carried out; modifying effect of IOS-4876 preparation on biological efficiency of incorporated sulfur-35 is also evaluated. Different radionuclide doses demonstrated identical tumor effect exceeding by 2.2-3 times the level of spontaneous tumors. Sulfur-35 incorporated in quantities of 185 and 925 kBq/g causes proved increase in rats death level during the first two years of observation. IOS-4876 preparation leads to certain decrease in the level of delayed biological effects due to internal irradiation. 11 refs

  5. A theoretical framework for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens: Identifying effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Nik J; Gilligan, Christopher A

    2011-06-07

    We develop and analyse a flexible compartmental model of the interaction between a plant host, a soil-borne pathogen and a microbial antagonist, for use in optimising biological control. By extracting invasion and persistence thresholds of host, pathogen and biological control agent, performing an equilibrium analysis, and numerical investigation of sensitivity to parameters and initial conditions, we determine criteria for successful biological control. We identify conditions for biological control (i) to prevent a pathogen entering a system, (ii) to eradicate a pathogen that is already present and, if that is not possible, (iii) to reduce the density of the pathogen. Control depends upon the epidemiology of the pathogen and how efficiently the antagonist can colonise particular habitats (i.e. healthy tissue, infected tissue and/or soil-borne inoculum). A sharp transition between totally effective control (i.e. eradication of the pathogen) and totally ineffective control can follow slight changes in biologically interpretable parameters or to the initial amounts of pathogen and biological control agent present. Effective biological control requires careful matching of antagonists to pathosystems. For preventative/eradicative control, antagonists must colonise susceptible hosts. However, for reduction in disease prevalence, the range of habitat is less important than the antagonist's bulking-up efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological effects of inhaled 144CeCl3 in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Data on biological effects in humans exposed briefly to high levels of external X or gamma irradiation provide the foundation of protection guidelines for low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Unfortunately, the extrapolation of the risk of these biological effects to humans exposed to internally deposited radionuclides is complicated by the protracted exposure and differences in local doses to organs and tissues that result from internal irradiation. Therefore, data from humans exposed to external radiation may not provide all of the information necessary to understand the long-term health effects of internally deposited, beta-particle-emitting radionuclides. Because of these uncertainties, it is important to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides such as radiocerium in the body and the relationship of their distribution to biological effects that result from acute inhalation exposure. The radiation effects of inhaled cerium 144 were studied in beagles

  7. Retrospective detection of sulfur mustard exposure by mass spectrometric analysis of adducts to albumin and hemoglobin: An in vivo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Degenhardt-Langelaan, C.E.A.M.; Hulst, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The persistence in rats of sulfur mustard adducts to albumin and hemoglobin was studied in vivo after exposure (intravenously; 0.3 mg/kg; approximately 0.1 LD50) of rats to sulfur mustard. The albumin adduct (S-HETE)Cys-Pro-Tyr was detectable up to 7 days after the exposure, while the adduct to the

  8. Ellipticine oxidation and DNA adduct formation in human hepatocytes is catalyzed by human cytochromes P450 and enhanced by cytochrome b5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborová, Marie; Poljaková, Jitka; Martínková, Eva; Ulrichová, Jitka; Simánek, Vilím; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Frei, Eva

