WorldWideScience

Sample records for adducts biological effects

  1. Photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yun-bo

    1988-03-01

    This thesis consists of three main parts and totally eight chapters. In Part I, The author will present studies on the photochemistry of psoralen-DNA adducts, specifically, the wavelength dependencies for the photoreversals of thymidine-HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4, 5', 8-trimenthylpsoralen) monoadducts and diadduct and the same adducts incorporated in DNA helices and the wavelength dependecies for the photocrossslinking of thymidine-HMT monoadducts in double-stranded helices. In Part II, The author will report some biological effects of psoralen-DNA adducts, i.e., the effects on double-stranded DNA stability, DNA structure, and transcription by E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases. Finally, The author will focus on the applications of psoralen-DNA photochemistry to investigation of protein-DNA interaction during transcription, which includes the interaction of E. coli and T7 RNA polymerases with DNA in elongation complexes arrested at specific psoralen-DNA adduct sites as revealed by DNase I footprinting experiments. 123 refs., 52 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. ECETOC workshop on the biological significance of DNA adducts: summary of follow-up from an expert panel meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottenger, Lynn H; Carmichael, Neil; Banton, Marcy I; Boogaard, Peter J; Kim, James; Kirkland, David; Phillips, Richard D; van Benthem, Jan; Williams, Gary M; Castrovinci, Alexis

    2009-08-01

    This workshop on the biological significance of DNA adducts included presentations of research results in the following areas: endogenous versus exogenous adduct levels; in vitro dose-response data on adducts and mutagenesis from alkylating agents; methyltransferases and alkyl transferase-like proteins in repair of O(6)-alkylguanine adducts; mathematical modeling of threshold dose-response in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis; and the use of genomics to characterize the relationships between adducts, gene expression, and downstream adverse effects. Presentations by regulatory scientists and other authorities addressed the role of adduct and mutation data in risk characterization. Consensus statements were developed and included the following: DNA adducts should be considered as biomarkers of exposure, which may play a key role in establishing a mode of action (MOA) for cancer. Adducts themselves should not be considered as equivalent to mutations or later stage events in carcinogenesis. Although it was not possible at this time to agree on a general level of adducts below which there is no adverse biological effect, there are examples of genotoxic mutagens/carcinogens for which thresholds have been demonstrated. Evidence regarding thresholds for mutations should be considered on a case-by-case basis, in light of available MOA and mechanistic data, to build a knowledge base. Participants agreed that guidance on a recommended format for data presentation (especially agreement on units and appropriate statistical analyses) would be beneficial. Finally, for initial cases, provision of a mechanistic explanation to support a hypothesis of a threshold for mutations was essential for the eventual use of this information in risk assessment.

  3. Chemistry and Biology of Aflatoxin-DNA Adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Michael P.; Banerjee, Surajit; Brown, Kyle L.; Egli, Martin (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-27

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal contaminant of stored rice, wheat, corn, and other grainstuffs, and peanuts. This is of concern to human health because it produces the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}), which is genotoxic and is implicated in the etiology of liver cancer. AFB{sub 1} is oxidized in vivo by cytochrome P450 to form aflatoxin B{sub 1} epoxide, which forms an N7-dG adduct (AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG) in DNA. The latter rearranges to a formamidopyrimidine (AFB{sub 1}-FAPY) derivative that equilibrates between {alpha} and {beta} anomers of the deoxyribose. In DNA, both the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts intercalate above the 5'-face of the damaged guanine. Each produces G {yields} T transversions in Escherichia coli, but the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct is more mutagenic. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) provides a model for understanding error-prone bypass of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts. It bypasses the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct, but it conducts error-prone replication past the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct, including mis-insertion of dATP, consistent with the G {yields} T mutations characteristic of AFB{sub 1} mutagenesis in E. coli. Crystallographic analyses of a series of binary and ternary complexes with the Dpo4 polymerase revealed differing orientations of the N7-C8 bond of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct as compared to the N{sup 5}-C8 bond in the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct, and differential accommodation of the intercalated AFB{sub 1} moieties within the active site. These may modulate AFB{sub 1} lesion bypass by this polymerase.

  4. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts as a common biological biomarker of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingsu; Zhao, Yuewei; Von Tungeln, Linda S; Doerge, Daniel R; Lin, Ge; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2013-09-16

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) classified riddelliine, a tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the NTP 12th Report on Carcinogens in 2011. We previously determined that four DNA adducts were formed in rats dosed with riddelliine. The structures of the four DNA adducts were elucidated as (i) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dG-3 and DHP-dG-4) as the predominant adducts; and (ii) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dA-3 and DHP-dA-4 adducts). In this study, we selected a nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxide, riddelliine N-oxide, and nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (riddelliine, retrorsine, monocrotaline, lycopsamine, retronecine, lasiocarpine, heliotrine, clivorine, and senkirkine) for study in animals. Seven of the nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, with the exception of lycopsamine and retronecine, are liver carcinogens. At 8-10 weeks of age, female F344 rats were orally gavaged for 3 consecutive days with 4.5 and 24 μmol/kg body weight test article in 0.5 mL of 10% DMSO in water. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, the rats were sacrificed, livers were removed, and liver DNA was isolated for DNA adduct analysis. DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4 adducts were formed in the liver of rats treated with the individual seven hepatocarcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and riddelliine N-oxide. These DNA adducts were not formed in the liver of rats administered retronecine, the nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, or vehicle control. These results indicate that this set of DNA adducts, DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4, is a common biological biomarker of

  5. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Bjørkheim, André; Rolstad, Linn E; Hölmich, Per; Bahr, Roald; Andersen, Thor Einar

    2017-08-01

    The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint testing before and after the intervention. Per-protocol analyses were performed, and 12 players were excluded due to low compliance (<67% of sessions completed). The main outcome was eccentric hip adduction strength (N·m/kg). Between-group analyses revealed a significantly greater increase in eccentric hip adduction strength of 0.29 Nm/kg (8.9%; P = .01) in favor of the group performing the Copenhagen adduction exercise, whereas no within-group change was noted in the group that used the standard FIFA 11+ program (-0.02 N·m/kg [-0.7%]; P = .69). Including the Copenhagen adduction exercise in the FIFA 11+ program increases eccentric hip adduction strength, while the standard FIFA 11+ program does not. Registration: Registration: ISRCTN13731446 (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry).

  6. Environmental air pollution and DNA adducts in Copenhagen bus drivers - effect of GSTM1 and NAT2 genotypes on adduct level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Sabro; de Pater, Nettie; Okkels, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The lymphocyte bulky PAH-DNA adduct levels have been studied in persons occupationally exposed to ambient air pollution. The exposure group consisted of 90 healthy, nonsmoking bus drivers from the Copenhagen area, divided into three exposure groups according to driving area, and 60 rural controls...... to levels of exposure to urban air pollution and indicated that these adducts might be helpful as a means of classifying better different exposure groups for epidemiological studies. Furthermore, it demonstrated the ability of 32P-postlabelling to discern small differences in low exposure to ambient air...... pollution and suggested a possible effect of GSTM1*0/0 on DNA adduct levels....

  7. Effect of Michael adduction on peptide preservation in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, G A; Kobiela, M E; Hatcher, P G

    2014-09-20

    The reaction of peptides with chemicals already present in natural waters (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) is one method that has been suggested to preserve peptides for the longer term. In this study we test whether the reaction of tetrapeptides with a model quinone can help stabilise the peptide in one polluted riverine system, Elizabeth River in Virginia, USA. We found that there is almost no difference in rate constants between the peptide and its quinone adduct (e.g. 6.62 versus 6.86 per day for AVFA and its respective adduct). However, when monitoring the removal of the adduct from natural water, we identified two new compounds that are formed as a result of its decomposition. Using tandem mass spectrometry we identified potential structures and mechanisms for the formation of these new compounds. These new compounds are more recalcitrant than their parent peptide-quinone adduct, since they remain in solution for 3-10 times longer. Based on our findings we postulate that the reaction of peptides with quinones can help preserve sections of the original peptide following an initial rearrangement of the original adduct, potentially explaining why seemingly labile peptides are observed in most natural waters.

  8. Effect of Laterally Wedged Insoles on the External Knee Adduction Moment across Different Reference Frames.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Biomechanical effects of laterally wedged insoles are assessed by reduction in the knee adduction moment. However, the degree of reduction may vary depending on the reference frame with which it is calculated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of reference frame on the reduction in the knee adduction moment by laterally wedged insoles.Twenty-nine healthy participants performed gait trials with a laterally wedged insole and with a flat insole as a control. The knee adduction moment, including the first and second peaks and the angular impulse, were calculated using four different reference frames: the femoral frame, tibial frame, laboratory frame and the Joint Coordinate System.There were significant effects of reference frame on the knee adduction moment first and second peaks (P < 0.001 for both variables, while the effect was not significant for the angular impulse (P = 0.84. No significant interaction between the gait condition and reference frame was found in either of the knee adduction moment variables (P = 0.99 for all variables, indicating that the effects of laterally wedged insole on the knee adduction moments were similar across the four reference frames. On the other hand, the average percent changes ranged from 9% to 16% for the first peak, from 16% to 18% for the second peak and from 17% to 21% for the angular impulse when using the different reference frames.The effects of laterally wedged insole on the reduction in the knee adduction moment were similar across the reference frames. On the other hand, Researchers need to recognize that when the percent change was used as the parameter of the efficacy of laterally wedged insole, the choice of reference frame may influence the interpretation of how laterally wedged insoles affect the knee adduction moment.

  9. Effect of external electric field on Cyclodextrin-Alcohol adducts: A DFT study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kundan Baruah; Pradip Kr Bhattacharyya

    2015-06-01

    Effect of external electric fields on the interaction energy between cyclodextrin and alcohol was analyzed in the light of density functional theory (DFT) and density functional reactivity theory (DFRT). Stability of the cyclodextrin-alcohol adducts was measured in terms of DFT based reactivity descriptor, global hardness, electrophilicity, and energy of the HOMO. Stability of adducts was observed to be sensitive towards the strength as well as direction of the applied external electric field. In addition, reactivity pattern follows the maximum hardness and minimum electrophilicity principles.

  10. GSTM1 and XRCC3 Polymorphisms: Effects on Levels of Aflatoxin B1-DNA Adducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-dai Long; Yun Ma; Zhou-lin Deng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which can cause the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts, is a known human carcinogen. AFB1-exposure individuals with inherited susceptible carcinogen-metabolizing or repairing genotypes may experience an increased risk of genotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate whether the polymorphisms of two genes, the metabolic gene Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and DNA repair gene x-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3), can affect the levels of AFB1-DNA adducts in Guangxi Population (n= 966) from an AFB1-exposure area.Methods: AFB1-DNA adducts were measured by ELISA, and GSTM1 and XRCC3 codon 241 genotypes were identified by PCR-RFLP.Results: The GSTM1-null genotype [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.61(2.71] and XRCC3 genotypes with 241 Met alleles [i.e., XRCC3-TM and -MM, adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 1.43 (1.08(1.89) and 2.42 (1.13(5.22), respectively] were significantly associated with higher levels of AFB1-DNA adducts. Compared with those individuals who did not express any putative risk genotypes as reference (OR = 1), individuals featuring all of the putative risk genotypes did experience a significantly higher DNA-adduct levels (adjusted ORs were 2.87 for GSTM1-null and XRCC3-TM; 5.83 for GSTM1-null and XRCC3-MM). Additionally, there was a positive joint effect between XRCC3 genotypes and long-term AFB1 exposure in the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts.Conclusion: These results suggest that individuals with susceptible genotypes GSTM1-null, XRCC3-TM, or XRCC3-MM may experience an increased risk of DNA damage elicited by AFB1 exposure.

  11. Modulatory effects of essential oils from spices on the formation of DNA adduct by aflatoxin B1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S; Aboobaker, V S; Madhubala, R; Bhattacharya, R K; Rao, A R

    1994-01-01

    Essential oils from common spices such as nutmeg, ginger, cardamom, celery, xanthoxylum, black pepper, cumin, and coriander were tested for their ability to suppress the formation of DNA adducts by aflatoxin B1 in vitro in a microsomal enzyme-mediated reaction. All oils were found to inhibit adduct formation very significantly and in a dose-dependent manner. The adduct formation appeared to be modulated through the action on microsomal enzymes, because an effective inhibition on the formation of activated metabolite was observed with each oil. The enzymatic modulation is perhaps due to the chemical constituents of the oils, and this could form a basis for their potential anticarcinogenic roles.

  12. The effect of exercise therapy on knee adduction moment in individuals with knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Giovanni E; Robinson, Caroline Cabral; Wiebusch, Matheus; Viero, Carolina Cabral de Mello; da Rosa, Luis Henrique Telles; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-07-01

    Exercise therapy is an evidence-based intervention for the conservative management of knee osteoarthritis. It is hypothesized that exercise therapy could reduce the knee adduction moment. A systematic review was performed in order to verify the effects of exercise therapy on the knee adduction moment in individuals with knee osteoarthritis in studies that also assessed pain and physical function. A comprehensive electronic search was performed on MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Google scholar and OpenGrey. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials with control or sham groups as comparator assessing pain, physical function, muscle strength and knee adduction moment during walking at self-selected speed in individuals with knee osteoarthritis that underwent a structured exercise therapy rehabilitation program. Two independent reviewers extracted the data and assessed risk of bias. For each study, knee adduction moment, pain and physical function outcomes were extracted. For each outcome, mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Due to clinical heterogeneity among exercise therapy protocols, a descriptive analysis was chosen. Three studies, comprising 233 participants, were included. None of the studies showed significant differences between strengthening and control/sham groups in knee adduction moment. In regards to pain and physical function, the three studies demonstrated significant improvement in pain and two of them showed increased physical function following exercise therapy compared to controls. Muscle strength and torque significantly improved in all the three trials favoring the intervention group. Clinical benefits from exercise therapy were not associated with changes in the knee adduction moment. The lack of knee adduction moment reduction indicates that exercise therapy may not be protective in knee osteoarthritis from a joint loading point of view. Alterations in neuromuscular control, not captured by the knee

  13. Biological significance of DNA adducts investigated by simultaneous analysis of different endpoints of genotoxicity in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells treated with methyl methanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Andreas; Schulz, Berta; Stopper, Helga; Lutz, Werner K

    2007-12-01

    The biological significance of DNA adducts is under continuous discussion because analytical developments allow determination of adducts at ever lower levels. Central questions refer to the biological consequences of adducts and to the relationship between background DNA damage and exposure-related increments. These questions were addressed by measuring the two DNA adducts 7-methylguanine (7-mG) and O(6)-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O(6)-mdGuo) by LC-MS/MS in parallel to two biological endpoints of genotoxicity (comet assay and in vitro micronucleus test), using large batches of L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The background level of 7-mG was 1440 adducts per 10(9) nucleotides while O(6)-mdGuo was almost 50-fold lower (32 adducts per 10(9) nucleotides). In the comet assay and the micronucleus test, background was in the usual range seen with smaller batches of cells (2.1% Tail DNA and 12 micronuclei-containing cells per 1000 binucleated cells, respectively). For the comparison of the four endpoints for dose-related increments above background in the low-response region we assumed linearity at low dose and used the concept of the "doubling dose", i.e., we estimated the concentration of MMS necessary to double the background measures. Doubling doses of 4.3 and 8.7microM MMS were deduced for 7-mG and O(6)-mdGuo, respectively. For doubling the background measures in the comet assay and the micronucleus test, 5 to 15-fold higher concentrations of MMS were necessary (45 and 66microM, respectively). This means that the contribution of an increase in DNA methylation to biological endpoints of genotoxicity is overestimated. For xenobiotics that generate adducts without background, the difference is even more pronounced because the dose-response curve starts at zero and the limit of detection of an increase is not affected by background variation. Consequences for the question of thresholds in dose-response relationships and for the

  14. Study of the use possibility of the chemical-biological adduct of the 1,1-bis-[5-bromopyrimidine-2’,4’-diono-1’-il]-2-bromo-2’-chloroethylene and bacterial lectin for the treatment of the Pliss’ lymphosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Welchinska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Study of the pyrimidine metabolism antimetabolites that can be preformed compounds in the link of biosynthetic processes and can brake tumour’s growth is a more successful, perspective finding direction of new antitumor medications. New original chemical-biological adduct was studied as potential antitumor agent. Methods and results. It was obtained on the base of 1,1-bis-[5-bromopyrimidine-2’,4’-diono-1’-il]-2-bromo-2’-chloroethylene and antitumour bacterial lectin from Bacillus polymyxa. It was found that new chemical-biological adduct of bis-derivative of pyrimidine and bacterial lectin has little toxic preparation (LD50=635 mg/kg and demonstrates considerable antitumour effect upon to 65.5% on Pliss Limphosarcoma tumour. Conclusion. It confirms that new chemical-biological adduct is perspective for the future investigation as substance with a little toxicity and high antitumour activity on the Pliss Limphosarcoma.

  15. Development of a competitive immunoassay for the determination of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine adducts in human haemoglobin and its application in biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lathan; Jones, Alan; Boogaard, Peter; Will, Wolfgang; Aston, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is an important industrial compound and a directly acting mutagen. Human exposure to it can be monitored by the determination of haemoglobin (Hb) adducts. An immunoassay that quantifies the N-terminal adduct N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine in whole blood was developed, and its potential usefulness as a tool for biologically monitoring occupational exposure demonstrated. Analytical reliability was confirmed in a comparative study with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (range 0.040-589 nmol g(-1) Hb, correlation coefficient 0.98, n=10). The assay was configured as a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to facilitate the rapid throughput of samples. The assay uses a whole blood matrix and has a working range of 10-10000 pmol N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine g(-1) hB. The assay does not appear to be affected by structurally similar metabolites and has been used to determine adducts in human blood samples. The first results from potentially exposed workers indicate the assay might be a powerful tool for the routine occupational biomonitoring of EO exposure.

  16. Development of a competitive immunoassay for the determination of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)valine adducts in human haemoglobin and its application in biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, L; Jones, A; Boogaard, P; Will, W; Aston, P

    2005-01-01

    Propylene oxide (PO) is an important industrial compound and a directly acting mutagen. Human exposure to PO can be monitored by the determination of haemoglobin adducts. An immunoassay that quantifies the N-terminal adduct N-(2-hydroxypropyl)valine in whole haemoglobin was developed and its potential usefulness as a tool for biologically monitoring occupational exposure was demonstrated. Analytical reliability was confirmed in a comparative study with GC-MS (range 3.7-992 nmol g-1 haemoglobin (Hb), correlation coefficient 0.99, n=10). The assay has been configured as a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to facilitate the rapid throughput of samples. The assay employs a whole blood matrix and has a working range of 2-250 pmol g-1 Hb. It does not appear to be affected by structurally similar metabolites and has been used to determine adducts in human blood samples. The first results in potentially exposed workers indicate the assay's high potential usefulness in routine occupational biomonitoring of exposure to PO.

  17. Foot alignments influence the effect of knee adduction moment with lateral wedge insoles during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tomonori; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Iwamoto, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Yuta; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Kito, Nobuhiro; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Lateral wedge insoles (LWIs) reduce the peak external knee adduction moment (KAM). However, the efficacy of LWIs is limited in certain individuals for whom they fail to decrease KAM. Possible explanations for a lack of desired LWI response are variations in foot alignments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the immediate biomechanical effects of LWIs depend on individual foot alignments during gait. Fifteen healthy adults participated in this study. Their feet were categorized as normal, pronated, and supinated using the foot posture index. All subjects were subsequently requested to perform a normal gait under barefoot and LWI conditions. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to record the kinematic and kinetic data, included peak KAM, KAM impulse (KAAI), center of pressure displacement, and knee-ground reaction force lever arm (KLA). Furthermore, lower limb frontal plane kinematic parameters at the rear foot, ankle, knee, and hip were evaluated. Among all feet, there was no significant difference in the peak KAM and KAAI between the conditions. In contrast, the peak KAM was significantly reduced under the LWI condition relative to the barefoot condition in the normal foot group. Reductions in the peak KAM were correlated with a more lateral center of pressure and reduced KLA. In addition, a reduced KLA was correlated with decreased hip adduction. LWIs significantly reduced the peak KAM in normal feet, indicating that biomechanical effects of LWIs vary between individual foot alignments. Our findings suggest that it is helpful to assess individual foot alignment to ensure adequate insole treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Chemopreventive effects of dithiocarbamates on aflatoxin B1 metabolism and formation of AFB1 adducts with glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, U V; Frei, E; Frank, N; Kliem, H C; Wiessler, M; Bertram, B; Bhattacharya, R K

    1998-01-01

    Several agents with anticarcinogenic potential such as diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), lactose-DDTC, proline-dithiocarbamate (PDTC), its dimer proline-thiuramdisulfide (PTDS) and 4-carboxy-piperazine-TDS (4-pip-TDS) were investigated for their influence on the metabolism and the detoxication of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in vitro and in vivo. Aflatoxins are a group of mycotoxins produced by aspergillus species and are among the most important risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain areas of the world. AFB1 metabolism measured by the formation of tris-diol adducts showed that the thiuramdisulfides 4-carboxy-piperazine-TDS and PTDS were better inhibitors in vitro than the corresponding dithiocarbamates. Ex vivo studies in rats showed that dithiocarbamates (DTCs) including sugar linked lactose-DDTC decreased the formation of tris-diol adducts. Among the dithiocarbamates administered, DDTC showed a 40% inhibition whereas the other compounds showed only marginal effects. In vivo experiments on the formation of glutathione-adducts derived from AFB1-endo- and exo-epoxides showed that lactose-DDTC enhanced the formation of AFB1-GSH adducts, whereas PDTC, 4-pip-TDS, PTDS and DDTC displayed inhibitory effects. We conclude that DTCs may be promising agents in the chemoprevention of liver carcinogenesis caused by AFB1.

  19. Effects of metal ion adduction on the gas-phase conformations of protein ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Tawnya G; Merenbloom, Samuel I; Williams, Evan R

    2013-11-01

    Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of α-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca(2+), is larger for the holo-form compared with the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution.

  20. Formation of an adduct between insulin and the toxic lipoperoxidation product acrolein decreases both the hypoglycemic effect of the hormone in rat and glucose uptake in 3T3 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Navarro, Rafael; Guzmán-Grenfell, Alberto M; Díaz-Flores, Margarita; Duran-Reyes, Genoveva; Ortega-Camarillo, Clara; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne M; Hicks, Juan José

    2007-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation induced by reactive oxygen species might modify circulating biomolecules because of the formation of alpha,beta-unsaturated or dicarbonylic aldehydes. In order to investigate the interaction between a lipoperoxidation product, acrolein, and a circulating protein, insulin, the acrolein-insulin adduct was obtained. To characterize the adduct, gel filtration chromatography, sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and carbonyl determination were performed. Induction of hypoglycemia in the rat and stimulation of glucose uptake by 3T3 adipocytes were used to evaluate the biological efficiency of the adduct compared with that of native insulin (Mackness, B., Quarck, R., Verte, W., Mackness, M., and Holvoet, P. (2006) Arterioscler., Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 26, 1545-1550). Formation of the acrolein-insulin complex in vitro increased the carbonyl group concentration from 2.5 to 22.5 nmol/mg of protein, and it formed without intermolecular aggregates (Halliwell, B., and Whiteman, M. (2004) Br. J. Pharmacol. 142, 231-255. The hypoglycaemic effect 18 min after administration to the rat is decreased by 25% (Robertson, R. P. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42351-42354. An adduct concentration of 94 nM, compared to 10 nM for native insulin, was required to obtain the A 50% (concentration needed to obtain 50% of maximum transport of glucose uptake by 3T3 adipocytes). In conclusion, formation of the acrolein-insulin adduct modifies the structure of insulin and decreases its hypoglycemic effect in rat and glucose uptake by 3T3 adipocytes. These results help explain how a toxic aldehyde prone to be produced in vivo can structurally modify insulin and change its biological action.

  1. Hyphenating the curtius rearrangement with Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts: synthesis of biologically active acyloins and vicinal aminoalcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarante, Giovanni W.; Cavallaro, Mayra; Coelho, Fernando, E-mail: coelho@iqm.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Sintese de Produtos Naturais e Farmacos

    2011-07-01

    Using Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts as substrates, the Curtius rearrangement was performed in a sequence that allowed the synthesis of several hydroxy-ketones (acyloins) with great structural diversity and in good overall yields. These acyloins in turn were easily transformed into 1,2-anti aminoalcohols through a highly diastereoselective reductive amination step. The synthetic utility of these approaches was exemplified by performing the syntheses of (+-)-bupropion, a drug used to treat the abstinence syndrome of smoker and (+-)-spisulosine, a potent anti-tumoral compound originally isolated from a marine source. (author)

  2. Acute and sub-acute effects of repetitive kicking on hip adduction torque in injury-free elite youth soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per;

    2014-01-01

    Hip adduction strength is important for kicking and acceleration in soccer players. Changes in hip adduction strength may therefore have an effect on soccer players' athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute and sub-acute effects of a kicking drill session on hip...... strength, concerning isometric hip adduction, abduction and flexion torque of the kicking leg and the supporting leg. Ten injury-free male elite soccer players, mean ± s age of 15.8 ± 0.4 years participated. All players underwent a specific 20 min kicking drill session, comprising 45 kicks. The players...

  3. Biological effect markers for exposure to carcinogenic compound and their relevance for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.; Roza, L.

    1998-01-01

    In this review data are summarized on biomarkers that are used for biological effect monitoring of human populations exposed to genotoxic carcinogens. The biomarkers are DNA and protein adducts and cytogenetic effects. Most of these biomarkers are relevant for the process of carcinogenesis. Emphasis

  4. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in rat spermatozoa and its effect on fetal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooser, S.T.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, C.M. van; Waalkens-Berendsen, I.D.H.; Smits-van Prooije, A.E.; Snoeij, N.J.; Baan, R.A.; Fichtinger-Schepman, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of males to some genotoxic chemicals causes DNA damage in spermatozoa resulting in embryotoxicity and developmental defects in their offspring. This study demonstrates that cisplatin-DNA adducts could be measured in spermatozoa following treatment with the antineoplastic drug, cisplatin. Th

  5. Effect of Increased Water Intake on Urinary DNA Adduct Levels and Mutagenicity in Smokers: A Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Buendia Jimenez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between fluid intake and bladder cancer risk remains controversial. Very little is known about to which extent the amount of water intake influences the action of excreting toxics upon the urinary system. This proof of concept trial investigates the effect of water intake on mutagenesis in smokers, a high risk population for bladder cancer. Methods. Monocentric randomized controlled trial. Inclusion Criteria. Male subjects aged 2045–45 y/o, smokers, and small drinkers (24-hour urinary volume 700 mOsmol/kg. Outcomes. 4-ABP DNA adducts formation in exfoliated bladder cells in 24-hour urine collection and urinary mutagenicity in 24-hour urine. Test Group. Subjects consumed 1.5 L daily of the study product (EVIAN on top of their usual water intake for 50 days. Control Group. Subjects continued their usual lifestyle habits. Results. 65 subjects were randomized. Mean age was 30 y/o and mean cigarettes per day were 20. A slight decrease in adducts formation was observed between baseline and last visit but no statistically significant difference was demonstrated between the groups. Urinary mutagenicity significantly decreased. The study shows that increasing water intake decreases urinary mutagenicity. It is not confirmed by urinary adducts formation. Further research would be necessary.

  6. Effects of alkyl chain length and substituent pattern of fullerene bis-adducts on film structures and photovoltaic properties of bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Kurotobi, Kei; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2014-10-08

    A series of alkoxycarbonyl-substituted dihydronaphthyl-based [60]fullerene bis-adduct derivatives (denoted as C2BA, C4BA, and C6BA with the alkyl chain of ethyl, n-butyl, and n-hexyl, respectively) have been synthesized to investigate the effects of alkyl chain length and substituent pattern of fullerene bis-adducts on the film structures and photovoltaic properties of bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. The shorter alkyl chain length caused lower solubility of the fullerene bis-adducts (C6BA > C4BA > C2BA), thereby resulting in the increased separation difficulty of respective bis-adduct isomers. The device performance based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the fullerene bis-adduct regioisomer mixtures was enhanced by shortening the alkyl chain length. When using the regioisomerically separated fullerene bis-adducts, the devices based on trans-2 and a mixture of trans-4 and e of C4BA exhibited the highest power conversion efficiencies of ca. 2.4%, which are considerably higher than those of the C6BA counterparts (ca. 1.4%) and the C4BA regioisomer mixture (1.10%). The film morphologies as well as electron mobilities of the P3HT:bis-adduct blend films were found to affect the photovoltaic properties considerably. These results reveal that the alkyl chain length and substituent pattern of fullerene bis-adducts significantly influence the photovoltaic properties as well as the film structures of bulk heterojunction solar cells.

  7. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  8. Quantum Effects in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  9. Gene-diet interactions in exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines and bulky DNA adduct levels in blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vikki; Peacock, Sarah; Massey, Thomas E; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Chen, Jian; King, Will D

    2015-08-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), carcinogens produced in meat when cooked at high temperatures, are an emerging biologic explanation for the meat-colorectal cancer relationship. HAAs form DNA adducts; left unrepaired, adducts can induce mutations, which may initiate/promote carcinogenesis. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between dietary HAAs, genetic susceptibility and bulky DNA adduct levels. Least squares regression was used to examine the relationship between dietary HAA exposure and bulky DNA adduct levels in blood measured using (32)P-postlabeling among 99 healthy volunteers. Gene-diet interactions between dietary HAAs and genetic factors relevant to the biotransformation of HAAs and DNA repair were also examined. No main effects of dietary HAAs on bulky DNA adduct levels was found. However, those with the putative NAT1 rapid acetylator phenotype had lower adduct levels than those with the slow acetylator phenotype (P = 0.02). Furthermore, having five or more 'at-risk' genotypes was associated with higher bulky DNA adduct levels (P = 0.03). Gene-diet interactions were observed between NAT1 polymorphisms and dietary HAAs (P adduct levels compared to lower intakes. This study provides evidence of a biologic relationship between dietary HAAs, genetic susceptibility and bulky DNA adduct formation. However, the lack of a strong main effect of HAAs suggests that dietary HAAs are not a large contributor to bulky DNA adducts in this population; future studies should consider relevant gene-diet interactions to clarify the role of HAAs in carcinogenesis.

  10. The effect of formaldehyde fixation on RNA: optimization of formaldehyde adduct removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, David L; Fowler, Carol B; Cunningham, Brady R; Mason, Jeffrey T; O'Leary, Timothy J

    2011-05-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues generally provide low yields of extractable RNA that exhibit both covalent modification of nucleic acid bases and strand cleavage. This frustrates efforts to perform retrospective analyses of gene expression using archival tissue specimens. A variety of conditions have been reported to demodify formaldehyde-fixed RNA in different model systems. We studied the reversal of formaldehyde fixation of RNA using a 50 base RNA oligonucleotide and total cellular RNA. Formaldehyde-adducted, native, and hydrolyzed RNA species were identified by their bioanalyzer electrophoretic migration patterns and RT-quantitative PCR. Demodification conditions included temperature, time, buffer, and pH. The reversal of formaldehyde-fixed RNA to native species without apparent RNA hydrolysis was most successfully performed in dilute Tris, phosphate, or similar buffers (pH 8) at 70°C for 30 minutes. Amines were not required for efficient formaldehyde demodification. Formaldehyde-fixed RNA was more labile than native RNA to treatment with heat and buffer, suggesting that antigen retrieval methods for proteins may impede RNA hybridization or RNA extraction. Taken together, the data indicate that reliable conditions may be used to remove formaldehyde adducts from RNA to improve the quality of RNA available for molecular studies.

  11. Single-stranded oligonucleotide adducts formed by Pt complexes favoring left-handed base canting: steric effect of flanking residues and relevance to DNA adducts formed by Pt anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Jamil S; Marzilli, Patricia A; Intini, Francesco P; Natile, Giovanni; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2011-09-01

    Platinum anticancer drug binding to DNA creates large distortions in the cross-link (G*G*) and the adjacent XG* base pair (bp) steps (G* = N7-platinated G). These distortions, which are responsible for anticancer activity, depend on features of the duplex (e.g., base pairing) and of the cross-link moiety (e.g., the position and canting of the G* bases). The duplex structure stabilizes the head-to-head (HH) over the head-to-tail (HT) orientation and right-handed (R) over left-handed (L) canting of the G* bases. To provide fundamental chemical information relevant to the assessment of such duplex effects, we examine (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) adducts (Bip = 2,2'-bipiperidine with S,R,R,S chiral centers at the N, C, C, and N chelate ring atoms, respectively; oligo = d(G*pG*) with 3'- and/or 5'-substituents). The moderately bulky (S,R,R,S)-Bip ligand favors L canting and slows rotation about the Pt-G* bonds, and the (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) models provide more useful data than do dynamic models derived from active Pt drugs. All 5'-substituents in (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) adducts favor the normal HH conformer (∼97%) by destabilizing the HT conformer through clashes with the 3'-G* residue rather than through favorable H-bonding interactions with the carrier ligand in the HH conformer. For all (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) adducts, the S pucker of the 5'-X residue is retained. For these adducts, a 5'-substituent had only modest effects on the degree of L canting for the (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) HH conformer. This small flanking 5'-substituent effect on an L-canted HH conformer contrasts with the significant decrease in the degree of R canting previously observed for flanking 5'-substituents in the R-canted (R,S,S,R)-BipPt(oligo) analogues. The present data support our earlier hypothesis that the distortion distinctive to the XG* bp step (S to N pucker change and movement of the X residue) is required for normal stacking and X·X' WC H bonding and to prevent XG* residue clashes.

  12. Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

  13. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene......, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual...... breaks, base oxidation, 8-oxodG and PAH bulky adducts in lymphocytes, markers of oxidative stress in plasma and genotypes of glutathione transferases (GSTs) and NADPH:quinone reductase (NQO1). With respect to benzene, the main result indicates that DNA base oxidation is correlated with PMA excretion...

  14. Formation of DNA adducts and induction of mutagenic effects in rats following 4 weeks inhalation exposure to ethylene oxide as a basis for cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sittert, N J; Boogaard, P J; Natarajan, A T; Tates, A D; Ehrenberg, L G; Törnqvist, M A

    2000-01-17

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is mutagenic in various in vitro and in vivo test systems and carcinogenic in rodents. EO forms different adducts upon reaction with DNA, N7-(2-hydroxyethyl)guanine (N7-HEG) being the main adduct. The major objectives of this study were: (a) to determine the formation and persistence of N7-HEG adducts in liver DNA of adult male rats exposed to 0, 50, 100 and 200 ppm by inhalation (4 weeks, 5 days/week, 6 h/day) and (b) to assess dose-response relationships for Hprt gene mutations and various types of chromosomal changes in splenic lymphocytes.N7-HEG adducts were measured 5, 21, 35 and 49 days after cessation of exposure. By extrapolation, the mean concentrations of N7-HEG immediately after cessation of exposure ('day 0') to 50, 100 and 200 ppm were calculated as 310, 558 and 1202 adducts/10(8) nucleotides, respectively, while the mean concentration in control rats was 2.6 adducts/10(8) nucleotides. At 49 days, N7-HEG values had returned close to background levels. The mean levels of N-(2-hydroxyethylvaline) adducts in haemoglobin were also determined and amounted 61.7, 114 and 247 nmol/g globin, respectively. Statistically significant linear relationships were found between mean N7-HEG levels ('day 0') and Hprt mutant frequencies at expression times 21/22 and 49/50 days and between mean N7-HEG ('day 0') and sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) or high frequency cells (HFC) measured 5 days post-exposure. At day 21 post-exposure, SCEs and HFCs in-part persisted and were significantly correlated with persistent N7-HEG adducts. No statistically significant dose effect relationships were observed for induction of micronuclei, nor for chromosome breaks or translocations. In conclusion, this study indicates that following sub-chronic exposure, EO is only weakly mutagenic in adult rats. Using the data of this study to predict cancer risk in man resulting from low level EO exposures in conjunction with other published data, i.e., those on (a) genotoxic

  15. The dramatic effect of the annealing temperature and dielectric functionalization on the electron mobility of indene-C60 bis-adduct thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgiu, Emanuele; Squillaci, Marco A; Rekab, Wassima; Börjesson, Karl; Liscio, Fabiola; Zhang, Lei; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-03-28

    Herein we report on the charge transport properties of spin-coated thin films of an n-type fullerene derivative, i.e. the indene-C60 bis-adduct (ICBA). In particular, the effects of annealing temperature and duration as well as surface functionalization are explored. Electron mobilities approaching 0.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) are reported.

  16. Quantitative comparison between in vivo DNA adduct formation from exposure to selected DNA-reactive carcinogens, natural background levels of DNA adduct formation and tumour incidence in rodent bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paini, Alicia; Scholz, Gabriele; Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Schilter, Benoît; O'Brien, John; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed at quantitatively comparing the occurrence/formation of DNA adducts with the carcinogenicity induced by a selection of DNA-reactive genotoxic carcinogens. Contrary to previous efforts, we used a very uniform set of data, limited to in vivo rat liver studies in order to investigate whether a correlation can be obtained, using a benchmark dose (BMD) approach. Dose-response data on both carcinogenicity and in vivo DNA adduct formation were available for six compounds, i.e. 2-acetylaminofluorene, aflatoxin B1, methyleugenol, safrole, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and tamoxifen. BMD(10) values for liver carcinogenicity were calculated using the US Environmental Protection Agency BMD software. DNA adduct levels at this dose were extrapolated assuming linearity of the DNA adduct dose response. In addition, the levels of DNA adducts at the BMD(10) were compared to available data on endogenous background DNA damage in the target organ. Although for an individual carcinogen the tumour response increases when adduct levels increase, our results demonstrate that when comparing different carcinogens, no quantitative correlation exists between the level of DNA adduct formation and carcinogenicity. These data confirm that the quantity of DNA adducts formed by a DNA-reactive compound is not a carcinogenicity predictor but that other factors such as type of adduct and mutagenic potential may be equally relevant. Moreover, comparison to background DNA damage supports the notion that the mere occurrence of DNA adducts above or below the level of endogenous DNA damage is neither correlated to development of cancer. These data strongly emphasise the need to apply the mode of action framework to understand the contribution of other biological effect markers playing a role in carcinogenicity.

  17. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  18. No effects of chlorophyllin on IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]-quinoline)-genotoxicity and -DNA adduct formation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Tomoe; Shinoda, Aki; Ishizaki, Nao; Hayatsu, Hikoya; Sugiyama, Chitose

    2004-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated that chlorophyllin suppressed the genotoxicities of many carcinogens. However, the genotoxicity of IQ (2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline), a carcinogenic heterocyclic amine, was not suppressed in Drosophila. On the contrary, it has been reported that chrolophyllin suppressed the genotoxicity of IQ in rodents, rainbow trout and Salmonella. We demonstrated that the chlorophyllin-induced suppression of MeIQx (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline)-genotoxicity was associated with a decrease in MeIQx-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila larval DNA. MeIQx represents another type of heterocyclic amine and is similar to IQ in structure. In this study we utilized (32)P-postlabeling to examine whether chlorophyllin reduced IQ-DNA adduct formation in Drosophila DNA in the same way as MeIQx. The results revealed that the formation of IQ-DNA adducts was unaffected by treatment with chlorophyllin. This was consistent with the absence of any inhibitory effect on genotoxicity as observed in the Drosophila repair test. These results suggest that IQ-behavior in Drosophila is not affected by chlorophyllin, indicating that the process of IQ-DNA adduct formation followed by expression of genotoxicity in Drosophila may be different from that in other organisms.

  19. Effect of proprioceptive training on foot posture, lower limb alignment, and knee adduction moment in patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yumi; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of proprioceptive training on foot progression angle, weight-bearing ratio, and knee adduction moment in patients with degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] The subjects were 37 patients diagnosed with Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 or 3 degenerative knee osteoarthritis. They were randomly allocated to three groups: a proprioceptive training group (PT group), quadriceps strengthening group (QS group), and control group. [Methods] The study parameters of the three groups were compared before and after a 12-week training period. Therapeutic exercises were performed twice per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the foot progression angle, weight-bearing ratio, and knee adduction moment. [Results] First, a significant difference in the foot progression angle was observed among the groups, significantly increasing in the PTG compared with the CG. Second, a significant difference in the weight-bearing ratio was observed among the groups, significantly increasing in the PTG compared with the CG. Third, a significant difference in the first peak knee adduction moment was observed among the groups, significantly decreasing in the PTG compared with the CG. [Conclusion] The results of the present study indicate that proprioceptive training increased the foot progression angle and weight-bearing ratio and decreased the first peak knee adduction moment. Moreover, incorporating proprioceptive training into a physical therapy exercise program could improve functional ability and delay the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis.

  20. Chemical-Biological Properties of Zinc Sensors TSQ and Zinquin: Formation of Sensor-Zn-Protein Adducts versus Zn(Sensor)2 Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B; Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Menden, Heather; Tomasiewicz, Henry; Petering, David H

    2015-12-21

    Fluorescent zinc sensors are the most commonly used tool to study the intracellular mobile zinc status within cellular systems. Previously, we have shown that the quinoline-based sensors Zinquin and 6-methoxy-8-p-toluenesulfonamido-quinoline (TSQ) predominantly form ternary adducts with members of the Zn-proteome. Here, the chemistries of these sensors are further characterized, including how Zn(sensor)2 complexes may react in an intracellular environment. We demonstrate that these sensors are typically used in higher concentrations than needed to obtain maximum signal. Exposing cells to either Zn(Zinquin)2 or Zn(TSQ)2 resulted in efficient cellular uptake and the formation of sensor-Zn-protein adducts as evidenced by both a fluorescence spectral shift toward that of ternary adducts and the localization of the fluorescence signal within the proteome after gel filtration of cellular lysates. Likewise, reacting Zn(sensor)2 with the Zn-proteome from LLC-PK1 cells resulted in the formation of sensor-Zn-protein ternary adducts that could be inhibited by first saturating the Zn- proteome with excess sensor. Further, a native SDS-PAGE analysis of the Zn-proteome reacted with either the sensor or the Zn(sensor)2 complex revealed that both reactions result in the formation of a similar set of sensor-Zn-protein fluorescent products. The results of this experiment also demonstrated that TSQ and Zinquin react with different members of the Zn-proteome. Reactions with the model apo-Zn-protein bovine serum albumin showed that both Zn(TSQ)2 and Zn(Zinquin)2 reacted to form ternary adducts with its apo-Zn-binding site. Moreover, incubating Zn(sensor)2 complexes with non-zinc binding proteins failed to elicit a spectral shift in the fluorescence spectrum, supporting the premise that blue-shifted emission spectra are due to sensor-Zn-protein ternary adducts. It was concluded that Zn(sensors)2 species do not play a significant role in the overall reaction between these sensors and

  1. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  2. Neuroprotective effect of a new synthetic aspirin-decursinol adduct in experimental animal models of ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Chun Yan

    Full Text Available Stroke is the second leading cause of death. Experimental animal models of cerebral ischemia are widely used for researching mechanisms of ischemic damage and developing new drugs for the prevention and treatment of stroke. The present study aimed to comparatively investigate neuroprotective effects of aspirin (ASA, decursinol (DA and new synthetic aspirin-decursinol adduct (ASA-DA against transient focal and global cerebral ischemic damage. We found that treatment with 20 mg/kg, not 10 mg/kg, ASA-DA protected against ischemia-induced neuronal death after transient focal and global ischemic damage, and its neuroprotective effect was much better than that of ASA or DA alone. In addition, 20 mg/kg ASA-DA treatment reduced the ischemia-induced gliosis and maintained antioxidants levels in the corresponding injury regions. In brief, ASA-DA, a new synthetic drug, dramatically protected neurons from ischemic damage, and neuroprotective effects of ASA-DA may be closely related to the attenuation of ischemia-induced gliosis and maintenance of antioxidants.

  3. Effects of ethylene oxide and ethylene inhalation on DNA adducts, apurinic/apyrimidinic sites and expression of base excision DNA repair genes in rat brain, spleen, and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Asakura, Shoji; Li, Yutai; Kosyk, Oksana; Koc, Hasan; Nakamura, Jun; Upton, Patricia B; Swenberg, James A

    2005-09-28

    -oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Mpg, AP endonuclease (Ape), polymerase beta (Pol beta) and alkylguanine methyltransferase were increased by 20-100% in livers of rats exposed to EO for 20 days. The only effects of ET on BER gene expression were observed in brain, where Ape and Pol beta expression were increased by less than 20% after 20 days of exposure to 3000 ppm. These data suggest that DNA damage induced by exposure to EO is repaired without accumulation of AP sites and is associated with biologically insignificant changes in BER gene expression in target organs. We conclude that accumulation of AP sites is not a likely primary mechanism for mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of EO.

  4. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  5. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samad, Ubair Abdus [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Center of excellence for research in engineering materials (CEREM), Advance Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Rawaiz [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Alam, Mohammad Asif [Center of excellence for research in engineering materials (CEREM), Advance Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Othman, Othman Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Deanship of Graduate Studies, The Saudi Electric University, P. O. Box 93499, Riyadh 11673 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Zahrani, Saeed M. [Center of excellence for research in engineering materials (CEREM), Advance Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); SABIC Polymer Research Center (SPRC) and department of chemical engineering, college of engineering, King Saud University, P. O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-05-22

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  6. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Ubair Abdus; Khan, Rawaiz; Alam, Mohammad Asif; Al-Othman, Othman Y.; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  7. Biological Effects of Acoustic Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    rectified diffusion. 56 III. STABLE CAVITATION A. Introduction There are manv areas associated with the biological effects of ultrasound in which the...used said as cavitation indicators. Further, if clinical ultrasound systems are found to be inducing cavitation , either stable or transient, it will...O BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC CAVITATION by Lawrence A. Crum -- Physical Acoustics Research Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy ’ CTE

  8. The biologically effective dose in inhalation nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Schinwald, Anja; Murphy, Fiona; Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Poland, Craig

    2013-03-19

    In all branches of toxicology, the biologically effective dose (BED) is the fraction of the total dose of a toxin that actually drives any toxic effect. Knowledge of the BED has a number of applications including in building structure-activity relationships, the selection of metrics, the design of safe particles, and the determination of when a nanoparticle (NP) can be considered to be "new" for regulatory purposes. In particle toxicology, we define the BED as "the entity within any dose of particles in tissue that drives a critical pathophysiogically relevant form of toxicity (e.g., oxidative stress, inflammation, genotoxicity, or proliferation) or a process that leads to it." In conventional chemical toxicology, researchers generally use the mass as the metric to describe dose (such as mass per unit tissue or cells in culture) because of its convenience. Concentration, calculated from mass, may also figure in any description of dose. In the case of a nanoparticle dose, researchers use either the mass or the surface area. The mass of nanoparticles is not the only driver of their activity: the surfaces of insoluble particles interact with biological systems, and soluble nanoparticles can release factors that interact with these systems. Nanoparticle shape can modify activity. In this Account, we describe the current knowledge of the BED as it pertains to different NP types. Soluble toxins released by NPs represent one potential indicator of BED for wholly or partially soluble NPs composed of copper or zinc. Rapid dissolution of these NPs into their toxic ions in the acidic environment of the macrophage phagolysosome causes those ions to accumulate, which leads to lysosome destabilization and inflammation. In contrast, soluble NPs that release low toxicity ions, such as magnesium oxide NPs, are not inflammogenic. For insoluble NPs, ζ potential can serve as a BED measurement because the exposure of the particle surface to the acidic milieu of the phagolysosome and

  9. Gait Retraining With Real-Time Biofeedback to Reduce Knee Adduction Moment: Systematic Review of Effects and Methods Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosie; van den Noort, Josien C; Dekker, Joost; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    To review the current literature regarding methods and effects of real-time biofeedback used as a method for gait retraining to reduce knee adduction moment (KAM), with intended application for patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with the keywords gait, feedback, and knee osteoarthritis from inception to May 2015. Titles and abstracts were screened by 1 individual for studies aiming to reduce KAM. Full-text articles were assessed by 2 individuals against predefined criteria. Data were extracted by 1 individual according to a predefined list, including participant demographics and training methods and effects. Electronic searches resulted in 190 potentially eligible studies, from which 12 met all inclusion criteria. Within-group standardized mean differences (SMDs) for reduction of KAM in healthy controls ranged from .44 to 2.47 and from .29 to .37 in patients with KOA. In patients with KOA, improvements were reported in pain and function, with SMDs ranging from .55 to 1.16. Methods of implementation of biofeedback training varied between studies, but in healthy controls increased KAM reduction was noted with implicit, rather than explicit, instructions. This review suggests that biofeedback gait training is effective primarily for reducing KAM but also for reducing pain and improving function in patients with KOA. The review was limited by the small number of studies featuring patients with KOA and the lack of controlled studies. The results suggest there is value and a need in further researching biofeedback training for reducing KAM. Future studies should include larger cohorts of patients, long-term follow-up, and controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA adducts and strand breaks in workers exposed to vapours and aerosols of bitumen: associations between exposure and effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczynski, Boleslaw; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Spickenheuer, Anne; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Mensing, Thomas; Engelhardt, Beate; Lee, Eun-Hyun; Schindler, Birgit K; Heinze, Evelyn; Welge, Peter; Bramer, Rainer; Angerer, Jürgen; Breuer, Dietmar; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Brüning, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    To study the associations between exposure to vapours and aerosols of bitumen and genotoxic effects, a cross-sectional and cross-shift study was conducted in 320 exposed workers and 118 non-exposed construction workers. Ambient air measurements were carried out to assess external exposure to vapours and aerosols of bitumen. Hydroxylated metabolites of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene were measured in urine, whereas (+)-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide ((+)-anti-BPDE), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxodGuo) and DNA strand breaks were determined in blood. Significantly higher levels of 8-oxodGuo adducts and DNA strand breaks were found in both pre- and post-shift blood samples of exposed workers compared to those of the referents. No differences between exposed workers and referents were observed for (+)-anti-BPDE. Moreover, no positive associations between DNA damage and magnitude of airborne exposure to vapours and aerosols of bitumen could be observed in our study. Additionally, no relevant association between the urinary metabolites of PAH and the DNA damage in blood was observed. Overall, our results indicate increased oxidative DNA damage in workers exposed to vapours and aerosols of bitumen compared to non-exposed referents at the group level. However, increased DNA strand breaks in bitumen workers were still within the range of those found in non-exposed and healthy persons as reported earlier. Due to the lack of an association between oxidative DNA damage and exposure levels at the workplaces under study, the observed increase in genotoxic effects in bitumen workers cannot be attributed to vapours and aerosols of bitumen.

  11. Red wine consumption is inversely associated with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-DNA adduct levels in prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Bock, Cathryn H; Nock, Nora L; Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Levin, Albert M; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Savera, Adnan T; Takahashi, Satoru; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Tang, Deliang

    2011-10-01

    In humans, genetic variation and dietary factors may alter the biological effects of exposure to 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), one of the major heterocyclic amines generated from cooking meats at high temperatures that has carcinogenic potential through the formation of DNA adducts. Previously, we reported grilled red meat consumption associated with PhIP-DNA adduct levels in human prostate. In this study, we expanded our investigation to estimate the associations between beverage consumption and PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate for 391 prostate cancer cases. Of the 15 beverages analyzed, red wine consumption had the strongest association with PhIP-DNA adduct levels showing an inverse correlation in both tumor (P = 0.006) and nontumor (P = 0.002) prostate cells. Red wine consumption was significantly lower in African American compared with white cases, but PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate did not vary by race. In African Americans compared with whites, however, associations between red wine consumption and PhIP-DNA adduct levels were not as strong as associations with specific (e.g., SULT1A1 and UGT1A10 genotypes) and nonspecific (e.g., African ancestry) genetic variation. In a multivariable model, the covariate for red wine consumption explained a comparable percentage (13%-16%) of the variation in PhIP-DNA adduct levels in prostate across the two racial groups, but the aforementioned genetic factors explained 33% of the PhIP-DNA adduct variation in African American cases, whereas only 19% of the PhIP-DNA adduct variation in whites. We conclude that red wine consumption may counteract biological effects of PhIP exposure in human prostate, but genetic factors may play an even larger role, particularly in African Americans.

