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Sample records for additives flavourings processing

  1. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids) , 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 65, Revisio n 1 (FGE.65Rev1 ) : Consideration of sulfur - substituted furan derivatives used as flavouring agents evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to a subgroup of substances within the group of ‘ Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side - chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14’ evaluated by JECFA in FGE.13Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 33 substances, the information is adequate....

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 13, Revision 2 (FGE.13 Rev2) Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side-chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 27 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 13, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Three of the su...... of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 24 flavouring substances evaluated through the Procedure....

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 8, Revision 3 (FGE.08Rev3): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 70 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. For the substan......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 70 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565....../2000. For the substances 2-methylpropane-2-thiol [FL-no: 12.174], methyl methanethiosulphonate [FL-no: 12.159], 2-methylbutane-2-thiol [FL-no: 12.172] and 2,4,4-trimethyl-1,3-oxathiane [FL-no: 16.057] there is an indication of a genotoxic potential in vitro. Therefore, in the absence of further genotoxicity data...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 3 (FGE.10Rev3): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 63 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, including additional two substances in this Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission R...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, Revision 1: Bi- and tricyclic secondary, ketones and related esters from chemical groups 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate six flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, including an additional two substances in this Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commissi...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity fo the materials of commerce have been provided for all six candidate substances....

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 5 (FGE.08Rev5): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since...... of a genotoxic potential in vitro. Therefore, in the absence of further genotoxicity data, the Panel concluded that the Procedure could not be applied to these five substances. For four substances, 3-mercaptooctanal [FL-no: 12.268], 3-mercaptodecanal [FL-no: 12.269], methanedithiol diacetate [FL-no: 12...

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4 (FGE.08Rev4): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since......-no: 12.174], ethyl 2-mercapto-2-methyl propanoate [FL-no: 12.304] and 2,4,4-trimethyl-1,3- oxathiane [FL-no: 16.057] there is an indication of a genotoxic potential in vitro. Therefore, in the absence of further genotoxicity data, the Panel concluded that the Procedure could not be applied to these five...

  8. Flavon-induced connections between lepton flavour mixing and charged lepton flavour violation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Pascoli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In leptonic flavour models with discrete flavour symmetries, couplings between flavons and leptons can result in special flavour structures after they gain vacuum expectation values. At the same time, they can also contribute to the other lepton-flavour-violating processes. We study the flavon-induced LFV 3-body charged lepton decays and radiative decays and we take as example the $A_4$ discrete symmetry. In $A_4$ models, a $Z_3$ residual symmetry roughly holds in the charged lepton sector for the realisation of tri-bimaximal mixing at leading order. The only processes allowed by this symmetry are $\\tau^-\\to \\mu^+ e^- e^-, e^+ \\mu^- \\mu^-$, and the other 3-body and all radiative decays are suppressed by small $Z_3$-breaking effects. These processes also depend on the representation the flavon is in, whether pseudo-real (case i) or complex (case ii). We calculate the decay rates for all processes for each case and derive their strong connection with lepton flavour mixing. In case i, sum rules for the branching...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 50, Revision 1 (FGE.50Rev1): Consideration of pyrazine derivatives evaluated by JECFA (57th meeting) structurally related to pyrazine derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.17Rev2 (2010)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Adequate specifications for the materials of commerce are available for all 41 flavouring substances....

  10. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 4 (FGE.21Rev4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 59 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision i...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 41 candidate substances...

  11. Green tea flavour determinants and their changes over manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Rana, Mohammad M; Liu, Guo-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Da-Xiang; Wu, Fu-Guang; Li, Xin-Bao; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Flavour determinants in tea infusions and their changes during manufacturing processes were studied using Camellia sinensis cultivars 'Bai-Sang Cha' ('BAS') possessing significant floral scents and 'Fuding-Dabai Cha' ('FUD') with common green tea odour. Metabolite profiling based on odour activity threshold revealed that 'BAS' contained higher levels of the active odorants β-ionone, linalool and its two oxides, geraniol, epoxylinalool, decanal and taste determinant catechins than 'FUD' (pmanufacturing processes, the levels of linalool and geraniol decreased whereas those of β-ionone, linalool oxides, indole and cis-jasmone increased. Compared with pan-fire treatment, steam treatment reduced the levels of catechins and proportion of geraniol, linalool and its derivatives, consequently, reducing catechin-related astringency and monoterpenol-related floral scent. Our study suggests that flavour determinant targeted modulation could be made through genotype and manufacturing improvements.

  12. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 3 (FGE.17Rev3): Pyrazine derivatives from chemical group 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 28 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, including seven additional substances considered in this Revision 3, using the Procedure...... adequate data showing absence of genotoxicity are provided. For one substance [FL-no: 14.051] no intake data are available preventing it from being evaluated through the Procedure. The remaining 25 substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure...

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 82, Revision 1 (FGE.82Rev1): Consideration of Epoxides evaluated by the JECFA (65 th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for four substances, the information is adequate; but for the substance [FL-no: 07.170] further information on stereoisomerism is required....

  14. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 216, Revision 1 (FGE.216Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated 2-Phenyl -2-Alkenals from Subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of five flavouring substances from subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19. In the Flavouring Group Evaluation 216 (FGE.216) additional genotoxicity...... of animals treated with 2-phenylcrotonaldehyde. Moreover, since the substance was genotoxic only without metabolic activation, it appears necessary to prove the absence of genotoxic effect locally in the gastro intestinal system using the Comet assay....

  15. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4): primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters from chemical groups 1 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 12 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4), including two additional substances, using the Procedure in Commission...... of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 12 candidate substances....

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 51, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to alicyclic ketones secondary alcohols and related esters in FGE.09Rev3 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 20 substances, the information is adequate....

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 303 (FGE.303): Spilanthol from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured...... at the use level reported by the Industry, especially in those cases where the annual production values were reported to be small. In consequence, the Panel had reservations about the data on use and use levels provided and the intake estimates obtained by the MSDI approach. In the absence of more precise...

  18. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 203, Revision 1 (FGE.203Rev1: α,β-Unsaturated aliphatic aldehydes and precursors from chemical subgroup 1.1.4 of FGE.19 with two or more conjugated double-bonds and with or without additional non-conjugated double-bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of flavouring substances from subgroup 1.1.4 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 203, Revision 1 (FGE.203Rev1. The Flavour Industry has provided additional genotoxicity studies for one representative substance in FGE.203, namely 2,4-decadienal [FL-no: 05.140]. Based on the available data, on newly submitted studies and on the scientific evidence from the literature, the Panel concluded that the genotoxic potential cannot be ruled out for the flavouring substances in this FGE.

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 16 substances, the information is adequate....

  20. Flavour exposures after conditioned aversion or preference trigger different brain processes in anaesthetised pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaultier, A; Meunier-Salaün, M C; Malbert, C H; Val-Laillet, D

    2011-11-01

    We describe the behavioural consequences of conditioned flavour aversion and preference in pigs and have investigated the brain circuits involved in the representation of flavours with different hedonic values. The study was performed on eight 30-kg pigs. (i) Animals were negatively conditioned to an F- flavour added to a meal followed by LiCl intraduodenal (i.d.) injection, and positively conditioned to an F+ flavour added to a meal followed by NaCl i.d. injection. F+ and F- were thyme or cinnamon flavours. After each conditioning, the behavioural activities were recorded; (ii) One and 5 weeks later, animals were subjected to three two-choice food tests to investigate their preferences between F+, F- and a novel flavour (O); and (iii) Anaesthetised animals were subjected to three SPECT brain imaging sessions: control situation (no flavour) and exposure to F+ and to F-. The negative reinforcement induced a physical malaise and visceral illness. After a positive reinforcement, animals showed playing or feeding motivation and quietness. F+ was significantly preferred over O and F-, and O was significantly preferred over F-. Both F- and F+ induced some metabolic differences in neural circuits involved in sensory associative processes, learning and memory, emotions, reward and feeding motivation. Exposure to F+ induced a higher activity in corticolimbic and reward-related areas, while F- induced a deactivation of the basal nuclei and limbic thalamic nuclei. This study reveals the unconscious cognitive dimension evoked by food flavours according to the individual experience, and highlights the importance of the food sensory image on hedonism and anticipatory eating behaviour.

  1. Food contact materials, flavouring substances and smoke flavourings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel K-H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The EFSA Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC Panel and the subsequent Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF Panel have undertaken evaluations of the safety of flavourings (both chemically defined substances and mixtures such as smoke flavourings and food contact materials (FCM, as well as assessments on other substances used in food. The major progress in methodologies for the evaluation of the safety of these substances is highlighted in this article. By December 2011, scientific opinions had been adopted for 247 substances for food contact materials, mainly plastics. Adoption of a series of opinions on active and/or intelligent packaging substances and on recycling processes of plastics is planned between July 2012 and December 2013. Panel opinions, EFSA statements/reports and guidance documents were published on specific issues and on substances for which there was an urgent request for safety evaluation (for example isopropylthioxanthone (ITX, bisphenol A (BPA, phthalates, epoxidised soybean oil (ESBO, benzophenone and 4-methylbenzophenone. By 2009, the AFC and CEF Panels had completed the safety review of 2 067 flavourings substances used in the EU. Additional data, which were requested for 404 substances, are currently under evaluation or have been generated. Eleven smoke flavourings have been evaluated, and the CEF Panel has prepared a guidance document on the future data required for the evaluation of flavourings.

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 22, Revision 1 (FGE.22Rev1): Ring substituted phenolic substances from chemical groups 21 and 25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 28 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 22, Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substance 3...... concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Adequate specifications for the materials of commerce are available for all 27 flavouring substances evaluated through the Procedure....

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 2 (FGE.25Rev2): Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from chemical group 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 37 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the sub...... assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. For five substances, the composition of the stereoisomeric mixture has to be specified further....

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2 (FGE.10Rev2): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 61 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the sub...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 300 (FGE.300): One cyclo-aliphatic amide from chemical group 33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate a flavouring substance in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 300 using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substance was not conside...

  6. EFSA Panel on F ood Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 63, Revision 2 (FGE.63Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59 th and 6 9 th meeting s ) structurally related to saturated and unsaturated aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and esters of secondary alcohols and saturated linear or branched - chain carboxylic acids evaluated by EFSA in FGE.07 Rev4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 20 substances, the information is adequate. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 309 (FGE.309): Sodium Diacetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate sodium diacetate [FL-no: 16.073] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 309, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. However, although ...... on Food. Based on this group ADI, the use as sodium diacetate as a flavouring substance at the current levels of dietary intake raises no safety concern.......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate sodium diacetate [FL-no: 16.073] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 309, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. However, although...... in principle it would be possible to evaluate sodium diacetate via the Procedure, the Panel considered that this is not necessary, since the substance and its dissociation products are covered by the group ADI for acetic acid and sodium acetate, including sodium diacetate, derived by the Scientific Committee...

  8. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 3 (FGE.74Rev3): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally related to Aliphatic and Alicyclic Mono-, Di-, Tri-, and Polysulphides with or wi thout Additional Oxygenated Functional Groups from Chemical Group 20 evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    concluded that they would pose “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered for the substances evaluated through...

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 91, Re vision 2 (FGE.91Rev2): Consid eration of simple aliphatic and aromatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 68th meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach For seven substances [FL-no: 12.038, 12.085, 12.137, 12.138, 12.145, 12.252 and 12.259] the Panel decided, contrary to the JECFA that these substances could not be evaluated due to absence of a NOAEL from either one of these substances or from a structurally...

  10. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 2 (FGE.73Rev2). Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev3 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 18 substances, the information is adequate....

  11. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 87, Revision 2 (FGE.87Rev2): Consideration of bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.47Rev1 (2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered for the substances evaluated through the Procedure and for all 19 substances, the information is adequate....

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 3 (FGE.11Rev3): Aliphatic dialcohols, diketones, and hydroxyketones from chemical groups 8 and 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 11 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substances ......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all candidate substances....

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 300, Revision 1 (FGE.300Rev1): One cyclo-aliphatic amide from chemical group 33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate a flavouring substance,cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-cyclohexyl)-amide [FL-no: 16.115] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 300, Revision 1...... (FGE.300Rev1) using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision is made due to a re-evaluation of the flavouring substance, cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-cyclohexyl)-amide [FL-no: 16.115], as a 90-day dietary study in rats has become available...

  14. Additive Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Duvenaud, David; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a Gaussian process model of functions which are additive. An additive function is one which decomposes into a sum of low-dimensional functions, each depending on only a subset of the input variables. Additive GPs generalize both Generalized Additive Models, and the standard GP models which use squared-exponential kernels. Hyperparameter learning in this model can be seen as Bayesian Hierarchical Kernel Learning (HKL). We introduce an expressive but tractable parameterization of the kernel function, which allows efficient evaluation of all input interaction terms, whose number is exponential in the input dimension. The additional structure discoverable by this model results in increased interpretability, as well as state-of-the-art predictive power in regression tasks.

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 3, Revision 2 (FGE.03Rev2): Acetals of branched- and straight-chain aliphatic saturated primary alcohols and branched- and straight-chain saturated or unsaturated, aldehydes, an ester of a hemiacetal and an orthoester of formic acid, from chemical groups 1, 2 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance, acetaldehyde ethyl isopropyl acetal [FL-no: 06.137], structurally related to the 58 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group...

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Ai ds (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 (FGE.208): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the α , β - unsaturation in ring / side - chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance from subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 208. The Flavour Industry has provided a...

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 2 (FGE.11Rev2): Aliphatic dialcohols, diketones, and hydroxyketones from chemical groups 8 and 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... in the present group have been reported to occur naturally in a wide range of food items. In its evaluation, the Panel as a default used the “Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake” (MSDI) approach to estimate the per capita intakes of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined...... the information provided by the European Flavour Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured at the use level reported by the Industry, especially in those cases where...

  18. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Flavouring Group Evaluation 46, Revision 1 (FGE.46Rev1): Ammonia and three ammonium salts from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... in a wide range of food items up to very high amounts. Hydrogen sulphide is also reported to occur naturally in a wide range of food items. In its evaluation, the Panel as a default used the “Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake” (MSDI) approach to estimate the per capita intakes of the flavouring...... substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured at the use...

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2): Primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, acid, and esters from chemical group 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured...... at the use level reported by the Industry, especially in those cases where the annual production values were reported to be small. In consequence, the Panel had reservations about the data on use and use levels provided and the intake estimates obtained by the MSDI approach. In the absence of more precise...

  20. Massive neutrinos and lepton-flavour-violating processes

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, J A

    2001-01-01

    If neutrino masses and mixings are suitable to explain the atmospheric and solar neutrino fluxes, this amounts to contributions to FCNC processes, in particular $\\mu\\to e, \\gamma$. If the theory is supersymmetric and the origin of the masses is a see-saw mechanism, we show that the prediction for BR($\\mu\\to e, \\gamma$) is in general larger than the experimental upper bound, especially if the solar data are explained by a large angle MSW effect, which recent analyses suggest as the preferred scenario.

  1. Contribution of oxidized tallow to aroma characteristics of beeflike process flavour assessed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least squares regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shiqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xiao, Zuobing; Niu, Yunwei; Hayat, Khizar; Eric, Karangwa

    2012-09-07

    Flavour profiles of seven beeflike process flavours (BFs) including non-oxidized or oxidized tallow were comparatively analysed by electronic nose, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis to characterize the headspace of BFs. Analysis of volatiles by GC-MS indicated that the effect of oxidized tallow with moderate oxidization level on Maillard reaction was more prominent than that of others, which potentially could result in an optimal meat flavour with strong, harmony and species-specific characteristics detected by sensory analysis. In addition, electronic nose data confirmed the accuracy of the GC-MS and sensory analysis results. Correlation analysis of the electronic nose measurements, sensory evaluation and characteristic compounds through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) further explained that moderate oxidized tallow with peroxide value (PV) of 87.67-160 mequiv./kg, the p-anisidine value (p-AV) of 30.57-50, and the acid value (AV) of 1.8-2.2 mg KOH/g tallow was a desirable precursor for imparting aroma characteristics of beef flavour.

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 96 (FGE.96): Consideration of 88 flavouring substances considered by EFSA for which EU production volumes / anticipated production volumes have been submitted on request by DG SANCO. Addendum to FGE. 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 68, 69, 70, 71, 73, 76, 77, 79, 80, 83, 84, 85 and 87

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... of commerce have also been considered and for eight stereoisomeric substances [FL-no: 06.040, 08.073, 09.371, 09.780, 10.050, 13.060, 13.161 and 16.039], the stereoisomeric composition has to be specified further....

  3. Precise limits from lepton flavour violating processes on the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity

    CERN Document Server

    del Águila, F; Jenkins, M D

    2009-01-01

    We recalculate the leading one-loop contributions to mu -> e gamma and mu -> eee in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity. When all the Goldstone interactions are taken into account the result is ultraviolet finite. The present experimental limits on these processes require a somewhat heavy effective scale ~2.5 TeV, or the flavour alignment of the Yukawa couplings of light and heavy leptons at the ~10% level, or the splitting of heavy lepton masses to a similar precision. Present limits on tau decays set no bounds on the corresponding parameters involving the tau lepton.

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 310 (FGE.310): Rebaudioside A from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate rebaudioside A [FL-no: 16.113], a steviol glycoside. The substance was not considered to have genotoxic potential. Since a comprehensive and adequate...... toxicological database, including human studies, is available for steviol glycosides, the Panel based its evaluation of rebaudioside A on a comparison of the ADI of 4 mg/kg bw, expressed as steviol, established by EFSA, with the estimated dietary exposure figures based on the MSDI and mTAMDI approaches...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 301 (FGE.301): A sulphur substituted pyrimidin-derivative and its hydrochloride salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate two flavouring substances, 4-amino-5,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2(1H)-one [FL-no: 16.116] and 4-amino-5,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2(1H)-one...

  6. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia;

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied...

  7. EFSA CEF Penal (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2 (FGE.212Rev2): α,β-Unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 24 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2. The Panel concluded in ...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 3 (FGE.06Rev3): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 50 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 6, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the subs...

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 93, Revision 1 (FGE.93Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    and agrees with the JECFA conclusion, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all five substances...

  10. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 76, Revision 1 (FGE.76Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    as flavouring substances, as these substances could not be evaluated because of concern with respect to genotoxicity. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 26 substances, the information is adequate....

  11. Gauged Lepton Flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, R.; Gavela, M.B.; Grinstein, B.; Merlo, L.; Quilez, P.

    2016-01-01

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; requiring in addition a phenomenologically viable setup leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplings are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavor Violation. In all cases, the $\\mu-\\tau$ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.

  12. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 24, Revision 2 (FGE.24Rev2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 24 candidate substances....

  14. Reconciling $(g-2)_\\mu$ and charged lepton flavour violating processes through a doubly charged scalar

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabortty, Joydeep; Mondal, Subhadeep; Srivastava, Tripurari

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the phenomenological consequences of a doubly charged scalar which may belong to different uncoloured scalar multiplets. This doubly charged scalar couples to the charged leptons as well as gauge bosons, which we parametrize in a model independent way. Restricting ourselves in the regime of conserved charged-parity (CP), we assume only a few non-zero Yukawa couplings ($y_{\\mu \\ell}$, where $\\ell=e,\\mu,\\tau$) between the doubly charged scalar and the charged leptons. Our choices allow the doubly charged scalar to impinge low-energy processes like anomalous magnetic moment of muon and a few possible charged lepton flavour violating (CLFV) processes. These same Yukawa couplings are also instrumental in producing same-sign di-lepton signatures at the LHC. In this article we examine the impact of individual contributions from the diagonal and off-diagonal Yukawa couplings in the light of muon $(g-2)$ excess. Subsequently, we use the derived information to inquire the possible CLFV proc...

  15. Reduction of Saltiness and Acrylamide Levels in Palm Sugar-Like Flavouring through Buffer Modification and the Addition of Calcium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Aida Wan Mustapha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO4 buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of the level found in original PSLF. A further decrease (~25% in the sodium content was achieved by removing monobasic sodium phosphate (NaH2PO4 from the buffer system. Meanwhile, the addition of CaCl2 at 20–40 mg/L reduced the acrylamide content in PSLF by as much as 58%. A CaCl2 concentration of 20 mg/mL was most favourable as it most efficiently suppressed acrylamide formation while providing an acceptably high flavour yield in PSLF. In view of the high acrylamide content in PSLF, additional work is necessary to further reduce the amount of acrylamide by controlling the asparagine concentration in the precursor mixture.

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 3 (FGE.21Rev3): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .092, 15.093, 15.094, 15.096, 15.097, 15.106, 15.107, 15.129 and 15.135] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 2 (FEG.17Rev2): Pyrazine derivatives from chemical group 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. For the remaining substance [FL-no: 14.052] additional toxicity data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for two substances...

  18. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2 (FGE.21Rev2): Thiazoles, thiophene, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical group 29. Miscellaneous substances from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 56 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Seven of the su...... of commerce have also been considered. For two substances are an identity test lacking and for one has the stereoisomeric composition to be specified....

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 18, Revision 2 (FGE.18Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols, aromatic tertiary alcohols and their esters from chemical groups 6 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 32 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 18, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the sub......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for six substances information is lacking....

  20. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 305 (FGE.305): L - Methionylglycine of chemical group 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    use in foods that are not heated or intended to be heated. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the material of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have...

  1. EFSA EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 304 (FGE.304): Five carboxamides from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all five candidate substances....

  2. Flavour Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    奎斯特国际有限公司

    2004-01-01

    @@ A good flavour must taste realistic and natural as well as performing under tough conditions, says Mairi Coia. In conjunction with texture or mouthfeel, flavour is the most important aspect of food. It is the one thing can bring consumers back to a product again and again - or not, as the case may be. In short, taste is the number one attribute in food and that is why the global fiavour business is worth A5 billion every year as manufacturers strive to make food taste better and fresher for longer.

  3. Risk assessment of flavouring substances used in foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norby, Karin; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Greve, Krestine

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present project, the FLAVIS project, is to perform risk assessment of chemically defined flavouring substances. The evaluations are then presented to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for final adoption in its Scientific Panel on food additives, flavourings, processing aids...... and materials in contact with food. The regulatory background for the work is found in the European Parliament and Council Regulation No. 2232/96 laying down a procedure for the establishment of a list of flavouring substances the use of which will be authorised to the exclusion of all others in the EU...... the approach developed by the “Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives” (JECFA) and referred to in Commission Regulation EC No. 1565/2000. First, the 2800 flavouring substances are divided into groups of structurally related substances. The Procedure is then a stepwise approach that integrates...

  4. Flavour Compounds in Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravasio, Davide Antonio

    Fungi produce a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during their primary or secondary metabolism and with a wide range of functions. The main focus of this research work has been put on flavour molecules that are produced during fermentation processes, mainly esters and alcohols derived...

  5. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 400 (FGE.400): 3-(1- ((3,5-dimethylisoxazol-4-yl)methyl)-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-1-(3-hydroxybenzyl)imidazolidine-2,4-dione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) of EFSA was requested to deliver a scientific opinion on the implications for human health of the flavouring substance 3-(1-((3,5-dimethylisoxazol-4-yl)methyl)-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-1-(3-hydroxybenzyl)imidazolidine-2...

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 3 (FGE.20Rev3): Benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, a related acetal, benzoic acids, and related esters from chemical groups 23 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 3 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, the SCF Opinion on benzoic acid. Furthermore information on stereoisomeric composition for two substa...

  7. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia; Henle, Thomas; Antequera, Teresa; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied. FES reduced cooking loss and increased water content in sous-vide samples. FES and cooking method showed a marked effect on browning development, both on the meat surface and within. FES led to tougher and chewier texture in sous-vide cooked lamb, and enhanced flavour scores of sous-vide samples more markedly than in roasted ones. FES added meat showed higher contents of furosine; 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural did not reach detectable levels. N-ε-carboxymethyllysine amounts were rather low and not influenced by the studied factors. Cooked meat seems to be a minor dietary source of MR products, regardless the presence of reducing sugars and the cooking method.

  8. Flavour equilibration studies of quark-gluon plasma with non-zero baryon density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Sen

    2009-12-01

    Flavour equilibration for a thermally equilibrated but chemically non-equilibrated quark-gluon plasma is presented. Flavour equilibration is studied enforcing baryon number conservation. In addition to the usual processes like single additional gluon production $gg \\rightleftharpoons ggg$ and its reverse and quark–antiquark pair production by gluon pair fusion $gg \\rightleftharpoons q_{i}q_{i}^{-}$ and reverse thereof, processes like quark-flavour interchanging $q_{i}q_{i}^{-} \\rightleftharpoons q_{j}q_{j}^{-}$ is also considered. The degree of equilibration is studied comparatively for various reactions/constraints that are being considered.

  9. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 2 (FGE.23Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... III. Ten of the substances in the present group have been reported to occur naturally in a wide range of food items. In its evaluation, the Panel as a default used the “Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake” (MSDI) approach to estimate the per capita intakes of the flavouring substances in Europe....... However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured at the use level reported...

  10. Improvement in shelf life of minimally processed cilantro leaves through integration of kinetin pretreatment and packaging interventions: Studies on microbial population dynamics, biochemical characteristics and flavour retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitha, K; Shivashankara, K S; Sudhakar Rao, D V; Oberoi, Harinder Singh; Roy, T K; Bharathamma, H

    2017-04-15

    Effect of integrating optimized combination of pretreatment with packaging on shelf life of minimally processed cilantro leaves (MPCL) was appraised through analysis of their sensory attributes, biochemical characteristics, microbial population and flavour profile during storage. Minimally pretreated cilantro leaves pretreated with 50ppm kinetin and packed in 25μ polypropylene bags showed a shelf life of 21days. Optimized combination helped in efficiently maintaining sensory parameters, flavour profile, and retention of antioxidants in MPCL until 21days. Studies conducted on the effect of optimized combination on microbial population and flavour profile revealed that among different microorganisms, pectinolysers had a significant effect on spoilage of MPCL and their population of ⩽3.59logcfu/g was found to be acceptable. Principal component analysis of headspace volatiles revealed that (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-hexadecenal, (E)-2-tetradecenal & (E)-2-tetradecen-1-ol in stored samples clustered with fresh samples and therefore, could be considered as freshness indicators for MPCL.

  11. Counting Processes in Simple Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Ola; Hedenborg, Maj-Lene

    1980-01-01

    The cognitive processes of seven children solving arithmetic problems were accurately classified as reconstructive or reproductive according to the child's verbal report of his thought processes. Classifications of thought processes by means of verbal reports can also be used to improve the analysis of latencies. (SB)

  12. Production of Japanese Soy-Sauce Flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der C.

    2001-01-01

    The salt-tolerant yeasts Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis are important for the formation of flavour in Japanese soy-sauce processes. In these processes Z. rouxii produces the flavour components ethanol, higher alcohols and 4-hydroxyfuranones, while C. versatilis is responsible for th

  13. Universal Constraints on Low-Energy Flavour Models

    CERN Document Server

    Calibbi, Lorenzo; Pokorski, Stefan; Ziegler, Robert

    2012-01-01

    It is pointed out that in a general class of flavour models one can identify certain universally present FCNC operators, induced by the exchange of heavy flavour messengers. Their coefficients depend on the rotation angles that connect flavour and fermion mass basis. The lower bounds on the messenger scale are derived using updated experimental constraints on the FCNC operators. The obtained bounds are different for different operators and in addition they depend on the chosen set of rotations. Given the sensitivity expected in the forthcoming experiments, the present analysis suggests interesting room for discovering new physics. As the highlights emerge the leptonic processes, $\\mu\\rightarrow e\\gamma$, $\\mu\\rightarrow eee$ and $\\mu\\rightarrow e$ conversion in nuclei.

  14. Discrete Flavour Groups, \\theta_13 and Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Merlo, Luca; Stamou, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Discrete flavour groups have been studied in connection with special patterns of neutrino mixing suggested by the data, such as Tri-Bimaximal mixing (groups A4, S4...) or Bi-Maximal mixing (group S4...) etc. We review the predictions for sin(\\theta_13) in a number of these models and confront them with the experimental measurements. We compare the performances of the different classes of models in this respect. We then consider, in a supersymmetric framework, the important implications of these flavour symmetries on lepton flavour violating processes, like \\mu -> e gamma and similar processes. We discuss how the existing limits constrain these models, once their parameters are adjusted so as to optimize the agreement with the measured values of the mixing angles. In the simplified CMSSM context, adopted here just for indicative purposes, the small tan(beta) range and heavy SUSY mass scales are favoured by lepton flavour violating processes, which makes it even more difficult to reproduce the reported muon g-2...

  15. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for flavour deterioration

  16. Dynamics of Non-supersymmetric Flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M Sohaib; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    We continue investigating the effect of the back-reaction by non-supersymmetric probes in the Kuperstein-Sonnenschein model. In the limit when the back-reaction is small, we discuss physical properties of the back-reacted geometry. We further introduce additional probe flavours in this back-reacted geometry and study in detail the phase structure of this sector when a constant electromagnetic field or a chemical potential are present. We find that the Landau pole, which serves as the UV cut-off of the background geometry, also serves as an important scale in the corresponding thermodynamics of the additional flavour sector. We note that since this additional probe flavours are indistinguishable from the back-reacting flavours, the results we obtain point to a much richer phase structure of the system.

  17. Flavoured Soft Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, Chee Sheng

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of flavour in ``soft leptogenesis'' (leptogenesis induced by soft supersymmetry breaking terms). We address the question of how flavour effects can affect the region of parameters in which successful soft leptogenesis induced by CP violation in the right-handed sneutrino mixing is possible. We find that for decays which occur in the intermediate to strong washout regimes for all flavours, the produced total $B-L$ asymmetry can be up to a factor ${\\cal O}(30)$ larger than the one predicted with flavour effects being neglected. This enhancement, permits slightly larger values of the required lepton violating soft bilinear term.

  18. Topological observables in many-flavour QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Yasumichi; Bennett, Ed; Kurachi, Masafumi; Maskawa, Toshihide; Miura, Kohtaroh; Nagai, Kei-ichi; Ohki, Hiroshi; Rinaldi, Enrico; Shibata, Akihiro; Yamawaki, Koichi; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    SU(3) gauge theory with eight massless flavours is believed to be walking, while the corresponding twelve- and four-flavour appear IR-conformal and confining respectively. Looking at the simulations performed by the LatKMI collaboration of these theories, we use the topological susceptibility as an additional probe of the IR dynamics. By drawing a comparison with SU(3) pure gauge theory, we see a dynamical quenching effect emerge at larger number of flavours, which is suggestive of emerging near-conformal and conformal behaviour.

  19. Cern Academic Training programme 2011 - Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES   4, 5, 6 and 7 April 2011 Flavour Physics and CP Violation Dr. Yosef Nir (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel 11:00-12:00 - 4, 6 and 7 April - Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant 5 April - Bldg. 80-1-001 - Globe 1st Floor   The B-factories have led to significant progress in our understanding of CP violation and of flavour physics. Yet, two flavour puzzles remain. The standard model flavour puzzle is the question of why there is smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters. The new physics flavour puzzle is the question of why TeV-scale new physics was not signalled in flavour changing neutral current processes. The high pT experiments, ATLAS and CMS, are likely to shed light on these puzzles. As concerns CP violation, the LHC will lead to progress on the puzzle of the baryon asymmetry as well.  

  20. Local Time of Additive Levy Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We studied the problem of existence of jointly continuous local time for an additive process.Here, “local time” is understood in the sence of occupation density, and by an additive Lévy process we mean a process X={X(t), t∈Rd+)} which has the decomposition X= X1 X2 … XN. We prove that if the product of it slower index and N is greater than d, then a jointly continuous local time can be obtained via Berman's method.

  1. Flavour Physics and Implication for New Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, Gino

    2016-10-01

    Flavour physics represents one of the most interesting and, at the same time, less understood sector of the Standard Theory. On the one hand, the peculiar pattern of quark and lepton masses, and their mixing angles, may be the clue to some new dynamics occurring at high-energy scales. On the other hand, the strong suppression of flavour-changing neutral-current processes, predicted by the Standard Theory and confirmed by experiments, represents a serious challenge to extend the Theory. This article reviews both these aspects of flavour physics from a theoretical perspective.

  2. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 67 Revision 2 (FGE.67Rev2): Consideration of 28 furan-substituted compounds evaluated by JECFA at the 55th, 65th and 69th meetings (JECFA, 2001, 2006a, 2009b)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), and to decide whether furth...

  3. New trends in beer flavour compound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Iglesias, Cristina; Montero, Olimpio; Sancho, Daniel; Blanco, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    As the beer market is steadily expanding, it is important for the brewing industry to offer consumers a product with the best organoleptic characteristics, flavour being one of the key characteristics of beer. New trends in instrumental methods of beer flavour analysis are described. In addition to successfully applied methods in beer analysis such as chromatography, spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry or electronic nose and tongue techniques, among others, sample extraction and preparation such as derivatization or microextraction methods are also reviewed.

  4. Flavour alignment in physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuninger, Carolin Barbara

    2012-11-21

    extension of the Standard Model where a second Higgs doublet is added. In such models, there are two Yukawa matrices for each fermion type. Going to the mass basis, one of them is diagonalized and together with the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs forms the mass matrix of the quarks. The other Yukawa matrix however is not diagonal. It couples two quarks and one of the mass eigenstates of the two Higgs doublets. Flavour violating processes can thus occur via the exchange of a neutral scalar. If the two Yukawa matrices were aligned for some reason this would not happen. However, the alignment can only be imposed at one energy scale and will be spoiled when evolving the couplings down to a lower scale. It is shown that in spite of this effect, alignment of the Yukawa couplings provides sufficient protection from flavour changing neutral currents to be in agreement with present experimental bounds. Another, more ambitious, extension of the Standard Model are warped extra dimensions. In these models spacetime consists of a slice of five-dimensional Anti-de Sitter space (the ''bulk'') sandwiched in between two flat four-dimensional boundaries (the ''branes''). The Higgs is assumed to live on one of the branes while all other particles are allowed to spread into the bulk. Particles that propagate in the bulk have a ''KK tower'' of heavier particles associated with them in the effective four-dimensional theory. In the bulk fermions have a vector-like mass term in addition to their Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. Via different localizations of the quarks' wave functions in the bulk, the huge differences in their masses can be explained. However, since the wave function profiles of the quarks are non-universal for the different flavours, so are the couplings to the KK excitations of gauge bosons. Rotating to the mass basis therefore introduces off-diagonal elements in these couplings and thus flavour changing

  5. Lepton-flavour violation in a Pati-Salam model with gauged flavour symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Thorsten; Moch, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Combining Pati-Salam (PS) and flavour symmetries in a renormalisable setup, we devise a scenario which produces realistic masses for the charged leptons. Flavour-symmetry breaking scalar fields in the adjoint representations of the PS gauge group are responsible for generating different flavour structures for up- and down-type quarks as well as for leptons. The model is characterised by new heavy fermions which mix with the Standard Model quarks and leptons. In particular, the partners for the third fermion generation induce sizeable sources of flavour violation. Focusing on the charged-lepton sector, we scrutinise the model with respect to its implications for lepton-flavour violating processes such as $\\mu \\rightarrow e\\gamma$, $\\mu\\rightarrow 3e$ and muon conversion in nuclei.

  6. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 313, (FGE.313): α,β-unsaturated 3(2H)-furanone derivatives from chemical group 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    Survey-derived Daily Intake (MSDI) approach. For the flavouring substance [FL-no: 13.175], toxicity data are required. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity...... criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for the three flavouring substances. The Panel concluded that for 2,5-dimethyl-4-ethoxyfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.117], 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.119] and 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.175] for which...

  7. Lepton Flavour Violation in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Pattori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We discuss in detail the constraints on partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In a first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well-above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sectors mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged lepton...

  8. Flavour alignment in physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuninger, Carolin Barbara

    2012-11-21

    extension of the Standard Model where a second Higgs doublet is added. In such models, there are two Yukawa matrices for each fermion type. Going to the mass basis, one of them is diagonalized and together with the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs forms the mass matrix of the quarks. The other Yukawa matrix however is not diagonal. It couples two quarks and one of the mass eigenstates of the two Higgs doublets. Flavour violating processes can thus occur via the exchange of a neutral scalar. If the two Yukawa matrices were aligned for some reason this would not happen. However, the alignment can only be imposed at one energy scale and will be spoiled when evolving the couplings down to a lower scale. It is shown that in spite of this effect, alignment of the Yukawa couplings provides sufficient protection from flavour changing neutral currents to be in agreement with present experimental bounds. Another, more ambitious, extension of the Standard Model are warped extra dimensions. In these models spacetime consists of a slice of five-dimensional Anti-de Sitter space (the ''bulk'') sandwiched in between two flat four-dimensional boundaries (the ''branes''). The Higgs is assumed to live on one of the branes while all other particles are allowed to spread into the bulk. Particles that propagate in the bulk have a ''KK tower'' of heavier particles associated with them in the effective four-dimensional theory. In the bulk fermions have a vector-like mass term in addition to their Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. Via different localizations of the quarks' wave functions in the bulk, the huge differences in their masses can be explained. However, since the wave function profiles of the quarks are non-universal for the different flavours, so are the couplings to the KK excitations of gauge bosons. Rotating to the mass basis therefore introduces off-diagonal elements in these couplings and thus flavour changing

  9. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  10. Flavour Tagging at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Grabalosa Gandara, M

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the most possible accurate knowledge of the flavour at production of the reconstructed B meson is required. This poster summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. We use same side an opposite side algorithms to establish wheter the meson contained a b or a b\\bar quark. The final decision is obtained through a combination of several methods. The use of control channels, decays to a flavour specific final state, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction \\omega (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as input for the determination of CKM unitary triangle angles.

  11. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 304, Revision 1 (FGE.304Rev1): Four carboxamides from Chemical Groups 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    .125] do not give rise to safety concern at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity...... criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all four candidate substances....