    2012-12-16

    Ellipticine is an antineoplastic agent considered a pro-drug, the pharmacological and genotoxic effects of which are dependent on cytochrome P450 (CYP)- and/or peroxidase-mediated activation to covalent DNA adducts. We investigated whether ellipticine-DNA adducts are formed in human hepatic microsomes and human hepatocytes. We then identified which human CYPs oxidize ellipticine to metabolites forming DNA adducts and the effect of cytochrome b(5) on this oxidation. 13-Hydroxyellipticine, the metabolite forming the major ellipticine-DNA adduct, was generated mainly by CYP3A4 and 1A1, followed by CYP2D6>2C19>1B1>1A2>2E1 and >2C9. Cytochrome b(5) increased formation of this metabolite by human CYPs, predominantly by CYP1A1, 3A4, 1A2 and 2C19. Formation of 12-hydroxyellipticine is generated mainly by CYP2C19, followed by CYP2C9>3A4>2D6>2E1 and >2A6. Other CYPs were less active (CYP2C8 and 2B6) or did not oxidize ellipticine to this metabolite (CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1). CYP2D6 was the most efficient enzyme generating ellipticine N(2)-oxide. CYP3A4 and 1A1 in the presence of cytochrome b(5) are mainly responsible for bioactivation of ellipticine to DNA adduct 1 (formed by ellipticine-13-ylium from 13-hydroxyellipticine), while 12-hydroxyellipticine generated during the CYP2C19-mediated ellipticine oxidation is the predominant metabolite forming ellipticine-12-ylium that generates ellipticine-DNA adduct 2. These ellipticine-DNA adducts were also generated by human hepatic microsomes and in primary human hepatocytes exposed to ellipticine. Ellipticine is toxic to these hepatocytes, decreasing their viability; the IC(50) value of ellipticine in these cells was 0.7 μM. In liver CYP3A4 is the predominant ellipticine activating CYP species, which is expected to result in efficient metabolism after oral ingestion of ellipticine in humans. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Adverse effects of biologics: a network meta-analysis and Cochrane overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. A.; Wells, G. A.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. While the efficacy of biologics has been established, there is uncertainty regarding the adverse effects of this treatment. Since serious risks such as tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, serious...... results We included 163 RCTs with 50,010 participants and 46 extension studies with 11,954 participants. The median duration of RCTs was six months and 13 months for OLEs. Data were limited for tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, lymphoma, and congestive heart failure. Adjusted for dose, biologics as a group...

  10. Biological activities and health effects of terpenoids from marine fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Li, Yong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed by the consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical products due to their various health beneficial effects. Hence, it can be suggested that bioactive functional ingredients from marine bioresources and their by-products are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to consumer's well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. Marine-derived fungi produce a vast array of secondary metabolites including terpenes, steroids, polyketides, peptides, alkaloids, and polysaccharides. These secondary metabolites serve many biopharmaceutical purposes. This chapter discusses about marine fungi-derived terpenoids and presents an overview of their beneficial health effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of heparin on insulin binding and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriauciunas, K.M.; Grigorescu, F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of heparin, a polyanionic glycosaminoglycan known to alter the function of many proteins, on insulin binding and bioactivity was studied. Cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9) were incubated with varying concentrations of heparin, then extensively washed, and 125 I-labeled insulin binding was measured. Heparin at concentrations used clinically for anticoagulation (1-50 U/ml) inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner; 50% inhibition of binding occurred with 5-10 U/ml. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding was due to a decrease in both the affinity and the apparent number of available insulin receptors. The effect occurred within 10 min at 22 degrees C and persisted even after the cells were extensively washed. Inhibition of insulin binding also occurred when cells were preincubated with heparinized plasma or heparinized serum but not when cells were incubated with normal serum or plasma from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. By contrast, other polyanions and polycations, e.g., poly-L-glutamic acid, poly-L-lysine, succinylated poly-L-lysine, and histone, did not inhibit binding. Heparin also inhibited insulin binding in Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-transformed lymphocytes but had no effect on insulin binding to isolated adipocytes, human erythrocytes, or intact hepatoma cells. When isolated adipocytes were incubated with heparin, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and, to a lesser extent, of basal glucose oxidation. Although heparin has no effect on insulin binding to intact hepatoma cells, heparin inhibited both insulin binding and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation in receptors solubilized from these cells

  12. Effectiveness and versatility of biological prosthesis in transplanted patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascian?, Gianluca; De Werra, Edoardo; Sandri, Giovanni Battista Levi; Ferraro, Daniele; Burocchi, Mirco; Tortorelli, Giovanni; Guglielmo, Nicola; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of prosthesis, and good tolerance by patients with incisional hernia (IH). METHODS From December 2001 to February 2016, 270 liver transplantations were performed at San Camillo Hospital. IH occurred in 78 patients (28.8%). IH usually appeared early within the first year post-orthotopic liver transplantation. In the first era, fascial defect was repaired by primary closure for defects smaller than 2.5 cm or with synthetic mesh for greater defe...