  12. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, M. A.; Di Luzio, Sr.; Di Luzio, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, concerns about hazards from electromagnetic fields represent an alarming source for human lives in technologically developed countries. We are surrounded by electromagnetic fields everywhere we spend our working hours, rest or recreational activities. The aim of this review is to summarize the biological effects due to these fields arising from power and transmission lines, electrical cable splices, electronic devices inside our homes and work-places, distribution networks and associated devices such as cellular telephones and wireless communication tower, etc. Special care has been reserved to study the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on cell lines of the mammalian immune system about which our research group has been working for several years.

  13. Comparative effect of dietary butylated hydroxyanisole and beta-naphthoflavone on aflatoxin B1 metabolism, DNA adduct formation, and carcinogenesis in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeger, D E; Shelton, D W; Hendricks, J D; Pereira, C; Bailey, G S

    1988-10-01

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), both chemicals with anti-carcinogenic properties in some experimental animals, were compared for effects on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) metabolism, hepatic DNA adduct formation and carcinogenesis in the rainbow trout. Dietary BHA had no effect on the hepatic tumor incidence when fed at 0.03 or 0.3% 4 weeks prior to and during a 4 week dietary exposure of 10 p.p.b. AFB1. BNF, when fed at 0.005 or 0.05% under similar conditions, significantly reduced tumor response, which confirms previous results in trout (Nixon et al., Carcinogenesis, 5, 615-619, 1984). BHA fed at either 0.03 or 0.3% for 8 weeks had no post-initiation effect on the 52 week hepatic tumor incidence of trout exposed to a 0.5 p.p.m. AFB1 solution as embryos. A similar post-initiation exposure to 0.05% BNF significantly enhanced AFB1 tumor response. The influence of dietary BHA and BNF on AFB1 metabolism and DNA adduct formation and persistence in trout were examined. A 3 week pre-treatment with 0.3% dietary BHA had no effect on in vivo hepatic nuclear AFB1-DNA adduct formation at 0.5, 1, 2 and 7 days after AFB1 i.p. injection. By contrast 0.05% dietary BNF reduced hepatic AFB1-DNA adducts to 33-60% of control levels at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 days after AFB1 exposure. This was accompanied by significantly lower blood and liver levels of AFB1 during the first 24 h after i.p. injection. Livers of BNF trout also contained 4-fold more of the less carcinogenic metabolite, aflatoxin M1, and 50% less aflatoxicol (AFL), a metabolite with similar carcinogenicity as AFB1. Bile AFL-glucuronide levels were significantly decreased in BNF-fed trout, but total bile glucuronides were significantly increased due to a 15-fold increase in aflatoxicol-M1 glucuronide. Freshly isolated hepatocytes from BHA-fed fish, when incubated with AFB1 for 1 h, showed no difference in levels of AFB1-DNA adducts or ratios of AFB1 metabolites when compared to hepatocytes isolated from fish

  14. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  15. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  16. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter; Hertel, Ole; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Vinzents, Peter; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual exposure to PM(2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and benzene has been measured in groups of 40-50 subjects. Measured biomarkers included 1-hydroxypyrene, benzene metabolites (phenylmercapturic acid (PMA) and trans-trans-muconic acid (ttMA)), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in urine, DNA strand breaks, base oxidation, 8-oxodG and PAH bulky adducts in lymphocytes, markers of oxidative stress in plasma and genotypes of glutathione transferases (GSTs) and NADPH:quinone reductase (NQO1). With respect to benzene, the main result indicates that DNA base oxidation is correlated with PMA excretion. With respect to exposure to PM, biomarkers of oxidative damage showed significant positive association with the individual exposure. Thus, 8-oxodG in lymphocyte DNA and markers of oxidative damage to lipids and protein in plasma associated with PM(2.5) exposure. Several types of DNA damage showed seasonal variation. PAH adduct levels, DNA strand breaks and 8-oxodG in lymphocytes increased significantly in the summer period, requiring control of confounders. Similar seasonal effects on strand breaks and expression of the relevant DNA repair genes ERCC1 and OGG1 have been reported. In the present setting, biological effects of air pollutants appear mainly related to oxidative stress via personal exposure and not to urban background levels. Future developments include personal time

  17. Decavanadate effects in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, Manuel; Gândara, Ricardo M C

    2005-05-01

    Vanadium biological studies often disregarded the formation of decameric vanadate species known to interact, in vitro, with high-affinity with many proteins such as myosin and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump and also to inhibit these biochemical systems involved in energy transduction. Moreover, very few in vivo animal studies involving vanadium consider the contribution of decavanadate to vanadium biological effects. Recently, it has been shown that an acute exposure to decavanadate but not to other vanadate oligomers induced oxidative stress and a different fate in vanadium intracellular accumulation. Several markers of oxidative stress analyzed on hepatic and cardiac tissue were monitored after in vivo effect of an acute exposure (12, 24 h and 7 days), to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM; 1 mg/kg) of two vanadium solutions ("metavanadate" and "decavanadate"). It was observed that "decavanadate" promote different effects than other vanadate oligomers in catalase activity, glutathione content, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial superoxide anion production and vanadium accumulation, whereas both solutions seem to equally depress reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as total intracellular reducing power. Vanadium is accumulated in mitochondria in particular when "decavanadate" is administered. These recent findings, that are now summarized, point out the decameric vanadate species contributions to in vivo and in vitro effects induced by vanadium in biological systems.

  18. Antineoplastic effect of iodine and iodide in dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors: association between lactoperoxidase and estrogen-adduct production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Ofelia; Delgado, Guadalupe; Anguiano, Brenda; Petrosyan, Pavel; Molina-Servín, Edith D; Gonsebatt, Maria E; Aceves, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    Several groups, including ours, have reported that iodine exhibited antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in various cancer cells only if this element is supplemented as molecular iodine, or as iodide, to cells that are able to oxidize it with the enzyme thyroperoxidase. In this study, we analyzed the effect of various concentrations of iodine and/or iodide in the dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) mammary cancer model in rats. The results show that 0.1% iodine or iodide increases the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type γ (PPARγ), triggering caspase-mediated apoptosis pathways in damaged mammary tissue (DMBA-treated mammary gland) as well as in frank mammary tumors, but not in normal mammary gland. DMBA treatment induces the expression of lactoperoxidase, which participates in the antineoplastic effect of iodide and could be involved in the pro-neoplastic effect of estrogens, increasing the formation of DNA adducts. In conclusion, our results show that a supplement of 0.1% molecular iodine/potassium iodide (0.05/0.05%) exert antineoplastic effects, preventing estrogen-induced DNA adducts and inducing apoptosis through PPARγ/caspases in pre-cancer and cancerous cells. Since this iodine concentration does not modify the cytology (histology, apoptosis rate) or physiology (triiodothyronine and thyrotropin) of the thyroid gland, we propose that it be considered as an adjuvant treatment for premenopausal mammary cancer.

  19. Effect of green tea catechins and hydrolyzable tannins on benzo[a]pyrene-induced DNA adducts and structure-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxiao; Cai, Jian; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2010-04-19

    Green tea catechins and hydrolyzable tannins are gaining increasing attention as chemopreventive agents. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four green tea catechins and two hydrolyzable tannins on microsome-induced benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-DNA adducts and the possible structure-activity relationship. BP (1 microM) was incubated with rat liver microsomes and DNA in the presence of the test compound (1-200 microM) or vehicle. The purified DNA was analyzed by (32)P-postlabeling. The inhibitory activity of the catechins was in the following descending order: epigallocatechin gallate (IC(50) = 16 microM) > epicatechin gallate (24 microM) > epigallocatechin (146 microM) > epicatechin (462 microM), suggesting a correlation between the number of adjacent aromatic hydroxyl groups in the molecular structure and their potencies. Tannic acid (IC(50) = 4 microM) and pentagalloglucose (IC(50) = 26 microM) elicited as much DNA adduct inhibitory activity as the catechins or higher presumably due to the presence of more functional hydroxyl groups. To determine if the activity of these compounds was due to direct interaction of phenolic groups with electrophilic metabolite(s) of BP, DNA was incubated with anti-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (anti-BPDE) (0.5 microM) in the presence of test compounds (200 microM) or vehicle. Significant inhibition of DNA adduct formation was found (tannic acid > pentagalloglucose > epigallocatechin gallate > epicatechin gallate). This notion was confirmed by analysis of the reaction products of anti-BPDE with the catechins and pentagalloglucose by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that green tea catechins and the hydrolyzable tannins are highly effective in inhibiting BP-DNA adduct formation at least, in part, due to direct interaction of adjacent hydroxyl groups in their structures and that the activity is

  20. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  1. Sustained induction of cytochrome P4501A1 in human hepatoma cells by co-exposure to benzo[a]pyrene and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole underlies the synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gábelová, Alena, E-mail: alena.gabelova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Poláková, Veronika [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Prochazka, Gabriela [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kretová, Miroslava; Poloncová, Katarína; Regendová, Eva; Luciaková, Katarína [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Segerbäck, Dan [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    To gain a deeper insight into the potential interactions between individual aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture, several benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) binary mixtures were studied. The biological activity of the binary mixtures was investigated in the HepG2 and WB-F344 liver cell lines and the Chinese hamster V79 cell line that stably expresses the human cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1). In the V79 cells, binary mixtures, in contrast to individual carcinogens, caused a significant decrease in the levels of micronuclei, DNA adducts and gene mutations, but not in cell survival. Similarly, a lower frequency of micronuclei and levels of DNA adducts were found in rat liver WB-F344 cells treated with a binary mixture, regardless of the exposure time. The observed antagonism between B[a]P and DBC may be due to an inhibition of Cyp1a1 expression because cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC showed a decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA levels. In human liver HepG2 cells exposed to binary mixtures for 2 h, a reduction in micronuclei frequency was also found. However, after a 24 h treatment, synergism between B[a]P and DBC was determined based on DNA adduct formation. Accordingly, the up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression was detected in HepG2 cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC. Our results show significant differences in the response of human and rat cells to B[a]P:DBC mixtures and stress the need to use multiple experimental systems when evaluating the potential risk of environmental pollutants. Our data also indicate that an increased expression of CYP1A1 results in a synergistic effect of B[a]P and DBC in human cells. As humans are exposed to a plethora of noxious chemicals, our results have important implications for human carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • B[a]P:DBC mixtures were less genotoxic in V79MZh1A1 cells than B[a]P and DBC alone. • An antagonism between B[a]P and DBC was determined in rat liver WB-F344 cells. • The inhibition of CYP1a1 expression by B[a]P:DBC mixture

  2. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Partitioning of knee joint internal forces in gait is dictated by the knee adduction angle and not by the knee adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2014-05-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease. Surgical and conservative interventions are performed to manage its progression via reduction of load on the medial compartment or equivalently its surrogate measure, the external adduction moment. However, some studies have questioned a correlation between the medial load and adduction moment. Using a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity driven by kinematics-kinetics of asymptomatic subjects at gait midstance, we aim here to quantify the relative effects of changes in the knee adduction angle versus changes in the adduction moment on the joint response and medial/lateral load partitioning. The reference adduction rotation of 1.6° is altered by ±1.5° to 3.1° and 0.1° or the knee reference adduction moment of 17Nm is varied by ±50% to 25.5Nm and 8.5Nm. Quadriceps, hamstrings and tibiofemoral contact forces substantially increased as adduction angle dropped and diminished as it increased. The medial/lateral ratio of contact forces slightly altered by changes in the adduction moment but a larger adduction rotation hugely increased this ratio from 8.8 to a 90 while in contrast a smaller adduction rotation yielded a more uniform distribution. If the aim in an intervention is to diminish the medial contact force and medial/lateral load ratio, a drop of 1.5° in adduction angle is much more effective (causing respectively 12% and 80% decreases) than a reduction of 50% in the adduction moment (causing respectively 4% and 13% decreases). Substantial role of changes in adduction angle is due to the associated alterations in joint nonlinear passive resistance. These findings explain the poor correlation between knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral compartment loading during gait suggesting that the internal load partitioning is dictated by the joint adduction angle.

  4. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  5. Biological transformation, kinetics and dose-response assessments of bound musk ketone hemoglobin adducts in rainbow trout as biomarkers of environmental exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M A Mottaleb; J H Zimmerman; T W Moy

    2008-01-01

    Low levels (ng/g) of musk ketone (MK), used as a fragrance additive in the formulation of personal care products, are frequently detected in the water and other environment. Thus, aquatic organisms can be continuously exposed to MK. In this study, kinetics and dose-response assessments of 2-amino-MK (AMK) metabolite, bound to cysteine-hemoglobin (Hb) in rainbow trout, formed by enzymatic nitro-reduction of MK have been demonstrated. Trout were exposed to a single exposure of 0.010, 0.030, 0.10, and or 0.30 mg MK/g of fish. Twenty-six Hb samples were collected from exposed- and control fish subsequent to exposure intervals of 1 d (24 h), 3 d (72 h), and 7 d (168 h). Basic hydrolysis released bound AMK metabolite was extracted into n-hexane and then concentrated and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) electron capture negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectrometry (MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM). The presence of the AMK metabolite in Hb extracts was confirmed by agreement of similar mass spectral features and retention time with a standard. In the dose-response study, maximum adduct formation was obtained at the 0.10 mg/g dose with an average AMK metabolite concentration of 2.2 ng/g. For kinetics, the highest concentration of the AMK metabolite was found to be 32.0 ng/g at 0.03 mg/g dose in 3-d sample. Further elimination of the metabolite showed kinetics with a half-life estimated to be 2 d, assuming first-order kinetics. The metabolite was not detected in the control samples, non-hydrolyzed Hb, and reagent blank extracts. The detection limit for AMK in the Hb was approximately 0.30 (g/L, based on a signal to noise ratio of 3 (S/N = 3).

  6. 78 FR 46260 - Sorbitan Monooleate Ethylene Oxide Adduct; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Sorbitan Monooleate Ethylene Oxide Adduct; Exemption From the Requirement of a... ethylene oxide adduct'' and as ``polysorbate 80'') when used as an inert ingredient in antimicrobial... residues of sorbitan monooleate ethylene oxide adduct. DATES: This regulation is effective July 31, 2013...

  7. Reactive Carbonyl Species In Vivo: Generation and Dual Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna M. Semchyshyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive carbonyls are widespread species in living organisms and mainly known for their damaging effects. The most abundant reactive carbonyl species (RCS are derived from oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Chemical modification of proteins, nucleic acids, and aminophospholipids by RCS results in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. In addition to their direct toxicity, modification of biomolecules by RCS gives rise to a multitude of adducts and cross links that are increasingly implicated in aging and pathology of a wide range of human diseases. Understanding of the relationship between metabolism of RCS and the development of pathological disorders and diseases may help to develop effective approaches to prevent a number of disorders and diseases. On the other hand, constant persistence of RCS in cells suggests that they perform some useful role in living organisms. The most beneficial effects of RCS are their establishment as regulators of cell signal transduction and gene expression. Since RCS can modulate different biological processes, new tools are required to decipher the precise mechanisms underlying dual effects of RCS.

  8. Investigation of the DNA adducts formed in B6C3F1 mice treated with benzene: Implications for molecular dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodell, W.J.; Pathak, D.N.; Levay, G. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    We have investigated the formation of DNA adducts in the bone marrow and white blood cells of male B6C3F1 mice treated with benzene using P1-enhanced {sup 32}P-postlabeling. No adducts were detected in the bone marrow of controls or mice treated with various doses of benzene once a day. After twice-daily treatment for 1 to 7 days with benzene, 440 mg/kg, one major (no. 1) and UP to two minor DNA adducts were detected in both the bone marrow and white blood cells. The relative adduct levels in these cells ranged from 0.06 to 1.46 x 10{sup -7}. A significant correlation (r 0.95) between levels of adducts in bone marrow and white blood cells was observed. After a 7-day treatment with benzene, 440 mg/kg twice a day, the number of cells per femur decreased from 1.6 x 10{sup 7} to 0.85 X 10{sup 7}, indicating myelotoxicity. In contrast, administration of benzene once a day produced only a small decrease in bone marrow cellularity. The observed induction of toxicity in bone marrow was paralleled by formation of DNA adducts. In vitro treatment of bone marrow with hydroquinone (HQ) for 24 hr produced the same DNA adducts as found after treatment of mice with benzene, suggesting that HQ is the principal metabolite of benzene leading to DNA adduct formation in vivo. Using {sup 32}P-postlabeling the principal DNA adduct formed in vivo was compared with N{sup 2}-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-deoxyguanosine-3-phosphate. The results of this comparison demonstrates that the DNA adduct formed in vivo co-chromatographs with N{sup 2}-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-deoxyguanosine-3{prime}-phosphate. These studies indicate that metabolic activation of benzene leads to the formation of DNA adducts in bone marrow and white blood cells and suggest that measurement of DNA adducts in white blood cells may be an indicator of biological effect following benzene exposure. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. The antimicrobial activities of the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing-Yi; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wen Ye

    2011-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a well-established natural antimicrobial compound. It is probable for cinnamaldehyde to react with amino acid forming Schiff base adduct in real food system. In this paper, 9 such kind of adducts were prepared by the direct reaction of amino acids with cinnamaldehyde at room temperature. Their antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated with benzoic acid as a reference. The adducts showed a dose-dependent activities against the three microbial strains. Both cinnamaldehyde and their adducts were more active against B. subtilis than on E. coli, and their antimicrobial activities were higher at lower pH. Both cinnamaldehyde and its adducts were more active than benzoic acid at the same conditions. The adduct compound A was non-toxic by primary oral acute toxicity study in mice. However, in situ effect of the adduct compound A against E. coli was a little lower than cinnamaldehyde in fish meat. This paper for the first time showed that the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids had similar strong antimicrobial activities as cinnamaldehyde, which may provide alternatives to cinnamaldehyde in food to avoid the strong unacceptable odor of cinnamaldehyde.

  10. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Muna; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-11-05

    Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA) adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease.

  11. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  12. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  13. Biological effects of drilling wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranford, P. J. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    2000-07-01

    An argument is made for the point of view that economic realities require that a sustainable fishery must co-exist with the offshore petroleum industry, and therefore to sustain the fishery comprehensive studies are needed to identify and minimize the impact of operational drilling wastes on fishery resources. Moreover, laboratory and field studies indicate that operational drilling platforms impact on fisheries at great distances, therefore studies should not be limited to the immediate vicinity of drilling sites. Studies on long-term exposure of resident organisms to low level contaminants and the chronic lethal and sublethal biological effects of production drilling wastes must be conducted under environmentally relevant conditions to ensure the validity of the results. Studies at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography on sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) shows them to be highly sensitive to impacts from drilling wastes. Results of these studies, integrated with toxicity data and information on the distribution and transport of drilling wastes have been used by regulatory agencies and industrial interests to develop scientifically sound and justifiable regulations. They also led to the development of practical, sensitive and cost-effective technologies that use resident resource species to detect environmental impacts at offshore production sites. 1 fig.

  14. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkova, Blanka [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Chvatalova, Irena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Lnenickova, Zdena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Milcova, Alena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Tulupova, Elena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Farmer, Peter B. [Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Sram, Radim J. [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2007-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in general population. These effects may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to respirable air particles. It is expected that metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms may modulate individual susceptibility to PAH exposure. This study investigates relationships between exposure to PAHs, polymorphisms of these genes and DNA adducts in group of occupationally exposed policemen (EXP, N = 53, males, aged 22-50 years) working outdoors in the downtown area of Prague and in matched 'unexposed' controls (CON, N = 52). Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was evaluated by personal samplers during working shift prior to collection of biological samples. Bulky-aromatic DNA adducts were analyzed in lymphocytes by {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay. Polymorphisms of metabolizing (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, CYP1A1-MspI) and DNA repair (XRCC1, XPD) genes were determined by PCR-based RFLP assays. As potential modifiers and/or cofounders, urinary cotinine levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, plasma levels of vitamins A, C, E and folates by HPLC, cholesterol and triglycerides using commercial kits. During the sampling period ambient particulate air pollution was as follows: PM10 32-55 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, PM2.5 27-38 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, c-PAHs 18-22 ng/m{sup 3}; personal exposure to c-PAHs: 9.7 ng/m{sup 3} versus 5.8 ng/m{sup 3} (P < 0.01) for EXP and CON groups, respectively. The total DNA adduct levels did not significantly differ between EXP and CON groups (0.92 {+-} 0.28 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.82 {+-} 0.23 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0.065), whereas the level of the B[a]P-'like' adduct was significantly higher in exposed group (0.122 {+-} 0.036 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.099 {+-} 0.035 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0

  15. Rear foot kinematics when wearing lateral wedge insoles and foot alignment influence the effect of knee adduction moment for medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tomonori; Tanimoto, Kenji; Tokuda, Kazuki; Iwamoto, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Yuta; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Kito, Nobuhiro; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    Lateral wedge insoles (LWIs) are prescribed for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis to reduce the external knee adduction moment (KAM). However, the biomechanical effects of LWIs are limited in some patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the biomechanical effects of LWIs depend on individual foot alignment and to examine the relationship between change in KAM and changes in foot and ankle biomechanics when wearing LWIs. Twenty-one patients participated in this study. They were categorized into normal or abnormal foot groups based on the foot posture index (FPI). All patients were requested to perform a normal gait under barefoot and LWI conditions. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to record 1st and 2nd KAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), center of pressure displacement, and knee-ground reaction force lever arm. Furthermore, the foot and ankle frontal plane kinematic parameters were evaluated. The 1st KAM was significantly reduced under the LWI condition compared to that under the barefoot condition in the normal foot group. In contrast, there was no significant difference in 1st KAM between both conditions in the abnormal foot group. Decreased rear foot eversion strongly correlated with reduction in the 1st KAM in the normal foot group. These findings suggested that it is helpful to assess individual foot alignment to ensure adequate insole treatment for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis and that decreased rear foot eversion during the early stance phase is significantly involved in the reduction of 1st KAM when wearing LWIs with normal feet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of a major DNA adduct of the mitomycin metabolite 2,7-diaminomitosene in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells treated with mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palom, Y; Belcourt, M F; Kumar, G S; Arai, H; Kasai, M; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells with [3H]mitomycin C (MC) results in the formation of six major DNA adducts, as described earlier using an HPLC assay of 3H-labeled products of enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA isolated from MC-treated cells. Four of these adducts were identified as monofunctional and bifunctional guanine-N2 adducts in the minor groove of DNA. In order to establish relationships between individual types of MC-DNA adducts and biological responses it is necessary to identify all of the adducts formed in cells. To this end we have now identified a predominant, previously unknown adduct formed in MC-treated EMT6 cells as a derivative not of MC, but of 2,7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), the major bioreductive metabolite of MC. Rigorous proof demonstrates that it is a DNA major groove, guanine-N7 adduct of 2,7-DAM, linked at C-10 to DNA. The adduct is relatively stable at ambient temperature, but is readily depurinated upon heating. Its isolation from MC-treated cells indicates that MC is reductively metabolized to 2,7-DAM, which then undergoes further reductive activation to alkylate DNA, along with the parent MC. Low MC:DNA ratios were identified as a critical factor promoting 2,7-DAM adduct formation in an in vitro model calf thymus DNA/ MC/reductase model system, as well as in MC-treated EMT6 cells. The 2,7-DAM-guanine-N7 DNA adduct appears to be relatively noncytotoxic, as indicated by the dramatically lower cytotoxicity of 2,7-DAM in comparison with MC in EMT6 cells. Like MC, 2,7-DAM exhibited slightly greater cytotoxicity to cells treated under hypoxic as compared to aerobic conditions. However, 2,7-DAM was markedly less cytotoxic than MC under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Thus, metabolic reduction of MC to 2,7-DAM represents a detoxification process. The differential effects of MC-DNA and 2,7-DAM-DNA adducts support the concept that specific structural features of the DNA damage may play a critical role in the cytotoxic response to a DNA

  17. PAH-DNA adducts in cord blood and fetal and child development in a Chinese cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, D.L.; Li, T.Y.; Liu, J.J.; Chen, Y.H.; Qu, L.R.; Perera, F. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). Dept. for Environmental Health Science

    2006-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important class of toxic pollutants released by fossil fuel combustion. Other pollutants include metals and particulate matter. PAH-DNA adducts, or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) adducts as their proxy, provide a chemical-specific measure of individual biologically effective doses that have been associated with increased risk of cancer and adverse birth outcomes. In the present study we examined the relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and fetal and child growth and development in Tongliang, China, where a seasonally operated coal-fired power plant was the major pollution source. In a cohort of 150 nonsmoking women and their newborns enrolled between 4 March 2002 and 19 June 2002, BaP-DNA adducts were measured in maternal and umbilical cord blood obtained at delivery. High PAH-DNA adduct levels (above the median of detectable adduct level) were associated with decreased birth head circumference (p = 0.057) and reduced children's weight at 18 months, 24 months, and 30 months of age (p {lt} 0.05), after controlling for potential confounders. In addition, in separate models, longer duration of prenatal exposure was associated with reduced birth length (p = 0.033) and reduced children's height at 18 (p = 0.001), 24 (p {lt} 0.001), and 30 months of age (p {lt} 0.001). The findings suggest that exposure to elevated levels of PAHS, with the Tongliang power plant being a significant source, is associated with reduced fetal and child growth in this population.

  18. Effect of multiple adduct fullerenes on microstructure and phase behavior of P3HT:fullerene blend films for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Anne A Y; Reynolds, Luke X; Bruno, Annalisa; MacLachlan, Andrew; King, Simon P; Faist, Mark A; Pires, Ellis; Macdonald, J Emyr; Stingelin, Natalie; Haque, Saif A; Nelson, Jenny

    2012-05-22

    The bis and tris adducts of [6,6]phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) offer lower reduction potentials than PCBM and are therefore expected to offer larger open-circuit voltages and more efficient energy conversion when blended with conjugated polymers in photovoltaic devices in place of PCBM. However, poor photovoltaic device performances are commonly observed when PCBM is replaced with higher-adduct fullerenes. In this work, we use transmission electron microscopy (TEM), steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to probe the microstructural properties of blend films of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) with the bis and tris adducts of PCBM. TEM and PL indicate that, in as-spun blend films, fullerenes become less soluble in P3HT as the number of adducts increases. PL indicates that upon annealing crystallization leads to phase separation in P3HT:PCBM samples only. DSC studies indicate that the interactions between P3HT and the fullerene become weaker with higher-adduct fullerenes and that all systems exhibit eutectic phase behavior with a eutectic composition being shifted to higher molar fullerene content for higher-adduct fullerenes. We propose two different mechanisms of microstructure development for PCBM and higher-adduct fullerenes. P3HT:PCBM blends, phase segregation is the result of crystallization of either one or both components and is facilitated by thermal treatments. In contrast, for blends containing higher adducts, the phase separation is due to a partial demixing of the amorphous phases. We rationalize the lower photocurrent generation by the higher-adduct fullerene blends in terms of film microstructure.

  19. Strategy for identifying unknown hemoglobin adducts using adductome LC-MS/MS data: Identification of adducts corresponding to acrylic acid, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 1-octen-3-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Henrik; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-06-01

    Electrophilic compounds have the ability to form adducts with nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA in tissues, and thereby constitute risks for toxic effects. Adductomic approaches are developed for systematic screening of adducts to DNA and blood proteins, with the aim to detect unknown internal exposures to electrophiles. In a previous adductomic screening of adducts to N-terminals in hemoglobin, using LC-MS/MS, 19 unknown adducts were detected in addition to seven previously identified adducts. The present paper describes the identification of four of these unknown adducts, as well as the strategy used to identify them. Using LC-MS data from the screening, hypotheses about adduct identities were formulated: probable precursor electrophiles with matching molecular weights were suggested based on the molecular weights of the modifications and the retention times of the analytes, in combination with comparisons of theoretical Log P calculations and databases. Reference adducts were generated by incubation of blood samples with the hypothesized precursor electrophiles. The four identified precursor electrophiles, corresponding to the observed unknown adducts, were glyoxal, methylglyoxal, acrylic acid and 1-octen-3-one. Possible origins/exposure sources and toxicological information concerning the electrophilic precursors are discussed. The identified adducts could be explored as possible biomarkers for exposure.

  20. Base sequence effects on DNA replication influenced by bulky adducts. Final report, March 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geacintov, N.E.

    1997-05-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are environmental pollutants that are present in air, food, and water. While PAH compounds are chemically inert and are sparingly soluble in aqueous solutions, in living cells they are metabolized to a variety of oxygenated derivatives, including the high mutagenic and tumorigenic diol epoxide derivatives. The diol epoxides of the sterically hindered fjord region compound benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]PhDE) are among the most powerful tumorigenic compounds in animal model test systems. In this project, site-specifically modified oligonucleotides containing single B[c]PhDE-N{sup 6}-dA lesions derived from the reactions of the 1S,2R,3R,4S and 1R,2S,3S,4R diol epoxides of B[c]PhDE with dA residues were synthesized. The replication of DNA catalyzed by a prokaryotic DNA polymerase (the exonuclease-free Klenow fragment E. Coli Po1 I) in the vicinity of the lesion at base-specific sites on B[c]PhDE-modified template strands was investigated in detail. The Michaelis-Menten parameters for the insertion of single deoxynucleotide triphosphates into growing DNA (primer) strands using the modified dA* and the bases just before and after the dA* residue as templates, depend markedly on the stereochemistry of the B[c]PhDE-modified dA residues. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which bulky PAH-DNA adducts affect normal DNA replication.

  1. Biological significance of DNA adducts: comparison of increments over background for various biomarkers of genotoxicity in L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Andreas; Richter, Ingrid; Lutz, Ursula; Wanek, Paul; Stopper, Helga; Lutz, Werner K

    2009-08-01

    DNA is affected by background damage of the order of one lesion per one hundred thousand nucleotides, with depurination and oxidative damage accounting for a major part. This damage contributes to spontaneous mutation and cancer. DNA adducts can be measured with high sensitivity, with limits of detection lower than one adduct per one billion nucleotides. Minute exposures to an exogenous DNA-reactive agent may therefore result in measurable adduct formation, although, as an increment over total DNA damage, a small increment in mutation cannot be measured and would be considered negligible. Here, we investigated whether this discrepancy also holds for adducts that are present as background induced by oxidative stress. L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells were incubated for 4h with hydrogen peroxide (0, 0.8, 4, 20, 100, 500muM) or cumene hydroperoxide (0, 0.37, 1.1, 3.3, 10muM). Five endpoints of genotoxicity were measured in parallel from aliquots of three replicates of large batches of cells: Two DNA adducts, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (varepsilondAdo) measured by LC-MS/MS, as well as strand breaks assessed with the comet assay and in vitro micronucleus test, and gene mutation as assessed using the thymidine kinase gene mutation assay. Background measures of 8-oxodGuo and varepsilondAdo were 500-1000 and 50-90 adducts per 10(9) nucleotides. Upon treatment, neither hydrogen peroxide nor cumene hydroperoxide significantly increased the DNA adduct levels above control. In contrast, dose-related increases above background were observed with both oxidants in the comet assay, the micronucleus test and the gene mutation assay. Differences in sensitivity of the assays were quantified by estimating the concentration of oxidant that resulted in a doubling of the background measure. We conclude that the increase in DNA breakage and mutation induced by hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide observed in our in vitro

  2. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  3. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  4. Correlation Effects in Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Bagdasaryan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of the complex network theory is presented and classification of such networks in accordance with the main statistical characteristics is considered. For the adjacency matrix of a real neural network the shortest distances for each pair of nodes as well as the node degree distribution and cluster coefficients are calculated. Comparison of the main statistical parameters with the random network is performed, and based on this, the conclusions about the correlation phenomena in biological system are made.

  5. Comparison of EMG activity on abdominal muscles during plank exercise with unilateral and bilateral additional isometric hip adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Eui-Ryong; Jung, In-Gui; Seo, Eun-Young; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of additional isometric hip adduction during the plank exercise on the abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy young men participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to monitor the activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), the internal oblique (IO), and the external oblique (EO) muscles. The participants performed three types of plank exercise; the standard plank exercise, the plank exercise with bilateral isometric hip adduction, and the plank exercise with unilateral isometric hip adduction. All abdominal muscle activity was significantly increased during the plank exercise combined with the bilateral and unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the standard plank exercise (pmuscle activity was significantly increased during the unilateral isometric hip adduction compared with the bilateral isometric hip adduction (pabdominal muscle activity. In particular, the unilateral isometric hip adduction is a more beneficial exercise than the bilateral isometric hip adduction.

  6. Stable acetaldehyde--protein adducts as biomarkers of alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduah Birt, J E; Shuker, D E; Farmer, P B

    1998-02-01

    The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been associated with increased risks of a number of chronic disorders including cancers. It is still not clear whether ethyl alcohol or other components such as metabolites are directly involved in the carcinogenic process or whether the effects are due to the modulation of metabolism of other carcinogens. At present, there is no good biomarker of alcohol intake, particularly at low or moderate levels of consumption. A number of studies have shown the ability of the major metabolite acetaldehyde to react with proteins in vitro to give stable and unstable adducts. The interaction of acetaldehyde with model peptides, which correspond to N-terminal globin sequences, was studied. The major stable adduct was identified by mass spectrometry and NMR as a diastereoisomeric mixture of imidazolidinones. This is believed to be formed by reaction and cyclization of the initial Schiff base adduct with the N-terminal valine. Incubation of human globin with acetaldehyde (0-2 mM) yielded products which were identified as the N-terminal adducts by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) of proteolytic digests. The specificity and sensitivity of the analysis was improved by the use of on-line HPLC-ESI-MS. Tryptic digests of the modified globin which contained both the N-terminal acetaldehyde adducts of alpha-globin (heptapeptide) and beta-globin (octapeptide) were resolved. These results suggest that analysis of stable imidazolidinone adducts is a promising approach to estimation of alcohol exposure.

  7. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Daneshvar, Bahram; Autrup, Herman;

    2003-01-01

    was observed. Intake of lard fat resulted in increased ascorbate synthesis and affected markers of oxidative damage to proteins in liver cytosol, but not in plasma. The effect was observed at all lard doses and was not dose-dependent. However, no evidence of increased oxidative DNA damage was found in liver...... supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver....... The DNA-adduct level measured by 32P-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  8. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.;

    2003-01-01

    was observed. Intake of lard fat resulted in increased ascorbate synthesis and affected markers of oxidative damage to proteins in liver cytosol, but not in plasma. The effect was observed at all lard doses and was not dose-dependent. However, no evidence of increased oxidative DNA damage was found in liver...... supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver....... The DNA-adduct level measured by P-32-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  9. Characterization of a Hemoglobin Adduct from Ethyl Vinyl Ketone Detected in Human Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Henrik; Motwani, Hitesh V; Osterman Golkar, Siv; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2015-11-16

    Electrophiles have the ability to form adducts to nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA. Internal exposure to such compounds thus constitutes a risk for toxic effects. Screening of adducts using mass spectrometric methods by adductomic approaches offers possibilities to detect unknown electrophiles present in tissues. Previously, we employed untargeted adductomics to detect 19 unknown adducts to N-terminal valine in hemoglobin (Hb) in human blood. This article describes the characterization of one of these adducts, which was identified as the adduct from ethyl vinyl ketone (EVK). The mean adduct level was 40 ± 12 pmol/g Hb in 12 human blood samples; adduct levels from acrylamide (AA) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) were quantified for comparison. Using l-valine p-nitroanilide (Val-pNA), introduced as a model of the N-terminal valine, the rate of formation of the EVK adduct was studied, and the rate constant determined to 200 M(-1)h(-1) at 37 °C. In blood, the reaction rate was too fast to be feasibly measured, EVK showing a half-life adduct was found to be unstable, with a half-life of 7.6 h. From the mean adduct level measured in human blood, a daily dose (area under the concentration-time-curve, AUC) of 7 nMh EVK was estimated. The AUC of AA from intake via food is about 20 times higher. EVK is naturally present in a wide range of foods and is also used as a food additive. Most probably, naturally formed EVK is a major source to observed adducts. Evaluation of available toxicological data and information on occurrence of EVK indicate that further studies of EVK are motivated. This study illustrates a quantitative strategy in the initial evaluation of the significance of an adduct detected through adduct screening.

  10. Biological effects of thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Saatov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the findings from the study on multifunctional effects of thyroid hormones in relation to normal and malignantly transformed tissues and cells. Both “rapid” and «slow» effects of thyroid hormones including calorigenic effects and effects over adenylate cyclase – cAMP system have been described. Thyroxin (Т4 has been established capable to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis of cells carrying Т4 receptors on their membranes as well as to change course of metabolic processes under its effect. Spectrum of Т4 targets is quite broad to include not only cells of hormone-producing organs, to name those of the breast and the colon, but also other types of cells to name melanin-containing ones; Т4 effects resulting in reconstruction of presentation of regulatory proteins on the cell membrane surface to ultimately activate the process of cell apoptosis. Our findings help determine alternative paths for hormonal regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis of cells of hormone-dependent tumors, breast cancer, in particular, upon impossibility to regulate the processes by conventional methods. This facilitates understanding mechanisms for activation of signal system of the breast cancer’s cells by hormones upon changes in expression of receptors on the cells’ surface, making possible development of novel strategy for replacement therapy of hormone-dependent tumors upon low efficacy of drug therapy.

  11. Charge transfer adducts of metal complexes of π-donor ligands with I 2 and TCNQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, T. R.; Sen, D.; Ghosh, R.

    1989-01-01

    Copper(II) and nickel(II) biguanides and O-alkyl-1-amidinourea can act as donors for the formation of charge transfer (CT) adducts with I 2 and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TNCQ) as acceptors. Iodine adducts are characterized both in solid and solution states whereas TCNQ adducts obtain only in solution. Appearance of a broad band at 355 nm for iodine adducts and at 335 nm for TNCQ adducts and shifting of i.r. frequencies support the formation of donor acceptor associates. Elemental analysis establishes 1:1 stoichiometry of the solid adducts. The K and ɛ values determined by modified Benesi—Hildebrand, Scott and Rose—Drago equations are found to be of the order of 10 4 and 10 3 respectively at 298 K in methanol. The solvent effect on the K values is discussed in terms of coupled solute-solute and solute-solvent equilibria.

  12. Identification and characterization of the major DNA adduct formed chemically and in vitro from the environmental genotoxin 3-nitrofluoranthene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, A M; Guenat, C R; Tomer, K B; Ball, L M

    1988-11-01

    The genotoxic environmental pollutant 3-nitrofluoranthene (3-NFA) was reduced chemically and allowed to react with calf thymus DNA, yielding one major adduct which was determined to be N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-amino-fluoranthene based on Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry (FAB-MS), proton nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet-visible wavelength light spectroscopy (UV-VIS), and fluorescence data. Extensive characterization of the isolated adduct by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was necessary to demonstrate definitively that the adduct isolated was the dG:C8 adduct, and not the isomeric dG:N2 adduct. The extent of modification of the initial calf thymus DNA by chemically reduced 3-NFA was 0.12% (1.2 adducts/10(3) nucleosides), which was sufficient to allow several hundred micrograms of the adduct to be isolated and purified. The chemically synthesized adduct was utilized as a reference standard for comparison to the major adduct isolated from xanthine-oxidase-catalyzed reduction of 3-NFA in vitro. The yield from the in vitro biological system was 2.4 adducts/10(5) nucleosides; the adduct isolated possessed the same mass spectrometric, UV-VIS, and fluorescence characteristics as the purified standard, and co-eluted with the standard on HPLC. No evidence for other adducts was found, either in vitro or in the chemical synthesis, based on FAB-MS examination of whole extracts of the reaction mixture for the presence of ions related to other possible adducts. Therefore, if minor adducts were present they were formed in substantially lesser amounts than N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminofluoranthene.

  13. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  14. Adduct formation in liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometric measurement of bryostatin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thomas J; Sen, Abhik; Alkon, Daniel L; Sun, Miao-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Bryostatin 1, a potential anti-Alzheimer drug, is effective at subnanomolar concentrations. Measurement is complicated by the formation of low m/z degradation products and the formation of adducts with various cations, which make accurate quantitation difficult. Adduct formation caused the sample matrix or mobile phase to partition bryostatin 1 into products of different mass. Degradation of the 927 [M+Na](+) ion to a 869m/z product was strongly influenced by ionization conditions. We validated a bryostatin 1 assay in biological tissues using capillary column HPLC with nanospray ionization (NSI) in a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Adduct formation was controlled by adding 1mM acetic acid and 0.1mM sodium acetate to the HPLC buffer, maximizing the formation of the [M+Na](+) ion. Efficient removal of contaminating cholesterol from the sample during solvent extraction was also critical. The increased sensitivity provided by NSI and capillary-bore columns and the elimination of signal partitioning due to adduct formation and degradation in the ionization source enabled a detection limit of 1×10(-18)mol of bryostatin 1 and a LLOQ of 3×10(-18)mol from 1μl of sample. Bryostatin 1 at low pmol/l concentrations enabled measurement in brain and other tissues without the use of radioactive labels. Despite bryostatin 1's high molecular weight, considerable brain access was observed, with peak brain concentrations exceeding 8% of the peak blood plasma concentrations. Bryostatin 1 readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, reaching peak concentrations of 0.2nM, and specifically activates and translocates brain PKCɛ. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON THE SOURCE OF GEONEUTRINOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2013-01-01

    its bulk earth value of similar to 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine...

  16. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  17. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  18. Biological effects of electric fields: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Phillips, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    An overview of the literature suggests tha electric-field exposure is an environmental agent/influence of relatively low potential toxicity to biological systems. Generally, many of the biological effects which have been reported are quite subtle and differences between exposed and unexposed subjects may be masked by normal biological variations. However, several recent reports indicate possibly more serious consequences from chronic exposure, emphasizing the need for more research in epidemiology and laboratory experiments. This paper presents a cursory overview of investigations on the biological consequences of exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields. Three important topics are discussed, including: 1) the general methodology of exposure experiments, including those elements which are critical for definitive studies in biological systems; 2) a brief discussion of epidemiological and clinical studies conducted to date; and 3) a somewhat more extensive examination of animal experiments representing major areas of investigation (behavior, biological rhythms, nervous and endocrine systems, bone growth and repair, cardiovascular system and blood chemistry, immunology, reproduction, growth and development mortality and pathology, cellular and membrane studies, and mutagenesis). A discussion of current concepts, possible mechanisms and future directions of research is presented. 110 references.

  19. Estimation of Biological Effects of Tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umata, Toshiyuki

    Nuclear fusion technology is expected to create new energy in the future. However, nuclear fusion requires a large amount of tritium as a fuel, leading to concern about the exposure of radiation workers to tritium beta radiation. Furthermore, countermeasures for tritium-polluted water produced in decommissioning of the reactor at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station may potentially cause health problems in radiation workers. Although, internal exposure to tritium at a low dose/low dose rate can be assumed, biological effect of tritium exposure is not negligible, because tritiated water (HTO) intake to the body via the mouth/inhalation/skin would lead to homogeneous distribution throughout the whole body. Furthermore, organically-bound tritium (OBT) stays in the body as parts of the molecules that comprise living organisms resulting in long-term exposure, and the chemical form of tritium should be considered. To evaluate the biological effect of tritium, the effect should be compared with that of other radiation types. Many studies have examined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium. Hence, we report the RBE, which was obtained with radiation carcinogenesis classified as a stochastic effect, and serves as a reference for cancer risk. We also introduce the outline of the tritium experiment and the principle of a recently developed animal experimental system using transgenic mouse to detect the biological influence of radiation exposure at a low dose/low dose rate.

  20. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  1. The Effect of Cancer Chemopreventive Agents on DNA Adduct Formation by the Dietary Prostate Carcinogen PhIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    significantly different from 5-mc scores of UBM (0.61 OC induced DNA damage that subsequently triggered apoptosis in a ± 0.08) and EH (0.54 ± 0.14...the genotoxic effects of PhIP and may be useful in the prevention of PhIP- induced prostate cancer. Consequently, this work has provided further evidence...8217,5,7-pentahyroxyflavone/kg ( quercetin ), 906mg 1-isothiocyanato- (4R,S)-(methylsulfinyl) butane/kg (sulforaphane), or the de-alcoholized-dehydrated

  2. Investigation of protein-styrene oxide adducts as a molecularbiomarker of human exposed to styrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hemoglobin-styrene oxide adducts in blood has been studied as a molecular biomarker of worker exposed to styrene.Determination of protein-styrene oxide adducts in different biological samples with modified Raney-Ni procedure is described in this paper. The following biological samples have been investigated: fresh rat blood reacted with styrene oxide in vitro; rat blood reacted with styrene or styrene oxide in vivo; vein blood from workers exposed to styrene in two factories. The data showed that there was a good linear dose-response relationship between reacting dose of styrene oxide or styrene and amount of protein-styrene oxide adducts in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. For human samples, a dose-response relationship between protein adducts and styrene exposure can be found in glass fiber factory, but not in piano manufacture plant.

  3. Lunar biological effects and the magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The debate about how far the Moon causes biological effects has continued for two millennia. Pliny the Elder argued for lunar power "penetrating all things", including plants, fish, animals and humans. He also linked the Moon with tides, confirmed mathematically by Newton. A review of modern studies of biological effects, especially from plants and animals, confirms the pervasive nature of this lunar force. However calculations from physics and other arguments refute the supposed mechanisms of gravity and light. Recent space exploration allows a new approach with evidence of electromagnetic fields associated with the Earth's magnetotail at full moon during the night, and similar, but more limited, effects from the Moon's wake on the magnetosphere at new moon during the day. The disturbance of the magnetotail is perhaps shown by measurements of electric fields of up to 16V/m compared with the usual effects on some sensitive organisms. Similar intensities found in sferics, geomagnetic storms, aurora disturbance, sensations of a 'presence' and pre-seismic electromagnetic radiation are known to affect animals and 10-20% of the human population. There is now evidence for mechanisms such as calcium flux, melatonin disruption, magnetite and cryptochromes. Both environmental and receptor variations explain confounding factors and inconsistencies in the evidence. Electromagnetic effects might also account for some evolutionary changes. Further research on lunar biological effects, such as acute myocardial infarction, could help the development of strategies to reduce adverse effects for people sensitive to geomagnetic disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  5. [Biological effects of electromagnetic fields (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, J

    1979-08-01

    This résumé deals with thermal and nonthermal effects of electromagnetic fields on man. In consideration of two aspects a limitation is necessary. Firstly, there will be discussed only direct and immediate influences on biological cells and tissues, secondly, the treatment is limited to such phenomena, for which biophysical aproximations, based on experimental data, could be developed. Hazards for the human being may occur only by thermal effects within the microwave range. Regarding frequencies below approximately 30 kHz, excitation processes cannot be excluded in exceptional cases. Thermal effects are predominant, between 30 kHz and 100 kHz, before excitations can appear. Furthermore, by comparing the electrically and magnetically induced currents with the naturally flowing currents in man caused by the brain's and heart's electrical activity, a "lower boundaryline" was estimated. Regarding electric or magnetic field strengths undercutting this boundary-line, direct effects on the central nervous system may be excluded; other mechanisms should be responsible for demonstrated biological effects. The paper closes referring to some reports--presently discussed--on experimental findings of biological effects, which are observed as a result of the influence of electromagnetic fields of small field strengths.

  6. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde. This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers.

  7. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, T. R.; AravindhaBabu, N.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2015-01-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers. PMID:26015708

  8. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells.

  9. Effect of heme structure on O(2)-binding properties of human serum albumin-heme hybrids: intramolecular histidine coordination provides a stable O(2)-adduct complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruyuki; Matsukawa, Yasuko; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2002-01-01

    5,10,15,20-Tetrakis[(alpha,alpha,alpha,alpha-o-pivaloylamino)phenyl]porphinatoiron(II) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis([alpha,alpha,alpha,alpha-o-(1-methylcyclohexanoylamino)]phenyl)porphinatoiron(II) complexes bearing a covalently bound 8-(2-methyl-1-imidazolyl)octanoyloxymethyl or 4-(methyl-L-histidinamido)butanoyloxymethyl side-chain [FeRP(B) series: R = piv or cyc, B = Im or His] have been synthesized. The histidine-bound derivatives [FepivP(His), FecycP(His)] formed five N-coordinated high-spin iron(II) complexes in organic solvents under an N(2) atmosphere and showed large O(2)-binding affinities in comparison to those of the 2-methylimidazole-bound analogues [FepivP(Im), FecycP(Im)] due to the low O(2)-dissociation rate constants. On the contrary, the difference in the fence groups around the O(2)-coordination site (pivaloyl or 1-methylhexanoyl) did not significantly influence to the O(2)-binding parameters. These four porphinatoiron(II)s were efficiently incorporated into recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA), thus providing the synthetic hemoprotein, the albumin-heme hybrid [rHSA-FeRP(B)]. An rHSA host absorbs a maximum of eight FeRP(B) molecules in each case. The obtained rHSA-FeRP(B) can reversibly bind and release O(2) under physiological conditions (in aqueous media, pH 7.3, 37 degrees C) like hemoglobin and myoglobin. As in organic solutions, the difference in the fence groups did not affect their O(2)-binding parameters, but the axial histidine coordination significantly increased the O(2)-binding affinity, which is again ascribed to the low O(2)-dissociation rates. The most remarkable effect of the heme structure appeared in the half-life (tau(1/2)) of the O(2)-adduct complex. The dioxygenated rHSA-FecycP(His) showed an unusually long lifetime (tau(1/2): 25 h at 37 degrees C) which is ca. 13-fold longer than that of rHSA-FepivP(Im).

  10. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Díaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol.

  11. The effect of knockout of sulfotransferases 1a1 and 1d1 and of transgenic human sulfotransferases 1A1/1A2 on the formation of DNA adducts from furfuryl alcohol in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Benjamin; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Monien, Bernhard H

    2014-10-01

    Furfuryl alcohol is a rodent carcinogen present in numerous foodstuffs. Sulfotransferases (SULTs) convert furfuryl alcohol into the DNA reactive and mutagenic 2-sulfoxymethylfuran. Sensitive techniques for the isotope-dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry quantification of resulting DNA adducts, e.g. N (2)-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N (2)-MF-dG), were developed. To better understand the contribution of specific SULT forms to the genotoxicity of furfuryl alcohol in vivo, we studied the tissue distribution of N (2)-MF-dG in different mouse models. Earlier mutagenicity studies with Salmonella typhimurium strains expressing different human and murine SULT forms indicated that human SULT1A1 and murine Sult1a1 and 1d1 catalyze furfuryl alcohol sulfo conjugation most effectively. Here, we used three mouse lines to study the bioactivation of furfuryl alcohol by murine SULTs, FVB/N wild-type (wt) mice and two genetically modified models lacking either murine Sult1a1 or Sult1d1. The animals received a single dose of furfuryl alcohol, and the levels of the DNA adducts were determined in liver, kidney, lung, colon and small intestine. The effect of Sult1d1 gene disruption on the genotoxicity of furfuryl alcohol was moderate and limited to kidney and small intestine. In contrast, the absence of functional Sult1a1 had a massive influence on the adduct levels, which were lowered by 33-73% in all tissues of the female Sult1a1 null mice compared with the wt animals. The detection of high N (2)-MF-dG levels in a humanized mouse line expressing hSULT1A1/1A2 instead of endogeneous Sult1a1 and Sult1d1 supports the hypothesis that furfuryl alcohol is converted to the mutagenic 2-sulfoxymethylfuran also in humans.