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 303, Revision 1 (FGE.303Rev1): Spilanthol from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    (MSDI) approach. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the material of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have been provided for the candidate substance....

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 3 (FGE.25Rev3): Aliphatic hydrocarbons from chemical group 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity and identity criteria for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 14...

  14. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 66, Revision 1 (FGE.66Rev1): Consideration of Furfuryl Alcohol and Related Flavouring Substances Evaluated by JECFA (55th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 14 flavouring substances in the Revision 1 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 66, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the s...

  15. The effect of Debina grapevine indigenous yeast strains of Metschnikowia and Saccharomyces on wine flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parapouli, Maria; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Drainas, Constantin; Perisynakis, Angelos

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of grape must is a complex microbiological process involving a large number of various yeast species, to which the flavour of every traditional wine is largely attributed. Whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily responsible for the conversion of sugar to alcohol, the activities of various non-Saccharomyces species enhance wine flavour. In this study, indigenous yeast strains belonging to Metschnikowia pulcherrima var. zitsae as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated and characterized from Debina must (Zitsa, Epirus, Greece). In addition, these strains were examined for their effect on the outcome of the wine fermentation process when used sequentially as starter cultures. The resulting wine, as analyzed over three consecutive years, was observed to possess a richer, more aromatic bouquet than wine from a commercial starter culture. These results emphasize the potential of employing indigenous yeast strains for the production of traditional wines with improved flavour.

  16. Lepton Flavour Violation Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lepton Flavour Violation in the charged lepton sector (CLFV is forbidden in the Minimal Standard model and strongly suppressed in extensions of the model to include finite neutrino mixing. On the other hand, a wide class of Supersymmetric theories, even coupled with Grand Unification models (SUSY-GUT models, predict CLFV processes at a rate within the reach of new experimental searches operated with high resolution detectors at high intensity accelerators. As the Standard model background is negligible, the observation of one or more CLFV events would provide incontrovertible evidence for physics beyond Standard model, while a null effect would severely constrain the set of theory parameters. Therefore, a big experimental effort is currently (and will be for incoming years accomplished to achieve unprecedented sensitivity on several CLFV processes. In this paper we review past and recent results in this research field, with focus on CLFV channels involving muons and tau's. We present currently operating experiments as well as future projects, with emphasis laid on how sensitivity enhancements are accompanied by improvements on detection techniques. Limitations due to systematic effects are also discussed in detail together with the solutions being adopted to overcome them.

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 5 (FGE.21Rev5): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    .108, 15.115, 15.116, 15.118 and 15.135] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake (MSDI) approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce...... have also been considered. Adequate specifications, including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce, have been provided for all 41 candidate substances....

  18. Overview of existing European food consumption databases: critical aspects in relation to their use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Donne, Cinzia; Piccinelli, Raffaela; Sette, Stefania; Leclercq, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    A critical analysis of existing food consumption databases was performed with particular regard for their current and potential use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials. Within the European Food Consumption Validation project (EFCOVAL), a questionnaire on critical aspects of such datasets was developed and administered to researchers responsible for the collection/analysis of national food consumption data in European countries. Information collected was complemented through a review of the literature and of grey publications in order to provide an inventory of the main food consumption surveys performed in Europe from 1994 to 2007, for a total of 23 countries and 37 surveys. It appeared that existing European food consumption surveys have as a main objective the assessment of nutrient intake in the population. On the other hand, most of the databases were shown to be used also for the purpose of dietary exposure assessment.

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 1 (FGE.220Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... genotoxic effects in germ cells, which theoretically may result in reduced reproductive capacity or in inheritable genetic damage. Reduced reproductive capacity and inheritable genetic damage are toxicological endpoints which differ from carcinogenicity and therefore, the negative results...... that the representative substance for subgroup 4.4b, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.010], is unable to induce adverse effects both on male rat reproductive capacity and dominant lethality. On this basis, the Panel concludes that there is no concern for this substance to induce heritable genetic damage...

  20. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC'workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays'and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  1. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC' workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays' and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  2. Linear flavour violation and anomalies in B physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben; Renner, S A

    2015-01-01

    We propose renormalizable models of new physics that can explain various anomalies observed in decays of B-mesons to electron and muon pairs. The new physics states couple to linear combinations of Standard Model fermions, yielding a pattern of flavour violation that gives a consistent fit to the gamut of flavour data. Accidental symmetries prevent contributions to baryon- and lepton-number-violating processes, as well as enforcing a loop suppression of new physics contributions to flavour violating processes. Data require that the new flavour-breaking couplings are largely aligned with the Yukawa couplings of the SM and so we also explore patterns of flavour symmetry breaking giving rise to this structure.

  3. LHCb flavour tagging performance

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Musy, M

    2003-01-01

    In CP violation measurements, the most accurate determination of the B flavour of neutral and charged B-mesons is necessary. In this note we summarize the tagging performances for the LHCb experiment, using different approaches and studying different decay channels.

  4. Update of the flavour-physics constraints in the NMSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, Florian [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica (UAM/CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    We consider the impact of several flavour-changing observables in the B- and the Kaon sectors on the parameter space of the NMSSM, in a minimal flavour violating version of this model. Our purpose consists in updating our previous results in [4] and designing an up-to-date flavour test for the public package NMSSMTools. We provide details concerning our implementation of the constraints in a series of brief reviews of the current status of the considered channels. Finally, we present a few consequences of these flavour constraints for the NMSSM, turning to two specific scenarios: one is characteristic of the MSSM-limit and illustrates the workings of charged-Higgs and genuinely supersymmetric contributions to flavour-changing processes; the second focus is a region where a light CP-odd Higgs is present. Strong limits are found whenever an enhancement factor - large tanβ, light H{sup ±}, resonant pseudoscalar - comes into play. (orig.)

  5. Additive functionals and excursions of Kuznetsov processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacène Boutabia

    2005-01-01

    semigroup of transition. In this paper, we give the excursion laws of (Xtt∈ℝ+ conditioned on the strict past and future without duality hypothesis. We study excursions of a general regenerative system and of a regenerative system consisting of the closure of the set of times the regular points of B are visited. In both cases, those conditioned excursion laws depend only on two points Xg− and Xd, where ]g,d[ is an excursion interval of the regenerative set M. We use the (FDt-predictable exit system to bring together the isolated points of M and its perfect part and replace the classical optional exit system. This has been a subject in literature before (e.g., Kaspi (1988 under the classical duality hypothesis. We define an “additive functional” for (Ytt∈ℝ with B, we generalize the laws cited before to (Ytt∈ℝ, and we express laws of pairs of excursions.

  6. Top-Flavoured Dark Matter in Dark Minimal Flavour Violation

    OpenAIRE

    Blanke, Monika; Kast, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We study a simplified model of top-flavoured dark matter in the framework of Dark Minimal Flavour Violation. In this setup the coupling of the dark matter flavour triplet to up-type quarks constitutes the only new source of flavour and CP violation. The parameter space of the model is restricted by LHC searches with missing energy final states, by neutral $D$ meson mixing data, by the observed dark matter relic abundance, and by the absence of signal in direct detection experiments. We consid...

  7. Two approaches towards the flavour puzzle. Dynamical minimal flavour violation and warped extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Michaela E.

    2010-08-16

    The minimal-flavour-violating (MFV) hypothesis considers the Standard Model (SM) Yukawa matrices as the only source of flavour violation. In this work, we promote their entries to dynamical scalar spurion fields, using an effective field theory approach, such that the maximal flavour symmetry (FS) of the SM gauge sector is formally restored at high energy scales. The non-vanishing vacuum expectation values of the spurions induce a sequence of FS breaking and generate the observed hierarchy in the SM quark masses and mixings. The fact that there exists no explanation for it in the SM is known as the flavour puzzle. Gauging the non-abelian subgroup of the spontaneously broken FS, we interpret the associated Goldstone bosons as the longitudinal degrees of freedom of the corresponding massive gauge bosons. Integrating out the heavy Higgs modes in the Yukawa spurions leads directly to flavour-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) at tree level. The coefficients of the effective four-quark operators, resulting from the exchange of heavy flavoured gauge bosons, strictly follow the MFV principle. On the other hand, the Goldstone bosons associated with the global abelian symmetry group behave as weakly coupled axions which can be used to solve the strong CP problem within a modified Peccei-Quinn formalism. Models with a warped fifth dimension contain five-dimensional (5D) fermion bulk mass matrices in addition to their 5D Yukawa matrices, which thus represent an additional source of flavour violation beyond MFV. They can address the flavour puzzle since their eigenvalues allow for a different localisation of the fermion zero mode profiles along the extra dimension which leads to a hierarchy in the effective four-dimensional (4D) Yukawa matrices. At the same time, the fermion splitting introduces non-universal fermion couplings to Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge boson modes, inducing tree-level FCNCs. Within a Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection (RSc model) we carefully work

  8. Charged-lepton flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andreas Hoecker

    2012-11-01

    This write-up on a talk at the 2011 Lepton–Photon symposium in Mumbai, India, summarizes recent results in the charged-lepton flavour sector. Searches for charged-lepton flavour violation, lepton electric dipole moments and flavour-conserving CP violation are reviewed here. Recent progress in -lepton physics and in the Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is also discussed.

  9. Flavour Tagging with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems require knowledge of the b quark production flavour. This identification is performed by the Flavour Tagging.

  10. 烹饪调味过程对加碘盐补碘效率的影响%The influence of cookery flavour process on supplement iodine efficiency of iodized salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光辉; 钟世荣

    2001-01-01

    It is discussed in the article that seasoning effects of the food salty flavour in common cooking were determined by Sickville method and iodine loss of iodized salt in common cooking was determined by the P*S blue-light photometric method,the influence of cookery flavour process on supplement iodine efficiency of iodized salt was analysed.%本文在常规烹饪盐咸味的调味过程中,分别用斯柯维法、P*S蓝光度法测定食物盐咸味的调味效果及加碘盐的碘损失情况,分析烹饪调味过程对加碘盐补碘效率的影响。

  11. Search for new phenomena in $t\\bar{t}$ final states with additional heavy-flavour jets in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for new phenomena in $t\\bar{t}$ final states with additional heavy-flavour jets is presented. The search targets a variety of signals, including the pair production of a vector-like top quark ($T$) with a significant branching ratio to a top quark and either a Standard Model Higgs boson or a $Z$ boson; four-top-quark production, both within the Standard Model and in several new physics scenarios; and heavy Higgs bosons (neutral and charged) produced in association with, and decaying into, third generation quarks. The analysis uses $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13\\tev$ recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 13.2 fb$^{-1}$. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets, as well as the jets+$E_{\\text{T}}^{\\text{miss}}$ final state, characterised by multiple jets and lar...

  12. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio, E-mail: feruglio@pd.infn.it; Paradisi, Paride, E-mail: paride.paradisi@pd.infn.it [Sezione di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ‘G. Galilei’, INFN, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea, E-mail: pattori@physik.uzh.ch [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, 8057, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-08

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ→e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis.

  13. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' G. Galilei' , Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ → e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis. (orig.) 7.

  14. Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    An introductory overview of the Standard Model description of flavour is presented. The main emphasis is put on present tests of the quark-mixing matrix structure and the phenomenological determination of its parameters. Special attention is given to the experimental evidences of CP violation and their important role in our understanding of flavour dynamics.

  15. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; L Maharana

    2004-09-01

    New neutral gauge bosons ' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson '. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes.

  16. Open heavy flavour production: conceptual framework and implementation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung Wuki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, MI (United States)]. E-mail: Tung@pa.msu.edu; Kretzer, Stefan; Schmidt, Carl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, MI (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Heavy flavour production is an important quantum chromodynamics (QCD) process both in its own right and as a key component of precision global QCD analysis. Apparent disagreements between fixed-flavour scheme calculations of b-production rate with experimental measurements in hadro-, lepto- and photo-production provide new impetus for a thorough examination of the theory and phenomenology of this process. We review existing methods of calculation and place them in the context of the general perturbative QCD framework of Collins. A distinction is drawn between scheme dependence and implementation issues related to quark mass effects near threshold. We point out a so far overlooked kinematic constraint on the threshold behaviour, which greatly simplifies the variable flavour number scheme. This obviates the need for the elaborate existing prescriptions and leads to robust predictions. It can facilitate the study of current issues on heavy flavour production as well as precision global QCD analysis. (author)

  17. A T' Flavour Model for Fermions and its Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We present a supersymmetric flavour model based on the T' discrete group, which explains fermion masses and mixings. The flavour symmetry, acting in the supersymmetric sector, provides well defined sfermion mass matrices and the resulting supersymmetric spectrum accounts for sufficiently light particles that could be seen at LHC. Furthermore, several contributions to FCNC processes are present and they can be useful to test the model in the present and future experiments. We will review the main results for both leptons and quarks.

  18. Process chain modeling and selection in an additive manufacturing context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Stolfi, Alessandro; Mischkot, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new two-dimensional approach to modeling manufacturing process chains. This approach is used to consider the role of additive manufacturing technologies in process chains for a part with micro scale features and no internal geometry. It is shown that additive manufacturing...... evolving fields like additive manufacturing....

  19. 酶法改性干酪风味配料的加工技术%Processing Technology of Enzyme Modified Cheese Flavour Ingredient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青; 刘佳; 赵秀明; 赵征

    2011-01-01

    酶改性干酪(EMC)作为酶法改性干酪风味配料的主要产品,可以赋予风味平淡的产品以特殊的干酪风味特性。本文介绍了EMC生产工艺以及生产过程中所用的酶和发酵剂。%As a main product of enzyme-modified cheese flavour ingredients, enzyme-modified cheese (EMC) can be used to impart a special cheese flavour character to a blander product. This review introduced the technology of EMC, and enzymes as well as starter cultures used in EMC manufacture.

  20. Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, Peyton A; Karpinski, Clarissa D; Brown, Jessica E; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F

    2015-01-01

    Background Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids. Methods Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary fla...

  1. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 218, Revision 1 (FGE.218Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 4.2 of FGE.19: Furfural derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .001], for which there was a request for genotoxicity data in FGE.218. Flavouring Group Evaluation 218 (FGE.218) consists of furfural [FL-no: 13.018] and seven substances structurally related to furfural, 5-methylfurfural [FL-no: 13.001], furfuryl alcohol [FL-no: 13.019] and five esters of furfuryl alcohol...... is expected to be oxidised to the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde furfural. However, based on the data then available the Panel concluded that furfural is not of concern with respect to genotoxicity. Furthermore, the Panel concluded that not only furfural but also the structurally related furfuryl alcohol...... to 5-[(sulphoxy)methyl]furfural which shows genotoxic potential in vitro, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure. Accordingly, the Panel concluded that 5-methylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure either. Industry has submitted additional data on the 5...

  2. Flavour physics and CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Kou, Emi

    2014-01-01

    In these three lectures, I overview the theoretical framework of the flavour physics and CP violation. The first lecture is the introduction to the flavour physics. Namely, I give theoretical basics of the weak interaction. I follow also some historical aspect, discovery of the CP violation, phenomenological studies of charged and neutral currents and the success of the GIM mechanism. In the second lecture, I describe the flavour physics and CP violating phenomena in the Standard Model (SM). I also give the latest experimental observation of the CP Violation at the B factories and the LHC and discuss its interpretation. In the third lecture, I discuss the on-going search of the signals beyond SM in the flavour physics and also the future prospects.

  3. Heavy flavour results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell P. J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of heavy-flavour physics results from the ATLAS experiment is presented, based on data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC during 2010. Differential cross-sections for the production of heavy flavours, charmonium and bottomonium states and D-mesons are presented and compared to various theoretical models. Results of B-hadron lifetime measurements are also reported.

  4. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  5. Effect of flavour of liquid Ensure diet supplement on energy intake in male SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Zoe A; Brown, Yvonne A; Rayner, D Vernon; Stubbs, R James; Mercer, Julian G

    2006-10-30

    Outbred male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with one of the four flavours of the liquid diet, Ensure, in addition to chow pellets, to examine whether differences in flavour lead to differences in energy intake i.e. degree of over-consumption. For half the rats, the Ensure supplement was provided for 14 days and then withdrawn for the final 8 days of the study, whereas the remaining animals were allowed to consume Ensure for 22 days. All four flavours of Ensure, chocolate, vanilla, coffee and asparagus, induced a sustained increase in daily energy intake of approximately 15%. There was an effect of flavour on initial consumption of the Ensure diet, with coffee and asparagus flavours being consumed less avidly than vanilla or chocolate. However, this effect was short-lived. Overall, there was no effect of flavour on body weight gain, energy intake from Ensure, total energy intake, body composition, or measured blood hormones and metabolites. Withdrawal of Ensure resulted in reductions in body weight gain, total energy intake, fat but not lean tissue mass, and concentrations of blood leptin, non-esterified fatty acids and triglycerides, but there was no effect of the flavour of Ensure previously supplied on any of these parameters. The ability of the liquid diet, Ensure, to stimulate long-term caloric over-consumption is not due to its flavouring. Rather, other attributes of Ensure must be more important, such as its intrinsic flavour, liquid formulation, macronutrient composition, and ease of ingestion, digestion and absorption.

  6. In-Process Monitoring of Additive Manufacturing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this project is the implementation of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) for in situ metal additive manufacturing process...

  7. Starter culture development for improving the flavour of Proosdij-type cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayad, E.H.E.; Verheul, A.; Bruinenberg, P.; Wouters, J.T.M.; Smit, G.

    2003-01-01

    The use of the additional mesophilic strain B851, which has specific flavour forming abilities, was tested for improving the flavour development of a Proosdij-type cheese made with a combination of an acidifying mesophilic and an adjunct thermophilic culture. This strain was selected because of its

  8. Production of natural flavour compounds: bioconversion of monoterpenes by spores of Penicillium digitatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolken, W.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Consumers prefer natural over artificial additives. Consequently natural flavour-compounds fetch higher prices than the corresponding artificial compound. Various natural means of flavour production are discussed in this dissertation. The major part is focused on the biotransformation of geraniol in

  9. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Janssen, Niels; Smith, Stefan; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with

  10. Heavy Flavour Production at LHC: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Bruno Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An overview of experimental results on the production of heavy flavour (charm and bottom hadrons at LHC is presented. Both the open and hidden heavy flavour sectors are covered, with an emphasis on heavy ion collisions.

  11. Design of Test Parts to Characterize Micro Additive Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Mischkot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The minimum feature size and obtainable tolerances of additive manufacturing processes are linked to the smallest volumetric elements (voxels) that can be created. This work presents the iterative design of a test part to investigate the resolution of AM processes with voxel sizes at the micro...... scale. Each design iteration reduces the test part size, increases the number of test features, improves functionality, and decreases coupling in the part. The final design is a set of three test parts that are easy to orient and measure, and that provide useful information about micro additive...... manufacturing processes....

  12. Metagenomics reveals flavour metabolic network of cereal vinegar microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin-Huan; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Zong-Min; Yu, Yong-Jian; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Multispecies microbial community formed through centuries of repeated batch acetic acid fermentation (AAF) is crucial for the flavour quality of traditional vinegar produced from cereals. However, the metabolism to generate and/or formulate the essential flavours by the multispecies microbial community is hardly understood. Here we used metagenomic approach to clarify in situ metabolic network of key microbes responsible for flavour synthesis of a typical cereal vinegar, Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, produced by solid-state fermentation. First, we identified 3 organic acids, 7 amino acids, and 20 volatiles as dominant vinegar metabolites. Second, we revealed taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiota by metagenomic shotgun sequencing. A total of 86 201 predicted protein-coding genes from 35 phyla (951 genera) were involved in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of Metabolism (42.3%), Genetic Information Processing (28.3%), and Environmental Information Processing (10.1%). Furthermore, a metabolic network for substrate breakdown and dominant flavour formation in vinegar microbiota was constructed, and microbial distribution discrepancy in different metabolic pathways was charted. This study helps elucidating different metabolic roles of microbes during flavour formation in vinegar microbiota.

  13. Flavour-changing Higgs couplings in a class of two Higgs doublet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella, F.J. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Burjassot (Spain); Branco, G.C. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Burjassot (Spain); Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisbon (Portugal); Nebot, M. [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisbon (Portugal); Rebelo, M.N. [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisbon (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    We analyse various flavour-changing processes like t → hu, hc, h → τe, τμ as well as hadronic decays h @→ bs, bd, in the framework of a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour-changing neutral scalar currents at tree level. These models have the remarkable feature of having these flavour-violating couplings entirely determined by the CKM and PMNS matrices as well as tan β. The flavour structure of these scalar currents results from a symmetry of the Lagrangian and there fore it is natural and stable under the renormalisation group. We show that in some of the models the rates of the above flavour-changing processes can reach the discovery level at the LHC at 13 TeV even taking into account the stringent bounds on low energy processes, in particular μ @→ eγ. (orig.)

  14. Heavy flavour decay properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, Ina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results on CP-violation searches in the Bs system, studied in the decay into J/psi phi, and the Bd system through the comparison of the decay time distributions in the flavour specific state J/psi K* and in the CP eigenstate J/psi KS. We additionally present new results in the search for the rare decays of Bs and Bd into mu+mu-. These searches are based on the full sample of data collected by ATLAS at 7 and 8 TeV collision energy. The consistency with the SM and with other available measurements is discussed.

  15. Lepton flavour universality violation from composite muons

    CERN Document Server

    Stangl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe a possibility to explain the $2.6\\sigma$ deviation from lepton flavour universality observed by the LHCb collaboration in $B^+\\to K^+\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays in the context of minimal composite Higgs models. We find that a sizable degree of compositeness of partially composite muons can lead to a good agreement with the experimental data. Our construction predicts a new physics contribution to $B_s$-$\\bar{B}_s$ mixing. Additionally, it accounts for the deficit in the invisible $Z$ width measured at LEP.

  16. Theory of electric dipole moments and lepton flavour violation

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Electric dipole moments and charged-lepton flavour-violating processes are extremely sensitive probes for new physics, complementary to direct searches as well as flavour-changing processes in the quark sector. Beyond the "smoking-gun" feature of a potential significant measurement, however, it is crucial to understand their implications for new physics models quantitatively. The corresponding multi-scale problem of relating the existing high-precision measurements to fundamental parameters can be approached model-independently to a large extent; however, care must be taken to include the uncertainties from especially nuclear and QCD calculations properly.

  17. Additive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Bue

    This Ph.D dissertation,ffAdditive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Controlff, deal with Additive Manufacturing technologies which is a common name for a series of processes that are recognized by being computer controlled, highly automated, and manufacture objects...... by a layered deposition of material. Two areas of particular interest is addressed. They are rooted in two very different areas, yet is intended to fuel the same goal. To help Additive Manufacturing technologies one step closer to becoming the autonomous, digital manufacturing method of tomorrow. Vision...... systems A paradox exist in the field of Additive Manufacturing. The technologies allow for close-to unrestrained and integral geometrical freedom. Almost any geometry can be manufactured fast, e"ciently and cheap. Something that has been missing fundamental capability since the entering of the industrial...

  18. Sustainable Production Process of Biological Mineral Feed Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Zielinska; Katarzyna Chojnacka; Marjana Simonic

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: This study discussed the problem of accumulation of Zn and Cu in the topsoil as a result of application of mineral feed additives that possess low bioavailability in animal diet. The review considered the production process of mineral feed additives in which a product supplies microelements in highly bioavailable form. Enrichment of natural biomass of edible microalgae with microelement metal ions, which supply microelements of feeding significance in livestock diet, is con...

  19. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-05-31

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar.

  20. Manufacturability analysis to combine additive and subtractive processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kerbrat, Olivier; MOGNOL, Pascal; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology to estimate manufacturing complexity for both machining and layered manufacturing. The goal is to take into account manufacturing constraints at design stage in order to realize tools (dies and molds) by a combination of a subtractive process (high-speed machining) and an additive process (selective laser sintering). Design/methodology/approach - Manufacturability indexes are defined and calculated from th...

  1. Fundamental Aspects of Selective Melting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Certain details of the additive manufacturing process known as selective laser melting (SLM) affect the performance of the final metal part. To unleash the full potential of SLM it is crucial that the process engineer in the field receives guidance about how to select values for a multitude of process variables employed in the building process. These include, for example, the type of powder (e.g., size distribution, shape, type of alloy), orientation of the build axis, the beam scan rate, the beam power density, the scan pattern and scan rate. The science-based selection of these settings con- stitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy, reactive, dynamic wetting followed by re-solidification. In addition, inherent to the process is its considerable variability that stems from the powder packing. Each time a limited number of powder particles are placed, the stacking is intrinsically different from the previous, possessing a different geometry, and having a different set of contact areas with the surrounding particles. As a result, even if all other process parameters (scan rate, etc) are exactly the same, the shape and contact geometry and area of the final melt pool will be unique to that particular configuration. This report identifies the most important issues facing SLM, discusses the fundamental physics associated with it and points out how modeling can support the additive manufacturing efforts.

  2. Thin-layer catalytic far-infrared radiation drying and flavour of tomato slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A far-infrared radiation (FIR catalytic laboratory dryer was designed by us and used to dry tomato. The kinetics of drying of tomato slices with FIR energy was dependent on both the distance from the heat source and the sample thickness. Numerical evaluation of the simplified Fick’s law for Fourier number showed that the effective moisture diffusivity increased from 0.193×10–9 to 1.893×10–9 m2/s, from 0.059×10–9 to 2.885×10–9 m2/s, and, from 0.170×10–9 to 4.531×10–9 m2/s for the 7, 9, and 11 mm thick slices as moisture content decreased. Application of FIR enhanced the flavour of the dried tomatoes by 36.6% when compared with the raw ones. The results demonstrate that in addition to shorter drying times, the flavour of the products can be enhanced with FIR. Therefore, FIR drying should be considered as an efficient drying method for tomato with respect to minimization of processing time, enhancement in flavour, and improvements in the quality and functional property of dried tomatoes.

  3. Heavy flavours: working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gladilin, Leonid [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Scobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Tonelli, Diego [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2009-07-15

    The talks presented in the working group ''Heavy flavours'' of the DIS 2009 workshop are summarised. New and recently updated results from theory, proton antiproton and heavy ion colliders, as well from HERA and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Heavy flavour production at HERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugnera Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review, recent experimental results from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations on heavy flavour production in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction regimes are summarized. The results cover charm fragmentation fractions, charm and beauty cross sections, F2cc̄ and F2bb̄ proton structure functions and the running charm- and beauty-quark masses.

  5. Kaon Flavour Physics Strikes Back

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2016-01-01

    In this short presentation I emphasize the increased importance of kaon flavour physics in the search for new physics (NP) that we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade. The main actors will be the branching ratios for the rare decays $K^+\\rightarrow\\pi^+\

  6. Sustainable Production Process of Biological Mineral Feed Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zielinska

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study discussed the problem of accumulation of Zn and Cu in the topsoil as a result of application of mineral feed additives that possess low bioavailability in animal diet. The review considered the production process of mineral feed additives in which a product supplies microelements in highly bioavailable form. Enrichment of natural biomass of edible microalgae with microelement metal ions, which supply microelements of feeding significance in livestock diet, is considered in term of sustainable production. Approach: Production of microalgae-derived products as mineral feed additives requires elaboration of the processes for cultivation of alga, enrichment process and afterwards recovery of the enriched biomass from the solution to obtain liquid free of cells that could be reused in the next process. In this study membrane bioreactor was considered as a method for separation, both in photobioreactor (growth of microorganism as well as in the enrichment process. Results: Effort involved in thermal and chemical separation techniques is higher than that in mechanical techniques. Membrane bioreactors which are usually applied to treat wastewater, both industrial and domestic. This study discussed method to separate a valuable biomass of enriched microalgae and reuse the solution with residual metal ions that can be used once again in the subsequent biosorption process. Conclusion/Recommendation: Taking into consideration care about the environment it is better to apply membrane modules in the production process in terms of sustainable production. The proposed solution assumed the application of membrane modules as a separation step after enrichment process and biomass recovery.

  7. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rukmani Mohanta; Anjan Kumar Giri

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that the study of flavour physics and CP violation is very important to critically test the Standard Model and to look for possible signature of new physics beyond it. The observation of CP violation in kaon system in 1964 has ignited a lot of experimental and theoretical efforts to understand its origin and to look for CP violation effects in other systems besides the neutral kaons. The two -factories BABAR and BELLE, along with other experiments, in the last decade or so made studies in flavour physics and CP violation a very interesting one. In this article we discuss the status and prospectives of the flavour physics associated with the strange, charm and bottom sectors of the Standard Model. The important results in kaon sector will be briefly discussed. Recently, mixing in the charm system has been observed, which was being pursued for quite some time without any success. The smallness of the mixing parameters in the charm system is due to the hierarchical structure of the CKM matrix. Interestingly, so far we have not found CP violation in the charm system but in the future, with more dedicated experiments at charm threshold, the situation could change. Many interesting observations have been made in the case of bottom mesons and some of them show some kind of deviations from that of the Standard Model expectations which are mainly associated with the → flavour changing neutral current transitions. It is long believed that the system could be the harbinger of new physics since it is a system in which both bottom and strange quarks are the constituents. Recently, D0 and CDF announced their result for the mixing which is claimed to be the first possible new physics signature in the flavour sector. We plan to touch upon all important issues pointing out both theoretical and experimental developments and future prospects in this review article.

  8. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocelík, V.; Janssen, N.; Smith, S. N.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-07-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with different amounts of aluminum prepared by arc melting were investigated and compared with the laser beam remelted HEAs with the same composition. Attempts to form HEAs coatings with a direct laser deposition from the mixture of elemental powders were made for AlCoCrFeNi and AlCrFeNiTa composition. A strong influence of solidification rate on the amounts of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phase, their chemical composition, and spatial distribution was detected for two-phase AlCoCrFeNi HEAs. It is concluded that a high-power laser is a versatile tool to synthesize interesting HEAs with additive manufacturing processing. Critical issues are related to the rate of (re)solidification, the dilution with the substrate, powder efficiency during cladding, and differences in melting points of clad powders making additive manufacturing processing from a simple mixture of elemental powders a challenging approach.

  9. Neutrinos from Stellar Collapse Comparison of the effects of three and four flavour mixings

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, G; Murthy, M V N; Rajasekaran, G; Dutta, Gautam

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of non-vanishing masses and mixings among neutrino flavours on the detection of neutrinos from stellar collapse by a water Cerenkov detector. We consider a frame-work in which there are four neutrino flavours, including a sterile neutrino, whose mass squared differences and mixings are constrained by the present understanding of solar, atmospheric and laboratory neutrino detection. We also include the effects of high density matter within the supernova core. Unlike in the three flavour scenario, we find that the number of events due to the dominant process involving electron-antineutrinos changes dramatically for some allowed mixing parameters. Furthermore, contributions from charged-current scattering off oxygen nuclei in the detector can be considerably enhanced due to flavour mixing. We also present a comparison between the two possible scenarios, namely, when only three active neutrino flavours are present and when they are accompanied by a fourth sterile neutrino.

  10. Lepton Flavour at the Electroweak Scale: A Complete A4 Model

    CERN Document Server

    Holthausen, Martin; Schmidt, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Apparent regularities in fermion masses and mixings are often associated with physics at a high flavour scale, especially in the context of discrete flavour symmetries. One of the main reasons for that is that the correct vacuum alignment requires usually some high scale mechanism to be phenomenologically acceptable. Contrary to this expectation, we present in this paper a renormalizable radiative neutrino mass model with an A4 flavour symmetry in the lepton sector, which is broken at the electroweak scale. For that we use a novel way to achieve the VEV alignment via an extended symmetry in the flavon potential proposed before by two of the authors. We discuss various phenomenological consequences for the lepton sector and show how the remnants of the flavour symmetry suppress large lepton flavour violating processes. The model naturally includes a dark matter candidate, whose phenomenology we outline. Finally, we sketch possible extensions to the quark sector and discuss its implications for the LHC, especia...

  11. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Fo od Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Proce ssing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evalua tion 35, Revision 1 (FGE.35Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate three flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 35, Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present ...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications, including complete purity criteria and identity, have been provided for all three candidate substances....

  12. Cold Spraying of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Delloro, F.; Jodoin, B.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium parts are ideally suited for aerospace applications due to their unique combination of high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance. However, titanium as bulk material is expensive and challenging/costly to machine. Production of complex titanium parts through additive manufacturing looks promising, but there are still many barriers to overcome before reaching mainstream commercialization. The cold gas dynamic spraying process offers the potential for additive manufacturing of large titanium parts due to its reduced reactive environment, its simplicity to operate, and the high deposition rates it offers. A few challenges are to be addressed before the additive manufacturing potential of titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying can be reached. In particular, it is known that titanium is easy to deposit by cold gas dynamic spraying, but the deposits produced are usually porous when nitrogen is used as the carrier gas. In this work, a method to manufacture low-porosity titanium components at high deposition efficiencies is revealed. The components are produced by combining low-pressure cold spray using nitrogen as the carrier gas with low-cost titanium powder produced using the Armstrong process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured titanium components are investigated.

  13. Technological foundations of processing tomato pomace in feed additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yegorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Search for new types of alternative raw material for the efficient development of poultry industry and problem of waste disposal of canning industry made it necessary to develop a method of processing tomato pomace in feed additives. Materials and methods. Sampling, preparation and testing were carried out by general and specific organ oleptic and physical-technological methods of assessment and analysis of the properties of raw materials and finished products. Results. Incorporation of tomato pomace in the feed additive reduces the cost of raw materials and expenses associated with moistening of the mixture before extrusion and incorporation of chalk feed will solve the problem of calcium imbalance of laying hens. It was found that extrusion process has improved the physical properties of feed additive and showed the possibility of its use as a feed component: moisture content decreased by 34.5 %, the angle of repose increased by 11.4 %, flowability decreased by 39.7 % and bulk density decreased by 32.3 %. Conclusions. The resulting feed additive will solve the problem of diversification of raw materials, waste, calcium imbalance of laying hens and reduce expenses on compound animal feedstuff production.

  14. Effect of tomato pleiotropic ripening mutations on flavour volatile biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, K.; Fray, R.G.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Graham, N.; Bradley, G.; Seymour, G.B.; Bovy, A.G.; Grierson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Ripening is a tightly controlled and developmentally regulated process involving networks of genes, and metabolites that result in dramatic changes in fruit colour, texture and flavour. Molecular and genetic analysis in tomato has revealed a series of regulatory genes involved in fruit development a

  15. Additive Manufacturing of Tooling for Refrigeration Cabinet Foaming Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian K [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nuttall, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cukier, Michael [Whirlpool Corp., Benton Harbor, MI (United States); Hile, Michael [Whirlpool Corp., Benton Harbor, MI (United States)

    2016-07-29

    The primary objective of this project was to leverage the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and materials into a long term, quick change tooling concept to drastically reduce product lead and development timelines and costs. Current refrigeration foam molds are complicated to manufacture involving casting several aluminum parts in an approximate shape, machining components of the molds and post fitting and shimming of the parts in an articulated fixture. The total process timeline can take over 6 months. The foaming process is slower than required for production, therefore multiple fixtures, 10 to 27, are required per refrigerator model. Molds are particular to a specific product configuration making mixed model assembly challenging for sequencing, mold changes or auto changeover features. The initial goal was to create a tool leveraging the ORNL materials and additive process to build a tool in 4 to 6 weeks or less. A secondary goal was to create common fixture cores and provide lightweight fixture sections that could be revised in a very short time to increase equipment flexibility reduce lead times, lower the barriers to first production trials, and reduce tooling costs.

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Tooling for Refrigeration Cabinet Foaming Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian K [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to leverage the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and materials into a long term, quick change tooling concept to drastically reduce product lead and development timelines and costs. Current refrigeration foam molds are complicated to manufacture involving casting several aluminum parts in an approximate shape, machining components of the molds and post fitting and shimming of the parts in an articulated fixture. The total process timeline can take over 6 months. The foaming process is slower than required for production, therefore multiple fixtures, 10 to 27, are required per refrigerator model. Molds are particular to a specific product configuration making mixed model assembly challenging for sequencing, mold changes or auto changeover features. The initial goal was to create a tool leveraging the ORNL materials and additive process to build a tool in 4 to 6 weeks or less. A secondary goal was to create common fixture cores and provide lightweight fixture sections that could be revised in a very short time to increase equipment flexibility reduce lead times, lower the barriers to first production trials, and reduce tooling costs.

  17. Lepton Flavour Violation in Models with A4 Flavour Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Lin, Yin; Merlo, Luca

    2008-01-01

    We analyze lepton flavour violating transitions, leptonic magnetic dipole moments (MDMs) and electric dipole moments (EDMs) in a class of models characterized by the flavour symmetry A4 x Z3 x U(1)_{FN}, whose choice is motivated by the approximate tri-bimaximal mixing observed in neutrino oscillations. We construct the relevant low-energy effective Lagrangian where these effects are dominated by dimension six operators, suppressed by the scale M of new physics. All the flavour breaking effects are universally described by the vacuum expectation values of a set of spurions. We separately analyze both a supersymmetric and a general case. While the observed discrepancy delta a_mu in the anomalous MDM of the muon suggests M of order of a few TeV, several data require M above 10 TeV, in particular the limit on EDM of the electron. In the general case also the present limit on BR(mu -> e gamma) requires M >10 TeV, at least. The branching ratios for mu -> e gamma, tau -> mu gamma and tau -> e gamma are all expecte...