  13. Biologic Effects of Dopamine on Tumor Vasculature in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrthala Moreno-Smith

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sympathetic nervous system activation results in increased angiogenesis and tumor growth in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian carcinoma. However, the mechanistic effects of such activation on the tumor vasculature are not well understood. Dopamine (DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, regulates the functions of normal and abnormal blood vessels. Here, we examined whether DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, could block the effects of chronic stress on tumor vasculature and tumor growth. Exogenous administration of DA not only decreased tumor microvessel density but also increased pericyte coverage of tumor vessels following daily restraint stress in mice. Daily restraint stress resulted in significantly increased tumor growth in the SKOV3ip1 and HeyA8 ovarian cancer models. DA treatment blocked stress-mediated increases in tumor growth and increased pericyte coverage of tumor endothelial cells. Whereas the antiangiogenic effect of DA is mediated by dopamine receptor 2 (DR2, our data indicate that DA, through DR1, stimulates vessel stabilization by increasing pericyte recruitment to tumor endothelial cells. DA significantly stimulated migration of mouse 10T1/2 pericyte-like cells in vitro and increased cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP levels in these cells. Moreover, DA or the DR1 agonist SKF 82958 increased platinum concentration in SKOV3ip1 tumor xenografts following cisplatin administration. In conclusion, DA stabilizes tumor blood vessels through activation of pericyte cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway by DR1. These findings could have implications for blocking the stimulatory effects of chronic stress on tumor growth.

  14. Biological effects of pesticides on rats treated with carbon tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Kader, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of repeated oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticide, cytrolane on normal and pretreated rate with different oral doses of carbon tetrachloride. For that purpose the effect of cytrolane, CCl 4 and their potential interaction had been studied on brain and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (Ache), plasma cholinesterase (Ch E), liver succinic dehydrogenase (SDH), serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP), liver succinic dehydrogenas (SDH), serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP), glutamic oxaloacetic (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic (GPT) transaminases. It also investigates the effect of an acute oral dose of cytrolane at short time intervals (1/2-24 hours) on brain and blood ache of normal and pretreated rate with a single oral dose of CCl 4 . The distribution and excretion of 1 4cc1 4 at different time intervals (2,6 and 24 hours) in normal rats and in rats pretreated with o.89 mg cytrolane/kg/day for a week had been determined in different organs, expired air, urine and faeces

  15. Radioactivity in the ocean: laws and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the literature on US laws and international agreements, experimental and monitoring data, and ongoing studies to provide background information for environmental assessment and regulatory compliance activities for ocean dumping of low-level radioactive waste. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act is the major US legislation governing ocean disposal of radioactive waste. The major international agreement on ocean dumping is the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The United States ended its ocean dumping of radioactive wastes in 1970, but other countries have continued ocean dumping under international supervision in the northeast Atlantic. Monitoring of former US disposal sites has neither revealed significant effects on marine biota nor indicated a hazard to human health. Also, no effects on marine organisms have been found that could be attributed to routine discharges into the Irish Sea from the Windscale reprocessing plant. We must improve our ability to predict the oceanic carrying capacity and the fate and effects of ionizing radiation in the marine environment.

  16. Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Inger

    Full Text Available Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.

  17. Radioactivity in the ocean: laws and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the literature on US laws and international agreements, experimental and monitoring data, and ongoing studies to provide background information for environmental assessment and regulatory compliance activities for ocean dumping of low-level radioactive waste. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act is the major US legislation governing ocean disposal of radioactive waste. The major international agreement on ocean dumping is the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The United States ended its ocean dumping of radioactive wastes in 1970, but other countries have continued ocean dumping under international supervision in the northeast Atlantic. Monitoring of former US disposal sites has neither revealed significant effects on marine biota nor indicated a hazard to human health. Also, no effects on marine organisms have been found that could be attributed to routine discharges into the Irish Sea from the Windscale reprocessing plant. We must improve our ability to predict the oceanic carrying capacity and the fate and effects of ionizing radiation in the marine environment