  12. Biological effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their first metabolic products in in vivo exposed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampanin, Daniela M; Le Goff, Jeremie; Skogland, Karianne; Marcucci, Cristian R; Øysæd, Kjell Birger; Lorentzen, Marianne; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Sydnes, Magne O

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the aquatic environment is a worldwide activity since some of these compounds are well-established carcinogens and mutagens. Contaminants in this class are in fact regarded as priority hazardous substances for environmental pollution (Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC). In this study, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was selected to assess in vivo effects of two PAH and their first metabolic products, namely, the corresponding trans-dihydrodiols, using biological markers. Fish were exposed for 1 wk to a single PAH (naphthalene or chrysene) and its synthetic metabolites ((1R,2R)-1,2-dihydronaphthalene-1,2-diol and (1R,2R)-1,2-dihydrochrysene-1,2-diol) by intraperitoneal injection in a continuous seawater flow system. After exposure, PAH metabolism including PAH metabolites in bile and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, oxidative stress glutathione S-transferases (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities, and genotoxicity such as DNA adducts were evaluated, as well as general health conditions including condition index (CI), hepatosomatic index (HSI), and gonadosomatic index (GSI). PAH metabolite values were low and not significantly different when measured with the fixed-wavelength fluorescence screening method, while the gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) method showed an apparent dose response in fish exposed to naphthalene. DNA adduct levels ≥0.16 × 10(-8) relative adduct level (RAL) were detected. It should be noted that 0.16 × 10(-8) RAL is considered the maximal acceptable background level for this species. The other biomarkers activities of catalase, GST, and EROD did not display a particular compound- or dose-related response. The GSI values were significantly lower in some chrysene- and in both naphthalene- and naphthalene diol-exposed groups compared to control.

  13. Sodium adduct formation efficiency in ESI source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruve, Anneli; Kaupmees, Karl; Liigand, Jaanus; Oss, Merit; Leito, Ivo

    2013-06-01

    Formation of sodium adducts in electrospray (ESI) has been known for long time, but has not been used extensively in practice, and several important aspects of Na(+) adduct formation in ESI source have been almost unexplored: the ionization efficiency of different molecules via Na(+) adduct formation, its dependence on molecular structure and Na(+) ion concentration in solution, fragmentation behaviour of the adducts as well as the ruggedness (a prerequisite for wider practical use) of ionization via Na(+) adduct formation. In this work, we have developed a parameter describing sodium adducts formation efficiency (SAFE) of neutral molecules and have built a SAFE scale that ranges for over four orders of magnitude and contains 19 compounds. In general, oxygen bases have higher efficiency of Na(+) adducts formation than nitrogen bases because of the higher partial negative charge on oxygen atoms and competition from protonation in the case of nitrogen bases. Chelating ability strongly increases the Na(+) adduct formation efficiency. We show that not only protonation but also Na(+) adduct formation is a quantitative and reproducible process if relative measurements are performed.

  14. Urinary physiologic and chemical metabolic effects on the urothelial cytotoxicity and potential DNA adducts of o-phenylphenol in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A; Christenson, W R; Bartels, M J; Arnold, L L; St John, M K; Cano, M; Garland, E M; Lake, S G; Wahle, B S; McNett, D A; Cohen, S M

    1998-06-01

    ortho-Phenylphenol (OPP), a fungicide and antibacterial agent with food residues, is carcinogenic to rat bladder. The present studies provide information on changes in urinary composition and urinary metabolites, urothelial cytotoxicity and regenerative hyperplasia, and DNA adducts in male F344 rats fed OPP. An initial experiment evaluated dietary doses of 0, 1,000, 4,000, and 12,500 ppm OPP fed for 13 weeks. There was no evidence of urinary calculi, microcrystalluria, or calcium phosphate-containing precipitate, but urothelial cytotoxicity and hyperplasia occurred at the highest dose only. In a second experiment, rats were fed dietary OPP levels of 0, 800, 4,000, 8,000, and 12,500 ppm. Urinary pH was > 7 in all groups. Urinary volume was increased at the 2 highest doses with consequent decreases in osmolality, creatinine, and other solutes. Total urinary OPP metabolite excretions were increased, mostly excreted as conjugates of OPP and of phenylhydroquinone. Free OPP or free metabolites accounted for less than 2% excreted in the urine without a dose response. Urothelial toxicity and hyperplasia occurred only at doses of 8,000 and 12,500 ppm. OPP-DNA adducts were not detected in the urothelium at any dose. In summary, OPP produces cytotoxicity and proliferation of the urothelium at dietary doses > or = 8,000 ppm without formation of urinary solids. The paucity of unconjugated metabolites and the lack of OPP-DNA adducts suggests that OPP is acting as a bladder carcinogen in male rats by inducing cytotoxicity and hyperplasia without it or its metabolites directly binding to DNA.

  15. Quantitation of DNA Adducts Induced by 1,3-Butadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaraju, Dewakar; Villalta, Peter W.; Wickramaratne, Susith; Swenberg, James; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Human exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) present in automobile exhaust, cigarette smoke, and forest fires is of great concern because of its potent carcinogenicity. The adverse health effects of BD are mediated by its epoxide metabolites such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene (EB), which covalently modify genomic DNA to form promutagenic nucleobase adducts. Because of their direct role in cancer, BD-DNA adducts can be used as mechanism-based biomarkers of BD exposure. In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based methodology was developed for accurate, sensitive, and precise quantification of EB-induced N-7-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl) guanine (EB-GII) DNA adducts in vivo. In our approach, EB-GII adducts are selectively released from DNA backbone by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by ultrafiltration, offline HPLC purification, and isotope dilution nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 analysis on an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Following method validation, EB-GII lesions were quantified in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells treated with micromolar concentrations of EB and in liver tissues of rats exposed to sub-ppm concentrations of BD (0.5-1.5 ppm). EB-GII concentrations increased linearly from 1.15 ± 0.23 to 10.11 ± 0.45 adducts per 106 nucleotides in HT1080 cells treated with 0.5-10 μM DEB. EB-GII concentrations in DNA of laboratory rats exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ppm BD were 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.33 ± 0.08, and 0.50 ± 0.04 adducts per 106 nucleotides, respectively. We also used the new method to determine the in vivo half-life of EB-GII adducts in rat liver DNA (2.20 ± 0.12 d) and to detect EB-GII in human blood DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first application of nanoLC/ESI+-HRMS3 Orbitrap methodology to quantitative analysis of DNA adducts in vivo.

  16. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jasprova

    Full Text Available Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC, and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it; and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf. Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells.

  17. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard A.; Doiron, Daniel R.; Crean, David H.

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  18. Spin traps: in vitro toxicity and stability of radical adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadeem; Wilmot, Carmen M; Rosen, Gerald M; Demidenko, Eugene; Sun, Jie; Joseph, Joy; O'Hara, Julia; Kalyanaraman, B; Swartz, Harold M

    2003-06-01

    We have evaluated the effects of DMPO, CMPO, EMPO, BMPO, and DEPMPO on functioning CHO cells and the stability of the radical adducts in the presence of cells. The potential toxic effects of the spin traps were measured by two estimates of cell viability (trypan blue exclusion and colony formation) and one of cell function (rate of oxygen consumption). We also studied the effects of the spin traps on colony formation in a second cell line, 9L tumor cells. Toxicity varied with the type of cell line and the parameter that was measured. In aqueous solutions the order of stability for all spin adducts was SO(3) > OH > CH(3), while in cell suspensions it was SO(3) > OH approximately CH(3). The radical adducts of the new spin traps have significantly increased stability as compared to DMPO. These results indicate that the new spin traps potentially offer increased stability of spin adducts in functioning cells. It also is clear that it is necessary to carry out appropriate studies of the stability and toxicity in the system that is to be studied for any particular use of these spin traps. It then should be feasible to select the spin trap(s) best suited for the proposed study.

  19. Bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells: a pooled analysis of 3,600 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricceri, Fulvio; Godschalk, Roger W; Peluso, Marco;

    2010-01-01

    Bulky DNA adducts are markers of exposure to genotoxic aromatic compounds, which reflect the ability of an individual to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a major class of carcinogens that are capable of forming such add......Bulky DNA adducts are markers of exposure to genotoxic aromatic compounds, which reflect the ability of an individual to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a major class of carcinogens that are capable of forming...... such adducts. Factors that have been reported to be related to DNA adduct levels include smoking, diet, body mass index (BMI), genetic polymorphisms, the season of collection of biologic material, and air pollutants....

  20. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  1. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  2. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  3. Crystal structure of the 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.3.1.13,8]undecane (TATU–4-nitrophenol (1/2 adduct: the role of anomeric effect in the formation of a second hydrogen-bond interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Rivera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title ternary co-crystalline adduct, C7H14N4·2C6H5NO3, molecules are linked by two intermolecular O—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming a tricomponent aggregates in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen-bond formation to one of the N atoms is enough to induce structural stereoelectronic effects in the normal donor→acceptor direction. In the title adduct, the two independent nitrophenol molecules are essentially planar, with maximum deviations of 0.0157 (13 and 0.0039 (13 Å. The dihedral angles between the planes of the nitro group and the attached benzene rings are 4.04 (17 and 5.79 (17°. In the crystal, aggregates are connected by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a supramolecular dimer enclosing an R66(32 ring motif. Additional C—H...O intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions form a second supramolecular inversion dimer with an R22(10 motif. These units are linked via C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  4. Theoretical study of the hydroxyl radical addition to uracil and photochemistry of the formed U6OH• adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2014-03-20

    Hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) is produced in biological systems by external or endogenous agents. It can damage DNA/RNA by attacking pyrimidine nucleobases through the addition to the C5═C6 double bond. The adduct resulting from the attachment at the C5 position prevails in the experimental measurements, although the reasons for this preference remain unclear. The first aim of this work is therefore to shed light on the comprehension of this important process. Thus, the thermal (•)OH addition to the C5═C6 double bond of uracil has been studied theoretically by using DFT, MP2, and the multiconfigurational CASPT2//CASSCF methodologies. The in-vacuo results obtained with the latter protocol plus the analysis of solvent effects support the experimental observation. A significant lower barrier height is predicted for the C5 pathway with respect to that of the C6 route. In contrast to the C5 adduct, the C6 adduct is able to absorb visible light. Hence, the second aim of the work is to study the photochemistry of this species using the CASPT2//CASSCF methodology within the framework of the photochemical reaction path approach (PRPA). The nonradiative decay to the ground state of this compound has been characterized. A photoreactive character is predicted for the C6 adduct in the excited states according to the presence of excited-state minima along the main decay channel. Finally, a new mechanism of photodissociation has been explored, which implies the photoinduced regeneration of the canonical nucleobase by irradiating with visible light, being therefore relevant in RNA protection against damage by reactive oxygen species.

  5. Assay of protein and peptide adducts of cholesterol ozonolysis products by hydrophobic and click enrichment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Katherine; Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Stec, Donald F; Kim, Hye-Young H; Tallman, Keri A; Porter, Ned A

    2014-10-20

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods-Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)-were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide-seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and asthma.

  6. Structural Characterization of Hydroxyl Radical Adducts in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G. N. R.

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation by the hydroxyl (OH) radical is one of the most widely studied reactions because of its central role in chemistry, biology, organic synthesis, and photocatalysis in aqueous environments, wastewater treatment, and numerous other chemical processes. Although the redox potential of OH is very high, direct electron transfer (ET) is rarely observed. If it happens, it mostly proceeds through the formation of elusive OH adduct intermediate which facilitates ET and formation of hydroxide anion. Using time resolved resonance Raman technique we structurally characterized variety of OH adducts to sulfur containing organic compounds, halide ions as well as some metal cations. The bond between oxygen of OH radical and the atom of oxidized molecule differs depending on the nature of solute that OH radical reacts with. For most of sulfur containing organics, as well as halide and pseudo-halide ions, our observation suggested that this bond has two-center three-electron character. For several metal aqua ions studied, the nature of the bond depends on type of the cation being oxidized. Discussion on spectral parameters of all studied hydroxyl radical adducts as well as the role solvent plays in their stabilization will be presented.

  7. Biophysical aspects of lysozyme adduct with monocrotophos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaraneni, Sreenivasa Rao; Kumar, Sudhir; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2014-09-01

    The present study on in vitro formation and characterization of lysozyme adduct with monocrotophos (MP) evaluates the potential of lysozyme to be used as a sensitive biomarker to monitor exposure levels to the commonly used organophosphorus pesticide monocrotophos. Crystallization of lysozyme protein adduct with monocrotophos was also undertaken to understand the adduct formation mechanism at a molecular level. The binding of organophosphorus pesticides to lysozyme is one of the key steps in their mutagenicity. The formation and structural characterization of lysozyme adduct with monocrotophos was done using MALDI-TOFMS, fluorescence, UV/Vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and X-ray diffraction studies. We report the crystal structure of lysozyme adduct with monocrotophos at 1.9 Å. It crystallized in the P43 space group with two monomers in one asymmetric unit having one molecule of monocrotophos bound to each protein chain. The results proved that the fluorescence quenching of lysozyme by monocrotophos is due to binding of monocrotophos with a tryptophan residue of lysozyme. Monocrotophos interacts most strongly with the Trp-108 and Asp-52 of lysozyme. The interactions of the monocrotophos molecule with the lysozyme suggest the formation of a stable adduct. In addition, the alteration of lysozyme secondary structure in the presence of monocrotophos was confirmed by circular dichroism and fluorescence inhibition of lysozyme by increasing monocrotophos and UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The formation of lysozyme adduct with monocrotophos was confirmed by MALDI-TOFMS.

  8. Aminoguanidine pyridoxal adduct is superior to aminoguanidine for preventing diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, H; Taguchi, T; Sugiura, M; Takeuchi, M; Yanagisawa, K; Watanabe, Y; Miwa, I; Makita, Z; Koike, T

    2002-07-01

    Aminoguanidine inhibits the formation of advanced glycation end-products, and has been extensively examined in animals. However, administration of aminoguanidine decreases the hepatic content of pyridoxal phosphate. In order to avoid this problem, we developed an aminoguanidine pyridoxal Schiff base adduct and examined its efficacy in vitro as well as in a model of diabetic nephropathy. Mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were treated with aminoguanidine or aminoguanidine pyridoxal adduct for 9 weeks. An in vitro study was also performed to assess the antioxidant activity of aminoguanidine and its pyridoxal adduct. Neither drug altered glycemic control. Aminoguanidine pyridoxal adduct significantly improved urinary albumin excretion by 78.1 % compared with the diabetic control, and also had a better preventive effect on the progression of renal pathology than aminoguanidine did. Inhibition of glycation by both drugs was similar, but the antioxidant activity of the pyridoxal adduct was far superior. These findings suggest that aminoguanidine pyridoxal adduct may be superior to aminoguanidine, as it not only prevents vitamin B6 deficiency but is also better at controlling diabetic nephropathy, as this adduct inhibits oxidation as well as glycation.

  9. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  10. Screening for DNA Alkylation Mono and Cross-Linked Adducts with a Comprehensive LC-MS(3) Adductomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornetta, Alessia; Villalta, Peter W; Hecht, Stephen S; Sturla, Shana J; Balbo, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    A high-resolution/accurate-mass DNA adductomic approach was developed to investigate anticipated and unknown DNA adducts induced by DNA alkylating agents in biological samples. Two new features were added to a previously developed approach to significantly broaden its scope, versatility, and selectivity. First, the neutral loss of a base (guanine, adenine, thymine, or cytosine) was added to the original methodology's neutral loss of the 2'-deoxyribose moiety to allow for the detection of all DNA base adducts. Second, targeted detection of anticipated DNA adducts based on the reactivity of the DNA alkylating agent was demonstrated by inclusion of an ion mass list for data dependent triggering of MS(2) fragmentation events and subsequent MS(3) fragmentation. Additionally, untargeted screening of the samples, based on triggering of an MS(2) fragmentation event for the most intense ions of the full scan, was included for detecting unknown DNA adducts. The approach was tested by screening for DNA mono and cross-linked adducts in purified DNA and in DNA extracted from cells treated with PR104A, an experimental DNA alkylating nitrogen mustard prodrug currently under investigation for the treatment of leukemia. The results revealed the ability of this new DNA adductomic approach to detect anticipated and unknown PR104A-induced mono and cross-linked DNA adducts in biological samples. This methodology is expected to be a powerful tool for screening for DNA adducts induced by endogenous or exogenous exposures.

  11. Redshift or adduct stabilization -- a computational study of hydrogen bonding in adducts of protonated carboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Solveig Gaarn; Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    changes and the redshift favor the Z OH group, matching the results of NBO and AIM calculations. This reflects that the thermochemistry of adduct formation is not a good measure of the hydrogen bond strength in charged adducts, and that the ionic interactions in the E and Z adducts of protonated......It is generally expected that the hydrogen bond strength in a D-H-A adduct is predicted by the difference between the proton affinities of D and A, measured by the adduct stabilization, and demonstrated by the IR redshift of the D-H bond stretching vibrational frequency. These criteria do...... not always yield consistent predictions, as illustrated by the hydrogen bonds formed by the E and Z OH groups of protonated carboxylic acids. The delta-PA and the stabilization of a series of hydrogen bonded adducts indicate that the E OH group forms the stronger hydrogen bonds, whereas the bond length...

  12. Cell Biology of Thiazide Bone Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Gerardo; Riccardi, Daniela

    2008-09-01

    The thiazide-sensitive Na+:Cl- cotransporter (NCC) is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the mammalian kidney. The activity of NCC is not only related to salt metabolism, but also to calcium and magnesium homeostasis due to the inverse relationship between NCC activity and calcium reabsorption. Hence, the thiazide-type diuretics that specifically block NCC have been used for years, not only for treatment of hypertension and edematous disease, but also for the management of renal stone disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that chronic thiazide treatment is associated with higher bone mineral density and reduced risk of bone fractures, which can only partly be explained in terms of their effects on the kidney. In this regard, we have recently shown that NCC is expressed in bone cells and that inhibition of NCC in bone, either by thiazides or by reduction of NCC protein with specific siRNA, is associated with increased mineralization in vitro. These observations open a field of study to begin to understand the cell biology of the beneficial effects of thiazides in bone.

  13. Metabolic stability of superoxide adducts derived from newly developed cyclic nitrone spin traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bézière, Nicolas; Hardy, Micael; Poulhès, Florent; Karoui, Hakim; Tordo, Paul; Ouari, Olivier; Frapart, Yves-Michel; Rockenbauer, Antal; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are by-products of aerobic metabolism involved in the onset and evolution of various pathological conditions. Among them, the superoxide radical is of special interest as the origin of several damaging species such as H2O2, hydroxyl radical, or peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Spin trapping coupled with ESR is a method of choice to characterize these species in chemical and biological systems and the metabolic stability of the spin adducts derived from reaction of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals with nitrones is the main limit to the in vivo application of the method. Recently, new cyclic nitrones bearing a triphenylphosphonium or permethylated β-cyclodextrin moiety have been synthesized and their spin adducts demonstrated increased stability in buffer. In this article, we studied the stability of the superoxide adducts of four new cyclic nitrones in the presence of liver subcellular fractions and biologically relevant reductants using an original setup combining a stopped-flow device and an ESR spectrometer. The kinetics of disappearance of the spin adducts were analyzed using an appropriate simulation program. Our results highlight the interest of the new spin trapping agents CD-DEPMPO and CD-DIPPMPO for specific detection of superoxide with high stability of the superoxide adducts in the presence of liver microsomes.

  14. What Makes Biology Learning Difficult and Effective: Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimer, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the biological topics that students have difficulties learning, the reasons why secondary school students have difficulties in learning biology, and ways to improve the effectiveness of students' biology learning. For these purposes, a self-administered questionnaire including three open-ended questions was…

  15. Biomarkers in natural fish populations indicate adverse biological effects of offshore oil production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Balk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the growing awareness of the necessity of a sustainable development, the global economy continues to depend largely on the consumption of non-renewable energy resources. One such energy resource is fossil oil extracted from the seabed at offshore oil platforms. This type of oil production causes continuous environmental pollution from drilling waste, discharge of large amounts of produced water, and accidental spills. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Samples from natural populations of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua in two North Sea areas with extensive oil production were investigated. Exposure to and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were demonstrated, and biomarker analyses revealed adverse biological effects, including induction of biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress, altered fatty acid composition, and genotoxicity. Genotoxicity was reflected by a hepatic DNA adduct pattern typical for exposure to a mixture of PAHs. Control material was collected from a North Sea area without oil production and from remote Icelandic waters. The difference between the two control areas indicates significant background pollution in the North Sea. CONCLUSION: It is most remarkable to obtain biomarker responses in natural fish populations in the open sea that are similar to the biomarker responses in fish from highly polluted areas close to a point source. Risk assessment of various threats to the marine fish populations in the North Sea, such as overfishing, global warming, and eutrophication, should also take into account the ecologically relevant impact of offshore oil production.

  16. Detection of DNA adducts by bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shunqing; Tan, Xianglin; Yao, Qunfeng; He, Min; Zhou, Yikai; Chen, Jian

    2001-09-01

    Luminescent assay for detection ATP is very sensitive with limitation of 10-17 moles. ATP using styrene oxide as a model carcinogen we currently apply a luminescence technique to detect the very low levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts in vitro and in vivo. The bioluminescent assay of DNA adducts entails three consecutive steps: digestion of modified DNA to adducted dinucleoside monophosphate and normal nucleotide are hydrolyzed to nucleosides (N) by nuclease P1 and prostatic acid phosphomonesterase (PAP); incorporation of (gamma) -P of ATP into normal nucleoside(N); detection of consumption of ATP by luminescence. This assay does not require separate manipulation because of the selective property of nuclease P1. One fmol of carcinogen- DNA adducts was detected by luminescent assay. A good correlation between results of luminescent assay and 32P-postlabeling procedures has been observed. We detect 1 adduct in 108 nucleotides for 10(mu) g DNA sample. The procedures of luminescent method is very simple and low- cost. IT appears applicable to the ultra sensitive detection of low levels of DNA adducts without radioactive isotope.

  17. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  18. Biological Effects on the Source of Geoneutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2013-11-01

    Detection of antineutrinos from U and Th series decay within the Earth (geoneutrinos) constrains the absolute abundance of these elements. Marine detectors will measure the ratio over the mantle beneath the site and provide spatial averaging. The measured mantle Th/U may well be significantly below its bulk earth value of 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine sediments and subducted upper oceanic crust. That is, U subducts preferentially relative to Th. Oxygen ultimately from photosynthesis oxidizes U(IV) to U(VI), which is soluble during weathering and sediment transport. Dissolved U(VI) reacts with FeO in the oceanic crust and organic carbon within sediments to become immobile U(IV). These deep marine rocks are preferentially subducted relative to Th(IV)-bearing continental margin rocks. Ferric iron from anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen in local oases likely mobilized some U during the Archean Era when there was very little O2 in the air. Conversely, these elements behave similarly in the absence of life, where the elements occur as U(IV) and Th(IV), which do not significantly fractionate during igneous processes. Neither do they fractionate during weathering, as they are essentially insoluble in water in surface environments. Th(IV) and U(IV) remain in solid clay-sized material. Overall, geoneutrino data constrain the masses of mantle chemical and isotopic domains recognized by studies of mantle-derived rocks and show the extent of recycling into the mantle over geological time.

  19. Glottal configuration, acoustic, and aerodynamic changes induced by variation in suture direction in arytenoid adduction procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagi, Katsuhide; Connor, Nadine P; Suzuki, Tatsutoshi; Ford, Charles N; Bless, Diane M; Nakajima, Masami

    2002-10-01

    Arytenoid adduction is a phonosurgical procedure in which the arytenoid cartilages are approximated to reduce posterior glottal gap size and improve voice. Voice outcomes following arytenoid adduction are not always optimal. The goal of this study was to systematically vary suture direction and force of pull on the arytenoid cartilages in a human excised laryngeal model to determine the optimal combination of factors for reducing glottal gap and improving voice. Several factors demonstrated significant effects. Changes in suture direction and force of pull affected glottal configuration in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Increased force of pull on the muscular process resulted in increased adduction of the vocal process for all suture directions. Changes in suture direction and force of pull also affected acoustic and aerodynamic measures of induced voice. Therefore, voice outcomes can be optimized with arytenoid adduction if the vocal fold plane is accurately adjusted.

  20. Effects of biological sex on the pathophysiology of the heart

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fazal, Loubina; Azibani, Feriel; Vodovar, Nicolas; Cohen Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Samuel, Jane‐Lise

    2014-01-01

    .... While the effects of biological sex on cardiovascular pathophysiology have long been known, the sex-specific mechanisms mediating these processes have been further elucidated over recent years...

  1. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janene Pierce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor (WT blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM, in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2 is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path.

  2. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  3. Tamoxifen-DNA adduct formation in monkey and human reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Ramon, Elena E; Sandoval, Nicole A; John, Kaarthik; Cline, J Mark; Wood, Charles E; Woodward, Ruth A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2014-05-01

    The estrogen analog tamoxifen (TAM), used for adjuvant therapy of breast cancer, induces endometrial and uterine tumors in breast cancer patients. Proliferation stimulus of the uterine endometrium is likely involved in tumor induction, but genotoxicity may also play a role. Formation of TAM-DNA adducts in human tissues has been reported but remains controversial. To address this issue, we examined TAM-DNA adducts in uteri from two species of monkeys, Erythrocebus patas (patas) and Macaca fascicularis (macaque), and in human endometrium and myometrium. Monkeys were given 3-4 months of chronic TAM dosing scaled to be equivalent to the daily human dose. In the uteri, livers and brains from the patas (n = 3), and endometrium from the macaques (n = 4), TAM-DNA adducts were measurable by TAM-DNA chemiluminescence immunoassay. Average TAM-DNA adduct values for the patas uteri (23 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) were similar to those found in endometrium of the macaques (19 adducts/10(8) nucleotides). Endometrium of macaques exposed to both TAM and low-dose estradiol (n = 5) averaged 34 adducts/10(8) nucleotides. To examine TAM-DNA persistence in the patas, females (n = 3) were exposed to TAM for 3 months and to no drug for an additional month, resulting in low or non-detectable TAM-DNA in livers and uteri. Human endometrial and myometrial samples from women receiving (n = 8) and not receiving (n = 8) TAM therapy were also evaluated. Women receiving TAM therapy averaged 10.3 TAM-DNA adducts/10(8) nucleotides, whereas unexposed women showed no detectable TAM-DNA. The data indicate that genotoxicity, in addition to estrogen agonist effects, may contribute to TAM-induced human endometrial cancer.

  4. In vitro studies of the genotoxic effects of bitumen and coal-tar fume condensates: comparison of data obtained by mutagenicity testing and DNA adduct analysis by 32P-postlabelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Méo, M; Genevois, C; Brandt, H; Laget, M; Bartsch, H; Castegnaro, M

    1996-08-14

    Bitumens contain traces of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), a part of which will end up in the fumes emitted during hot handling of bitumen-containing products, e.g. during roadpaving. Although exposure of workers to these fumes is low, it might lead to health problems. Studies on bitumen fume condensates (BFCs) showed weak to moderate mutagenic activities, but studies on DNA adduct formation have not been reported. Therefore, a study was initiated in which fumes were generated from two road grade bitumens, in such a way that they were representative of the fumes produced in the field. The combined vapour/particulates were tested in vitro for their ability to produce DNA adducts and in modified Ames mutation assays, using a number of different strains. An attempt was made to relate the results to chemical data, such as the content of a number of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and with a measure for the total PAC content. As a reference material fume condensate from coal-tar (coal-tar pitch volatiles; CTPV) were subjected to the same tests. All fume condensates tested were mutagenic to all strains and induced the formation of DNA adducts. The patterns of DNA adducts, obtained by 32P-postlabelling, arising from the BFCs were qualitatively different from the patterns of adducts obtained from the CTPVs, implying qualitative differences in the nature of the compounds responsible for the formation of these adducts. This is corroborated by the observation that for BFCs quantitative adduct levels are higher than would be expected based on the PAH content. These data thus indicate that the PAHs analysed are not the sole components responsible for adduct formation from BFCs, but that an important contribution comes from other (hetero- and/or substituted-) PACs.

  5. N-acetylcysteine prevents the geldanamycin cytotoxicity by forming geldanamycin-N-acetylcysteine adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlejnek, Petr; Dolezel, Petr

    2014-09-05

    Geldanamycin (GDN) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic with anti-proliferative activity on tumor cells. GDN cytotoxicity has been attributed to the disruption of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) binding and stabilizing client proteins, and by the induction of oxidative stress with concomitant glutathione (GSH) depletion. The later mechanism of cytotoxicity can be abrogated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). It was suggested that NAC prevents GDN cytotoxicity mainly by the restoring of glutathione (GSH) level (Clark et al., 2009). Here we argue that NAC does not protect cells from the GDN cytotoxicity by restoring the level of GSH. A detailed LC/MS/MS analysis of cell extracts indicated formation of GDN adducts with GSH. The amount of the GDN-GSH adduct is proportional to the GDN concentration and increases with incubation time. While nanomolar and low micromolar GDN concentrations induce cell death without an apparent GSH decrease, only much higher micromolar GDN concentrations cause a significant GSH decrease. Therefore, only high micromolar GDN concentrations can cause cell death which might be related to GSH depletion. Addition of NAC leads to the formation of adducts with GDN which diminish formation of GDN adducts with GSH. NAC also forms stable adducts with GDN extracellularly. Although NAC induces an increase in the GSH pool, this effect is not crucial for abrogation of GDN cytotoxicity. Indeed, the presence of NAC in the growth medium causes a rapid conversion of GDN into the GDN-NAC adduct, which is the real cause of the abrogated GDN cytotoxicity.

  6. Effects of Individualized Assignments on Biology Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    1983-01-01

    Compared detailed (favoring field dependence and induction) and nondetailed (favoring field dependence and deduction) assignments on biology achievement of grade 10 male students (N=95) over a seven-month period. Detailed assignments, employing pictorial and verbal block diagrams and high structure, significantly enhanced learning among some…

  7. The Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-29

    surrounding C-12-81 normal tissues. According to N.W. Bleehan, this was the method used by Hippocrates , with the aid of a hot iron. Hippocrates , by the way, is...temporal pattern of desired increases of tempera - ture in the body; (2) the biological consequences of doing this must be established and evaluated

  8. Technology Rich Biology Labs: Effects of Misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuech, Robert; Zogg, Gregory; Zeeman, Stephan; Johnson, Mark

    This paper describes a study conducted on the lab sections of the general biology course for non-science majors at the University of New England, and reports findings of student misconceptions about photosynthesis and the mass/carbon uptake during plant growth. The current study placed high technology analytic tools in the hands of introductory…

  9. New DNA adducts of crotonaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, S S; McIntee, E J; Wang, M

    2001-09-14

    This paper summarizes our recent studies on adducts produced in the reactions of the carcinogens crotonaldehyde (2-butenal) and acetaldehyde with deoxyguanosine (dG) and DNA. Human exposure to these carcinogens can be considerable, from both exogenous and endogenous sources. Crotonaldehyde reacts with DNA to form Michael addition products, a pathway that has been well described. We describe a second major pathway, in which 3-hydroxybutanal, formed by addition of H(2)O to crotonaldehyde, reacts with DNA to produce the Schiff base N(2)-(3-hydroxybut-1-ylidene)dG as well as several diastereomers of N(2)-paraldol-dG. Acetaldehyde reacts with DNA and dG giving a major Schiff base adduct, N(2)-ethylidene-dG. A cross-linked adduct of acetaldehyde has been characterized for the first time, and other adducts resulting from the reaction of two and three molecules of acetaldehyde with dG have been observed. The results of these studies demonstrate that some structurally unique adducts are formed from these carcinogenic aldehydes and suggest some new directions for research on the potential role of aldehydes in human cancer.

  10. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts are common toxicological biomarkers of pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Xia, Qingsu; Woodling, Kellie; Lin, Ge; Fu, Peter P

    2017-10-01

    There are 660 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and PA N-oxides present in the plants, with approximately half being possible carcinogens. We previously reported that a set of four PA-derived DNA adducts is formed in the liver of rats administered a series of hepatocarcinogenic PAs and a PA N-oxide. Based on our findings, we hypothesized that this set of DNA adducts is a common biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. In this study, we determined that rat liver microsomal metabolism of five hepatocarcinogenic PAs (lasiocarpine, retrorsine, riddelliine, monocrotaline, and heliotrine) and their corresponding PA N-oxides produced the same set of DNA adducts. Among these compounds, lasiocarpine N-oxide, retrorsine N-oxide, monocrotaline N-oxide, and heliotrine N-oxide are for first time shown to be able to produce these DNA adducts. These results further support the role of these DNA adducts as potential common biomarkers of PA-induced liver tumor initiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. LC-MS/MS screening strategy for unknown adducts to N-terminal valine in hemoglobin applied to smokers and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Henrik; von Stedingk, Hans; Nilsson, Ulrika; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2014-12-15

    Electrophilically reactive compounds have the ability to form adducts with nucleophilic sites in DNA and proteins, constituting a risk for toxic effects. Mass spectrometric detection of adducts to N-terminal valine in hemoglobin (Hb) after detachment by modified Edman degradation procedures is one approach for in vivo monitoring of exposure to electrophilic compounds/metabolites. So far, applications have been limited to one or a few selected reactive species, such as acrylamide and its metabolite glycidamide. This article presents a novel screening strategy for unknown Hb adducts to be used as a basis for an adductomic approach. The method is based on a modified Edman procedure, FIRE, specifically developed for LC-MS/MS analysis of N-terminal valine adducts in Hb detached as fluorescein thiohydantoin (FTH) derivatives. The aim is to detect and identify a priori unknown Hb adducts in human blood samples. Screening of valine adducts was performed by stepwise scanning of precursor ions in small mass increments, monitoring four fragments common for the FTH derivative of valine with different N-substitutions in the multiple-reaction mode, covering a mass range of 135 Da (m/z 503-638). Samples from six smokers and six nonsmokers were analyzed. Control experiments were performed to compare these results with known adducts and to check for artifactual formation of adducts. In all samples of smokers and nonsmokers, seven adducts were identified, of which six have previously been studied. Nineteen unknown adducts were observed, and 14 of those exhibited fragmentation patterns similar to earlier studied FTH derivatives of adducts to valine. Identification of the unknown adducts will be the focus of future work. The presented methodology is a promising screening tool using Hb adducts to indicate exposure to potentially toxic electrophilic compounds and metabolites.

  12. Structural water cluster as a possible proton acceptor in the adduct decay reaction of oat phototropin 1 LOV2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ruby H; Bogomolni, Roberto A

    2012-09-06

    LOV domains (Light, Oxygen, Voltage) are the light-sensory modules of phototropins, the blue-light photoreceptor kinases in plants, and of a wide variety of flavoproteins found in all three domains of life. These 12 kDa modules bind a flavin chromophore (FMN or FAD) noncovalently and undergo a photochemical activation in which the sulfur atom of a conserved cysteine forms an adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the flavin. The adduct breaks spontaneously in a base-catalyzed reaction involving a rate-limiting proton-transfer step, regenerating the dark state in seconds. This photocycle involves chromophore and protein structural changes that activate the C-terminal serine/threonine kinase. Previous studies (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 7016-7021) showed that decreased hydration obtained at high glycerol concentrations stabilizes the adduct state in a manner similar to that attained at low temperatures, resulting in much longer adduct decay times. This kinetic effect was attributed to an increased protein rigidity that hindered structural fluctuations necessary for the decay reaction. In this work, we studied the adduct decay kinetics of oat phototropin 1 (phot1) LOV2 at varying hydration using a specially designed chamber that allowed for measurement of UV-visible and FTIR spectra of the same samples. Therefore, we obtained LOV protein concentrations, adduct decay kinetics, and the different populations of bound water by deconvolution of the broad water absorption peak around 3500 cm(-1). A linear dependence of the adduct decay rate constant on the concentration of double and triple hydrogen-bonded waters strongly suggests that the adduct decay is a pseudo-first-order reaction in which both the adduct and the strongly bound waters are reactants. We suggest that a cluster of strongly bound water functions as the proton acceptor in the rate-limiting step of adduct decay.

  13. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  14. Non-Thermal Effects Mobile Phones at Biological Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Balogh

    2003-01-01

    The article deals with non-thermal effects of mobile phones on biological objects. Even though these effects are observed for longer period, there are not so far unequivocal results on obtained biological and biophysical results in this field. Biologicaleffects of electromagnetic field (EMF) depend on its character, its duration as well as on features of organism. As the receptors offield are not known (e.g. inputs of EMF into organism), its effects are judged only by non-specific reaction of...

  15. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper; Madsen, Thomas Moller

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain....

  16. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain....

  17. Chlorophyllin intervention reduces aflatoxin-DNA adducts in individuals at high risk for liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, P A; Wang, J B; Zhu, Y R; Zhang, B C; Wu, Y; Zhang, Q N; Qian, G S; Kuang, S Y; Gange, S J; Jacobson, L P; Helzlsouer, K J; Bailey, G S; Groopman, J D; Kensler, T W

    2001-12-04

    Residents of Qidong, People's Republic of China, are at high risk for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, in part from consumption of foods contaminated with aflatoxins. Chlorophyllin, a mixture of semisynthetic, water-soluble derivatives of chlorophyll that is used as a food colorant and over-the-counter medicine, has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of aflatoxin hepatocarcinogenesis in animal models by blocking carcinogen bioavailability. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled chemoprevention trial, we tested whether chlorophyllin could alter the disposition of aflatoxin. One hundred and eighty healthy adults from Qidong were randomly assigned to ingest 100 mg of chlorophyllin or a placebo three times a day for 4 months. The primary endpoint was modulation of levels of aflatoxin-N(7)-guanine adducts in urine samples collected 3 months into the intervention measured by using sequential immunoaffinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. This aflatoxin-DNA adduct excretion product serves as a biomarker of the biologically effective dose of aflatoxin, and elevated levels are associated with increased risk of liver cancer. Adherence to the study protocol was outstanding, and no adverse events were reported. Aflatoxin-N(7)-guanine could be detected in 105 of 169 available samples. Chlorophyllin consumption at each meal led to an overall 55% reduction (P = 0.036) in median urinary levels of this aflatoxin biomarker compared with those taking placebo. Thus, prophylactic interventions with chlorophyllin or supplementation of diets with foods rich in chlorophylls may represent practical means to prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma or other environmentally induced cancers.

  18. Compact bis-adduct fullerenes and additive-assisted morphological optimization for efficient organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun-Yu; Liao, Ming-Hung; Chen, Yen-Ting; Cao, Fong-Yi; Hsu, Chain-Shu; Cheng, Yen-Ju

    2014-11-26

    Bis-adduct fullerenes surrounded by two insulating addends sterically attenuate intermolecular interaction and cause inferior electron transportation. In this research, we have designed and synthesized a new class of bis-adduct fullerene materials, methylphenylmethano-C60 bis-adduct (MPC60BA), methylthienylmethano-C60 bis-adduct (MTC60BA), methylphenylmethano-C70 bis-adduct (MPC70BA), and methylthienylmethano-C70 bis-adduct (MTC70BA), functionalized with two compact phenylmethylmethano and thienylmethylmethano addends via cyclopropyl linkages. These materials with much higher-lying lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels successfully enhanced the Voc values of the P3HT-based solar cell devices. The compact phenylmethylmethano and thienylmethylmethano addends to promote fullerene intermolecular interactions result in aggregation-induced phase separation as observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/bis-adduct fullerene thin films. The device based on the P3HT/MTC60BA blend yielded a Voc of 0.72 V, a Jsc of 5.87 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) of 65.3%, resulting in a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.76%. The unfavorable morphologies can be optimized by introducing a solvent additive to fine-tune the intermolecular interactions. 1-Chloronaphthalene (CN) having better ability to dissolve the bis-adduct fullerenes can homogeneously disperse the fullerene materials into the P3HT matrix. Consequently, the aggregated fullerene domains can be alleviated to reach a favorable morphology. With the assistance of CN additive, the P3HT/MTC60BA-based device exhibited enhanced characteristics (a Voc of 0.78 V, a Jsc of 9.04 mA/cm(2), and an FF of 69.8%), yielding a much higher PCE of 4.92%. More importantly, the additive-assisted morphological optimization is consistently effective to all four compact bis-adduct fullerenes regardless of the methylphenylmethano

  19. 40 CFR 721.4590 - Mannich-based adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mannich-based adduct. 721.4590 Section... Substances § 721.4590 Mannich-based adduct. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a Mannich-based adduct (PMN P-93-66)...

  20. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  1. New adducts of Lapachol with primary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Mirelly D.F.; Litivack-Junior, Jose T.; Antunes, Roberto V.; Silva, Tania M.S.; Camara, Celso A., E-mail: ccelso@dq.ufrpe.b [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    New adducts of lapachol with neat primary aliphatic amines were obtained in a solvent-free reaction in good to reasonable yields (52 to 88%), at room temperature. The new compounds containing a phenazine moiety were obtained from suitable functionalized aminoalkyl compounds, including ethanolamine, 3-propanolamine, 2-methoxy-ethylamine, 3-methoxy-propylamine, n-butylamine and 2-phenetylamine. (author)

  2. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  3. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  4. Effect of grain splitting on biology and development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of grain splitting on biology and development of Callosobruchus Maculatus ... Data on oviposition, adult eclosion and weights of emergent adults were ... for C. maculatus at F1, F2 and F3 generations on spilt compared to whole grains.

  5. Some Biological Effects Of Ditching Tidewater Marshes Research Report 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Studies conducted over a 12-year period, 1935-47, of the biological effects of ditching tidewater marshes in Delaware for mosquito control showed that marked...

  6. Distinguishing between "function" and "effect" in genome biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, W Ford; Brunet, Tyler D P; Linquist, Stefan; Gregory, T Ryan

    2014-05-09

    Much confusion in genome biology results from conflation of possible meanings of the word "function." We suggest that, in this connection, attention should be paid to evolutionary biologists and philosophers who have previously dealt with this problem. We need only decide that although all genomic structures have effects, only some of them should be said to have functions. Although it will very often be difficult or impossible to establish function (strictly defined), it should not automatically be assumed. We enjoin genomicists in particular to pay greater attention to parsing biological effects. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Formica Domenico; Silvestri Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to a...

  8. Hormesis [Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (Belle)] and Dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Thong, Haw-Yueh; Maibach, Howard I.

    2008-01-01

    Hormesis, or biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE), is characterized by nonmonotonic dose response which is biphasic, displaying opposite effects at low and high dose. Its occurrence has been documented across a broad range of biological models and diverse type of exposure. Since hormesis appears to be a relatively common phenomenon in many areas, the objective of this review is to explore its occurrence related to dermatology and its public health and risk assessment implication....

  9. Biological Effects of the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fossil evidence of photoautotrophy, documented in Precambrian sediments by stromatolites, stromatolitic microfossils, and carbon isotopic data consistent with autotrophic CO2-fixation, extends to ~3,500 Ma. Such data, however, are insufficient to establish the time of origin of O2-producing (cyanobacterial) photosynthesis from its anoxygenic, photosynthetic bacterial, evolutionary precursor. The oldest (Paleoarchean) stromatolites may have been formed by anoxygenic photoautotrophs, rather than the cyanobacteria that dominate Proterozoic and modern stromatolites. Unlike the cyanobacteria of Proterozoic microbial assemblages, the filamentous and coccoidal microfossils of Archean deposits may represent remnants of non-O2-producing prokaryotes. And although the chemistry of Archean organic matter shows it to be biogenic, its carbon isotopic composition is insufficient to differentiate between oxygenic and anoxygenic sources. Though it is well established that Earth's ecosystem has been based on autotrophy since its early stages and that O2-producing photosynthesis evolved earlier, perhaps much earlier, than the increase of atmospheric oxygen in the ~2,450 and ~2,320 Ma Great Oxidation Event (GOE), the time of origin of oxygenic photoautotrophy has yet to be established. Recent findings suggest that Earth's ecosystem responded more or less immediately to the GOE. The increase of atmospheric oxygen markedly affected ocean water chemistry, most notably by increasing the availability of biologically usable oxygen (which enabled the development of obligate aerobes, such as eukaryotes), and of nitrate, sulfate and hydrogen sulfide (the increase of H2S being a result of microbial reduction of sulfate), the three reactants that power the anaerobic basis of sulfur-cycling microbial sulfuretums. Fossil evidence of the earliest eukaryotes (widely accepted to date from ~1800 Ma and, arguably, ~2200 Ma) fit this scenario, but the most telling example of life's response to the GOE

  10. STUDY ON GMA-DNA ADDUCTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective. DNA modification fixed as mutations in the cells may be an essential factor in the initiation step of chemical carcinogenesis. In order to explore the mechanism of gene mutation and cell transformation induced by glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), the current test studied the characteristics of GMA-DNA adducts formation in vitro.Methods. In vitro test, dAMP, dCMP, dGMP, dTMP and calf thymus DNA were allowed to react with GMA (Glycidyl Methacrylate). After the reaction, the mixtures were detected by UV and subjected to reversed-phase HPLC on ultrasphere ODS reversed-phase column, the reaction products were eluted with a linear gradients of methanol (solvent A) and 10mmol/L ammonium formate, pH5.0 (solvent B). The synthesized adducts were then characterized by UV spectroscopy in acid (pH1.0), neutral (pH7.2), alkaline (pH11.0) and by mass spectroscopy.Results. The results showed that GMA could bind with dAMP, dCMP, dGMP and calf thymus DNA by covalent bond, and the binding sites were specific (N6 of adenine, N3 of cytosine). Meanwhile, a main GMA-DNA adduct in the reaction of GMA with calf thymus DNA was confirmed as N3-methacrylate-2-hydroxypropy1-dCMP.Conclusions. GMA can react with DNA and /or deoxynucleotide monophosphate and generate some adducts such as N6-methacrylate-2-hydroxypropyl-dAMP and N3-methacrylate-2-hydroxypropyl-dCMP, ets. Formation of GMA-DNA adducts is an important molecular event in gene mutation and cell transformation induced by GMA.

  11. Aromatic adducts and lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Spanish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberson, Tamra; Peluso, Marco E M; Munia, Armelle; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Amiano, Pilar; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, J Ramón; Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Tormo, María-José; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Confortini, Massimo; Bonet, Catalina; Sala, Núria; González, Carlos A; Agudo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    In this case-cohort study, we examined the association between bulky DNA adducts and the risk of lung cancer within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Spanish cohort with an average 7-year follow-up, including 98 cases of primary lung cancer and 296 subjects randomly selected from the cohort. Aromatic adducts were measured using (32)P-postlabeling in leukocyte DNA from blood samples collected at enrollment. The association between DNA adducts and the risk of lung cancer was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model with a modified partial likelihood. There was an overall significant increased risk for developing lung cancer when DNA adduct concentrations were doubled, with relative risk (RR) adjusting for all relevant confounders of 1.36 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-157. There was a significant increased risk for developing lung cancer when DNA adduct concentrations were doubled for current smokers and among subjects exposed to PAH at work; there was also a slightly higher increase among males than females. However, no statistically significant differences were observed for the effect of adduct levels across smoking status, sex or occupational exposure to PAH. A meta-analysis combined four prospective studies, including this study, resulting in a significant association among current smokers, with an overall estimate of 34% increase in the risk of lung cancer when doubling the level of aromatic DNA adducts in leukocytes.

  12. Contribution of artifacts to N-methylated piperazine cyanide adduct formation in vitro from N-alkyl piperazine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minli; Resuello, Christina M; Guo, Jian; Powell, Mark E; Elmore, Charles S; Hu, Jun; Vishwanathan, Karthick

    2013-05-01

    In the liver microsome cyanide (CN)-trapping assays, piperazine-containing compounds formed significant N-methyl piperazine CN adducts. Two pathways for the N-methyl piperazine CN adduct formation were proposed: 1) The α-carbon in the N-methyl piperazine is oxidized to form a reactive iminium ion that can react with cyanide ion; 2) N-dealkylation occurs followed by condensation with formaldehyde and dehydration to produce N-methylenepiperazine iminium ion, which then reacts with cyanide ion to form the N-methyl CN adduct. The CN adduct from the second pathway was believed to be an artifact or metabonate. In the present study, a group of 4'-N-alkyl piperazines and 4'-N-[¹³C]methyl-labeled piperazines were used to determine which pathway was predominant. Following microsomal incubations in the presence of cyanide ions, a significant percentage of 4'-N-[¹³C]methyl group in the CN adduct was replaced by an unlabeled natural methyl group, suggesting that the second pathway was predominant. For 4'-N-alkyl piperazine, the level of 4'-N-methyl piperazine CN adduct formation was limited by the extent of prior 4'-N-dealkylation. In a separate study, when 4'-NH-piperaziens were incubated with potassium cyanide and [¹³C]-labeled formaldehyde, 4'-N-[¹³C]methyl piperazine CN-adduct was formed without NADPH or liver microsome suggesting a direct Mannich reaction is involved. However, when [¹³C]-labeled methanol or potassium carbonate was used as the one-carbon donor, 4'-N-[¹³C]methyl piperazine CN adduct was not detected without liver microsome or NADPH present. The biologic and toxicological implications of bioactivation via the second pathway necessitate further investigation because these one-carbon donors for the formation of reactive iminium ions could be endogenous and readily available in vivo.

  13. Variations in protein/flavin hydrogen bonding in a LOV domain produce non-Arrhenius kinetics of adduct decay†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Nash, Abigail I.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Light Oxygen Voltage (LOV) domains utilize a conserved blue light-dependent mechanism to control a diverse array of effector domains in biological and engineered proteins. Variations in the kinetics and efficiency of LOV photochemistry fine tune various aspects of the photic response. Characterization of the kinetics of a key aspect of this photochemical mechanism in EL222, a blue-light responsive DNA binding protein from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594, reveals unique non-Arrhenius behavior in the rate of dark state cleavage of the photochemically-generated adduct. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis studies establish that this effect stems from a Gln to Ala mutation unique to EL222 and homologous proteins from marine bacteria. Kinetic and spectroscopic analyses reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions between the FMN N1, O2 and ribityl hydroxyls with the surrounding protein regulate photocycle kinetics and stabilize the LOV active site from temperature-induced alteration in local structure. Substitution of residues interacting with the N1-O2 locus modulates adduct stability, structural flexibility and sequestration of the active site from bulk solvent without perturbation of light-activated DNA binding. Together, these variants link non-Arrhenius behavior to specific alteration of an H-bonding network, while affording tunability of photocycle kinetics. PMID:21923139

  14. Formation of DNA Adducts by Ellipticine and Its Micellar Form in Rats — A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Stiborova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The requirements for early diagnostics as well as effective treatment of cancer diseases have increased the pressure on development of efficient methods for targeted drug delivery as well as imaging of the treatment success. One of the most recent approaches covering the drug delivery aspects is benefitting from the unique properties of nanomaterials. Ellipticine and its derivatives are efficient anticancer compounds that function through multiple mechanisms. Formation of covalent DNA adducts after ellipticine enzymatic activation is one of the most important mechanisms of its pharmacological action. In this study, we investigated whether ellipticine might be released from its micellar (encapsulated form to generate covalent adducts analogous to those formed by free ellipticine. The 32P-postlabeling technique was used as a useful imaging method to detect and quantify covalent ellipticine-derived DNA adducts. We compared the efficiencies of free ellipticine and its micellar form (the poly(ethylene oxide-block-poly(allyl glycidyl ether (PAGE-PEO block copolymer, P 119 nanoparticles to form ellipticine-DNA adducts in rats in vivo. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that treatment of rats with ellipticine in micelles resulted in formation of ellipticine-derived DNA adducts in vivo and suggest that a gradual release of ellipticine from its micellar form might produce the enhanced permeation and retention effect of this ellipticine-micellar delivery system.