  18. Contribution of crosslinking products in the flavour enhancer processing: the new concept of Maillard peptide in sensory characteristics of Maillard reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karangwa, Eric; Murekatete, Nicole; Habimana, Jean de Dieu; Masamba, Kingsley; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Muhoza, Bertrand; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the flavour-enhancing properties of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) for different systems consisted of different peptides (sunflower, SFP; corn, CP and soyabean SP) with, xylose and cysteine were investigated. Maillard systems from peptides of sunflower, corn and soyabean with xylose and cysteine were designated as PXC, MCP and MSP, respectively. The Maillard systems were prepared at pH of 7.4 using temperature of 120C for 2 h. Results showed that all systems were significantly different in all sensory attributes. The highest scores for mouthfulness and continuity were observed for MCP with the lowest peptides distribution between 1000 and 5000 Da, known as Maillard peptide. This revealed that the MCP with the lowest Maillard peptide content had the strongest "Kokumi" effect compared to the other MRPsand demonstrated that "kokumi effect" of MRPs was contributed by not only the "Maillard peptide" defined by the molecular weight (1000-5000 Da). Results on sensory evaluation after fractionation of PXC followed by enzymatic hydrolysis showed no significant differences between PXC, P-PXC and their hydrolysates. This observation therefore confirmed that the presence of other contributors attributed to the "Kokumi" effect rather than the Maillard peptide. It can be deduced that the unhydrolyzed crosslinking products might have contributed to the "Kokumi" effect of MRPs. The structures of four probable crosslinking compounds were proposed and the findings have provided new insights in the sensory characteristics of xylose, cysteine and sunflower peptide MRPs.

  19. B decays and lepton flavour (universality) violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellin, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb found hints for physics beyond the standard model in Bto K^*μ^+μ^- , Bto K^*μ^+μ^-/Bto K^*e^+e^- and B_stoφμ^+μ^- . In addition, the BABAR results for Bto D^{(*)}τν and the CMS excess in htoτ^±μ^∓ also point towards lepton flavour (universality) violating new physics. While Bto D^{(*)}τν and htoτ^±μ^∓ can be naturally explained by an extended Higgs sector, the probably most promising explanation for the bto sμμ anomalies is a Z' boson. Furthermore, combining a 2HDM with a gauged L_μ-L_τ symmetry allows for explaining the bto sμ^+μ^- anomalies and htoτ^±μ^∓ simultaneously, with interesting correlations to τto3μ . In the light of these deviations from the SM we also discuss the possibilities of observing lepton flavour violating B decays ( e.g. Bto K^{(*)}τ^±μ^∓ and B_stoτ^±μ^∓ in Z^' models.

  20. DeepFlavour in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Flavour-tagging of jets is an important task in collider based high energy physics and a field where machine learning tools are applied by all major experiments. A new tagger (DeepFlavour) was developed and commissioned in CMS that is based on an advanced machine learning procedure. A deep neural network is used to do multi-classification of jets that origin from a b-quark, two b-quarks, a c-quark, two c-quarks or light colored particles (u, d, s-quark or gluon). The performance was measured in both, data and simulation. The talk will also include the measured performance of all taggers in CMS. The different taggers and results will be discussed and compared with some focus on details of the newest tagger.

  1. Aspects of Leptonic Flavour Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations many ideas have been put forward to explain the special features of the leptonic mixing and the differences with respect to the quark sector. In this talk I review some of these proposals, emphasizing especially their predictability. In the light of the new data, I first revisit fixed-point relations among mixing angles and phases. Then I briefly comment on radiative neutrino masses. Finally I discuss the role of flavour symmetries. Given the very many existing models I focus on two classes of models. On the one hand I illustrate the ability of models based on a generalization of the anarchy idea in reproducing the main features of both the quark and the lepton spectrum, also in a GUT framework. On the other hand I discuss less ambitious but more predictive models based on discrete flavour symmetries, centered on the properties of the leptonic mixing matrix.

  2. Neutrino Mass and Flavour Models

    CERN Document Server

    King, Stephen F

    2009-01-01

    We survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and tri-bimaximal mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. We focus in particular on models with discrete family symmetry and unification, and show how such models can also solve the SUSY flavour and CP problems. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

  3. Electroacoustics modeling of piezoelectric welders for ultrasonic additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent 3D metal printing technology which utilizes ultrasonic vibrations from high power piezoelectric transducers to additively weld similar and dissimilar metal foils. CNC machining is used intermittent of welding to create internal channels, embed temperature sensitive components, sensors, and materials, and for net shaping parts. Structural dynamics of the welder and work piece influence the performance of the welder and part quality. To understand the impact of structural dynamics on UAM, a linear time-invariant model is used to relate system shear force and electric current inputs to the system outputs of welder velocity and voltage. Frequency response measurements are combined with in-situ operating measurements of the welder to identify model parameters and to verify model assumptions. The proposed LTI model can enhance process consistency, performance, and guide the development of improved quality monitoring and control strategies.

  4. Minimal flavour violation and anomalous top decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theoretische Physik 1, Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Gadatsch, Stefan [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomatic Physics, P.O. Box 41882, 1009 Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    Any experimental evidence of anomalous top-quark couplings will open a window to study physics beyond the standard model (SM). However, all current flavour data indicate that nature is close to ''minimal flavour violation'', i.e. the pattern of flavour violation is given by the CKM matrix, including the hierarchy of parameters. In this talk we present results of the conceptual test of minimal flavour violation for the anomalous charged as well as flavour changing top-quark couplings. Our analysis is embedded in two-Higgs doublet model of type II (2HDM-II). Including renormalization effects, we calculate the top decay rates taking into account anomalous couplings constrained by minimal flavour violation.

  5. Flavour Covariant Formalism for Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena and apply it to study the flavour-dynamics of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL). We show that this formalism provides a complete and unified description of RL, consistently accounting for three distinct physical phenomena: (i) resonant mixing and (ii) coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, as well as (iii) quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. We describe the necessary emergence of higher-rank tensors in flavour space, arising from the unitarity cuts of partial self-energies. Finally, we illustrate the importance of this formalism within a minimal Resonant $\\tau$-Genesis model by showing that, with the inclusion of all flavour effects in a consistent way, the final lepton asymmetry can be enhanced by up to an order of magnitude, when compared to previous partially flavour-dependent treatments.

  6. The warped, resolved, deformed conifold gets flavoured

    CERN Document Server

    Gaillard, Jerome; Nunez, Carlos; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    We discuss a simple transformation that allows to generate SU(3) structure solutions of Type IIB supergravity with RR fluxes, starting from non-Kahler solutions of Type I supergravity. The method may be applied also in the presence of supersymmetric source branes. We apply this transformation to a solution describing fivebranes wrapped on the two-sphere of the resolved conifold with additional flavour fivebrane sources. The resulting solution is a generalisation of the resolved deformed conifold solution of Butti et al. by the addition of D5 brane and D3 brane sources. We propose that this solution may be interpreted in terms of a combined effect of Higgsing and cascade of Seiberg dualities in the dual field theory.

  7. Sodium dichromate as a process water additive: An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutton, J.M.

    1953-03-19

    For several years-after the start-up of the Hanford Piles, little concern was felt for the quality of process water. Techniques developed by CMX and improved in the course of operating experience were substantially successful for controlling and removing pressure drop film; and corru%ion rates at the early power levels were uniformly low and not a matter of concern, particularly since slugs were not exposed for more than 250 MWD/ton. As power and exposure levels were drastically increased, however, corrosion rates began to become serious and now threaten to limit future increases. Whether or not corrosion was causing these latter problems, it was clearly imperative to seek ways to reduce the corrobivity of the water. It was recognized that subtantial savings could be made by the elimination of sodium dichromate as a process water additive. Since the rather high pH of process water was neceasary primarily to prevent dichromate reduction, the way would then be open for reducing the pH, and it was hoped that this would improve in-pile corrosion and materially reduce water treatment costs. There is a large amount of data in the project literature pertaining to the dichromate problem, and it seemed urgent in view of recent experiences to re-evaluate this information to learn whether the issues might not be clarified and firm conclusions reached. This document presents such a re-evaluation and drawn conclusions which pending the completion of experiments now in progress, will serve as a primary basis for technical recommendations concerning dichromate addition to process water at all existing 100 areas and at the 100-K areas now under construction.

  8. Patterns of Flavour Violation in the RSc Model, the LHT Model and Supersymmetric Flavour Models

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2009-01-01

    We summarize the results on patterns of flavour violation in a Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection (RSc) and compare them with those identified in the Littlest Higgs Model with T--parity (LHT) and in a number of SUSY Flavour Models. While K decays play in this presentation a prominent role, the inclusion of B physics and lepton flavour violation is crucial in the distinction between these three popular extensions of the Standard Model (SM) by means of flavour physics.

  9. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 86, Revision 2 (FGE.86Rev2: Consideration of aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA (65th meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA, and to decide whether further evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 30 aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA at the 65th meeting in 2005. This revision is required owing to additional available toxicity data on piperine [FL-no: 14.003] and deca-(2E,4E-dienoic acid isobutyl-amide [FL-no: 16.091]. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological thresholds of concern and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel agrees with JECFA’s conclusion “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake (MSDI approach for all substances considered in this FGE. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 30 substances, the information is adequate.

  10. Preservation of minimally processed 'aurora-1' peaches using additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramilo Nogueira Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 'Aurora-1' peaches establishes an interesting alternative as a minimally processed product, due to its characteristics like flavor, color, smell, and also because of its handling resistance. However, it has a short shelf life after a fresh-cut due to enzymatic browning and stone cavity collapse. The main purpose of this research was to test the additive with antioxidant effect to prevent browning in minimally processed 'Aurora-1' peaches. The minimal processing consists of washing, sanitizing, peelings and fruit stone extraction. After that, longitudinal cuts were made to obtain eight segments per fruit. The slices were immersed into the following treatment solutions: control (immersion in 2% ascorbic acid; 2% ascorbic acid + 2% calcium chloride; 1% sodium isoascorbate; 1% citric acid; 1% L-cysteine hydrochloride. The products were placed into rigid polystyrene trays branded MEIWA M-54, covered with 14 µm PVC film (OmnifilmTM and kept in cold storage at 3ºC ± 2ºC and 65% RH for twelve days, and evaluated each three days. Appraised variables were appearance, soluble solids, titratable acidity, soluble carbohydrates and reducing sugars, total and soluble pectin, ascorbic acid, and peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase enzyme activity. L-cysteine gave to the minimally processed products a shelf life of twelve days, limmited by off-flavor. The treatment with ascorbic acid was efficient to maintainthe ascorbic acid content, with a shelf-life of nine days, limited by enzymatic browning.

  11. Grand Unified Theories and Lepton-Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, C S

    1998-01-01

    Lepton-flavour violating processes, such as $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$, are studied in ordinary (non-SUSY) SU(5) and SUSY SU(5) grand unified theories. First given are some introductory argument on the mechanism of U.V. divergence cancellation in flavour changing neutral current processes and on the decoupling of particles with GUT scale masses . We next see that such general argument is confirmed by an explicit calculation of the amplitude of $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$ in ordinary SU(5), which shows that logarithmic divergence really cancels among diagrams and remaining finite part are suppressed by at least $1/M_{GUT}^2$. In SUSY SU(5), flavour changing slepton mass-squared term get a logarithmic correction, as recently claimed. However, when the effect of flavour changing wave function renormalization is also taken into account such logarithmic correction turns out to disappear, provided a condition is met among SUSY breaking soft masses. In SUGRA-inspired SUSY GUT, such condition is not satisfied. But the remaining logarit...

  12. Quark Yukawa pattern from spontaneous breaking of flavour $SU(3)^3$

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    A $SU(3)_Q \\times SU(3)_u \\times SU(3)_d$ invariant scalar potential breaking spontaneously the quark flavour symmetry can explain the standard model flavour puzzle. The approximate alignment in flavour space of the vacuum expectation values of the up and down `Yukawa fields' results as a dynamical effect. The observed quark mixing angles, the weak CP violating phase, and hierarchical quark masses can be all reproduced at the cost of introducing additional (auxiliary) scalar multiplets, but without the need of introducing hierarchical parameters.

  13. Role of anterior piriform cortex in the acquisition of conditioned flavour preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Cristina; Martin-Signes, Mar; Risco, Severiano

    2016-09-14

    Flavour aversion learning (FAL) and conditioned flavour preference (CFP) facilitate animal survival and play a major role in food selection, but the neurobiological mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Neuroanatomical bases of CFP were examined by using Fos immunohistochemistry to record neuronal activity. Rats were trained over eight alternating one-bottle sessions to acquire a CFP induced by pairing a flavour with saccharin (grape was CS+ in Group 1; cherry in Group 2; in Group 3, grape/cherry in half of animals; Group 4, grape/cherry in water). Animals were offered the grape flavour on the day immediately after the training and their brains were processed for c-Fos. Neurons evidencing Fos-like immunoreactivity were counted in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens core, and anterior piriform cortex (aPC). Analysis showed a significantly larger number of activated cells after learning in the aPC alone, suggesting that the learning process might have produced a change in this cortical region. Ibotenic lesions in the aPC blocked flavour-taste preference but did not interrupt flavour-toxin FAL by LiCl. These data suggest that aPC cells may be involved in the formation of flavour preferences and that the integrity of this region may be specifically necessary for the acquisition of a CFP.

  14. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 4 (FGE.06Rev4 ): Straight - and branched - chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters from chemical groups 1, 3 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    , estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided...

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 30, Revision 1 (FGE.30Rev1): 4-Prop-1-enylphenol and 2-methoxy-4-(prop- 1enyl)phenyl 3-methylbutyrate from chemical group 17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    concluded that the two substances [FL-no: 04.097, 09.894] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 3 (FGE.23Rev3): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 20 candidate substances....

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 51, Revision 2 (FGE.51Rev2): Consideration of alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to alicyclic ketones secondary alcohols and related esters in FGE.09Rev6 (2015b)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    and to finalise the evaluation. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered and are adequate for 21 substances. For [FL-no: 07.094 and 07.112], information on the solubility in water and ethanol is missing. The chemical...

  18. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016 Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 75, Revision 1 (FGE.75Rev1): Consideration of tetrahydrofuran derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to tetrahydrofuran derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.33 (2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    with the JECFA conclusion ‘No safety concern at estimated level of intake as flavouring substances’ based on the maximised survey-derived daily intake (MSDI) approach. The specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 11 substances, the information is adequate....

  19. Supersymmetry, the flavour puzzle and rare B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, David Michael

    2010-07-14

    The gauge hierarchy problem and the flavour puzzle belong to the most pressing open questions in the Standard Model of particle physics. Supersymmetry is arguably the most popular framework of physics beyond the Standard Model and provides an elegant solution to the gauge hierarchy problem; however, it aggravates the flavour puzzle. In the first part of this thesis, I discuss several approaches to address the flavour puzzle in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model and experimental tests thereof: supersymmetric grand unified theories with a unification of Yukawa couplings at high energies, theories with minimal flavour violation and additional sources of CP violation and theories with gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking and a large ratio of Higgs vacuum expectation values. In the second part of the thesis, I discuss the phenomenology of two rare B meson decay modes which are promising probes of physics beyond the Standard Model: The exclusive B {yields} K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay, whose angular decay distribution will be studied at LHC and gives access to a large number of observables and the b{yields}s{nu}anti {nu} decays, which are in the focus of planned high-luminosity Super B factories. I discuss the predictions for these observables in the Standard Model and their sensitivity to New Physics. (orig.)

  20. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  1. Processing and Quality Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing Monolayer Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Wendt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although its importance has increased significantly, Additive Manufacturing is not yet a fully accepted industrial manufacturing process for load-carrying parts. The future success of the process group depends on its standardization. This work proposes a methodology for the design, manufacturing, and quality evaluation of specimens manufactured by Fused Layer Modeling that are composed of only one layer (so-called monolayers. The processing methodology and properties of monolayers have not been studied systematically yet. A first systematic design of monolayers for mechanical testing is presented. Rectangular and circular monolayers adapted to the loads of tensile and compression testing are manufactured using different trajectory strategies. Frequently occurring macro- and microgeometrical defects are evaluated and categorized in order to optimize the part quality. This work also studies the effect of some manufacturing parameters such as the gap between print head and machine bed, trajectory strategy, bed leveling, and temperatures on part quality. The most suitable specimens are tested mechanically in tensile or compression tests. In the case of study, tensile strength values are only 8.6% lower than the values for reference tests on the unextruded filament. However, the properties deviate more strongly for compression tests which may be due to the selected specimen geometry.

  2. Lepton flavour violation in models with A flavour symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Hagedorn, Claudia; Lin, Yin; Merlo, Luca

    2009-03-01

    We analyze lepton flavour violating transitions, leptonic magnetic dipole moments (MDMs) and electric dipole moments (EDMs) in a class of models characterized by the flavour symmetry A×Z×U(1, whose choice is motivated by the approximate tri-bimaximal mixing observed in neutrino oscillations. We construct the relevant low-energy effective Lagrangian where these effects are dominated by dimension six operators, suppressed by the scale M of new physics. All the flavour breaking effects are universally described by the vacuum expectation values of a set of spurions. We separately analyze both a supersymmetric and a general case. While the observed discrepancy δa in the anomalous MDM of the muon suggests M of order of a few TeV, several data require M above 10 TeV, in particular the limit on EDM of the electron. In the general case also the present limit on BR(μ→eγ) requires M>10 TeV, at least. The branching ratios for μ→eγ, τ→μγ and τ→eγ are all expected to be of the same order. In the supersymmetric case the constraint from μ→eγ is softened and it can be satisfied by a smaller scale M. In this case both the observed δa and the current bound on BR(μ→eγ) can be satisfied, at the price of a rather small value for ||, of the order of a few percents, that reflects on a similar value for θ.

  3. Anarchic Yukawas and top partial compositeness: the flavour of a successful marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Lee, Seung J.; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    The top quark can be naturally singled out from other fermions in the Standard Model due to its large mass, of the order of the electroweak scale. We follow this reasoning in models of pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson composite Higgs, which may derive from an underlying confining dynamics. We consider a new class of flavour models, where the top quark obtains its mass via partial compositeness, while the lighter fermions acquire their masses by a deformation of the dynamics generated at a high flavour scale. One interesting feature of such scenario is that it can avoid all the flavour constraints without the need of flavour symmetries, since the flavour scale can be pushed high enough. We show that both flavour conserving and violating constraints can be satisfied with top partial compositeness without invoking any flavour symmetry for the up-type sector, in the case of the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset with top partners in the four-plet and singlet of SO(4). In the down-type sector, some degree of alignment is required if all down-type quarks are elementary. We show that taking the bottom quark partially composite provides a dynamical explanation for the hierarchy causing this alignment. We present explicit realisations of this mechanism which do not require to include additional bottom partner fields. Finally, these conclusions are generalised to scenarios with non-minimal cosets and top partners in larger representations.

  4. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  5. Wiener-Hopf factorizations for a multidimensional Markov additive process and their applications to reflected processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakiyo Miyazawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the framework of Neuts' matrix analytic approach to a reflected process generated by a discrete time multidimensional Markov additive process. This Markov additive process has a general background state space and a real vector valued additive component, and generates a multidimensional reflected process. Our major interest is to derive a closed form formula for the stationary distribution of this reflected process. To this end, we introduce a real valued level, and derive new versions of the Wiener-Hopf factorization for the Markov additive process with the multidimensional additive component. In particular, itis represented by moment generating functions, and we consider the domain for it to be valid.Our framework is general enough to include multi-server queues and/or queueing networks as well as non-linear time series which are currently popular in financial and actuarial mathematics. Our results yield structural results for such models. As an illustration, we apply our results to extend existing results on the tail behavior of reflected processes.A major theme of this work is to connect recent work on matrix analytic methods to classical probabilistic studies on Markov additive processes. Indeed, using purely probabilistic methods such as censoring, duality, level crossing and time-reversal (which are known in the matrix analytic methods community but date back to Arjas & Speed [2] and Pitman [29], we extend and unify existing results in both areas.

  6. Heavy flavour production at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Three recent results in heavy flavour production at the CMS experiment are addressed in this report. Measurements of the differential production cross sections of B hadron and quarkonium states in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV are presented. These are important tools to investigate heavy-quark production mechanisms in QCD. The dependences on transverse momentum and rapidity are investigated and comparisons with theory expectations and among different collision energies are provided. Also the new observation of $\\Upsilon(1S)\\Upsilon(1S)$ production is reported.

  7. HEAVY FLAVOUR PRODUCTION AT ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sivoklokov, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The production of heavy flavours at LHC provides an opportunity for new insight into QCD. ATLAS detector provides data at higher transverse momenta and wider rapidity ranges than have previously been studied. Both Charmonia and Bottomonia production cross-section have been measured in proton-proton collisions at centre of mass energy of 7 TeV as a function of transverse momemtum and rapidity. Exclusive B and D meson states have been also reconstructed. Results are compared to theoretical predictions of various QCD models.

  8. Additive manufacturing of stretchable tactile sensors: Processes, materials, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatani, Morteza

    3D printing technology is becoming more ubiquitous every day especially in the area of smart structures. However, fabrication of multi-material, functional, and smart structures is problematic because of the process and material limitations. This thesis sought to develop a Direct Print Photopolymerization (DPP) fabrication technique that appreciably extends the manufacturing space for the 3D smart structures. This method employs a robotically controlled micro-extrusion of a filament equipped with a photopolymerization process. The ability to use polymers and ultimately their nanocomposites in this process is the advantage of the proposed process over the current fabrication methods in the fabrication of 3D structures featuring mechanical, physical, and electrical functionalities. In addition, this study focused to develop a printable, conductive, and stretchable nanocomposite based on a photocurable and stretchable liquid resin filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). This nanocomposite exhibited piezoresistivity, means its resistivity changes as it deforms. This property is a favorable factor in developing resistance based tactile sensors. They were also able to resist high tensile strains while they showed conductivity. Furthermore, this study offered a possible and low-cost method to have a unique and highly stretchable pressure sensitive polymer. This disruptive pressure sensitive polymer composed of an Ionic Liquid (IL) and a stretchable photopolymer embedded between two layers of Carbon Nanotube (CNTs) based stretchable electrodes. The developed IL-polymer showed both field effect property and piezoresistivity that can detect large tensile strains up 30%. In summary, this research study focused to present feasible methods and materials for printing a 3D smart structure especially in the context of flexible tactile sensors. This study provides a foundation for the future efforts in fabrication of skin like tactile sensors in three-dimensional motifs

  9. Lepton flavour violation searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dawe, Edmund; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Recent results from searches for lepton flavour violation performed by ATLAS and CMS in the $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\text{TeV}$ data are presented. The search for $Z\\rightarrow e\\mu$ and lepton flavour violating heavy neutral particle decays are summarized before covering the search for $H\\rightarrow \\mu \\tau$ in greater detail.

  10. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; 10.1016/j.physletb.2011.05.023

    2011-01-01

    A search for second and third generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions via the lepton flavour violating processes ep -> mu X and ep -> tau X is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full data sample taken at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt{s} = 319 GeV is used for the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 245 pb^-1 of e^+ p and 166 pb^-1 of e^- p collision data. No evidence for the production of such leptoquarks is observed in the H1 data. Leptoquarks produced in e^+- p collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to leptoquark masses of 712 GeV and 479 GeV, respectively.

  11. Pyrrolidinone derivatives as processing additives for solution processed organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsaysy, Uyxing; Pavageau, Bertrand; Servant, Laurent; Aziz, Hany

    2014-10-01

    Processing additives are widely used to increase the efficiency of solution processed organic solar cells. We use the Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) to investigate novel processing additives. The HSPs predict pyrrolidinone derivatives to be efficient processing additives for OSC systems based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61- butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM). Two pyrrolidinone derivatives are identified: 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 1- benzyl-2-pyrrolidinone. The processing additives are introduced with various concentrations in the formulation of P3HT and PCBM solution. The electrical characterizations show that the two processing additives significantly increase the short circuit current and thus the power conversion efficiency of the OSCs. The results thus highlight HSPs as an effective and relatively straightforward tool that can be employed to optimize OSC morphology from a theoretical standpoint. Such a tool will be invaluable for identifying additives for novel high efficiency polymer species as they are synthesized, and thus to streamline the device fabrication and device optimization process.

  12. Lepton Flavour Violation in Left-Right Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Murgui, Clara

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the predictions for lepton flavour number violating processes in the context of a simple left-right symmetric theory. In this context neutrinos are Majorana fermions and their masses are generated at the quantum level through the Zee mechanism using the simplest Higgs sector. We show that the right handed neutrinos are generically light and can give rise to large lepton number violating contributions to rare processes. We discuss the correlation between the collider constrains ...

  13. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  14. FAKTOR-FAKTOR PENGOLAHAN DAN KOMPOSISI BAHAN YANG MEMPENGARUHI CITARASA "OFF FLAVOUR" FORMULA TEMPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelis Imanningsih

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available PROCESSING FACTORS AND INGREDIENTS CONTRIBUTED IN TEMPE FORMULA'S OFF FLAVOUR.Background: Tempe Formula is processed food with tempe as the main ingredient. was previously formulated as infant formula and under five years children formula who have diarrhea problem. In later researches, tempe Fromula was found to be efective to increase nutritional satatus of severe malnourished children, to cure gastrointestinal infection of 6-24 months children, and had benefit to repair dislipldemia in adults and bone reformation of pre and post menopause women. However, this formula had off flavour that limit Its utilization. Methods: The design is laboratory experiment. The type of research is explorative. The panelist is trained panelist.Results: The result shows that off flavour component identified were beany odour, moldy odour, tangy taste and bitter taste. Tempe processing with half boiled of soybean and steam sterilization with traditional starter of mixed innoculum gave the best sensori quality. Less intensity of beany flavour and bitter taste were gained by improving the composition of palm oil and sesame oil with composition 1:1. The additon of mocca and milk flavours also reduced the beany odour of the formula. Conclusion: Improved tempe formula was determined to have higher intensity of sweetness, less intensity of saltyness, bitemess and tangy taste, and less beany, rancid, and moldy odours than original formula.Keywords: tempe formula, off flavour, processing

  15. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 3 (FGE.73Rev3): Consideration of alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th and 63rd meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev4 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    .712] considered in this FGE and agrees with the JECFA conclusion, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered...

  16. Assessment of Grape, Plum and Orange Synthetic Food Flavourings Using in vivo Acute Toxicity Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ila Monize Sousa Sales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the acute toxicity of synthetic grape, plum and orange flavourings in root meristem cells of Allium cepa at the doses of 3.5, 7.0 and 14.0 mL/kg and exposure times of 24 and 48 h, and in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice treated orally for seven days with 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL/kg of flavouring. The results of the plant test showed that grape, plum and orange flavourings, at both exposure times, inhibited cell division and promoted the formation of a significant number of micronuclei and mitotic spindle changes. These alterations were observed in at least one exposure time analysed, demonstrating a significant cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic activity. In mouse bioassay, animals treated with 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL/kg of flavouring died before the seventh day of treatment. The amounts of 0.5 and 1.0 mL/kg of the three additives were cytotoxic to erythrocytes, and treatment with the grape flavouring significantly induced the formation of micronucleated cells in the bone marrow of animals. Therefore, under the study conditions, the grape, plum and orange flavouring additives promoted significant toxicity to cells of the test systems used.

  17. Studies on additive properties of some processing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Malewski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of prediction of mineral processing operation by partial effects summation is analyzed. Methodological and practical aspects of the problem are discussed using laboratory studies of selected comminution and classifying operations as examples. Laboratory experiments show that the effects of examined mineral processing operation depend on simultaneously running processes of classification and comminution. The influence rate of interaction between both processes on the final results is significant, but in some cases it may be neglected. The obtained results have preliminary character and needed a further verification.

  18. Supersymmetric Lepton Flavour Violation in Low-Scale Seesaw Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ilakovac, Amon

    2009-01-01

    We study a new supersymmetric mechanism for lepton flavour violation in \\mu and \\tau decays and \\mu -> e conversion in nuclei, within a minimal extension of the MSSM with low-mass heavy singlet neutrinos and sneutrinos. We find that the decays \\mu -> e\\gamma$, \\tau -> e\\gamma and \\tau -> \\mu\\gamma are forbidden in the supersymmetric limit of the theory, whereas other processes, such as \\mu -> eee, \\mu -> e conversion, \\tau -> eee and \\tau -> e\\mu\\mu, are allowed and can be dramatically enhanced several orders of magnitude above the observable level by potentially large neutrino Yukawa coupling effects. The profound implications of supersymmetric lepton flavour violation for present and future experiments are discussed.

  19. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P C Vinodkumar

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understanding heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multiquark hadrons the hadron molecular states etc., also will be reviewed. Various issues and challenges in understanding the physics and dynamics of the quarks at the hadronic dimensions are highlighted. Looking into the present and future experimental prospects at different heavy flavour laboratories like BES-III, CLEO-c, BaBar, Belle, LHC etc., the scope for theoretical extensions of the present knowledge of heavy flavour physics would be very demanding. In this context, many relevant contributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted.

  20. Strong coupling, discrete symmetry and flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, Steven

    2010-01-01

    We show how two principles - strong coupling and discrete symmetry - can work together to generate the flavour structure of the Standard Model. We propose that in the UV the full theory has a discrete flavour symmetry, typically only associated with tribimaximal mixing in the neutrino sector. Hierarchies in the particle masses and mixing matrices then emerge from multiple strongly coupled sectors that break this symmetry. This allows for a realistic flavour structure, even in models built around an underlying grand unified theory. We use two different techniques to understand the strongly coupled physics: confinement in N=1 supersymmetry and the AdS/CFT correspondence. Both approaches yield equivalent results and can be represented in a clear, graphical way where the flavour symmetry is realised geometrically.

  1. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    OpenAIRE

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J.; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity durin...

  2. Optimization of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097144

    Studies of $C\\!P$ violation can be used to test the Standard Model and might give insight into New Physics. Therefore, a wide range of $C\\!P$ measurements, including time-dependent decay rate measurements, are performed with the LHCb Experiment. Many of these are subject to mixing of neutral $B$ meson states with their antiparticles. The knowledge of the initial $B$ flavour is essential in these cases which is why several Flavour Tagging algorithms are used to deduce this information from the available event properties. These algorithms must be adjusted to changes in the shape of the event properties, resulting from an upgrade of the LHC centre-of-mass energy to $\\sqrt{s} = 13\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$. To simplify this process, the Flavour Tagging software is re-implemented. The tagging power of the muon, electron and kaon tagger is measured based on $B^+ \\to J\\!/\\!\\psi K^+$ data, which is processed within the new framework. It is found to be $(0.782 ± 0.018)\\%$, $(0.243 ± 0.011)\\%$ and $(0.649 ± 0.020)\\%$ for Run 1...

  3. Study of flavour compounds from orange juices by HS-SPME and GC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Covaciu, F.; Feher, I.; Magdas, A.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The flavour of the orange juices, which gives the taste and odour of the product, is an important criterion about the products quality for consumers. A fresh single strength and two commercial orange juices (obtained from concentrate) flavour profile were studied using a selective and sensitive gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical system, after a solvent free, single step preconcentration and extraction technique, the headspace solid phase microextraction (HP-SPME). In the studied orange juices 55 flavour compounds were detected and classified as belonging to the esters, alcohols, ketones, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes chemical families. The fresh single strength orange juice was characterized by high amount of esters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Limonene and valencene were the most abundant flavours in this fresh natural orange juice. Alcohols and ketones were found in higher concentration in the commercial orange juices made from concentrate, than in the single strength products. Nevertheless, in commercial juices the most abundant flavour was limonene and α-terpineol. The results highlight clear differences between fresh singles strength orange juice and juice from concentrate. The orange juices reconstructed from concentrate, made in Romania, present low quantity of flavour compounds, suggesting the absence or a low rearomatization process, but extraneous components were not detected.

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific O pinion Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4 (FGE.23Rev4): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    .068, 04.069, 04.075, 04.079, 04.084, 08.127, 09.687, 13.170 and 13.200] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have...... also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 21 candidate substances. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  5. b-flavour tagging in pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    An essential ingredient of all time-dependent CP violation studies of B mesons is the ability to tag the initial flavour of the B meson. The harsh environment of 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions makes this a particularly difficult enterprise. We report progresses in the flavour tagging of B0 and Bs mesons, including developments of novel techniques like the use of an opposite side charm tagger.

  6. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  7. Minimal Flavour Violation and Anomalous Top Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Top quark physics at the LHC may open a window to physics beyond the standard model and even lead us to an understanding of the phenomenon "flavour". However, current flavour data is a strong hint that no "new physics" with a generic flavour structure can be expected in the TeV scale. In turn, if there is "new physics" at the TeV scale, it must be "minimally flavour violating". This has become a widely accepted assumption for "new physics" models. In this paper we propose a way to test the concept of minimal flavour violation for the anomalous charged $Wtq$, $q\\in\\{d,s,b\\}$, and flavour-changing $Vtq$, $q\\in\\{u,c\\}$ and $V\\in\\{Z,\\gamma,g\\}$, couplings within an effective field theory framework, i.e. in a model independent way. We perform a spurion analysis of our effective field theory approach and calculate the decay rates for the anomalous top-quark decays in terms of the effective couplings for different helicities by using a two-Higgs doublet model of type II (2HDM-II), under the assumption that the top-q...

  8. Additional force field in cooling process of cellular Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑明军; 何德坪; 戴戈

    2002-01-01

    The foaming process of Al alloy is similar to that of Al, but there is a solid-liquid state zone in the solidification process of cellular Al alloy which does not exist in the case of Al. In the unidirectional solidification of cellular Al alloy, the proportion of the solid phase gradually reduces from the solid front to the liquid front. This will introduce a force and result in a serious quick shrinkage. By the mathematic and physical mode, the solidification of the cellular Al alloy is studied. The data measured by experiment are close to the result calculated by the mode. This kind of shrinkage can be solved by suitable cooling method in appropriate growth stage. The compressive strength of the cellular Al alloy made by this way is 40% higher than that of cellular Al.

  9. SELF-INTERSECTION LOCAL TIME OF ADDITIVE LEVY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟玉泉; 胡迪鹤

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of existence of jointly continuous self-process X = {X(t), t ∈ RN+)} which has the decomposition X = X1 X2 ... Xv, eachThey prove that if Nrα> d(r - 1), then a jointly continuous local time of Z, i.e. theself-intersection local time of X, can be obtained.

  10. Colloidal processing of alumina with MgO additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckfeldt, O. [Swedish Ceramic Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Ferreira, J.M.F. [Dept. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, Univ. of Aveiro (Portugal)

    1997-12-31

    Both rheological studies and casting studies were made to evaluate the effects of adding MgO (0.10 wt%) to alumina slips with a solids loading of 45 vol%, stabilised either with a polyacrylic acid (Dispex A40, Allied Colloids Ltd, UK) or with a low M{sub w} sulphonic acid (Tiron, Aldrich Chemie, Germany). Tiron and Dispex are expected to give electrostatic and electrosteric stabilisation, respectively. The addition of MgO gave significant effects displayed by increased viscosity and elasticity of the slips and a considerable decrease in density of slip-cast and filter-pressed bodies. When the casting pressure increased, there was also a general tendency that the density of filter-pressed bodies decreased with well-stabilised slips (without MgO), but increased when the slip was weakly flocculated (with MgO). This was explained by the casting rate dependency under stabilised slip conditions, and the compressibility of the filter-pressed cakes formed using flocculated slips. Furthermore, it was shown that Tiron gave a higher degree of deflocculation both with addition of MgO and without MgO, indicating that the electrostatic stabilising mechanism dominates the particle interactions whereas steric effects are less important at the solids loading used. (orig.) 5 refs.

  11. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Harald; Zeugner, Thomas; Zaeh, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  12. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Harald, E-mail: harald.krauss@iwb.tum.de; Zaeh, Michael F. [AMLab, iwb Application Center Augsburg, Technische Universität München (Germany); Zeugner, Thomas [Augsburg University (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 2 (FGE.220Rev1): α,β-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    of subgroup 4.4a, 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.119] and 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.175]. Based on the new data the Panel concluded that 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.119] does not give rise to concern with respect to genotoxicity. For 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one......, including analysis of liver. This is also applicable to 2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxyfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no:13.089] and 2,5-dimethyl-4-ethoxyfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no:13.117], which are covered by the representative substance 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no:13.175]. The Flavour Industry has informed...... that 5-methylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.157] is not in common use in the flavour industry and is no longer supported....

  14. Following butter flavour deterioration with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cláudia R B S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2012-09-15

    Off-flavours develop naturally in butter and the process is accelerated by heat. An acoustic wave sensor was used to detect the aroma compounds evolved from heated butter and the results have shown that registered marked changes were coincident to odour changes detected by sensory analysis. The flavour compounds have also been analysed by GC/MS for identification. The response of the sensor was fully characterized in terms of the sensitivity to each of the identified compounds, and sensitivities of the system SPME/sensor were compared with the sensitivities of the system SPME/GC/MS. It was found that the sensor analytical system was more sensitive to methylketones than to fatty acids. The SPME/GC/MS system also showed the highest sensitivity to 2-heptanone, followed by 2-nonanone, but third place was occupied by undecanone and butanoic acid, to which the sensor showed moderate sensitivity. 2-heptanone was found to be an appropriate model compound to follow odour changes till the 500 h, and the lower sensitivity of the sensor to butanoic acid showed to be a positive characteristic, as saturation was prevented, and other more subtle changes in the flavour could be perceived.

  15. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Andreev, V; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, Roland Paul; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Hussain, S; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovskii, E I; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Mladenov, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Prideaux, P; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zálesák, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, J; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2007-01-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep->mu X and ep -> tau X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e^+ p collisions and 13.7 pb^-1 for e^- p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchm"uller-R"uckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  16. Minimal flavour violation an effective field theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, G.; Isidori, G.; Strumia, A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a general analysis of extensions of the Standard Model which satisfy the criterion of Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV). We define this general framework by constructing a low-energy effective theory containing the Standard Model fields, with one or two Higgs doublets and, as the only source of SU(3)^5 flavour symmetry breaking, the background values of fields transforming under the flavour group as the ordinary Yukawa couplings. We analyse present bounds on the effective scale of dimension-six operators, which range between 1 and 10 TeV, with the most stringent constraints imposed by B -> X_s gamma. In this class of theories, it is possible to relate predictions for FCNC processes in B physics to those in K physics. We compare the sensitivity of various experimental searches in probing the hypothesis of MFV. Within the two-Higgs-doublet scenario, we develop a general procedure to obtain all tan(beta)-enhanced Higgs-mediated FCNC amplitudes, discussing in particular their impact in B -> l^+l^-, Delta...