  18. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of azoxymethane-induced DNA adduct formation by Aloe arborescens var. natalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpo, Kan; Chihara, Takeshi; Beppu, Hidehiko; Ida, Chikako; Kaneko, Takaaki; Hoshino, Motoyuki; Kuzuya, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the possible mechanisms of inhibition of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the rat colorectum by freeze-dried whole leaves of Aloe arborescens var. natalensis (Kidachi aloe) (hereinafter referred to as ALOE) and commercial crude aloin (Sigma A-0451; from Curacao aloe) (hereinafter ALOIN), we studied the effects of ALOE and ALOIN on the formation of AOM-induced DNA adducts (O6-methylguanine; O6-MeG) in rats. Male F344 rats (4 weeks old) were fed a basal diet, or experimental diets containing 5%ALOE or 0.25%ALOIN for 5 weeks. All rats were injected s.c. twice with 15 mg/kg AOM, once at the end of week 1, and once at the end of week 2. The animals were sacrificed 6 hours after the second injection to analyze DNA adducts (O6-MeG) in the colorectum. Dietary administration of ALOE significantly inhibited the O6-MeG levels (50% reduction) compared with controls, whereas the O6-MeG levels in the ALOIN-fed rats showed a tendency to decrease (by 30%), although not significantly. In this study, we also measured the enzyme activity and mRNA level of cytochrome (CYP) 2E1, known to be responsible for the activation of AOM, in rat liver. ALOE-fed rats showed significantly reduced CYP2E1 enzymatic activity (27% reduction) compared with controls. On the other hand, the activity in ALOIN-fed rats tended to decrease by 11%, although not significantly. The CYP2E1 mRNA levels in ALOE- and ALOIN-fed rats were slightly reduced (9.7% and 5.2%, respectively). These results may explain, at least in part, the previously observed inhibitory effects of ALOE and ALOIN, especially ALOE on AOM-induced ACF formation in the rat colorectum.

  20. High school and college biology: A multi-level model of the effects of high school biology courses on student academic performance in introductory college biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, John Francis

    The issue of student preparation for college study in science has been an ongoing concern for both college-bound students and educators of various levels. This study uses a national sample of college students enrolled in introductory biology courses to address the relationship between high school biology preparation and subsequent introductory college biology performance. Multi-Level Modeling was used to investigate the relationship between students' high school science and mathematics experiences and college biology performance. This analysis controls for student demographic and educational background factors along with factors associated with the college or university attended. The results indicated that high school course-taking and science instructional experiences have the largest impact on student achievement in the first introductory college biology course. In particular, enrollment in courses, such as high school Calculus and Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, along with biology course content that focuses on developing a deep understanding of the topics is found to be positively associated with student achievement in introductory college biology. On the other hand, experiencing high numbers of laboratory activities, demonstrations, and independent projects along with higher levels of laboratory freedom are associated with negative achievement. These findings are relevant to high school biology teachers, college students, their parents, and educators looking beyond the goal of high school graduation.

  1. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pneutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  2. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume V, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    EFFECTS ON VIABILITY established by competition between internal AND HEREDITY OF MAMMALIAN CELL hydrogen bonding and bonding to solvent LINES (MEETING...Delayed hypersensitivity to en Josas. France. p. 22:1980 (no refs). sheep red blood antigen was analyzed in 40 exposed and 40 control mice by the food pad...beginning to the 15th day of 40-60 mW/cml. 2 hr/day for 4. 7, 10. or 14 days. One after the end of irradiation. Delayed hypersensitivity day after

  3. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  4. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  5. Working group 6: Health. 2. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Health hazards associated with the increasing development of nuclear energy have been evaluated for the Belgian population. Nuclear industry has been shown to be safer than conventional industry, epidemiological and toxicological data connected with the nuclear energy being more complete than those related to the conventional energy. Somatic and genetic effects of small and high doses of ionizing radiations on the Belgian population have been estimated. Small doses of ionizing radiations are expected to promote only carcinogenic effects. The latent period of cancers, the plateau region (period of high risk) and the absolute and relative risk expressed per rem per 10 6 people per year for leukaemia (having the highest risk) and for the ''other cancers'' have been also estimated. These estimations were obtained by linear extrapolation to the 1 rem level from observations made after irradiation at relatively high dose levels and much higher dose rates. Strict protective regulations have been recommended in order to reduce to a minimum the exposure of population to ionizing radiations as well as to get more information on the radioactive genetic and somatic consequences on population. (G.C.)

  6. Mindmapping: Its effects on student achievement in high school biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Glennis Edge