  15. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    , enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers...... and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes....... No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL...

  16. Inhibition of nicotine-DNA adduct formation by polyphenolic compounds in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yan; WANG Hai-Fang; SUN Hong-Fang; LI Hong-Li

    2004-01-01

    Nicotine [3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine], a major alkaloid in tobacco products, has proven to be a potential genotoxic compound. Some polyphenolic compounds can suppress the DNA adduction, and hence act as the potential inhibitors of carcinogenesis. In this study, the inhibitory effects of three polyphenolic compounds, curcumin (diferuloylmethane), resveratrol (trans-3, 5, 4-trihydroxystilbene) and tea polyphenols, on the nicotine-DNA adduction have been investigated in vitro using radiolabelled nicotine and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) technique. Also, the inhibition mechanism of these chemopreventive agents in regard to the activity of the biotransformation enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP450), cytochrome b5 (CYb5) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), has been studied. The results demonstrated that these three polyphenols induced marked dose-dependent decrease in nicotine-DNA adducts as compared with the controls. The elimination rate of adducts reached above 46% at the highest dose for all the three agents with 51.6% for resveratrol. Correspondingly, three polyphenols all suppressed CYP450 and CYb5, whereas curcumin and resveratrol induced GST. We may arrive at a point that the three polyphenols are beneficial to prevent the nicotine adduct formation, and thus may be used to block the potential carcinogenesis induced by nicotine.

  17. Biological and therapeutical effects of Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deetjen, P. [Institute of Physiologie and Balneologie, University of Innsbruck (Austria)

    1998-12-31

    In spas with a somewhat elevated Radon{sup 222} (Rn) activity (between 300 and 3000 Bq/l), the empirical medicine ended - in all parts of the world - with the same list of indications. It mainly includes the more painful rheumatic diseases such as deformation or degeneration of the joints and non bacterial inflammation of muscles, tendons or joints; Morbus Bechterew and other diseases of the vertebral column like spondylosis, spondylarthrosis or osteochondrosis. While informer times these effects were seldom documented in an objective manner, in recent years several prospective randomized double-blind studies proved the pain reducing efficacy of Radon therapy in patients with cervical pain syndromes, with chronic polyarthritis or with Morbus Bechterew. Studies in experimental animal models have accumulated remarkable data in organs, tissue and cultured cells that provide a rationale to explain the observed effects of Radon therapy in patients. (author)

  18. Palytoxin and Analogs: Biological and Ecological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Ramos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PTX is a potent marine toxin that was originally found in soft corals from tropical areas of the Pacific Ocean. Soon after, its occurrence was observed in numerous other marine organisms from the same ecological region. More recently, several analogs of PTX were discovered, remarkably all from species of the dinoflagellate genus Ostreopsis. Since these dinoflagellates are also found in other tropical and even in temperate regions, the formerly unsuspected broad distribution of these toxins was revealed. Toxicological studies with these compounds shows repeatedly low LD50 values in different mammals, revealing an acute toxic effect on several organs, as demonstrated by different routes of exposure. Bioassays tested for some marine invertebrates and evidences from environmental populations exposed to the toxins also give indications of the high impact that these compounds may have on natural food webs. The recognition of its wide distribution coupled with the poisoning effects that these toxins can have on animals and especially on humans have concerned the scientific community. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the effects of PTX and its analogs on different organisms, exposing the impact that these toxins may have in coastal ecosystems.

  19. The long persistence of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts in vivo: kinetic study following single and multiple exposures in male ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Xue, Junyi; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P; Lin, Ge

    2017-02-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants are widespread in the world and the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Our previous studies demonstrated that PA-derived DNA adducts can potentially be a common biological biomarker of PA-induced liver tumor formation. In order to validate the use of these PA-derived DNA adducts as a biomarker, it is necessary to understand the basic kinetics of the PA-derived DNA adducts formed in vivo. In this study, we studied the dose-dependent response and kinetics of PA-derived DNA adduct formation and removal in male ICR mice orally administered with a single dose (40 mg/kg) or multiple doses (10 mg/kg/day) of retrorsine, a representative carcinogenic PA. In the single-dose exposure, the PA-derived DNA adducts exhibited dose-dependent linearity and persisted for up to 4 weeks. The removal of the adducts following a single-dose exposure to retrorsine was biphasic with half-lives of 9 h (t 1/2α) and 301 h (~12.5 days, t 1/2β). In the 8-week multiple exposure study, a marked accumulation of PA-derived DNA adducts without attaining a steady state was observed. The removal of adducts after the multiple exposure also demonstrated a biphasic pattern but with much extended half-lives of 176 h (~7.33 days, t 1/2α) and 1736 h (~72.3 days, t 1/2β). The lifetime of PA-derived DNA adducts was more than 8 weeks following the multiple-dose treatment. The significant persistence of PA-derived DNA adducts in vivo supports their role in serving as a biomarker of PA exposure.

  20. Effect of hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) oxidoreductase deficiency on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-DNA adduct formation in P450 reductase conditional null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Volker M; Singh, Rajinder; Stiborová, Marie; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Frei, Eva; Evans, James D; Farmer, Peter B; Wolf, C Roland; Henderson, Colin J; Phillips, David H

    2011-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), formed during the cooking of foods, induces colon cancer in rodents. PhIP is metabolically activated by cytochromes P450 (P450s). To evaluate the role of hepatic P450s in the bioactivation of PhIP, we used Reductase Conditional Null (RCN) mice, in which cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), the unique electron donor to P450s, can be specifically deleted in hepatocytes by pretreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), resulting in the loss of essentially all hepatic P450 function. RCN mice were treated orally with 50 mg/kg b.wt. PhIP daily for 5 days, with and without 3-MC pretreatment. PhIP-DNA adducts (i.e., N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine [dG-C8-PhIP]), measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, were highest in colon (1362 adducts/10(8) deoxynucleosides), whereas adduct levels in liver were ∼3.5-fold lower. Whereas no differences in PhIP-DNA adduct levels were found in livers with active POR versus inactivated POR, adduct levels were on average ∼2-fold lower in extrahepatic tissues of mice lacking hepatic POR. Hepatic microsomes from RCN mice with or without 3-MC pretreatment were also incubated with PhIP and DNA in vitro. PhIP-DNA adduct formation was ∼8-fold lower with hepatic microsomes from POR-inactivated mice than with those with active POR. Most of the hepatic microsomal activation of PhIP in vitro was attributable to CYP1A. Our results show that PhIP-DNA adduct formation in colon involves hepatic N-oxidation, circulation of activated metabolites via the bloodstream to extrahepatic tissues, and further activation, resulting in the formation of dG-C8-PhIP. Besides hepatic P450s, PhIP may be metabolically activated mainly by a non-P450 pathway in liver.

  1. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I

    1996-01-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create a radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  2. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Krath, B.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    , providing 600hairspg fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit......, enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers...

  3. Nanosilver – Harmful effects of biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanosilver, also identified as colloidal silver, has been known and used for ages to combat diseases or prolong food freshness. It usually occurs in the form of a suspension consisting of particles of size < 100 nm. Due to its specific properties, silver nanoparticles are used in many technologies to produce medical devices, textiles, conductive materials or photovoltaic cells. The growing popularity of nanosilver applications increases the number of people occupationally exposed to this substance. Potential exposure routes for silver nanoparticles are through dermal, oral and inhalation pathways. Silver nanoparticles may be absorbed through the lungs, intestine, and through the skin into circulation and thus may reach such organs as the liver, kidney, spleen, brain, heart and testes. Nanosilver may cause mild eyes and skin irritations. It can also act as a mild skin allergen. Inhalation of silver nanoparticles mainly affects the lungs and liver. It has been demonstrated that silver nanoparticles may be genotoxic to mammalian cells. There are some alarming reports on the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on reproduction of experimental animals. Exposure to silver nanoparticles may exert a neurotoxic effect and affect cognitive functions, causing the impairment of short-term and working memory. Maximum admissible concentration (MAC for the inhalable fraction of silver of 0.05 mg/m3 is currently binding in Poland. In light of toxicological studies of silver nanoparticles it seems reasonable to update the hygiene standards for silver with nanoparticles as a separate fraction. Med Pr 2014;65(6:831–845

  4. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  5. Lysine adducts between methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride and collagen in guinea pig lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, B A; Wishnok, J S; Skipper, P L; Stillwell, W G; Tannenbaum, S R

    1995-11-01

    The formation of adducts between methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride (MTHPA), an important industrial chemical and potent allergen, and collagen from guinea pig lung tissue was investigated. Collagen peptides were obtained from the lung tissue by homogenization, defatting, washing, and digestion with collagenase. In experiments in vitro, lung tissue was exposed to 8.4 mumol (50 microCi) of 14C MTHPA. The amount of adducts was 97 nmol MTHPA/g of wet tissue as determined from the bound radioactivity. In a study in vivo, four guinea pigs were injected intratracheally with 8.4 mumol of 14C MTHPA each. The amount of adducts was 0-1.2 nmol MTHPA/g of wet tissue (determined by bound radioactivity). N epsilon-methyltetrahydrophthaloyl-L-lysine (MTHPL) was synthesized and characterized by NMR, UV, and mass spectrometry (MS). A method to analyze MTHPL, after derivatization with methanol and pentafluorobenzoyl chloride, using gas chromatography-MS was developed. Analysis of Pronase-digested MTHPA-exposed lung tissue showed a concentration of 19 nmol MTHPL/g wet lung in vitro and between 0 and 0.15 nmol MTHPL/g wet lung in vivo. Thus, 20% in vitro and 12-15% in vivo of the bound radioactivity was found as adducts with lysine. These results are a first step toward studies of allergenic epitopes in proteins and methods for biological monitoring of exposure to acid anhydrides.

  6. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  7. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  8. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li+-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen-zhen; He, Liang-Nian

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs) and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li+ and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well ...

  9. Biological monitoring the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of coke oven workers in relation to smoking and genetic polymorphisms for GSTM1 GSTT1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Asten, J.G. van; Vogel, N. de; Bruijntjes-Rozier, T.C.D.M.; Schouten, T.; Cramers, P.; Maas, L.; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Schooten, F.-J. van; Hopmans, P.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Human exposure is often demonstrated by increased internal levels of PAH metabolites and of markers for early biological effects, like DNA adducts and cytogenetic aberrations. Objective: Thi

  10. Biological monitoring the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of coke oven workers in relation to smoking and genetic polymorphisms for GSTM1 GSTT1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M.-J.S.T.; Asten, J.G. van; Vogel, N. de; Bruijntjes-Rozier, T.C.D.M.; Schouten, T.; Cramers, P.; Maas, L.; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Schooten, F.-J. van; Hopmans, P.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Human exposure is often demonstrated by increased internal levels of PAH metabolites and of markers for early biological effects, like DNA adducts and cytogenetic aberrations. Objective: Thi

  11. A new approach to evaluating the extent of Michael adduct formation to PAH quinones: tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis with GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Mary K; Desavis, Emmanuel; Mazzer, Paula A; Sunoj, R B; Hatcher, Susan A; Hadad, Christopher M; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2003-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmental pollutants that are converted to cytotoxic and carcinogenic metabolites, quinones, by detoxifying enzyme systems in animals. PAH metabolites such as the quinones can form Michael adducts with biological macromolecules containing reactive nucleophiles, making detection of exposure to PAHs difficult using conventional techniques. A technique has been developed for detecting exposure to PAHs. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis coupled with GC/MS is proposed as an assay method for PAH quinones that have formed Michael adducts with biological molecules. Three PAH quinones (1,4-naphthoquinone, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 1,4-anthraquinone) and 1,4-benzoquinone were reacted with cysteine, and the TMAH thermochemolysis method was used to assay for both thiol and amine adduction between the quinones and the cysteine. Additional studies with 1,4-naphthoquinone adducts to glutathione and bovine serum albumin showed the same thiol and amine TMAH thermochemolysis products with larger peptides as was observed with cysteine adducts. The TMAH GC/MS method clearly shows great promise for detecting PAH quinones, produced by enzymatic conversion of PAHs in biological systems, that have been converted to respective Michael adducts.

  12. Third eye, the biological effects; 3. oeil, les effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-02-01

    The discovery of a third kind of photo-receptor cell in the human eye has permitted to better understand the biological effects of lighting, not only on the vision, but also on some nervous processes, like emotion, mood, stress, biological clock, etc.. This additional dimension has led the engineers of Philips Lighting company to launch a new indoor lighting concept named 'Carpe Diem'. This concept adapts both the illuminance and the color of a lighting system according to the type of work and to the expected stimulating effect. (J.S.)

  13. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  14. Interactions between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in binary mixtures: Effects on gene expression and DNA adduct formation in precision-cut rat liver slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, Y.C.M.; Pushparajah, D.S.; Herwijnen, M.H.M. van; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Maas, L.M.; Ioannides, C.; Schooten, F.J. van; Delft, J.H.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Although exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurs mostly through mixtures, hazard and risk assessment are mostly based on the effects caused by individual compounds. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether interactions between PAHs occur, focusing on gene expr

  15. Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on prostaglandin synthesis and cyclooxygenase-mediated DNA adduct formation by heterocyclic aromatic amines in human adenocarcinoma colon cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, H.J.J.; Dommels, Y.E.M.; Zwam, M.; Herwijnen, van M.H.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Alink, G.M.; Kok, de T.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Dietary heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are both believed to play a role in colon carcinogenesis, and are both substrate for the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). In HCA-7 cells, highly expressing isoform COX-2, we investigated the effects of PUFA on prostaglandi

  16. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume II. Review of Our Studies on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-1965-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Ben Fine. 8. W.T. Ham,Jr., R.C. Williams, H.A. Mueller, Du Pont Guerry,III, A.M. Clarke and W.J. Geeraets, Effects of Laser Radiation on the Mammalian...and Applications course, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn Graduate Center, September, 1969 35. S. Fine and E. Klein, "Biological Effects of Laser

  17. Plasma effects in electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. P.; Batra, Karuna; Excell, Peter S.

    2011-02-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of the nonlinear behavior of charge carriers in biological tissue under the influence of varying low-intensity electromagnetic (EM) field. The interaction occurs because of the nonlinear force arising due to the gradient of the EM field intensity acting on free electrons in the conduction band of proteins in metabolically active biological cell membrane receptors leading to a redistribution of charge carriers. Field dependence of the resulting dielectric constant is investigated by a suitable modification to include an additional electronic contribution term to the three-term Debye model. The exogenous EM field propagating in this nonlinear cellular medium satisfies the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and can be affected significantly. Resulting field effect can be substantially augmented and effective rectification/demodulation can occur. Possible implications of this modification on biological processes in white and grey matter are discussed.

  18. Prolonged Acetaminophen-Protein Adduct Elimination During Renal Failure, Lack of Adduct Removal by Hemodiafiltration, and Urinary Adduct Concentrations After Acetaminophen Overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Steven C; Padilla-Jones, Angela; O'Connor, Ayrn D; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Bikin, Dale S; Wilkins, Diana G; Rollins, Douglas E; Slawson, Matthew H; Gerkin, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Elevated concentrations of serum acetaminophen-protein adducts, measured as protein-derived acetaminophen-cysteine (APAP-CYS), have been used to support a diagnosis of APAP-induced liver injury when histories and APAP levels are unhelpful. Adducts have been reported to undergo first-order elimination, with a terminal half-life of about 1.6 days. We wondered whether renal failure would affect APAP-CYS elimination half-life and whether continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), commonly used in liver failure patients, would remove adducts to lower their serum concentrations. Terminal elimination half-lives of serum APAP-CYS were compared between subjects with and without renal failure in a prospective cohort study of 168 adults who had ingested excessive doses of APAP. APAP-CYS concentrations were measured in plasma ultrafiltrate during CVVHDF at times of elevated serum adduct concentrations. Paired samples of urine and serum APAP-CYS concentrations were examined to help understand the potential importance of urinary elimination of serum adducts. APAP-CYS elimination half-life was longer in 15 renal failure subjects than in 28 subjects with normal renal function (41.3 ± 2.2 h versus 26.8 ± 1.1 h [mean ± SEM], respectively, p adduct elimination, and consideration of prolonged elimination needs to be considered if attempting back-extrapolation of adduct concentrations. CVVHDF did not remove detectable APAP-CYS, suggesting approximate APAP-protein adduct molecular weights ≥ 50,000 Da. The presence of urinary APAP-CYS in the minority of instances was most compatible with renal adduct production and protein shedding into urine rather than elimination of serum adducts.

  19. "Danger" conditions increase sulfamethoxazole-protein adduct formation in human antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, S N; Wang, H; Callan, H E; Park, B K; Naisbitt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APC) are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced immune reactions. Various pathological factors can activate APC and therefore influence the immune equilibrium. It is interesting that several diseases have been associated with an increased rate of drug allergy. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of such "danger signals" on sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism in human APC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Epstein-Barr virus-modified B lymphocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and two cell lines). APC were incubated with SMX (100 microM-2 mM; 5 min-24 h), in the presence of pathological factors: bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B), flu viral proteins, cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; interferon-gamma; and transforming growth factor-beta], inflammatory molecules (prostaglandin E2, human serum complement, and activated protein C), oxidants (buthionine sulfoximine and H(2)O(2)), and hyperthermia (37.5-39.5 degrees C). Adduct formation was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confocal microscopy. SMX-protein adduct formation was time- and concentration-dependent for each cell type tested, in both physiological and danger conditions. A danger environment significantly increased the formation of SMX-protein adducts and significantly shortened the delay for their detection. An additive effect was observed with a combination of danger signals. Dimedone (chemical selectively binding cysteine sulfenic acid) and antioxidants decreased both baseline and danger-enhanced SMX-adduct formation. Various enzyme inhibitors were associated with a significant decrease in SMX-adduct levels, with a pattern varying depending on the cell type and the culture conditions. These results illustrate that danger signals enhance the formation of intracellular SMX-protein adducts in human APC. These findings might be relevant

  20. Insights into the conformation of aminofluorene-deoxyguanine adduct in a DNA polymerase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Vaidyanathan G; Liang, Fengting; Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Wilson, Samuel H; Cho, Bongsup P

    2013-08-09

    The active site conformation of the mutagenic fluoroaminofluorene-deoxyguanine adduct (dG-FAF, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene) has been investigated in the presence of Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Kfexo(-)) and DNA polymerase β (pol β) using (19)F NMR, insertion assay, and surface plasmon resonance. In a single nucleotide gap, the dG-FAF adduct adopts both a major-groove- oriented and base-displaced stacked conformation, and this heterogeneity is retained upon binding pol β. The addition of a non-hydrolysable 2'-deoxycytosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate (dCMPcPP) nucleotide analog to the binary complex results in an increase of the major groove conformation of the adduct at the expense of the stacked conformation. Similar results were obtained with the addition of an incorrect dAMPcPP analog but with formation of the minor groove binding conformer. In contrast, dG-FAF adduct at the replication fork for the Kfexo(-) complex adopts a mix of the major and minor groove conformers with minimal effect upon the addition of non-hydrolysable nucleotides. For pol β, the insertion of dCTP was preferred opposite the dG-FAF adduct in a single nucleotide gap assay consistent with (19)F NMR data. Surface plasmon resonance binding kinetics revealed that pol β binds tightly with DNA in the presence of correct dCTP, but the adduct weakens binding with no nucleotide specificity. These results provide molecular insights into the DNA binding characteristics of FAF in the active site of DNA polymerases and the role of DNA structure and sequence on its coding potential.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of an N2-guanine adduct derived from the tumorigen dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in DNA: impact of adduct stereochemistry, size, and local DNA sequence on solution conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Fabián A; Liu, Zhi; Lin, Chin H; Ding, Shuang; Cai, Yuqin; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2014-03-25

    The dimensions and arrangements of aromatic rings (topology) in adducts derived from the reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) diol epoxide metabolites with DNA influence the distortions and stabilities of double-stranded DNA, and hence their recognition and processing by the human nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is a highly tumorigenic six-ring PAH, which contains a nonplanar and aromatic fjord region that is absent in the structurally related bay region five-ring PAH benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The PAH diol epoxide-DNA adducts formed include the stereoisomeric 14S and 14R trans-anti-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG and the stereochemically analogous 10S- and 10R-B[a]P-N(2)-dG (B[a]P-dG) guanine adducts. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution studies of the 14S-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG adduct in DNA have not yet been presented. Here we have investigated the 14S-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG adduct in two different sequence contexts using NMR methods with distance-restrained molecular dynamics simulations. In duplexes with dC opposite the adduct deleted, a well-resolved base-displaced intercalative adduct conformation can be observed. In full duplexes, in contrast to the intercalated 14R stereoisomeric adduct, the bulky DB[a,l]P residue in the 14S adduct is positioned in a greatly widened and distorted minor groove, with significant disruptions and distortions of base pairing at the lesion site and two 5'-side adjacent base pairs. These unique structural features are significantly different from those of the stereochemically analogous but smaller B[a]P-dG adduct. The greater size and different topology of the DB[a,l]P aromatic ring system lead to greater structurally destabilizing DNA distortions that are partially compensated by stabilizing DB[a,l]P-DNA van der Waals interactions, whose combined effects impact the NER response to the adduct. These structural results broaden our understanding of the structure-function relationship in NER.

  2. Organocatalytic Removal of Formaldehyde Adducts from RNA and DNA Bases

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is universally employed to fix tissue specimens, where it forms hemiaminal and aminal adducts with biomolecules, hindering the ability to retrieve molecular information. Common methods for removing these adducts involve extended heating, which can cause extensive degradation of nucleic acids, particularly RNA. Here we show that water-soluble bifunctional catalysts (anthranilates and phosphanilates) speed the reversal of formaldehyde adducts of mononucleotides over standard buffer...

  3. Contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor genetic variants to the risk of glioma and PAH-DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Aihua; Ji, Guixiang; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Ailin; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Luo, Chengzhang; Yan, Wei; Zhao, Peng

    2012-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene is involved in the response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. To investigate the hypothesis that the genetic variants in the AHR gene might be a causal genetic susceptibility to PAH-DNA adduct formation and glioma risk, we conducted a case-control study of 384 glioma cases and 384 cancer-free controls to explore the association between six common single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the AHR gene and glioma risk. Using PAH-DNA adducts as biomarkers, we then evaluated the association between PAH-DNA adduct levels and glioma risk based on a tissue microarray including 11 controls and 77 glioma patients. We further explored the contributions of the glioma risk-associated AHR polymorphisms to the levels of PAH-DNA adducts in glioma tissues based on 77 glioma patients. We found that PAH-DNA adduct staining existed in normal brain tissues and grades I-IV gliomas, and the staining intensity was significantly associated with the glioma grade. Two AHR polymorphisms (rs2066853 and rs2158041) demonstrated significant association with glioma risk. Intriguingly, we also found statistically significant associations between these two variants and PAH-DNA adduct levels in glioma tissue. These data suggest the contributions of AHR rs2066853 and rs2158041 to glioma risk and the PAH-DNA adduct levels, which shed new light on gene-environment interactions in the etiology of glioma. Further studies with a larger sample size and ethnically diverse populations are required to elucidate the potential biological mechanism for, as well as the impact of, the susceptibility to glioma due to genetic variants of AHR.

  4. Detection of human butyrylcholinesterase-nerve gas adducts by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis after in gel chymotryptic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Kouichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2006-06-21

    To verify the exposure to nerve gas, a method for detecting human butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)-nerve gas adduct was developed using LC-electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Purified human serum BuChE was incubated with sarin, soman or VX, and the adduct was purified by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and digested in gel by treatment with chymotrypsin. The resulting peptide mixture was subjected to LC-ESI-MS. From the chymotryptic digest of untreated human BuChE, one peak corresponding to the peptide fragment containing the active center serine residue was detected on the extracted ion chromatogram at m/z 948.5, and the sequence was ascertained to be "GESAGAASVSL" by MS/MS analysis. From the chymotryptic digest of the human BuChE-sarin adduct, a singly charged peptide peak was detected on the extracted ion chromatogram at m/z 1,069.5, and the sequence was ascertained to be "GEXAGAASVSL" by MS/MS analysis (X denotes isopropylmethylphosphonylated serine). The difference in molecular weight (120.0 Da) between the active center peptide fragments corresponding to the untreated BuChE and BuChE-sarin adduct was assumed to be derived from the addition of an isopropyl methylphosphonyl moiety to the serine residue. The formation of human BuChE adducts with soman, VX and an aged soman adduct was confirmed by detecting the respective active center peptide fragments using LC-ESI-MS. To apply the established method to an actual biological sample, human serum was incubated with VX, and the adduct was purified by procainamide affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. After chymotryptic in gel digestion, the ethylphosphonylated active center peptide fragment could be detected, and the structure of the residue was ascertained by LC-ESI-MS analysis.

  5. Challenges in Analyzing the Biological Effects of Resveratrol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdogan, Cihan Süleyman; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The suggested health effects (e.g., disease prevention) of dietary bioactive compounds such as resveratrol are challenging to prove in comparison to man-made drugs developed for therapeutic purposes. Dietary bioactive compounds have multiple cellular targets and therefore have a variety of biolog...

  6. Sterically locked synthetic bilin derivatives and phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens form photoinsensitive Pr- and Pfr-like adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Katsuhiko; Hammam, Mostafa A S; Kinoshita, Hideki; Murata, Yasue; Khawn, Htoi; Noack, Steffi; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2005-07-01

    Phytochrome photoreceptors undergo reversible photoconversion between the red-absorbing form, Pr, and the far-red-absorbing form, Pfr. The first step in the conversion from Pr to Pfr is a Z to E isomerization around the C15=C16 double bond of the bilin chromophore. We prepared four synthetic biliverdin (BV) derivatives in which rings C and D are sterically locked by cyclizing with an additional carbon chain. In these chromophores, which are termed 15Za, 15Zs, 15Ea, and 15Es, the C15=C16 double bond is in either the Z or E configuration and the C14-C15 single bond in either the syn or anti conformation. The chromophores were assembled with Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1, which incorporates BV as natural chromophore. All locked BV derivatives bound covalently to the protein and formed adducts with characteristic spectral properties. The 15Za adduct was spectrally similar to the Pr form and the 15Ea adduct similar to the Pfr form of the BV adduct. Thus, the chromophore of Agp1 adopts a C15=C16 Z configuration and a C14-C15 anti conformation in the Pr form and a C15=C16 E configuration and a C14-C15 anti conformation in the Pfr form. Both the 15Zs and the 15Es adducts absorbed only in the blue region of the visible spectra. All chromophore adducts were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography and histidine kinase activity to probe for protein conformation. In either case, the 15Za adduct behaved like the Pr and the 15Ea adduct like the Pfr form of Agp1. Replacing the natural chromophore by a locked 15Ea derivative can thus bring phytochrome holoprotein in the Pfr form in darkness. In this way, physiological action of Pfr can be studied in vivo and separated from Pr/Pfr cycling and other light effects.

  7. Evidence for phosphorus bonding in phosphorus trichloride-methanol adduct: a matrix isolation infrared and ab initio computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prasad Ramesh; Ramanathan, N; Sundararajan, K; Sankaran, K

    2015-04-09

    The weak interaction between PCl3 and CH3OH was investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and ab initio computations. In a nitrogen matrix at low temperature, the noncovalent adduct was generated and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Computations were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ, and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory to optimize the possible geometries of PCl3-CH3OH adducts. Computations revealed two minima on the potential energy surface, of which, the global minimum is stabilized by a noncovalent P···O interaction, known as a pnictogen bonding (phosphorus bonding or P-bonding). The local minimum corresponded to a cyclic adduct, stabilized by the conventional hydrogen bonding (Cl···H-O and Cl···H-C interactions). Experimentally, 1:1 P-bonded PCl3-CH3OH adduct in nitrogen matrix was identified, where shifts in the P-Cl modes of PCl3, O-C, and O-H modes of CH3OH submolecules were observed. The observed vibrational frequencies of the P-bonded adduct in a nitrogen matrix agreed well with the computed frequencies. Furthermore, computations also predicted that the P-bonded adduct is stronger than H-bonded adduct by ∼1.56 kcal/mol. Atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses were performed to understand the nature of interactions and effect of charge transfer interaction on the stability of the adducts.

  8. Development of a strategy for biological monitoring in a chemical plant producing 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, Kristian F; Will, Norbert; Leng, Gabriele; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann M

    2012-01-01

    In a chemical plant in Germany producing 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride for the manufacture of colorants, blood and urine samples were taken for biological monitoring. 3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine (DBZ) was analyzed in urine by thin-layer chromatography and subsequently further combined with analysis of adducts of 3,3'-DBZ in hemoglobin. Data highlight current ranges of industrial exposure to 3,3'-DBZ in Germany and demonstrate the applicability of biological monitoring to minimize this exposure. Effective biological monitoring was achieved by a combination of monitoring hemoglobin adducts with spot samplings of urinary 3,3'-DBZ excretion in cases of reported exposure periods. Data presented might help to identify biological guidance values (BGV/BAR) for 3,3'-DBZ-exposed individuals.

  9. Acridine adduct of [60]fullerene with enhanced DNA-cleaving activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakoshi, Yoko Nakajima; Yagami, Takeshi; Sueyoshi, Shoko; Miyata, Naoki [National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-18

    Photochemical cleavage of DNA in the presence of C{sub 60} and a C{sub 60} acridine derivative is reported. It is found that the intercalator-linked C{sub 60} is more effective in photochemical DNA cleavage. Structural simulations of the adducted nucleotides are reported.

  10. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  11. Examining the nature of retrocausal effects in biology and psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossbridge, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Multiple laboratories have reported physiological and psychological changes associated with future events that are designed to be unpredictable by normal sensory means. Such phenomena seem to be examples of retrocausality at the macroscopic level. Here I will discuss the characteristics of seemingly retrocausal effects in biology and psychology, specifically examining a biological and a psychological form of precognition, predictive anticipatory activity (PAA) and implicit precognition. The aim of this examination is to offer an analysis of the constraints posed by the characteristics of macroscopic retrocausal effects. Such constraints are critical to assessing any physical theory that purports to explain these effects. Following a brief introduction to recent research on PAA and implicit precognition, I will describe what I believe we have learned so far about the nature of these effects, and conclude with a testable, yet embryonic, model of macroscopic retrocausal phenomena.

  12. Effect of biologic agents on radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J Tobón

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel J Tobón1, Alain Saraux1,2, Valérie Devauchelle-Pensec1,21Immunology Laboratory, Morvan Hospital, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France; 2Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, CHU Brest, FranceAbstract: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has benefited over the last few years from the introduction of biologic agents whose development was based on new insights into the immunological factors involved in the pathogenesis of RA and the development of joint damage. These biological agents have been proven effective in RA patients with inadequate responses to synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Preventing joint damage is now the primary goal of RA treatment, and guidelines exist for the follow-up of joint abnormalities. Most biologic agents produced high clinical and radiological response rates in patients with established or recent-onset RA. Thus, for the first time, obtaining a remission is a reasonable treatment goal in RA patients. Factors that are crucial to joint damage control are: early initiation of DMARDs, use of intensive treatments including biological agents, and close monitoring of clinical disease activity and radiographic progression. However, some patients remain unresponsive to all available treatments and continue to experience joint damage progression. A major objective now is to identify patients at high risk for severe joint damage, in order to tailor the treatment regimen to their specific needs.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, radiographic progression, biologics

  13. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods: We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results: We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of

  14. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene......, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual....... With respect to exposure to PM, biomarkers of oxidative damage showed significant positive association with the individual exposure. Thus, 8-oxodG in lymphocyte DNA and markers of oxidative damage to lipids and protein in plasma associated with PM(2.5) exposure. Several types of DNA damage showed seasonal...

  15. Metabolic stability of superoxide and hydroxyl radical adducts of a cyclic nitrone toward rat liver microsomes and cytosol: A stopped-flow ESR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bézière, Nicolas; Frapart, Yves; Rockenbauer, Antal; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2010-08-01

    The metabolic stability of the spin adducts derived from the reaction of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals with 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (BocMPO) in the presence of rat liver microsomes (RLM) and rat liver cytosol (RLC) was studied by using a stopped-flow device coupled to an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. The kinetics of the disappearance of the BocMPO-OH and BocMPO-OOH radicals could be followed by ESR spectroscopy with treatment of the ESR data by an appropriate computer program. The presence of cytosol led to a 60-fold decrease of the half-life of BocMPO-OOH with the intermediate formation of BocMPO-OH. This effect of cytosol was due to an ascorbate- and thiol-dependent reduction of BocMPO-OOH. RLC only led to a 5-fold decrease of the half-life of BocMPO-OH that was predominantly due to cytosolic ascorbate. RLM led to a 10-fold decrease of the BocMPO-OOH half-life that was mainly related to a direct reaction of the hydroperoxide function of BocMPO-OOH with cytochrome P450 Fe(III) (P450). Other ferric heme proteins, such as methemoglobin (metHb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), as well as hemin itself, exhibited a similar behavior. RLM and metHb showed a much weaker effect on BocMPO-OH half-life (2-fold decrease), whereas RLM in the presence of NADPH caused a greater decrease of the BocMPO-OH half-life ( approximately 5-fold). The effect of RLM without NADPH was mainly due to a direct reaction with microsomal P450, whereas the RLM- and NADPH-dependent effect was mainly due to flavin-containing reductases such as cytochrome P450 reductase. These data on the effects of liver subcellular fractions on the half-life of the BocMPO-OOH and the BocMPO-OH spin adducts highlight the role of heme as a biological cofactor involved in the disappearance of such spin adducts. They should be helpful for the design of new spin traps that would form more metabolically stable spin adducts in vitro and in vivo.

  16. A Review of Depleted Uranium Biological Effects: In vivo Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Chromatid Exchange Other Biomarkers DNA Adducts Micronuclei Dicentrics Simple: 1 or 2 breaks in 1 chromosome Complex: 3 or more breaks in 2 or more... Chromosomal Aberrations Control 0.25 0.03 DU 0.49 0.05 Ta 0.29 0.03 DU Genotoxicity in vivo (Sprague-Dawley Rats) Miller et al, 2003, Mil Med. 2002 Feb;167(2...Inhalation Internal Fragment Unpublished data Comparison of Inhalation versus Chronic Internal Fragment Exposure in vivo: Measurement of Chromosomal

  17. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Formica Domenico

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited.

  18. A liquid-crystalline hexa-adduct of [60]fullerene

    OpenAIRE

    Chuard, Thierry; Deschenaux, Robert; Hirsch, Andreas; Schönberger, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    A hexa-adduct of [60]fullerene was synthesized by addition of a mesomorphic twin cyanobiphenyl malonate derivative to C60; whereas the malonate derivative gave a monotropic nematic phase, the fullerene hexa-adduct showed an enantiotropic smectic A phase.

  19. Synthesis and Photophysical Properties of C60-carbazole Adducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN ,Gui(尹桂); YIN,Gui; MAO,Xin-Ping(毛新平); MAO,Xin-Ping; SUO,Zhi-Yong(锁志勇); SUO,Zhi-Yong; XU,Zheng(徐正); XU,Zheng

    2001-01-01

    Three C60-cartazole adducts have been synthesized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction.Intramolecular energy/electron transfer from carbazole to C60 was observed by steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra.The fluorescence spectra of these adducts were similau to each other and dependent on the excitation wavelength and solvent.

  20. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  1. Fluorescence of Phytochrome Adducts with Synthetic Locked Chromophores*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A. S.; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S.; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive. According to fluorescence quantum yields, the adducts may be divided into four different groups: wild type BV adducts exhibiting a weak fluorescence, mutant BV adducts with about 10-fold enhanced fluorescence, adducts with locked chromophores in which the fluorescence quantum yields are around 0.02, and PEB adducts with a high quantum yield of around 0.5. Thus, the strong fluorescence of the PEB adducts is not reached by the locked chromophore adducts, although the photoconversion energy dissipation pathway is blocked. We therefore suggest that ring D of the bilin chromophore, which contributes to the extended π-electron system of the locked chromophores, provides an energy dissipation pathway that is independent on photoconversion. PMID:21071442

  2. Fluorescence of phytochrome adducts with synthetic locked chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A S; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-14

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive. According to fluorescence quantum yields, the adducts may be divided into four different groups: wild type BV adducts exhibiting a weak fluorescence, mutant BV adducts with about 10-fold enhanced fluorescence, adducts with locked chromophores in which the fluorescence quantum yields are around 0.02, and PEB adducts with a high quantum yield of around 0.5. Thus, the strong fluorescence of the PEB adducts is not reached by the locked chromophore adducts, although the photoconversion energy dissipation pathway is blocked. We therefore suggest that ring D of the bilin chromophore, which contributes to the extended π-electron system of the locked chromophores, provides an energy dissipation pathway that is independent on photoconversion.

  3. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  4. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhao; Yan-Hui Hao; Rui-Yun Peng

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  5. Diet-related DNA adduct formation in relation to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemeryck, Lieselot Y; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-08-01

    The human diet contributes significantly to the initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis. It has become clear that the human diet contains several groups of natural foodborne chemicals that are at least in part responsible for the genotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic potential of certain foodstuffs. Electrophilic chemicals are prone to attack nucleophilic sites in DNA, resulting in the formation of altered nucleobases, also known as DNA adducts. Since DNA adduct formation is believed to signal the onset of chemically induced carcinogenesis, the DNA adduct-inducing potential of certain foodstuffs has been investigated to gain more insight into diet-related pathways of carcinogenesis. Many studies have investigated diet-related DNA adduct formation. This review summarizes work on known or suspected dietary carcinogens and the role of DNA adduct formation in hypothesized carcinogenesis pathways.

  6. On Quantum Effects in a Theory of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable. PMID:22413059

  7. On quantum effects in a theory of biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M A

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable.

  8. Controlling the biological effects of spermine using a synthetic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Laurent; Ludlow, R Frederick; Leclaire, Julien; Pérez-Fernandez, Ruth; Otto, Sijbren

    2006-08-09

    Polyamines play an important role in biology, yet their exact function in many processes is poorly understood. Artificial host molecules capable of sequestering polyamines could be useful tools for studying their cellular function. However, designing synthetic receptors with affinities sufficient to compete with biological polyamine receptors remains a huge challenge. Binding affinities of synthetic hosts are typically separated by a gap of several orders of magnitude from those of biomolecules. We now report that a dynamic combinatorial selection approach can deliver a synthetic receptor that bridges this gap. The selected receptor binds spermine with a dissociation constant of 22 nM, sufficient to remove it from its natural host DNA and reverse some of the biological effects of spermine on the nucleic acid. In low concentrations, spermine induces the formation of left-handed DNA, but upon addition of our receptor, the DNA reverts back to its right-handed form. NMR studies and computer simulations suggest that the spermine complex has the form of a pseudo-rotaxane. The spermine receptor is a promising lead for the development of therapeutics or molecular probes for elucidating spermine's role in cell biology.

  9. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1) surface topography, (2) pore size and geometry, (3) porous networks, and (4) macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  10. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabella eGariboldi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1 surface topography, (2 pore size and geometry, (3 porous networks and (4 macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way, as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  11. Effect of pH on biological phosphorus uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serralta, J; Ferrer, J; Borrás, L; Seco, A

    2006-12-05

    An anaerobic aerobic laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to study the effect of pH on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Seven steady states were achieved under different operating conditions. In all of them, a slight variation in the pH value was observed during anaerobic phase. However, pH rose significantly during aerobic phase. The increase observed was due to phosphorus uptake and carbon dioxide stripping. When pH was higher than 8.2-8.25 the phosphorus uptake rate clearly decreased. The capability of Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1 (BNRM1) to simulate experimental results was evaluated. Both models successfully characterized the enhanced biological phosphorus removal performance of the SBR. Furthermore, BNRM1 also reproduced the pH variations observed and the decrease in the phosphorus uptake rate. This model includes a switch function in the kinetic expressions to represent the pH inhibition in biological processes. The pH inhibition constants related to polyphosphate storage process were obtained by adjusting model predictions to measured phosphorus concentrations. On the other hand, pH inhibition should be included in ASM2d to accurately simulate experimental phosphorus evolution observed in an A/O SBR.

  12. Quantum Chemical Studies on Detail Mechanism of Nitrosylation of NAMI-A-HSA Adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dharitri; Mondal, Paritosh

    2015-08-20

    Hydrolysis of NAMI-A in NAMI-A-HSA (HSA = human serum albumin) and nitrosylation of hydrolyzed NAMI-A-HSA adduct have been studied in detail using density functional theory method. It has been observed that the chloride exchange reaction with water in the NAMI-A-HSA adduct follows an interchange dissociative mechanism passing through an unstable heptacoordinated activated complex. The computed free energy of activation (ΔG) and rate constant (k) for the hydrolysis process in aqueous medium are observed to be 24.85 kcal mol(-1) and 3.81 × 10(-6) s(-1), respectively. Nitrosylation of hydrolyzed NAMI-A-HSA adduct with nitric oxide is found to be thermodynamically more favorable with the incorporation of solvent effect and provides a detailed understanding related to the antimetastatic activity of the NAMI-A drug. This investigation shows that nitric oxide coordinates linearly to NAMI-A-HSA adduct leading to the reduction of ruthenium(III) to more active ruthenium(II), with the reduction potential of -2.32 V. Negative relative solvation and relative binding free energies suggest that the hydrolysis and nitrosylation reactions are found to be thermodynamically favorable and faster. Our computed results provide a detailed thermodynamics and kinetics which may be highly beneficial for understanding antimetastatic activity as well as the nitric oxide scavenging ability of NAMI-A.

  13. The N(2)-Furfuryl-deoxyguanosine Adduct Does Not Alter the Structure of B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke, Pratibha P; Gore, Kiran R; Harikrishna, S; Samanta, Biswajit; Kottur, Jithesh; Nair, Deepak T; Pradeepkumar, P I

    2016-01-15

    N(2)-Furfuryl-deoxyguanosine (fdG) is carcinogenic DNA adduct that originates from furfuryl alcohol. It is also a stable structural mimic of the damage induced by the nitrofurazone family of antibiotics. For the structural and functional studies of this model N(2)-dG adduct, reliable and rapid access to fdG-modified DNAs are warranted. Toward this end, here we report the synthesis of fdG-modified DNAs using phosphoramidite chemistry involving only three steps. The functional integrity of the modified DNA has been verified by primer extension studies with DNA polymerases I and IV from E. coli. Introduction of fdG into a DNA duplex decreases the Tm by ∼1.6 °C/modification. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA duplex bearing the fdG adduct revealed that though the overall B-DNA structure is maintained, this lesion can disrupt W-C H-bonding, stacking interactions, and minor groove hydrations to some extent at the modified site, and these effects lead to slight variations in the local base pair parameters. Overall, our studies show that fdG is tolerated at the minor groove of the DNA to a better extent compared with other bulky DNA damages, and this property will make it difficult for the DNA repair pathways to detect this adduct.

  14. Oral Cell DNA Adducts as Potential Biomarkers for Lung Cancer Susceptibility in Cigarette Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    This perspective considers the use of oral cell DNA adducts, together with exposure and genetic information, to potentially identify those cigarette smokers at highest risk for lung cancer, so that appropriate preventive measures could be initiated at a relatively young age before too much damage has been done. There are now well established and validated analytical methods for the quantitation of urinary and serum metabolites of tobacco smoke toxicants and carcinogens. These metabolites provide a profile of exposure and in some cases lung cancer risk. But they do not yield information on the critical DNA damage parameter that leads to mutations in cancer growth control genes such as KRAS and TP53. Studies demonstrate a correlation between changes in the oral cavity and lung in cigarette smokers, due to the field effect of tobacco smoke. Oral cell DNA is readily obtained in contrast to DNA samples from the lung. Studies in which oral cell DNA and salivary DNA have been analyzed for specific DNA adducts are reviewed; some of the adducts identified have also been previously reported in lung DNA from smokers. The multiple challenges of developing a panel of oral cell DNA adducts that could be routinely quantified by mass spectrometry are discussed. PMID:28092948

  15. Adduct formation of ionic and nanoparticular silver with amino acids and glutathione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaske, Franziska; Stork, Lisa; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe, E-mail: uk@uni-muenster.de [University of Muenster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    To investigate the interaction of ionic and nanoparticular silver with amino acids and small peptides, an electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry method was developed. Monomeric and oligomeric silver adducts were formed with amino acids including cysteine (Cys), methionine, histidine, lysine, or the tripeptide glutathione (GSH). The obtained spectra for ionic silver show clusters in different ratios between Ag{sup +} and the reaction partners (X) including [Ag{sub n}X{sub m} - (n + 1)H]{sup -} (n = 1-4, m = 1-3). Regarding Cys, adduct clusters up to n = 5 and m = 4 were observed as well. Considering silver-GSH interactions, even doubly charged oligomers occur generating [Ag{sub (a+1)}GSH{sub a} - (a + 3)H]{sup 2-} (a = 5-7) and [Ag{sub b}GSH{sub b} - (b + 2)H]{sup 2-} (b = 4-8) ions. {sup 1}H NMR data of free GSH compared to that after treatment with Ag{sup +} confirm sulfur-metal interactions due to changing chemical shifts for the protons located adjacent to the thiol group. Density functional theory calculations for silver-GSH clusters may explain the formation of experimentally recorded large clusters due to cooperative effects between silver and carboxylic acid side chains. Both sets of experiments indicate the presence of these adducts in the liquid phase. For silver nanoparticles, the respective data confirm the release of silver ions and the subsequent adduct formation.

  16. Intuitive biological thought: Developmental changes and effects of biology education in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, John D; Arenson, Melanie; Xu, Yian; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2017-02-01

    A large body of cognitive research has shown that people intuitively and effortlessly reason about the biological world in complex and systematic ways. We addressed two questions about the nature of intuitive biological reasoning: How does intuitive biological thinking change during adolescence and early adulthood? How does increasing biology education influence intuitive biological thinking? To do so, we developed a battery of measures to systematically test three components of intuitive biological thought: anthropocentric thinking, teleological thinking and essentialist thinking, and tested 8th graders and university students (both biology majors, and non-biology majors). Results reveal clear evidence of persistent intuitive reasoning among all populations studied, consistent but surprisingly small differences between 8th graders and college students on measures of intuitive biological thought, and consistent but again surprisingly small influence of increasing biology education on intuitive biological reasoning. Results speak to the persistence of intuitive reasoning, the importance of taking intuitive knowledge into account in science classrooms, and the necessity of interdisciplinary research to advance biology education. Further studies are necessary to investigate how cultural context and continued acquisition of expertise impact intuitive biology thinking.

  17. Muonium adducts of benzaldehyde: Structural correlation with nitroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, C.J. [John Moores University, School of Pharmacy and Chemistry (United Kingdom); Reid, I.D. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Jackson, R.A. [University of Sussex, School of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-15

    We have formed adduct radicals (ArCHOMu{center_dot}) by muonium addition to the carbonyl group of benzaldehyde and its derivatives. The muon coupling is found to be highly sensitive to the nature of substituents in the benzene ring, being increased by electron releasing groups. Similarly, the {sup 14}N coupling in a series of nitroxides [ArN(O{center_dot})OSiEt{sub 3}], measured using ESR spectroscopy, is increased by electron releasing substituents and a linear correlation is found between the two; their connected nature is discussed.For the radical derived from benzaldehyde itself, a strong dependence is also found on the solvent in which it is solved. We suggest that this may be used in the study of solvent effects, particularly H-bonding, pertinent to organic and bioorganic media.

  18. Biological effects from electromagnetic field exposure and public exposure standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Sage, Cindy

    2008-02-01

    During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential health risks from power-frequency fields (extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields; ELF) and from radiofrequency/microwave radiation emissions (RF) from wireless communications. Non-thermal (low-intensity) biological effects have not been considered for regulation of microwave exposure, although numerous scientific reports indicate such effects. The BioInitiative Report is based on an international research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at low-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. Health endpoints reported to be associated with ELF and/or RF include childhood leukaemia, brain tumours, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, breast cancer, miscarriage and some cardiovascular effects. The BioInitiative Report concluded that a reasonable suspicion of risk exists based on clear evidence of bioeffects at environmentally relevant levels, which, with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. Regarding ELF a new lower public safety limit for habitable space adjacent to all new or upgraded power lines and for all other new constructions should be applied. A new lower limit should also be used for existing habitable space for children and/or women who are pregnant. A precautionary limit should be adopted for outdoor, cumulative RF exposure and for cumulative indoor RF fields with considerably lower limits than existing guidelines, see the BioInitiative Report. The current guidelines for the US and European microwave exposure from mobile phones, for the brain are 1.6 W/Kg and 2 W/Kg, respectively. Since use of mobile phones is associated with an increased risk for brain tumour after 10 years, a new biologically based guideline is warranted. Other health impacts associated with exposure to

  19. The knee adduction moment during gait is associated with the adduction angle measured during computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Richard D; Wilson, Janie L Astephen; Wilson, David A J; Richardson, Glen; Dunbar, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Computer-assisted surgery can be used to measure 3-dimensional knee function during arthroplasty surgery; however, it is unknown if the movement of the knee measured during surgery is related to the in vitro, dynamic state of the knee joint, specifically the knee adduction moment during gait, which has been related to implant migration. The purpose of this study was to determine if the preoperative adduction moment is correlated with the knee abduction/adduction angle measured intraoperatively. A statistically significant correlation was found between the mean (r(2) = 0.59; P = .001) and peak (r(2) = 0.53; P = .003) preoperative knee adduction moment and the mean abduction/adduction angle measured intraoperatively. The association found in this study suggests the potential for incorporating functional information that relates to surgical outcome into surgical decision making using computer-assisted surgery.

  20. Biological effects of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, E.J. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    In May 1990 a group of scientists representing several federal agencies, the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, the private sector, and academia met to develop a strategy to encourage the study of the biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE) to chemical agents and radioactivity. A workshop was held in 1991 with seven invited speakers focusing on the toxicological implications of biological adaptations. The selection of topics and speakers was designed to consider critically the concept of hormesis, not only in a broad, conceptual manner, but also at the molecular and biochemical levels. These presentations offered a complementary perspective on the diverse range of molecular mechanisms that can become activated at low levels of toxicant exposure. In addition to chemical toxicology research, an overview of current research on Effects of low-dose radiation on the immune response' was presented as well as Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis'. The final presentation was devoted to biostatistical considerations when designing studies that address issues associated with the biological responses to low doses of chemicals and radiation, as well as issues in interpretation of the findings from such studies.