  17. Additive CAD/CAM process for dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nelson R F A; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Rekow, Elizabeth D; Smay, Jim

    2011-02-01

    This article describes the evolution of a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) process where ceramic paste is deposited in a layer-by-layer sequence using a computer numerical control machine to build up core and fixed partial denture (FPD) structures (robocasting). Al(2)O(3) (alumina) or ZrO(2) (Y-TZP) are blended into a 0.8% aqueous solution of ammonium polyacrylate in a ratio of approximately 1:1 solid:liquid. A viscosifying agent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, is added to a concentration of 1% in the liquid phase, and then a counter polyelectrolyte is added to gel the slurry. There are two methods for robocasting crown structures (cores or FPD framework). One is for the core to be printed using zirconia ink without support materials, in which the stereolithography (STL) file is inverted (occlusal surface resting on a flat substrate) and built. The second method uses a fugitive material composed of carbon black codeposited with the ceramic material. During the sintering process, the carbon black is removed. There are two key challenges to successful printing of ceramic crowns by the robocasting technique. First is the development of suitable materials for printing, and second is the design of printing patterns for assembly of the complex geometry required for a dental restoration. Robocasting has room for improvement. Current development involves enhancing the automation of nozzle alignment for accurate support material deposition and better fidelity of the occlusal surface. An accompanying effort involves calculation of optimal support structures to yield the best geometric results and minimal material usage.

  18. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 94, Revision 2 (FGE.94Rev2: Consideration of aliphatic amines and amides evaluated in an addendum to the group of aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA (68th meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA, and to decide whether further evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 12 aliphatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA at the 68th meeting in 2007. This revision is required owing to additional toxicity data on 3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-N-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-ethyl]-acrylamide [FL-no: 16.090]. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel agrees with JECFA conclusion “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach for all substances considered in this FGE. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered and for all 12 substances, the information is adequate.

  19. The effects of flavour symmetry breaking on hadron matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, A.N.; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Pleiter, D. [Juelich Research Centre (Germany); Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ. (Australia). School of Chemistry and Physics

    2012-12-15

    By considering a flavour expansion about the SU(3)-flavour symmetric point, we investigate how flavour-blindness constrains octet baryon matrix elements after SU(3) is broken by the mass difference between the strange and light quarks. We find the expansions to be highly constrained along a mass trajectory where the singlet quark mass is held constant, which proves beneficial for extrapolations of 2+1 flavour lattice data to the physical point. We investigate these effects numerically via a lattice calculation of the flavour-conserving and flavour-changing matrix elements of the vector and axial operators between octet baryon states.

  20. Heavy Flavour Electron Elliptic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto

    Due to the large mass of the Charm and Beauty quarks, they are c reated in the very first moments of the ultra-high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions taking place at the CERN LHC, therefore, they should be unaware of the geome try of the colli- sion system and carry no azimuthal anisotropies. Similarly , the energy loss via gluon radiation for these massive quarks should be suppressed, th e so-called dead cone ef- fect. Although the observation of elliptic flow in the electro ns produced through the semileptonic decay of these heavy mesons is an indirect meas urement, throughout this thesis it will be shown that a strong correlation exists between the momentum anisotropy of the mother and daughter particles. In the low t ransverse momentum region such measurement would establish whether or not the s ystem reaches local thermal equilibrium. While at large transverse momentum, t he observation of collec- tivity for the heavy flavours can be understood only if the col lisional and radiative in-medium interaction...

  1. Flavour Dependent Gauged Radiative Neutrino Mass Model

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, Seungwon; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-loop induced radiative neutrino mass model with anomaly free flavour dependent gauge symmetry: $\\mu$ minus $\\tau$ symmetry $U(1)_{\\mu-\\tau}$. A neutrino mass matrix satisfying current experimental data can be obtained by introducing a weak isospin singlet scalar boson that breaks $U(1)_{\\mu-\\tau}$ symmetry, an inert doublet scalar field, and three right-handed neutrinos in addition to the fields in the standard model. We find that a characteristic structure appears in the neutrino mass matrix: two-zero texture form which predicts three non-zero neutrino masses and three non-zero CP-phases which can be determined five well measured experimental inputs of two squared mass differences and three mixing angles. Furthermore, it is clarified that only the inverted mass hierarchy is allowed in our model. In a favored parameter set from the neutrino sector, the discrepancy in the muon anomalous magnetic moment between the experimental data and the the standard model prediction can be explained by the ...

  2. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...

  3. First passage process of a Markov additive process, with applications to reflection problems

    CERN Document Server

    D'Auria, Bernardo; Kella, Offer; Mandjes, Michel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider the first passage process of a spectrally negative Markov additive process (MAP). The law of this process is uniquely characterized by a certain matrix function, which plays a crucial role in fluctuation theory. We show how to identify this matrix using the theory of Jordan chains associated with analytic matrix functions. Importantly, our result also provides us with a technique, which can be used to derive various further identities. We then proceed to show how to compute the stationary distribution associated with a one-sided reflected (at zero) MAP for both the spectrally positive and spectrally negative cases as well as for the two sided reflected Markov-modulated Brownian motion; these results can be interpreted in terms of queues with MAP input.

  4. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM AM Inconel 718 standards for yield stress and ultimate tensile strength, and STA yield stress, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation exceeded the ASTM standards for AM Inconel 718.

  5. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    CERN Document Server

    de Salas, Pablo F

    2016-01-01

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, N_eff. We find a value of N_eff=3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), ...

  6. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Pablo F. de [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de València),Parc Científic UV, C/ Catedrático José Beltrán 2, E-46980 Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology (TTK),RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Pastor, Sergio [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de València),Parc Científic UV, C/ Catedrático José Beltrán 2, E-46980 Paterna (Valencia) (Spain)

    2016-07-28

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, N{sub eff}. We find a value of N{sub eff}=3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), predicted in many theoretical models where neutrinos acquire mass. For two sets of NSI parameters allowed by present data, we find that N{sub eff} can be reduced down to 3.040 or enhanced up to 3.059.

  7. New perspectives for heavy flavour physics from the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, R. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Heavy flavours represent a challenge for lattice QCD. We discuss it in very general terms. We give an idea of the significant recent progress which opens up good perspectives for high precision first principles QCD computations for flavour physics. (orig.)

  8. Minimal flavour violation and SU(5)-unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Riccardo, E-mail: barbieri@sns.it; Senia, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.senia@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Minimal flavour violation in its strong or weak versions, based on U(3){sup 3} and U(2){sup 3}, respectively, allows suitable extensions of the standard model at the TeV scale to comply with current flavour constraints in the quark sector. Here we discuss considerations analogous to minimal flavour violation (MFV) in the context of SU(5)-unification, showing the new effects/constraints that arise both in the quark and in the lepton sector, where quantitative statements can be made controlled by the CKM matrix elements. The case of supersymmetry is examined in detail as a particularly motivated example. Third generation sleptons and neutralinos in the few hundred GeV range are shown to be compatible with current constraints.

  9. Leading Particle Production in Light Flavour Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boeriu, O; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couchman, J; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; Davis, R; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J I; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, I; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trefzger, T M; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    2000-01-01

    The energy distribution and type of the particle with the highest momentum in quark jets are determined for each of the five quark flavours making only minimal model assumptions. The analysis is based on a large statistics sample of hadronic Z0 decays collected with the OPAL detector at the LEP e+e- collider. These results provide a basis for future studies of light flavour production at other centre-of-mass energies. We use our results to study the hadronisation mechanism in light flavour jets and compare the data to the QCD models JETSET and HERWIG. Within the JETSET model we also directly determine the suppression of strange quarks to be gamma_s=0.422+-0.049 (stat.)+-0.059 (syst.) by comparing the production of charged and neutral kaons in strange and non-strange light quark events. Finally we study the features of baryon production.

  10. Flavour-Violating Gluino and Squark Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC; Porod, Werner; /Wurzburg U.

    2010-06-11

    We consider scenarios with large flavour violating entries in the squark mass matrices focusing on the mixing between second and third generation squarks. These entries govern both, flavour violating low energy observables on the one hand and squark and gluino decays on the other hand. We first discuss the constraints on the parameter space due to the recent data on B mesons from the B factories and Tevatron. We then consider flavour violating squark and gluino decays and show that they can still be typically of order 10% despite the stringent constraints from low energy data. Finally we briefly comment on the impact for searches and parameter determinations at future collider experiments such as the upcoming LHC or a future International Linear Collider.

  11. On the origin of neutrino flavour symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    King, Stephen F

    2009-01-01

    We study classes of models which are based on some discrete family symmetry which is completely broken such that the observed neutrino flavour symmetry emerges indirectly as an accidental symmetry. For such "indirect" models we discuss the D-term flavon vacuum alignments which are required for such an accidental flavour symmetry consistent with tri-bimaximal lepton mixing to emerge. We identify large classes of suitable discrete family symmetries, namely the $\\Delta(3n^2)$ and $\\Delta(6n^2)$ groups, together with other examples such as $Z_7\\rtimes Z_3$. In such indirect models the implementation of the type I see-saw mechanism is straightforward using constrained sequential dominance. However the accidental neutrino flavour symmetry may be easily violated, for example leading to a large reactor angle, while maintaining accurately the tri-bimaximal solar and atmospheric predictions.

  12. LHCb New algorithms for Flavour Tagging at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Fazzini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The Flavour Tagging technique allows to identify the B initial flavour, required in the measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems. The identification performances at LHCb are further enhanced thanks to the contribution of new algorithms.

  13. Heavy Flavour Production and Decay at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, RWL; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is taking advantage of its large integrated luminosity band sophisticated muon and dimuon triggers to make competitive measurements of heavy flavour production and decay. Inclusive production and heavy flavour jet production is discussed before turning to charm and onium production. The production and decay of individual B hadron species is then addressed, including the current best measurement of the Λb lifetime. A much improved analysis of CP related quantities in Bs decays is presented, before turning to recent results and prospects for rare B decays.

  14. SU(3) flavour breaking and baryon structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, A.N.; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Pleiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC); Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Shanahan, P.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stueben, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Regionales Rechenzentrum; Collaboration: QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    We present results from the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration for hyperon electromagnetic form factors and axial charges obtained from simulations using N{sub f}=2+1 flavours of O(a)-improved Wilson fermions. We also consider matrix elements relevant for hyperon semileptonic decays. We find flavour-breaking effects in hyperon magnetic moments which are consistent with experiment, while our results for the connected quark spin content indicates that quarks contribute more to the spin of the {Xi} baryon than they do to the proton.

  15. Heavy-flavour production in ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Shingo

    2014-06-15

    We present measurements of heavy-flavour production in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV and in p–Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV by the ALICE Collaboration. A strong suppression of heavy-flavour production at high p{sub T} is observed in central Pb–Pb collisions, while non-zero elliptic flow is seen at low p{sub T} in semi-central collisions. The cold nuclear matter effects on the measurements in Pb–Pb collisions have been investigated in p–Pb collisions, and no large effects have been observed.

  16. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  17. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Bluemlein, J.; Kuprash, O.; Placakyte, R.; Starovoitov, P. [DESY Hamburg and Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Cooper-Sarkar, A. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Garzelli, M.V.; Moch, S.O. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Guzzi, M. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Nadolsky, P. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX (United States); Rabbertz, K. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schienbein, I. [LPSC Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Collaboration: PROSA Collaboration

    2015-08-15

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x ∝ 5 x 10{sup -6}. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits. (orig.)

  18. The supersymmetric flavour problem in 5D GUTs and its consequences for LHC phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fichet, S.; Kraml, S. [CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-09-15

    We study supersymmetric models with a GUT-sized extra dimension, where both the Higgs fields and the SUSY breaking hidden sector are localized on a 4D brane. Exponential wave function profiles of the matter fields give rise to hierarchical structures in the Yukawa couplings and soft terms. Such structures can naturally explain hierarchical fermion masses and mixings, while at the same time alleviating the supersymmetric flavour problem. We discuss two sources of supersymmetry breaking, radion mediation and brane fields, and perform a detailed numerical analysis, thoroughly taking into account the proliferation of unknown O(1) coefficients that occurs in this class of models. It turns out that additional assumptions on supersymmetry breaking are necessary to evade the stringent experimental bounds on lepton flavour violation. The favourable regions of parameter space are then examined with regards to their LHC phenomenology. They generically feature heavy gluinos and squarks beyond current bounds. Lepton flavour violation in SUSY cascade decays can give interesting signatures. (orig.)

  19. Masses and magnetic moments of triple heavy flavour baryons in hypercentral model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhavin Patel; Ajay Majethiya; P C Vinodkumar

    2009-04-01

    Triple heavy flavour baryons are studied using the hypercentral description of the three-body system. The confinement potential is assumed as hypercentral Coulomb plus power potential with power index . The ground state ($J^{P} = \\dfrac{1}{2}^{+}$ and $\\dfrac{3}{2}^{+}$) masses of heavy flavour baryons are computed for different power index, starting from 0.5 to 2.0. The predicted masses are found to attain a saturated value with respect to variation in p beyond the power index > 1.0. Using the spin-flavour structure of the constituting quarks and by defining effective mass of the confined quarks within the baryons, the magnetic moments are computed with no additional free parameters.

  20. pipi scattering in three flavour ChPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the pipi processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order. We then combine this calculation with the determination of the parameters from Ke4, the meson masses and decay constants and compare with the results of a dispersive analysis of pipi scattering. The comparison indicates a small but nonzero value for the 1/Nc suppressed NLO low energy constants L4r and L6r.

  1. $\\pi\\pi$ Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Talavera, P; Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the $\\pi\\pi$ processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order. We then combine this calculation with the determination of the parameters from $K_{e4}$ and the masses and decay constants and compare with the results of a dispersive analysis of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering. The comparison indicates a small but nonzero value for the $1/N_c$ suppressed NLO low energy constants $L_4^r$ and $L_6^r$.

  2. General squark flavour mixing: constraints, phenomenology and benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    De Causmaecker, Karen; Herrmann, Bjoern; Mahmoudi, Farvah; O'Leary, Ben; Porod, Werner; Sekmen, Sezen; Strobbe, Nadja

    2015-01-01

    We present an extensive study of non-minimal flavour violation in the squark sector in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We investigate the effects of multiple non-vanishing flavour-violating elements in the squark mass matrices by means of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scanning technique and identify parameter combinations that are favoured by both current data and theoretical constraints. We then detail the resulting distributions of the flavour-conserving and flavour-violating model parameters. Based on this analysis, we propose a set of benchmark scenarios relevant for future studies of non-minimal flavour violation in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  3. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debajyoti Choudhury; Asesh K Datta; Anirban Kundu

    2009-01-01

    The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  4. Safety evaluation of natural flavour complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, R.L.; Adams, T.B.; Cohen, S.M.; Doull, J.; Feron, V.J.; Goodman, J.I.; Hall, R.L.; Marnett, L.J.; Portoghese, P.S.; Waddell, W.J.; Wagner, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Natural flavour complexes (NFCs) are chemical mixtures obtained by applying physical separation methods to botanical sources. Many NFCs are derived from foods. In the present paper, a 12-step procedure for the safety evaluation of NFCs, 'the naturals paradigm', is discussed. This procedure, which is

  5. Constraining multi-Higgs flavour models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Felipe, R.; Silva, Joao P. [Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro 1, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa-ISEL, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Ivanov, I.P. [Universite de Liege, IFPA, Liege (Belgium); Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent (Belgium); Nishi, C.C. [Universidade Federal do ABC-UFABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Serodio, Hugo [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Burjassot (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    To study a flavour model with a non-minimal Higgs sector one must first define the symmetries of the fields; then identify what types of vacua exist and how they may break the symmetries; and finally determine whether the remnant symmetries are compatible with the experimental data. Here we address all these issues in the context of flavour models with any number of Higgs doublets. We stress the importance of analysing the Higgs vacuum expectation values that are pseudo-invariant under the generators of all subgroups. It is shown that the only way of obtaining a physical CKM mixing matrix and, simultaneously, non-degenerate and non-zero quark masses is requiring the vacuum expectation values of the Higgs fields to break completely the full flavour group, except possibly for some symmetry belonging to baryon number. The application of this technique to some illustrative examples, such as the flavour groups Δ(27), A{sub 4} and S{sub 3}, is also presented. (orig.)

  6. Sweetness flavour interactions in soft drinks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahon, D.F.; Roozen, J.P.; Graaf, de C.

    1996-01-01

    Sucrose can be substituted by intense sweeteners to lower the calorie content of soft drinks. Although the sweetness is kept at the same level as much as possible, the flavour of the product often changes. This change could be due to both the mechanism of sensory perception and interactive effects o

  7. The Revival of Kaon Flavour Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2016-01-01

    After years of silence we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade the revival of kaon flavour physics. This is not only because of the crucial measurements of the branching ratios for the rare decays $K^+\\to\\pi^+\

  8. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 91, Revision 1 (FGE.91Rev1): Consideration of simple aliphatic and aromatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by JECFA (53rd and 68th meetings) structurally related to aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev3 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    to concern for genotoxicity. So, the Panel concluded that 37 substances do not give rise to safety concern at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also...

  9. OFF-FLAVOURS IN MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz GÜRSOY

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavour is the main factor determining the purchase of food and it also effects to consumer preferences. Therefore, flavour problems usually come to light as a result of consumers' complaints, and flavour defects in food are a major cause of consumer rejection of the food product including milk and milk products. Flavour and off-flavour in milk and milk products have been the subject of active research in the last decade; there have been developments in the analytical techniques used to monitor flavour development, flavour and off-flavour compounds in many dairy product have now been investigated. The chemicals responsible for unacceptable flavours in milk and milk products can originate incidental contamination from environmental sources, from animal feeding, from chemical reactions occuring within the food material itself and from other sources. The objectives of this paper comprise, after definitions, summarizing the possible sources and specific compounds of off-flavours, and discussing different approaches for off-flavour concept in milk and dairy products.

  10. Phenomenological Implications of an S4 x SU(5) SUSY GUT of Flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Dimou, Maria; Luhn, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the low energy phenomenological implications of an SU(5) Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory (SUSY GUT) whose flavour structure is controlled by the family symmetry S4 x U(1), which provides a good description of all quark and lepton masses, mixings as well as CP violation. Although the model closely mimics Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV) as shown in arXiv:1511.07886, here we focus on the differences. We first present numerical estimates of the low energy mass insertion parameters, including canonical normalisation and renormalisation group running, for well-defined ranges of SUSY parameters and compare the naive model expectations to the numerical scans and the experimental bounds. Our results are then used to estimate the predictions for Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs), Lepton Flavour Violation (LFV), B and K meson mixing as well as rare B decays. The largest observable deviations from MFV come from the LFV process mu --> e gamma and the EDMs.

  11. Heavy-flavour correlations in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelogrlić, Sandro, E-mail: sandro.bjelogrlic@cern.ch

    2014-11-15

    Heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are produced in initial hard scattering processes in heavy-ion collisions, before the formation of a strongly interacting medium, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Insight into the effects of the medium on charm and beauty production can be obtained by measuring the angular correlations between open heavy-flavour hadrons and charged particles. In Pb–Pb collisions, the azimuthal correlation can provide information on the way heavy quarks lose energy in the QGP and is sensitive to possible modifications of the charm parton shower and hadronisation in the presence of the medium. The observed double-ridge long-range correlations in p–Pb collisions for light-flavour hadrons could originate from a collective expansion of the system, as well as from gluon saturation in the initial state (colour glass condensate). The same effect can be studied for heavier quarks via the correlation between heavy-flavour hadrons (or their decay electrons) and charged particles.

  12. Flavour Covariant Transport Equations: an Application to Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena, by deriving Markovian master equations that describe the time-evolution of particle number densities in a statistical ensemble with arbitrary flavour content. As an application of this general formalism, we study flavour effects in a scenario of resonant leptogenesis (RL) and obtain the flavour-covariant evolution equations for heavy-neutrino and lepton number densities. This provides a complete and unified description of RL, capturing three relevant physical phenomena: (i) the resonant mixing between the heavy-neutrino states, (ii) coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, and (iii) quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. To illustrate the importance of this formalism, we numerically solve the flavour-covariant rate equations for a minimal RL model and show that the total lepton asymmetry can be enhanced up to one order of magnitude, as compared to that obtained from flavour-diagonal or partially ...

  13. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of $B^0$ mesons using pions and protons

    CERN Document Server

    LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Two new algorithms for use in the analysis of $pp$ collision are developed to identify the flavour of $B^0$ mesons at production using pions and protons from the hadronization process. The algorithms are optimized and calibrated on data, using $B^0 \\rightarrow D^- \\pi^+$ decays from $pp$ collision data collected by LHCb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The tagging power of the new pion algorithm is 60% greater than the previously available one; the algorithm using protons to identify the flavour of a $B^0$ meson is the first of its kind.

  14. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of $B^0$ mesons using pions and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Two new algorithms for use in the analysis of $pp$ collision are developed to identify the flavour of $B^0$ mesons at production using pions and protons from the hadronization process. The algorithms are optimized and calibrated on data, using $B^0 \\rightarrow D^- \\pi^+$ decays from $pp$ collision data collected by LHCb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The tagging power of the new pion algorithm is 60 % greater than the previously available one; the algorithm using protons to identify the flavour of a $B^0$ meson is the first of its kind.

  15. Multiple High-Fidelity Modeling Tools for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Despite the rapid commercialization of additive manufacturing technology such as selective laser melting, SLM, there are gaps in process modeling and material...

  16. Flavour violating decays of the Higgs bosons in the THDM-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Bock, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Ap. Postal J-48, C.P. 72570, Puebla, Pue (Mexico)

    2006-06-15

    We calculate the branching ratios for the decays of neutral Higgs bosons (h{sup 0}, H{sup 0}, A{sup 0}) into pairs of fermions, including flavour violating processes, in the context of the general two Higgs doublet model III.

  17. Neutrino observables from predictive flavour patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebola, Luis M.; Emmanuel-Costa, David [Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas - CFTP, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Felipe, Ricardo Gonzalez [Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas - CFTP, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); ISEL - Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politecnico de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    We look for predictive flavour patterns of the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix that are compatible with current neutrino oscillation data. Our search is based on the assumption that the neutrino mass matrix contains equal elements and a minimal number of parameters, in the flavour basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal and real. Three unique patterns that can successfully explain neutrino observables at the 3σ confidence level with just three physical parameters are presented. Neutrino textures described by four and five parameters are also studied. The predictions for the lightest neutrino mass, the effective mass parameter in neutrinoless double beta decays and for the CP-violating phases in the leptonic mixing are given. (orig.)

  18. Neutrino observables from predictive flavour patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cebola, Luis M; Felipe, Ricardo Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    We look for predictive flavour patterns of the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix that are compatible with current neutrino oscillation data. Our search is based on the assumption that the neutrino mass matrix contains equal elements and a minimal number of parameters, in the flavour basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal and real. Three unique patterns that can successfully explain neutrino observables at the $3\\sigma$ confidence level with just three physical parameters are presented. Neutrino textures described by four and five parameters are also studied. The predictions for the lightest neutrino mass, the effective mass parameter in neutrinoless double beta decays and the CP-violating phases in the leptonic mixing are given.

  19. Some theoretical issues in heavy flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    2012-11-01

    Some of the recent developments in heavy flavour physics will be reviewed. This will include an update on some of the Standard Model predictions, and a summary of recent measurements that may indicate the presence of new physics (NP). The focus will be on selected models of NP that are indicated by the anomalies in the current data. Observables that can potentially yield signatures of specific physics beyond the Standard Model will be pointed out.

  20. Towards Four-Flavour Dynamical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Herdoiza, Gregorio

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of physical effects from sea quarks has been one of the main advances in lattice QCD simulations over the last few years. We report on recent studies with four flavours of dynamical quarks and address some of the potential issues arising in this new setup. First results for physical observables in the light, strange and charm sectors are presented together with the status of dedicated simulations to perform the non-perturbative renormalisation in mass-independent schemes.

  1. Towards four-flavour dynamical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdoiza, Gregorio [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Inst. de Fiscia Teorica

    2011-03-15

    The inclusion of physical effects from sea quarks has been one of the main advances in lattice QCD simulations over the last few years. We report on recent studies with four flavours of dynamical quarks and address some of the potential issues arising in this new setup. First results for physical observables in the light, strange and charm sectors are presented together with the status of dedicated simulations to perform the non-perturbative renormalisation in mass-independent schemes. (orig.)

  2. Lepton flavour violation in the RS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, Paul; Beneke, Martin [Physik Department T31, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Rohrwild, Juergen [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    We consider charged lepton flavour observables in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with and without custodial protection.To this end, we apply a fully five dimensional (5D) framework to calculate the matching coefficients of the effective field theory at the electroweak scale. This enables us to compute predictions for the radiative decay μ → eγ as well as the decay μ → 3e and μ → e conversion in nuclei.

  3. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulini, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1997-01-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{bar B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given. 38 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Bimaximal Neutrino Mixing with Discrete Flavour Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, Luca

    2011-01-01

    In view of the fact that the data on neutrino mixing are still compatible with a situation where Bimaximal mixing is valid in first approximation and it is then corrected by terms of order of the Cabibbo angle, we present examples where these properties are naturally realized. The models are supersymmetric in 4-dimensions and based on the discrete non-Abelian flavour symmetry S4.

  5. Neutrino-flavoured sneutrino dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    March-Russell, John; McCabe, Christopher; McCullough, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    A simple theory of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) naturally linked to neutrino flavour physics is studied. The DM sector comprises a spectrum of mixed lhd-rhd sneutrino states where both the sneutrino flavour structure and mass splittings are determined by the associated neutrino masses and mixings. Prospects for indirect detection from solar capture are good due to a large sneutrino-nucleon cross-section afforded by the inelastic splitting (solar capture limits exclude an explanation of DAMA/LIBRA). We find parameter regions where all heavier states will have decayed, leaving only one flavour mixture of sneutrino as the candidate DM. Such regions have a unique ‘smoking gun’ signature — sneutrino annihilation in the Sun produces a pair of neutrino mass eigenstates free from vacuum oscillations, with the potential for detection at neutrino telescopes through the observation of a hard spectrum of ν μ and ν τ (for a normal neutrino hierarchy). Next generation direct detection experiments can explore much of the parameter space through both elastic and inelastic scattering. We show in detail that the observed neutrino masses and mixings can arise as a consequence of supersymmetry breaking effects in the sneutrino DM sector, consistent with all experimental constraints.

  6. Neutrino-Flavoured Sneutrino Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    March-Russell, John; McCullough, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    A simple theory of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) naturally linked to neutrino flavour physics is studied. The DM sector comprises a spectrum of mixed lhd-rhd sneutrino states where both the sneutrino flavour structure and mass splittings are determined by the associated neutrino masses and mixings. Prospects for indirect detection from solar capture are good due to a large sneutrino-nucleon cross-section afforded by the inelastic splitting (solar capture limits exclude an explanation of DAMA/LIBRA). We find parameter regions where all heavier states will have decayed, leaving only one flavour mixture of sneutrino as the candidate DM. Such regions have a unique `smoking gun' signature--sneutrino annihilation in the Sun produces a pair of neutrino mass eigenstates free from vacuum oscillations, with the potential for detection at neutrino telescopes through the observation of a hard spectrum of nu_mu and nu_tau (for a normal neutrino hierarchy). Next generation direct detection experiments can explore much of...

  7. Flavour Condensate and the Dark Sector of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tarantino, Walter

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the development of a nonperturbative quantum field theoretical approach to flavour physics, with special attention to cosmological applications. Neutrino flavour oscillation is nowadays a fairly well-established experimental fact. However, the formulation of flavour oscillations in a relativistic field theoretical framework presents non-trivial difficulties. A nonperturbative approach for building flavour states has been proposed by Blasone, Vitiello and coworkers. The formalism implies a non-trivial physical vacuum (called "flavour vacuum"), which might act as a source of Dark Energy. Furthermore, such a vacuum has been recognized as the effective vacuum state arising in the low energy limit of a string theoretical model, D-particle Foam Model. In the attempt of probing the observable phenomenology of the D-particle foam model, a simple toy model (two scalars with mixing \\`a la Blasone & Vitiello on a adiabatically expanding background) has been studied, proving that the flavour...

  8. Quark flavour mixing with right-handed currents: an effective theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J; Isidori, Gino

    2010-01-01

    The impact of right-handed currents in both charged- and neutral-current flavour-violating processes is analysed by means of an effective theory approach. More explicitly, we analyse the structure of dimension-six operators assuming a left-right symmetric flavour group, commuting with an underlying $SU(2)_L \\times SU(2)_R \\times U(1)_{B-L}$ global symmetry, broken only by two Yukawa couplings. The model contains a new unitary matrix controlling flavour-mixing in the right-handed sector. We determine the structure of this matrix by charged-current data, where the tension between inclusive and exclusive determinations of $|V_{ub}|$ can be solved. Having determined the size and the flavour structure of right-handed currents, we investigate how they would manifest themselves in neutral current processes, including particle-antiparticle mixing, $Z\\to b \\bar b$, $B_{s,d}\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $B\\to {Xs,K,K*} \

  9. Leptonic minimal flavour violation in warped extra dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhishek M Iyer; Sudhir K Vempati

    2012-10-01

    Lepton mass hierarchies and lepton flavour violation are revisited in the framework of Randall–Sundrum models. Models with Dirac-type as well as Majorana-type neutrinos are considered. The five-dimensional -parameters are fit to the charged lepton and neutrino masses and mixings using 2 minimization. Leptonic flavour violation is shown to be large in these cases. Schemes of minimal flavour violation are considered for the cases of an effective LLHH operator and Dirac neutrinos and are shown to significantly reduce the limits from lepton flavour violation.

  10. Flavour tagging of $b$ mesons in $pp$ collisions at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Mueller, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Flavour tagging, i.e. the inference of the production flavour of reconstructed $b$ hadrons, is essential for precision measurements of decay time-dependent $CP$ violation and of mixing parameters in the the neutral $B$ meson systems. LHC's $pp$ collisions with their high track multiplicities constitute a challenging environment for flavour tagging and demand for new and improved strategies. We present recent progress and new developments in flavour tagging at the LHCb experiment, which will allow for a further improvement of $CP$ violation measurements in decays of $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons.

  11. Searches for flavour changing neutral currents in the top sector

    CERN Document Server

    Araque, Juan Pedro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) processes are forbidden at tree level in the Standard Model and highly suppressed at higher orders. This makes FCNC one of the key processes to search for new physics since any small deviations from the Standard Model expectations could have a big impact. Both ATLAS and CMS Collaborations have designed a comprehensive strategy to search for FCNC in top quark physics both in the production and decay. The strategies followed by both collaborations are here described, using data from $pp$ collisions at the LHC collected at a centre of mass energies of 7 and 8~TeV with integrated luminosities ranging from $5~\\rm{ fb}^{-1}$ to $20.3~\\rm{ fb}^{-1}$.

  12. Searches for flavour changing neutral currents in the top sector

    CERN Document Server

    Araque, J P

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) processes are forbidden at tree level in the Standard Model and highly suppressed at higher orders. This makes FCNC one of the key processes to search for new physics since any small deviations from the Standard Model expectations could have a big impact. Both ATLAS and CMS Collaborations have designed a comprehensive strategy to search for FCNC in top quark physics both in the production and decay. The strategies followed by both collaborations are here described, using data from $pp$ collisions at the LHC collected at a centre of mass energies of 7 and 8~TeV with integrated luminosities ranging from $5~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ to $20.3~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$.

  13. Complementarity in lepton-flavour violating muon decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, A; Pruna, G M; Signer, A

    2016-01-01

    This note presents an analysis of lepton-flavour-violating muon decays within the framework of a low-energy effective field theory that contains higher-dimensional operators allowed by QED and QCD symmetries. The decay modes $\\mu\\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu\\to 3e$ are investigated below the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale, down to energies at which such processes occur, i.e. the muon mass scale. The complete class of dimension-5 and dimension-6 operators is studied systematically at the tree level, and one-loop contributions to the renormalisation group equations are fully taken into account. Current experimental limits are used to extract bounds on the Wilson coefficients of some of the operators and, ultimately, on the effective couplings at any energy level below the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale. Correlations between two couplings relevant to both processes illustrate the complementarity of searches planned for the MEG II and Mu3e experiments.

  14. Flavour Independent Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    A flavour independent search for the CP-even and CP-odd neutral Higgs bosons h and A is performed in 624/pb of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209GeV. Higgs boson production through the e^+e^- -> Z h and the e^+e^- ->h A processes is considered and decays of the Higgs bosons into hadrons are studied. No significant signal is observed and 95% confidence level limits on the hZZ and hAZ couplings are derived as a function of the Higgs boson masses. Assuming the Standard Model cross section for the Higgs-strahlung process and a 100% branching fraction into hadrons, a 95% confidence level lower limit on the mass of the Higgs boson is set at 110.3GeV.

  15. Neutrino Masses at LHC: Minimal Lepton Flavour Violation in Type-III See-saw

    CERN Document Server

    Eboli, O J P; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C

    2011-01-01

    We study the signatures of minimal lepton flavour violation in a simple Type-III see--saw model in which the flavour scale is given by the new fermion triplet mass and it can be naturally light enough to be produced at the LHC. In this model the flavour structure of the couplings of the triplet fermions to the Standard Model leptons can be reconstructed from the neutrino mass matrix and the smallness of the neutrino mass is associated with a tiny violation of total lepton number. Characteristic signatures of this model include suppressed lepton number violation decays of the triplet fermions, absence of displaced vertices in their decays and predictable lepton flavour composition of the states produced in their decays. We study the observability of these signals in the processes $pp\\rightarrow 3\\ell + 2j +\\Sla{E_T}$ and $pp\\rightarrow 2\\ell + 4j$ with $\\ell =e$ or $\\mu$ taking into account the present low energy data on neutrino physics and the corresponding Standard Model backgrounds. Our results indicate th...

  16. REPRESENTATION OF ADDITIVE FUNCTIONALS AND LOCAL TIMES FOR JUMP MARKOV PROCESSES AND THEIR FUNCTIONAL LIMIT THEOREM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋义文; 刘禄勤

    2003-01-01

    The representation of additive functionals and local times for jump Markovprocesses are obtained. The results of uniformly functional moderate deviation and theirapplications to birth-death processes are also presented.

  17. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  18. Flavour covariant transport equations: An application to resonant leptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Bhupal Dev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena, by deriving Markovian master equations that describe the time-evolution of particle number densities in a statistical ensemble with arbitrary flavour content. As an application of this general formalism, we study flavour effects in a scenario of resonant leptogenesis (RL and obtain the flavour-covariant evolution equations for heavy-neutrino and lepton number densities. This provides a complete and unified description of RL, capturing three distinct physical phenomena: (i the resonant mixing between the heavy-neutrino states, (ii coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, and (iii quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. To illustrate the importance of this formalism, we numerically solve the flavour-covariant rate equations for a minimal RL model and show that the total lepton asymmetry can be enhanced by up to one order of magnitude, as compared to that obtained from flavour-diagonal or partially flavour off-diagonal rate equations. Thus, the viable RL model parameter space is enlarged, thereby enhancing further the prospects of probing a common origin of neutrino masses and the baryon asymmetry in the Universe at the LHC, as well as in low-energy experiments searching for lepton flavour and number violation. The key new ingredients in our flavour-covariant formalism are rank-4 rate tensors, which are required for the consistency of our flavour-mixing treatment, as shown by an explicit calculation of the relevant transition amplitudes by generalizing the optical theorem. We also provide a geometric and physical interpretation of the heavy-neutrino degeneracy limits in the minimal RL scenario. Finally, we comment on the consistency of various suggested forms for the heavy-neutrino self-energy regulator in the lepton-number conserving limit.

  19. A mechanistic understanding of processing additive-induced efficiency enhancement in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, Kristin

    2013-10-31

    The addition of processing additives is a widely used approach to increase power conversion efficiencies for many organic solar cells. We present how additives change the polymer conformation in the casting solution leading to a more intermixed phase-segregated network structure of the active layer which in turn results in a 5-fold enhancement in efficiency. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Measurements of heavy-flavour decay leptons with ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of electrons and muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at central and forward rapidity performed by the ALICE Collaboration in p–Pb (√sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb–Pb collisions (√sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are reconstructed using several detectors of the ALICE central barrel. Muons are reconstructed using the muon spectrometer at forward rapidity (2.5 < y < 4. The nuclear modification factors in Pb–Pb (RAA and in p–Pb (RpPb collisions, and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2 in Pb– Pb collisions will be discussed. Theoretical predictions are compared with the data. In addition, the measurement of the azimuthal correlation between electrons from heavyflavour hadron decays and charged hadrons in p–Pb collisions will be shown.

  1. Process Control and Development for Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing with Embedded Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent additive manufacturing technology which combines ultrasonic metal welding, CNC machining, and mechanized foil layering to create large gapless near net-shape metallic parts. The process has been attracting much attention lately due to its low formation temperature, the capability to join dissimilar metals, and the ability to create complex design features not possible with traditional subtractive processes alone. These process attributes enable light-weighting of structures and components in an unprecedented way. However, UAM is currently limited to niche areas due to the lack of quality tracking and inadequate scientific understanding of the process. As a result, this thesis work is focused on improving both component quality tracking and process understanding through the use of average electrical power input to the welder. Additionally, the understanding and application space of embedding fibers into metals using UAM is investigated, with particular focus on NiTi shape memory alloy fibers.