    The primary goal of schools is to promote the highest degree of learning possible. Yet teachers spend the majority of their time engaged in lecturing while students spend the majority of their time passively present (Cawelti, 1997, Grinder, 1991; Jackson & Davis, 2000; Jenkins, 1996). Helping students develop proficiency in learning, which translates into using that expertise to construct knowledge in subject domains, is a crucial goal of education. Students need exposure to teaching and learning practices that prepare them for both the classroom and their places in the future workforce (Ettinger, 1998; Longley, Goodchild, Maguire, & Rhind, 2001; NRC, 1996; Texley & Wild, 1996). The purpose of this study was to determine if achievement in high school science courses could be enhanced utilizing mindmapping. The subjects were primarily 9th and 10th graders (n = 147) at a suburban South Texas high school. A pretest-posttest control group design was selected to determine the effects of mindmapping on student achievement as measured by a teacher-developed, panel-validated instrument. Follow-up interviews were conducted with the teacher and a purposive sample of students (n = 7) to determine their perceptions of mindmapping and its effects on teaching and learning. Mindmapping is a strategy for visually displaying large amounts of conceptual, hierarchical information in a concise, organized, and accessible format. Mindmaps arrange information similar to that found on the traditional topic outline into colorful spatial displays that offer the user a view of the "forest" as well as the "trees" (Hyerle, 1996; Wandersee, 1990b). An independent samples t-test and a one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) determined no significant difference in achievement between the groups. The experimental group improved in achievement at least as much as the control group. Several factors may have played a role in the lack of statistically significant results. These factors include the

  7. Long-term biological effects induced by ionizing radiation--implications for dose mediated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, S D; Astărăstoae, V

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are considered to be risk agents that are responsible for the effects on interaction with living matter. The occurring biological effects are due to various factors such as: dose, type of radiation, exposure time, type of biological tissue, health condition and the age of the person exposed. The mechanisms involved in the direct modifications of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA are reviewed. Classical target theory of energy deposition in the nucleus that causes DNA damages, in particular DNA double-strand breaks and that explanation of the biological consequences of ionizing radiation exposure is a paradigm in radiobiology. Recent experimental evidences have demonstrated the existence of a molecular mechanism that explains the non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation exposure. Among these novel data, genomic instability and a variety of bystander effects are discussed here. Those bystander effects of ionizing radiation are fulfilled by cellular communication systems that give rise to non-targeted effects in the neighboring non irradiated cells. This paper provides also a commentary on the synergistic effects induced by the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and various physical agents such as electromagnetic fields and the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and chemical environmental contaminants such as metals. The biological effects of multiple stressors on genomic instability and bystander effects are also discussed. Moreover, a brief presentation of the methods used to characterize cyto- and genotoxic damages is offered.

  8. The biological bases of the dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    2001-01-01

    In radiation protection, the recent data in epidemiology, in animal experimentation and on the base researches are no more compatible with a linear dose-effect relationship without threshold and do not account for the radiological risks at low doses. The cancers should be accelerated by radiations as any pathology linked to the ageing and for which threshold exit. Relative to the genetic risk it is known today that the natural exposure that lasts for several generations has not lead excess of hereditary illness as it was to be feared in 1959 for several countries. Considering that for populations the exposure levels induced by human activities have already been, under these ones of average natural exposures the genetic risk can be negligible and it is the somatic risk alone, with its thresholds that has to be into account. (N.C.)

  9. Research of biological isotope effect of deuterium in Anabaena azollae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongbo; Wang Wenqing; Shi Dingji; Luo Shanggeng

    1996-01-01

    Anabaena azollae is cultured in BG-11 medium whose mass fraction of heavy water is 0%, 10%, 30%, 60% and 90%, respectively. During different time, activities of photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogenase are measured. In addition, growth-curve, absorption spectrum and low temperature fluorescence spectrum are given. The change of cellular morphology is observed with scanning electron microscope. The results show that the addition of heavy water causes lagging of the exponential period of growth, and inhibits the activities of photosynthesis respiration and nitrogenase markedly. Absorption spectrum shows that the ratio of phycobilins to carotenoid decreases with increasing percentage of heavy water. Low temperature fluorescence spectrum indicates that the ratio of F 733 /F 695 decreases and photo-energy distributed to system II is more than to system I. According to the maximum of net photosynthesis, the isotope effect is also discussed

  10. Studies on the biological effects of deuteriated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh-Nguyen, Nguyen; Vincent, J.

    1976-01-01

    The antifungal activity of some perdeuterated fatty acids with a normal chain of 11 to 18 carbon atoms was investigated on common dermatophytes Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum under in vitro conditions. A perdeuterated compound is one in which most of the hydrogen atoms in the molecule are replaced by deuterium. These studies were performed by the dilution technique with respiratory measurements. Perdeuteration of of some fatty acids increases their inhibitory effect on the dermatophyte growth. Perdeuterated n-hendecanoic acid proved to be the most active of the substances tested. Possible mechanisms behind the enhanced antifungal activity due to the perdeuteration of fatty acids are discussed. The present study investigates the antifungal properties of some perdeuterated fatty acids on dermatophytes in vitro

  11. Catalytically and noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust: biological effects in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.P. (Univ. of Cincinnati); Lewkowski, J.P.; Hastings, L.; Malanchuk, M.