  1. The use of innate immune responses as biomarkers in a programme of integrated biological effects monitoring on flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Andreas; Broeg, Katja; Dizer, Halim; von Westernhagen, Hein; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    Immunological biomarkers that reflect the effects of exposure to environmental contaminants in coastal marine habitats were sought in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from five locations in the German Bight with different anthropogenic impacts. During a 2-year period of sampling, innate immune responses were monitored from a total of 331 individual flounder of a body length of 18 to 25 cm. From the fish, plasma lysozyme, phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leucocytes were analysed and implemented as part of an integrated biological effects monitoring programme. As the measurements of the parameters applied here varied within wide ranges at some locations, spatial differences could not always be established, but some general trends could be drawn: plasma lysozyme activity was decreased in flounder contaminated with DDT adducts and some PCBs, while cellular functions such as phagocytosis and respiratory burst were stimulated by some chlorinated hydrocarbons. Correlation analysis also revealed connections not only between the parameters applied here and some contaminants but also with some biochemical parameters used as biomarkers in pollution monitoring: in flounder with decreased integrity of hepatocyte lysosomal membranes, immune functions also were impaired, and plasma lysozyme as well as phagocytosis activity of head kidney cells were impaired when the activity of cytochrome P450 1A was induced. The data presented here indicate that innate immune responses may be useful parameters to monitor cellular functions in a battery of biomarkers of different levels of biological organisation.

  2. Biological effects of pulsating magnetic fields: role of solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze biological effects produced by magnetic fields in order to elucidate the physical mechanisms, which can produce them. We show that there is a chierarchy of such mechanisms and that the mutual interplay between them can result in the synergetic outcome. In particular, we analyze the biological effects of magnetic fields on soliton mediated charge transport in the redox processes in living organisms. Such solitons are described by nonlinear systems of equations and represent electrons that are self-trapped in alpha-helical polypeptides due to the moderately strong electron-lattice interaction. They represent a particular type of disssipativeless large polarons in low-dimensional systems. We show that the effective mass of solitons in the is different from the mass of free electrons, and that there is a resonant effect of the magnetic fields on the dynamics of solitons, and, hence, on charge transport that accompanies photosynthesis and respiration. These effects can result in non-therm...

  3. Differences in micronucleus frequency and acrylamide adduct levels with hemoglobin between vegetarians and non-vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Natalia; Frostne, Cecilia; Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne; Tareke, Eden; Bergman, Rolf; Haghdoost, Siamak; Paulsson, Birgit; Törnqvist, Margareta; Segerbäck, Dan; Jenssen, Dag; Grawé, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nutrients and food constituents can prevent or contribute to genotoxicity. In this study, the possible influence of a vegetarian/non-vegetarian diet on genotoxic effects was investigated in 58 non-smoking healthy vegetarians (V) and non-vegetarians (NV), age 21-37 years from the Stockholm area in Sweden. Physical activity and dietary habits were similar in both groups, with the exception of the intake of meat and fish. Using flow cytometry, we determined the formation of micronuclei (MN) in transferrin-positive immature peripheral blood reticulocytes (Trf-Ret) (Total: n = 53; V: n = 27; NV: n = 26). Dietary exposure to acrylamide was measured through hemoglobin (Hb) adducts in peripheral erythrocytes (Total: n = 53; V: n = 29; NV: n = 24). Hb adducts of both acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide were monitored as a measure of the corresponding in vivo doses. Our data demonstrated that compared with the non-vegetarians, the vegetarians exhibited lower frequencies of MN (fMN) in the Trf-Ret (p vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Furthermore, there were no significant relationships between the adduct levels and fMN in the individuals. The ratio of the Hb adduct levels from glycidamide and acrylamide, however, showed a significant difference (p vegetarian diet might be beneficial in lowering genomic instability in healthy individuals. The measured Hb adduct levels indicate that the total intake of acrylamide does not differ between the two studied groups and does not contribute to the observed difference in fMN, although an influence of the diet on the metabolic rates of acrylamide was indicated. In addition, the observed significant difference in the background fMN in the two groups demonstrated that the MN analysis method has a sensitivity applicable to the biomonitoring of human lifestyle factors.

  4. Covalent adduct formation between the plasmalogen-derived modification product 2-chlorohexadecanal and phloretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üllen, Andreas; Nusshold, Christoph; Glasnov, Toma; Saf, Robert; Cantillo, David; Eibinger, Gerald; Reicher, Helga; Fauler, Günter; Bernhart, Eva; Hallstrom, Seth; Kogelnik, Nora; Zangger, Klaus; Oliver Kappe, C; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2015-02-15

    Hypochlorous acid added as reagent or generated by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2-Cl(-) system oxidatively modifies brain ether-phospholipids (plasmalogens). This reaction generates a sn2-acyl-lysophospholipid and chlorinated fatty aldehydes. 2-Chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA), a prototypic member of chlorinated long-chain fatty aldehydes, has potent neurotoxic potential by inflicting blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. During earlier studies we could show that the dihydrochalcone-type polyphenol phloretin attenuated 2-ClHDA-induced BBB dysfunction. To clarify the underlying mechanism(s) we now investigated the possibility of covalent adduct formation between 2-ClHDA and phloretin. Coincubation of 2-ClHDA and phloretin in phosphatidylcholine liposomes revealed a half-life of 2-ClHDA of approx. 120min, decaying at a rate of 5.9×10(-3)min(-1). NMR studies and enthalpy calculations suggested that 2-ClHDA-phloretin adduct formation occurs via electrophilic aromatic substitution followed by hemiacetal formation on the A-ring of phloretin. Adduct characterization by high-resolution mass spectroscopy confirmed these results. In contrast to 2-ClHDA, the covalent 2-ClHDA-phloretin adduct was without adverse effects on MTT reduction (an indicator for metabolic activity), cellular adenine nucleotide content, and barrier function of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC). Of note, 2-ClHDA-phloretin adduct formation was also observed in BMVEC cultures. Intraperitoneal application and subsequent GC-MS analysis of brain lipid extracts revealed that phloretin is able to penetrate the BBB of C57BL/6J mice. Data of the present study indicate that phloretin scavenges 2-ClHDA, thereby attenuating 2-ClHDA-mediated brain endothelial cell dysfunction. We here identify a detoxification pathway for a prototypic chlorinated fatty aldehyde (generated via the MPO axis) that compromises BBB function in vitro and in vivo.

  5. 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine adduct formation in aortic DNA following inhalation of acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, A; Nath, R; Pan, J; Chen, L; Widmer, K; Henk, W; Chung, F L

    2001-03-01

    Recent reports indicate that many of the cytotoxic and health-threatening components of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) reside in the vapor phase of the smoke. We have reported previously that inhalation of 1,3-butadiene, a prominent vapor phase component of ETS, accelerates arteriosclerotic plaque development in cockerels. In this study we asked whether inhaled acrolein, a reactive aldehyde that is also a prominent vapor-phase component of ETS, damages artery-wall DNA and accelerates plaque development. Cockerels inhaled 0, 1, or 10 ppm acrolein mixed with HEPA-filtered air for 6 hr. Half were killed immediately (day 1 group) for detection of the stable, premutagenic 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine acrolein adduct (AdG3) in aortic DNA via a (32)P-postlabeling/HPLC method, and half were killed after 10 days (day 10 group) for indirect assessment of adduct repair. In the day 1 group, acrolein-DNA adducts were 5 times higher in the 1 and 10 ppm groups than in HEPA-filtered air controls. However, in the day 10 group, adduct levels in the 1 and 10 ppm acrolein groups were reduced to the control adduct level. For the plaque studies, cockerels inhaled 1 ppm acrolein (6 hr/day, 8 weeks), mixed with the same HEPA-filtered air inhaled by controls. Plaque development was measured blind by computerized morphometry. Unlike butadiene inhalation, acrolein inhalation did not accelerate plaque development. Thus, even though repeated exposure to acrolein alone has no effect on plaque size under the exposure conditions described here, a single, brief inhalation exposure to acrolein elicits repairable DNA damage to the artery wall. These results suggest that frequent exposure to ETS may lead to persistent artery-wall DNA damage and thus provide sites on which other ETS plaque accelerants can act.

  6. Formation of Hydroxymethyl DNA Adducts in Rats Orally Exposed to Stable Isotope Labeled Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun; Gul, Husamettin; Upton, Patricia B.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Swenberg, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Methanol is a large volume industrial chemical and widely used solvent and fuel additive. Methanol’s well known toxicity and use in a wide spectrum of applications has raised long-standing environmental issues over its safety, including its carcinogenicity. Methanol has not been listed as a carcinogen by any regulatory agency; however, there are debates about its carcinogenic potential. Formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol, has been proposed to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of methanol. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen and actively targets DNA and protein, causing diverse DNA and protein damage. However, formaldehyde-induced DNA adducts arising from the metabolism of methanol have not been reported previously, largely due to the absence of suitable DNA biomarkers and the inability to differentiate what was due to methanol compared with the substantial background of endogenous formaldehyde. Recently, we developed a unique approach combining highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods and exposure to stable isotope labeled chemicals to simultaneously quantify formaldehyde-specific endogenous and exogenous DNA adducts. In this study, rats were exposed daily to 500 or 2000 mg/kg [13CD4]-methanol by gavage for 5 days. Our data demonstrate that labeled formaldehyde arising from [13CD4]-methanol induced hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in multiple tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The results also demonstrated that the number of exogenous DNA adducts was lower than the number of endogenous hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in all tissues of rats administered 500 mg/kg per day for 5 days, a lethal dose to humans, even after incorporating an average factor of 4 for reduced metabolism due to isotope effects of deuterium-labeled methanol into account. PMID:22157354

  7. Glottal Adduction and Subglottal Pressure in Singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Christian T; Hess, Markus; Müller, Frank; Švec, Jan G; Sundberg, Johan

    2015-07-01

    Previous research suggests that independent variation of vocal loudness and glottal configuration (type and degree of vocal fold adduction) does not occur in untrained speech production. This study investigated whether these factors can be varied independently in trained singing and how subglottal pressure is related to average glottal airflow, voice source properties, and sound level under these conditions. A classically trained baritone produced sustained phonations on the endoscopic vowel [i:] at pitch D4 (approximately 294 Hz), exclusively varying either (a) vocal register; (b) phonation type (from "breathy" to "pressed" via cartilaginous adduction); or (c) vocal loudness, while keeping the others constant. Phonation was documented by simultaneous recording of videokymographic, electroglottographic, airflow and voice source data, and by percutaneous measurement of relative subglottal pressure. Register shifts were clearly marked in the electroglottographic wavegram display. Compared with chest register, falsetto was produced with greater pulse amplitude of the glottal flow, H1-H2, mean airflow, and with lower maximum flow declination rate (MFDR), subglottal pressure, and sound pressure. Shifts of phonation type (breathy/flow/neutral/pressed) induced comparable systematic changes. Increase of vocal loudness resulted in increased subglottal pressure, average flow, sound pressure, MFDR, glottal flow pulse amplitude, and H1-H2. When changing either vocal register or phonation type, subglottal pressure and mean airflow showed an inverse relationship, that is, variation of glottal flow resistance. The direct relation between subglottal pressure and airflow when varying only vocal loudness demonstrated independent control of vocal loudness and glottal configuration. Achieving such independent control of phonatory control parameters would be an important target in vocal pedagogy and in voice therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Non Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Adducts of Freons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Walther; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Feng, Gang; Spada, Lorenzo; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2014-06-01

    The complexation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with atmospheric water and pollutants of the atmosphere affects their reactivity and it seems to accelerate, for example, the decomposition rate of freons in the atmosphere [1]. For this reason we characterized shapes, stabilities, nature of the non-covalent interactions, structures and internal dynamics of a number of complexes of CFCs with water and of their dimers or oligomers by rotational spectroscopy. It has been found that hydrogenated CFCs form adducts with other molecules through weak hydrogen bonds (WHBs). Their C-H groups can act as proton donors, enhanced by the electron withdrawing of the halogen atoms, interacting with the electron rich regions of the partner molecules [2]. Also in adducts or oligomers of hydrogenated CFCs the monomer units are held together by nets of WHBs [3]. When CFCs are perhalogenated, the positive electrostatic region ("σ-hole") can interact electrostatically with negative sites of another, or of the same molecular entity, giving rise, according to IUPAC, to the so called halogen bond (HaB). However, it has been observed that when the perhalogenated CFCs has a Π electron system, a lone pair•••Π interaction (Bürgi-Dunitz) is favoured [4]. We describe here the HaBs that CF4 and CF3Cl form with a variety of partner molecules such as water, ammonia, dimethyl ether, etc. Important spectroscopic features outline strong dynamics effects taking place in this kind of complex. References [1] V. Vaida, H. G. Kjaergaard, K. J. Feierabend, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 22 (2003) 203. [2] See, for example: W. Caminati, S. Melandri, A. Maris, P. Ottaviani, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45 (2006) 2438. [3] G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, I. Cacelli, L. Carbonaro, G. Prampolini, W. Caminati, Chem. Commun. 50 (2014) 171. [4] Q. Gou, G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, W. Caminati, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 52 11888.

  9. Bulky DNA adducts in human sperm associated with semen parameters and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA adducts are widely used marker of DNA damage induced by environmental pollutants. The present study was designed to explore whether sperm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts were associated with sperm DNA integrity and semen quality. Methods A total of 433 Han Chinese men were recruited from an infertility clinic. Immunofluorescence was applied to analyze sperm PAH-DNA adducts. Sperm DNA fragmentation was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (Tdt)-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Results After adjustment for potential confounders using linear regression, sperm PAH-DNA adducts were negatively associated with sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm motility, and curvilinear velocity (VCL). In addition, a positive relationship between sperm PAH-DNA adducts and sperm DNA fragmentation was found. Conclusions Our findings suggested an inverse association between sperm PAH-DNA adducts and semen quality, and provided the first epidemiologic evidence of an adverse effect of PAH-DNA adducts on sperm DNA integrity. PMID:24073787

  10. Variations in protein-flavin hydrogen bonding in a light, oxygen, voltage domain produce non-Arrhenius kinetics of adduct decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltowski, Brian D; Nash, Abigail I; Gardner, Kevin H

    2011-10-18

    Light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domains utilize a conserved blue light-dependent mechanism to control a diverse array of effector domains in biological and engineered proteins. Variations in the kinetics and efficiency of LOV photochemistry fine-tune various aspects of the photic response. Characterization of the kinetics of a key aspect of this photochemical mechanism in EL222, a blue light responsive DNA binding protein from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594, reveals unique non-Arrhenius behavior in the rate of dark-state cleavage of the photochemically generated adduct. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis studies establish that this effect stems from a Gln to Ala mutation unique to EL222 and homologous proteins from marine bacteria. Kinetic and spectroscopic analyses reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions between the FMN N1, O2, and ribityl hydroxyls and the surrounding protein regulate photocycle kinetics and stabilize the LOV active site from temperature-induced alteration in local structure. Substitution of residues interacting with the N1-O2 locus modulates adduct stability, structural flexibility, and sequestration of the active site from bulk solvent without perturbation of light-activated DNA binding. Together, these variants link non-Arrhenius behavior to specific alteration of an H-bonding network, while affording tunability of photocycle kinetics. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Levuglandin forms adducts with histone h4 in a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent manner, altering its interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Erica J; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A

    2014-04-22

    Inflammation and subsequent cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity has long been linked with the development of cancer, although little is known about any epigenetic effects of COX-2. A product of COX-2 activation, levuglandin (LG) quickly forms covalent bonds with nearby primary amines, such as those in lysine, which leads to LG-protein adducts. Here, we demonstrate that COX-2 activity causes LG-histone adducts in cultured cells and liver tissue, detectable through LC-MS, with the highest incidence in histone H4. Adduction is blocked by a γ-ketoaldehyde scavenger, which has no effect on COX-2 activity as measured by PGE2 production. Formation of the LG-histone adduct is associated with an increased histone solubility in NaCl, indicating destabilization of the nucleosome structure; this is also reversed with scavenger treatment. These data demonstrate that COX-2 activity can cause histone adduction and loosening of the nucleosome complex, which could lead to altered transcription and contribute to carcinogenesis.

  12. The Biological Effects of Ivabradine in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziano Riccioni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies in healthy and asymptomatic subjects, as well as patients with already established cardiovascular disease (CAD have demonstrated that heart rate (HR is a very important and major independent cardiovascular risk factor for prognosis. Lowering heart rate reduces cardiac work, thereby diminishing myocardial oxygen demand. Several experimental studies in animals, including dogs and pigs, have clarified the beneficial effects of ivabradine associated with HR lowering. Ivabradine is a selective inhibitor of the hyperpolarisation activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated funny current (If involved in pacemaker generation and responsiveness of the sino-atrial node (SAN, which result in HR reduction with no other apparent direct cardiovascular effects. Several studies show that ivabradine substantially and significantly reduces major risks associated with heart failure when added to guideline-based and evidence-based treatment. However the biological effect of ivabradine have yet to be studied. This effects can appear directly on myocardium or on a systemic level improving endothelial function and modulating immune cell migration. Indeed ivabradine is an ‘open-channel’ blocker of human hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels of type-4 (hHCN4, and a ‘closed-channel’ blocker of mouse HCN1 channels in a dose-dependent manner. At endothelial level ivabradine decreased monocyte chemotactin protein-1 mRNA expression and exerted a potent anti-oxidative effect through reduction of vascular NADPH oxidase activity. Finally, on an immune level, ivabradine inhibits the chemokine-induced migration of CD4-positive lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss the biological effects of ivabradine and highlight its effects on CAD.

  13. Bulky carcinogen-DNA adducts and exposure to environmental and occupational sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Influence of susceptibility genotypes on adduct level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabro Nielsen, P.

    1996-12-31

    PAH exposure, whether it is of occupational or environmental origin, is thought to result in an elevated risk of cancer especially in the lungs. DNA damage is considered an important step in the carcinogenic effect of PAH. Hence, methods that elucidate the steps in the carcinogenic process are important to understand the action of PAH. It may prove useful in the exposure assessment and in combination with classical epidemiological methods give better basis for risk estimation. The objective in this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility of the {sup 32}P-postlabeling method to detect carcinogen-DNA adducts for assessing exposure to DNA damaging compounds in different occupationally and environmentally exposed groups. The studies included groups, that have an elevated cancer risk due to occupational exposure to PAH. Exposure levels were supposed to be relatively low according to reports on occupational and environmental air quality programs. Another aim was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in metabolizing enzyme genes on DNA adduct levels. A third objective was to establish some kind of baseline DNA adduct level for individuals with supposed low exposure, and compare it to the more exposed groups. A fourth aim in these studies was to examine if biomarkers of genotoxic exposure could be useful in epidemiological studies to identify groups at risk and thereby contribute with better exposure estimates in the study of PAH related cancer risk. (EG).

  14. Current research on biological effects of low-level exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    Rather substantial numbers of industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and radiation display U-shaped or seemingly paradoxical dose-response relationships. A limited listing of studies providing examples of data fitting the U-shaped curve has been published. This array suggests that the U-shaped response is broadly generalizable and therefore potentially of considerable significance in the toxicological and public health domains. In fact, in 1992 and 1993, three conferences (Japan, United States, and China) were held exclusively on the topic of the biological effects of low doses of chemicals and radioactivity with articular emphasis on U-shaped curves. Substantial efforts have been made at understanding this observation.

  15. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Koyano, Yuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous 2D fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it has been shown [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)] that such active proteins should in- duce non-thermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxis-like drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  16. DNA adducts, benzo(a)pyrene monooxygenase activity, and lysosomal membrane stability in Mytilus galloprovincialis from different areas in Taranto coastal waters (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, M; Cogotzi, L; Frigeri, A; Corsi, I; Bonacci, S; Iacocca, A; Lancini, L; Mastrototaro, F; Focardi, S; Svelto, M

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of environmental pollution at different stations along the Taranto coastline (Ionian Sea, Puglia, Italy) using several biomarkers of exposure and the effect on mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected in October 2001 and October 2002. Five sampling sites were compared with a "cleaner" reference site in the Aeronautics Area. In this study we also investigated the differences between adduct levels in gills and digestive gland. This Taranto area is the most significant industrial settlement on the Ionian Sea known to be contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, heavy metals, etc. Exposure to PAHs was evaluated by measuring DNA adduct levels and benzo(a)pyrene monooxygenase activity (B(a)PMO); DNA adducts were analyzed by 32P-postlabeling with nuclease P1 enhancement in both gills and digestive glands to evaluate differences between DNA adduct levels in the two tissues. B(a)PMO was assayed in the microsomal fraction of the digestive glands as a result of the high expression of P450-metabolizing enzymes in this tissue. Lysosomal membrane stability, a potential biomarker of anthropogenic stress, was also evaluated in the digestive glands of mussels, by measuring the latent activity of beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Induction of DNA adducts was evident in both tissues, although the results revealed large tissue differences in DNA adduct formation. In fact, gills showed higher DNA adduct levels than did digestive gland. No significant differences were found in DNA adduct levels over time, with both tissues providing similar results in both years. DNA adduct levels were correlated with B(a)PMO activity in digestive gland in both years (r = 0.60 in 2001; r = 0.73 in 2002). Increases were observed in B(a)PMO activity and DNA adduct levels at different stations; no statistical difference was observed in B(a)PMO activity over the two monitoring campaigns. The membrane labilization

  17. Biological activity of selected plants with adaptogenic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ivanišová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine biological activity of plants with adaptogenic effect: Panax ginseng Mayer., Withania somnifera L., Eleuterococcus senticosus Rupr. et Maxim., Astragallus membranaceus Fisch. and Codonopsis pilosulae Franch. The antioxidant activity was detected by DPPH and phosphomolybdenum method, total polyphenol content with Folin – Ciocalteu reagent, flavonoids content by aluminium chloride method. The detection of antimicrobial activity was carried out by disc diffusion method against three species of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807, Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and two Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus thuringiensis CCM 19, Stapylococcus aureus subsp. aureus CCM 2461. Results showed that plants with adaptogenic effect are rich for biologically active substances. The highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was determined in the sample of Eleuterococcus senticosus (3.15 mg TEAC – Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity per g of sample and by phosphomolybdenum method in the sample of Codonopsis pilosulae (188.79 mg TEAC per g of sample. In the sample of Panax ginseng was measured the highest content of total polyphenols (8.10 mg GAE – galic acid equivalent per g of sample and flavonoids (3.41 μg QE – quercetin equivalent per g of sample. All samples also showed strong antimicrobial activity with the best results in Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera in particular for species Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807. The analyzed species of plant with high value of biological activity can be used more in the future, not only in food, but also in cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries.

  18. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers: differences in metabolism and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2009-01-01

    The term conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a mixture of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, characterized by having conjugated double bonds, not separated by a methylene group as in linoleic acid. CLA isomers appear as a minor component of the lipid fraction, found mainly in meat and dairy products from cows and sheep. The most abundant isomer is cis-9,trans-11, which represents up to 80% of total CLA in food. These isomers are metabolized in the body through different metabolic pathways, but important differences, that can have physiological consequences, are observed between the two main isomers. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer is more efficiently oxidized than the cis-9,trans-11 isomer, due to the position of its double bounds. Interest in CLA arose in its anticarcinogenic action but there is an increasing amount of specific scientific literature concerning the biological effects and properties of CLA. Numerous biological effects of CLA are due to the separate action of the most studied isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. It is also likely that some effects are induced and/or enhanced by these isomers acting synergistically. Although the cis-9,trans-11 isomer is mainly responsible for the anticarcinogenic effect, the trans-10,cis-12 isomer reduces body fat and it is referred as the most effective isomer affecting blood lipids. As far as insulin function is concerned, both isomers seem to be responsible for insulin resistance in humans. Finally, with regard to the immune system it is not clear whether individual isomers of CLA could act similarly or differently.

  19. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-06-30

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation.

  20. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ON BRAIN TISSUE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Đinđić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to microwave radiation induces multiple organ dysfunctions, especially in CNS.The aim of this work was investigation of biological effects of microwave radiation on rats' brain and determination of increased oxidative stress as a possible pathogenetic's mechanism.Wis tar rats 3 months old were divided in experimental (4 female and 4 male animal and control group (5 female and 4 male. This experimental group was constantly exposed to a magnetic field of 5 mG. We simulated using of mobile phones 30 min every day. The source of NIR emitted MF that was similar to mobile phones at 900 MHz. The rats were killed after 2 months. Biological effects were determined by observation of individual and collective behavior and body mass changes. Lipid per oxidation was determined by measuring quantity of malondialdehyde (MDA in brain homogenate.The animals in experimental group exposed to EMF showed les weight gain. The most important observations were changing of basic behavior models and expression of aggressive or panic behavior. The content of MDA in brain tissue is singificantly higher (1.42 times in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields (3,82±0.65 vs. control 2.69±0.42 nmol/mg proteins, p<0.01.Increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation after exposition in EM fields induced disorders of function and structure of brain.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of fullerene C60/anthracene adducts

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Manchado, A

    2013-01-01

    Recent Spitzer Space Telescope observations of several astrophysical environments such as Planetary Nebulae, Reflection Nebulae, and R Coronae Borealis stars show the simultaneous presence of mid-infrared features attributed to neutral fullerene molecules (i.e., C60) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). If C60 fullerenes and PAHs coexist in fullerene-rich space environments, then C60 may easily form adducts with a number of different PAH molecules; at least with catacondensed PAHs. Here we present the laboratory infrared spectra (~2-25 um) of C60 fullerene and anthracene Dies-Alder mono- and bis-adducts as produced by sonochemical synthesis. We find that C60/anthracene Diels-Alder adducts display spectral features strikingly similar to those from C60 (and C70) fullerenes and other unidentified infrared emission features. Thus, fullerene-adducts - if formed under astrophysical conditions and stable/abundant enough - may contribute to the infrared emission features observed in fullerene-containing circu...

  2. Arsenic in the aquatic environment - speciation and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landner, L. [Swedish Environmental Research Group (MFG)

    1998-03-01

    The present report is a contribution to EC Commission`s undertaking to review existing EC provisions on the substances for which Sweden has been granted transitional provisions. The provisions imply that Sweden may maintain more stringent regulations on four substances until the end of 1998. The present report deals with speciation and biological effects of arsenic in three types of aquatic environments - marine water, estuarine or brackish water and freshwater. The similarity between arsenate and phosphate and the interference in phosphorylation reactions is discussed. It is clear that in Scandinavian inland waters the concentration of phosphorous is on average lower than in most inland waters in continental Europe. However, in most inland waters phosphorus is the limiting factor for phytoplankton development and eutrophication, which means that there is a clear risk for detrimental effects in the great majority of inland waters, also eutrophic waters 167 refs, 27 figs, 12 tabs. Exemption Substances Project (Directive 89/677/EEC)

  3. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  4. Biological effects of Echinacea purpurea on human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksić, Gordana; Petrović, Sandra; Joksić, Ivana; Leskovac, Andreja

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate radioprotective properties of Echinacea purpurea tablets in vivo. We analysed lymphocyte chromosome aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), apoptosis of leukocytes and haematological parameters in a group of radiation workers who were identified as carrying dicentric chromosomes in their lymphocytes. All radiation workers were taking two 275 mg Echinacea tablets b.i.d., according to a pharmacist's recommendation. All parameters were analysed before and after the two-week treatment. At the end of the treatment lymphocyte CA frequency dropped significantly, and the number of apoptotic cells increased. The inverse lymphocyte-to-granulocyte ratio at the beginning of the study changed to normal at its end. In conclusion, biological effects observed after administration of Echinacea purpurea preparation suggest that it may be beneficial for the prevention of adverse health effects in workers exposed to ionising radiation.

  5. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Effect of double-leg semi-squats with hip adduction on the vastus medialis oblique of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome%双足半蹲伴髋内收对髌股疼痛综合征股内斜肌的强化作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪萍; 王楚怀; 潘翠环

    2014-01-01

    目的 采用表面肌电图(sEMG)评估髌股疼痛综合征(PFPS)患者的股四头肌失衡程度,观察PFPS患者各种表面肌电的特征及变化规律,并探讨髋内收对股内斜肌的针对性强化作用机制.方法 将PFPS患者60例按随机数字表法分为病例组和对照组,每组患者30例,分别在双足半蹲伴或不伴髋内收动作时检测股外侧肌(VL)及股内斜肌(VMO)表面肌电图,分析股内、外侧肌时域指标,比较其平衡关系.结果 双足半蹲不伴髋内收动作时,病例组VL的均方根振幅(RMS)和积分肌电值(IEMG)分别为(103.31±44.54) μV和(8.02±3.45) μVs,分别与组内VMO RMS的(85.02 ±41.19) μV和IEMG的(6.72±3.20) μVs比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).病例组不伴髋内收时VMO的RMS、IEMG与组内伴髋内收时VMO的RMS、IEMG比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 双足半蹲伴髋内收的动作可以优先强化VMO,使VL与VMO之间达到更好的平衡状态.%Objective To investigate the possible effect of performing double-leg semi-squats with hip adduction on the imbalance between vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis oblique (VMO) muscles of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS).Methods Thirty patients with PFPS were selected to be in the study group,matched with 30 healthy subjects who were enrolled as the control group.Electromyography was used to record VL and VMO activities while the subjects performed double-leg semi-squats (DSs) and double-leg semi-squats with hip adduction (DSs-HA).Results In the study group,when performing DSs,the average RMS was (103.31 ± 44.54) μV and the IEMG was (8.02 ±3.45) μVs for VL.For VMO the RMS was (85.02 ±41.19) μV and the IEMG was (6.72 ±3.20) μVs.The differences in the time domain indexes (RMS,IEMG) between VL and VMO were both significant during DSs (P < 0.05).There was no significant differences during DSs-HA (P > 0.05).The time domain indexes (RMS,IEMG) of VMO were significantly

  7. Effect of Organic Loading on Rotating Biological Contactor Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kossay K. Al-Ahmady

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic loading (weight per unit time per volume is useful for the design of rotating biological contactors (RBC and for comparison with the other processes such as activated sludge or oxidation ponds. The present study puts emphasis on the significance of this control or design parameter because it allows direct comparison of the RBC system's performance when operated under various circumstances and with different kinds of wastewater. The results of the paper proved that, the COD removal in rotating biological contactor systems is a function of the organic loading rate. However, each of the wastewater concentration and flow rate are also influence on the system efficiency but theirs impact can be combined by the effect of organic loading. The majority of COD removal (40-85 % of the total removal depending on the organic loading applied occurs in the first stages of the system. There is a strong correlation between the organic loading and the concentration of the suspended solids in the rotating biological contactor basin. At higher loadings higher concentrations noted. At a loading of about, (24 g/m2.d suspended solids were 225, 125, 35, and 25 mg/L in the first, second, third and, the fourth stage respectively. To achieve an effluent quality of (BOD < 25 mg/L, COD < 60 mg/L, the system must be operated on organic loadings of about (22 gBOD/m2.d and 65 gCOD/m2.d respectively. For nitrification process, the system must be designed to operate at organic loading of about (10 g/m2.d or less and, the reactor or basin volume should be designed to achieve a hydraulic loading of about (40 L/m2.d or less.

  8. Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood, Maternal Fruit-and-Vegetable Consumption, and Birth Weight in a European Mother–Child Study (NewGeneris)

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Marie; Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W.; Wright, John; von Stedingk, Hans; Törnqvist, Margareta; Sunyer, Jordi; Nielsen, Jeanette K.; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Mendez, Michelle A.; Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Lukacs, Viktoria; Landström, Anette; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kovacs, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tobacco-smoke, airborne, and dietary exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with reduced prenatal growth. Evidence from biomarker-based studies of low-exposed populations is limited. Bulky DNA adducts in cord blood reflect the prenatal effective dose to several genotoxic agents including PAHs. Objectives: We estimated the association between bulky DNA adduct levels and birth weight in a multicenter study and examined modification of this associat...

  9. Detection of adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2010-01-01

    There have been many attempts in the past to determine whether significant levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts form in cells and contribute to the anticancer activity of this agent. Supraclincal drug levels have been required to study drug-DNA adducts because of the lack of sensitivity associated with many of the techniques employed, including liquid scintillation counting of radiolabeled drug. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has provided the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adduct formation in cells at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection (compared to liquid scintillation counting) and has revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. The rigorous protocol required for this approach, together with many notes on the precautions and procedures required in order to ensure that absolute levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts can be determined with good reproducibility, is outlined in this chapter.

  10. Adduction of untested derived stimulus relations depends on environmental complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippy, Sterling M; Doughty, Adam H

    2017-10-01

    The present research assessed adduction involving derived stimulus relations as a function of environmental complexity. In Group CA, four college students were trained with arbitrary-matching-to-sample discriminations that could have established four, 3-member stimulus classes. In Group EA, four other students were trained with discriminations that could have established four, 5-member classes. Neither group received derived-relations testing; instead, adduction was assessed immediately after the baseline discriminations were learned. The adduction assessment required participants to derive the untested CA (Group CA) or EA (Group EA) equivalence relations and combine them with their already learned math skills. All participants in Group CA showed above 90% accuracy during the adduction assessment, whereas only one of four Group EA participants responded in that manner. These results extend adduction to untested equivalence relations and clarify the environmental conditions under which such adduction is less likely to occur (i.e., with larger relational networks). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adduct ion-targeted qualitative and quantitative analysis of polyoxypregnanes by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Jiang; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2017-10-25

    Polyoxypregnane and its glycosides (POPs) are frequently present in plants of Asclepiadaceae family, and have a variety of biological activities. There is a great need to comprehensively profile these phytochemicals and to quantify them for monitoring their contents in the herbs and the biological samples. However, POPs undergo extensive adduct ion formation in ESI-MS, which has posed a challenge for qualitative and quantitative analysis of POPs. In the present study, we took the advantage of such extensive adduct ion formation to investigate the suitability of adduct ion-targeted analysis of POPs. For the qualitative analysis, we firstly demonstrated that the sodium and ammonium adduct ion-targeted product ion scans (PIS) provided adequate MS/MS fragmentations for structural characterization of POPs. Aided with precursor ion (PI) scans, which showed high selectivity and sensitivity and improved peak assignment confidence in conjunction with full scan (FS), the informative adduct ion-targeted PIS enabled rapid POPs profiling. For the quantification, we used formic acid rather than ammonium acetate as an additive in the mobile phase to avoid simultaneous formation of sodium and ammonium adduct ions, and greatly improved reproducibility of MS response of POPs. By monitoring the solely formed sodium adduct ions [M+Na](+), a method for simultaneous quantification of 25 POPs in the dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mode was then developed and validated. Finally, the aforementioned methods were applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of POPs in the extract of a traditional Chinses medicinal herb, Marsdenia tenacissima (Roxb.) Wight et Arn., and in the plasma obtained from the rats treated with this herb. The results demonstrated that adduct ion formation could be optimized for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of POPs, and our developed PI/FS-PIS scanning and sole [M+Na](+) ion monitoring significantly improved the analysis of POPs in both herbal and

  12. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li(+)-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen; He, Liang-Nian

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs) and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li(+) and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well as the CO2 capacity of the chelated ILs obtained were investigated. For example, the CO2 capacity of PEG150MeBu2N increased steadily from 0.10 to 0.66 (mol CO2 absorbed per mol of base) through the formation of zwitterionic adducts being stabilized by Li(+).

  13. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal: Metabolic Insights and Salinity Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welles, L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a biological process for efficient phosphate removal from wastewaters through intracellular storage of polyphosphate by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and subsequent removal of PAO from the system through wastage of sludge. In comparison

  14. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    magnetic field may cause different biological effects at the cellular, tissue and organ levels. They may be functionally related to systems that regulate plant metabolism including the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis. However, our understanding of very complex fundamental mechanisms and sites of interactions between weak magnetic fields and biological systems is still incomplete and still deserve strong research efforts.

  15. [DIRECTIONALITY OF THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, K K; Karasev, A K; Marasanov, A V; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V

    2015-01-01

    There have been performed the studies of the dimensional parameters of peroxide associates in drinking water, per- forming regulatory functions in cellular metabolism, that determine the character of the biological response of the human body to drinking water The direction of action of peroxide associates type Σ [(HO2-(*) ... OH-(*) (H2O) tp)]q, (where (H2O) tp is an associate with the tetragonal structure (Walrafen pentamer Is ice VI), q is the degree of association p--parameter of ion coordination) on the cellular structures of the organism is associated with their quantum properties, determining the macroscopic parameters of the electron wave packets. Research has confirmed the addressness of the nonlocal entering electron to certain cellular structures of the body, which is determined by the structural similarity of centers of condensation of electrons in the cells of systems and organs of the body with the parameters of the electron wave packets in the associates. Methodology for the estimation of the orientation of biological effect of the drinking water to the systems of the body on the base of the analysis of variations in heart rhythm under non-contact influence of water on the human body and its relationship with the dimensional parameters and peroxide activity of associates in drinking water can be suggested for the implementation of screening tests for drinking water quality, taking into account both the individualfeatures of responses of body systems to drinking water and its group action.

  16. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Biological particle mixing (bioturbation and solute transfer (bio-irrigation contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator and Abra alba (bioturbator compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1 microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2 microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3 control microcosms and (4 microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13C of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2, which included TO(13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food

  17. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  18. Effect of Computer Animations Upon Student's Achievement of Biology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YAKIŞAN

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The prime purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of computer animation supported biology education upon students’ academic achievement. The study was participated by 97 pre service teachers studying in the first year of university. The data were collected by “Cell Achievement Test” There were control and experimental groups formed and the experimental group was taught with computer animations related with diffusion, osmosis, active transport, protein synthesis, mitosis and meiosis phenomena taking place in cell while the control group was taught with traditional method based on question and answer process. The data obtained were evaluated by t- test and represented by tables and graphs. The results of the study indicated significant differences between the academic achievements of control and experimental groups. The difference is in the favor of the experimental group which revealed the fact the computer animations caused a significant increase in the academic achievements of the students.

  19. Investigation on inhibition of biological effects of endothelin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田青; 赵东; 张继峰; 高连如; 刘胜昔; 杨军; 苏静怡; 张肇康; 汤健; 唐朝枢

    1996-01-01

    The effects of a series of substances on the biological function of endothelin (ET) are reported. The substances used are: synthetic inhibitors of endothelium derived relaxing factors (EDRFs), inhibitor of big-endothelin converting enzyme phosphoramidon, antiserum of endothelin, antagonists of endothelin A receptor BQ123 and JKC301, and two Chinese anti-snake venom herb medicines Lobelia radians Thumb and Taris polyphylla Smith var. chinensis (Franch) Hara. The results showed that inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO) could stimulate ET release from vascular endothelium, elevate plasma ET and increase blood pressure. These changes could be reversed by L-arginine (L-Arg), the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The amount of ET released by arterial endothelium could be increased or inhibited by inhibiting or stimulating the synthesis of prostacyclin (PGI2). The plasma ET level and blood pressure in both SHR and WKY rats could be decreased by giving phosphoramidon (PhR). The above results i

  20. Biological Effects on Fruit Fly by N+ ion Beam Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mutation induced by low energy ion beam implantation has beenapplied widely both in plants and microbes. However, due to the vacuum limitation, such ion implantation into animals was never studied except for silkworm. In this study, Pupae of fruit fly were irradiated with different dosage N+ ions at energy 20 KeV to study the biological effect of ion beam on animal. The results showed a saddle-like curve exists between incubate rate and dosage. Damage of pupae by ion beam implantation was observed using scanning electron microscope. Some individuals with incomplete wing were obtained after implantation but no similar character was observed in their offspring. Furthermore, about 5.47% mutants with wide variation appeared in M1 generation. Therefore, ion beam implantation could be widely used for mutation breeding.

  1. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: a software solution

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Marcovici, Celine Lantieri

    2013-01-01

    The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding the delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. We therefore propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to the equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers.

  2. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m=2-10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=8, 10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m>8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes.

  3. Behavioural biology: an effective and relevant conservation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Richard

    2007-08-01

    'Conservation behaviour' is a young discipline that investigates how proximate and ultimate aspects of the behaviour of an animal can be of value in preventing the loss of biodiversity. Rumours of its demise are unfounded. Conservation behaviour is quickly building a capacity to positively influence environmental decision making. The theoretical framework used by animal behaviourists is uniquely valuable to elucidating integrative solutions to human-wildlife conflicts, efforts to reintroduce endangered species and reducing the deleterious effects of ecotourism. Conservation behaviourists must join with other scientists under the multidisciplinary umbrella of conservation biology without giving up on their focus: the mechanisms, development, function and evolutionary history of individual differences in behaviour. Conservation behaviour is an increasingly relevant tool in the preservation of nature.

  4. [The biological effect of fireproof ceramic fibers--literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnow, A

    1996-01-01

    The work presents reports, selected from the world literature, on the studies of biological effect of refractory ceramic fibres, carried out on experimental animals. The discrepancy between the results of studies performed may originate from differences in the distribution of fibre sizes or the durability of fibres in the organism and their surface properties which, in turn, depend on the chemical composition of fibres. In all studies discussed, ceramic fibres generally activated macrophages and they were characterised by a moderate fibrotic activity. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumor (mesothelioma) observed in several very important experimental studies may suggest that some types of refractory ceramic fibres show a similar carcinogenic potential to that of natural asbestos: crocidolite or chrysotile.

  5. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide-Amide: Indolicidin on Biological Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gergely Végh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolicidin, a cationic antimicrobial tridecapeptide amide, is rich in proline and tryptophan residues. Its biological activity is intensively studied, but the details how indolicidin interacts with membranes are not fully understood yet. We report here an in situ atomic force microscopic study describing the effect of indolicidin on an artificial supported planar bilayer membrane of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC and on purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. Concentration dependent interaction of the peptide and membranes was found in case of DPPC resulting the destruction of the membrane. Purple membrane was much more resistant against indolicidin, probably due to its high protein content. Indolicidin preferred the border of membrane disks, where the lipids are more accessible. These data suggest that the atomic force microscope is a powerful tool in the study of indolicidin-membrane interaction.

  6. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  7. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  8. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  9. A mitomycin-N6-deoxyadenosine adduct isolated from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palom, Y; Lipman, R; Musser, S M; Tomasz, M

    1998-03-01

    A minor N6-deoxyadenosine adduct of mitomycin C (MC) was isolated from synthetic oligonucleotides and calf thymus DNA, representing the first adduct of MC and a DNA base other than guanine. The structure of the adduct (8) was elucidated using submilligram quantities of total available material. UV difference spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and electrospray mass spectroscopy as well as chemical transformations were utilized in deriving the structure of 8. A series of synthetic oligonucleotides was designed to probe the specificities of the alkylation of adenine by MC. The nature and frequency of the oligonucleotide-MC adducts formed under conditions of reductive activation of MC were determined by their enzymatic digestion to the nucleoside level followed by quantitative analysis of the products by HPLC. The analyses indicated the following: (i) (A)n sequence is favored over (AT)n for adduct formation; (ii) the alkylation favors the duplex structure; (iii) at adenine sites only monofunctional alkylation occurs; (iv) the adenine-to-alkylation frequency in the model oligonucleotides was 0.3-0.6 relative to guanine alkylation at the 5'-ApG sequence but only 0.02-0.1 relative to guanine alkylation at 5'-CpG. The 5'-phosphodiester linkage of the MC-adenine adduct is resistant to snake venom diesterase. The overall ratio of adenine to guanine alkylation in calf thymus DNA was 0.03, indicating that 8 is a minor MC-DNA adduct relative to MC-DNA adducts at guanine residues in the present experimental residues in the present experimental system. However, the HPLC elution time of 8 coincides with that of a major, unknown MC adduct detected previously in mouse mammary tumor cells treated with radiolabeled MC [Bizanek, R., Chowdary, D., Arai, H., Kasai, M., Hughes, C. S., Sartorelli, A. C., Rockwell, S., and Tomasz, M. (1993) Cancer Res. 53, 5127-5134]. Thus, 8 may be identical or closely related to this major adduct formed in vivo. This possibility can now be tested by

  10. Effect of a biological activated carbon filter on particle counts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-hua WU; Bing-zhi DONG; Tie-jun QIAO; Jin-song ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Due to the importance of biological safety in drinking water quality and the disadvantages which exist in traditional methods of detecting typical microorganisms such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia,it is necessary to develop an alternative.Particle counts is a qualitative measurement of the amount of dissolved solids in water.The removal rate of particle counts was previously used as an indicator of the effectiveness of a biological activated carbon(BAC)filter in removing Cryptosporidium and Giardia.The particle counts in a BAC filter effluent over one operational period and the effects of BAC filter construction and operational parameters were investigated with a 10 m3/h pilot plant.The results indicated that the maximum particle count in backwash remnant water was as high as 1296 count/ml and it needed about 1.5 h to reduce from the maximum to less than 50 count/ml.During the standard filtration period,particle counts stay constant at less than 50 count/ml for 5 d except when influ-enced by sand filter backwash remnant water.The removal rates of particle counts in the BAC filter are related to characteristics of the carbon.For example,a columned carbon and a sand bed removed 33.3% and 8.5% of particles,respectively,while the particle counts in effluent from a cracked BAC filter was higher than that of the influent.There is no significant difference among particle removal rates with different filtration rates.High post-ozone dosage(>2 mg/L)plays an important role in particle count removal;when the dosage was 3 mg/L,the removal rates by carbon layers and sand beds decreased by 17.5% and increased by 9.5%,respectively,compared with a 2 mg/L dosage.

  11. TLC surface integrity affects the detection of alkali adduct ions in TLC-MALDI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Ferrazza, Ruggero; Anesi, Andrea; Guella, Graziano; Franceschi, Pietro

    2017-07-20

    Direct coupling of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allows fast and detailed characterization of a large variety of analytes. The use of this technique, however, presents great challenges in semiquantitative applications because of the complex phenomena occurring at the TLC surface. In our laboratory, we recently observed that the ion intensities of several alkali adduct ions were significantly different between the top and interior layer of the TLC plate. This indicates that the integrity of the TLC surface can have an important effect on the reproducibility of TLC- MALDI analyses. Graphical Abstract MALDI imaging reveals that surface integrity affects the detection of alkali adductions in TLC-MALDI.

  12. The effect of air supply on nitrogen removal using a biological filter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of air supply on nitrogen removal using a biological filter proposed for ventilated pit latrines. ... In this research the nitrogen was removed in a biological filter using a combination of nitrification and denitrification ... Article Metrics.

  13. DNA Polymerases η and ζ Combine to Bypass O(2)-[4-(3-Pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl]thymine, a DNA Adduct Formed from Tobacco Carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, A S Prakasha; Spratt, Thomas E

    2016-03-21

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are important human carcinogens in tobacco products. They are metabolized to produce a variety 4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl (POB) DNA adducts including O(2)-[4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobut-1-yl]thymidine (O(2)-POB-dT), the most abundant POB adduct in NNK- and NNN-treated rodents. To evaluate the mutagenic properties of O(2)-POB-dT, we measured the rate of insertion of dNTPs opposite and extension past O(2)-POB-dT and O(2)-Me-dT by purified human DNA polymerases η, κ, ι, and yeast polymerase ζ in vitro. Under conditions of polymerase in excess, polymerase η was most effective at the insertion of dNTPs opposite O(2)-alkyl-dTs. The time courses were biphasic suggesting the formation of inactive DNA-polymerase complexes. The kpol parameter was reduced approximately 100-fold in the presence of the adduct for pol η, κ, and ι. Pol η was the most reactive polymerase for the adducts due to a higher burst amplitude. For all three polymerases, the nucleotide preference was dATP > dTTP ≫ dGTP and dCTP. Yeast pol ζ was most effective in bypassing the adducts; the kcat/Km values were reduced only 3-fold in the presence of the adducts. The identity of the nucleotide opposite the O(2)-alkyl-dT did not significantly affect the ability of pol ζ to bypass the adducts. The data support a model in which pol η inserts ATP or dTTP opposite O(2)-POB-dT, and then, pol ζ extends past the adduct.

  14. Simultaneous Screening of Glutathione and Cyanide Adducts Using Precursor Ion and Neutral Loss Scans-Dependent Product Ion Spectral Acquisition and Data Mining Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenying; Liu, Hua-Fen; Zhao, Weiping; Jones, Elliott; Zhu, Mingshe

    2012-05-01

    Drugs can be metabolically activated to soft and hard electrophiles, which are readily trapped by glutathione (GSH) and cyanide (CN), respectively. These adducts are often detected and structurally characterized using separate tandem mass spectrometry methods. We describe a new method for simultaneous screening of GSH and CN adducts using precursor ion (PI) and neutral loss (NL) scans-dependent product ion spectral acquisition and data mining tools on an triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry. GSH, potassium cyanide, and their stable isotope labeled analogues were incubated with liver microsomes and a test compound. Negative PI scan of m/z 272 for detection of GSH adducts and positive NL scans of 27 and 29 Da for detection of CN adducts were conducted as survey scans to trigger acquisition of enhanced resolution (ER) spectrum and subsequent enhanced product ion (EPI) spectrum. Post-acquisition data mining of EPI data set using NL filters of 129 and 27 Da was then performed to reveal the GSH adducts and CN adducts, respectively. Isotope patterns and EPI spectra of the detected adducts were utilized for identification of their molecular weights and structures. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated by analyzing reactive metabolites of nefazodone formed from rat liver microsomes. In addition to known GSH- and CN-trapped reactive metabolites, several new CN adducts of nefazodone were identified. The results suggested that current approach is highly effective in the analysis of both soft and hard reactive metabolites and can be used as a high-throughput method in drug discovery.

  15. Using cyclodextrins to encapsulate oxygen-centered and carbon-centered radical adducts: the case of DMPO, PBN, and MNP spin traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spulber, Mariana; Schlick, Shulamith

    2010-06-03

    We present electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments that describe the interaction of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with spin adducts of three spin traps: 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN), and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). The focus was on spin adducts of oxygen-centered radicals trapped by DMPO and PBN and on carbon-centered radical adducts trapped by MNP. The radicals were generated by reaction with hydroxyl radicals and the spin adducts studied were DMPO/OH and PBN/OH, MNP/CH(2)COOH generated in CH(3)COOH, and MNP/CF(2)COOH in CF(2)HCOOH. Di-tert-butyl nitroxide ((CH(3))(3)C)(2)NO (DTBN) was also detected in experiments with MNP as the spin trap. A range of interactions of the spin adducts and DTBN with beta-CD was identified. The presence of beta-CD led to significant stabilization of DMPO/OH and PBN/OH but to a negligible effect on the (14)N hyperfine splitting of the adducts, a(N), indicating that the N-O group is outside the beta-CD cavity. An increase of a(N) was detected for DTBN and MNP/CH(2)COOH in CH(3)COOH in the presence of beta-CD, a result we assigned to bonding at the rim of the host. Experiments with methylated beta-CD (Me beta-CD) provided support for this conclusion. A different type of complexation was detected for DTBN and MNP/CF(2)COOH in CF(2)HCOOH: for specific host concentrations both "in" and "out" species were detected. We suggest that the hydrophobicity of the fluorinated adduct leads to insertion of the adduct inside the host cavity. Calculation of the association constant K(a) indicated the competition between DTBN and the adduct for inclusion in the host. For MNP as spin trap, the two nitroxide radicals (adduct and DTBN) have the same type of interaction with the host: at the rim in acetic acid, and inside the host cavity in CF(2)HCOOH. Experiments with DTBN in the absence of the spin trap and of adducts illuminated the effect of the local polarity and of the pH on the hyperfine

  16. 石蜡疗法配合作业疗法对痉挛型脑瘫患儿拇指内收的效果观察%Effects of Combination of Wax Therapy and Occupational Therapy on Spastic Cerebral Palsy with Thumb Adduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓庆先; 李晓捷; 李晓红; 汤敬华; 张士岭

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe effects of combination of wax therapy and occupational therapy on spastic cerebral palsy with thumb adduction. Methods 100 cases of children with spastic cerebral palsy were randomly divided into observation group(n= 50) and control group(n= 50). The observation group received occupational therapy and wax therapy, while the control group received only occupational therapy. The effect was compared between the two groups 3 months after treatment. Results The two groups improved significantly 3 months after treatment, while the observation group was better than the control group(P<0. 001). Conclusion Wax therapy combined with occupational therapy have better effects on thumb adduction in spastic cerebral palsy than simple occupational therapy.%目的观察石蜡疗法配合作业疗法治疗痉挛型脑瘫患儿拇指内收的效果.方法 100例痉挛型脑瘫患儿随机分为观察组(n=50)和对照组(n=50),观察组采用作业疗法及石蜡疗法;对照组仅接受作业疗法.治疗3个月后比较两组的疗效.结果治疗后两组患儿均有改善,但观察组显著优于对照组(P<0.001).结论石蜡疗法配合作业疗法可促进痉挛型脑瘫患儿拇指功能的恢复,效果优于单纯作业疗法.