  2. High performance poly(etherketoneketone) (PEKK) composite parts fabricated using Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunc, Vlastimil [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kishore, Vidya [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Xun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ajinjeru, Christine [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hassen, Ahmed A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    ORNL collaborated with Arkema Inc. to investigate poly(etherketoneketone) (PEKK) and its composites as potential feedstock material for Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. In this work thermal and rheological properties were investigated and characterized in order to identify suitable processing conditions and material flow behavior for BAAM process.

  3. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  4. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  5. Additives effects on crystallization and morphology in a novel caustic aluminate solution decomposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying ZHANG; Sbili ZHENG; Yifei ZHANG; Hongbin XU; Yi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    A novel process of caustic aluminate solution decomposition by alcohol medium was developed by the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences in order to solve the problem of low decomposi-tion ratio in the traditional Bayer seeded hydrolysis process. In this research, effects of additives on the crystallization ratio, secondary particle size and morphol-ogy of aluminum hydroxide in the new process were studied to obtain high-quality products. On the basis of primary selection of additives, an orthogonal design L9(34)was used as a chemometric method to investigate the effects of additives. The studied parameters include the reaction style, quantity of additives, caustic soda concen-tration, as well as the combination manner. The crystal-lization ratios of sodium aluminate solution and crystal size of aluminum hydroxide, determined by ICP-OES, SEM and MLPSA (Malvern Laser Particle Size Analyzer), were used to evaluate the effects of the additives. The results showed that different combination manners could promote agglomeration or dispersion. An additive composed by Tween 80 and PEG 200 could promote agglomeration,while a spot of PEG species had a relatively strong dispersion effect. However, the additives had little effects on the crystallization ratios. According to the Raman spectra result, the added alcohol medium might serve as a kind of solvent.

  6. Test of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lionetto, Federica

    2016-01-01

    This contribution presents the $R_D{\\ast}$ and $R_K$ measurements, which are a clean probe of lepton flavour universality, and the angular analyses of the $B^0 \\to K^\\ast {0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to K^\\ast{0} ~e^+ e^-$ decays, which allow to search for New Physics in rare decays proceeding through ${\\text a} ~b \\to s \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ transition. All measurements have been performed by the LHCb collaboration using the full statistics of LHC Run I. An overview of the ongoing and future measurements is given in the conclusions.

  7. New Physics Search in Flavour Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    With the running B, kaon and neutrino physics experiments, flavour physics takes centre stage within today's particle physics. We discuss the opportunities offered by these experiments in our search for new physics beyond the SM and discuss their complementarity to collider physics. We focus on rare B and kaon decays, highlighting specific observables in an exemplary mode. We also comment on the so-called B {yields} {pi}{pi} and B {yields} K{pi} puzzles. Moreover, we briefly discuss the restrictive role of long-distance strong interactions and some new tools such as QCD factorization and SCET to handle them.

  8. Two-Higgs Leptonic Minimal Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Botella, F J; Nebot, M; Rebelo, M N

    2011-01-01

    We construct extensions of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublets, where there are flavour changing neutral currents both in the quark and leptonic sectors, with their strength fixed by the fermion mixing matrices $V_{CKM}$ and $V_{PMNS}$. These models are an extension to the leptonic sector of the class of models previously considered by Branco, Grimus and Lavoura, for the quark sector. We consider both the cases of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos and identify the minimal discrete symmetry required in order to implement the models in a natural way.

  9. B flavour tagging using charm decays at the LHCb experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is described for tagging the flavour content at production of neutral B mesons in the LHCb experiment. The algorithm exploits the correlation of the flavour of a B meson with the charge of a reconstructed secondary charm hadron from the decay of the other b hadron produced in the proton

  10. Heavy flavour production in 13 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Braun, Svende Annelies

    2015-01-01

    This summer first data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV is collected at the LHC. This opens a new era in searches for new particles and precision tests of the Standard Model. Heavy flavour production plays an important role both as precision QCD test and as backgrounds for new particles. The first measurements of heavy flavour production are presented.

  11. Hard Fats As Additives In Palm Oil And Its Relationships To Crystallization Process And Polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, MR; Glazieli Marangoni; Ribeiro; Ana Paula Badan; dos Santos; Adenilson Oliveira; Cardoso; Lisandro Pavie; Kieckbusch; Theo Guenter

    2016-01-01

    The application of palm oil in fat-based product can be inappropriate due to its low crystallization rates and formation of crystalline clusters in post-processing stages. The adjustment of these properties can be achieved with the addition of hard fats, which are low-cost industrial products resulting from the process of total catalytic hydrogenation of liquid oils. During the crystallization of palm oil, these components can act as preferential nuclei in a crystalline ordering process, and ...

  12. Flavour Independent Searches for Hadronically Decaying Neutral Higgs Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes flavour independent searches for hadronically decaying neutral Higgs bosons in the data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. The collected data-set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of around 610 pb^{-1}. The e+e- -> hA and e+e- -> hZ processes are considered, with direct Higgs boson decays into hadrons. No evidence for Higgs boson production is found, and cross-section limits are set as a function of the Higgs boson masses. No explicit assumptions are made on the underlying physics beyond the Standard Model, allowing interpretation of the data in a large class of models.

  13. piK Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-05-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the piK processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The calculation has been performed analytically but we only include analytical results for the dependence on the low-energy constants (LECs) at NNLO due to the size of the expressions. These results, together with resonance estimates of the NNLO LECs are used to obtain constraints on the Zweig rule suppressed LECs at NLO, L4r and L6r. Contrary to expectations from NLO order calculations we find them to be compatible with zero. We do a preliminary study of combining the results from pipi scattering, piK scattering and the scalar form-factors and find only a marginal compatibility with all experimental/dispersive input data.

  14. $\\pi K$ Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, Johan; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the $\\pi K$ processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The calculation has been performed analytically but we only include analytical results for the dependence on the low-energy constants (LECs) at NNLO due to the size of the expressions. These results, together with resonance estimates of the NNLO LECs are used to obtain constraints on the Zweig rule suppressed LECs at NLO, $L_4^r$ and $L_6^r$. Contrary to expectations from NLO order calculations we find them to be compatible with zero. We do a preliminary study of combining the results from $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, $\\pi K$ scattering and the scalar form-factors and find only a marginal compatibility with all experimental/dispersive input data.

  15. Tri-Bimaximal Neutrino Mixing and Discrete Flavour Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Merlo, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We review the application of non-Abelian discrete groups to Tri-Bimaximal (TB) neutrino mixing, which is supported by experiment as a possible good first approximation to the data. After summarizing the motivation and the formalism, we discuss specific models, mainly those based on A4 but also on other finite groups, and their phenomenological implications, including the extension to quarks. The recent measurements of \\theta_13 favour versions of these models where a suitable mechanism leads to corrections to \\theta_13 that can naturally be larger than those to \\theta_12 and \\theta_23. The virtues and the problems of TB mixing models are discussed, also in connection with lepton flavour violating processes, and the different approaches are compared.

  16. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  17. Factors influencing the flavour of game meat: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethling, J; Hoffman, L C; Muller, M

    2016-03-01

    Flavour is a very important attribute contributing to the sensory quality of meat and meat products. Although the sensory quality of meat includes orthonasal and retronasal aroma, taste, as well as appearance, juiciness and other textural attributes, the focus of this review is primarily on flavour. The influence of species, age, gender, muscle anatomical location, diet, harvesting conditions, ageing of meat, packaging and storage, as well as cooking method on the flavour of game meat are discussed. Very little research is available on the factors influencing the flavour of the meat derived from wild and free-living game species. The aim of this literature review is thus to discuss the key ante- and post-mortem factors that influence the flavour of game meat, with specific focus on wild and free-living South African game species.

  18. Numerical analysis of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission for an extension of the process limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-02-01

    By sheet metal forming processes the forming limits and part characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. In deep drawing processes the maximum deep draw ratios as well as the springback behaviour of the metal parts are depending on the stress distribution in the part material during the forming process. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the forming limit of material is achieved. This contribution deals with numerical investigation of process effect caused by additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Here, the steel material HCT 600X+Z (1.0941) in thickness s 0 = 1.0 mm is analyzed numerically using the anisotropic model Hill48. This model is validated by the means of cup test by Swift. Both, the FEA of conventional and forming process with additional force transmission are carried out. The numerical results are compared with reference geometry of rectangle cup.

  19. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 4 (FGE.09Rev4: Secondary alicyclic saturated and unsaturated alcohols, ketones and esters containing secondary alicyclic alcohols from chemical group 8 and 30, and an ester of a phenol derivative from chemical group 25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC No 1565/2000. The present revision of FGE.09 includes the assessment of four additional flavouring substances, p-menthan-3-one [FL-no: 07.059], 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-2-en-1-one [FL-no: 07.202], l-piperitone [FL-no: 07.255] and menthol 1-and 2-propylene glycol carbonate [FL-no: 09.843]. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that the 20 substances [FL-no: 02.070, 02.075, 02.135, 02.167, 06.136, 07.059, 07.202, 07.203, 07.255, 09.154, 09.355, 09.520, 09.618, 09.619, 09.621, 09.843, 09.870, 09.929, 09.935 and 09.949] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. For the remaining candidate substance [FL-no: 07.207], additional toxicity data are requested (further metabolism and/or toxicity studies. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all candidate substances.

  20. The Japan Flavour and Fragrance Materials Association's (JFFMA) safety assessment of acetal food flavouring substances uniquely used in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hajime; Hasegawa-Baba, Yasuko; Saito, Kenji; Sekiya, Fumiko; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Mirokuji, Yoshiharu; Maruyama, Shinpei; Ono, Atsushi; Nakajima, Madoka; Degawa, Masakuni; Ozawa, Shogo; Shibutani, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Using the procedure devised by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), we performed safety evaluations on five acetal flavouring substances uniquely used in Japan: acetaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal, acetoin dimethyl acetal, hexanal dibutyl acetal, hexanal glyceryl acetal and 4-methyl-2-pentanone propyleneglycol acetal. As no genotoxicity study data were available in the literature, all five substances had no chemical structural alerts predicting genotoxicity. Using Cramer's classification, acetoin dimethyl acetal and hexanal dibutyl acetal were categorised as class I, and acetaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal, hexanal glyceryl acetal and 4-methyl-2-pentanone propyleneglycol acetal as class III. The estimated daily intakes for all five substances were within the range of 1.45-6.53 µg/person/day using the method of maximised survey-derived intake based on the annual production data in Japan from 2001, 2005, 2008 and 2010, and 156-720 µg/person/day using the single-portion exposure technique (SPET), based on the average use levels in standard portion sizes of flavoured foods. The daily intakes of the two class I substances were below the threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) - 1800 μg/person/day. The daily intakes of the three class III substances exceeded the TTC (90 μg/person/day). Two of these, acetaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal and hexanal glyceryl acetal, were expected to be metabolised into endogenous products after ingestion. For 4-methyl-2-pentanone propyleneglycol acetal, one of its metabolites was not expected to be metabolised into endogenous products. However, its daily intake level, based on the estimated intake calculated by the SPET method, was about 1/15 000th of the no observed effect level. It was thus concluded that all five substances raised no safety concerns when used for flavouring foods at the currently estimated intake levels. While no information on in vitro and in vivo toxicity for all five substances was available

  1. Minimal flavour violations and tree level FCNC

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, Anjan S

    2007-01-01

    Consequences of a specific class of two Higgs doublet models in which the Higgs induced tree level flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) display minimal flavour violation (MFV) are considered. These FCNC are fixed in terms of the CKM matrix elements and the down quark masses. The minimal model in this category with only two Higgs doublets has no extra CP violating phases but such a phase can be induced by adding a complex singlet. Many of the theoretical predictions are similar to other MFV scenario. The FCNC contribute significantly to $B$ meson mixing and CP violation. Detailed numerical analysis to determine the allowed Higgs contributions to neutral meson mixings and the CKM parameters $\\bar{\\rho},\\bar{\\eta}$ in their presence is presented. The Higgs induced phase in the $B^0_{d,s}-\\bar{B}^0_{d,s}$ transition amplitude $M_{12}^{d,s}$ is predicted to be equal for the $B_d$ and the $B_s$ systems. There is a strong correlation between phases in $M_{12}^{d,s}$ and $|V_{ub}|$. A measurable CP violating phas...

  2. Critical Number of Flavours in QED

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, A; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L X; Tejeda-Yeomans, M E

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that in unquenched quantum electrodynamics (QED), chiral symmetry breaking ceases to exist above a critical number of fermion flavours $N_f$. This is a necessary and sufficient consequence of the fact that there exists a critical value of electromagnetic coupling $\\alpha$ beyond which dynamical mass generation gets triggered. We employ a multiplicatively renormalizable photon propagator involving leading logarithms to all orders in $\\alpha$ to illustrate this. We study the flavour and coupling dependence of the dynamically generated mass analytically as well as numerically. We also derive the scaling laws for the dynamical mass as a function of $\\alpha$ and $N_f$. Up to a multiplicative constant, these scaling laws are related through $(\\alpha, \\alpha_c) \\leftrightarrow (1/N_f, 1/N_f^c)$. Calculation of the mass anomalous dimension $\\gamma_m$ shows that it is always greater than its value in the quenched case. We also evaluate the $\\beta$-function. The criticality plane is drawn in the $(\\alpha...

  3. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor machine and plastic sacks; fermentation agents (fresh cage-luwakcoffee, “ragi tape”, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk; temperature of fermentation (room, 30 C, 35 C, and 40 C; and duration of fermentation (6, 12, and 18 hours. The experiment were replicated three times. Wet-coffee parchments were washed and sundried until moisture content reached 12%. The dried parchment was hulled and examined for the bean quality and flavors. The experiment indicated that 40 C fermentation in fermentor machine resulted in higher content of “full sour defect”. Fermentation agents significanly influenced bean size. Temperature treatment significanly influenced bulk density and bean size. The best flavor profile was obtained from fermentation in plastic sack at ambient temperature. Bacteria of fermented milk and “fresh luwak coffee” as fermentation agents resulted up to excellent flavor. Twelve hours fermentation produced best flavor of Arabica coffee compared to 6 and 18 hours. Key words: Arabica coffee, fermentation, flavour, fermentation agents

  4. Influence of sweetener stevia on the quality of strawberry flavoured fresh yoghurt

    OpenAIRE

    Katarina Lisak; Irena Jeličić; Ljubica Tratnik; Rajka Božanić

    2011-01-01

    Stevia is a natural, non energetic sweetener, 200-300 times sweeter than sucrose, and is obtained by leaves extraction of the Stevia rebaudiana. According to the low energy value of stevia to sweeten food products, it is a great possibility of its use in the dairy industry. This study examined the differences in the sweetness of the strawberry flavoured yoghurt with the addition of sucrose, stevia and equal portions of sucrose and stevia; each combination was used at three different concentra...

  5. Biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite scaffolds processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesavibul, Passakorn; Chantaweroad, Surapol; Laohaprapanon, Apinya; Channasanon, Somruethai; Uppanan, Paweena; Tanodekaew, Siriporn; Chalermkarnnon, Prasert; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications by using lithography-based additive manufacturing techniques has been introduced due to the abilities to control porous structures with suitable resolutions. In this research, the use of hydroxyapatite cellular structures, which are processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing machine, as a bone tissue engineering scaffold was investigated. The utilization of digital light processing system for additive manufacturing machine in laboratory scale was performed in order to fabricate the hydroxyapatite scaffold, of which biocompatibilities were eventually evaluated by direct contact and cell-culturing tests. In addition, the density and compressive strength of the scaffolds were also characterized. The results show that the hydroxyapatite scaffold at 77% of porosity with 91% of theoretical density and 0.36 MPa of the compressive strength are able to be processed. In comparison with a conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite, the scaffold did not present any cytotoxic signs while the viability of cells at 95.1% was reported. After 14 days of cell-culturing tests, the scaffold was able to be attached by pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) leading to cell proliferation and differentiation. The hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering was able to be processed by the lithography-based additive manufacturing machine while the biocompatibilities were also confirmed.

  6. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton distribution amplitude (PDA by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ=2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on the difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5 inferred in e+e− annihilation at s=17 GeV2.

  7. Gauge-Higgs unification with broken flavour symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olschewsky, M.

    2007-05-15

    We study a five-dimensional Gauge-Higgs unification model on the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} based on the extended standard model (SM) gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F}. The group SO(3){sub F} is treated as a chiral gauged flavour symmetry. Electroweak-, flavour- and Higgs interactions are unified in one single gauge group SU(7). The unified gauge group SU(7) is broken down to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} by orbifolding and imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The compactification scale of the theory is O(1) TeV. Furthermore, the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} is put on a lattice. This setting gives a well-defined staring point for renormalisation group (RG) transformations. As a result of the RG-flow, the bulk is integrated out and the extra dimension will consist of only two points: the orbifold fixed points. The model obtained this way is called an effective bilayered transverse lattice model. Parallel transporters (PT) in the extra dimension become nonunitary as a result of the blockspin transformations. In addition, a Higgs potential V({phi}) emerges naturally. The PTs can be written as a product e{sup A{sub y}}e{sup {eta}}e{sup A{sub y}} of unitary factors e{sup A{sub y}} and a selfadjoint factor e{sup {eta}}. The reduction 48 {yields} 35 + 6 + anti 6 + 1 of the adjoint representation of SU(7) with respect to SU(6) contains SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} leads to three SU(2){sub L} Higgs doublets: one for the first, one for the second and one for the third generation. Their zero modes serve as a substitute for the SM Higgs. When the extended SM gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} is spontaneously broken down to U(1){sub em}, an exponential gauge boson mass splitting occurs naturally. At a first step SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} is broken to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} by VEVs for the selfadjoint factor e{sup {eta}}. This breaking leads to masses of flavour changing SO(3){sub F

  8. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  9. Reduction of Surface Roughness by Means of Laser Processing over Additive Manufacturing Metal Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Alfieri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of processing parameters and exposure strategies is usually performed in additive manufacturing to set up the process; nevertheless, standards for roughness may not be evenly matched on a single complex part, since surface features depend on the building direction of the part. This paper aims to evaluate post processing treating via laser surface modification by means of scanning optics and beam wobbling to process metal parts resulting from selective laser melting of stainless steel in order to improve surface topography. The results are discussed in terms of roughness, geometry of the fusion zone in the cross-section, microstructural modification, and microhardness so as to assess the effects of laser post processing. The benefits of beam wobbling over linear scanning processing are shown, as heat effects in the base metal are proven to be lower.

  10. Modelling the effect of oil/fat content in food systems on flavour absorption by LLDPE.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, M.; Willige, van R.W.G.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the phenomena in food packaging interactions is flavour absorption. Absorption of flavour compounds from food products into food-packaging materials can result in loss of flavour compounds or an unbalance in the flavour profile changing a product's quality. The food matrix influences the amou

  11. QUALITY OF MINIMALLY PROCESSED ‘FUJI’ APPLE UNDER REFRIGERATED STORAGE AND TREATMENT WITH ADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINES BATALHA MORENO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to prolong the useful life of the minimally processed ‘Fuji’ apple by applying the individual or combined additives (L-cysteine chloride, L-ascorbic acid and calcium chloride and to determine the appropriate period of storage of the whole fruit to perform the minimum processing. The experimental design was completely randomized in three-factor design with three replications. Factor A was composed of storage periods of whole apples, pre-processing, in cold chambers (20, 78, 138 and 188 days; the factor B was represented by storage periods minimum post-processing, simulating shelf life (3, 6, 9 and 12 days, and factor C was represented by chemical additives (distilled water, as control, 0.5% L-cysteine chloride, 1% L-ascorbic acid, 0.5% L-cysteine chloride along with 1% calcium chloride and 1% L-ascorbic acid together with 1% calcium chloride. The evaluated dependent variables were pulp color (L* and hº, soluble solids, titratable acidity, content of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and quantification of polyphenol oxidase. In addition, was analyzed the presence or absence of Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli. The prolongation of the storage time of ‘Fuji’ apples in a refrigerated atmosphere promotes increased susceptibility to browning and softening after processing from 78 days of storage. The use of additives in the process, helps prevent these problems, especially when combined 0.5% L-cysteine chloride with 1% calcium chloride, achieving an excellent conservation in refrigerated shelf up to 6 days. From a microbiological aspect, minimally processed apples are toxicologically safe.

  12. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  13. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 2 (FGE.06Rev2): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    , an additional study in which 2-ethylbutyric acid was given by gavage to pregnant rats showed a NOAEL of 200 mg/kg bw/day of 2-ethylbutyric acid. This dose is more than 4 x 107 times higher than the MSDI for 2-ethylbutyric acid arising from the intake of the candidate substance, [FL-no: 09.884]. Accordingly...

  14. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 94, Revision 2 (FGE.94Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic amines and amides evaluated in an addendum to the group of aliphatic and aromatic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 12 aliphatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA at the 68th meeting in 2007. This revision is required owing to additional toxicity data on 3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[2...

  15. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 86, Revision 2 (FGE.86Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA (65th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 30 aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA at the 65th meeting in 2005. This revision is required owing to additional available toxicity data on piperine [FL...

  16. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 2 (FGE.77Rev2): Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related, to Pyridine, Pyrrole, Indole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.24Rev2 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 22 pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting). The revision of this consideration is made since additional toxicity data have become available...

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 1 (FGE.77Rev1): Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 22 pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives evaluated by the JECFA (63rd meeting). The revision of this consideration is made since additional toxicity data have become available...

  18. Sequential neural processes in abacus mental addition: an EEG and FMRI case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixuan Ku

    Full Text Available Abacus experts are able to mentally calculate multi-digit numbers rapidly. Some behavioral and neuroimaging studies have suggested a visuospatial and visuomotor strategy during abacus mental calculation. However, no study up to now has attempted to dissociate temporally the visuospatial neural process from the visuomotor neural process during abacus mental calculation. In the present study, an abacus expert performed the mental addition tasks (8-digit and 4-digit addends presented in visual or auditory modes swiftly and accurately. The 100% correct rates in this expert's task performance were significantly higher than those of ordinary subjects performing 1-digit and 2-digit addition tasks. ERPs, EEG source localizations, and fMRI results taken together suggested visuospatial and visuomotor processes were sequentially arranged during the abacus mental addition with visual addends and could be dissociated from each other temporally. The visuospatial transformation of the numbers, in which the superior parietal lobule was most likely involved, might occur first (around 380 ms after the onset of the stimuli. The visuomotor processing, in which the superior/middle frontal gyri were most likely involved, might occur later (around 440 ms. Meanwhile, fMRI results suggested that neural networks involved in the abacus mental addition with auditory stimuli were similar to those in the visual abacus mental addition. The most prominently activated brain areas in both conditions included the bilateral superior parietal lobules (BA 7 and bilateral middle frontal gyri (BA 6. These results suggest a supra-modal brain network in abacus mental addition, which may develop from normal mental calculation networks.

  19. Sequential neural processes in abacus mental addition: an EEG and FMRI case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yixuan; Hong, Bo; Zhou, Wenjing; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2012-01-01

    Abacus experts are able to mentally calculate multi-digit numbers rapidly. Some behavioral and neuroimaging studies have suggested a visuospatial and visuomotor strategy during abacus mental calculation. However, no study up to now has attempted to dissociate temporally the visuospatial neural process from the visuomotor neural process during abacus mental calculation. In the present study, an abacus expert performed the mental addition tasks (8-digit and 4-digit addends presented in visual or auditory modes) swiftly and accurately. The 100% correct rates in this expert's task performance were significantly higher than those of ordinary subjects performing 1-digit and 2-digit addition tasks. ERPs, EEG source localizations, and fMRI results taken together suggested visuospatial and visuomotor processes were sequentially arranged during the abacus mental addition with visual addends and could be dissociated from each other temporally. The visuospatial transformation of the numbers, in which the superior parietal lobule was most likely involved, might occur first (around 380 ms) after the onset of the stimuli. The visuomotor processing, in which the superior/middle frontal gyri were most likely involved, might occur later (around 440 ms). Meanwhile, fMRI results suggested that neural networks involved in the abacus mental addition with auditory stimuli were similar to those in the visual abacus mental addition. The most prominently activated brain areas in both conditions included the bilateral superior parietal lobules (BA 7) and bilateral middle frontal gyri (BA 6). These results suggest a supra-modal brain network in abacus mental addition, which may develop from normal mental calculation networks.

  20. Rare leptonic and semileptonic $b$-hadron decays and tests of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Bifani, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of heavy-flavoured particles provide an ideal laboratory to look for deviations from the Standard Model, and explore energy regimes beyond the LHC reach. Decays proceeding via electroweak penguin diagrams are excellent probes to search for New Physics, and $b \\to s \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ processes are particularly interesting since they give access to many observables such as branching fractions, asymmetries and angular observables. Recent results from the LHCb experiment are reviewed.

  1. Rationalization of Microstructure Heterogeneity in INCONEL 718 Builds Made by the Direct Laser Additive Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; McAllister, Donald; Colijn, Hendrik; Mills, Michael; Farson, Dave; Nordin, Mark; Babu, Sudarsanam

    2014-09-01

    Simulative builds, typical of the tip-repair procedure, with matching compositions were deposited on an INCONEL 718 substrate using the laser additive manufacturing process. In the as-processed condition, these builds exhibit spatial heterogeneity in microstructure. Electron backscattering diffraction analyses showed highly misoriented grains in the top region of the builds compared to those of the lower region. Hardness maps indicated a 30 pct hardness increase in build regions close to the substrate over those of the top regions. Detailed multiscale characterizations, through scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction imaging, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ChemiSTEM, also showed microstructure heterogeneities within the builds in different length scales including interdendritic and interprecipitate regions. These multiscale heterogeneities were correlated to primary solidification, remelting, and solid-state precipitation kinetics of γ″ induced by solute segregation, as well as multiple heating and cooling cycles induced by the laser additive manufacturing process.

  2. Measurement of powder bed density in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Donmez, A.; Slotwinski, J.; Moylan, S.

    2016-11-01

    Many factors influence the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) processes, resulting in a high degree of variation in process outcomes. Therefore, quantifying these factors and their correlations to process outcomes are important challenges to overcome to enable widespread adoption of emerging AM technologies. In the powder bed fusion AM process, the density of the powder layers in the powder bed is a key influencing factor. This paper introduces a method to determine the powder bed density (PBD) during the powder bed fusion (PBF) process. A complete uncertainty analysis associated with the measurement method was also described. The resulting expanded measurement uncertainty, U PBD (k  =  2), was determined as 0.004 g · cm-3. It was shown that this expanded measurement uncertainty is about three orders of magnitude smaller than the typical powder bed density. This method enables establishing correlations between the changes in PBD and the direction of motion of the powder recoating arm.

  3. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  4. Minimal flavour violation and neutrino masses without R-parity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcadi, G.; Di Luzio, L.; Nardecchia, M.

    2012-01-01

    symmetry breaking all the couplings of the superpotential including the R-parity violating ones. If R-parity violation is responsible for neutrino masses, our setup can be seen as an extension of MFV to the lepton sector. We analyze two patterns based on the non-abelian flavour symmetries SU(3)(4) circle...... times SU(4) and SU(3)(5). In the former case the total lepton number and the lepton flavour number are broken together, while in the latter the lepton number can be broken independently by an abelian spurion, so that visible effects and peculiar correlations can be envisaged in flavour changing charged...

  5. Neutrino masses and mixing: a flavour symmetry roadmap

    CERN Document Server

    Morisi, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last ten years tri-bimaximal mixing has played an important role in modeling the flavour problem. We give a short review of the status of flavour symmetry models of neutrino mixing. We concentrate on non-Abelian discrete symmetries, which provide a simple way to account for the TBM pattern. We discuss phenomenological implications such as neutrinoless double beta decay, lepton flavour violation as well as theoretical aspects such as the possibility to explain quarks and leptons within a common framework, such as grand unified models.

  6. Implications of lepton flavour violation on long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Soumya, C

    2016-01-01

    Non-standard neutrino interactions (NSIs), the sub-leading effects in the flavour transitions of neutrinos, play a crucial role in the determination of the various unknowns in neutrino oscillations, such as neutrino mass hierarchy, Dirac CP violating phase and the octant of atmospheric mixing angle. In view of the recent experimental observation of several lepton flavor universality (LFU) violating observables in $B$ decays, we study the possible implications of these interactions in the determination of various neutrino oscillation parameters. We consider the model with an additional $Z'$ boson (which is quite successful in explaining the observed LFU anomalies) and analyze its effect in the lepton flavour violating (LFV) $\\tau$ decays, i.e., $\\tau^- \\to e^- e^+ e^-$ and $\\tau^- \\to e^- \\pi^0$. From the present upper bounds of these decay rates, we obtain the constraints on the new physics parameters, which are related to the corresponding NSI parameters in the neutrino sector by $SU(2)_L$ symmetry. These ne...

  7. Heavy flavour decay properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00235989; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results on CP-violation searches in the $B_s$ system, studied in the $B_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$ decay and the $B_d$ system through the comparison of the decay time distributions in the flavour specific state $J/\\psi\\ K^*$ and in the CP eigenstate $J/\\psi\\ K_s$. We also present new results in the search for the rare decays of $B_d$ and $B_s$ into $\\mu^+\\mu^-$. All results are based on the full sample of data collected during LHC Run 1 by ATLAS at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The consistency with the SM and with other available measurements is discussed.

  8. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 213, Revision 2 (FGE.213Rev2): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.7 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    . Moreover, the Panel reconsidered the available data on p-mentha-1,4(8)-dien-3-one [FL-no: 07.127], based on new data on the structurally related substance pulegone, and concluded that additional genotoxicity data are needed to rule out the concern for genotoxicity of p-mentha-1,4(8)-dien-3-one [FL-no: 07.127]....

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 222: Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for alpha,betaunsaturated furyl derivatives with the α,β-unsaturation in the side chain from subgroup 4.6 of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    additional genotoxicity studies for two representative substances, 3-(2-furyl)acrylaldehyde [FL-no: 13.034] and 4-(2-furyl)but-3-en-2-one [FL-no: 13.044], in FGE.222. Based on these new data the Panel could not rule out a clastogenic and aneugenic potential for the two substances and a in vivo Comet assay...

  10. Patterns of Flavour Violation in Models with Vector-Like Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Bobeth, Christoph; Celis, Alejandro; Jung, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We study the patterns of flavour violation in renormalizable extensions of the Standard Model (SM) that contain vector-like quarks (VLQs) in a single complex representation of either the SM gauge group G_SM or G_SM' = G_SM x U(1)_{L_mu - L_tau}. We first decouple VLQs in the (1 - 10) TeV range and then at the electroweak scale also Z, Z' gauge bosons and additional scalars to study the resulting phenomenology that depends on the relative size of Z- and Z'-induced flavour-changing neutral currents, as well as the size of |Delta F|=2 contributions. In addition to rare decays like M--> l^+l^-, M--> M' l^+l^-, M--> M' vv with M = K, B_s, B_d and |Delta F|=2 observables we analyze the ratio epsilon'/epsilon which appears in the SM to be significantly below the data. We study patterns and correlations between various flavour observables in VLQ models with left-handed (LH) and right-handed currents (RH) including experimental constraints. Among the highlights are large new physics (NP) effects in Kaon observables in...

  11. Multiscale simulation process and application to additives in porous composite battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Christian; Prill, Torben; Schladitz, Katja

    2015-03-01

    Structure-resolving simulation of porous materials in electrochemical cells such as fuel cells and lithium ion batteries allows for correlating electrical performance with material morphology. In lithium ion batteries characteristic length scales of active material particles and additives range several orders of magnitude. Hence, providing a computational mesh resolving all length scales is not reasonably feasible and requires alternative approaches. In the work presented here a virtual process to simulate lithium ion batteries by bridging the scales is introduced. Representative lithium ion battery electrode coatings comprised of μm-scale graphite particles as active material and a nm-scale carbon/polymeric binder mixture as an additive are imaged with synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR-CT) and sequential focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), respectively. Applying novel image processing methodologies for the FIB/SEM images, data sets are binarized to provide a computational grid for calculating the effective mass transport properties of the electrolyte phase in the nanoporous additive. Afterwards, the homogenized additive is virtually added to the micropores of the binarized SR-CT data set representing the active particle structure, and the resulting electrode structure is assembled to a virtual half-cell for electrochemical microheterogeneous simulation. Preliminary battery performance simulations indicate non-negligible impact of the consideration of the additive.

  12. Measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmacher, Marc

    2013-06-15

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The data is reconstructed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the full data sample of 2010 is used. Three types of jet flavours, bottom, charm and light, are distinguished and thus six possible flavour combinations are identified in the dijet events. Kinematic variables, based on the properties of displaced decay vertices and optimised for jet flavour identification, are employed in an event-based likelihood fit. Multidimensional templates derived from Monte Carlo are used to measure the fractions of the six dijet flavour states as functions of the leading jet transverse momentum in the range 40 GeV to 500 GeV and jet rapidity vertical stroke y vertical stroke <2.1. The fit results agree with the predictions of leading- and next-to-leading-order calculations, with the exception of the dijet fraction composed of a bottom and a light flavour jet, which is underestimated by all models at large transverse jet momenta. In addition, the difference between bottom jet production rates in leading and subleading jets is measured and found to be consistent with the next-to-leadingorder predictions. The ability to identify jets containing two b-hadrons is demonstrated and used to identify a deficiency in the predictions of leading order Monte Carlo for the contribution of these jets to dijet production.

  13. Monitoring the influence of high-gravity brewing and fermentation temperature on flavour formation by analysis of gene expression levels in brewing yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerens, S M G; Verbelen, P J; Vanbeneden, N; Thevelein, J M; Delvaux, F R

    2008-10-01

    During fermentation, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces a broad range of aroma-active substances, which are vital for the complex flavour of beer. In order to obtain insight into the influence of high-gravity brewing and fermentation temperature on flavour formation, we analysed flavour production and the expression level of ten genes (ADH1, BAP2, BAT1, BAT2, ILV5, ATF1, ATF2, IAH1, EHT1 and EEB1) during fermentation of a lager and an ale yeast. Higher initial wort gravity increased acetate ester production, while the influence of higher fermentation temperature on aroma compound production was rather limited. In addition, there is a good correlation between flavour production and the expression level of specific genes involved in the biosynthesis of aroma compounds. We conclude that yeasts with desired amounts of esters and higher alcohols, in accordance with specific consumer preferences, may be identified based on the expression level of flavour biosynthesis genes. Moreover, these results demonstrate that the initial wort density can determine the final concentration of important volatile aroma compounds, thereby allowing beneficial adaptation of the flavour of beer.

  14. A novel experiment searching for the lepton flavour violating decay mu -> eee

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Niklaus

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations it is known that lepton flavour is not conserved. Lepton flavour violating processes in the charged lepton sector have so far however eluded detection; as they are heavily suppressed in the standard model of particle physics, an observation would be a clear signal for new physics and help to understand the source of neutrino masses and CP violation. We propose a novel experiment searching for the decay mu -> eee with the aim of ultimately reaching a sensitivity of 10^-16, an improvement by four orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The technologies enabling this step are thin high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors for precise tracking at high rates with a minimum of material and scintillating fibres for high resolution time measurements.

  15. A novel experiment searching for the lepton flavour violating decay μ → eee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Niklaus

    2013-02-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations it is known that lepton flavour is not conserved. Lepton flavour violating processes in the charged lepton sector have so far however eluded detection; as they are heavily suppressed in the standard model of particle physics, an observation would be a clear signal for new physics and help to understand the source of neutrino masses and CP violation. We propose a novel experiment searching for the decay μ → eee with the aim of ultimately reaching a sensitivity of 10-16, an improvement by four orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The technologies enabling this step are thin high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors for precise tracking at high rates with a minimum of material and scintillating fibres for high resolution time measurements.

  16. Structure-property relationships in flavour-barrier membranes with reduced high-temperature diffusivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2010-10-12

    Encapsulation is used to decrease the premature release of volatile flavour ingredients while offering protection against environmental damage such as oxidation, light-induced reactions, etc. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) is investigated here as a 'smart,' temperature responsive membrane for flavour encapsulation and delivery. Gel films were synthesized and characterized by diffusion and small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. Increasing temperature typically increases the diffusion rate across a membrane; HPC, however, can be tailored to give substantially improved elevated temperature properties. Scattering results indicate processing conditions have a significant impact on membrane morphology (micro phase separation). Under certain synthetic conditions, micro phase separation is mitigated and the membranes show temperature-independent diffusivity between 25 C and 60 C.

  17. Suppressing Lepton Flavour Violation in a Soft-Wall Extra Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A soft-wall warped extra dimension allows one to relax the tight constraints imposed by electroweak data in conventional Randall-Sundrum models. We investigate a setup, where the lepton flavour structure of the Standard Model is realised by split fermion locations. Bulk fermions with general locations are not analytically tractable in a soft-wall background, so we follow a numerical approach to perform the Kaluza-Klein reduction. Lepton flavour violation is induced by the exchange of Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons. We find that rates for processes such as muon-electron conversion are significantly reduced compared to hard-wall models, allowing for a Kaluza-Klein scale as low as 2 TeV. Accommodating small neutrino masses forces one to introduce a large hierarchy of scales into the model, making pressing the question of a suitable stabilisation mechanism.

  18. SO(10) models with flavour symmetries: classification and examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Lavoura, L.

    2016-10-01

    Renormalizable SO(10) grand unified theory (GUT) models equipped with flavour symmetries are a popular framework for addressing the flavour puzzle. Usually, the flavour symmetry group has been an ad hoc choice, and no general arguments limiting this choice were known. In this paper, we establish the full list of flavour symmetry groups which may be enforced, without producing any further accidental symmetry, on the Yukawa-coupling matrices of an SO(10) GUT with arbitrary numbers of scalar multiplets in the {{10}}, \\bar{{{126}}}, and {{120}} representations of SO(10). For each of the possible discrete non-Abelian symmetry groups, we present examples of minimal models which do not run into obvious contradiction with the phenomenological fermion masses and mixings.