    1977-12-01

    Chronic exposure to catalytically treated or noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust significantly depressed the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) of rats. Exposure to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone or CO at comparable levels did not alter the SLA. Exposure to noncatalytically treated exhaust resulted in significant reductions in growth rate and food and water intake. However, these effects were not evident in the exposure to catalytically treated exhaust or in the control H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and CO exposures. Blood acid-base analyses indicated that exposure to either catalytically treated exhaust or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ elicits a metabolic alkalosis, while exposure to CO alone results in a metabolic acidosis. All acid-base parameters were within the normal range several weeks after the termination of exposure.

  12. Iodine Oxide Thermite Reactions: Physical and Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Rod; Pantoya, Michelle; Bless, Stephan; Clark, William

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the potential for some thermite-like material reactions to kill bacteria spores. Iodine oxides and silver oxides react vigorously with metals like aluminum, tantalum, and neodymium. These reactions theoretically produce temperatures as high as 8000K, leading to vaporization of the reactants, producing very hot iodine and/or silver gases. We performed a series of computations and experiments to characterize these reactions under both quasi-static and ballistic impact conditions. Criteria for impact reaction were established. Measurements of temperature and pressure changes and chemical evolution will be reported. Basic combustion characterizations of these reactions, such as thermal equilibrium analysis and reaction propagation rates as well as ignition sensitivity, will be discussed. Additionally, testing protocols were developed to characterize the biocidal effects of these reactive materials on B. subtilis spores. The evidence from these tests indicates that these reactions produce heat, pressure, and highly biocidal gases.

  13. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: calculation and optimization of biologically effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Scholz, M.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy based on the local effect model (LEM) which allows to calculate the biologically effective dose not only for the target region but for the entire irradiation volume. LEM is ideally suited to be used as an integral part of treatment planning code systems for active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. Thus, it has been incorporated into our standard treatment planning system for ion therapy (TRiP). Single intensity modulated fields can be optimized with respect to homogeneous biologically effective dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is calculated separately for each voxel of the patient CT. Our radiobiologically oriented code system is in use since 1995 for the planning of irradiation experiments with cell cultures and animals such as rats and minipigs. Since 1997 it is in regular and successful use for patient treatment planning. (orig.)

  14. Stability, accumulation and cytotoxicity of an albumin-cisplatin adduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charlotte; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2010-01-01

    significant amount within 24 h incubation. The accumulation and cytotoxicity of HSA-Pt was compared to 10 µmol L¿¹ cisplatin for which a larger accumulation and cytotoxicity were observed in EATC compared to Lettré. The experiment was performed with cell medium exchange every fourth hour as HSA......-Pt and cisplatin were not stable in RPMI-1640 with 10% serum. The stability was determined using size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) and after 4 h new platinum peaks were observed. These findings indicate that before conducting cell experiments, the stability......The accumulation and cytotoxicity of a 10 µmol L¿¹ equimolar human serum albumin-cisplatin adduct (HSA-Pt) was investigated in suspension Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettré Ascites Cells (Lettré). HSA-Pt did not induce apoptosis nor was it taken up by the cells to any...

  15. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-04-26

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation.

  16. Recent advances in biological effect and molecular mechanism of arabidopsis thaliana irradiated by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dali; Hou Suiwen; Li Wenjian

    2008-01-01

    Newly research progresses were summarized in effect of ion beams on seed surface, biological effect, growth, development, gravitropism and so on. Furthermore, mutation molecular mechanism of Arabidopsis thaliana was discussed, for example, alteration of DNA bases, DNA damage, chromosomal recombination, characteristics of mutant transmissibility, etc. Meanwhile, the achievements of transfer- ring extraneous gene to Arabidopsis thaliana by ion beams were reviewed in the paper. At last, the future prospective are also discussed here in mutation molecular mechanism and the potential application of biological effect of heavy ion beams. (authors)

  17. Biological effects of electromagnetic radiations - 7. International Conference, La Valette, Malta, 8-12 October 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaret, P.