  17. Lewis Acid-Base Adduct Approach for High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Kim, Hui-Seon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-02-16

    Since the first report on the long-term durable 9.7% solid-state perovskite solar cell employing methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3), mesoporous TiO2, and 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis[N,N-di(4-methoxyphenyl)amino]-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) in 2012, following the seed technologies on perovskite-sensitized liquid junction solar cells in 2009 and 2011, a surge of interest has been focused on perovskite solar cells due to superb photovoltaic performance and extremely facile fabrication processes. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells reached 21% in a very short period of time. Such an unprecedentedly high photovoltaic performance is due to the intrinsic optoelectronic property of organolead iodide perovskite material. Moreover, a high dielectric constant, sub-millimeter scale carrier diffusion length, an underlying ferroelectric property, and ion migration behavior can make organolead halide perovskites suitable for multifunctionality. Thus, besides solar cell applications, perovskite material has recently been applied to a variety fields of materials science such as photodetectors, light emitting diodes, lasing, X-ray imaging, resistive memory, and water splitting. Regardless of application areas, the growth of a well-defined perovskite layer with high crystallinity is essential for effective utilization of its excellent physicochemical properties. Therefore, an effective methodology for preparation of high quality perovskite layers is required. In this Account, an effective methodology for production of high quality perovskite layers is described, which is the Lewis acid-base adduct approach. In the solution process to form the perovskite layer, the key chemicals of CH3NH3I (or HC(NH2)2I) and PbI2 are used by dissolving them in polar aprotic solvents. Since polar aprotic solvents bear oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen, they can act as a Lewis base. In addition, the main group compound PbI2 is known to be a Lewis acid. Thus, PbI2 has a chance

  18. Benzene-derived N2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-deoxyguanosine adduct: UvrABC incision and its conformation in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, Bo; Rodriguez, Ben; Yang, Yanu; Guliaev, Anton B.; Chenna, Ahmed

    2010-06-14

    Benzene, a ubiquitous human carcinogen, forms DNA adducts through its metabolites such as p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) and hydroquinone (HQ). N(2)-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-4-HOPh-dG) is the principal adduct identified in vivo by (32)P-postlabeling in cells or animals treated with p-BQ or HQ. To study its effect on repair specificity and replication fidelity, we recently synthesized defined oligonucleotides containing a site-specific adduct using phosphoramidite chemistry. We here report the repair of this adduct by Escherichia coli UvrABC complex, which performs the initial damage recognition and incision steps in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. We first showed that the p-BQ-treated plasmid was efficiently cleaved by the complex, indicating the formation of DNA lesions that are substrates for NER. Using a 40-mer substrate, we found that UvrABC incises the DNA strand containing N(2)-4-HOPh-dG in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The specificity of such repair was also compared with that of DNA glycosylases and damage-specific endonucleases of E. coli, both of which were found to have no detectable activity toward N(2)-4-HOPh-dG. To understand why this adduct is specifically recognized and processed by UvrABC, molecular modeling studies were performed. Analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories showed that stable G:C-like hydrogen bonding patterns of all three Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds are present within the N(2)-4-HOPh-G:C base pair, with the hydroxyphenyl ring at an almost planar position. In addition, N(2)-4-HOPh-dG has a tendency to form more stable stacking interactions than a normal G in B-type DNA. These conformational properties may be critical in differential recognition of this adduct by specific repair enzymes.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by benzo(a)pyrene ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schults, Marten A; Chiu, Roland K; Nagle, Peter W; Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification attenuates underlying relationships. Conversely, ex vivo studies offer the advantage of controlled exposure settings, allowing the possibility to better elucidate genotype-phenotype relationships and gene-gene interactions. Therefore, we exposed lymphocytes of 168 non-smoking volunteers ex vivo to the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and BaP-related DNA adducts were quantified. Thirty-four genetic polymorphisms were assessed in genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, oxidative stress and DNA repair. Polymorphisms in catalase (CAT, rs1001179) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1, rs1800440) were significantly associated with DNA adduct levels, especially when combined. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in a subset of 30 subjects revealed that expression of catalase correlated strongly with expression of CYP1B1 (R = 0.92, P CYP1B1 and how they simultaneously affect BaP-related DNA adduct levels, catalase expression was transiently knocked down in the human lung epithelial cell line A549. Although catalase knockdown did not immediately change CYP1B1 gene expression, recovery of catalase expression 8 h after the knockdown coincided with a 2.2-fold increased expression of CYP1B1 (P polymorphism in the promoter region of CAT may determine the amount and activity of catalase, which may subsequently regulate the expression of CYP1B1. As a result, both genetic polymorphisms modulate DNA adduct levels in lymphocytes by BaP ex vivo.

  20. Tissue distribution of DNA adducts and their persistence in blood of mice exposed to benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilan Li; Wang Chunguang; Songnian Yin [Institute of Occupational Medicine Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine, Beijing (China); Weidong Xin [Medical College of Qingdao, Shandong Province (China)

    1996-12-01

    Chemicals combine with DNA, resulting in DNA damage, which could initiate carcinogenesis. To study whether benzene or benzene metabolites bind to DNA, DNA adducts in various tissues and their persistence in leukocytes were examined using the {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay. LACA mice were dosed in with benzene at 500 mg/kg bw twice daily for 5 days. Two additional spots of DNA adducts are formed in bone marrow cells, liver cells, and peripheral blood compared with control mice. The relative adduct labeling values are 10.39, 11.32, and 13.77 adducts; x 10{sup -8} nucleotides in these tissues, respectively. DNA adducts in blood leukocytes were observed at 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days after exposure to benzene, but adduct levels decreased as a function of time. Relative adduct labeling of {open_quotes}adduct B{close_quotes} declined linearly but mildly, while {open_quotes}adduct C{close_quotes} displayed a stepwise decrease. The relative adduct labeling values of both these adducts at day 14 were 50% of those at day 1 after the last treatment. Both adducts were still detectable at day 21 after benzene exposure. These studies demonstrate that benzene could induce DNA adducts; in bone marrow, liver, and white blood cells of mice dosed with benzene and that measurement of adducts in white blood cells may be useful as a biomarker to predict carcinogenic risk of benzene to workers exposed to benzene. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Niluka M; Current, Kelley M; Obare, Sherine O

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism's ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 23483 transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells.

  2. The effect of green tea on radiation-induced late biological effect in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae June; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of Green tea on the late biological effect of mice irradiated with 3 Gy of gamma-radiation. There were various findings including hematopoietic and lymphoid tumor, lung cancer, ovarian cancer and cancer of other lesions. Further studies are needed to characterize better the protective nature of active compounds.

  3. Generation of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide hydroxyl and scavenger radical adducts from copper/H2O2 mixtures: effects of metal ion chelation and the search for high-valent metal-oxygen intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, M J; Tsang, S Y; Tam, S C; Bremner, I

    1995-10-20

    A metal-catalyzed nucleophilic addition mechanism for the formation of radical adducts of the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) has been described recently (K. Makino, T. Hagiwara, A. Hagi, M. Nishi, and A. Murakami, 1990, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 172, 1073-1080; P. M. Hanna, W. Chamulitrat, and R. P. Mason, 1992, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 296, 640-644). In the present investigation, we have demonstrated that the recently reported inhibition of copper-dependent hydroxyl radical formation by the complexing agent 1,10-phenanthroline (OP), which appears to contradict the well-known chemical nuclease properties of CuI(OP)2, is an artifact resulting from an inhibition of the nucleophilic addition of water to DMPO by OP (A. C. Mello-Filho and R. Meneghini, 1991, Mutat. Res. 251, 109-113). Copper bound to OP was found to be a good catalyst of hydroxyl radical formation: the CuII(OP)2 complex can be reduced by H2O2 and the CuI(OP)2 generated reacts with the peroxide to form .OH. In contrast, no evidence could be obtained for oxidant formation from the CuII(aq)/H2O2 reaction system, despite the detection of a prominent signal from the DMPO hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO/.OH) (the formation of which was due solely to the nucleophilic addition of water to DMPO). The failure to generate an oxidant in this reaction mixture was attributed to the failure of hydrogen peroxide to reduce CuII(aq), as hydroxyl radical formation did occur when CuI(aq) was added directly to H2O2. However, in order to account for the high concentration of alpha-hydroxyethanol radicals detected when ethanol was included in the CuI(aq)/H2O2 reaction, the possibility that an oxidant in addition to .OH (e.g., CuO+) is generated is discussed.

  4. Creating context for the use of DNA adduct data in cancer risk assessment: I. Proposed framework for data organization *

    Science.gov (United States)

    The assessment of human cancer risk from chemical exposure requires the integration of diverse types of data. Such data involve effects at the cell and tissue levels. This report focuses on the specific utility of one type of data, namely DNA adducts. Emphasis is placed on the ap...

  5. New Scientific Pearl about Biologic Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Alamdaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of X-ray by Rontgen in 1895, it became evident that radiation can cause some somatic damage to tissues. The hazards of X-ray exposure were clearly known when many large hospitals had radiology departments. The greatest increased in knowledge about X-ray risks had accrued from the dropping of the two atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 and some other atomic accident. For example, among the Japanese bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there have been about 400 extra cancer deaths. These were the origin of radiology personnel and people fear from radiation exposure and resistant in against simple X-ray exam (radiophobia. However, new scientific data on the effects radiation on survivors, especially about biologic effect of ionizing rays, background radiation exposure, amount of endogenous radiation, hormosis phenomenon and comparison radiation risk with other risk over lifetime are still being continuously revised and risk estimates updated. Fundamentally, this risk is much"nlower than whatever already estimated and it is insignificant in diagnostic domain. Better perception of physician from these instances help to prevent of false radiophobia and to make proper use of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages of ionizing beam.

  6. Effect of Sedimentation on Treated Greywater Through Rotating Biological Contactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaque Ahmed Pathan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study the effect of sedimentation on effluent of a pilot scale Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC. The treated greywater was given three hours sedimentation period and samples were analyzed to observe the effect of sedimentations under variousflow rates. Greywater was separated from the black water and collected in the collection tank and then it was pumped to an overhead tank. This tank supplied a regulated continuous flow of greywater into the RBC chamber at the required flow rate ranging between 0.28 to 1.89 l/min. A pilot scale RBC simulator was developed and placed outside a hall of residence at National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, Sindh University, Jamshoro. The simulator was operated at the rotational speed of discs of 1.7 rpm. The disks were uneven and textured so as to encourage growth of bacteria on them. These discs were immersed about 40 percent in the greywater.The simulator produced effluent of significant quality and was found efficient in removal of BOD5, COD and TSS as 85%, 68% and 95% respectively.

  7. [Effects of decitabine on biological behavior of U266 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Fang; Yang, Lin-Hua; Dong, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Rui-Juan; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Guo, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Jian-Fang; Zhagn, Li; Feng, Da-Wei

    2011-08-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effects of decitabine on the biological behaviour of U266 cells in vitro so as to provide a new thinking and experiment basis, as well as new evidences for the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. MTT and colony formation assays were used to evaluate the impact of decitabine on the ability of proliferation of U266 cells; flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell distribution in cell cycle; transwell chamber and matrigel assays were used to observe the ability of migration and invasion. The results indicated that decitabine could significantly suppress the proliferation of U266 cells in time-and dose-dependent manners. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the cells in G(0)-G(1) phase significantly increased while the cells in S and G(2)/M phase decreased. The migration and matrigel invading tests showed that the number of cells moving into under chamber of transwell decreased after U266 cells treated with decitabine. It is concluded that decitabine may act as an effective drug for MM by inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion ability, and the specific mechanism needs to be deeply explored.

  8. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother-newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marie; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Autrup, Herman; Brouwer, Abraham; Besselink, Harrie; Loft, Steffen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2012-06-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet was estimated on the basis of maternal food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed by the end of pregnancy. Biomarkers were detected in paired blood samples through the dioxin-responsive chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX)(®) bioassay, (32)P-postlabelling technique and cytokinesis-block MN assay. Maternal preference for meats with dark surface were significantly associated with higher bulky DNA adducts in both maternal (β 95%CI; 0.46 (0.08, 0.84)) and cord blood (β 95%CI; 0.46 (0.05, 0.86)) before and after adjustment for potential confounders. No other significant associations between the 18 dietary variables and the biomarkers measured in maternal and fetal samples were identified. The present study suggests that maternal intake of meats with dark surface contributes to the bulky DNA adduct levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. Relationship between food preparation and bulky DNA adducts appear to be captured by a FFQ while potential associations for other biomarkers might be more complex or need larger sample size.

  9. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother-newborns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Marie, E-mail: mpedersen@creal.cat [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Halldorsson, Thorhallur I., E-mail: lur@ssi.dk [Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland Reykjavik (Iceland); Center for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Autrup, Herman, E-mail: ha@mil.au.dk [School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Brouwer, Abraham, E-mail: Bram.Brouwer@bds.nl [BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Besselink, Harrie, E-mail: Harrie.Besselink@bds.nl [BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Loft, Steffen, E-mail: stl@sund.ku.dk [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Knudsen, Lisbeth E., E-mail: liek@sund.ku.dk [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2012-06-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet was estimated on the basis of maternal food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed by the end of pregnancy. Biomarkers were detected in paired blood samples through the dioxin-responsive chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX){sup Registered-Sign} bioassay, {sup 32}P-postlabelling technique and cytokinesis-block MN assay. Maternal preference for meats with dark surface were significantly associated with higher bulky DNA adducts in both maternal ({beta} 95%CI; 0.46 (0.08, 0.84)) and cord blood ({beta} 95%CI; 0.46 (0.05, 0.86)) before and after adjustment for potential confounders. No other significant associations between the 18 dietary variables and the biomarkers measured in maternal and fetal samples were identified. The present study suggests that maternal intake of meats with dark surface contributes to the bulky DNA adduct levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. Relationship between food preparation and bulky DNA adducts appear to be captured by a FFQ while potential associations for other biomarkers might be more complex or need larger sample size.

  10. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (poccupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different critical life stages.

  11. Protein adducts of the prostate carcinogen PhIP in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-02-20

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. few epidemiology studies have indicated that exposure to PhIP, a rodent prostate carcinogen formed in meat during cooking, may be an important risk factor for prostate cancer in humans. Therefore, a highly sensitive biomarker assay is urgently needed to clarify the role of PhIP in prostate cancer. The goal of this project is to develop an assay that can be used to more accurately quantify human exposure to PhIP and potential prostate cancer risk. Our hypothesis is that an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry-based method can be developed to measure protein adducts of PhIP in the blood of humans. This will provide a measure of the internal dose, as well as the capacity for carcinogen bioactivation to a form that can initiate the cancer process. Towards this goal, we have characterized an adduct formed by PhIP in vitro with the amino acid cysteine. This adduct should provide a biomarker of dietary PhIP exposure and potential prostate cancer risk that could be used to identify individuals for prevention and for monitoring the effect chemoprevention strategies.

  12. Molecular structures of five adducts assembled from p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde and organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Lanqing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Li; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Daqi; Li, Minghui; Guo, Jianzhong; Guo, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Five adducts 1-5 derived from p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde have been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the five adducts two are organic salts (1, and 2) and the other three (3-5) are cocrystals. In salts 1, and 2, the L molecules are protonated. The supramolecular architectures of the adducts 1-5 involve extensive intermolecular N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯S, and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds as well as other non-covalent interactions. The role of weak and strong non-covalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. The complexes displayed 2D/3D framework structure for the synergistic effect of the various non-covalent interactions. The results presented herein tell that the strength and directionality of the N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯S hydrogen bonds between organic acids and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary cocrystals or organic salts.

  13. A three-dimensional model of vocal fold abduction/adduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Eric J.; Titze, Ingo R.; Alipour, Fariborz

    2004-04-01

    A three-dimensional biomechanical model of tissue deformation was developed to simulate dynamic vocal fold abduction and adduction. The model was made of 1721 nearly incompressible finite elements. The cricoarytenoid joint was modeled as a rocking-sliding motion, similar to two concentric cylinders. The vocal ligament and the thyroarytenoid muscle's fiber characteristics were implemented as a fiber-gel composite made of an isotropic ground substance imbedded with fibers. These fibers had contractile and/or passive nonlinear stress-strain characteristics. The verification of the model was made by comparing the range and speed of motion to published vocal fold kinematic data. The model simulated abduction to a maximum glottal angle of about 31°. Using the posterior-cricoarytenoid muscle, the model produced an angular abduction speed of 405° per second. The system mechanics seemed to favor abduction over adduction in both peak speed and response time, even when all intrinsic muscle properties were kept identical. The model also verified the notion that the vocalis and muscularis portions of the thyroarytenoid muscle play significantly different roles in posturing, with the muscularis portion having the larger effect on arytenoid movement. Other insights into the mechanisms of abduction/adduction were given.

  14. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  15. Glutathione Adduct Patterns of Michael-Acceptor Carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawik, Christian; Rickmeyer, Christiane; Brehm, Martin; Böhme, Alexander; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2017-02-22

    Glutathione (GSH) has so far been considered to facilitate detoxification of soft organic electrophiles through covalent binding at its cysteine (Cys) thiol group, followed by stepwise catalyzed degradation and eventual elimination along the mercapturic acid pathway. Here we show that in contrast to expectation from HSAB theory, Michael-acceptor ketones, aldehydes and esters may form also single, double and triple adducts with GSH involving β-carbon attack at the much harder N-terminus of the γ-glutamyl (Glu) unit of GSH. In particular, formation of the GSH-N single adduct contradicts the traditional view that S alkylation always forms the initial reaction of GSH with Michael-acceptor carbonyls. To this end, chemoassay analyses of the adduct formation of GSH with nine α,β-unsaturated carbonyls employing high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry have been performed. Besides enriching the GSH adductome and potential biomarker applications, electrophilic N-terminus functio-nalization is likely to impair GSH homeostasis substantially through blocking the γ-glutamyl transferase catalysis of the first breakdown step of modified GSH, and thus its timely reconstitution. The discussion includes a comparison with cyclic adducts of GSH and furan metabolites as reported in literature, and quantum chemically calculated thermodynamics of hard-hard, hard-soft and soft-soft adducts.

  16. Organocatalytic removal of formaldehyde adducts from RNA and DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Harcourt, Emily M.; Hewings, David S.; Lovejoy, Alexander F.; Kurtz, David M.; Ehrenschwender, Thomas; Barandun, Luzi J.; Roost, Caroline; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Kool, Eric T.

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde is universally used to fix tissue specimens, where it forms hemiaminal and aminal adducts with biomolecules, hindering the ability to retrieve molecular information. Common methods for removing these adducts involve extended heating, which can cause extensive degradation of nucleic acids, particularly RNA. Here, we show that water-soluble bifunctional catalysts (anthranilates and phosphanilates) speed the reversal of formaldehyde adducts of mononucleotides over standard buffers. Studies with formaldehyde-treated RNA oligonucleotides show that the catalysts enhance adduct removal, restoring unmodified RNA at 37 °C even when extensively modified, while avoiding the high temperatures that promote RNA degradation. Experiments with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cell samples show that the catalysis is compatible with common RNA extraction protocols, with detectable RNA yields increased by 1.5-2.4-fold using a catalyst under optimized conditions and by 7-25-fold compared with a commercial kit. Such catalytic strategies show promise for general use in reversing formaldehyde adducts in clinical specimens.

  17. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal: Metabolic Insights and Salinity Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welles, L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a biological process for efficient phosphate removal from wastewaters through intracellular storage of polyphosphate by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and subsequent removal of PAO from the system through wastage of sludge. In comparison t

  18. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  19. The effect of network biology on drug toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2013-01-01

    it with bioinformatics. With this approach, the assessment of chemical safety can be done across multiple scales of complexity from molecular to cellular and system levels in human health. Network biology can be used at several levels of complexity. Areas covered: This review describes the strengths and limitations......Introduction: The high failure rate of drug candidates due to toxicity, during clinical trials, is a critical issue in drug discovery. Network biology has become a promising approach, in this regard, using the increasingly large amount of biological and chemical data available and combining...... of network biology. The authors specifically assess this approach across different biological scales when it is applied to toxicity. Expert opinion: There has been much progress made with the amount of data that is generated by various omics technologies. With this large amount of useful data, network...

  20. Examining the Effect of Multiple Writing Tasks on Year 10 Biology Students' Understandings of Cell and Molecular Biology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian; Hohenshell, Liesl; Prain, Vaughan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the cumulative effects on students' learning of science, and perceptions of the role of writing in learning, when the students engaged in multiple writing tasks with planning strategy support. The study was conducted with Year 10 biology students who completed two consecutive units on Cells and Molecular…

  1. Cellulose based hybrid hydroxylated adducts for polyurethane foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pisapia, Laura; Verdolotti, Letizia; Di Mauro, Eduardo; Di Maio, Ernesto; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid flexible polyurethane foams (HPU) were synthesized by using a hybrid hydroxilated adduct (HHA) based on renewable resources. In particular the HHA was obtained by dispersing cellulose wastes in colloidal silica at room temperature, pressure and humidity. The colloidal silica was selected for its ability of modifying the cellulose structure, by inducing a certain "destructurization" of the crystalline phase, in order to allow cellulose to react with di-isocyanate for the final synthesis of the polyurethane foam. In fact, cellulose-polysilicate complexes are engaged in the reaction with the isocyanate groups. This study provides evidence of the effects of the colloidal silica on the cellulose structure, namely, a reduction of the microfiber cellulose diameter and the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polysilicate functional groups and the hydroxyl groups of the cellulose, as assessed by IR spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The HHA was added to a conventional polyol in different percentages (between 5 and 20%) to synthesize HPU in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The mixture was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Thermal analysis, optical microscopy and mechanical tests were performed on the foams. The results highlighted an improvement of thermal stability and a decrease of the cell size with respect neat polyurethane foam. Mechanical tests showed an improvement of the elastic modulus and of the damping properties with increasing HHA amount.

  2. 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts: Key mediator in Rett syndrome oxinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Carlo; Hayek, Joussef

    2017-01-05

    In the last 15 years a strong correlation between oxidative stress (OxS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder known to be caused in 95% of the cases, by a mutation in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene, has been well documented. Here, we revised, summarized and discussed the current knowledge on the role of lipid peroxidation byproducts, with special emphasis on 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE), in RTT pathophysiology. The posttranslational modifications of proteins via 4HNE, known as 4HNE protein adducts (4NHE-PAs), causing detrimental effects on protein functions, appear to contribute to the clinical severity of the syndrome, since their levels increase significantly during the subsequent 4 clinical stages, reaching the maximum degree at stage 4, represented by a late motor deterioration. In addition, 4HNE-PA are only partially removed due to the compromised functionality of the proteasome activity, contributing therefore to the cellular damage in RTT. All this will lead to a characteristic subclinical inflammation, defined "OxInflammation", derived by a positive feedback loop between OxS byproducts and inflammatory mediators that in a long run further aggravates the clinical features of RTT patients. Therefore, in a pathology completely orphan of any therapy, aiming 4HNE as a therapeutic target could represent a coadjuvant treatment with some beneficial impact in these patients.‬‬‬.

  3. Nanogold – Biological effects and occupational exposure levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanogold has different properties and biological activity compared to metallic gold. It can be applied in many fields, such as medicine, laboratory diagnostics and electronics. Studies on laboratory animals show that nanogold can be absorbed by inhalation and ingestion. It can penetrate deep into the epidermis and dermis, but there is no evidence that it is absorbed through the skin. Gold nanoobjects accumulate mainly in the liver and spleen, but they can also reach other internal organs. Nanogold can cross the blood–brain and blood–placenta barriers. Toxicokinetics of nanogold depends on the particle size, shape and surface charge. In animals exposure to gold nanoparticles via inhalation induces slight changes in the lungs. Exposure to nanogold by the oral route does not cause adverse health effects in rodents. In animals after injection of gold nanoobjects changes in the liver and lungs were observed. Nanogold induced genotoxic effects in cells, but not in animals. No adverse effects on the fetus or reproduction were found. There are no carcinogenicity studies on gold nanoparticles. The mechanism of toxicity may be related to the interaction of gold nanoobjects with proteins and DNA, and it leads to the induction of oxidative stress and genetic material damage. The impact of nanostructures on human health has not yet been fully understood. The person, who works with nanomaterials should exercise extreme caution and apply existing recommendations on the evaluation of nanoobjects exposure. The risk assessment should be the basis for taking appropriate measures to limit potential exposure to nanometals, including nanogold. Med Pr 2017;68(4:545–556

  4. Occurrence and Potential Biological Effects of Amphetamine on Stream Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sylvia S; Paspalof, Alexis M; Snow, Daniel D; Richmond, Erinn K; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kelly, John J

    2016-09-06

    The presence of pharmaceuticals, including illicit drugs in aquatic systems, is a topic of environmental significance because of their global occurrence and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health, but few studies have examined the ecological effects of illicit drugs. We conducted a survey of several drug residues, including the potentially illicit drug amphetamine, at 6 stream sites along an urban to rural gradient in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. We detected numerous drugs, including amphetamine (3 to 630 ng L(-1)), in all stream sites. We examined the fate and ecological effects of amphetamine on biofilm, seston, and aquatic insect communities in artificial streams exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration (1 μg L(-1)) of amphetamine. The amphetamine parent compound decreased in the artificial streams from less than 1 μg L(-1) on day 1 to 0.11 μg L(-1) on day 22. In artificial streams treated with amphetamine, there was up to 45% lower biofilm chlorophyll a per ash-free dry mass, 85% lower biofilm gross primary production, 24% greater seston ash-free dry mass, and 30% lower seston community respiration compared to control streams. Exposing streams to amphetamine also changed the composition of bacterial and diatom communities in biofilms at day 21 and increased cumulative dipteran emergence by 65% and 89% during the first and third weeks of the experiment, respectively. This study demonstrates that amphetamine and other biologically active drugs are present in urban streams and have the potential to affect both structure and function of stream communities.

  5. Determining environmental causes of biological effects: the need for a mechanistic physiological dimension in conservation biology

    OpenAIRE

    Seebacher, Frank; Craig E. Franklin

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of Conservation Physiology links environmental change and ecological success by the application of physiological theory, approaches and tools to elucidate and address conservation problems. Human activity has changed the natural environment to a point where the viability of many ecosystems is now under threat. There are already many descriptions of how changes in biological patterns are correlated with environmental changes. The next important step is to determine the causa...

  6. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  7. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  8. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  9. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  10. Chemical and biological oxidative effects of carbon black nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2006-11-01

    Several studies show that ultrafine particles have a larger surface area than coarse particles, thus causing a greater inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated chemical and biological oxidative effects of nanoparticles in vitro. Carbon black (CB) nanoparticles with mean aerodynamic diameters of 14, 56, and 95nm were examined. The innate oxidative capacity of the CB nanoparticles was measured by consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT) in cell-free system. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat alveolar type II epithelial cell line (SV40T2) and alveolar macrophages (AM) exposed to CB nanoparticles was measured by ELISA. DTT consumption of 14nm CB was higher than that of other CB nanoparticles having the same particle weight. However, DTT consumption was directly proportional to the particle surface area. HO-1 protein in SV40T2 cells was significantly increased by the 14nm and 56nm CB, however, 95nm CB did not affect. HO-1 protein in AM was significantly increased by the 14, 56, and 95nm CB. The increase in HO-1 expression was diminished by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment of each CB nanoparticles before exposure although the difference between the effects of NAC-treated and untreated 14nm CB did not achieve significant. In conclusion, CB nanoparticles have innate oxidative capacity that may be dependent on the surface area. CB nanoparticles can induce oxidative stress in alveolar epithelial cells and AM that is more prominent with smaller particles. The oxidative stress may, at least partially, be mediated by surface function of particles.

  11. Tea polyphenols, their biological effects and potential molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Milacic, V; Chen, M S; Wan, S B; Lam, W H; Huo, C; Landis-Piwowar, K R; Cui, Q C; Wali, A; Chan, T H; Dou, Q P

    2008-04-01

    Tea is the most popular beverage in the world, second only to water. Tea contains an infusion of the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, the most abundant of which is (-)-EGCG. Although tea has been consumed for centuries, it has only recently been studied extensively as a health-promoting beverage that may act to prevent a number of chronic diseases and cancers. The results of several investigations indicate that green tea consumption may be of modest benefit in reducing the plasma concentration of cholesterol and preventing atherosclerosis. Additionally, the cancer-preventive effects of green tea are widely supported by results from epidemiological, cell culture, animal and clinical studies. In vitro cell culture studies show that tea polyphenols potently induce apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells but not in their normal cell counterparts. Green tea polyphenols were shown to affect several biological pathways, including growth factor-mediated pathway, the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-dependent pathway, and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathways. Various animal studies have revealed that treatment with green tea inhibits tumor incidence and multiplicity in different organ sites such as skin, lung, liver, stomach, mammary gland and colon. Recently, phase I and II clinical trials have been conducted to explore the anticancer effects of green tea in humans. A major challenge of cancer prevention is to integrate new molecular findings into clinical practice. Therefore, identification of more molecular targets and biomarkers for tea polyphenols is essential for improving the design of green tea trials and will greatly assist in a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying its anti-cancer activity.

  12. Effectiveness of a biological control agent Palexorista gilvoides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Uganda Journal of Agricultural Sciences by National Agricultural Research Organisation is licensed under a ... gilvoides as a potential biological control agent for G. podocarpi. Field and .... are related to stress factors and are considered ...

  13. EMG evaluation of hip adduction exercises for soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exercise programmes are used in the prevention and treatment of adductor-related groin injuries in soccer; however, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the intensity of frequently used exercises. OBJECTIVE: Primarily to investigate muscle activity of adductor longus during six...... and the abdominals showed relatively low values (5-48% nEMG, pprevention and treatment of groin injuries....... The Copenhagen Adduction and the hip adduction with an elastic band are dynamic high-intensity exercises, which can easily be performed at any training facility and could therefore be relevant to include in future prevention and treatment programmes....

  14. A stabilised tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane adduct in reduced collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, D J; Davison, P F

    1976-01-01

    The reduction of collagen with sodium [3H] borohydride in the presence of Tris buffer results in the stabilization of a Schiff base adduct which is formed between allysine residues and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane. The reduced, radioactive derivative of this adduct has been identified in hydrolyzates or reduced collagen. It elutes before hydroxylysine on an amino acid analyzer column close to the position of dihydroxylysinonorleucine. Similar artifacts may occur when aldehydes present in or added to proteins react with Tris or other amines prior to reduction.

  15. Cytochrome P4501A induction, benzo[a]pyrene metabolism, and nucleotide adduct formation in fish hepatoma cells: Effect of preexposure to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, J.M.W.; Voormolen, A.; Tillitt, D.E.; Everaarts, J.M.; Seinen, W.; Vanden Berg, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    In PLHC-1 hepatoma cells, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) caused a maximum induction of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) activity, measured as ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD), after 4 to 8 h of exposure, depending on the B[a]P concentration. The decline of EROD activity at longer exposure times was probably caused by the rapid metabolism of B[a]P in this system (57% metabolism within 4 h incubation). In subsequent experiments, PLHC-1 cells were preinduced with PCB 126 for 24 h and then received a dose of 10, 100, or 1,000 nM 3H-B[a]P. A 1-nM concentration of PCB 126 caused an 80-fold induction of CYP1A activity, resulting in an increase in B[a]P metabolism of less than 10%, except at the highest concentration of B[a]P (1,000 nM), where a 50% increase was observed. In another experiment, an 80-fold induction of CYP1A activity caused a 20% increase in the metabolism of B[a]P (100 nM), and RNA adduct formation was increased approximately twofold. These results indicate that, at exposure concentrations up to 100 nM B[a]P, CYP1A activity is not rate limiting for B[a]P metabolism. Furthermore, CYP1A seems to also he specifically involved in B[a]P activation in PLHC-1 cells. However, CYP1A induction causes only a relatively small increase in activation, probably because of the action of other enzymes involved in B[a]P activation and deactivation.

  16. Sex matters: The effects of biological sex on adipose tissue biology and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G. Valencak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue is a complex and multi-faceted organ. It responds dynamically to internal and external stimuli, depending on the developmental stage and activity of the organism. The most common functional subunits of adipose tissue, white and brown adipocytes, regulate and respond to endocrine processes, which then determine metabolic rate as well as adipose tissue functions. While the molecular aspects of white and brown adipose biology have become clearer in the recent past, much less is known about sex-specific differences in regulation and deposition of adipose tissue, and the specific role of the so-called pink adipocytes during lactation in females. This review summarises the current understanding of adipose tissue dynamics with a focus on sex-specific differences in adipose tissue energy metabolism and endocrine functions, focussing on mammalian model organisms as well as human-derived data. In females, pink adipocytes trans-differentiate during pregnancy from subcutaneous white adipocytes and are responsible for milk-secretion in mammary glands. Overlooking biological sex variation may ultimately hamper clinical treatments of many aspects of metabolic disorders.

  17. The Effects of Ultrasound on Biological Systems: Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Karmi, Anan M.

    vs. 18 minutes). This demonstrates that the biological effects of ultrasound are influenced by Ca^ {2+}. The larger increases in G _{rm t} and the time constants confirm other studies addressing the role of Ca ^{2+} in potentiating lipid peroxidation by free radicals, and the role of calcium ions in the formation of tight junctions.

  18. Penetration and propagation into biological matter and biological effects of high-power ultra-wideband pulses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, Thérèse; Bieth, François; Pinguet, Sylvain; Delmote, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Systems emitting ultra-wideband high power microwave (HP/UWB) pulses are developed for military and civilian applications. HP/UWB pulses typically have durations on the order of nanoseconds, rise times of picoseconds and amplitudes around 100 kV m(-1). This article reviews current research on biological effects from HP/UWB exposure. The different references were classified according to endpoints (cardiovascular system, central nervous system, behavior, genotoxicity, teratology …). The article also reviews the aspects of mechanisms of interactions and tissue damage as well as the numerical work that has been done for studying HP/UWB pulse propagation and pulse energy deposition inside biological tissues. The mechanisms proposed are the molecular conformation change, the modification of chemical reaction rates, membrane excitation and breakdown and direct electrical forces on cells or cell constituents, and the energy deposition. As regards the penetration of biological matter and the deposited energy, mainly computations were published. They have shown that the EM field inside the biological matter is strongly modified compared to the incident EM field and that the energy absorption for HP/UWB pulses occurs in the same way as for continuous waves. However, the energy carried by a HP/UWB pulse is very low and the deposited energy is low. The number of published studies dealing with the biological effects is small and only a few pointed out slight effects. It should be further noted that the animal populations used in the studies were not always large, the statistical analyses not always relevant and the teams involved in this research rather limited in number.

  19. DNA and protein adducts in human tissues resulting from exposure to tobacco smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, David H.; Venitt, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains a variety of genotoxic carcinogens that form adducts with DNA and protein in the tissues of smokers. Not only are these biochemical events relevant to the carcinogenic process, but the detection of adducts provides a means of monitoring exposure to tobacco smoke. Characterization of smoking-related adducts has shed light on the mechanisms of smoking-related diseases and many different types of smoking-derived DNA and protein adducts have been identified. Such approaches...

  20. UNUSUALLY STABLE ADDUCT BETWEEN METHANOLYZED AMOXICILLIN OR AMPICILLIN AND THEIR DIKETOPIPERAZINE DERIVATIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosińska, Katarzyna; Frański, Rafał; Frańska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin and ampicillin were subjected to methanolysis. As expected, the methanolysis products were observed by HPLC-ESI-MS. Besides these products, diketopiperazine derivatives were also detected. Additionally, unusually stable adduct formed between the products of methanolysis and diketopiperazine derivatives was also identified. Analogical adducts were detected when ethanolysis was performed instead of methanolysis. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis of the separated adducts confirmed that the adducts were composed of methanolysis products and diketopiperazine derivatives.

  1. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  2. Plasma and liver acetaminophen-protein adduct levels in mice after acetaminophen treatment: Dose–response, mechanisms, and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Norris, Hye-Ryun K.; Slawson, Matthew H. [Center for Human Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bajt, Mary Lynn; Xie, Yuchao; Williams, C. David [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Wilkins, Diana G.; Rollins, Douglas E. [Center for Human Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-06-15

    At therapeutic doses, acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe and effective analgesic. However, overdose of APAP is the principal cause of acute liver failure in the West. Binding of the reactive metabolite of APAP (NAPQI) to proteins is thought to be the initiating event in the mechanism of hepatotoxicity. Early work suggested that APAP-protein binding could not occur without glutathione (GSH) depletion, and likely only at toxic doses. Moreover, it was found that protein-derived APAP-cysteine could only be detected in serum after the onset of liver injury. On this basis, it was recently proposed that serum APAP-cysteine could be used as diagnostic marker of APAP overdose. However, comprehensive dose–response and time course studies have not yet been done. Furthermore, the effects of co-morbidities on this parameter have not been investigated. We treated groups of mice with APAP at multiple doses and measured liver GSH and both liver and plasma APAP-protein adducts at various timepoints. Our results show that protein binding can occur without much loss of GSH. Importantly, the data confirm earlier work that showed that protein-derived APAP-cysteine can appear in plasma without liver injury. Experiments performed in vitro suggest that this may involve multiple mechanisms, including secretion of adducted proteins and diffusion of NAPQI directly into plasma. Induction of liver necrosis through ischemia–reperfusion significantly increased the plasma concentration of protein-derived APAP-cysteine after a subtoxic dose of APAP. While our data generally support the measurement of serum APAP-protein adducts in the clinic, caution is suggested in the interpretation of this parameter. - Highlights: • Extensive GSH depletion is not required for APAP-protein binding in the liver. • APAP-protein adducts appear in plasma at subtoxic doses. • Proteins are adducted in the cell and secreted out. • Coincidental liver injury increases plasma APAP-protein adducts at subtoxic doses

  3. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  4. 40 CFR 721.465 - Alkoxylated alkylpolyol acrylates, adduct with alkylamine (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., adduct with alkylamine (generic). 721.465 Section 721.465 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.465 Alkoxylated alkylpolyol acrylates, adduct with... substances identified generically as alkoxylated alkylpolyol acrylates, adduct with alkylamine (PMNs...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1850 - Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... epoxy adduct. 721.1850 Section 721.1850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1850 Toluene sulfonamide bis-phe-nol A epoxy adduct. (a) Chemical... as toluene sulfonamide bisphenol A epoxy adduct (PMN P-90-113) is subject to reporting under...

  6. Environmental, Dietary, Maternal, and Fetal Predictors of Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Mendez, Michelle A; Schoket, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bulky DNA adducts reflect genotoxic exposures, have been associated with lower birth weight, and may predict cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: We selected factors known or hypothesized to affect in utero adduct formation and repair and examined their associations with adduct levels in neonates....

  7. Environmental, Dietary, Maternal, and Fetal Predictors of Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Mendez, Michelle A; Schoket, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bulky DNA adducts reflect genotoxic exposures, have been associated with lower birth weight, and may predict cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: We selected factors known or hypothesized to affect in utero adduct formation and repair and examined their associations with adduct levels in neonates....

  8. Effect of Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning on Non-majors Biology Students' Understanding of Biological Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Breann M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) on non-majors college biology students' understanding of biological classification. This study addressed an area of science instruction, POGIL in the non-majors college biology laboratory, which has yet to be qualitatively and quantitatively researched. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods approach was used. Students' understanding of biological classification was measured in two areas: scores on pre and posttests (consisting of 11 multiple choice questions), and conceptions of classification as elicited in pre and post interviews and instructor reflections. Participants were Minnesota State University, Mankato students enrolled in BIOL 100 Summer Session. One section was taught with the traditional curriculum (n = 6) and the other section in the POGIL curriculum (n = 10) developed by the researcher. Three students from each section were selected to take part in pre and post interviews. There were no significant differences within each teaching method (p vs. M = 7.330 +/- .330; z =-1.729, p = .084) and the traditional group may have scored higher on the pretest than the posttest (M = 8.333 +/- .333 vs M = 7.333 +/- .333; z = -1.650 , p = .099). Two themes emerged after the interviews and instructor reflections: 1) After instruction students had a more extensive understanding of classification in three areas: vocabulary terms, physical characteristics, and types of evidence used to classify. Both groups extended their understanding, but only POGIL students could explain how molecular evidence is used in classification. 2) The challenges preventing students from understanding classification were: familiar animal categories and aquatic habitats, unfamiliar organisms, combining and subdividing initial groupings, and the hierarchical nature of classification. The POGIL students were the only group to surpass these challenges after the teaching intervention. This

  9. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  10. Aldehyde and Ketone Adducts of the Gaseous Trifluoromethyl Cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Morton, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    IR spectra of CF3+ adduct ions are reported for the first time using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Carbonyl stretches of ketone conjugate acids shift less than do those of ions containing C=OCF3+ groups. Carbonyl absorptions shift in proportion to the empirical softness of the

  11. Aldehyde and ketone adducts of the gaseous trifluoromethyl cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Morton, T.H.

    2011-01-01

    IR spectra of CF3+ adduct ions are reported for the first time using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Carbonyl stretches of ketone conjugate acids shift less than do those of ions containing C═OCF3+ groups. Carbonyl absorptions shift in proportion to the empirical softness of the

  12. SOME SULFATO ADDUCTS AND DERIVATIVE: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOUHAMADOU BIRAME DIOP

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Three new adducts and derivative have been synthesized and studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopies. The suggested structures are discrete with a sulfate behaving as a monochelating, bichelating or monodentate ligand, the environments around the tin centre being octahedral or pentagonal bipyramidal. In all the studied compounds, proposed supramolecular architectures may be obtained when intermolecular hydrogen bonds are considered.

  13. Theoretical investigations on the formation of nitrobenzanthrone-DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2011-09-07

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust. The thermochemical formation cascades were calculated for six 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts employing its arylnitrenium ion as precursor using density functional theory (DFT). Clear exothermic pathways were found for four adducts, i.e., 2-(2'-deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, 2-(2'-deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone and 2-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone. All four have been observed to be formed in cell-free experimental systems. The formation of N-(2'-deoxyadenosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone is predicted to be not thermochemically viable explaining its absence in either in vitro or in vivo model systems. However, 2-(2'-deoxyadenosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone, can be formed, albeit not as a major product, and is a viable candidate for an unknown adenine adduct observed experimentally. 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA), an isomer of 3-NBA, was also included in the calculations; it has a higher abundance in ambient air than 3-NBA, but a much lower genotoxic potency. Similar thermochemical profiles were obtained for the calculated 2-NBA-derived DNA adducts. This leads to the conclusion that enzymatic activation as well as the stability of its arylnitrenium ion are important determinants of 2-NBA genotoxicity.

  14. Triphosgene mediated chlorination of Baylis-Hillman adducts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narender Reddy Thatikonda; Naga Sesha Sai Pavan Kumar Chebolu; Mahendar Budde; Jayathirtha Rao Vaidya

    2012-03-01

    An efficient method for the preparation of allyl chlorides from Baylis-Hillman adducts has been developed using triphosgene/pyridine system. This method is best illustrated by its advantages like operational simplicity, excellent yields, short reaction time, simple procedure and stereoselectivity.

  15. Effect of Organic Solvents and Biologically Relevant Ions on the Light-Induced DNA Cleavage by Pyrene and Its Amino and Hydroxy Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yu

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are a class of carcinogenic compounds that are both naturally and artificially produced. Many PAHs are pro-carcinogens that require metabolic activation. Recently, it has been shown that PAH can induce DNA single strand cleavage and formation of PAH-DNA covalent adduct upon irradiation with UVA light. The light-induced DNA cleavage parallels phototoxicity in one instance. The DNA photocleavage efficiency depends on the structure of the PAHs. This article reports the effect of both organic solvents and the presence of biologically relevant ions, Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn+2, Mn2+, and I-, on the light-induced DNA cleavage by pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene and 1-aminopyrene. Since both 1-hydroxypyrene (0.6 μM and 1-aminopyrene (6 μM dissolve well in the minimum organic solvents used (2% methanol, dimethylsulfoxide, and dimethylformamide, increasing the amount of the organic solvent resulted in the decrease of the amount of DNA single strand cleavage caused by the combination effect of 1-hydroxy or 1-aminopyrene and UVA light. The result with the less watersoluble pyrene shows that increase of the amount of the organic solvent can increase the amount of DNA single strand DNA photocleavage cause by the combination of pyrene and UVA light. Therefore, there are two effects by the organic solvents: (i to dissolve PAH and (ii to quench DNA photocleavage. The presence of Fe3+ and Zn2+ enhances, while the presence of Ca2+ and Mn2+ inhibits the DNA photocleavage caused by 1-aminopyrene and UVA light. Other metal ions have minimal effect. This means that the effect of ions on DNA photocleavage by PAHs is complex. The presence of KI enhances DNA photocleavage. This indicates that the triplet-excited state of 1-aminopyrene is involved in causing DNA cleavage

  16. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M W [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range {approx}66 {mu}m) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range {approx}44 {mu}m). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 {mu}m. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the

  17. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  18. Controlling the Biological Effects of Spermine Using a Synthetic Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vial, Laurent; Ludlow, R. Frederick; Leclaire, Julien; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Otto, Sijbren

    2006-01-01

    Polyamines play an important role in biology, yet their exact function in many processes is poorly understood. Artificial host molecules capable of sequestering polyamines could be useful tools for studying their cellular function. However, designing synthetic receptors with affinities sufficient to

  19. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Approaches for improving the nutritional wellbeing of humans such as food diversification, supplementation with capsules or syrups, molecular biology and industrial food ... To record growth, yield attributes and yields of corn, five plants were randomly selected ..... FAO (1996) Human vitamin and mineral requirements. No.

  20. Effect of sulphide on enhanced biological phosphorus removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio Rincon, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    The enhanced biological removal of phosphorus (EBPR) is a popular process due to high removal efficiency, low operational costs, and the possibility of phosphorus recovery. Nevertheless, the stability of the EBPR depends on different factors such as: temperature, pH, and the presence of toxic

  1. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume II, Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    produce meat cubes and similar ingredients f or p ies , ready meals , and Alan H. Barrett and Philip C. Meyers of MIT have de— canned products. It can also...area and may cause hormonal and biochemical Cross e , Wisc.) and A. Prieto , Jr. Biologic and Cli~— changes . A series of p i l o t hormonal screening

  2. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Porru

    Full Text Available DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028, whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006 was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001, coffee (p<0.001, cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041 and MnSOD (p = 0.009 and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008 were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different

  3. Therapy-induced carboplatin-DNA adduct levels in human ovarian tumours in relation to assessment of adduct measurement in mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Ian W H; Meczes, Emma L; Thomas, Huw D; Edmondson, Richard J; Veal, Gareth J; Boddy, Alan V; Ottley, Christopher J; Pearson, D Graham; Tilby, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Despite an increasing understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which platinum drug DNA adducts interact with cellular processes, the relationship between adduct formation in tumours and clinical response remains unclear. We have determined carboplatin-DNA adduct levels in biopsies removed from ovarian cancer patients following treatment. Reliability of DNA adduct measurements in tissues samples were assessed using experimental animals. Platinum-DNA adduct levels were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and plasma drug concentrations determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Adduct levels in tissues and plasma pharmacokinetics were determined in Balb/c mice exposed to platinum drugs. Comparisons of adduct levels in tumour and normal tissue were made in nu/nu mice carrying human neuroblastoma xenografts. At 30 min post-cisplatin administration, adduct levels in DNA from kidney and liver were approximately 10- and 6-fold higher than spleen or tumour. By 60 min, levels in liver and kidney, but not spleen or tumour, had fallen considerably. Carboplatin showed high adduct levels only in kidney. Adduct levels in tumour xenografts were comparable to those induced in vitro with similar drug exposures. In clinical samples removed 6h after drug administration, adduct levels ranged from 1.9 to 4.3 and 0.2 to 3.6 nmol Pt/g DNA for tumour biopsies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively. No correlation was apparent between these two data sets. The present results demonstrate that reliable measurements of adducts in clinical tumours are feasible. Future results should provide insight into drug resistance.

  4. K-shell ionization and biological effects; Ionisation en couche K et effet biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Hoir, A.; Herve du Penhoat, M.A.; Champion, C.; Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Abel, F.; Politis, M.F.; Chetioui, A. [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France); Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France); Despiney-Bailly, I. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Sabatier, L. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Direction des Sciences du Vivant

    1998-04-01

    Initial steps of radiation action mechanism on biological targets are still unknown. The strong correlation observed between inactivation cross sections by heavy ions and K-vacancy production cross sections has drawn the attention on this process. Although quite minor in the energy deposition of these particles, the K-ionization process gives rise to quite efficient ionization clusters. Values of K-ionization biological effectivenesses extracted from measured relative biological efficiencies of ultra soft X-rays support the idea of a major -may be a dominant- contribution of the K-vacancy process to the biological effect of heavy ions. (authors)

  5. Immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard-adducts with DNA and proteins: Exploratory research on adducts with proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Noort, D.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, H.C.M. van; Fidder, A.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed two modes of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard adducts to DNA in human blood and skin. In the shortened mode data could be generated within 9 h after in vitro exposure of human blood to > 1 μM sulfur mustard. The sensitive mode allo

  6. Chloroethyinitrosourea-derived ethano cytosine and adenine adducts are substrates for escherichia coli glycosylases excising analogous etheno adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guliaev, Anton B.; Singer, B.; Hang, Bo

    2004-05-05

    Exocyclic ethano DNA adducts are saturated etheno ring derivatives formed mainly by therapeutic chloroethylnitrosoureas (CNUs), which are also mutagenic and carcinogenic. In this work, we report that two of the ethano adducts, 3,N{sup 4}-ethanocytosine (EC) and 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine (EA), are novel substrates for the Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug) and 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), respectively. It has been shown previously that Mug excises 3,N{sup 4}-ethenocytosine ({var_epsilon}C) and AlkA releases 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using synthetic oligonucleotides containing a single ethano or etheno adduct, we found that both glycosylases had a {approx}20-fold lower excision activity toward EC or EA than that toward their structurally analogous {var_epsilon}C or {var_epsilon}A adduct. Both enzymes were capable of excising the ethano base paired with any of the four natural bases, but with varying efficiencies. The Mug activity toward EC could be stimulated by E. coli endonuclease IV and, more efficiently, by exonuclease III. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed similar structural features of the etheno and ethano derivatives when present in DNA duplexes. However, also as shown by MD, the stacking interaction between the EC base and Phe 30 in the Mug active site is reduced as compared to the {var_epsilon}C base, which could account for the lower EC activity observed in this study.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of manganese-glycine and copper-glycine adducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Fernandes de Farias

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the synthesis and characterization of adducts of general formula MCl2.ngly, where M= Mn and Cu; n= 2 and 4, and gly= glycine. The manganese adducts were synthesized by dissolution of both, manganese chloride and glycine in water, whereas the copper adducts were obtained by using an alternative solid state synthesis approach. For all adducts, the obtained infrared data shows that the coordination involves the amine nitrogen atom, as well as an oxygen atom of the COO- group. The TG curves for the synthesized adducts exhibit only one mass loss step associated with the release of glycine molecules.