  19. Euroopa Liidu 7. Raamprogrammi projekt FLAVOURE / Marge Malbe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Malbe, Marge, 1968-

    2011-01-01

    2009. a sai Eesti Maaviljeluse Instituut 843,270.00 € suuruse Euroopa Liidu finantseeringu 3 aastat kestva projekti FLAVOURE (Food and Feed Laboratory of Varied and Outstanding Research in Estonia) läbiviimiseks ja koordineerimiseks

  20. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N. [Nanophase Technologies Corp., Darien, IL (United States); Chen, Nan [Illinois Superconductor Corp., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  1. Composition, Processing Technology and Property of Ceramic Die Materials Containing Rare Earth Additives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Guangchun; Xu Chonghai; Fang Bin

    2007-01-01

    Development and application of new ceramic die materials is one of the important topics in the field of die research. The composition, processing technology, mechanical property and engineering performance of the ceramic materials such as cermet, ZTA, TZP, TZP/Al2O3, TZP/TiC/Al2O3, PSZ and Sialon, etc., with rare earth yttrium, lanthanum and cerium, and so on working as additives, were investigated and analyzed in the present study. Problems existed in the research and application of rare earth ceramic die materials were discussed. Rare earth additives can effectively improve the mechanical property and engineering performance of ceramic die materials. Thus, it will have further perspectives of wider application. More attention should be paid in the future to the toughening and strengthening of the ceramic die materials, the adding forms and kinds of rare earth elements and acting mechanisms of rare earth additives in ceramic die materials.

  2. Advancement in additive manufacturing & numerical modelling considerations of direct energy deposition process

    OpenAIRE

    Quanren Zeng; Zhenhai Xu; Yankang Tian; Yi Qin

    2016-01-01

    The development speed and application range of the additive manufacturing (AM) processes, such as selective laser melting (SLM), laser metal deposition (LMD) or laser-engineering net shaping (LENS), are ever-increasing in modern advanced manufacturing field for rapid manufacturing, tooling repair or surface enhancement of the critical metal components. LMD is based on a kind of directed energy deposition (DED) technology which ejects a strand of metal powders into a moving molten pool caused ...

  3. Lepton Flavour Violation via the K\\"ahler Potential in Compactified M-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Sebastian A R

    2015-01-01

    We use lepton-flavour violating (LFV) processes as a probe of higher-order corrections to the K\\"ahler potential in compactified M-theory. We consider a generic K\\"ahler potential with higher-order terms coupling visible sector fields to fields in the hidden sector of the compactified theory. Such terms generally give rise to potentially large flavour-violating effects. Unless there are suppressions, the size of the resulting off-diagonal terms in the K\\"ahler potential may be at odds with experimental results. The rare decay $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e$ conversion in nuclei probe the size of the potential flavour non-diagonality of the higher-order terms for realistic spectra in the M-theory compactification. We consider a parameterisation of the higher-order corrections in terms of a small parameter $\\epsilon$. By analysing various textures for the higher-order corrections, we find current bounds on $\\epsilon$ from the LFV processes. The constraint from the neutral kaon mass difference $\\Delta m_K$ is...

  4. Bromate Formation Characteristics of UV Irradiation, Hydrogen Peroxide Addition, Ozonation, and Their Combination Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Kishimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromate formation characteristics of six-physicochemical oxidation processes, UV irradiation, single addition of hydrogen peroxide, ozonation, UV irradiation with hydrogen peroxide addition (UV/H2O2, ozonation with hydrogen peroxide addition (O3/H2O2, and ozonation with UV irradiation (O3/UV were investigated using 1.88 μM of potassium bromide solution with or without 6.4 μM of 4-chlorobenzoic acid. Bromate was not detected during UV irradiation, single addition of H2O2, and UV/H2O2, whereas ozone-based treatments produced . Hydroxyl radicals played more important role in bromate formation than molecular ozone. Acidification and addition of radical scavengers such as 4-chlorobenzoic acid were effective in inhibiting bromate formation during the ozone-based treatments because of inhibition of hydroxyl radical generation and consumption of hydroxyl radicals, respectively. The H2O2 addition was unable to decompose 4-chlorobenzoic acid, though O3/UV and O3/H2O2 showed the rapid degradation, and UV irradiation and UV/H2O2 showed the slow degradation. Consequently, if the concentration of organic contaminants is low, the UV irradiation and/or UV/H2O2 are applicable to organic contaminants removal without bromate formation. However, if the concentration of organic contaminants is high, O3/H2O2 and O3/UV should be discussed as advanced oxidation processes because of their high organic removal efficiency and low bromate formation potential at the optimum condition.

  5. Monitoring Residual Solvent Additives and Their Effects in Solution Processed Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Derek M.; Basham, James I.; Engmann, Sebastian; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J.; Bittle, Emily G.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2015-03-01

    High boiling point solvent additives are a widely adopted approach for increasing bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell efficiency. However, experiments show residual solvent can persist for hours after film deposition, and certain common additives are unstable or reactive. We report here on the effects of residual 1,8-diiodooctane on the electrical performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT): phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC[71]BM) BHJ photovoltaic cells. We optimized our fabrication process for efficiency at an active layer thickness of 220 nm, and all devices were processed in parallel to minimize unintentional variations between test structures. The one variable in this study is the active layer post spin drying time. Immediately following the cathode deposition, we measured the current-voltage characteristics at one sun equivalent illumination intensity, and performed impedance spectroscopy to quantify charge density, lifetime, and recombination process. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR, and XPS are also used to monitor residual solvent and correlated with electrical performance. We find that residual additive degrades performance by increasing the series resistance and lowering efficiency, fill factor, and free carrier lifetime.

  6. Improvement of a grass-clover silage-fed biogas process by the addition of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, A.; Jarlsvik, T. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultual Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Mathisen, B. [Swedish Inst. of Agricultural Engineering, Uppsala (Sweden)] Svensson, B.H. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    1997-12-31

    Batch assays were performed with samples from a silage-fed mesophilic biogas process accumulating acetate to examine if the addition of single trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum) or a mixture of trace elements could improve the process. The results from the batch assays led to the addition of cobalt to reach a concentration of 0.2 mg L{sup -1}. This made it possible to increase the organic loading rate (OLR) above that in a parallel process not receiving any extra cobalt. Problems with low gas production and decreasing pH were overcome by the daily supply of this single element in small amounts. Acetate conversion to methane was improved, which was confirmed by increased specific methanogenic activity (SMA) with acetate as a substrate. As a consequence, an OLR of 7.0 g VS L{sup -1} was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20 days with an equivalent increase in methane production. Without cobalt addition, an OLR of 5.0 g VS L{sup -1} day{sup -1} with an HRT of 20 days was reached after 70 weeks operation. (Author)

  7. Quark flavour mixing with right-handed currents: An effective theory approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buras, Andrzej J. [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); TUM Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Arcisstrasse 21, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany); Gemmler, Katrin [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Isidori, Gino, E-mail: isidori@lnf.infn.i [TUM Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Arcisstrasse 21, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2011-02-01

    The impact of right-handed currents in both charged- and neutral-current flavour-violating processes is analysed by means of an effective theory approach. More explicitly, we analyse the structure of dimension-six operators assuming a left-right symmetric flavour group, commuting with an underlying SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub B-L} global symmetry, broken only by two Yukawa couplings. The model contains a new unitary matrix controlling flavour-mixing in the right-handed sector. We determine the structure of this matrix by charged-current data, where the tension between inclusive and exclusive determinations of {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} can be solved. Having determined the size and the flavour structure of right-handed currents, we investigate how they would manifest themselves in neutral current processes, including particle-antiparticle mixing, Z{yields}bb-bar, B{sub s,d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, B{yields}{l_brace}X{sub s},K,K{sup *}{r_brace}{nu}{nu}-bar, and K{yields}{pi}{nu}{nu}-bar decays. The possibility to explain a non-standard CP-violating phase in B{sub s} mixing in this context, and the comparison with other predictive new-physics frameworks addressing the same problem, is also discussed. While a large S{sub {psi}{phi}} asymmetry can easily be accommodated, we point out a tension in this framework between {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} and S{sub {psi}}K.

  8. Rare decays of flavoured mesons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2016-01-01

    In absence of strong, direct signs of New Physics at the LHC, rare decays of heavy flavoured hadrons constitute an ideal laboratory for indirectly exploring energies beyond those of the LHC in order to look for deviations from the Standard Model. The main results regarding flavour changing neutral current transitions obtained at the LHC are presented here, with particular emphasis put on $b \\to s$ transitions, in which tensions with the Standard Model have been observed.

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 217, Revision 1 (FGE.217Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.1 of FGE.19: Lactones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    the Procedure. Additional data on genotoxicity for the three representative substances, 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.023], 3,4-dimethyl-5-pentylidenefuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.042] and furan-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.066], have now been provided. Based on the new data, the Panel concluded...... that 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.023] does not give rise to concern with respect to genotoxicity and can accordingly, together with the structurally related substance, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.030] for which it is a representative, be evaluated using...... the Procedure. For 3,4-dimethyl-5-pentylidenefuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.042] and furan-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.066] the concern for genotoxicity could not be ruled out and a combined micronucleus and Comet assay is requested for these two substances, covering the remaining seven substances [FL-no: 10.034, 10...

  10. Design and tuning of standard additive model based fuzzy PID controllers for multivariable process systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinath, Eranda; Mann, George K I

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes a design and two-level tuning method for fuzzy proportional-integral derivative (FPID) controllers for a multivariable process where the fuzzy inference uses the inference of standard additive model. The proposed method can be used for any n x n multi-input-multi-output process and guarantees closed-loop stability. In the two-level tuning scheme, the tuning follows two steps: low-level tuning followed by high-level tuning. The low-level tuning adjusts apparent linear gains, whereas the high-level tuning changes the nonlinearity in the normalized fuzzy output. In this paper, two types of FPID configurations are considered, and their performances are evaluated by using a real-time multizone temperature control problem having a 3 x 3 process system.

  11. The additive nonparametric and semiparametric Aalen model as the rate function for a counting process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas Harder

    2002-01-01

    We use the additive risk model of Aalen (Aalen, 1980) as a model for the rate of a counting process. Rather than specifying the intensity, that is the instantaneous probability of an event conditional on the entire history of the relevant covariates and counting processes, we present a model...... for the rate function, i.e., the instantaneous probability of an event conditional on only a selected set of covariates. When the rate function for the counting process is of Aalen form we show that the usual Aalen estimator can be used and gives almost unbiased estimates. The usual martingale based variance...... estimator is incorrect and an alternative estimator should be used. We also consider the semi-parametric version of the Aalen model as a rate model (McKeague and Sasieni, 1994) and show that the standard errors that are computed based on an assumption of intensities are incorrect and give a different...

  12. Investigation of the microbial community in a microbiological additive used in a manure composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakase, Shiho; Sasaki, Hiraku; Itoh, Kikuji; Otawa, Kenichi; Kitazume, Osamu; Nonaka, Jun; Satoh, Masaaki; Sasaki, Takako; Nakai, Yutaka

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the fate of microorganisms by using cultivation methods as well as DNA analyses in a commercial microbiological additive (MA) in the course of the composting. Almost all the predominant species in the microbial succession during composting process determined by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) were in disagreement with those determined by the clone library method. None of the microbial species in the composting stages corresponded to the microorganisms identified in the MA either by the cultivation method or DNA analysis. The results in regard to predominant microorganisms of the MA detected from the liquid medium by the PCR-DGGE did not correspond with those detected from the MA itself and composting processes. Although no evidence was found that predominant species in the MA itself dominate in the composting process, predominant species diversity in the MA itself was markedly changed after culturing at different thermophilic temperatures. These results suggested that cultivable microorganisms in the MA did not become predominant in the composting process: however, some microorganisms that are detected from the MA itself by the DNA analysis may act effectively in the composting process.

  13. Flavour blindness and patterns of flavour symmetry breaking in lattice simulations of up, down and strange quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Univ. Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Bornyakov, V. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protovino (Russian Federation); Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2011-02-15

    QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the up-down quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, first for the general 1+1+1 flavour case and then for the 2+1 flavour case (when two quark flavours are mass degenerate). These enable highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results for the 2+1 flavour case confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. Singlet quantities remain constant which allows the lattice spacing to be determined from hadron masses (without necessarily being at the physical point). Furthermore an extension of this programme to include partially quenched results is also given. (orig.)

  14. Perspectives for Detecting Lepton Flavour Violation in Left-Right Symmetric Models

    CERN Document Server

    Bonilla, Cesar; Opferkuch, Toby; Porod, Werner

    2016-01-01

    We investigate lepton flavour violation in a class of minimal left-right symmetric models where the left-right symmetry is broken by triplet scalars. In this context we present a method to consistently calculate the triplet-Yukawa couplings which takes into account the experimental data while simultaneously respecting the underlying symmetries. Analysing various scenarios, we then calculate the full set of tree-level and one-loop contributions to all radiative and three-body flavour-violating fully leptonic decays as well as $\\mu-e$ conversion in nuclei. Our method illustrates how these processes depend on the underlying parameters of the theory. To that end we observe that, for many choices of the model parameters, there is a strong complementarity between the different observables. For instance, in a large part of the parameter space, lepton flavour violating $\\tau$-decays have a large enough branching ratio to be measured in upcoming experiments. Our results further show that experiments coming online in t...

  15. Squark and Gaugino Hadroproduction and Decays in Non-Minimal Flavour Violating Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzi, G; Herrmann, B; Klasen, M

    2007-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis of squark and gaugino hadroproduction and decays in non-minimal flavour violating supersymmetry. We employ the so-called super-CKM basis to define the possible misalignment of quark and squark rotations, and we use generalized (possibly complex) charges to define the mutual couplings of (s)quarks and gauge bosons/gauginos. The cross sections for all squark-(anti-)squark/gaugino pair and squark-gaugino associated production processes as well as their decay widths are then given in compact analytic form. For four different constrained supersymmetry breaking models with non-minimal flavour violation in the second/third generation squark sector only, we establish the parameter space regions allowed/favoured by low-energy, electroweak precision, and cosmological constraints and display the chirality and flavour decomposition of all up- and down-type squark mass eigenstates. Finally, we compute numerically the dependence of a representative sample of production cross sections at the...

  16. Squark and gaugino hadroproduction and decays in non-minimal flavour violating supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, Giuseppe; Fuks, Benjamin; Herrmann, Björn; Klasen, Michael

    2007-12-01

    We present an extensive analysis of squark and gaugino hadroproduction and decays in non-minimal flavour violating supersymmetry. We employ the so-called super-CKM basis to define the possible misalignment of quark and squark rotations, and we use generalized (possibly complex) charges to define the mutual couplings of (s)quarks and gauge bosons/gauginos. The cross sections for all squark-(anti-)squark/gaugino pair and squark-gaugino associated production processes as well as their decay widths are then given in compact analytic form. For four different constrained supersymmetry breaking models with non-minimal flavour violation in the second/third generation squark sector only, we establish the parameter space regions allowed/favoured by low-energy, electroweak precision, and cosmological constraints and display the chirality and flavour decomposition of all up- and down-type squark mass eigenstates. Finally, we compute numerically the dependence of a representative sample of production cross sections at the LHC on the off-diagonal mass matrix elements in the experimentally allowed/favoured ranges.

  17. Squark and gaugino hadroproduction and decays in non-minimal flavour violating supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzi, Giuseppe [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fuks, Benjamin; Herrmann, Bjoern [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier/CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France); Klasen, Michael [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier/CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: klasen@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2007-12-24

    We present an extensive analysis of squark and gaugino hadroproduction and decays in non-minimal flavour violating supersymmetry. We employ the so-called super-CKM basis to define the possible misalignment of quark and squark rotations, and we use generalized (possibly complex) charges to define the mutual couplings of (s)quarks and gauge bosons/gauginos. The cross sections for all squark-(anti-)squark/gaugino pair and squark-gaugino associated production processes as well as their decay widths are then given in compact analytic form. For four different constrained supersymmetry breaking models with non-minimal flavour violation in the second/third generation squark sector only, we establish the parameter space regions allowed/favoured by low-energy, electroweak precision, and cosmological constraints and display the chirality and flavour decomposition of all up- and down-type squark mass eigenstates. Finally, we compute numerically the dependence of a representative sample of production cross sections at the LHC on the off-diagonal mass matrix elements in the experimentally allowed/favoured ranges.

  18. Anatomy of flavour-changing Z couplings in models with partial compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Straub, David M

    2013-01-01

    In models with partially composite quarks, the couplings of quarks to the Z boson generically receive non-universal corrections that are not only constrained by electroweak precision tests but also lead to flavour-changing neutral currents at tree level. The impact of these flavour-changing couplings on rare K and B decays is studied in two-site models for three scenarios: an anarchic strong sector with two different choices of fermion representations both leading to a custodial protection of the Z->bb coupling, and for a strong sector invariant under a U(2)^3 flavour symmetry. In the complete numerical analysis, all relevant constraints from Delta(F)=2 processes are taken into account. In all scenarios, visible effects in rare K and B decays like K->pi nu anti-nu, B(s)->mu+mu- and B->K*mu+mu- are possible that can be scrutinized experimentally in the near future. Characteristic correlations between observables allow to distinguish the different cases. To sample the large parameter space of the anarchic model...

  19. Acidic electrolyzed water efficiently improves the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. cv. Mopan) wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanqi; Zhu, Baoqing; Li, Yao; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Bolin; Fan, Junfeng

    2016-04-15

    The ability of acidic (AcW) and alkaline electrolyzed waters (AlW) to improve the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) wine was evaluated. Wines made with AcW (WAcW) were significantly better than wines made with AlW or pure water (PW) in aroma, taste, and colour. Volatile analysis showed that WAcW has high alcohol and ester contents, including 2-phenylethanol, isopentanol, isobutanol, ethyl dodecanoate, phenethyl acetate, and butanedioic acid diethyl ester. The total amino acid content of persimmon slurry soaked with AcW reached 531.2 mg/l, which was much higher than those of the slurries soaked in AlW (381.3 mg/l) and PW (182.7 mg/l). The composition of major amino acids in the AcW-soaked slurry may contribute to the strong ester flavour of WAcW. This is the first report to suggest that electrolyzed functional water (EFW) can be used to improve wine flavour, leading to the possible use of EFW in food processing.

  20. Nucleophilic addition/double cyclization cascade processes between enynyl Fischer carbene complexes and alkynyl malonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fernández, Ana; Suárez-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Suárez-Sobrino, Ángel L

    2014-07-18

    Two new selective cascade processes for enynyl Fischer carbene complexes 1 are described in their reaction with alkynyl malonates. When carbene complexes 1 react with the sodium enolate of homopropargyl malonates 3 a consecutive Michael-type addition/cyclopentannulation/6-exo cyclization takes place leading, in a regio- and stereoselective way, to n/5/6 angular tricyclic compounds 5. Furthermore, when propargylic malonates are used, a delayed protonation of the reaction mixture allows intermediate 1,4-addition adduct Ia to evolve through a 5-exo cyclization, consisting of an intramolecular nucleophilic attack from the central carbon of the allenylmetallate over the triple C-C bond. Further spontaneous cyclopentannulation of the resulting metallatriene gives rise to bicyclic and linear polycyclic compounds 6 and 7, some of them bearing a polyquinane framework.

  1. MC rate at NLO for heavy flavour photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toll, Tobias

    2010-02-15

    A Monte Carlo at next-to-leading order (MC rate at NLO) has been constructed for the production of heavy quark flavours in photoproduction. As such, it is the rst Monte Carlo event generator with next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy for a process in lepton hadron scattering. In order to construct such an MC rate at NLO, the matrix element for the process has to be calculated at NLO and then be matched with a parton shower. When doing this, it is important that none of the parton configurations produced are doubly counted. In this thesis, the concept of a Monte Carlo event generator will be explained, with emphasis on the HERWIG parton shower. Also, different techniques of calculating matrix elements at NLO accuracy will be explained. It will then be shown how the NLO calculation can be matched with the HERWIG parton shower in an MC rate at NLO without double counting, producing unweighted events at NLO-accuracy. Many comparisons are made between the MC rate at NLO here constructed, the HERWIG Monte Carlo and the FMNR NLO calculation. Also many comparisons are made to HERA data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments. It is shown that all HERA data with heavy quarks produced in photoproduction can be described by the MC rate at NLO program constructed in this thesis. (orig.)

  2. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Varni, Carlo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment includes a well-developed trigger system that allows a selection of events which are thought to be of interest, while achieving a high overall rejection against less interesting processes. An important part of the online event selection is the ability to distinguish between jets arising from heavy-flavour quarks (b- and c-jets) and light jets (jets from u-, d-, s- and gluon jets) in real-time. This is essential for many physics analysis that include processes with large jet multiplicity and b-quarks in the final state. An overview of the b-jet triggers with a description of the application and performance of the offline Multivariate (MV2) b-tagging algorithms at High Level Trigger (HLT) in Run 2 will be presented. During 2016 b-jet trigger menu and algorithms were adapted to use The Fast Tracker (FTK) system which will be commissioned in 2017. We will show initial expected performance of newly designed triggers and compare it with the existing HLT chains.

  3. Seafood-like flavour obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein by-products of seaweed (Gracilaria sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohakunjit, Natta; Selamassakul, Orrapun; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin

    2014-09-01

    An enzymatic bromelain seaweed protein hydrolysate (eb-SWPH) was characterised as the precursor for thermally processed seafood flavour. Seaweed (Gracilaria fisheri) protein after agar extraction was hydrolysed using bromelain (enzyme activity=119,325 U/g) at 0-20% (w/w) for 0.5-24 h. Optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined using response surface methodology. The proposed model took into account the interaction effect of the enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the physicochemical properties and volatile components of eb-SWPH. The optimal hydrolysis conditions for the production of eb-SWPH were 10% bromelain for 3h, which resulted in a 38.15% yield and a 62.91% degree of hydrolysis value. Three free amino acids, arginine, lysine, and leucine, were abundant in the best hydrolysate. Ten volatile flavours of the best eb-SWPH were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The predominant odourants were hexanal, hexanoic acid, nonanoic acid, and dihydroactinidiolide. The thermally processed seafood flavour produced from eb-SWPH exhibited a roasted seafood-like flavouring.

  4. Scanning laser ultrasound and wavenumber spectroscopy for in-process inspection of additively manufactured parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new in-process laser ultrasound inspection technique for additive manufacturing. Ultrasonic energy was introduced to the part by attaching an ultrasonic transducer to the printer build-plate and driving it with a single-tone, harmonic excitation. The full-field response of the part was measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer after each printer layer. For each scan, we analyzed both the local amplitudes and wavenumbers of the response in order to identify defects. For this study, we focused on the detection of delamination between layers in a fused deposition modeling process. Foreign object damage, localized heating damage, and the resulting delamination between layers were detected in using the technique as indicated by increased amplitude and wavenumber responses within the damaged area.

  5. 3D Machine Vision and Additive Manufacturing: Concurrent Product and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Ismet P.

    2013-06-01

    The manufacturing environment rapidly changes in turbulence fashion. Digital manufacturing (DM) plays a significant role and one of the key strategies in setting up vision and strategic planning toward the knowledge based manufacturing. An approach of combining 3D machine vision (3D-MV) and an Additive Manufacturing (AM) may finally be finding its niche in manufacturing. This paper briefly overviews the integration of the 3D machine vision and AM in concurrent product and process development, the challenges and opportunities, the implementation of the 3D-MV and AM at POLMAN Bandung in accelerating product design and process development, and discusses a direct deployment of this approach on a real case from our industrial partners that have placed this as one of the very important and strategic approach in research as well as product/prototype development. The strategic aspects and needs of this combination approach in research, design and development are main concerns of the presentation.

  6. Thermoplastic starch/polyester films: effects of extrusion process and poly (lactic acid) addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Marianne Ayumi; Olivato, Juliana Bonametti; Garcia, Patrícia Salomão; Müller, Carmen Maria Olivera; Grossmann, Maria Victória Eiras; Yamashita, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable films were produced using the blown extrusion method from blends that contained cassava thermoplastic starch (TPS), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with two different extrusion processes. The choice of extrusion process did not have a significant effect on the mechanical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP) or viscoelasticity of the films, but the addition of PLA decreased the elongation, blow-up ratio (BUR) and opacity and increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and viscoelastic parameters of the films. The films with 20% PLA exhibited a lower WVP due to the hydrophobic nature of this polymer. Morphological analyses revealed the incompatibility between the polymers used.

  7. Linking natural supersymmetry to flavour physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudas, Emilian [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS,Palaiseau (France); Gersdorff, Gero von [ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research,Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Sao Paulo State University,Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pokorski, Stefan [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,Warsaw (Poland); Ziegler, Robert [TUM-IAS and Physik Department, Technische Universität München,Munich (Germany)

    2014-01-22

    With the aim of linking natural supersymmetry to flavour physics, a model is proposed based on a family symmetry G×U(1), where G is a discrete nonabelian subgroup of SU(2), with both F-term and (abelian) D-term supersymmetry breaking. A good fit to the fermion masses and mixing is obtained with the same U(1) charges for the left- and right- handed quarks of the first two families and the right-handed bottom quark, and with zero charge for the left-handed top-bottom doublet and the the right handed top. The model shows an interesting indirect correlation between the correct prediction for the V{sub ub}/V{sub cb} ratio and large right-handed rotations in the (s,b) sector, required to diagonalise the Yukawa matrix. For the squarks, one obtains almost degenerate first two generations. The main source of the FCNC and CP violation effects is the splitting between the first two families and the right-handed sbottom determined by the relative size of F-term and D-term supersymmetry breaking. The presence of the large right-handed rotation implies that the bounds on the masses of the first two families of squarks and the right handed sbottom are in a few to a few tens TeV range. The picture that emerges is light stops and left handed sbottom and much heavier other squarks.

  8. Flavour singlets in gauge theory as Permutations

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Gauge-invariant operators can be specified by equivalence classes of permutations. We develop this idea concretely for the singlets of the flavour group $SO(N_f)$ in $U(N_c)$ gauge theory by using Gelfand pairs and Schur-Weyl duality. The singlet operators, when specialised at $N_f =6$, belong to the scalar sector of ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM. A simple formula is given for the two-point functions in the free field limit of $g_{YM}^2 =0$. The free two-point functions are shown to be equal to the partition function on a 2-complex with boundaries and a defect, in a topological field theory of permutations. The permutation equivalence classes are Fourier transformed to a representation basis which is orthogonal for the two-point functions at finite $N_c , N_f$. Counting formulae for the gauge-invariant operators are described. The one-loop mixing matrix is derived as a linear operator on the permutation equivalence classes.

  9. Dark Matter and observable lepton flavour violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heurtier, Lucien [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Service de Physique Theorique; Teresi, Daniele [Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Service de Physique Theorique

    2016-07-15

    Seesaw models with leptonic symmetries allow right-handed (RH) neutrino masses at the electroweak scale, or even lower, at the same time having large Yukawa couplings with the Standard Model leptons, thus yielding observable effects at current or near-future lepton-flavour-violation (LFV) experiments. These models have been previously considered also in connection to low-scale leptogenesis, but the combination of observable LFV and successful leptogenesis has appeared to be difficult to achieve unless the leptonic symmetry is embedded into a larger one. In this paper, instead, we follow a different route and consider a possible connection between large LFV rates and Dark Matter (DM). We present a model in which the same leptonic symmetry responsible for the large Yukawa couplings guarantees the stability of the DM candidate, identified as the lightest of the RH neutrinos. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry, caused by a Majoron-like field, also provides a mechanism to produce the observed relic density via the decays of the latter. The phenomenological implications of the model are discussed, finding that large LFV rates, observable in the near-future μ→e conversion experiments, require the DM mass to be in the keV range. Moreover, the active-neutrino coupling to the Majoron-like scalar field could be probed in future detections of supernova neutrino bursts.

  10. Dark matter and observable Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Heurtier, Lucien

    2016-01-01

    Seesaw models with leptonic symmetries allow right-handed (RH) neutrino masses at the electroweak scale, or even lower, at the same time having large Yukawa couplings with the Standard Model leptons, thus yielding observable effects at current or near-future lepton-flavour-violation (LFV) experiments. These models have been previously considered also in connection to low-scale leptogenesis, but the combination of observable LFV and successful leptogenesis has appeared to be difficult to achieve unless the leptonic symmetry is embedded into a larger one. In this paper, instead, we follow a different route and consider a possible connection between large LFV rates and Dark Matter (DM). We present a model in which the same leptonic symmetry responsible for the large Yukawa couplings guarantees the stability of the DM candidate, identified as the lightest of the RH neutrinos. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry, caused by a Majoron-like field, also provides a mechanism to produce the observed relic density ...

  11. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  12. Inclusion complexation of flavour compounds by dispersed high-amylose maize starch (HAMS) in an aqueous model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lihe; Thompson, Donald B; Peterson, Devin G

    2016-05-15

    This study investigated how hydrophobicity, solubility and the concentration of flavour compounds related to inclusion complexation by dispersed native high amylose maize starch (HAMS). The effect of native lipid on flavour retention and the effect of time (one day to one month) on flavour retention and precipitated starch yield was also examined. Flavour-starch complexation was dependent on the flavour compound hydrophobicity, the flavour concentration in a dose-dependent manner and also influenced by time (increased during storage). Flavour composition also influenced starch complexation; no flavour complexes were reported with limonene by itself but were observed when added in binary flavour mixtures with menthone or thymol. Furthermore, no difference in flavour retention was observed for native and lipid-free starch dispersions. In summary, flavour inclusion complexes with HAMS exhibited cooperativity-type binding behaviour; with a critical ligand concentration needed for a stable physical association between flavour compounds and HAMS.

  13. Optimization of solution-processed oligothiophene:fullerene based organic solar cells by using solvent additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Gisela L; Urdanpilleta, Marta; Fitzner, Roland; Brier, Eduard; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Reinold, Egon; Bäuerle, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of solution-processed organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells with the acceptor-substituted quinquethiophene DCV5T-Bu 4 as donor in conjunction with PC61BM as acceptor is described. Power conversion efficiencies up to 3.0% and external quantum efficiencies up to 40% were obtained through the use of 1-chloronaphthalene as solvent additive in the fabrication of the photovoltaic devices. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy investigations of the photoactive layer gave insight into the distribution of donor and acceptor within the blend. The unique combination of solubility and thermal stability of DCV5T-Bu 4 also allows for fabrication of organic solar cells by vacuum deposition. Thus, we were able to perform a rare comparison of the device characteristics of the solution-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :PC61BM solar cell with its vacuum-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :C60 counterpart. Interestingly in this case, the efficiencies of the small-molecule organic solar cells prepared by using solution techniques are approaching those fabricated by using vacuum technology. This result is significant as vacuum-processed devices typically display much better performances in photovoltaic cells.

  14. Optimization of solution-processed oligothiophene:fullerene based organic solar cells by using solvent additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela L. Schulz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of solution-processed organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells with the acceptor-substituted quinquethiophene DCV5T-Bu4 as donor in conjunction with PC61BM as acceptor is described. Power conversion efficiencies up to 3.0% and external quantum efficiencies up to 40% were obtained through the use of 1-chloronaphthalene as solvent additive in the fabrication of the photovoltaic devices. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy investigations of the photoactive layer gave insight into the distribution of donor and acceptor within the blend. The unique combination of solubility and thermal stability of DCV5T-Bu4 also allows for fabrication of organic solar cells by vacuum deposition. Thus, we were able to perform a rare comparison of the device characteristics of the solution-processed DCV5T-Bu4:PC61BM solar cell with its vacuum-processed DCV5T-Bu4:C60 counterpart. Interestingly in this case, the efficiencies of the small-molecule organic solar cells prepared by using solution techniques are approaching those fabricated by using vacuum technology. This result is significant as vacuum-processed devices typically display much better performances in photovoltaic cells.

  15. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  16. SPheno 3.1: extensions including flavour, CP-phases and models beyond the MSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, W.; Staub, F.

    2012-11-01

    high scale parameters by evaluating the corresponding renormalisation group equations. These parameters must be consistent with the requirement of correct electroweak symmetry breaking. The second issue is to use the obtained masses and couplings for calculating decay widths and branching ratios of supersymmetric particles as well as the cross sections for these particles in electron-positron annihilation. The third issue is to calculate low energy constraints in the B-meson sector such as BR(b s), MB s, rare lepton decays, such as BR(e), the SUSY contributions to anomalous magnetic moments and electric dipole moments of leptons, the SUSY contributions to the ρ parameter as well as lepton flavour violating Z decays. Solution method: The renormalisation connecting a high scale and the electroweak scale is calculated by the Runge-Kutta method. Iteration provides a solution consistent with the multi-boundary conditions. In case of three-body decays and for the calculation of initial state radiation Gaussian quadrature is used for the numerical solution of the integrals. Reasons for new version: Inclusion of new models as well as additional observables. Moreover, a new standard for data transfer had been established, which is now supported. Summary of revisions: The already existing models have been extended to include also CP-violation and flavour mixing. The data transfer is done using the so-called SLHA2 standard. In addition new models have been included: all three types of seesaw models as well as bilinear R-parity violation. Moreover, additional observables are calculated: branching ratios for flavour violating lepton decays, EDMs of leptons and of the neutron, CP-violating mass difference in the B-meson sector and branching ratios for flavour violating b-quark decays. Restrictions: In case of R-parity violation the cross sections are not calculated. Running time: 0.2 seconds on an Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU T9900 with 3.06 GHz

  17. QUALITATIVE PECULIARITIES OF THE FLAVOURED WINES AND OF THE VERMOUTH TYPE WINES, OBTAINED FROM THE SAUVIGNON BLANC VARIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Elena CULEA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the dynamics of the physical-chemical parameters of flavoured wines and vermouth type wines, obtained by the addition of hydroalcoholic macerates from plants to the Sauvignon Blanc wine variety, we analyzed certain physical and chemical characteristics (D 20 20, Alcool %, Total dry extract g/l, Free sugar g/l, Unreducing extract g /l, Total Acidity g/l C4H6O6, Free SO2 mg/l Total SO2 mg/l for 9 samples. Compared to the main wine parameters, the tested parameters had the following evolution: Alcoholic strength, Free sugar and Density increased in vermouth type wines, Total acidity decreased slightly in flavoured wines and more obvious in vermouth type wines. The total dry extract increased sharply in vermouth type wines and the unreducing extract decreased sharply in vermouth type wines. The amount of Free SO2 was higher in flavoured wines, but Total SO2 had lower values, both for flavoured wines and vermouth type wines, comparative to Sauvignon Blanc wine. Plants macerates added to the Sauvignon Blanc basic wine, influenced most of the physical-chemical parameters and provided new qualitative features to resulting beverages.

  18. Characterization of semi-solid processing of aluminium alloy 7075 with Sc and Zr additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogal, Ł., E-mail: l.rogal@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dutkiewicz, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Atkinson, H.V. [The University of Leicester, Department of Engineering University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, L.; Czeppe, T. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Modigell, M. [RWTH Aachen—Department of Mechanical Process Engineering, 55 Templergraben St., Aachen (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    For thixoforming (semi-solid processing) it is necessary to have a fine globular microstructure in a semi-solid range. Here this has been obtained for 7075 aluminium alloy by addition of modifying agents: 0.5 weight % of scandium and zirconium. The thixoforming process was carried out at 632 °C which gave about 23 volume % of liquid phase. The microstructure of the thixo-formed part (a rotor) consisted of globular grains surrounded by precipitates of secondary phase. The average hardness of thixo-formed parts was 105 HV{sub 5} and the tensile strength 300 MPa. T6 heat treatments were performed with solutionisation at 450 °C for 30 min and 10 h. In both cases the ageing time was set as 18 h at 120 °C. The heat treatments led to an increase in average tensile strength up to 495 MPa. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis enabled the identification of precipitates of the metastable dispersoids of L1{sub 2}–Al{sub 3} (Zr, Sc) and η′ (MgZn{sub 2}) phases in the alloy after the thixoforming and T6 treatment. The measurements of rheological properties of 7075Al alloy with Sc and Zr additions in the semi-solid range indicated an increase of particle size and spheroidization leading to an observable decrease of viscosity during isothermal shearing. A shear rate jump experiment showed that with increasing shear rate the viscosity rapidly falls.

  19. Statistical properties of a filtered Poisson process with additive random noise: Distributions, correlations and moment estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun; Rypdal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The filtered Poisson process is often used as a reference model for intermittent fluctuations in physical systems. Here, this process is extended by adding a noise term, either as a purely additive term to the process or as a dynamical term in a stochastic differential equation. The moments, probability density function, auto- correlation function and power spectral density are derived and used to compare the effects of the different noise terms. Monte-Carlo studies of synthetic time series are used to investigate the accuracy of parameter estimation and to identify methods for separating the noise types. It is shown that the probability density function and the three lowest moments provide accurate estimations of the parameters, but are unable to separate the noise types. The auto-correlation function and the power spectral density also provide methods for estimating the model parameters, as well as being capable of determining the noise type. The number of times the signal passes a prescribed threshold in t...

  20. Single top-quark production through flavour changing neutral currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ozan; Brock, Ian C. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Hirschbuehl, Dominic [University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) processes are highly suppressed in the Standard Model due to Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani (GIM) mechanism. However, in some extensions of the Standard Model such as supersymmetry (SUSY) and the 2-Higgs doublet model, the FCNC contributes at tree level, enhancing the branching ratio significantly. The FCNC are searched for in single top-quark production where a u(c)-quark interacts with a gluon, producing a single top-quark with no associated quark production. The data collected by the ATLAS detector during year 2012 is used with a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ∝20 fb{sup -1}. The candidate signal events are selected by requiring one lepton, muon or electron, missing transverse momentum and exactly one jet originating from a b-quark in the final state. The separation between the signal and background events is enhanced by using neural network algorithms. The cross section upper limit at 95% C.L. is calculated following most frequently statistical approach using a binned likelihood method calculated from the full neural network output.