    2013-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of a conference on the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations. With reference to epidemiological studies, different issues have been addressed: pathological effects (either of static fields, or of extremely low frequencies, or of radio-frequencies), biological effects (methodological issues, case of extremely low frequencies and of radio-frequencies), medical applications of electromagnetic fields (tumour removal, neurological disorders, consolidation, wound healing and recovery), assessment of electromagnetic fields (existing directives and regulations, case of electric lines and of radio-frequencies), exposure to electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure in medical or industrial applications, specific devices such as telephones, regulation)

  18. Effect of biologic therapy on radiological progression in rheumatoid arthritis: what does it add to methotrexate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Graeme Jones, Erica Darian-Smith, Michael Kwok, Tania WinzenbergMenzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania, Tasmania, AustraliaAbstract: There have been substantial advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in recent years. Traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs have been shown to have small effects on the progression of radiographic damage. This quantitative overview summarizes the evidence for biologic DMARDS and radiographic damage either alone or in combination with methotrexate. Two outcomes were used (standardized mean difference and odds of progression. A total of 21 trials were identified of which 18 had useable data. For biologic monotherapy, tocilizumab, adalimumab, and etanercept were significantly better than methotrexate, with tocilizumab ranking first in both outcomes while golimumab was ineffective in both outcomes. For a biologic in combination with methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone, most therapies studied (etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, certolizumab, tocilizumab, and rituximab were effective at slowing X-ray progression using either outcome, with infliximab ranking first in both outcomes. The exceptions to this were golimumab (no effect on standardized mean difference and abatacept (no effect on odds of progression. This effect was additional to methotrexate; thus, the overall benefit is moderate to large in magnitude, which is clearly of major clinical significance for sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis and supports the use of biologic DMARDs in those with a poor disease prognosis.Keywords: rheumatoid, trials, meta-analysis, radiographs, biologic, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, DMARDs

  19. EFFECTS OF 5E LEARNING CYCLE ON STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT IN BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Osawaru Ajaja,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of this study was to determine the effects of learning cycle as an instructional strategy on biology andchemistry students achievement. To guide this study, six research hypotheses were stated and tested at 0.05 level ofsignificance. The design of this study was 2x2x3x6 Pre-test Post-test non-equivalent control group quasi experimental design.These included two instructional groups (experimental and control groups, sex (male and female, repeated testing (Pre,Post and follow-up tests, and six weeks of experience. The samples of the study included six senior secondary schools, 112science students, and 12 biology and chemistry teachers. The instruments used for this study were: teacher’s questionnaireon knowledge and use of learning cycle (KULC; and Biology and Chemistry Achievement Test (BCAT. The data collected wereanalyzed with simple percentage, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA and student t-test statistics. The major findings of thestudy included that only 30.43% and 26.31% of biology and chemistry teachers have the knowledge that learning cycle is aninstructional method; all the biology and chemistry teachers sampled have never used learning cycle as an instructionalmethod; learning cycle had a significant effect on students achievement in biology and chemistry; students taught withlearning cycle significantly achieved better in biology/chemistry Post-test than those taught with lecture method; the posttestscores of students in the learning cycle group increased over the period of experience; non-significant difference in Posttestscores between males and females taught with learning cycle; non-significant interaction effect between method andsex on achievement; and a significant higher retention of biology and chemistry knowledge by students taught with learningcycle than those taught with lecture method. It was concluded that the method seems an appropriate instructional modelthat could be used to solve the problems of

  20. Bioaccumulation and biological effects of cigarette litter in marine worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephanie L.; Rowe, Darren; Reid, Malcolm J.; Thomas, Kevin V.; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards cigarette filters present to marine life. Here we studied the impacts of smoked cigarette filter toxicants and microfibres on the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor (ragworm), a widespread inhabitant of coastal sediments. Ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter toxicants in seawater at concentrations 60 fold lower than those reported for urban run-off exhibited significantly longer burrowing times, >30% weight loss, and >2-fold increase in DNA damage compared to ragworms maintained in control conditions. In contrast, ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter microfibres in marine sediment showed no significant effects. Bioconcentration factors for nicotine were 500 fold higher from seawater than from sediment. Our results illustrate the vulnerability of organisms in the water column to smoking debris and associated toxicants, and highlight the risks posed by smoked cigarette filter debris to aquatic life. PMID:26369692