  8. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of diazene adducts: isolation of iso-diazene stabilized as a borane adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiß, Fabian; Schulz, Axel; Villinger, Alexander

    2014-09-08

    This work describes the synthesis and full characterization of a series of GaCl3 and B(C6 F5 )3 adducts of diazenes R(1) NNR(2) (R(1) =R(2) =Me3 Si, Ph; R(1) =Me3 Si, R(2) =Ph). Trans-PhNNPh forms a stable adduct with GaCl3 , whereas no adduct, but instead a frustrated Lewis acid-base pair is formed with B(C6 F5 )3 . The cis-PhNNPh⋅B(C6 F5 )3 adduct could only be isolated when UV light was used, which triggers the isomerization from trans- to cis-PhNNPh, which provides more space for the bulky borane. Treatment of trans-PhNNSiMe3 with GaCl3 led to the expected trans-PhNNSiMe3 ⋅GaCl3 adduct but the reaction with B(C6 F5 )3 triggered a 1,2-Me3 Si shift, which resulted in the formation of a highly labile iso-diazene, Me3 Si(Ph)NN; stabilized as a B(C6 F5 )3 adduct. Trans-Me3 SiNNSiMe3 forms a labile cis-Me3 SiNNSiMe3 ⋅B(C6 F5 )3 adduct, which isomerizes to give the transient iso-diazene species (Me3 Si)2 NN⋅B(C6 F5 )3 upon heating. Both iso-diazene species insert easily into one BC bond of B(C6 F5 )3 to afford hydrazinoboranes. All new compounds were fully characterized by means of X-ray crystallography, vibrational spectroscopy, CHN analysis, and NMR spectroscopy. All compounds were further investigated by DFT and the bonding situation was assessed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  9. Biological Effects of Listeriolysin O: Implications for Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Hernández-Flores

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeriolysin O (LLO is a thiol-activated cholesterol-dependent pore-forming toxin and the major virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes (LM. Extensive research in recent years has revealed that LLO exerts a wide array of biological activities, during the infection by LM or by itself as recombinant antigen. The spectrum of biological activities induced by LLO includes cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, modulation of gene expression, intracellular calcium oscillations, and proinflammatory activity. In addition, LLO is a highly immunogenic toxin and the major target for innate and adaptive immune responses in different animal models and humans. Recently, the crystal structure of LLO has been published in detail. Here, we review the structure-function relationship for this fascinating microbial molecule, highlighting the potential uses of LLO in the fields of biomedicine and biotechnology, particularly in vaccination.

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthesis, metabolism, biological effects, and clinical use (analytical review)

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharov, N. P.; G. V. Katsiya

    2015-01-01

    The review presents the fundamental information on the metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), its biological role and possibilities of its use for replacement therapy. There were studied species differences in the synthesis of DHEA in the adrenal cortex. It was found that DHEA and DHEA-sulfate are produced only by the adrenal glands of humans and monkeys, including lower monkeys. Their biosynthesis involves the following steps: cholesterol → pregnenolone → 17-hydroxypregnenolone → DHEA....

  11. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  12. Resurrecting the body: Has portmodernism had any effect on biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, S F

    1995-01-01

    While postmodernism has had very little influence in biology (for reasons discussed in the paper), it can provide a framework for discussing the context in which biology is done. Here, four biological views of the body/self are contrasted: the neural, immunological, genetic, and phenotypic bodies. Each physical view of the body extrapolates into a different model of the body politic, and each posits a different relationship between bodies of knowledge. The neural view of the body models a body politic wherein society is defined by its culture and laws. The genetic view privileges views of polities based on ethnicity and race. The immune body extrapolates into polities that can defend themselves against other such polities. The phenotypic view of the body politic stands in opposition to these three major perspectives and integrates them without giving any predominance. The view of science as a "neural" body of knowledge contends that science is aperspectival and objective. The perspective of the "immune" body is that science exists to defend the interests of its creataors. The genetic view of science is that science is the basis of all culture. The extrapolation of the phenotypic body to science insists upon the utilitarian rationale for scientific interprises. In all instances, the genetic view of the body/body politic/body of science is presently in ascendance.

  13. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Autrup, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei...... (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet...

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Ester from Rosin Acrylic Acid Adduct and Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.L.Yu; F.A.Zhang

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Rosin is a sort of important renewable resources,which is a foremost product of our country forestry. It has very important meaning to modify the rosin based on its molecule structure and active group, to develop some deep processing products, and to endure with rosin new characteristic[1]. This work uses the rosin and acrylic acid to form rosin adduct, and then reacted with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to form ester under the different condition. The effect of different ratios with the ...

  15. Air pollution effects on fetal and child development: a cohort comparison in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Deliang; Li, Ting Yu; Chow, Judith C; Kulkarni, Sanasi U; Watson, John G; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Quan, Zhang Y; Qu, L R; Perera, Frederica

    2014-02-01

    In Tongliang, China, a coal-fired power plant was the major pollution source until its shutdown in 2004. We enrolled two cohorts of nonsmoking women and their newborns before and after the shutdown to examine the relationship between prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fetal and child growth and development. PAHs were used to measure exposure to air pollution generated by the power plant. Using PAH-DNA adduct levels as biomarkers for the biologically effective dose of PAH exposure, we examined whether PAH-DNA adduct levels were associated with birth outcome, growth rate, and neurodevelopment. Head circumference was greater in children of the second cohort, compared with the first (p = 0.001), consistent with significantly reduced levels of cord blood PAH-DNA adducts in cohort II (p < 0.001) and reduced levels of ambient PAHs (p = 0.01).

  16. Integrated monitoring of chemicals and their effects on four sentinel species, Limanda limanda, Platichthys flesus, Nucella lapillus and Mytilus sp., in Seine Bay: A key step towards applying biological effects to monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida; Ménard, Dominique; Robinson, Craig; Loizeau, Véronique; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Martínez-Gòmez, Concepción; Le Goff, Jérémie; Budzinski, Hélène; Le Menach, Karine; Cachot, Jérome; Minier, Christophe; Broeg, Katja; Hylland, Ketil

    2017-03-01

    The International workshop on Integrated Assessment of CONtaminants impacts on the North sea (ICON) provided a framework to validate the application of chemical and biological assessment thresholds (BACs and EACs) in the Seine Bay in France. Bioassays (oyster larval anomalies, Corophium arenarium toxicity assay and DR Calux) for sediment and biomarkers: ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), DNA strand breaks using the Comet assay, DNA adducts, micronucleus (MN), PAH metabolites, imposex, intersex and fish external pathologies were analysed in four marine sentinel species (Platichthys flesus, Limanda limanda, Mytilus sp. and Nucella lapilus). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals were analysed in biota and sediment. Results for sediment and four species in 2008-2009 made it possible to quantify the impact of contaminants using thresholds (Environmental Assessment Criteria/EAC2008: 70% and EAC2009: 60%) and effects (EAC2008: 50% and EAC2009: 40%) in the Seine estuary. The Seine estuary is ranked among Europe's most highly polluted sites.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in beluga whales from the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, A; Payne, J F; Fancey, L L; Santella, R M; Young, T L

    1997-05-01

    The Arctic is still relatively pristine in nature, but it is also vulnerable to pollution because contaminants originating from midlatitudes are transported to the Arctic by atmospheric processes, ocean currents, and rivers (Muir et al., 1992). Recognition of this fact of Arctic vulnerability has resulted in a Declaration on the Protection of the Arctic Environment by eight Arctic countries. A manifest aim of this declaration is to develop an Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program. We report here on the presence of measurable levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts, including relatively high levels in Arctic beluga (Delphinapterus leucas). These results lend support to the value of developing biological assessment programs for Arctic wildlife.

  18. Nitrated and Brominated Narcotine and its Cleaved Adduct as Butyrylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Abbasi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcotine is a very antitussive agent and its modification may lead to some more biological activities. In this presented paper, narcotine (1 was first subjected to nitration and bromination to yield nitrated narcotine (2 and brominated narcotine (3. It was further made to react with phenylchloroformate (6 to give a cleaved addition product 4. This adduct 4 was further nitrated and brominated to yield substituted derivatives 5 and 6, respectively. The structure elucidation of the synthesized compounds was processed via IR, EI-MS and 1H-NMR spectra. These were also screened against butyrylcholinesterase enzyme and were found to the moderate inhibitors of butyrylcholinesterase except nitrated product, 2, of narcotine (1.

  19. Increased micronuclei and bulky DNA adducts in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.; Wichmann, J.; Autrup, H.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollution in urban environment is common and has been associated with adverse human health effects. In utero exposures that result in DNA damage may affect health later in life. Early effects of maternal and in utero exposures to traffic-related air pollution were...... for potential confounders and effect modifiers. For the first time increased bulky DNA adducts and MN in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution are found, demonstrating that these transplacental environmental exposures induce DNA damage in newborns. Given that increased DNA damage...... umbilical cords, concurrently collected at the time of planned Caesarean section. Modeled residential traffic density, a proxy measure of traffic-related air pollution exposures, was validated by indoor levels of nitrogen dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in 42 non-smoking homes. DNA adduct...

  20. Integrated Network Analysis and Effective Tools in Plant Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eFukushima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals in plant systems biology is to elucidate the genotype-phenotype relationship in plant cellular systems. Integrated network analysis that combines omics data with mathematical models has received particular attention. Here we focus on the latest cutting-edge computational advances that facilitate their combination. We highlight (1 network visualization tools, (2 pathway analyses, (3 genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, and (4 the integration of high-throughput experimental data and mathematical models. Multi-omics data that contain the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome and mathematical models are expected to integrate and expand our knowledge of complex plant metabolisms.

  1. Biological influences on hydrogen effects in steel in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edyvean, R.G.J.; Benson, J.; Thomas, C.J. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering; Beech, I.B. [Univ. of Portsmouth (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Videla, H.A. [Univ. of La Plata (Argentina). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-08-01

    Conditions conducive to the enhancement of corrosion-fatigue crack growth and of hydrogen embrittlement can be generated by the activity of sulfate-reducing bacterial. However, while the presence of bacteria encourages more hydrogen entry into susceptible metals when compared to similar levels of sulfide generated abiotically, corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates are slower in biological environments than the equivalent abiological environment. These results are discussed in the light of recent findings on the enhancement and inhibition of surface corrosion by bacterial biofilms.

  2. Effects of outside air temperature on the preparation of antineoplastic drug solutions in biological safety cabinets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Itoh, Akio; Ando, Yuichi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Wakiya, Yoshifumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2015-08-01

    In Japan, biological safety cabinets are commonly used by medical staff to prepare antineoplastic agents. At the Division of Chemotherapy for Outpatients, Nagoya University Hospital, a class II B2 biological safety cabinet is used. The temperature inside this biological safety cabinet decreases in winter. In this study, we investigated the effect of low outside air temperature on the biological safety cabinet temperature, time required to admix antineoplastic agents, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement. Studies were conducted from 1 January to 31 March 2008 (winter). The outside air temperature near the biological safety cabinet intake nozzle was compared with the biological safety cabinet temperature. The correlation between the outside air temperature and the biological safety cabinet temperature, time for cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine solubilization, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement were investigated at low and high biological safety cabinet temperatures. The biological safety cabinet temperature correlated with the outside air temperature of 5-20℃ (p antineoplastic agents. We suggest that a decrease in biological safety cabinet temperature may increase the time required to admix antineoplastic agents, thereby increasing the time for which outpatients must wait for chemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Gender Inequality in Biology Classes in China and Its Effects on Students' Short-Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated gender inequality in biology lessons and analysed the effects of the observed inequality on students' short-term knowledge achievement, situational interest and students' evaluation of teaching (SET). Twenty-two biology teachers and 803 7th-grade students from rural and urban classrooms in China participated in the study.…

  4. A Study of the Probe Effect on the Apparent Image of Biological Atomic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The probe effect on the apparent image of biological atomic force microscopy was explored in this study, and the potential of AFM in conformational study of gene related biological processes was illustrated by the specific nanostructural information of a new antitumor drug binding to DNA.

  5. Indirect ecological effects in invaded landscapes: Spillover and spillback from biological control agents to native analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control remains an effective option for managing large-scale weed problems in natural areas. The predation or parasitism of biological control agents by other species present in the introduced range (biotic resistance) is well studied and is often cited as the cause for a lack of establis...

  6. Adverse effects of biologics: a network meta-analysis and Cochrane overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. A.; Wells, G. A.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. While the efficacy of biologics has been established, there is uncertainty regarding the adverse effects of this treatment. Since serious risks such as tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, serious infect...

  7. Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    TITLE: Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jianghua Wang, M.D...6 JAN 2009 / / /4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Biological Effects of TMPRSS2/ERG Fusion Isoforms in Human Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH...quantitative RT-PCR arrays we have identified candidate mediators of these phenotypic effects . We propose to extend these studies to primary prostate epithelial

  8. Structural identification of imatinib cyanide adducts by mass spectrometry and elucidation of bioactivation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Austin C; Yu, Erya; Ring, Steven C; Chovan, James P

    2014-01-15

    Recent publications have reported that imatinib forms cyanide and methoxylamine adducts in vitro but without detail structural identification. The current work reports the identification of seven cyanide adducts that elucidate the bioactivation pathways and may provide hints for observed clinical adverse effects of the drug. Imatinib was incubated with human liver microsomal proteins in the presence of a NADPH-regeneration system and the trapping agents reduced GSH, potassium cyanide and methoxylamine. Samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a LTQ-Orbitrap data collection system. Chemical structures were determined and/or postulated based on data-dependent high-resolution tandem mass spectrometric (MS(n)) exact mass measurements in both positive and negative scan modes, as well as in combination with hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX). GSH and methoxylamine conjugates were either not detected or were in insufficient quantities for characterization. However, seven cyanide conjugates were identified, indicating that the piperazine and p-toluidine partial structures in imatinib can become bioactivated and subsequently trapped by the nucleophile cyanide ion. The reactive intermediates were postulated as imine and imine-carbonyl conjugate (α,β-unsaturated) structures on the piperazine ring, and imine-methide on the p-toluidine partial structure. Chemical structures of seven cyanide adducts of imatinib have been identified or proposed based on high-resolution MS/MS data. Mechanisms for the formation of the conjugates were also proposed. The findings may help to understand the mechanism of hepatotoxicity of imatinib in humans. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Exposure of bus and taxi drivers to urban air pollutants as measured by DNA and protein adducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemminki, K.; Zhang, L.F.; Krüger, J.;

    1994-01-01

    Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, lymphocyte DNA adducts, serum protein-bound PAH and hemoglobin-bound alkene adducts were analysed from 4 groups of non-smoking men: urban and suburban bus drivers, taxi drivers and suburban controls. The only differences between the groups were in DNA adducts between...... suburban bus drivers and controls, and in DNA adduct and plasma protein PAH-adducts between taxi drivers and controls....

  10. Crystal Structure of Ethanolamine 5-Nitrosalicylic Acid Organic Adduct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金轶; 车云霞; 魏荣敏; 郑吉民

    2004-01-01

    The title adduct (C18H24N4O12, Mr = 488.41) crystallizes in monoclinic, space group P21/c with a = 4.0514(19), b = 25.193(11), c = 10.751(5)(A), β = 95.070(8)o, V = 1093.0(9)(A)3, Z = 4, Dc = 1.484 g/cm3, F(000) = 512, μ(MoKα) = 1.26 cm-1, T = 293 K, the final R = 0.0593 and wR = 0.0862 for 956 observed reflections with I > 2(I). The compound is a 1:1 adduct of ethanolamine and 5-nitrosalicylic acid. The nitrogen atom of ethanolamine is protonated. In this crystal there exist a number of hydrogen bonds which link the ethanolamine and 5-nitrosalicylic acid molecules to form a three-dimensional infinite network structure.

  11. NEW HYDROGENOXALATO ADDUCTS AND MALONATO COMPLEX: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Two new hydrogenoxalato and one malonato adduct and complex have been synthesized and studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopies. The suggested structures are discrete, the hydrogenoxalate behaving as a monodentate ligand or only involved in hydrogen bonding, the environment around the tin (IV) centre being tetrahedral or trigonal bipyramidal. The malonate anion is a monodentate ligand. In all the suggested structures, when extra hydrogen bonds are considered, supramolecular architectures are...

  12. NEW HYDROGENOXALATO ADDUCTS AND MALONATO COMPLEX: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOUHAMADOU BIRAME DIOP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two new hydrogenoxalato and one malonato adduct and complex have been synthesized and studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopies. The suggested structures are discrete, the hydrogenoxalate behaving as a monodentate ligand or only involved in hydrogen bonding, the environment around the tin (IV centre being tetrahedral or trigonal bipyramidal. The malonate anion is a monodentate ligand. In all the suggested structures, when extra hydrogen bonds are considered, supramolecular architectures are obtained.

  13. SOME NEW SULFONATO ADDUCT: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOUHAMADOU BIRAME DIOP

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Three new adducts have been synthesized and studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopies. The suggested structures are discrete with a pyridine -3- sulfonate acting as a tri O-chelating and N-donor or as a non σ coordinating ligand, a 4-aminobenzenesulfonate behaving as a monodentate O-donor, the environments around the tin centre being tetrahedral, octahedral or seven coordinated. In all the studied compounds, supramolecular architectures are obtained when hydrogen bonds are considered.

  14. NEW HALO- AND ORGANOTIN (IV PHENYLARSENIATO ADDUCTS AND DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOCAR TRAORE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four new phenylarseniato adducts and organotin derivatives have been synthesized and studied by infrared. The suggested structures are polymeric, (SnX4; X = Cl, Br and SnPh3Cl while being discrete for SnPh2Cl(PhAsO3H2isoBu2NH2. When OH- - - Cl, NH - - - O or NH- - -Cl hydrogen bonds are involved, supramolecular architectures are obtained.

  15. PHOSPHATO AND PHOSPHONATO ADDUCTS: SYNTHESIS AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamadou Birame Diop

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Two new adducts have been synthesized and studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopy. The suggested structures are discrete or of infinite chain type with a phosphate behaving as a bidentate ligand, a phosphonate acting as a monodentate ligand, the environments around the tin centre being tetrahedral or trigonal bipyramidal. In all the studied compounds, supramolecular architectures are obtained when hydrogen bonds are considered.

  16. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de [Walther-Straub-Institut Für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80336 München (Germany); Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wjiang@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  17. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  18. Fluorescence of Phytochrome Adducts with Synthetic Locked Chromophores*

    OpenAIRE

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A. S.; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S.; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2010-01-01

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive...

  19. Synthesis and selenation of tandem multicomponent condensation adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Guoxiong; Du, Junyi; Fuller, Amy; Athukorala Arachchige, Kasun Sankalpa; Cordes, David Bradford; Slawin, Alexandra Martha Zoya; Woollins, J. Derek

    2015-01-01

    A number of four-component condensation adducts, which were readily obtained from one-pot reaction of aryl carboxylic acids, arylaldehydes, arylamines and c-hexylisocyanide, were treated with two equivalents of Woollins’ reagent leading to the formation of a series of novel selenoamides with one or two C=Se groups, or heterocyclic compounds such as 1,3-selenazole and 1,3-selenazolidin-5-one Postprint Peer reviewed

  20. Diagnosis and dosimetry of exposure to sulfur mustard: Development of a standard operating procedure for mass spectrometric analysis of haemoglobin adducts - Exploratory research on albumin and keratin adducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to develop a standard operating procedure for analysis of sulfur mustard adducts to the N-terminal valine in haemoglobin and to explore adduct formation with albumin and keratin. In the first approach, gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (GC

  1. Diagnosis and dosimetry of exposure to sulfur mustard: Development of a standard operating procedure for hemoglobin adducts: Exploratory research on albumin and keratin adducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Schans, G.P. van der; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) for determination of the sulfur mustard adduct to the N-terminal valine in hemoglobin was developed. By using this SOP, it was found that the Nterminal valine adduct in globin of hairless guinea pigs and marmosets which had been exposed to sulfur mustard (0.5 LD5

  2. Biological effects of an impulse current according to laboratory researches of electroshock devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryev О.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The federal law "About Weapons" permits the use of electroshock devices if they are safe for people. We developed requirements for the procedure medical-biological testing on the safety of electroshock devices. We did an experimental study assessing medical-biological safety of electroshock devices. The assessment is based on a point system, which use ranges of biological effects. The experiments were performed in rabbits. We used 13 electroshock devices with different characteristics. Electroshock devices were made in Russia. We found that the response of a biological object to inrush current included convulsions, respiratory and cardiac activity. We analyzed the biological effects of pulsed current electroshock device obtained in experimental conditions. It is concluded that the characteristic clinical and physiological response to the action of electric current is pulsepolyparametric and depending on a combination of characteristics and condition of the electric impulse influence object.

  3. Biological methanogenesis and the CO2 greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well established that plants tend to increase net photosynthesis under increased carbon dioxide. It is also well established that a large fraction of atmospheric methane is produced by microbial metabolism of organic sediments in paddies and freshwater wetlands, where a major source of organic debris is local plant growth. As CO2 increases, it may lead to increased methane production and a resulting enhancement of the expected greenhouse warming. A rough estimate of the present rate of this biologically mediated feedback on the climate system indicates that it might account for as much as 30 percent of the observed methane increase and speed up the greenhouse forcing by as much as 15 percent.

  4. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthesis, metabolism, biological effects, and clinical use (analytical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Goncharov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the fundamental information on the metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, its biological role and possibilities of its use for replacement therapy. There were studied species differences in the synthesis of DHEA in the adrenal cortex. It was found that DHEA and DHEA-sulfate are produced only by the adrenal glands of humans and monkeys, including lower monkeys. Their biosynthesis involves the following steps: cholesterol → pregnenolone → 17-hydroxypregnenolone → DHEA. The adrenal glands of other species, including rats and mice do not synthesize DHEA. At the same time, in certain brain structures not only in man and monkey, but also in other animals DHEA and its precursors are synthesized de novo which are denoted as neurosteroids. It was demonstrated that Purkinje cells which play an important role in memory formation and learning are mainly place neurosteroid formation in mammals and other vertebrates. To establish the relationship of age and the level of DHEA and other steroids we studied the dynamics of their levels at different periods of postnatal development of people. Peak concentration DHEA observed in aged 25–30 years. In the interval from 20 to 90 years in humans the level falls approximately for 90 %. Cortisol levels in blood does not vary with age, leading to an imbalance in the ratio of cortisol/DHEA. Proved a major role of DHEA as a source (precursor for the synthesis of biologically active sex steroids – testosterone, estradiol and estrone in peripheral tissues. This review presents the bioavailability of DHEA in various physiological and pathological processes in humans and animals. In animal experiments has shown a higher bioavailability of DHEA in transdermal administration as compared with oral administration as in this case there is no steroid rapid inactivation in the liver during its first passage. According to recent studies there is a pronounced dependence of bioavailability of DHEA

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone biosynthesis, metabolism, biological effects, and clinical use (analytical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Goncharov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the fundamental information on the metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, its biological role and possibilities of its use for replacement therapy. There were studied species differences in the synthesis of DHEA in the adrenal cortex. It was found that DHEA and DHEA-sulfate are produced only by the adrenal glands of humans and monkeys, including lower monkeys. Their biosynthesis involves the following steps: cholesterol → pregnenolone → 17-hydroxypregnenolone → DHEA. The adrenal glands of other species, including rats and mice do not synthesize DHEA. At the same time, in certain brain structures not only in man and monkey, but also in other animals DHEA and its precursors are synthesized de novo which are denoted as neurosteroids. It was demonstrated that Purkinje cells which play an important role in memory formation and learning are mainly place neurosteroid formation in mammals and other vertebrates. To establish the relationship of age and the level of DHEA and other steroids we studied the dynamics of their levels at different periods of postnatal development of people. Peak concentration DHEA observed in aged 25–30 years. In the interval from 20 to 90 years in humans the level falls approximately for 90 %. Cortisol levels in blood does not vary with age, leading to an imbalance in the ratio of cortisol/DHEA. Proved a major role of DHEA as a source (precursor for the synthesis of biologically active sex steroids – testosterone, estradiol and estrone in peripheral tissues. This review presents the bioavailability of DHEA in various physiological and pathological processes in humans and animals. In animal experiments has shown a higher bioavailability of DHEA in transdermal administration as compared with oral administration as in this case there is no steroid rapid inactivation in the liver during its first passage. According to recent studies there is a pronounced dependence of bioavailability of DHEA

  7. Detection of Radical Adducts with Small Molecular Weights by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization with Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN,Yao-Wei; SUN,Shi-Hao; XIE,Jian-Ping; ZONG,Yong-Li; NIE,Cong; GUO,Yin-Long

    2007-01-01

    As an alternative method, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS) has been successfully used to detect and identify free radical adducts with small molecular weights of hydroxyl and 2-cyano-2-propyl radicals trapped with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). The detection and identification by MS/MS experiments using sustained offresonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) of [(DMPO+·OH-·H)+H+] (m/z 130.0868) and [DMPO+2 ·CH(CH3)2CN+H+] (m/z 250.1917) have demonstrated that MALDI-FTMS could be an effective method for detection and identification of free radical adducts. Other radical adducts have been also detected and identified. The approach of MALDI-FTMS is simple, fast, and sensitive which has potential for high-throughput analysis.

  8. Isolation of Cyclopropenylidene Lithium Adducts: The Weiss-Yoshida Reagent**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallo, Vincent; Ishida, Yutaka; Donnadieu, Bruno; Bertrand, Guy

    2008-01-01

    A lithium-halogen exchange reaction occurs when the chloro[bis(diisopropylamino)]cyclopropenium tetrafluoroborate salt 1 (X = BF4) is treated with n-butyllithium. The resulting cyclopropenylidene-lithium adduct 3 has been isolated in 45% yield. In the solid state, this compound exists as a polymeric chain with an overall stoichiometry of two LiBF4 per carbene ligand. Addition of 12-crown-4-ether does not liberate the carbene from the lithium cation, but affords a monomeric tertiary complex (60% yield) that includes the crown ether. Moreover, complex 3 can also be synthesized by depro tonation of the bis(diisopropylamino)cyclopropenium tetrafluoroborate salt 2 (X = BF4) with n-butyllithium, whereas using potassium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide the free cyclopropenylidene was isolated in 53% yield. These results as whole seem to demonstrate that only certain counteranions allow for the isolation of cyclopropenylidene-lithium adducts, and only bases not containing lithium allow for the isolation of the free cyclopropenylidene. The former and the latter presumably prevented Weiss and Yoshida from isolating what would have been the first example of a stable carbene-lithium adduct and a free carbene, respectively. PMID:16986195

  9. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume I. Review of the Literature on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-to 1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Microbeam 51 7. Embryology 82 8. Studies on Normal Animals 91 9. Tumor Studies 159 10. Clinical Studies 188 11. Ophthalmology 232 12. Dental Studies 263...o f e:xnosures 7wacs cad st. Cn3 side of the lesion was Mnainted w-ith 1 7=ns blue. I-oia=io wsCarried out in a fch.eck-er- boar-d ditiuinZt 1...ocular structures. Abstr. - Biological sessions - Boston laser conference, Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. Aug 5-7, 1964. 53. Polyak , S.L.: The

  10. Risk of serious adverse effects of biological and targeted drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Simon; Eric Furst, Daniel; Boers, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine possible differences in serious adverse effects among the 10 currently approved biological and targeted synthetic DMARDs (b/ts-DMARDs) for RA. METHODS: Systematic review in bibliographic databases, trial registries and websites of regulatory agencies identified randomized...

  11. Sequestration of mitochondrial iron by silica particles initiates a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary Inhalation of particulate matter has presented a challenge to human health for thousands of years. The underlying mechanism for biological effect following particle exposure is incompletely understood. We tested the postulate that particle sequestration of cell and mit...

  12. Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ... varied spatially and temporally but were generally within safe ranges for freshwater habitats. ... and depressed zooplankton diversity at WC suggested impacts from the fish ...

  13. Professional development strategies for teaching urban biology teachers to use concept maps effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor Petgrave, Dahlia M.

    Many teachers are not adequately prepared to help urban students who have trouble understanding conceptual ideas in biology because these students have little connection to the natural world. This study explored potential professional development strategies to help urban biology teachers use concept maps effectively with various topics in the biology curriculum. A grounded theory approach was used to develop a substantive professional development model for urban biology teachers. Qualitative data were collected through 16 semi-structured interviews of professional developers experienced in working with concept maps in the urban context. An anonymous online survey was used to collect quantitative data from 56 professional developers and teachers to support the qualitative data. The participants were from New York City, recruited through the NY Biology-Chemistry Professional Development Mentor Network and the NY Biology Teachers' Association. According to the participants, map construction, classroom applications, lesson planning, action research, follow-up workshops, and the creation of learning communities are the most effective professional development strategies. The interviewees also proposed English language learning strategies such as picture maps, native word maps, and content reading materials with underlined words. This study contributes to social change by providing a professional development model to use in planning workshops for urban teachers. Urban teachers improve their own conceptual understanding of biology while learning how to implement concept mapping strategies in the classroom. Students whose teachers are better prepared to teach biology in a conceptual manner have the potential of growing into more scientifically literate citizens.

  14. Comparison of mutagenicity and calf thymus DNA adducts formed by the particulate and semivolatile fractions of vehicle exhausts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, Sanna K; Lappi, Maija; Honkanen, Markku; Savela, Kirsti

    2003-01-01

    consistent with diesel extracts containing higher concentrations of nitro-PAHs. The results of this study indicate that diesel extracts are more mutagenic and form more DNA adducts than gasoline extracts and that the effects of extract dose on DNA adduct formation are complex. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Effectiveness and biological compatibility of different generations of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João M F; Rodrigues, José R; Camargo, Carlos H R; Fernandes, Virgilio Vilas Boas; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Besides possessing good mechanical properties, dental materials should present a good biological behavior and should not injure the involved tissues. Bond strength and biocompatibility are both highly significant properties of dentin adhesives. For that matter, these properties of four generations of adhesive systems (Multi-Purpose/Single Bond/SE Plus/Easy Bond) were evaluated. Eighty bovine teeth had their dentin exposed (500- and 200-μm thickness). Adhesive was applied on the dentin layer of each specimen. Following that, the microshearing test was performed for all samples. A dentin barrier test was used for the cytotoxicity evaluation. Cell cultures (SV3NeoB) were collected from testing materials by means of 200- or 500-μm-thick dentin slices and placed in a cell culture perfusion chamber. Cell viability was measured 24 h post-exposition by means of a photometrical test (MTT test). The best bonding performance was shown by the single-step adhesive Easy Bond (21 MPa, 200 μm; 27 MPa, 500 μm) followed by Single Bond (15.6 MPa, 200 μm; 23.4 MPa, 500 μm), SE Plus (18.2 MPa, 200 μm; 20 MPa, 500 μm), and Multi-Purpose (15.2 MPa, 200 μm; 17.9 MPa, 500 μm). Regarding the cytotoxicity, Multi-Purpose slightly reduced the cell viability to 92% (200 μm)/93% (500 μm). Single Bond was reasonably cytotoxic, reducing cell viability to 71% (200 μm)/64% (500 μm). The self-etching adhesive Scotchbond SE decreased cell viability to 85% (200 μm)/71% (500 μm). Conversely, Easy Bond did not reduce cell viability in this test, regardless of the dentin thickness. Results showed that the one-step system had the best bond strength performance and was the least toxic to pulp cells. In multiple-step systems, a correct bonding technique must be done, and a pulp capping strategy is necessary for achieving good performance in both properties. The study showed a promising system (one-step self-etching), referring to it as a good alternative for specific cases, mainly due to its

  16. The role of biological rates in the simulated warming effect on oceanic CO2 uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Long; Zhang, Han

    2017-05-01

    Marine biology plays an important role in the ocean carbon cycle. However, the effect of warming-induced changes in biological rates on oceanic CO2 uptake has been largely overlooked. We use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to investigate the effect of temperature-induced changes in biological rates on oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and compare it with the effects from warming-induced changes in CO2 solubility and ocean mixing and circulation. Under the representative CO2 concentration pathway RCP 8.5 and its extension, by year 2500, relative to the simulation without warming effect on the ocean carbon cycle, CO2-induced warming reduces cumulative oceanic CO2 uptake by 469 Pg C, of which about 20% is associated with the warming-induced change in marine biological rates. In our simulations, the bulk effect of biological-mediated changes on CO2 uptake is smaller than that mediated by changes in CO2 solubility and ocean mixing and circulation. However, warming-induced changes in individual biological rates, including phytoplankton growth, phytoplankton mortality, and detritus remineralization, are found to affect oceanic CO2 uptake by an amount greater than or comparable to that caused by changes in CO2 solubility and ocean physics. Our simulations, which include only a few temperature-dependent biological processes, demonstrate the important role of biological rates in the oceanic CO2 uptake. In reality, many more complicated biological processes are sensitive to temperature change, and their responses to warming could substantially affect oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2.

  17. Bioaccumulation and biological effects in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to natural and depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, Anna, E-mail: anna.giovanetti@enea.i [ENEA, Institute of Radiation Protection, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Cozzella, Maria L. [ENEA, National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Asencio, Lisbet D. [Centro de Estudios Ambientales, Carretera a Castillo de Jagua, CP. 59350 C. Nuclear, Cienfuegos (Cuba); Sansone, Umberto [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The accumulations of both natural (U) and depleted (DU) uranium in the earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were studied to evaluate corresponding biological effects. Concentrations of metals in the experimental soil ranged from 1.86 to 600 mg kg{sup -1}. Five biological endpoints: mortality, animals' weight increasing, lysosomal membrane stability by measuring the neutral red retention time (the NRRT), histological changes and genetic effects (Comet assay) were used to evaluate biological effects in the earthworms after 7 and 28 days of exposure. No effects have been observed in terms of mortality or weight reduction. Cytotoxic and genetic effects were identified at quite low U concentrations. For some of these endpoints, in particular for genetic effects, the dose (U concentration)-effect relationships have been found to be non-linear. The results have also shown a statistically significant higher level of impact on the earthworms exposed to natural U compared to depleted U.

  18. III. Biological effects of radiation from external and internal sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, R.S.

    1948-05-24

    This report focuses on the hemotological effects of total body irradiation from external and internal sources observed in patients treated for arthritis with radioactive phosphorus administered intravenously.

  19. Soil degradation effect on biological activity in Mediterranean calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Alcover-Sáez, S.; Mormeneo, S.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Soil degradation processes include erosion, organic matter decline, compaction, salinization, landslides, contamination, sealing and biodiversity decline. In the Mediterranean region the climatological and lithological conditions, together with relief on the landscape and anthropological activity are responsible for increasing desertification process. It is therefore considered to be extreme importance to be able to measure soil degradation quantitatively. We studied soil characteristics, microbiological and biochemical parameters in different calcareous soil sequences from Valencia Community (Easter Spain), in an attempt to assess the suitability of the parameters measured to reflect the state of soil degradation and the possibility of using the parameters to assess microbiological decline and soil quality. For this purpose, forest, scrubland and agricultural soil in three soil sequences were sampled in different areas. Several sensors of the soil biochemistry and microbiology related with total organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, microorganism number and enzyme activities were determined. The results show that, except microorganism number, these parameters are good indicators of a soil biological activity and soil quality. The best enzymatic activities to use like indicators were phosphatases, esterases, amino-peptidases. Thus, the enzymes test can be used as indicators of soil degradation when this degradation is related with organic matter losses. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative O2 uptake and extracellular enzymes among the soils with different degree of degradation. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  20. Increased micronuclei and bulky DNA adducts in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.; Wichmann, J.; Autrup, H.

    2009-01-01

    umbilical cords, concurrently collected at the time of planned Caesarean section. Modeled residential traffic density, a proxy measure of traffic-related air pollution exposures, was validated by indoor levels of nitrogen dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in 42 non-smoking homes. DNA adduct...... levels were similar and positively correlated in maternal and cord blood (1.40 vs. 1.37 n/10(8) nucleotides; r = 0.99; p ... for potential confounders and effect modifiers. For the first time increased bulky DNA adducts and MN in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution are found, demonstrating that these transplacental environmental exposures induce DNA damage in newborns. Given that increased DNA damage...

  1. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  2. Colorimetric and fluorescent detection of biological thiols in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Hui Li; Jin-Feng Yang; Chang-Hui Liu; Ji-Shan Li; Rong-Hua Yang

    2013-01-01

    A new colorimetric and fluorescent probe,2-(2,4-dinitrostyryl)-1,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indolium iodide (DTI),for selective and sensitive detection of biological thiols is reported.In aqueous solution at physiological pH 7.4,biological thiols react with DTI via Michael addition to give the brownish red adduct concomitant with fluorescence emission decrease.

  3. Zinc acetylacetonate hydrate adducted with nitrogen donor ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis of zinc acetylacetonate complex adducted by nitrogen donor ligands, such as pyridine, bipyridine, and phenanthroline. The pyridine adducted complex crystallizes to monoclinic crystal structure, whereas other two adducted complexes have orthorhombic structure. Addition of nitrogen donor ligands enhances the thermal property of these complexes as that with parent metal-organic complex. Zinc acetylacetonate adducted with pyridine shows much higher volatility (106 °C), decomposition temperature (202 °C) as that with zinc acetylacetonate (136 °C, 220 °C), and other adducted complexes. All the adducted complexes are thermally stable, highly volatile and are considered to be suitable precursors for metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The formation of these complexes is confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The complexes are widely used as starting precursor materials for the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by microwave irradiation assisted coating process.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of the relative biological effectiveness predicted by the local effect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, T; Grün, R; Scholz, U; Elsässer, T; Durante, M; Scholz, M

    2013-10-07

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is a central quantity in particle radiobiology and depends on many physical and biological factors. The local effect model (LEM) allows one to predict the RBE for radiobiologic experiments and particle therapy. In this work the sensitivity of the RBE on its determining factors is elucidated based on monitoring the RBE dependence on the input parameters of the LEM. The relevance and meaning of all parameters are discussed within the formalism of the LEM. While most of the parameters are fixed by experimental constraints, one parameter, the threshold dose Dt, may remain free and is then regarded as a fit parameter to the high LET dose response curve. The influence of each parameter on the RBE is understood in terms of theoretic considerations. The sensitivity analysis has been systematically carried out for fictitious in vitro cell lines or tissues with α/β = 2 Gy and 10 Gy, either irradiated under track segment conditions with a monoenergetic beam or within a spread out Bragg peak. For both irradiation conditions, a change of each of the parameters typically causes an approximately equal or smaller relative change of the predicted RBE values. These results may be used for the assessment of treatment plans and for general uncertainty estimations of the RBE.

  5. Hydrolytic Cleavage Products of Globin Adducts in Urine as Possible Biomarkers of Cumulative Dose: Proof of Concept Using Styrene Oxide as a Model Adduct-Forming Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mráz, Jaroslav; Hanzlíková, Iveta; Moulisová, Alena; Dušková, Šárka; Hejl, Kamil; Bednářová, Aneta; Dabrowská, Ludmila; Linhart, Igor

    2016-04-18

    A new experimental model was designed to study the fate of globin adducts with styrene 7,8-oxide (SO), a metabolic intermediate of styrene and a model electrophilic compound. Rat erythrocytes were incubated with SO at 7 or 22 °C. Levels of specific amino acid adducts in globin were determined by LC/MS analysis of the globin hydrolysate, and erythrocytes with known adduct content were administered intravenously to recipient rats. The course of adduct elimination from the rat blood was measured over the following 50 days. In the erythrocytes incubated at 22 °C, a rapid decline in the adduct levels on the first day post-transfusion followed by a slow phase of elimination was observed. In contrast, the adduct elimination in erythrocytes incubated at 7 °C was nearly linear, copying elimination of intact erythrocytes. In the urine of recipient rats, regioisomeric SO adducts at cysteine, valine, lysine, and histidine in the form of amino acid adducts and/or their acetylated metabolites as well as SO-dipeptide adducts were identified by LC/MS supported by synthesized reference standards. S-(2-Hydroxy-1-phenylethyl)cysteine and S-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)cysteine, the most abundant globin adducts, were excreted predominantly in the form of the corresponding urinary mercapturic acids (HPEMAs). Massive elimination of HPEMAs via urine occurred within the first day from the erythrocytes incubated at both 7 and 22 °C. However, erythrocytes incubated at 7 °C also showed a slow second phase of elimination such that HPEMAs were detected in urine up to 50 days post-transfusion. These results indicate for the first time that globin adducts can be cleaved in vivo to modified amino acids and dipeptides. The cleavage products and/or their predictable metabolites are excreted in urine over the whole life span of erythrocytes. Some of the urinary adducts may represent a new type of noninvasive biomarker for exposure to adduct-forming chemicals.

  6. The biological effects of five feline IFN-alpha subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Powell, Tim D; Sellins, Karen S; Radecki, Steven V; Cohen, J John; Milhausen, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    IFN-alpha has been shown to induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in animals. This report describes the biological activity of five recently identified feline IFN-alpha subtypes expressed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line (rfeIFN-alpha1[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha2[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha5[CHO] and rfeIFN-alpha6[CHO]) and the feIFN-alpha6 subtype expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris (rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]). The rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes were tested for antiviral activity against either Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or feline calicivirus (FCV) infected feline embryonic fibroblast cell line (AH927) or Crandell feline kidney cell line (CRFK). Antiviral activity was induced against both VSV and FCV infected AH927 cells and VSV infected CRFK cells by all five of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]. In addition, the IFN-alpha inducible Mx gene (associated with antiviral activity) was upregulated in vivo 24 h following treatment with rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris], compared to baseline levels seen prior to treatment. All of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris] exhibited antiproliferative activity in the FeT-J cell line (an IL-2 independent feline T-cell line). Both necrosis and apoptosis were observed in rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]-treated FeT-J cells. The rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO] subtype consistently exhibited lower antiviral and antiproliferative activity compared to that observed with the other four rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes. In summary, this paper demonstrates that five previously described feIFN-alpha subtypes induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in vitro and are capable of upregulating the feMx gene in vivo.

  7. DNA adducts and PM(10) exposure in traffic-exposed workers and urban residents from the EPIC-Florence City study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Domenico; Saieva, Calogero; Munnia, Armelle; Peluso, Marco; Grechi, Daniele; Zanna, Ines; Caini, Saverio; Decarli, Adriano; Sera, Francesco; Masala, Giovanna

    2008-09-15

    Air pollution and particulate matter in urban areas have been associated with increased mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and increased cancer risk. Carcinogenic effects of particulate matter have been related to the contents of specific compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The latter may form bulky DNA adducts, that may be considered as candidate markers of cancer risk. We have recently shown that traffic-exposed workers and the general population in Florence have divergent levels of DNA adducts, possibly related to different levels of exposure to genotoxic agents from vehicle emissions. In the current study, in a series of 214 Florence City healthy adults enrolled in a prospective study in the period 1993-1998 (152 residents / 62 traffic-exposed workers), we investigated the correlation between individual levels of DNA bulky adducts and PM(10) exposure scores based on daily environmental measures provided by the local Environmental Protection Agency for the whole study period, by two types of urban monitoring stations (high- and low-traffic). We found that PM(10) cumulative scores from high-traffic stations over the last 1-2 weeks prior to blood drawing significantly correlated (r=0.58, p=0.02) with DNA adduct levels among non-smoking traffic-exposed workers (but not among residents with no occupational exposure to vehicle emissions). A multivariate regression analysis adjusted for possible confounders confirmed these findings. PM(10) scores from low-traffic stations did not show any correlation. These results show that DNA adduct levels in non-smoking workers reflect the average levels of exposure to PM(10) in high-traffic urban areas experienced over a time period of 1-2 weeks. Since DNA adduct levels have been found predictive of lung cancer risk, our findings provide clues relevant to the reduction of genotoxic damage and possibly cancer risk among traffic-exposed urban workers.

  8. Trifluoroacetylated adducts in spermatozoa, testes, liver and plasma and CYP2E1 induction in rats after subchronic inhalatory exposure to halothane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropeza-Hernández, Luis F; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Reyes-Mejía, Raul A; Serrano, Carmen J; García-Latorre, Ethel A; Dekant, Wolfgang; Manno, Maurizio; Albores, Arnulfo

    2003-09-15

    The induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 in testes and liver and the presence of trifluoroacetylated (TFA) adducts in spermatozoa, testes, liver and plasma were investigated in rats subchronically exposed by inhalation to halothane (15 ppm/4 h/day/5 days/week/9 weeks). After halothane exposure, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (p-NPH) activity increased 3.2-fold and CYP2E1 apo-protein content 7-fold in testes, whereas in liver, p-NPH increased 2.3-fold and CYP2E1 apoprotein content 1.4-fold. These results suggest a differential inductive effect of halothane on CYP2E1 in these tissues. Moreover, TFA adducts were present in microsomes of testis and liver and in plasma of halothane-treated rats. The immunoblot analysis of testicular microsomes showed two intense TFA protein bands of 63 and 59 kDa, whereas in liver three intense bands of 100, 76 and 63 kDa were observed. Bands of similar molecular weights to those observed in liver were detected in the plasma of halothane-treated animals. In addition, TFA adducts were detected by immunofluorescence in spermatozoa, probably in the acrosome and/or perinuclear theca region, and in the distal tail of spermatozoa. The increase in CYP2E1 apoprotein and p-NPH activity observed in testis and liver microsomes suggests that halothane induces its own biotransformation both hepatically and extrahepatically and in addition, that the nature of the TFA adducts will depend on the proteins present in each tissue. Also, the presence of TFA adducts in spermatozoa may result from the activation of halothane in the reproductive tract. The detailed mechanism of TFA adduct formation and its consequences on the spermatozoa function remain to be fully clarified.

  9. Aflatoxin-albumin adduct formation after single and multiple doses of aflatoxin B(1) in rats treated with Thai medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinitketkumnuen, U; Chewonarin, T; Dhumtanom, P; Lertprasertsuk, N; Wild, C P

    1999-07-16

    The objective was to conduct an assessment of the ability of two Thai medicinal plants, Cymbopogon citratus Stapf and Murdannia loriformis, to modulate levels of serum aflatoxin-albumin (AF-albumin) adducts following aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) exposure in rats. The influence of the plant extracts on AF-albumin adduct formation after a single exposure to 250 microg/kg body weight (bw) AFB(1) was measured over a 48-h period. Rats received M. loriformis extract (3 g/kg bw) or C. citratus Stapf extract (5 g/kg bw) daily for the week prior to the AFB(1) administration. In control rats, maximum adduct levels were observed 12 h post-AFB(1) treatment but in the animals receiving Murdannia extract, maximum levels occurred earlier, at 4 h post-treatment. No such effect was observed with the Cymbopogon extract. Daily treatment of rats with AFB(1) at 250 microg/kg bw for 3 weeks caused serum AF-albumin adduct levels to accumulate over a 10-14 day period and reach plateau levels 4.4-fold higher than observed after a single dose. Treatment with Murdannia extract for 1 week before and then throughout the AFB(1) exposure period resulted in a slight decrease in the AF-albumin adduct levels in the first week of the intervention. After that time, however, the reduction in adduct levels in the Murdannia extract group did not differ significantly from controls. No significant alteration in the biomarker levels was seen with the Cymbopogon extract treatments compared to control rats.

  10. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Plant growth, yield attributes, yield and net ... nutrient cycle in agro-ecosystems, and could be utilized along with chemical fertilizers. ..... Choudhury ATMA & Khanif YM (2001) Evaluation of the effects of nitrogen and magnesium fertilization on ...

  11. MICROWAVE SYSTEM FOR RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON LABORATORY ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Alexei; Kruglik, Olga; Khlebopros, Rem

    2014-01-01

    This research is concerned with development of the microwave system for research the radiophysical microwave radiation effects on laboratory animals. The frequency was 1 GHz. The results obtained demonstrate the metabolic changes in mice under the electromagnetic field influence.

  12. Radioprotective effect and other biological benefits associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fields including military, medicine, agriculture and industry. As a result, humans ... plant stems, leaves, and fruits, and generally exist in the plant ... effects of bailcalein on DNA damage in irradiated mice. The study ..... electric current production.

  13. Psychological Effects towards Humans Living in the Environment Made of Biological Concrete in Malaysia at 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Talaiekhozani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day-to-day life concrete become a compulsory material in the construction field as to make it a real concern among researchers for producing concrete with improved properties. Biological method is one of the new methods to improve concrete properties. Although, much research about biological concrete has been carried out, but till now nobody has not studied for the psychological effects of using a house or offices made up of biological concrete. The aim of this study is to investigate and find out the person's opinion about staying in a house or offices made up of biological concrete. In this study, a questionnaire containing eight questions was prepared and distributed among 21 persons in Malaysia University of Technology including students, academic and non-academic staffs among which few of them was an expert in the field of biological concrete and others did not have any knowledge about the bioconcrete. Finally, the results obtained from the questionnaires were analyzed. The results showed that 81% of participants in this study would like to stay in a house or office made up of biological concrete. However, 38% of participants believe that staying in a house or office made of biological concrete can cause health related problems. The current research paper can be considered significant for architects and civil engineers to have the insight to look into the psychological aspects of using biological concrete for various applications in the field of construction.

  14. Examining the effects of students' classroom expectations on undergraduate biology course reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kristi Lyn

    In this dissertation, I perform and compare three studies of introductory biology students' classroom expectations -- what students expect to be the nature of the knowledge that they are learning, what they think they should be (or are) doing in order to learn, and what they think they should be (or are) doing in order to be successful. Previous work has shown that expectations can impact how students approach learning, yet biology education researchers have been reluctant to acknowledge or address the effects of student expectations on curricular reform (NRC, 2012). Most research in biology education reform has focused on students' conceptual understandings of biology and the efficacy of specific changes to content and pedagogy. The current research is lacking a deeper understanding of how students perceive the classroom environment and how those perceptions can shape students' interactions with the content and pedagogy. For present and future reforms in biology to reach their full potential, I argue that biology education should actively address the different ways students think about and approach learning in biology classes. The first study uses a Likert-scale instrument, adapted from the Maryland Physics Expectations Survey (Redish, Saul, & Steinberg, 1998). This new survey, the Maryland Biology Expectations Survey (MBEX) documents two critical results in biology classrooms: (i) certain student-centered pedagogical contexts can produce favorable changes in students' expectations, and (ii) more traditional classroom contexts appear to produce negative epistemological effects. The second study utilizes a modified version of the MBEX and focuses on students' interdisciplinary views. This study documents that: (i) biology students have both discipline-specific and context-specific classroom expectations, (ii) students respond more favorably to interdisciplinary content in the biology courses we surveyed (as opposed to biology content introduced into the physics

  15. Detection and quantification of 4-ABP adducts in DNA from bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Beatriz; Stillwell, Sara W; Wishnok, John S; Trudel, Laura J; Skipper, Paul; Yu, Mimi C; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Wogan, Gerald N

    2007-02-01

    We analyzed bladder DNA from 27 cancer patients for dG-C8-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP) adducts using the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method with a 700 attomol (1 adduct in 10(9) bases) detection limit. Hemoglobin (Hb) 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) adduct levels were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After isolation of dG-C8-ABP by immunoaffinity chromatography and further purification, deuterated (d9) dG-C8-ABP (MW=443 Da) was added to each sample. Structural evidence and adduct quantification were determined by selected reaction monitoring, based on the expected adduct ion [M+H+]+1, at m/z 435 with fragmentation to the product ion at m/z 319, and monitoring of the transition for the internal standard, m/z 444-->328. The method was validated by analysis of DNA (100 microg each) from calf thymus; livers from ABP-treated and untreated rats; human placentas; and TK6 lymphoblastoid cells. Adduct was detected at femtomol levels in DNA from livers of ABP-treated rats and calf thymus, but not in other controls. The method was applied to 41 DNA samples (200 microg each) from 27 human bladders; 28 from tumor and 14 from surrounding non-tumor tissue. Of 27 tissues analyzed, 44% (12) contained 5-80 dG-C8-ABP adducts per 10(9) bases; only 1 out of 27 (4%) contained adduct in both tumor and surrounding tissues. The Hb adduct was detected in samples from all patients, at levels of 12-1960 pg per gram Hb. There was no correlation between levels of DNA and Hb adducts. The presence of DNA adducts in 44% of the subjects and high levels of Hb adducts in these non-smokers indicate environmental sources of exposure to 4-ABP.