  1. Production of heavy flavours with associated jets at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kind, O.M.

    2006-12-15

    Inclusive cross-sections for the production of open beauty and charm in ep collisions at HERA recorded with the ZEUS detector in the years 1996-2000 are measured. The data is restricted to photoproduction processes, i. e. collision events with small four-momentum transfers squared, Q{sup 2} {approx}0. Two associated jets with transverse energies E{sub t}>7(6)GeV and pseudo-rapidities vertical stroke {eta} vertical stroke <2.5 are required. The flavour is tagged by the identification of electrons and positrons from semi-leptonic decays of the heavy quark. For this a likelihood method is developed, mainly consisting of energy loss measurements in the central drift chamber of the detector and some other discriminant variables. The fractions of beauty and charm production are determined by a fit of Monte Carlo templates to the data. The total measured production cross-section for b anti b production is 820{+-}150{sup +20}{sub -30} pb for centre-of-mass energies {radical}(S{sub ep})=300 GeV and 1170{+-}130{sup +30}{sub -100} pb for {radical}(S{sub ep})=318 GeV. The total cross-section for charm production is given as well as differential cross-sections for b anti b and c anti c production. (orig.)

  2. Processing of New Materials by Additive Manufacturing: Iron-Based Alloys Containing Silver for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thomas; Brenne, Florian; Hoyer, Peter; Schwarze, Dieter; Schaper, Mirko; Grothe, Richard; Wiesener, Markus; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    In the biomedical sector, production of bioresorbable implants remains challenging due to improper dissolution rates or deficient strength of many candidate alloys. Promising materials for overcoming the prevalent drawbacks are iron-based alloys containing silver. However, due to immiscibility of iron and silver these alloys cannot be manufactured based on conventional processing routes. In this study, iron-manganese-silver alloys were for the first time synthesized by means of additive manufacturing. Based on combined mechanical, microscopic, and electrochemical studies, it is shown that silver particles well distributed in the matrix can be obtained, leading to cathodic sites in the composite material. Eventually, this results in an increased dissolution rate of the alloy. Stress-strain curves showed that the incorporation of silver barely affects the mechanical properties.

  3. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]. Taking into account the constraints from [Formula: see text] processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours [Formula: see text], which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in [Formula: see text] decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the [Formula: see text] constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for [Formula: see text] with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of [Formula: see text]. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of indirect measurements and

  4. The S{sub 3} flavour symmetry: Neutrino masses and mixings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Canales, F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias de la Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Mondragon, A.; Mondragon, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-04-02

    In this work, we discuss the neutrino masses and mixings as the realization of an S{sub 3} flavour permutational symmetry in two models, namely the Standard Model and an extension of the Standard Model with three Higgs doublets. In the S{sub 3} Standard Model, mass matrices of the same generic form are obtained for the neutrino and charged leptons when the S{sub 3} flavour symmetry is broken sequentially according to the chain S{sub 3L} x S{sub 3R} contains S{sub 3}{sup diag} contains S{sub 2}. In the minimal S{sub 3}-symmetric extension of the Standard Model, the S{sub 3} symmetry is left unbroken, and the concept of flavour is extended to the Higgs sector by introducing in the theory three Higgs fields which are SU(2) doublets. In both models, the mass matrices of the neutrinos and charged leptons are reparametrized in terms of their eigenvalues, and exact, explicit analytical expressions for the neutrino mixing angles as functions of the masses of neutrinos and charged leptons are obtained. In the case of the S{sub 3} Standard Model, from a {chi}{sup 2} fit of the theoretical expressions of the lepton mixing matrix to the values extracted from experiment, the numerical values of the neutrino mixing angles are obtained in excellent agreement with experimental data. In the S{sub 3} extension of the Standard Model, if two of the right handed neutrinos masses are degenerate, the reactor and atmospheric mixing angles are determined by the masses of the charged leptons, yielding {theta}{sub 23} in excellent agreement with experimental data, and {theta}{sub 13} different from zero but very small. If the masses of the three right handed neutrinos are assumed to be different, then it is possible to get {theta}{sub 13}also in very good agreement with experimental data. We also show the branching ratios of some selected flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) process as well as the contribution of the exchange of a neutral flavour changing scalar to the anomaly of the

  5. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard W^± and Z^0 gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }, KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν }, K_L→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ X_sγ , B_{s,d}→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ν bar{ν }, and \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon . Taking into account the constraints from Δ F=2 processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν } and KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-) ≥ B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-)_SM, which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^- decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of

  6. Heavy Neutrinos and Lepton Flavour Violation in Left-Right Symmetric Models at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Das, S P; Kittel, O; Valle, J W F

    2012-01-01

    We discuss lepton flavour violating processes induced in the production and decay of heavy right-handed neutrinos at the LHC. Such particles appear in left-right symmetrical extensions of the Standard Model as the messengers of neutrino mass generation, and can have masses at the TeV scale. We determine the expected sensitivity on the right-handed neutrino mixing matrix, as well as on the right-handed gauge boson and heavy neutrino masses. By comparing the sensitivity of the LHC with that of searches for low energy LFV processes, we identify favourable areas of the parameter space to explore the complementarity between LFV at low and high energies.

  7. Preparation and Properties of Sintering Additives Coated Si3N4 from Heterogeneous Nucleation Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The sintering additives such as Al2O3 and/or Y2O3 were coated on the surfaces of Si3N4 particles via heterogeneousnucleation processing using a buffered pH solution as the precipitation reagent. They nucleated and grew only onthe surfaces of Si3N4 and did not form sol particles in solution by TEM observation. The isoelectric point (IEP) ofcoated Si3N4 was different from that of as-received Si3N4. The IEP of Al(OH)3-coated Si3N4 occurred at pH8.4,which is close to that of alumina. When Al(OH)3-coated Si3N4 particles were coated with Y(OH)3, the IEP of coatedSi3N4 powder shifted from pH8.4 to pH9.2, similar to that of yttria. In addition, the rheological data showed thatAl2O3 and/or Y2O3 coated Si3N4 suspension is nearly Newtonian and that added Si3N4 suspension shows a shearrate thinning behavior.

  8. Fuzzy Control of Nitrate Recirculation and External Carbon Addition in A/O Nitrogen Removal Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马勇; 彭永臻; 王淑莹; 王晓莲

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of effluent water must be taken into account for the design and operation of wastewater treatment plants. In addition, the requirement for effluent quality is becoming strict.Therefore, intelligent control approaches are recently required in removing biological nutrient. In this study, fuzzy control has been successfully applied to improve the nitrogen removal. Experimental results showed that a close relationship between nitrate concentration and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at the end of anoxic zone was found for anoxic/oxic (A/O) nitrogen removal process treating synthetic wastewater. ORP can be used as online fuzzy control parazneter of nitrate recirculation and external carbon addition. The established fuzzy logic controller that includes two inputs and one output can maintain ORP value at-86 mV and -90 mV by adjusting the nitrate recirculation flow and external carbon dosage respectively to realize the optimal control of nitrogen removal, improving the effluent quality and reducing the operating cost.

  9. PROCESSING OF MULTI-DIGIT ADDITIONS IN HIGH MATH-ANXIOUS INDIVIDUALS: PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ISABEL eNÚÑEZ-PEÑA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA and low-math anxious (LMA individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. They also took longer and made more errors than their LMA peers. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources towards emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may invest more attentional resources during the arithmetical

  10. New pyrometallurgical process of EAF dust treatment with CaO addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romchat Chairaksa-Fujimoto; Yosuke Inoue; Naoyoshi Umeda; Satoshi Itoh; Tetsuya Nagasaka

    2015-01-01

    The non-carbothermic zinc pyrometallurgical processing of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust was investigated on a laboratory scale. The main objective of this process was to convert highly stable zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), which accounts for more than half of total zinc in the EAF dust, into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 by CaO addition. The EAF dust was mixed with CaO powder in various ratios, pressed into pellets, and heated in a muffle furnace in air at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1100°C for a predetermined holding time. All ZnFe2O4 was transformed into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 at a minimum temperature of 900°C within 1 h when sufficient CaO to achieve a Ca/Fe molar ratio of 1.1 was added. However, at higher temperatures, excess CaO beyond the stoichiometric ratio was required because it was consumed by reactions leading to the formation of compounds other than ZnFe2O4. The evaporation of halides and heavy metals in the EAF dust was also studied. These components could be pref-erentially volatilized into the gas phase at 1100°C when CaO was added.

  11. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF FOOD ADDITIVES FROM PUMPKIN PROCESSING SECONDARY RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupin G. A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data characterizing the composition of macro and micronutrients from secondary resources of pumpkin processing – pumpkin pomace. We have found that extracts of pumpkin are valuable raw materials for the production of food additives, as they contain proteins, dietary fiber, including pectin and protopectin, minerals, as well as such biologically active substances as vitamin C, β- carotene and P-active substances using nuclear magnetic relaxation, it is shown that pretreatment of pomace pumpkin in the microwave electromagnetic field of certain parameters before IR drying allows to transfer part of the bound moisture free moisture, that allows to intensify the subsequent process IR drying. We have developed an innovative technology of production of food supplements from pumpkin extracts, which is protected by Russian patent for the invention and having the “know-how” status. The article presents data describing the organoleptic and physical and chemical indicators of quality nutritional supplements, formulated according to the developed technological regimes

  12. Addition of cattle manure to sheep bedding allows vermicomposting process and improves vermicompost quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestonaro, Taiana; Costa, Mônica Sarolli Silva de Mendonça; Costa, Luiz Antonio de Mendonça; Pereira, Dercio Ceri; Rozatti, Marcos A T; Martins, Marcos F Leal

    2017-02-04

    Animal waste is usually a good substrate for vermicomposting. However, numerous animal husbandry systems use bedding that consists primarily of lignocellulosic substrates, which hinders earthworm and microorganism's development and thus, the entire bioconversion process. One possible solution is to mix the used bedding with other waste materials that are more amenable to earthworm ingestion and can provide better conditions for earthworm population growth. Here, we have aimed to examine the effectiveness of such procedure by mixing rice-husk-based sheep bedding with cattle manure in different proportions (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%). We have carried out vermicomposting experiments in benchtop vermireactors inoculated with 0.88kg of dry matter (sheep bedding+cattle manure). Data used in the Principal Component Analysis were the multiple vermicomposting variables (i.e., EC; pH; HA/FA and C/N ratios; P, K, cellulose, and hemicellulose content). The effect of the treatment on earthworm count was analyzed with ANOVA. We have observed that the addition of at least 25% of cattle manure to sheep bedding allows vermicomposting process but it is necessary 148days to obtain a stabilized vermicompost. However, increasing the proportion of cattle manure to sheep bedding, the vermicomposting time decreases proportionally to 94days. We concluded that vermicomposting can be considered a bioprocess to stabilize rice husk after being used as sheep bedding.

  13. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements in $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production ("Flavour Tagging") is fundamental. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. The performances of the flavour tagging algorithms on the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  14. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements of $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production is fundamental. This is known as "flavour tagging" and at LHCb it is performed with several algorithms. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. Also the performances of the flavour tagging algorithms in the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  15. Minimal flavour violation in the quark and lepton sector and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, S.L.

    2008-01-07

    We address to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in a framework that generalizes the quark minimal flavour violation hypothesis to the lepton sector. We study the impact of CP violation present at low and high energies and investigate the existence of correlations among leptogenesis and lepton flavour violation. Further we present an approach alternative to minimal flavour violation where the suppression of flavour changing transitions involving quarks and leptons is governed by hierarchical fermion wave functions. (orig.)

  16. Maximal sfermion flavour violation in super-GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108556; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric grand unified theories with soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar masses $m_0$ specified above the GUT scale (super-GUTs) and patterns of Yukawa couplings motivated by upper limits on flavour-changing interactions beyond the Standard Model. If the scalar masses are smaller than the gaugino masses $m_{1/2}$, as is expected in no-scale models, the dominant effects of renormalization between the input scale and the GUT scale are generally expected to be those due to the gauge couplings, which are proportional to $m_{1/2}$ and generation-independent. In this case, the input scalar masses $m_0$ may violate flavour maximally, a scenario we call MaxFV, and there is no supersymmetric flavour problem. We illustrate this possibility within various specific super-GUT scenarios that are deformations of no-scale gravity.

  17. Heavy flavour measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo Castellanos, Javier [service de physique nucleaire - SPhN, IRFU, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The main purpose of ALICE is to investigate the properties of a state of deconfined nuclear matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy flavour measurements will play a crucial role in this investigation. The physics programme of ALICE has started by studying proton-proton collisions at unprecedented high energies. We will present the first results on open heavy flavour and quarkonia in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at both mid- and forward-rapidities. We will conclude with the prospects for heavy flavour and quarkonium measurements in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. (author)

  18. Flavoured quantum Boltzmann equations from cQPA

    CERN Document Server

    Fidler, Christian; Kainulainen, Kimmo; Rahkila, Pyry Matti

    2011-01-01

    We develop a Boltzmann-type quantum transport theory for interacting fermion and scalar fields including both flavour and particle-antiparticle mixing. Our formalism is based on the coherent quasiparticle approximation (cQPA) for the 2-point correlation functions, whose extended phase-space structure contains new spectral shells for flavour- and particle-antiparticle coherence. We derive explicit cQPA propagators and Feynman rules for the transport theory. In particular the nontrivial Wightman functions can be written as composite operators $\\sim {\\cal A} F {\\cal A}$, which generalize the usual Kadanoff-Baym ansatz. Our numerical results show that particle-antiparticle coherence can strongly influence CP-violating flavour mixing even for relatively slowly-varying backgrounds. Thus, unlike recently suggested, these correlations cannot be neglected when studying asymmetry generation due to time-varying mass transition, for example in electroweak-type baryogenesis models. Finally, we show that the cQPA coherence...

  19. Inclusive tagging of B-flavour at LHCb [Vidyo

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important procedure needed for the study of CP violation in Beauty sector is the tagging of the flavour of neutral B-mesons at production. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present a proposal to upgrade current flavour tagging strategy in LHCb experiment. This strategy consists of inclusive tagging ensemble methods (i.e: the use inclusive information about the event without a firm selection rule), which are combined using a probabilistic model for each event. The probabilistic model uses all reconstructed tracks and secondary vertices to obtain well-determined probability of B flavour at production. Such approach reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus has the potential to increase the overall performance.

  20. Maximal sfermion flavour violation in super-GUTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Olive, Keith A. [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Velasco-Sevilla, L. [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, PO Box 7803, Bergen (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    We consider supersymmetric grand unified theories with soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar masses m{sub 0} specified above the GUT scale (super-GUTs) and patterns of Yukawa couplings motivated by upper limits on flavour-changing interactions beyond the Standard Model. If the scalar masses are smaller than the gaugino masses m{sub 1/2}, as is expected in no-scale models, the dominant effects of renormalisation between the input scale and the GUT scale are generally expected to be those due to the gauge couplings, which are proportional to m{sub 1/2} and generation independent. In this case, the input scalar masses m{sub 0} may violate flavour maximally, a scenario we call MaxSFV, and there is no supersymmetric flavour problem. We illustrate this possibility within various specific super-GUT scenarios that are deformations of no-scale gravity. (orig.)

  1. Lepton Mixing Predictions from (Generalised) CP and Discrete Flavour Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Neder, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    An important class of flavour groups, that are subgroups of $U(3)$ and that predict experimentally viable lepton mixing parameters including Majorana phases, is the $\\Delta(6n^2)$ series. The most well-known member is $\\Delta(24)=S_4$. I present results of several extensive studies of lepton mixing predictions obtained in models with a $\\Delta(6n^2)$ flavour group that preserve either the full residual $Z_2\\times Z_2$ or a $Z_2$ subgroup for neutrinos and can include a generalised CP symmetry. Predictions include mixing angles and Dirac CP phase generally; and if invariance under a generalised CP symmetry is included, also Majorana phases. For this, the interplay of flavour group and generalised CP symmetry has to be studied carefully.

  2. Fermion masses and mixing in $\\Delta(27)$ flavour model

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    An extension of the Standard Model (SM) based on the non-Abelian discrete group $\\Delta(27)$ is considered. The $\\Delta(27)$ flavour symmetry is spontaneously broken only by gauge singlet scalar fields, therefore our model is free from any flavour changing neural current. We show that the model accounts simultaneously for the observed quark and lepton masses and their mixing. In the quark sector, we find that the up quark mass matrix is flavour diagonal and the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix arises from down quarks. In the lepton sector, we show that the charged lepton mass matrix is almost diagonal. We also adopt type-I seesaw mechanism to generate neutrino masses. A deviated mixing matrix from tri-bimaximal Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS), with $\\sin\\theta_{13} \\sim 0.13$ and $\\sin^2 \\theta_{23} \\sim 0.41$, is naturally produced.

  3. Neutrino Mixings and the S4 Discrete Flavour Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzocchi, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Discrete non-Abelian Symmetries have been extensively used to reproduce the lepton mixings. In particular, the S4 group turned out to be suitable to describe predictive mixing patterns, such as the well-known Tri-Bimaximal and the Bimaximal schemes, which all represent possible first approximations of the experimental lepton mixing matrix. We review the main application of the S4 discrete group as a flavour symmetry, first dealing with the formalism and later with the phenomenological implications. In particular, we summarize the main features of flavour models based on S4, commenting on their ability in reproducing a reactor angle in agreement with the recent data and on their predictions for lepton flavour violating transitions.

  4. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  5. Post Processing Methods used to Improve Surface Finish of Products which are Manufactured by Additive Manufacturing Technologies: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, N. N.; Mulay, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes open the possibility to go directly from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to a physical prototype. These prototypes are used as test models before it is finalized as well as sometimes as a final product. Additive Manufacturing has many advantages over the traditional process used to develop a product such as allowing early customer involvement in product development, complex shape generation and also save time as well as money. Additive manufacturing also possess some special challenges that are usually worth overcoming such as Poor Surface quality, Physical Properties and use of specific raw material for manufacturing. To improve the surface quality several attempts had been made by controlling various process parameters of Additive manufacturing and also applying different post processing techniques on components manufactured by Additive manufacturing. The main objective of this work is to document an extensive literature review in the general area of post processing techniques which are used in Additive manufacturing.

  6. Dark matter and lepton flavour violation in a hybrid neutrino mass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppisch, Frank; Huang, Wei-Chih [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower Street, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-14

    We describe a hybrid model in which the light neutrino mass matrix receives both tree-level seesaw and loop-induced contributions. An additional U(1) gauge symmetry is used to stabilize the lightest right-handed neutrino as the Dark Matter candidate. After fitting the experimental neutrino data, we analyze and correlate the phenomenological consequences of the model, namely its impact on electroweak precision measurements, the Dark Matter relic abundance, lepton flavour violating rare decays and neutrinoless double beta decay. We find that natural realizations of the model characterized by large Yukawa couplings are compatible with and close to the current experimental limits.

  7. Volatile and non-volatile compounds in ripened cheese: their formation and their contribution to flavour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flavour is one of the most important attributes of cheese. Cheese flavour is the result of the breakdown of milk protein, fat, lactose and citrate due to enzymes from milk, rennet and microorganisms during production and ripening of cheese. For a large part the development of flavour during the ripe

  8. Impact of squark flavour violation on neutralino dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Björn; Boulc'h, Quentin Le

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of new sources of flavour violation in the squark sector of supersymmetric models in the context of the dark matter relic density. We show that the corresponding non-minimal flavour violation terms in the squark mass matrices can have an important impact on the thermally averaged (co)annihilation cross section of the neutralino, and in consequence can modify its predicted relic density. We discuss in detail the relevant effects and present a numerical study of neutralino annihilation and coannihilation in this context. We also comment on the LHC phenomenology of the corresponding scenarios.

  9. Heavy-flavour and quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The comparison of heavy-flavour hadron production in proton-proton, proton-Pb and Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC offers the opportunity to investigate the properties of the high-density colour-deconfined state of strongly-interacting matter (Quark Gluon Plasma, QGP that is expected to be formed in high-energy collisions of heavy nuclei. A review of the main quarkonium and open heavy-flavour results obtained by the ALICE, ATLAS and CMS experiments is presented.

  10. Pulsars: Macro-nuclei with 3-flavour symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2015-01-01

    A pulsar-like compact star is the rump left behind after a supernova where normal baryonic matter is intensely compressed by gravity, but the real state of such compressed baryonic matter is still not well understood because of the non-perturbative nature of the fundamental color interaction. We argue that pulsars could be of condensed matter of quark clusters, i.e., "quark-cluster stars" which distinguish from conventional neutron and quark stars. In comparison with 2-flavour symmetric micro-nuclei, a quark-cluster star could simply be considered as a macro-nucleus with 3-flavour symmetry. New research achievements both theoretical and observational are briefly presented.

  11. Impact of squark flavour violation on neutralino dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Bjoern [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Klasen, Michael [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Le Boulc' h, Quentin [Univ. Joseph Fourier/CNRS-IN2P3/INPG, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-06-15

    We discuss the possibility of new sources of flavour violation in the squark sector of supersymmetric models in the context of the dark matter relic density. We show that the corresponding non-minimal flavour violation terms in the squark mass matrices can have an important impact on the thermally averaged (co)annihilation cross section of the neutralino, and in consequence can modify its predicted relic density. We discuss in detail the relevant effects and present a numerical study of neutralino annihilation and coannihilation in this context. We also comment on the LHC phenomenology of the corresponding scenarios. (orig.)

  12. Novel tomato flavours introduced by plastidial terpenoid pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, Beat; Niederberger, Peter; Pétiard, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Until recently breeding efforts centred on high-yield production while sacrificing flavour and taste quality traits of mass produced food products, such as tomatoes. The recent publication of Davidovich-Rikanati et al. demonstrates the technical feasibility of the genetical engineering of pathways in tomato plants to modify their fruit flavour profile in a proof-of-concept approach. The reported work ranks among an increasing number of reported successful modifications of edible plants with a focus on the benefits to end-consumers.

  13. Gauge Invariants and Correlators in Flavoured Quiver Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Mattioli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the construction of holomorphic gauge invariant operators for general quiver gauge theories with flavour symmetries. Using a characterisation of the gauge invariants in terms of equivalence classes generated by permutation actions, along with representation theory results in symmetric groups and unitary groups, we give a diagonal basis for the 2-point functions of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic operators. This involves a generalisation of the previously constructed Quiver Restricted Schur operators to the flavoured case. The 3-point functions are derived and shown to be given in terms of networks of symmetric group branching coefficients. The networks are constructed through cutting and gluing operations on the quivers.

  14. Development of magnetodielectric materials to be used in additive manufacturing processes for high-frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Paul Emerson, II

    Electrical devices for very-high frequency (VHF, 0.03 -- 0.3 GHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 0.3 -- 3.0 GHz) are commonly used for communications. However, the wavelengths, lambda, of these frequency bands correspond to lengths between 10 and 0.1 m, resulting in prohibitively large devices. Materials with an index of refraction, n, greater than 1 can be used to effectively shrink these devices by a factor of 1/ n. In this thesis, magnetodielectric materials (MDM), where n ≥1, have been made to be used in additive manufacturing processes with strict particle size requirements and were developed using various methods, such as polyol reduction and conventional ceramic solid state processing. These materials were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), to determine their crystalline, physical, and direct current (DC) magnetization properties. The techniques used to synthesize the MDM yielded particles that were chemically similar, but had drastically different physical properties which heavily influences their high-frequency electromagnetic properties. These materials were then uniformly dispersed into a non-conducting medium, such as a low-electrical loss polymer or resin, and formed into composite samples with variable volumetric loading. These composite samples were measured using several techniques to characterize the frequency-dependent electromagnetic (EM) properties, such as relative permeability, relative permittivity, and their respective losses. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were performed using these MDM-composites to design a spiral antenna to be used at approximately 585 MHz.

  15. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbold, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  16. Effect of Molecular Weight and Processing Additive on the Performance of Low Bandgap Polymer Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓礼; 唐浩为; 杨大磊; 李慧; 徐文涛; 尹丽; 杨小牛

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we synthesized a low bandgap polymer polysilole(-2,6-diyl-alt-5-octylthieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6- dione) (PDTSTPD) with different molecular weights (Mn). The devices based on PDTSTPD/PC71BM composite are prepared and the dependence of power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices on the M,1 of conjugated poly- mers is addressed. We found the hole mobility of PDTSTPD is dependent on the Mn of the polymer, which should be the main reason contributing to the drastic difference of device performance, i.e. the PCE of the device using 10 kDa polymer is only 0.52%, in contrast to 2.3% for 24 kDa polymer device. This PCE data is then further improved to 5.0% via using 1,8-diiodoctane as processing additive to achieve an optimized morphology for the photoactive layer with an appropriate length-scale of phase separation for both exciton dissociation and charge transportation.

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 201Rev1: 2-Alkylated, aliphatic, acyclic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and precursors, with or without additional double-bonds, from chemical subgroup 1.1.2 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    .177 and 09.931], for which it was concluded in the previous version of this FGE that the available data were insufficient to evaluate their genotoxicity. Secondly, the Panel considers that the mutagenicity hazard could not be cleared by the endpoints evaluated in the in vivo micronucleus assay submitted....... The Panel therefore concluded that further data are required in order to clarify the genotoxic potential of this subgroup. The Panel considers the Comet assay with [FL-no: 05.095] as test material and performed on liver, blood and first site of contact, as a preferred option to further investigate...

  18. Perinatal flavour learning and adaptation to being weaned: all the pig needs is smell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije Oostindjer

    Full Text Available Perinatal flavour learning through the maternal diet is known to enhance flavour preference and acceptance of flavoured food in many species, yet still little is known about the mechanism underlying perinatal flavour learning. Previously we found positive effects of perinatal flavour learning on food intake, growth and behaviour of piglets postweaning, but no increased preference for the flavour. This suggests that flavour learning in pigs works through a reduction of weaning stress by the presence of the familiar flavour instead. The aim of this study was to investigate whether perinatal flavour learning reduces stress at weaning, and whether the effect is stronger when the familiar flavour is present in the food. Sows were offered an anethol-flavoured diet (Flavour treatment or control diet (Control treatment during late gestation and lactation. Flavour and Control piglets were provided with anethol either in their food (Food treatment or in the air (Air treatment after weaning. Preweaning and postweaning treatments did not affect food intake, preference or growth in the first two weeks postweaning but flavour treatment reduced the latency to eat (24 versus 35 hours, P = 0.02 and within-pen variation in growth (SD within-pen: 0.7 versus 1.2 kg, P<0.001. Salivary cortisol levels tended to be lower four and seven hours postweaning for Flavour piglets compared to Control piglets (4 hours: 2.5 versus 3.0 ng/ml, P = 0.05, 7 hours: 3.1 versus 3.4 ng/ml, P = 0.08. Flavour piglets played more and showed less damaging behaviours than Control piglets, indicating that the familiar flavour reduced stress around weaning. Few interaction effects were found between preweaning and postweaning treatment, and no effects of postweaning treatment. We conclude that in the newly weaned pig, perinatal flavour learning results in a reduction of stress when the familiar flavour is present, regardless of providing the flavour in the food or in the air.

  19. Encapsulation of orange terpenes investigating a plasticisation extrusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Extrusion is widely used for flavour encapsulation. However, there is a lack of process understanding. This study is aimed at improving the understanding of a counter rotating twin screw extrusion process. Orange terpenes as model flavour, maltodextrin and sucrose as matrix materials, and a water feed rate between 4.0% and 5.7% were applied. Product temperatures < 80 °C and specific mechanical energy inputs <260 Wh/kg resulted. Amorphous and partly crystalline samples were obtained. The loss of crystalline sucrose was linked to a dissolution process of the sugar in the available water amount. Melting of the excipients did not arise, resulting in a plasticisation extrusion process. Maximally 67% of the flavour was retained (corresponding to a 4.1% product flavour load). The flavour loss correlated with insufficient mixing during the process and flavour evaporation after extrusion. Based on these results, recommendations for an improved encapsulation process are given.

  20. Effects of flavour absorption on foods and their packaging materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willige, van R.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: flavour absorption, scalping, packaging, food matrix, lldpe, ldpe, pp, pc, pet, pen,b-lactoglobulin, casein, pectin, cmc, lactose, saccharose, oil, modelling, storage, oxygen permeability, taste perception, sensory quality.Abso

  1. A taste of dark matter: flavour constraints on pseudoscalar mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolan, M.J.; Kahlhoefer, F.; McCabe, C.; Schmidt-Hoberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter interacting via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar can induce observable signals in indirect detection experiments and experience large self-interactions while evading the strong bounds from direct dark matter searches. The pseudoscalar mediator will however induce flavour-changing int

  2. The flavour of supersymmetry: Phenomenological implications of sfermion mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Arana-Catania, M

    2013-01-01

    We study the phenomenological implications of sfermion flavour mixing in supersymmetry in the context of Non-Minimal Flavour Violation (NMFV). We study the general flavour mixing hypothesis, parametrizing the squark and slepton mass matrices by a complete set of delta^XY_ij (X,Y=L,R; i,j= t,c,u or b,s,d for squarks/1,2,3 for sleptons). With respect to the squark sector, we study the behaviour of the B-physics observables BR(B -> Xs gamma), BR(Bs -> mu+ mu-) and delta M_B_s and update the constraints to the delta parameters coming from them. We present one-loop corrections to the Higgs boson masses in the MSSM with NMFV in the squark sector, and taking into account the previous constraints we evaluate them, finding sizable corrections, exceeding sometimes tens of GeV for the light Higgs boson. These corrections might be used to set further constraints on the delta parameters from the Higgs boson mass measurement. With respect to the slepton sector, we explore the implications on charged lepton flavour violatin...

  3. Volatile flavour components of grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez, A.J.; Maarse, H.; Bemelmans, J.M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The qualitative analysis of volatile flavour components in grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen) was performed using a gas chromatography/mass spectro‐metry/computer system which allowed the identification of 58 components, 25 of them being reported for the first time. The aroma concentrates

  4. The role of flavon cross couplings in leptonic flavour mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Pascoli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In models with discrete flavour symmetries, flavons are critical to realise specific flavour structures. Leptonic flavour mixing originates from the misalignment of flavon vacuum expectation values which respect different residual symmetries in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. Flavon cross couplings are usually forbidden, in order to protect these symmetries. Contrary to this approach, we show that cross couplings can play a key role and give raise to necessary corrections to flavour-mixing patterns, including a non-zero value for the reactor angle and CP violation. For definiteness, we present two models based on $A_4$. In the first model, all flavons are assumed to be real or pseudo-real, with 7 real degrees of freedom in the flavon sector in total. A sizable reactor angle associated with nearly maximal CP violation is achieved, and, as both originate from the same cross coupling, a sum rule results with a precise prediction for the value of the Dirac CP-violating phase. In the second model, the fla...

  5. A fuller flavour treatment of N_2-dominated leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, Stefan; Jones, David A; King, Steve F

    2010-01-01

    We discuss N_2-dominated leptogenesis in the presence of flavour dependent effects that have hitherto been neglected, in particular the off-diagonal entries of the flavour coupling matrix that connects the total flavour asymmetries, distributed in different particle species, to the lepton and Higgs doublet asymmetries. We derive analytical formulae for the final asymmetry including the flavour coupling at the N_2-decay stage as well as at the stage of washout by the lightest right-handed neutrino N_1. We point out that in general part of the electron and muon asymmetries can completely escape the wash-out at the production and a total B-L asymmetry can be generated by the lightest RH neutrino wash-out yielding so called phantom leptogenesis. Taking of all these new effects into account can enhance the final asymmetry produced by the decays of the next-to-lightest RH neutrinos by orders of magnitude, opening up new interesting possibilities for N_2-dominated thermal eptogenesis. We illustrate these effects for...

  6. LHCb : Search for Lepton Flavour Violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Rives Molina, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations has re-opened the case for searches of lepton-flavour violating decays. We report on recent results on searches for short or long-lived Majorana heavy neutrinos in B&arr;μμπ and τ→μμμ decays

  7. SU(2) Gauge Theory with Two Fundamental Flavours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Rudy; Drach, Vincent; Hansen, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the continuum spectrum of the SU(2) gauge theory with $N_f=2$ flavours of fermions in the fundamental representation. This model provides a minimal template which is ideal for a wide class of Standard Model extensions featuring novel strong dynamics that range from composite (Golds...

  8. Removal of naphthenic acids using adsorption process and the effect of the addition of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Fakhry Seyedeyn; Abedi, Jalal; Iranmanesh, Sobhan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, various types of adsorbents were examined for the removal of Naphthenic acids (NAs) in the preliminary stage of this study. Among them, activated carbon and nickel (Ni) based alumina (Ni-Al2O3) possess relatively high adsorption capacity of NAs. The removal of NAs was evaluated comparing the total organic carbon (TOC) of the solution before and after the adsorption process. The effect of Ni loading was investigated using Ni-Al2O4 with various nickel loadings. The highest adsorption capacity (20 mg of TOC/1 mg of adsorbent) was belong to Ni-Al2O4 with 10.7% Ni loading. By the addition of salt (1500 ppm NaCl) to NAs solutions having concentrations from of 15 to 38 ppm, it was observed that the adsorption decreased dramatically (up to 80%) depending on the concentration of TOC. The kinetics of the adsorption of TOC on Ni-based alumina was also investigated. The decrease of TOC was more that 40% in the first half hour, indicating that adsorption was very rapid in the beginning. The adsorption increased slightly for up to 5 h and then leveled off when the TOC reached to 50% of initial TOC concentration. However, when sodium chloride (NaCl) was added to the solution, the adsorption decreased to almost 9% within the first half hour, reaching to almost 5% after 3 h. These phenomena suggest that the effectiveness of adsorbents may be improved by decreasing the total dissolved salts in tailings pond wastewater.

  9. Influence of water quality on the presence of off-flavour compounds (geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinet, Julien; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sérodes, Jean

    2010-12-01

    Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol are off-flavour compounds related to poor organoleptics and a decrease in consumer satisfaction with drinking water. The relationship between these off-flavour compounds and 39 parameters of water quality (chemical, physical and biological) for three different surface waters from lotic systems that supply potable water to Quebec City and Lévis (Canada) was studied using principal component analysis. The objective of this study was to show that a multidimensional approach with principal component analysis using the component matrix serves to differentiate the processes involved in the appearance of the olfactory compounds from those not involved or little involved and to extract the most representative data of these processes. Our study shows that the presence of geosmin can be explained, in the case of the water studied, by a process associated primarily with the eutrophication of water and, to a lesser degree, by an allochthonous origin. However, the presence of 2-methylisoborneol may be linked to two processes with different origins, but of equal importance: a winter origin - most likely allochthonous - involving anthropic contributions and an autochthonous bacterial origin.

  10. Flavour effects in Resonant Leptogenesis from semi-classical and Kadanoff-Baym approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Flavour effects play an important role in the statistical evolution of particle number densities in several particle physics phenomena. We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena, in order to consistently capture all flavour effects in the system. We explicitly study the scenario of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL), and show that flavour covariance requires one to consider generically off-diagonal number densities, rank-4 rate tensors in flavour space, and non-trivial generalization of the discrete symmetries C, P and T. The flavour-covariant transport equations, obtained in our semi-classical framework, describe the effects of three relevant physical phenomena: coherent heavy-neutrino oscillations, quantum decoherence in the charged-lepton sector, and resonant CP violation due to heavy-neutrino mixing. We show quantitatively that the final asymmetry is enhanced by up to an order of magnitude, for electroweak-scale heavy neutrinos, as compared to that obtained from flavour-diagonal or pa...

  11. Advanced Process Chains for Prototyping and Pilot Production based on Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischkot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For many years, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has been a well-established production technology used mainly for rapid prototyping. But the need for increased flexibility and economic low volume production led to the discovery of Additive Manufacturing as a suitable fabrication technique (Mellor 2013...

  12. A study on effective use of heat transfer additives in the process of steam condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemuri, Srinivas; Kim, Kwang J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Kang, Yong Tae [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Systems Engineering, KyungHee University, KyungHee (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    It is well known that the additives in absorption chillers play a significant role in increasing absorber performance. Realizing that the additives in absorption chillers circulate throughout the system including the condensers, we investigated the effect of additives in the condenser. Reported herein are the results of the experimental and theoretical investigations done by using effective heat transfer additives for enhancing heat transfer coefficient in condensation of steam over a horizontal copper (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) tube surface. By using effective additives, the condensation heat transfer coefficient can be enhanced as much as 1.47 times when compared to filmwise condensation. The steam condensation, which occurred in our experiments while using effective additives, was mostly pseudo-dropwise like. In our experiments, we noted that the use of heat transfer additive such as 2-ethoxyethanol for steam condensation was highly effective. This increase in heat transfer coefficient can be attributed to concept of Marangoni effect. It is understood that this surface convection is caused by local variations in the interfacial tension. So far there has been very little noted literature available on the theoretical aspect of surface tension effect on enhancing heat transfer rate in steam condensation. In the current research we try to explain the surface tension effect for enhancing heat transfer rate in steam condensation using effective heat transfer additives. (author)

  13. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Flavour Esters through Immobilized Lipase Mediated Transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlapati, Vijay Kumar; Banerjee, Rintu

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of methyl butyrate and octyl acetate through immobilized Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 3562 lipase mediated transesterification was studied under solvent-free conditions. The effect of different transesterification variables, namely, molarity of alcohol, reaction time, temperature, agitation, addition of water, and enzyme amount on molar conversion (%) was investigated. A maximum molar conversion of 70.42% and 92.35% was obtained in a reaction time of 14 and 12 h with the transesterification variables of 0.6 M methanol in vinyl butyrate and 2 M octanol in vinyl acetate using 80 U and 60 U immobilized lipase with the agitation speed of 200 rpm and 0.2% water addition at 32°C and 36°C for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. The immobilized enzyme has retained good relative activity (more than 95%) up to five and six recycles for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. Hence, the present investigation makes a great impingement in natural flavour industry by introducing products synthesized under solvent-free conditions to the flavour market.