  16. Tissue distribution of DNA adducts and their persistence in blood of mice exposed to benzene.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, G.; Wang, C.; Xin, W. (Weidong); Yin, S

    1996-01-01

    Chemicals combine with DNA, resulting in DNA damage, which could initiate carcinogenesis. To study whether benzene or benzene metabolites bind to DNA, DNA adducts in various tissues and their persistence in leukocytes were examined using the 32P-postlabeling assay. LACA mice were dosed ip with benzene at 500 mg/kg bw twice for 5 days. Two additional spots of DNA adducts are formed in bone marrow cells, liver cells, and peripheral blood compared with control mice. The relative adduct labeling ...

  17. A theoretical framework for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens: Identifying effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Nik J; Gilligan, Christopher A

    2011-06-07

    We develop and analyse a flexible compartmental model of the interaction between a plant host, a soil-borne pathogen and a microbial antagonist, for use in optimising biological control. By extracting invasion and persistence thresholds of host, pathogen and biological control agent, performing an equilibrium analysis, and numerical investigation of sensitivity to parameters and initial conditions, we determine criteria for successful biological control. We identify conditions for biological control (i) to prevent a pathogen entering a system, (ii) to eradicate a pathogen that is already present and, if that is not possible, (iii) to reduce the density of the pathogen. Control depends upon the epidemiology of the pathogen and how efficiently the antagonist can colonise particular habitats (i.e. healthy tissue, infected tissue and/or soil-borne inoculum). A sharp transition between totally effective control (i.e. eradication of the pathogen) and totally ineffective control can follow slight changes in biologically interpretable parameters or to the initial amounts of pathogen and biological control agent present. Effective biological control requires careful matching of antagonists to pathosystems. For preventative/eradicative control, antagonists must colonise susceptible hosts. However, for reduction in disease prevalence, the range of habitat is less important than the antagonist's bulking-up efficiency.

  18. [When science becomes technology: epistemological and ethical consequences of the Adduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugini, P

    2015-01-01

    Notwithstanding that the sciences are every day closest to technology, the Philosophy of Science has not yet well realized the epistemological and ethical differences that make different the "Traditional Naturalistic Science" (TNS) and the technological, artefactual, intrusive science that I called: "Post-Modern Meta-Naturalistic Science" (P-MM-NS). The first type of science has as a primary scope the knowledge of nature, using a methodology that departs from the methodic doubt, realizes a hypothesis, defines the aim(s), adopts a protocol, interprets and discusses the results, inferentially derives the conclusions, according to the classical philosophical reasonings of induction, deduction, abduction. In my philosophical reasoning, I realized that P-MM-NS follows an absolutely different epistemological procedure. The technological science prefigures a scope, produces a non-natural technically-modified object, gives for sure the occurrence of the effect for which the object has been manufactured. This means that only "in retrospect" it will ascertain whether or not the promised effect has occurred, considering that any technical artifact could be rejected by that natural environment in which it has been, acritically, delivered, without knowing how to remedy in case of an unexpected effect. In such a circumstance, the technological science has totally failed in its scope and effect, The potential failure of the predicted effect will prove that P-MM-NS follows a logical reasoning that is substantially and formally "sui generis" with respect to the epistemology and ethics of NS. This divergence from the classic reasoning of induction, deduction, abduction, has been called by me: "Adduction", because of the following considerations: the scientific procedure doesn't depart from the methodic doubt and hypothesis, only declares a scope, for which it is produced a technically-manufactured object, and gives for sure which will be the expected effect, but, not knowing how to

  19. Biological effects of lysophosphatidic acid in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisca, Frisca; Sabbadini, Roger A; Goldshmit, Yona; Pébay, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that regulates a broad range of cellular effects in various cell types, leading to a variety of responses in tissues, including in the nervous system. LPA and its receptors are found in the nervous system, with different cellular and temporal profiles. Through its ability to target most cells of the nervous system and its induction of pleiotropic effects, LPA mediates events during neural development and adulthood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the effects of LPA in the nervous system, during development and adulthood, and in various pathologies of the nervous system. We also explore potential LPA intervention strategies for anti-LPA therapeutics.

  20. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of the Adducts of Bis(O-ethyldithiocarbonatocopper(II with Substituted Pyridines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Kour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monomeric five coordinated adducts of bis(O-ethyldithiocarbonatocopper(II of general formula [Cu(C2H5OCS22(L], [L = 2-, 3-, 4-methylpyridines and 2-, 3-, 4-ethylpyridines] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, i.r. and electronic spectroscopy, magnetic and conductivity measurements. Analytical results show that the adducts have 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The adducts were found to be paramagnetic and their magnetic moments at room temperature lie within the 1.81–1.94 B.M. range and this indicates the presence of one unpaired electron. All the adducts have distorted square pyramidal geometry.

  2. Chlorambucil-adducts in DNA analyzed at the oligonucleotide level using HPLC-ESI MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Dalia; Mowaka, Shereen; Thomale, Jürgen; Linscheid, Michael W

    2009-08-01

    Chlorambucil (N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-p-aminophenylbutyric acid) is a bifunctional alkylating drug belonging to the nitrogen mustard group and is widely used as an anticancer agent. As the antitumor activity of the nitrogen mustards is based on the formation of adducts with genomic DNA, calf thymus DNA-Chlorambucil adducts were the major target in this study. Calf thymus DNA was incubated with Chlorambucil to induce the formation of a wide variety of adducts. Subsequently, enzymatic digestion of the DNA was performed using Benzonase and Nuclease S1 aiming at the production of oligonucleotides. Separation and structure elucidation of the individual DNA-Chlorambucil adducts was achieved using HPLC interfaced to electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry. Both trinucleotide and tetranucleotide Chlorambucil adducts were detected. The majority of the detected trinucleotide adducts involved monofunctional alkylation with guanine being the hotspot for alkylation. Only a few bifunctional trinucleotide adducts both intra- and interstrand cross-links were found. On the contrary, cross-linked adducts were the major detected tetranucleotides in which the intrastrand cross-links predominated over the interstrand cross-links. To a lesser extent, monofunctional guanine alkylated tetranucleotides were detected as well. With MS(n) experiments, the detailed structures of Chlorambucil adducts of the tri- and tetranucleotides were determined.

  3. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batal, Mohamed [Laboratoire «Lésions des Acides Nucléiques», Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1, CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France); Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche (France); Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche (France); Bérard, Izabel [Laboratoire «Lésions des Acides Nucléiques», Université Joseph Fourier – Grenoble 1, CEA/Institut Nanoscience et Cryogénie/SCIB, UMR-E3, Grenoble (France); Cléry-Barraud, Cécile [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Unité de Brûlure Chimique, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Antenne de La Tronche (France); and others

    2013-12-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied.

  4. N7-guanine adducts of the epoxy metabolites of 1,3-butadiene in mice lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, P; Peltonen, K

    2001-06-01

    Epoxy metabolites of 1,3-butadiene are electrophilic and can bind to nucleophilic sites in DNA forming DNA adducts. In this study, guanine N7 adducts of epoxy butene and guanine N7 adducts of epoxy butanediol were measured in lung tissues of mice inhalation exposed to various concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. 32P-postlabeling of DNA adducts were used to demonstrate that the DNA adducts derived from epoxybutene and epoxybutanediol were formed in a dose dependent manner. More than 98% of all adducts detected were formed from epoxybutanediol. Enantiomeric distribution of the adducts formed in vivo differs from that of in vitro experiments demonstrated before. In the case of epoxybutene most of the adducts were formed to the terminal carbon of the S-epoxybutene enantiomer. Most of the adducts derived from epoxybutanediol were formed from the 2S-3R enantiomer. The data demonstrates that enzymatic processes involved with activation and/or detoxification of the metabolites are enantiospecific and/or DNA repair machinery repairs the damage with stereochemical considerations. These are the crucial factors if interspecies differences in tumor sensitiveness is concerned.

  5. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  6. Correlation between Quadriceps Endurance and Adduction Moment in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hyuck Lee

    Full Text Available It is not clear whether the strength or endurance of thigh muscles (quadriceps and hamstring is positively or negatively correlated with the adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees. This study therefore assessed the relationships between the strength and endurance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and adduction moment in osteoarthritic knees and evaluated predictors of the adduction moment. The study cohort comprised 35 patients with unilateral medial osteoarthritis and varus deformity who were candidates for open wedge osteotomy. The maximal torque (60°/sec and total work (180°/sec of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and knee adduction moment were evaluated using an isokinetic testing device and gait analysis system. The total work of the quadriceps (r = 0.429, P = 0.037 and hamstring (r = 0.426, P = 0.045 muscles at 180°/sec each correlated with knee adduction moment. Preoperative varus deformity was positively correlated with adduction moment (r = 0.421, P = 0.041. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that quadriceps endurance at 180°/sec was the only factor independently associated with adduction moment (β = 0.790, P = 0.032. The adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees correlated with the endurance, but not the strength, of the quadriceps muscle. However, knee adduction moment did not correlate with the strength or endurance of the hamstring muscle.

  7. Some features of irradiated chitosan and its biological effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Le; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Luan, Le Quang; Hanh, Truong Thi; Man, Nguyen Tan; Ha, Pham Thi Le; Thuy, Tran Thi [Nuclear Research Institute, VAEC, Dalat (Viet Nam); Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Preparation of chitosan oligomer by radiation degradation was carried out on the gamma Co-60 source. The radiation degradation yield (G{sub d}) of the chitosan was found to be of 1.03. The oligochitosan with 50% of dp>8 fraction was obtained by irradiating the 10% (w/v) chitosan solution in 5% acetic acid at 45 kGy for the chitosan having the initial viscometric average molecular weight, Mv=60,000. Irradiated chitosan showed higher antifungal effect than that of unirradiated one. Furthermore, the irradiated chitosan also showed the growth-promotion effect for plants. (author)

  8. Electrical and Biological Effects of Transmission Lines: A Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jack M.

    1989-06-01

    This review describes the electrical properties of a-c and d-c transmission lines and the resulting effects on plants, animals, and people. Methods used by BPA to mitigate undesirable effects are also discussed. Although much of the information in this review pertains to high-voltage transmission lines, information on distribution lines and electrical appliances is included. The electrical properties discussed are electric and magnetic fields and corona: first for alternating-current (a-c) lines, then for direct current (d-c).

  9. Effect of solids retention time and wastewater characteristics on biological phosphorus removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Aspegren, H.; Jansen, J.l.C.

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the effect of wastewater, plant design and operation in relation to biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the possibilities to model the processes. Two Bio-P pilot plants were operated for 2.5 years in parallel receiving identical wastewater. The plants had SRT of 4...... with time which has importance in relation to modelling. The overall conclusion of the comparison between the two plants is that the biological phosphorus removal efficiency under practical operating conditions is affected by the SRT in the plant and the wastewater composition. Thus great care should...... in verification of models for Nitrogen and Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal....

  10. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  11. Biological effects of ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, J.C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire]|[Commission Internationale de protection radiologique (France)]|[Association Internationale de Radiopathologie (France)

    1999-01-01

    Since ten years the ionizing radiations are more and more often used in various domains as medical, industrial or research sector. In the same way, these radiation impacts on the environment and the living organisms, have been studied intensively. The effects mechanism knowledge improved considerably and allowed to better protect the workers and the public. (A.L.B.)

  12. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Cellular Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Beheshte; Wilson, James; Masood, Samina

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of organisms with environmental magnetic fields at the cellular level is well documented, yet not fully understood. We review the existing experimental results to understand the physics behind the effects of ambient magnetic fields on the growth, metabolism, and proliferation of in vitro cell cultures. Emphasis is placed on identifying the underlying physical principles responsible for alterations to cell structure and behavior.

  13. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    albino rats over two and five days, and also the effects of a two-week recovery period. Methomyl ... rabbits at a dose of 10 mg/kg body wt for seven days produced significant decrease in red blood cell ... role of vitamins on Japanese quails.

  14. Biological and technological effects of some mulberry varieties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    The effect of light intensities (1500-6000 lux) and temperature (20-40 ... harvested in the exponential phase of growth by pelleting at high speed (8000 rpm) for 20 .... Figure 3: Biocidal activity (measured as zone of inhibition) of crude extract of ...

  15. Nanoscaled biological gated field effect transistors for cytogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Andersen, Karsten Brandt;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is the study of chromosome structure and function, and is often used in cancer diagnosis, as many chromosome abnormalities are linked to the onset of cancer. A novel label free detection method for chromosomal translocation analysis using nanoscaled field effect transistors...

  16. Protection by quercetin and quercetin-rich fruit juice against induction of oxidative DNA damage and formation of BPDE-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boots, A.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of the flavonoid quercetin against the formation of oxidative DNA damage and bulky DNA adducts in human l

  17. Protection by quercetin and quercetin-rich fruit juice against induction of oxidative DNA damage and formation of BPDE-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boots, A.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of the flavonoid quercetin against the formation of oxidative DNA damage and bulky DNA adducts in human

  18. In vitro screening of 50 highly prescribed drugs for thiol adduct formation--comparison of potential for drug-induced toxicity and extent of adduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Ruan, Qian; He, Bing; Zhu, Mingshe; Shyu, Wen C; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2009-04-01

    Reactive metabolite formation has been associated with drug-induced liver, skin, and hematopoietic toxicity of many drugs that has resulted in serious clinical toxicity, leading to clinical development failure, black box warnings, or, in some cases, withdrawal from the market. In vitro and in vivo screening for reactive metabolite formation has been proposed and widely adopted in the pharmaceutical industry with the aim of minimizing the property and thus the risk of drug-induced toxicity (DIT). One of the most common screening methods is in vitro thiol trapping of reactive metabolites. Although it is well-documented that many hepatotoxins form thiol adducts, there is no literature describing the adduct formation potential of safer drugs that are widely used. The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the thiol adduct formation potential of 50 drugs (10 associated with DIT and 40 not associated) and document apparent differences in adduct formation between toxic and safer drugs. Dansyl glutathione was used as a trapping agent to aid the quantitation of adducts following in vitro incubation of drugs with human liver microsomes in the presence and absence of NADPH. Metabolic turnover of these drugs was also monitored by LC/UV. Overall, 15 out of the 50 drugs screened formed detectable levels of thiol adducts. There were general trends toward more positive findings in the DIT group vs the non-DIT group. These trends became more marked when the relative amount of thiol adducts was taken into account and improved further when dose and total daily reactive metabolite burdens were considered. In conclusion, there appears to be a general trend between the extent of thiol adduct formation and the potential for DIT, which would support the preclinical measurement and minimization of the property through screening of thiol adduct formation as part of an overall discovery optimization paradigm.

  19. Resource Letter BELFEF-1: Biological effects of low-frequency electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafemeister, David

    1996-08-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the interaction of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF/EMF) interactions with biological matter, and on the possibility that such interactions could have a harmful effect on human health. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: ELF/EMF theoretical interactions with biological cells, organs and organisms, magnetic dipole interactions, sensing by animals, biomedical-biophysical experiments, epidemiology, and litigation-mitigation risk issues.

  20. Replication past the butadiene diepoxide-derived DNA adduct S-[4-(N(6)-deoxyadenosinyl)-2,3-dihydroxybutyl]glutathione by DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hee; Guengerich, F Peter

    2013-06-17

    1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane (DEB), a metabolite of the carcinogen butadiene, has been shown to cause glutathione (GSH)-dependent base substitution mutations, especially A:T to G:C mutations in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 [Cho, S. H., et al. (2010) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 23, 1544] and Escherichia coli TRG8 cells [Cho, S. H., and Guengerich, F. P. (2012) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 25, 1522]. We previously identified S-[4-(N(6)-deoxyadenosinyl)-2,3-dihydroxybutyl]GSH [N(6)dA-(OH)2butyl-GSH] as a major adduct in the reaction of S-(2-hydroxy-3,4-epoxybutyl)glutathione (DEB-GSH conjugate) with nucleosides and calf thymus DNA and in vivo in livers of mice and rats treated with DEB [Cho, S. H., and Guengerich, F. P. (2012) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 25, 706]. For investigation of the miscoding potential of the major DEB-GSH conjugate-derived DNA adduct [N(6)dA-(OH)2butyl-GSH] and the effect of GSH conjugation on replication of DEB, extension studies were performed in duplex DNA substrates containing the site-specifically incorporated N(6)dA-(OH)2butyl-GSH adduct, N(6)-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)deoxyadenosine adduct (N(6)dA-butanetriol), or unmodified deoxyadenosine (dA) by human DNA polymerases (Pol) η, ι, and κ, bacteriophage polymerase T7, and Sulfolobus solfataricus polymerase Dpo4. Although dTTP incorporation was the most preferred addition opposite the N(6)dA-(OH)2butyl-GSH adduct, N(6)dA-butanetriol adduct, or unmodified dA for all polymerases, the dCTP misincorporation frequency opposite N(6)dA-(OH)2butyl-GSH was significantly higher than that opposite the N(6)dA-butanetriol adduct or unmodified dA with Pol κ or Pol T7. LC-MS/MS analysis of full-length primer extension products confirmed that Pol κ or Pol T7 incorporated the incorrect base C opposite the N(6)dA-(OH)2butyl-GSH lesion. These results indicate the relevance of GSH-containing adducts for the A:T to G:C mutations produced by DEB.

  1. Determination of ginsenoside compound K in human plasma by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry of lithium adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunhui; Lu, Youming; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Liang; Zhong, Dafang

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenoside compound K (GCK), the main metabolite of protopanaxadiol constituents of Panax ginseng, easily produces alkali metal adduct ions during mass spectrometry particularly with lithium. Accordingly, we have developed a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method for analysis of GCK in human plasma based on formation of a lithium adduct. The analyte and paclitaxel (internal standard) were extracted from 50 µL human plasma using methyl tert-butyl ether. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Phenomenex Gemini C18 column (50 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm) using stepwise gradient elution with acetonitrile–water and 0.2 mmol/L lithium carbonate at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Detection was performed in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions at m/z 629→449 for the GCK-lithium adduct and m/z 860→292 for the adduct of paclitaxel. The assay was linear in the concentration range 1.00–1000 ng/mL (r2>0.9988) with intra- and inter-day precision of ±8.4% and accuracy in the range of −4.8% to 6.5%. Recovery, stability and matrix effects were all satisfactory. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving administration of a single GCK 50 mg tablet to healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:26579476

  2. High school and college biology: A multi-level model of the effects of high school biology courses on student academic performance in introductory college biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, John Francis

    The issue of student preparation for college study in science has been an ongoing concern for both college-bound students and educators of various levels. This study uses a national sample of college students enrolled in introductory biology courses to address the relationship between high school biology preparation and subsequent introductory college biology performance. Multi-Level Modeling was used to investigate the relationship between students' high school science and mathematics experiences and college biology performance. This analysis controls for student demographic and educational background factors along with factors associated with the college or university attended. The results indicated that high school course-taking and science instructional experiences have the largest impact on student achievement in the first introductory college biology course. In particular, enrollment in courses, such as high school Calculus and Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, along with biology course content that focuses on developing a deep understanding of the topics is found to be positively associated with student achievement in introductory college biology. On the other hand, experiencing high numbers of laboratory activities, demonstrations, and independent projects along with higher levels of laboratory freedom are associated with negative achievement. These findings are relevant to high school biology teachers, college students, their parents, and educators looking beyond the goal of high school graduation.

  3. Biological activities and health effects of terpenoids from marine fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Li, Yong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed by the consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical products due to their various health beneficial effects. Hence, it can be suggested that bioactive functional ingredients from marine bioresources and their by-products are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to consumer's well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. Marine-derived fungi produce a vast array of secondary metabolites including terpenes, steroids, polyketides, peptides, alkaloids, and polysaccharides. These secondary metabolites serve many biopharmaceutical purposes. This chapter discusses about marine fungi-derived terpenoids and presents an overview of their beneficial health effects.

  4. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume V, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    7 Hz: field estimates were shorter than no-field killing fungi and retarding the fermentation of must. estimates. The differences were in the same...a photodiode detector association of t-caprolactam in cyclohexane. the The signal is processed and displayed as a digital association of n- butanol in... acetone effects c! Jirect current magnetic fields on E. coliare every second day) to induce skin cancer, and then much le..s than those reported by

  5. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TNF-BINDING VARIOLAVIRUS RECOMBINANT PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Orlovskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This review presents a summary of our data concerning in vivo and in vitro effects of recombinant TNF-binding protein from variola virus (VARVCrmB upon TNF-induced functional changes of human and murine cells. VARV-CrmB protein blocks TNF-induced production of IL-1β and IL-6 by human mononuclear cells, and their in vitro oxidation-related metabolic (OM activity. VARV-CrmB protein restores TNF-induced reduction of BFU-E+CFU-E colony-forming activity and normalizes TNF-induced effects upon CFU-GM formation in a colony-forming model of human and murine bone morrow cells (BMC. VARV-CrmB protein displays a pronounced in vivo alleviation of LPS-induced endotoxic shock symptoms in SPF BALB/C mice thus significantly increasing survival of experimental animals. Moreover, VARV-CrmBprotein decreases intensity of collagen-induced arthritis at early terms. Application of VARV-CrmB protein results in normalization of TNF-induced increase of migratory and OM activity of murine leukocytes, and exerts corrective effects upon colony-forming ability of murine hematopoietic precursors. Skin application of VARV-CrmB protein decreases leukocyte migration from a skin scrap in afferent phase of DNCB-induced contact reaction, as well as “ear oedema” index. Our results demonstrate TNF-blocking properties of VARVCrmB protein. In summary, our data allow to consider a recombinant variola virus VARV-CrmB as a new potential TNF-antagonist. Its effects can be explained by its ability of neutralizing TNF-induced activation of oxidation-related metabolic, cytokine-producing and migratory functions of effector cells in therapy of pathological inflammatory processes.

  6. Biologic Effects of Dopamine on Tumor Vasculature in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrthala Moreno-Smith

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sympathetic nervous system activation results in increased angiogenesis and tumor growth in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian carcinoma. However, the mechanistic effects of such activation on the tumor vasculature are not well understood. Dopamine (DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, regulates the functions of normal and abnormal blood vessels. Here, we examined whether DA, an inhibitory catecholamine, could block the effects of chronic stress on tumor vasculature and tumor growth. Exogenous administration of DA not only decreased tumor microvessel density but also increased pericyte coverage of tumor vessels following daily restraint stress in mice. Daily restraint stress resulted in significantly increased tumor growth in the SKOV3ip1 and HeyA8 ovarian cancer models. DA treatment blocked stress-mediated increases in tumor growth and increased pericyte coverage of tumor endothelial cells. Whereas the antiangiogenic effect of DA is mediated by dopamine receptor 2 (DR2, our data indicate that DA, through DR1, stimulates vessel stabilization by increasing pericyte recruitment to tumor endothelial cells. DA significantly stimulated migration of mouse 10T1/2 pericyte-like cells in vitro and increased cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP levels in these cells. Moreover, DA or the DR1 agonist SKF 82958 increased platinum concentration in SKOV3ip1 tumor xenografts following cisplatin administration. In conclusion, DA stabilizes tumor blood vessels through activation of pericyte cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway by DR1. These findings could have implications for blocking the stimulatory effects of chronic stress on tumor growth.

  7. [Effects and Biological Response on Bioremediation of Petroleum Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Man-li; Nie, Mai-qian; Wang, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ming-hui

    2015-05-01

    Bioaugmentation and biostimulation were used to remediate petroleum-contaminated soil which were collected from Zichang city in North of Shaanxi. The optimal bioremediation method was obtained by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon(TPH) using the infrared spectroscopy. During the bioremediation, number of degrading strains, TPH catabolic genes, and soil microbial community diversity were determined by Most Probable Number (MPN), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined agarose electrophoresis, and PCR-denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The results in different treatments showed different biodegradation effects towards total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH). Biostimulation by adding N and P to soils achieved the best degradation effects towards TPH, and the bioaugmentation was achieved by inoculating strain SZ-1 to soils. Further analysis indicated the positive correlation between catabolic genes and TPH removal efficiency. During the bioremediation, the number of TPH and alkanes degrading strains was higher than the number of aromatic degrading strains. The results of PCR-DGGE showed microbial inoculums could enhance microbial community functional diversity. These results contribute to understand the ecologically microbial effects during the bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soil.

  8. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK, which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B, has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development.

  9. Radioactivity in the ocean: laws and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the literature on US laws and international agreements, experimental and monitoring data, and ongoing studies to provide background information for environmental assessment and regulatory compliance activities for ocean dumping of low-level radioactive waste. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act is the major US legislation governing ocean disposal of radioactive waste. The major international agreement on ocean dumping is the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The United States ended its ocean dumping of radioactive wastes in 1970, but other countries have continued ocean dumping under international supervision in the northeast Atlantic. Monitoring of former US disposal sites has neither revealed significant effects on marine biota nor indicated a hazard to human health. Also, no effects on marine organisms have been found that could be attributed to routine discharges into the Irish Sea from the Windscale reprocessing plant. We must improve our ability to predict the oceanic carrying capacity and the fate and effects of ionizing radiation in the marine environment.

  10. Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Inger

    Full Text Available Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.

  11. Error-prone replication bypass of the primary aflatoxin B1 DNA adduct, AFB1-N7-Gua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chih; Li, Liang; Makarova, Alena V; Burgers, Peter M; Stone, Michael P; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2014-06-27

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The highest rates of early onset HCCs occur in geographical regions with high aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) exposure, concomitant with hepatitis B infection. Although the carcinogenic basis of AFB1 has been ascribed to its mutagenic effects, the mutagenic property of the primary AFB1-DNA adduct, AFB1-N7-Gua, in mammalian cells has not been studied extensively. Taking advantage of the ability to create vectors containing a site-specific DNA adduct, the mutagenic potential was determined in primate cells. This adduct was highly mutagenic following replication in COS-7 cells, with a mutation frequency of 45%. The spectrum of mutations was predominantly G to T base substitutions, a result that is consistent with previous mutation data derived from aflatoxin-associated HCCs. To assess which DNA polymerases (pol) might contribute to the mutational outcome, in vitro replication studies were performed. Unexpectedly, replicative pol δ and the error-prone translesion synthesis pol ζ were able to accurately bypass AFB1-N7-Gua. In contrast, replication bypass using pol κ was shown to occur with low fidelity and could account for the commonly detected G to T transversions.

  12. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  13. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  14. THE EFFECT OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL ON DNA ADDUCT FORMATION IN C57B1/6 TRP53 +/+ AND C57B16 TRP53 -/- MICE EXPOSED TO BENZO[A]PYRENE MAY BE ASSOCIATED WITH P53 FUNCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractPrevious studies have shown that pentachlorophenol (PCP) has both potentiative and antagonistic effects on the genotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). It has been suggested that these effects are due to inhibition and/or induction of enzymes involved in the biotr...

  15. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  16. Behavioral and Biological Effects of Resonant Electromagnetic Absorption in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    C) -c C) C) C) tj~ C) C) -c C -C C C’: k ~ ~f jt~ - 39 - anesthetized wits Nembuta] 𔃿 mg/kg). !he LCOF temperature probe1 0 " ] a,, 7 : t. ’on.. enI...Animals with and wit ,.hout Ground Effects", to be submitted for publication to IEEEr Trcznsac -ions or IMior’clave Theory and T,,chriques. 2. 0. P. G... B17 ... .- .- 20 Value for various regions of the leg * aValue for various regions of the arm 10 Ci a U 6 *\\ , c0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.5 3.0 2 Cross

  17. Stability, accumulation and cytotoxicity of an albumin-cisplatin adduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charlotte; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation and cytotoxicity of a 10 µmol L¿¹ equimolar human serum albumin-cisplatin adduct (HSA-Pt) was investigated in suspension Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettré Ascites Cells (Lettré). HSA-Pt did not induce apoptosis nor was it taken up by the cells to any...... significant amount within 24 h incubation. The accumulation and cytotoxicity of HSA-Pt was compared to 10 µmol L¿¹ cisplatin for which a larger accumulation and cytotoxicity were observed in EATC compared to Lettré. The experiment was performed with cell medium exchange every fourth hour as HSA...

  18. Effect of biologic therapy on radiological progression in rheumatoid arthritis: what does it add to methotrexate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Graeme Jones, Erica Darian-Smith, Michael Kwok, Tania WinzenbergMenzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania, Tasmania, AustraliaAbstract: There have been substantial advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in recent years. Traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs have been shown to have small effects on the progression of radiographic damage. This quantitative overview summarizes the evidence for biologic DMARDS and radiographic damage either alone or in combination with methotrexate. Two outcomes were used (standardized mean difference and odds of progression. A total of 21 trials were identified of which 18 had useable data. For biologic monotherapy, tocilizumab, adalimumab, and etanercept were significantly better than methotrexate, with tocilizumab ranking first in both outcomes while golimumab was ineffective in both outcomes. For a biologic in combination with methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone, most therapies studied (etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, certolizumab, tocilizumab, and rituximab were effective at slowing X-ray progression using either outcome, with infliximab ranking first in both outcomes. The exceptions to this were golimumab (no effect on standardized mean difference and abatacept (no effect on odds of progression. This effect was additional to methotrexate; thus, the overall benefit is moderate to large in magnitude, which is clearly of major clinical significance for sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis and supports the use of biologic DMARDs in those with a poor disease prognosis.Keywords: rheumatoid, trials, meta-analysis, radiographs, biologic, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, DMARDs

  19. EFFECTS OF 5E LEARNING CYCLE ON STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT IN BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Osawaru Ajaja,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of this study was to determine the effects of learning cycle as an instructional strategy on biology andchemistry students achievement. To guide this study, six research hypotheses were stated and tested at 0.05 level ofsignificance. The design of this study was 2x2x3x6 Pre-test Post-test non-equivalent control group quasi experimental design.These included two instructional groups (experimental and control groups, sex (male and female, repeated testing (Pre,Post and follow-up tests, and six weeks of experience. The samples of the study included six senior secondary schools, 112science students, and 12 biology and chemistry teachers. The instruments used for this study were: teacher’s questionnaireon knowledge and use of learning cycle (KULC; and Biology and Chemistry Achievement Test (BCAT. The data collected wereanalyzed with simple percentage, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA and student t-test statistics. The major findings of thestudy included that only 30.43% and 26.31% of biology and chemistry teachers have the knowledge that learning cycle is aninstructional method; all the biology and chemistry teachers sampled have never used learning cycle as an instructionalmethod; learning cycle had a significant effect on students achievement in biology and chemistry; students taught withlearning cycle significantly achieved better in biology/chemistry Post-test than those taught with lecture method; the posttestscores of students in the learning cycle group increased over the period of experience; non-significant difference in Posttestscores between males and females taught with learning cycle; non-significant interaction effect between method andsex on achievement; and a significant higher retention of biology and chemistry knowledge by students taught with learningcycle than those taught with lecture method. It was concluded that the method seems an appropriate instructional modelthat could be used to solve the problems of

  20. Structural perturbations induced by the alpha-anomer of the aflatoxin B(1) formamidopyrimidine adduct in duplex and single-strand DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyle L; Voehler, Markus W; Magee, Shane M; Harris, Constance M; Harris, Thomas M; Stone, Michael P

    2009-11-11

    and base levels. The structural distortions and the less favorable stacking interactions induced by the AFB-alpha-FAPY adduct explain its lower stability as compared to the AFB-beta-FAPY adduct in duplex DNA. In this DNA sequence, hydrogen bonding between the formyl oxygen and the exocyclic amine of the 3'-neighboring adenine stabilizing the E configuration of the formamide moiety is also observed for the AFB-beta-FAPY adduct, and suggests that the identity of the 3'-neighbor nucleotide modulates the stability and biological processing of AFB adducts.

  1. Catalytically and noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust: biological effects in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.P. (Univ. of Cincinnati); Lewkowski, J.P.; Hastings, L.; Malanchuk, M.

    1977-12-01

    Chronic exposure to catalytically treated or noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust significantly depressed the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) of rats. Exposure to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone or CO at comparable levels did not alter the SLA. Exposure to noncatalytically treated exhaust resulted in significant reductions in growth rate and food and water intake. However, these effects were not evident in the exposure to catalytically treated exhaust or in the control H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and CO exposures. Blood acid-base analyses indicated that exposure to either catalytically treated exhaust or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ elicits a metabolic alkalosis, while exposure to CO alone results in a metabolic acidosis. All acid-base parameters were within the normal range several weeks after the termination of exposure.

  2. Aromatic DNA adducts in human white blood cells and skin after dermal application of coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godschalk, R.W.L.; Ostertag, J.U.; Moonen, E.J.C.; Neumann, H.A.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Schooten, F.J. van [University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology

    1998-09-01

    A group of eczema patients topically treated with coal tar (CT) ointments was used as a model population to examine the applicability of DNA adducts in white blood cell (WBC) subpopulations as a measure of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Aromatic DNA adducts were examined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling in exposed skin and WBC subsets, and urinary excretion of PAH metabolites was determined to assess the whole-body burden. The median urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene and 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene was 0.39 and 0.01 {mu}mol/mol creatinine respectively, before the dermal application of CT ointments. After treatment for 1 week, these levels increased to 139.7 and 1.18 {mu}mol/mol creatinine respectively, indicating that considerable amounts of PAHs were absorbed. Median aromatic DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in skin from 2.9 adduct/10{sup 8} nucleotides before treatment to 63.3 adducts/10{sup 8} nt after treatment with CT, in monocytes from 0.28 to 0.86 adducts/10{sup 8} nt, in lymphocytes from 0.33 to 0.89 adducts/10{sup 8} nt and in granulocytes from 0.28 to 0.54 adducts/10{sup 8} nt. A week after stopping the CT treatment, the DNA adduct levels in monocytes and granulocytes were reduced to 0.38 and 0.38 adducts/10{sup 8} nt respectively, whereas the adduct levels in lymphocytes remained enhanced. Total DNA adduct levels in skin correlated with the adduct levels in monocytes and lymphocytes. Excretion of urinary metabolites during the first week of treatment was correlated with the percentage of the skin surface treated with CT ointment and decreased within a week after the cessation of treatment. 3-Hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene excretion, correlated with the levels of DNA adducts in skin that comigrated with benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide-DNA. This study indicates that the DNA adduct levels in mononuclear WBCs can possibly be used as a surrogate for skin DNA after dermal exposure to PAHs. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Detection of Riddelliine-Derived DNA Adducts in Blood of Rats Fed Riddelliine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming W. Chou

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We have previously shown that riddelliine, a naturally occurring genotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, induces liver tumors in rats and mice through a genotoxic mechanism mediated by the formation of a set of eight 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5Hpyrrolizine ( DHP-derived DNA adducts. In this study we report the formation of these DHP-derived DNA adducts in blood DNA of rats fed riddelliine. In an adduct formation and removal experiment, male and female F344 rats (8 weeks of age were administered riddelliine by gavage at a single dose of 10.0 mg/kg body weight in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. At 8, 24, 48, and 168 hrs after dosing, the levels of DHP-derived DNA adduct in blood and liver were determined by 32P-postlabeling/HPLC. Maximum DNA adduct formation occurred at 48 hr after treatment. From 48 to 168 hours, the adduct levels in female rat blood were 4-fold greater than those in male rats. In a dose response experiment, female rats were gavaged 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg doses of riddelliine for three consecutive days and the DHPderived DNA adducts in blood DNA were assayed. The levels of the DHP-derived DNA adducts in blood of rats receiving 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg doses were 12.9 and 51.8 adducts/107 nucleotides. These results suggest that: (i leucocyte DNA can bind with DHP to form a set of DHP-derived DNA adducts generated in liver; (ii DHP-derived DNA adducts in blood can serve as a potential non-invasive biomarkers for assessing the exposure to riddelliine.

  4. Differences in lysine adduction by acrolein and methyl vinyl ketone: implications for cytotoxicity in cultured hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskas, Lisa M; Pyke, Simon M; Burcham, Philip C

    2005-11-01

    Acrolein is a highly toxic environmental pollutant that readily alkylates the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in proteins. In model systems, such chemistry involves sequential addition of two acrolein molecules to a given nitrogen, forming bis-Michael-adducted species that undergo aldol condensation and dehydration to form Nepsilon-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine. Whether this ability to form cyclic adducts participates in the toxicity of acrolein is unknown. To address this issue, we compared the chemistry of protein adduction by acrolein to that of its close structural analogue methyl vinyl ketone, expecting that the alpha-methyl group would hinder the intramolecular cyclization of any bis-adducted species formed by methyl vinyl ketone. Both acrolein and methyl vinyl ketone displayed comparable protein carbonylating activity during in vitro studies with the model protein bovine serum albumin, confirming the alpha,beta,-unsaturated bond of both compounds is an efficient Michael acceptor for protein nucleophiles. However, differences in adduction chemistry became apparent during the use of electrospray ionization-MS to monitor reaction products in a lysine-containing peptide after modification by each compound. For example, although a Schiff base adduct was detected following reaction of the peptide with acrolein, an analogous species was not formed by methyl vinyl ketone. Furthermore, while ions corresponding to mono- and bis-Michael adducts were detected at the N-terminus and lysine residues following peptide modification by both carbonyls, only acrolein modification generated ions attributable to cyclic adducts. Despite these differences in adduction chemistry, in mouse hepatocytes, the two compounds exhibited very comparable abilities to induce rapid, concentration-dependent cell death as well as protein carbonylation. These findings suggest that the acute toxicity of short-chain alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds involves their ability to

  5. Oil spills: Biological effects. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biological and ecological effects of oil spills. Citations discuss effects on microorganisms, plants, and animals. Damage assessment, ecological modeling, and environmental impact statements are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Low power laser therapy — an introduction and a review of some biological effects

    OpenAIRE

    Thiel, Haymo

    1986-01-01

    This report gives a brief introduction to the characteristics of therapeutic low power laser devices. Absorption, tissue penetration and physiological mechanisms of laser irradiation are discussed. The biological effects of low power laser light are reviewed in the areas of collagen metabolism, woundhealing, inflammation and pain control. Contraindications, precautions and side effects of low power laser irradiation are discussed.

  7. The First Time Ever I Saw Your Feet: Inversion Effect in Newborns' Sensitivity to Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Inversion effect in biological motion perception has been recently attributed to an innate sensitivity of the visual system to the gravity-dependent dynamic of the motion. However, the specific cues that determine the inversion effect in naïve subjects were never investigated. In the present study, we have assessed the contribution of the local…

  8. [Adipogenic function and other biologic effects of insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankov, Y A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on experimental animals with knockout of the insulin receptor gene Insr (in the whole body or in certain tissues) and/or related genes encoding proteins involved in realization of insulin signal transduction in target cells, have made an important contribution to the elucidation of insulin regulation of metabolism, particularly fat metabolism. Since the whole insulin secreted by b-cells, together with the products of gastrointestinal tract digestion of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates reach the liver, the latter is the first organ on which this hormone acts. The liver employs released amino acids for synthesis of proteins, including apoproteins for various lipoproteins. Glucose is used for synthesis of glycogen, fatty acids, and triglycerides, which enter all the organs in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). The LIRKO mice with knockout of the Insr gene in the liver demonstrated inhibition of synthesis of macromolecular compounds from amino acids, glucose, and fatty acids. Low molecular weight substances demonstrated increased entry to circulation, and together with other disorders induced hyperglycemia. In LIRKO mice blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance demonstrated time-dependent normalization and at later stages the increase in glucose levels was replaced by hypoglycemia. These changes can be well explained if we take into consideration that one of the main functions of insulin consists in stimulation of energy accumulation by means of activation of triglyceride deposition in adipose tissue. FIRKO mice with selective knockout of adipose tissue Insr were characterized by decreased uptake of glucose in adipocytes, and its transformation into lipids. However, the level of body fat in animals remained normal, possibly due to preserved insulin receptor in the liver and insulin-induced activation of triglyceride production which maintained normal levels of body fat stores, the effective functioning of adipose tissue and secretion of leptin by

  9. [Quality of interior air: biological contaminants and their effects on health; bioaerosols and gathering techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălan, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality: biological contaminants and health effects; airborne organisms and sampling instruments. Biological contaminants include bacteria, molds, viruses, animal dander and cat saliva, house dust, mites, cockroaches and pollen. Symptoms of health problems caused by biological pollutants include sneezing, watery eyes, coughing, shortness of breath, dizziness, lethargy, fevers. Children, elderly people with breathing problems, allergies and lung diseases are particularly susceptible to disease-causing biological agents in the indoor air. It is convenient to consider microbiological samplers for collecting organisms in air as falling into several broad categories. Many popular microbiological air samplers use the principle of impaction to trap the organisms by impacting them directly on to agar. Further distinct groups are the impingers, which operate by impinging organisms into liquid.

  10. Biologic effects of fenbendazole in rats and mice: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, David; Cray, Carolyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2007-11-01

    This review summarizes findings from toxicologic, carcinogenic, immunologic, and metabolic studies on fenbendazole (FBZ). Currently, FBZ is used to treat or prevent pinworm outbreaks in laboratory rodents. Because antiparasitic treatments usually are not part of experimental designs, interactions from the medication on the outcomes of ongoing experiments are a concern. At therapeutic levels, FBZ does not alter the total content of cytochromes P450 but does induce certain hepatic cytochrome P450 isoforms, namely 1A1, 1A2, and 2B1. Although expressed constitutively at low or undetectable levels, these isoforms particularly are known for bioactivating a number of procarcinogens. Lifetime studies in rats have shown that FBZ is not a carcinogen but that it may behave as a tumor promoter when given after certain initiators. Unlike in other animal species, FBZ treatment-associated myelosuppression has not been reported to occur in rodents. The few currently available immunologic studies in mice, including an autoimmune model, have not shown effects on selected immune responses. However, data from other animal species suggest that the ability of B and T lymphocytes to proliferate in the secondary immune response may be suppressed during treatment with FBZ.

  11. Bioaccumulation and biological effects of cigarette litter in marine worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephanie L.; Rowe, Darren; Reid, Malcolm J.; Thomas, Kevin V.; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards cigarette filters present to marine life. Here we studied the impacts of smoked cigarette filter toxicants and microfibres on the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor (ragworm), a widespread inhabitant of coastal sediments. Ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter toxicants in seawater at concentrations 60 fold lower than those reported for urban run-off exhibited significantly longer burrowing times, >30% weight loss, and >2-fold increase in DNA damage compared to ragworms maintained in control conditions. In contrast, ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter microfibres in marine sediment showed no significant effects. Bioconcentration factors for nicotine were 500 fold higher from seawater than from sediment. Our results illustrate the vulnerability of organisms in the water column to smoking debris and associated toxicants, and highlight the risks posed by smoked cigarette filter debris to aquatic life. PMID:26369692

  12. Biological effects of exposure to intermediate neutron and repair mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Onishi, Takeo; Onizuka, Masahiko

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was made on cytotoxic effects of neutron capture using chicken B-cell line mutants, DT40, KURO{sup -/-}, RAD54 {sup -/-} and KU70{sup -/-} / RAD54{sup -/-}. Suspensions of these cells were exposed to two times X-radiation at various doses and the cell surviving was evaluated. The sensitivity to radiation was highest in the double defective mutant, KU70{sup -/-} / RAD54{sup -/-} and followed by that of RAD54 {sup -/-}, a homologous recombination mutant, whereas KURO {sup -/-} cell, a non-homologous end-joining mutant showed a peculiar surviving curve composed of two phases and the cell was highly sensitive to a low-dose radiation. This indicates that there are two different DNA repair systems for double-strand breaks and the system for non-homologous end-joining repair can be involved in all phases of cell cycle, but the system for the homologous one is involved only in S-phase. Therefore, it was thought that variation of sensitivity to radiation exposure depending to the phase of cell cycle might explain the alternation of repair system depending to the phase progressing of cell cycle. It was thus likely that the recovery from radiation injury, which is still a black box might be explained with the double strand breaks of DNA. (M.N.)

  13. The biological effect and medical functions of the Infrared Rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-feng

    2001-01-01

    The quantum vibrational energy-spectra including high excited states of the protein molecules have been calculated by new theory of bio-energy transport along the protein molecules and its dynamic equation, discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, appropriate to the protein molecules on the basis of the level of molecular structure. This energy-spectra obtained are basically consistent with the experimental values by infrared absorption and radiated measurement of person's hands and laser-Raman spectrum from metabolically active E. Coli.. From this energy-spectra we know that the infrared lights with (1-3)x1000nm and (5-7)x1000nm wavelength can be absorbed by the protein molecules in the living systems.In accordance with the non-linear theory of the bio-energy transport we know that the energy of the infrared light absorbed by the proteins can result in vibrations of amide-I in amino acids and can facilitate the bio-energy transport along the protein molecular chains from one place to other for the growth of living bodies. This processe is non-thermal. This is just non-thermal effect of the infrared lights. According to the mechanism we explained further the medical functions of the infrared lights absorbed.

  14. Cardiometabolic risk in psoriasis: differential effects of biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana J Kaplan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariana J KaplanDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is associated to an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV complications. Overall, the pathogenic mechanisms involved in premature CV complications in psoriasis appear to be complex and multifactorial, with traditional and nontraditional risk factors possibly contributing to the increased risk. Based on what is known about the pathogenesis of psoriasis and extrapolating the current knowledge on CV complications in other inflammatory diseases, studies are needed to investigate if appropriate control of the inflammatory, immunologic and metabolic disturbances present in psoriasis can prevent the development of this potentially lethal complication. It is clear that there is a great need for heightened awareness of the increased risk for vascular damage in patients with psoriasis. It is also crucial to closely monitor patients with psoriasis for CV risk factors including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. Whether treatment regimens that effectively manage systemic inflammation will lead to prevention of CV complications in psoriasis needs to be investigated. Clearly, studies should focus on establishing the exact mechanisms that determine CV risk in psoriasis so that appropriate preventive strategies and treatment guidelines can be established.Keywords: psoriasis, atherosclerosis, inflammation, vascular

  15. Possible Mechanisms of Ethanol-Mediated Colorectal Carcinogenesis: The Role of Cytochrome P4502E1, Etheno-DNA Adducts, and the Anti-Apoptotic Protein Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Bruno Christian; Arslic-Schmitt, Tatjana; Peccerella, Theresa; Scherr, Anna-Lena; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Bruckner, Thomas; Gdynia, Georg; Jäger, Dirk; Mueller, Sebastian; Bartsch, Helmut; Seitz, Helmut K

    2016-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. The mechanisms by which ethanol (EtOH) exerts its carcinogenic effect on the colorectal mucosa are not clear and may include oxidative stress with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated through EtOH metabolism via cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) leading to carcinogenic etheno-DNA adducts. ROS may also induce apoptosis. However, the effect of chronic EtOH consumption on CYP2E1, etheno-DNA adducts as well as anti-apoptotic proteins in the colorectal mucosa of heavy drinkers without colorectal inflammation is still not known. Rectal biopsies from 32 alcoholics (>60 g EtOH/d) and from 12 controls (alcoholics and control patients. However, CYP2E1 and etheno-DNA adducts correlated significantly when both groups were combined (p colorectal CYP2E1 was not found to be significantly increased in alcoholics, CYP2E1 correlated overall with the level of etheno-DNA adducts in the colorectal mucosa, which identifies CYP2E1 as an important factor in colorectal carcinogenesis. Most importantly, however, is the up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 in heavy drinkers counteracting apoptosis and possibly stimulating cancer development. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  16. Synthesis and Isolation of cis-2 Regiospecific Ethylene-Tethered Indene Dimer-[70]Fullerene Adduct for Polymer Solar Cell Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Higashino, Tomohiro; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-08-05

    Although the utilization of [70]fullerene bis-adducts can enhance the power conversion efficiencies of polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to their strong absorption intensities and high-lying lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels, this synthetic strategy typically yields a mixture of regioisomers that would mask the intrinsic device performances depending on the substituent pattern on the [70]fullerene derivatives. In this study, a single cis-2 regioisomer of C70 bis-adduct (cis-2-[70]BIEC) has been prepared for the first time by the same strategy that had been applied to [60]fullerene to obtain a regioisomerically pure C60 bis-adduct (cis-2-[60]BIEC). Diels-Alder reaction was conducted between a rationally designed ethylene-tethered indene dimer and [70]fullerene, followed by isolation using high-performance liquid chromatography suitable for the separation of fullerene derivatives. A series of structural analysis techniques including NMR spectroscopies and X-ray crystallography were used to identify the absolute configuration of the bis-adduct. A systematic study on the optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties of cis-2-[70]BIEC as well as the corresponding regioisomer mixture (bis-[70]BIEC) and the monoadduct (α-mono-[70]BIEC) has been performed to examine the effect of the pure cis-2 regioisomer. More importantly, their properties are compared with those of cis-2-[60]BIEC to address the effect of fullerene cage structures, that is, C60 versus C70. The PSC based on cis-2-[70]BIEC and poly(3-hexylthiophene) showed a remarkable power conversion efficiency of 4.2%, which is higher than those with bis-[70]BIEC (2.2%), α-mono-[70]BIEC (2.2%), cis-2-[60]BIEC (2.8%), and even a prevalent high-performance C70 monoadduct ([70]PCBM, 3.8%). Our synthetic strategy will pave the way for further development on the rational design and isolation of single fullerene bis-adduct regioisomers exhibiting high device performances.

  17. Modeling the conformational preference of the carbon-bonded covalent adduct formed upon exposure of 2'-deoxyguanosine to ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Purshotam; Manderville, Richard A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2013-05-20

    The conformational flexibility of the C8-linked guanine adduct formed from attachment of ochratoxin A (OTA) was analyzed using a systematic computational approach and models ranging from the nucleobase to the adducted DNA helix. A focus was placed on the influence of the C8-modification of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) on the preferred relative arrangement of the nucleobase and the C8-substituent and, more importantly, the anti/syn conformational preference with respect to the glycosidic bond. Although OTA is twisted with respect to the base in the nucleobase model, addition of the deoxyribose sugar induces a further twist and restricts rotation about the C-C linkage due to close contacts between OTA and the sugar. The nucleoside model preferentially adpots a syn orientation (by 10-20 kJ mol(-1) depending on the OTA conformation) due to the presence of an O5'-H···N3 interaction. However, when this hydrogen bond is eliminated, which better mimics the DNA environment, a small (simulations and free energy analysis predict that both syn- and anti-conformations of OTB-dG are equally stable in helices when paired opposite cytosine. These results indicate that the adduct will likely adopt a syn conformation in an isolated nucleoside and nucleotide, while a mixture of syn and anti conformations will be observed in DNA duplexes. Since the syn conformation could stabilize base mismatches upon DNA replication or Z-DNA structures with varied biological outcomes, future computational and experimental work should elucidate the consequences of the conformational preference of this potentially harmful DNA lesion.

  18. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  19. Fullerene–Carbene Lewis Acid–Base Adducts

    KAUST Repository

    <