  14. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Flavour Esters through Immobilized Lipase Mediated Transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Garlapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of methyl butyrate and octyl acetate through immobilized Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 3562 lipase mediated transesterification was studied under solvent-free conditions. The effect of different transesterification variables, namely, molarity of alcohol, reaction time, temperature, agitation, addition of water, and enzyme amount on molar conversion (% was investigated. A maximum molar conversion of 70.42% and 92.35% was obtained in a reaction time of 14 and 12 h with the transesterification variables of 0.6 M methanol in vinyl butyrate and 2 M octanol in vinyl acetate using 80 U and 60 U immobilized lipase with the agitation speed of 200 rpm and 0.2% water addition at 32°C and 36°C for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. The immobilized enzyme has retained good relative activity (more than 95% up to five and six recycles for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. Hence, the present investigation makes a great impingement in natural flavour industry by introducing products synthesized under solvent-free conditions to the flavour market.

  15. Assessment of dietary intake of flavouring substances within the procedure for their safety evaluation: advantages and limitations of estimates obtained by means of a per capita method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, D; Leclercq, C

    2005-01-01

    The procedure for the safety evaluation of flavourings adopted by the European Commission in order to establish a positive list of these substances is a stepwise approach which was developed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and amended by the Scientific Committee on Food. Within this procedure, a per capita amount based on industrial poundage data of flavourings, is calculated to estimate the dietary intake by means of the maximised survey-derived daily intake (MSDI) method. This paper reviews the MSDI method in order to check if it can provide conservative intake estimates as needed at the first steps of a stepwise procedure. Scientific papers and opinions dealing with the MSDI method were reviewed. Concentration levels reported by the industry were compared with estimates obtained with the MSDI method. It appeared that, in some cases, these estimates could be orders of magnitude (up to 5) lower than those calculated considering concentration levels provided by the industry and regular consumption of flavoured foods and beverages. A critical review of two studies which had been used to support the statement that MSDI is a conservative method for assessing exposure to flavourings among high consumers was performed. Special attention was given to the factors that affect exposure at high percentiles, such as brand loyalty and portion sizes. It is concluded that these studies may not be suitable to validate the MSDI method used to assess intakes of flavours by European consumers due to shortcomings in the assumptions made and in the data used. Exposure assessment is an essential component of risk assessment. The present paper suggests that the MSDI method is not sufficiently conservative. There is therefore a clear need for either using an alternative method to estimate exposure to flavourings in the procedure or for limiting intakes to the levels at which the safety was assessed.

  16. Decays of Z Boson into Pseudoscalar Meson Pair of Different Flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Chia, Swee-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the process Z-zero to M1 M2, where M1 and M2 are pseudoscalar mesons with quark contents of q1 q-bar and q-bar q2 respectively. At the quark level, the process-zero to q1 q2-bar, where q1 and q2 are quarks of different flavours, receives contribution only from the Z-penguin. In order to fold the quark-level process to the hadronic process, we make the fundamental assumption that the vertex of type M q q-bar can be approximated by an effective constant gamma 5 coupling. With this assumption, estimates are obtained for the cross-sections for the following processes: Z-zero to K-minus pi-plus, Z-zero to B-minus K-plus.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of feeder and lint slide moisture addition on ginning, fiber quality, and textile processing of western cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of moisture addition at the gin stand feeder conditioning hopper and/or the battery condenser slide on gin performance and Western cotton fiber quality and textile processing. The test treatments included no moisture addition, feeder hopper hum...

  18. External Carbon Source Addition as a Means to Control an Activated Sludge Nutrient Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik;

    1994-01-01

    In alternating type activated sludge nutrient removal processes, the denitrification rate can be limited by the availability of readily-degradable carbon substrate. A control strategy is proposed by which an easily metabolizable COD source is added directly to that point in the process at which...

  19. Processing and characterization of glass reinforced biogenic hydroxyapatite composites with ferromagnetic additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Pinchuk

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic hydroxyapatite-glass composites, with addition of up to 2 wt.% of Fe or Fe3O4, were fabricated from biogenic hydroxyapatite powder and four types of reinforcing glasses by sintering under different conditions. It has been established that the relative density, mechanical and magnetic properties of the prepared composites depend on the composition and sintering conditions. The composites with 1 wt.% Fe or Fe3O4 sintered at 500°С in vacuum have a magnetic susceptibility of 2–3·10-3 cm3/g. This parameter decreases to 0.858·10-3 cm3/g for the specimens with 1 wt.% additives sintered at 800°С in vacuum and to 0.27–1.3·10-3cm3/g for the specimens with 2 wt.% additives sintered at 500°С under the usual atmospheric conditions. The magnetic susceptibility for the specimens with 2 wt.% additives sintered at 780°С under the same atmospheric conditions decreases to 0.24–1.25·10-6 cm3/g. These ferromagnetic additives influence the degradation rate in vitro within the first 40 min of the composite soaking. Short-term treatment of specimens by the magnetic field leads to an increase in the initial degradation rate, but insignificantly influences it within more prolonged soaking.

  20. Wand Z production in association with light and heavy-flavour jets at the LHC and the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Ciaccio Lucia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent results on W and Z production in association with light and heavy-flavour jets at the Tevatron and the LHC are reviewed. The integrated luminosity which is used for physics analysis by each of the two Tevatron experiments (CDF and D0 corresponds to a maximum of ≈10 fb−1, at an energy in the centre of massof 1.96 TeV. The LHC analyses of ATLAS and CMS use the data sample collected in 2011 which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ≈5 fb−1, at an energy in the centre of mass of 7 TeV. Events with W and Z bosons accompanied by jets represent one of the main background samples in the analyses of rare Standard Model processes and in searches for New Physics. Furthermore these measurements provide a test of perturbative QCD calculations and probe the strange and heavy flavour content of the proton.

  1. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  2. Flavour Independent $h^{0}A^{0}$ Search and Two Higgs Doublet Model Interpretation of Neutral Higgs Boson Searches at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von, J H; Krogh, A; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2005-01-01

    Upper limits on the cross-section of the pair-production process e+e- -> h0A0 assuming 100% decays into hadrons, are derived from a new search for the h0A0 -> hadrons topology, independent of the hadronic flavour of the decay products. Searches for the neutral Higgs bosons h0 and A0, are used to obtain constraints on the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM(11)) with no CP violation in the Higgs sector and no additional non Standard Model particles besides the five Higgs bosons. The analysis combines LEP1 and LEP2 data collected with the OPAL detctor up to the highest available centre-of-mass energies. The searches are sensitive to the h0, A0 -> qq, gg,tau+tau- and h0 -> A0A0 decay modes of the Higgs bosons. The 2HDM(II) parameter space is explored in a detailed scan. Large regions of the 2HDM(II) parameter space are excluded at the 95% CL in the (mh, mA), (mh, tanb) and (mA, tanb) planes, using both direct neutral Higgs boson searches and indirect limits derived from Standard Model high precision measuremen...

  3. Cherry-flavoured electronic cigarettes expose users to the inhalation irritant, benzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Prokopowicz, Adam; Kurek, Jolanta; Zaciera, Marzena; Knysak, Jakub; Smith, Danielle; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2016-04-01

    Many non-cigarette tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, contain various flavourings, such as fruit flavours. Although many flavourings used in e-cigarettes are generally recognised as safe when used in food products, concerns have been raised about the potential inhalation toxicity of these chemicals. Benzaldehyde, which is a key ingredient in natural fruit flavours, has been shown to cause irritation of respiratory airways in animal and occupational exposure studies. Given the potential inhalation toxicity of this compound, we measured benzaldehyde in aerosol generated in a laboratory setting from flavoured e-cigarettes purchased online and detected benzaldehyde in 108 out of 145 products. The highest levels of benzaldehyde were detected in cherry-flavoured products. The benzaldehyde doses inhaled with 30 puffs from flavoured e-cigarettes were often higher than doses inhaled from a conventional cigarette. Levels in cherry-flavoured products were >1000 times lower than doses inhaled in the workplace. While e-cigarettes seem to be a promising harm reduction tool for smokers, findings indicate that using these products could result in repeated inhalation of benzaldehyde, with long-term users risking regular exposure to the substance. Given the uncertainty surrounding adverse health effects stemming from long-term inhalation of flavouring ingredients such as benzaldehyde, clinicians need to be aware of this emerging risk and ask their patients about use of flavoured e-cigarettes.

  4. IMPLEMENTING AN ISO 9001 MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN PROCESSES OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING FOR MEDICAL USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketinlly Yasmyne Nascimento Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a case study, this paper presents a methodology to adopt ISO 9001 standards for organizations which make use of additive manufacturing to build products for medical use. Starting with a conceptual model, guidelines were identified to guide planning and operation of the management system, as well as its maintenance and improvement.

  5. Aluminium content of some processed foods, raw materials and food additives in China by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Li, Ke; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fen; Dai, Jing-Jing; Li, Hua-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The level of aluminium in 178 processed food samples from Shenzhen city in China was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Some processed foods contained a concentration of up to 1226 mg/kg, which is about 12 times the Chinese food standard. To establish the main source in these foods, Al levels in the raw materials were determined. However, aluminium concentrations in raw materials were low (0.10-451.5 mg/kg). Therefore, aluminium levels in food additives used in these foods was determined and it was found that some food additives contained a high concentration of aluminium (0.005-57.4 g/kg). The results suggested that, in the interest of public health, food additives containing high concentrations of aluminium should be replaced by those containing less. This study has provided new information on aluminium levels in Chinese processed foods, raw materials and a selection of food additives.

  6. Fermion number conservation and two Higgs doublet models without tree level flavour changing neutral currents

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, Anjan S

    2010-01-01

    The charged fermion mass matrices are always invariant under $U(1)^3$ symmetry linked to the fermion number transformation. A class of two Higgs doublet models (2HDM) can be identified by requiring that the definition of this symmetry in an arbitrary weak basis be independent of Higgs parameters such as the ratio of the Higgs vacuum expectation values. The tree level flavour changing neutral currents normally present in 2HDM are absent in this class of models but unlike the type I or type II Higgs doublet models, the charged Higgs couplings in these models contain additional flavour dependent CP violating phases. These phases can account for the recent hints of the beyond standard model CP violation in the $B_d$ and $B_s$ mixing. In particular, there is a range of parameters in which new phases do not contribute to the $K$ meson CP violation but give identical new physics contribution to the $B_d$ and $B_s$ meson mixing. Specific model realizations of the above scenario are briefly discussed.

  7. Effects of Alkali Concentration and Conching Temperature on Flavour, Hardness and Colour of Chocolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnawi Jati

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkalization is an addition of alkali into cocoa mass to improve product quality in terms of flavour and colour appearance. Sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate are usual to be added into cocoa cotyledon prior to roasting. A study has been carried out to evaluate the effects of alkalization proceeded upon conching on chocolate sensory properties, hardness and colour. Re sponse Surface Methodology design at alkali concentrations of 1—15 g kg -1 and conching temperature of 40—80 oC have been used in the study. Parameters evaluated were sensory properties, particle size, hardness and colour. Results of the study showed that alkali concentration significantly influenced aroma, overall preference, particle size and hardness; meanwhile, conching temperature showed significant influence on aroma, taste, appearance, overall preference and texture of chocolate. Alkali concentration and conching temperature showed interactively influence on aroma and overall preference. A good quality of chocolate could be found at the alkali concentration of 8—15 g kg -1 and conching temperature of 74—80 oC. Key words: cocoa bean, chocolate, flavour, conching, alkalization, colour, particle size, texture.

  8. Flavour-changing Higgs decays into bottom and strange quarks in supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, G; Lee, J S; López-Ibáñez, M L; Vives, O

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we explore the flavour changing decays $H_i \\to b s$ in a general supersymmetric scenario. In these models, the flavour changing decays arise at loop-level but, originating from a dimension-four operator, do not decouple and may provide a first sign of new physics for heavy masses beyond collider reach. In the framework of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM), we find that the largest branching ratio of the lightest Higgs ($H_1$) is ${\\cal O}(10^{-6})$ after imposing present experimental constraints. While heavy Higgs states may still present branching ratios ${\\cal O}(10^{-3})$. In a more general supersymmetric scenario, where additional Higgs states may modify the Higgs mixings, the branching ratio BR($H_1 \\to b s$) can reach values ${\\cal O}(10^{-4})$ , while heavy Higgses still remain at ${\\cal O}(10^{-3})$. Although these values are clearly out of reach for the LHC, a full study in a linear collider environment could be worth.

  9. Effect of excess Y2O3 addition on the physical properties of melt processed YBCO bulks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Wanmin; ZHOU; Lian; FENG; Yong; ZHANG; Pingxiang; WU

    2004-01-01

    The YBCO superconductors with Y2O3 addition were prepared by a modified melt textured process and the effects of excess Y2O3 addition on the physical properties of melt textured YBCO have been investigated. It is found that the melt temperature of YBCO samples decreases drastically with the increasing Y2O3, and the maximum levitation forces are drastically different for samples with different Y2O3 addition. It is also found that the optimal Y2O3 addition to YBCO is about 10wt%. Considering the microstructure and the starting composition, the results are well discussed and interpreted.

  10. Surfactants as additives for NO{sub x} reduction during SNCR process with urea solution as reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayoub, Muhammad [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kwangwoon University (Korea, Republic of); Irfan, Muhammad Faisal, E-mail: muhammadfipk@um.edu.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yoo, Kyung-Seun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kwangwoon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} We study SNCR process using urea as a reducing agent for NO{sub x} reduction. {yields} We improve NO{sub x} reduction efficiency by adding the different types of additives. {yields} We introduce new additives: surfactants and blends of alkali metal with organic group. {yields} Anionic surfactants give maximum efficiency and max. range for temperature window. - Abstract: NO{sub x} reduction from gas stream by selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) using urea as a reducing agent was performed in this study. A Pilot-scale experimental system was designed and constructed to evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction efficiency and temperature window of the process. Particularly, different types of additives were added during SNCR process to improve NO{sub x} reduction efficiency and enlarge temperature window. The addition of additives was based on organic compounds like alcoholic group (CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH) and metallic compounds like alkali metals (NaOH, KOH and LiOH). Some newly introduced additives, such as surfactants and different blends of alkali metal NaOH (1%) with organic group or surfactants were also added to assess the effect of these mixed additives on NO{sub x} reduction efficiency and reaction temperature window during SNCR process. Main focus was laid on surfactants as an additive because of their cost effectiveness and availability. Basically, surfactants have both organic and metallic parts which provide -OH free radicals from both ends (organic and metallic) to enhance the reaction mechanism and improve the NO{sub x} reduction at low temperature. Different types of surfactants (anionic, cationic, amphitricha, long chain, short chain and with different functional groups attached to chains) were tested as an additive during SNCR process. Anionic surfactants (SPES, APS, LAS and SPS) gave maximum efficiency for NO{sub x} reduction and provided maximum range for the temperature window.

  11. Conceptual approach for an in-line quality control system in Additive Manufacturing Powder Bed Fusion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulga Simina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing is one of the genuine hopes for the forth industrial revolution since digital data is controlling the whole layered production process. At the same time the geometric freedom and tool-free production assures a high degree of individualisation. But to be the driving force behind a new industrial revolution, a qualification of additive manufacturing processes is necessary so that the resulting products meet the required quality and safety standards in the different fields of application such as in handling technology or medical technology. This paper will discuss a conceptual approach for the development of an in-line quality control system in Additive Manufacturing Powder Bed Fusion processes using the example of the Selective Laser Sintering process.

  12. Effect of Additive on Sulfur-fixation Process of Sulfur-fixation Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jun-lin; QIU Jian-rong; ZHAO Gai-ju; LOU Jin-ping; HAN Chun-hua

    2003-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of desulfurization product is directly related to its high-temperatureresistant ability. Effects of the additive on the sulfur-fixation efficiency of the Ba-sulfur-fixation agent and also on the crystallization behavior of the sulfur-fixation product were studied when CaCO3 and BaCO3 were used as the desulfurization agent and MgO and SrCO3 used as the assistant sulfur-fixation agent. The result shows that increase of sulfur-fixation capability for the additive is not owe to their directly react to form sulfate or interact with CaCO3 and BaCO3 to form composite mineral heat-resistant in high temperature, but owe to their activation to sulfur-fixation reaction of the sulfur-fixation agent.

  13. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1979-10-30

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  14. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-26

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  15. Inconsistency and non-additive Choquet integration in the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We propose to extend the aggregation scheme of Saaty's AHP, from the standard weighted averaging to the more general Choquet integration. In our model, a measure of inconsistency between criteria is derived from the main pairwise comparison matrix and it is used to construct a non-additive capacity, whose associated Choquet integral reduces to the standard weighted mean in the consistency case. In the general inconsistency case, however, the new aggregation scheme based on Choquet integration...

  16. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  17. Harnessing reversible oxidative addition: application of diiodinated aromatic compounds in the carboiodination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, David A; Lischka, Matthias; Lautens, Mark

    2013-09-27

    An I for an I: Conditions for the intramolecular carboiodination and the simultaneous convergent intramolecular carboiodination/intermolecular Heck reaction of various diiodoarenes were developed. The ability of the Pd(0)/QPhos catalyst/ligand combination to undergo reversible oxidative addition allows these reactions to proceed well, thus increasing both the appeal and utility of this class of substrates in site-selective cross-coupling reactions.

  18. Denitrification potential enhancement by addition of external carbon sources in a pre-denitrification process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yong-zhen; MA Yong; WANG Shu-ying

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the denitrification potential enhancement by addition of external carbon sources and to estimate the denitrification potential for the predenitrification system using nitrate utilization rate(NUR)batch tests.It is shown that the denitrification potential Can be substantially increased with the addition of three external carbon sources,i.e.methanol,ethanol,and acetate.and the denitrification rates of ethanol,acetate,and methanol reached up to 9.6,12,and 3.2 mgN/(gVSS·h),respectively,while mat of starch wastewater was only 0.74 mgN/(gVSS·h).By comparison,ethanol was found to be the best extemal carbon source.NUR batch tests with starch wastewater and waste ethanol were carried out.The denitrification potential increased from 5.6 to 16.5 mg NO.-N/L owing to waste ethanol addition.By means of NUR tests,the wastewater characteristics and kinetic parameters can be estimated.which are used to determine the denitrification potential of wastewater,to calculate the denitrification potential of the plant and to predict the nitrate effluent quality,as well as provide information for developing carbon dosage conlxol strategy.

  19. Development of coatings for ultrasonic additive manufacturing sonotrode using laser direct metal deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Niyanth [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dehoff, Ryan R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jordan, Brian H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    ORNL partnered with Fabrisonic, LLC to develop galling resistant hard facing coatings on sonotrodes used to fabricate 3D printed materials using ultrasonic additive manufacturing. The development and deployment of a coated sonotrode is expected to push the existing state of the art to facilitate the solidstate additive manufacturing of hard steels and titanium alloys. To this effect a structurally amorphous stainless steel material and cobalt chrome material were deposited on the sonotrode material. Both the deposits showed good adhesion to the substrate. The coatings made using the structurally amorphous steel materials showed cracking during the initial trials and cracking was eliminated by deposition on a preheated substrate. Both the coatings show hardness in excess of 600 HVN. Thus the phase 1 of this project has been used to identify suitable materials to use to coat the sonotrode. Despite the fact that successful deposits were obtained, the coatings need to be evaluated by performing detailed galling tests at various temperatures. In addition field tests are also necessary to test the stability of these coatings in a high cycle ultrasonic vibration mode. If awarded, phase 2 of the project would be used to optimize the composition of the deposit material to maximize galling resistance. The industrial partner would then use the coated sonotrode to fabricate builds made of austenitic stainless steel to test the viability of using a coated sonotrode.

  20. Matter inflation with A{sub 4} flavour symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel, CH-4056 Switzerland (Switzerland); Nolde, David, E-mail: stefan.antusch@unibas.ch, E-mail: david.nolde@unibas.ch [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, München, D-80805 Germany (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    We discuss model building in tribrid inflation, which is a framework for realising inflation in the matter sector of supersymmetric particle physics models. The inflaton is a D-flat combination of matter fields, and inflation ends by a phase transition in which some Higgs field obtains a vacuum expectation value. We first describe the general procedure for implementing tribrid inflation in realistic models of particle physics that can be applied to a wide variety of BSM particle physics models around the GUT scale. We then demonstrate how the procedure works for an explicit lepton flavour model based on an A{sub 4} family symmetry. The model is both predictive and phenomenologically viable, and illustrates how tribrid inflation connects cosmological and particle physics parameters. In particular, it predicts a relation between the neutrino Yukawa coupling and the running of the spectral index α{sub s}. We also show how topological defects from the flavour symmetry breaking can be avoided automatically.

  1. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Felix [International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); McGarrie, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). School of Physics and Centre for Theoretical Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.

    2014-04-15

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3){sub F} symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3){sub F} is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3){sub F} breaking.

  2. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brümmer, Felix [SISSA/ISAS,Via Bonomea 265, Trieste I-34136 (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); McGarrie, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); National Institute for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics,and Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg, WITS 2050 (South Africa); Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); CERN Theory Division,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-04-10

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3){sub F} symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3){sub F} is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3){sub F} breaking.

  3. Lepton flavour violating top decays at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Sacha; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Perries, Stéphane; Sordini, Viola

    We consider lepton-flavour violating decays of the top quark, mediated by 4-fermion operators. We compile constraints on a complete set of SU(3) [Formula: see text] U(1)-invariant operators, arising from their loop contributions to rare decays and from HERA's single-top search. The bounds on e-[Formula: see text] flavour change are more restrictive than on [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]; nonetheless the top could decay to a jet [Formula: see text] with a branching ratio of order [Formula: see text]. We estimate that the currently available LHC data (20 fb[Formula: see text] at 8 TeV) could be sensitive to [Formula: see text]+ jet) [Formula: see text], and we extrapolate that 100 fb[Formula: see text] at 13 TeV could reach a sensitivity of [Formula: see text].

  4. $B$ flavour tagging using charm decays at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; 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Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; 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Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is described for tagging the flavour content at production of neutral $B$ mesons in the LHCb experiment. The algorithm exploits the correlation of the flavour of a $B$ meson with the charge of a reconstructed secondary charm hadron from the decay of the other $b$ hadron produced in the proton-proton collision. Charm hadron candidates are identified in a number of fully or partially reconstructed Cabibbo-favoured decay modes. The algorithm is calibrated on the self-tagged decay modes $B^+ \\to J/\\psi \\, K^+$ and $B^0 \\to J/\\psi \\, K^{*0}$ using $3.0\\mathrm{\\,fb}^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment at $pp$ centre-of-mass energies of $7\\mathrm{\\,TeV}$ and $8\\mathrm{\\,TeV}$. Its tagging power on these samples of $B \\to J/\\psi \\, X$ decays is $(0.30 \\pm 0.01 \\pm 0.01) \\%$.

  5. Lepton Flavour Violating Higgs Decays in the (SUSY) Inverse Seesaw

    CERN Document Server

    Arganda, E; Marcano, X; Weiland, C

    2016-01-01

    The observation of charged lepton flavour violation would be a smoking gun for new physics and could help in pinpointing the mechanism at the origin of neutrino masses and mixing. We present here our recent studies of lepton flavour violating Higgs decays in the inverse seesaw and its supersymmetric embedding, two examples of low-scale seesaw mechanisms. We predict branching ratios as large as $10^{-5}$ for the decays $h\\rightarrow \\tau \\mu$ and $h \\rightarrow \\tau e$ in the inverse seesaw, which can be probed in future colliders. Supersymmetric contributions can enhance the branching ratio of $h\\rightarrow \\tau \\mu$ up to $1\\%$, making it large enough to explain the small excess observed by ATLAS and CMS.

  6. Scale-setting, flavour dependence and chiral symmetry restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Binosi, Daniele; Rodriguez-Quintero, Jose

    2016-01-01

    We determine the flavour dependence of the renormalisation-group-invariant running interaction through judicious use of both unquenched Dyson-Schwinger equation and lattice results for QCD's gauge-sector two-point functions. An important step is the introduction of a physical scale setting procedure that enables a realistic expression of the effect of different numbers of active quark flavours on the interaction. Using this running interaction in concert with a well constrained class of dressed--gluon-quark vertices, we estimate the critical number of active lighter-quarks above which dynamical chiral symmetry breaking becomes impossible: $n_f^{\\rm cr}\\approx 9$; and hence in whose neighbourhood QCD is plausibly a conformal theory.

  7. Use of terpenoids as natural flavouring compounds in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Lorenzo; Aprea, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Terpenoids represent the oldest known biomolecules, having been recovered from sediments as old as 2.5 billion years. Among plant secondary metabolites, they are the most abundant and diverse class of natural compounds. The diversity of terpenoids is probably a reflection of their many biological activities in nature, which has made them a widely used resource for traditional and modern human exploitation. They are usually the main constituents of essential oils of most plants offering a wide variety of pleasant scents from flowery to fruity, to woody or balsamic notes. For this reason terpenoids constitute a very important class of compounds for flavour and fragrance industries, in fact, in the US alone, the demand is forecast to grow 3.7 percent per year to $5.3 billion in 2012. The recent patents on production and extraction of terpenoids commonly used as natural flavouring compounds in food industries are reviewed in the present manuscript.

  8. Higgs and flavour as doors to new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    A natural solution to the hierarchy problem of the Fermi scale motivates signals of New Physics at current and near future experiments. After a critical synthesis of this general motivation, we concentrate our attention on the interplay between LHC searches for new resonances, and precision measurements of both Higgs couplings and flavour violating observables. We do so for i) the Higgs sectors of the NMSSM and MSSM, as paradigmatic examples of theories providing extra scalars, and for ii) CKM-like flavour symmetries, with a focus on U(2)^3. This article is mainly based on several papers by the author, but it also reviews other recent related results. Its goal is to provide a synthetic - yet comprehensive orientation on these subjects, at the dawn of several (ATLAS and CMS, LHCb, NA62 etc.) coming experimental results.

  9. Matter inflation with A_4 flavour symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Antusch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We discuss model building in tribrid inflation, which is a framework for realising inflation in the matter sector of supersymmetric particle physics models. The inflaton is a D-flat combination of matter fields, and inflation ends by a phase transition in which some Higgs field obtains a vacuum expectation value. We first describe the general procedure for implementing tribrid inflation in realistic models of particle physics that can be applied to a wide variety of BSM particle physics models around the GUT scale. We then demonstrate how the procedure works for an explicit lepton flavour model based on an A_4 family symmetry. The model is both predictive and phenomenologically viable, and illustrates how tribrid inflation connects cosmological and particle physics parameters. In particular, it predicts a relation between the neutrino Yukawa coupling and the running of the spectral index alpha_s. We also show how topological defects from the flavour symmetry breaking can be avoided automatically.

  10. Flavour-mixing gauge field theory of massive Majorana neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Marsch, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    A gauge-field theory for massive neutral particles is developed on the basis of the real four-component Majorana equation. By use of its spin operator, a purely imaginary representation of the SU(2) algebra can be defined, which gives a covariant derivative that is real. Such a coupling to the gauge field preserves the real nature of the Majorana equation even when including interactions. As the associated isospin is four-dimensional, this procedure introduces four intrinsic degrees of freedom to the Majorana field, which may be related to four flavours. The main aim is to describe here the mathematical possibility for coupling Majorana particles with a gauge field which resembles that of the weak interaction. By adding a fourth member to the family, flavour could become a dynamic trait of the neutral Majorana particles, and thus lead to a dynamic understanding of mixing.

  11. Microbial populations causing off-flavour in recirculated aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Schramm, Edward

    Microbial production of geosmin, a secondary metabolite with an earthy off-flavour is a serious economic problem in wine production, drinking water and aquaculture. Geosmin is produced by a small group of bacteria all harboring the geosmin synthetase gene (geoA). Sequencing and analyzing the dist......Microbial production of geosmin, a secondary metabolite with an earthy off-flavour is a serious economic problem in wine production, drinking water and aquaculture. Geosmin is produced by a small group of bacteria all harboring the geosmin synthetase gene (geoA). Sequencing and analyzing...... and activity. These findings are useful for the future optimization and management of full-scale aquaculture plants, and can be used as a diagnostic tool in developing strategies to limit the presence and growth of geosmin-producing bacteria....

  12. Heavy Flavour Cascade Production in a Beam Dump

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    SHiP will use a 400~GeV/c proton beam impinging on a several interaction length long Molybdenum target. Heavy flavour hadrons produced in the dump can decay semi-leptonically, which can produce both the Heavy Neutral Leptons as signal, but also potential background from muons and neutrinos. The absolute rate of heavy flavour production is taken from measurements. Pythia is used to predict the phase space distribution of the charm and beauty hadrons which are produced both in the primary interaction of the 400~GeV/c proton and in interactions of the secondaries produced in the cascade. The full cascade production of both HNL and background is compared to that reported in the SHiP Technical Proposal, where only the primary $pN$ interactions were taken into account.

  13. New Aspects of Flavour Model Building in Supersymmetric Grand Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Spinrath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We derive predictions for Yukawa coupling ratios within GUTs generated from operators with mass dimension four and five. These relations are a characteristic property of unified flavour models and can reduce the large number of free parameters related to the flavour sector of the SM. The Yukawa couplings of the down-type quarks and charged leptons are affected within SUSY models by tan beta-enhanced threshold corrections. We analyse these corrections and give simple analytic expressions and numerical estimates for them. The threshold corrections sensitively depend on the soft SUSY breaking parameters. Especially, they determine if the affected Yukawa couplings are enhanced or suppressed. In a first approach, we make some plausible assumptions about the soft SUSY parameters. In a second, more sophisticated approach we use three common breaking schemes in which all the soft breaking parameters at the electroweak scale can be calculated from only a handful of parameters. Within this approach, we apply various ph...

  14. PowerPoint Presentations: A Creative Addition to the Research Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Alan E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the requirement of a PowerPoint presentation as part of the research process would benefit students in the following ways: learning how to conduct research; starting their research project sooner; honing presentation and public speaking skills; improving cooperative and social skills; and enhancing technology skills. Outlines the…

  15. Information-Theoretic Capacity and Error Exponents of Stationary Point Processes under Random Additive Displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Anantharam, Venkat

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the Shannon regime for the random displacement of stationary point processes. Let each point of some initial stationary point process in $\\R^n$ give rise to one daughter point, the location of which is obtained by adding a random vector to the coordinates of the mother point, with all displacement vectors independently and identically distributed for all points. The decoding problem is then the following one: the whole mother point process is known as well as the coordinates of some daughter point; the displacements are only known through their law; can one find the mother of this daughter point? The Shannon regime is that where the dimension $n$ tends to infinity and where the logarithm of the intensity of the point process is proportional to $n$. We show that this problem exhibits a sharp threshold: if the sum of the proportionality factor and of the differential entropy rate of the noise is positive, then the probability of finding the right mother point tends to 0 with $n$ for all point...

  16. Predictive flavour symmetries of the neutrino mass matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, M; Kaneko, S; Valle, J W F; Joshipura, Anjan S.

    2007-01-01

    Here we propose an $A_4$ flavour symmetry model which implies a lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay rate, corresponding to an effective mass parameter $M_{ee} \\gsim 0.03$ eV, and a direct correlation between the expected magnitude of CP violation in neutrino oscillations and the value of $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}$, as well as a nearly maximal CP phase $\\delta$.

  17. A Short Guide to Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seung J

    2015-01-01

    We present the invited lectures given at the second Asia-Europe-Pacific School of High-Energy Physics (AEPSHEP), which took place in Puri, India in November 2014. The series of lectures aimed at graduate students in particle experiment/theory, covering the very basics of flavor physics and CP violation, some useful theoretical methods such as OPE and effective field theories, and some selected topics of flavour physics in the era of LHC.

  18. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flavour composition in Soudan 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Border, P. M.; Brooks, C. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Cotton, R. J.; Courant, H.; Demuth, D. M.; Fields, T. H.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garcia-Garcia, C.; Goodman, M. C.; Gray, R. N.; Johns, K.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Leeson, W.; Litchfield, P. J.; Longley, N. P.; Lowe, M. J.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; May, E. N.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, W. H.; Mualem, L.; Napier, A.; Oliver, W.; Pearce, G. F.; Perkins, D. H.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Price, L. E.; Roback, D. M.; Ruddick, K.; Schmid, D. J.; Schneps, J.; Schub, M. H.; Seidlein, R. V.; Shupe, M. A.; Stassinakis, A.; Sundaralingam, N.; Thomas, J.; Thron, J. L.; Vassiliev, V.; Villaume, G.; Wakely, S. P.; Wall, D.; Werkema, S. J.; West, N.; Wielgosz, U. M.

    1997-02-01

    The atmospheric neutrino flavour ratio measured using a 1.52 kton-year exposure of Soudan 2 is found to be 0.72 +/- 0.19+0.05-0.07 relative to the expected value from a Monte Carlo calculation. The possible background of interactions of neutrons and photons produced in muon interactions in the rock surrounding the detector has been investigated and is shown not to produce low values of the ratio.

  19. The supersymmetric Higgs boson with flavoured A-terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brignole

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider a supersymmetric scenario with large flavour violating A-terms in the stop/scharm sector and study their impact on the Higgs mass, the electroweak ρ parameter and the effective Higgs couplings to gluons, photons and charm quarks. For each observable we present explicit analytical expressions which exhibit the relevant parametric dependences, both in the general case and in specific limits. We find significant effects and comment on phenomenological implications for the LHC and future colliders.

  20. Open flavour charmed mesons in a quantum chromodynamics potential model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna Kingkar Pathak; D K Choudhury

    2012-12-01

    We modify the mesonic wave function by using a short distance scale 0 in analogy with hydrogen atom and estimate the values of masses and decay constants of the open flavour charm mesons , $D_{s}$ and $B_{c}$ within the framework of a QCD potential model. We also calculate leptonic decay widths of these mesons to study branching ratios and lifetime. The results are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical values.

  1. Flavour decomposition of electromagnetic transition form factors of nucleon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Segovia, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In Poincar\\'e-covariant continuum treatments of the three valence-quark bound-state problem, the force behind dynamical chiral symmetry breaking also generates nonpointlike, interacting diquark correlations in the nucleon and its resonances. We detail the impact of these correlations on the nucleon's elastic and nucleon-to-Roper transition electromagnetic form factors, providing flavour-separation versions that can be tested at modern facilities.

  2. Flavour in heavy neutrino searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Kittel, O; Valle, J W F

    2012-01-01

    Heavy neutrinos at the TeV scale have been searched for at the LHC in the context of left-right models, under the assumption that they couple to the electron, the muon, or both. We show that current searches are also sensitive to heavy neutrinos coupling predominantly to the tau lepton, and present limits can significantly constrain the parameter space of general flavour mixing.

  3. Role of Strecker aldehydes on beer flavour stability

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, M. P. Guedes de; Ferreira, A. C. Silva

    2005-01-01

    In this work, attempts were made in order to measure the importance of “Strecker aldehydes” on flavour stability of beer correlating chemical and sensory data. It has been observed that methional and phenylacetaldehyde accumulates during storage and that these molecules were well correlated with “Aroma Quality”. A “fresh beer” was spiked with methional, phenylacetaldehyde and also with trans-2-nonenal, singly and in combination, the “Similarity Value” was then determined, betwe...

  4. Analytical Analysis and Numerical Solution of Two Flavours Skyrmion

    CERN Document Server

    Hadi, Miftachul; Hermawanto, Denny

    2010-01-01

    Two flavours Skyrmion will be analyzed analytically, in case of static and rotational Skyrme equations. Numerical solution of a nonlinear scalar field equation, i.e. the Skyrme equation, will be worked with finite difference method. This article is a more comprehensive version of \\textit{SU(2) Skyrme Model for Hadron} which have been published at Journal of Theoretical and Computational Studies, Volume \\textbf{3} (2004) 0407.

  5. The flavour problem and family symmetry beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dziewit, Bartosz; Richter, Monika; Zając, Sebastian; Zrałek, Marek

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of two Higgs doublet model we try to explain the lepton masses and mixing matrix elements assuming that neutrinos are Dirac particles. Discrete family symmetry groups, which are subgroups of U(3) up to the 1025 order are considered. Like in the one Higgs Standard Model, we found that discrete family symmetries do not give satisfactory answer for this basic questions in the flavour problem.

  6. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flavour composition in Soudan 2

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, W W M; Ayres, D S; Barrett, W L; Bode, C; Border, P M; Brooks, C B; Cobb, J H; Cockerill, D J A; Cotton, R J; Courant, H; Demuth, D M; Fields, T H; Gallagher, H R; García-García, C; Goodman, M C; Gray, R N; Johns, K; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M; Leeson, W; Litchfield, P J; Longley, N P; Lowe, M J; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; May, E N; Milburn, R H; Miller, W H; Mualem, L M; Napier, A; Oliver, W; Pearce, G F; Perkins, Donald Hill; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Price, L E; Roback, D M; Ruddick, K; Schmid, D J; Schneps, J; Schub, M H; Seidlein, R V; Shupe, M A; Stassinakis, A; Sundaralingam, N; Thomas, J; Thron, J L; Vasilev, V; Villaume, G; Wakely, S P; Wall, D; Werkema, S J; West, N; Wielgosz, U M

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric neutrino flavour ratio measured using a 1.52 kton-year exposure of Soudan 2 is found to be 0.72 +- 0.19 +0.05 -0.07 relative to the expected value from a Monte Carlo calculation. The possible background of interactions of neutrons and photons produced in muon interactions in the rock surrounding the detector has been investigated and is shown not to produce low values of the ratio.

  7. Violation of lepton flavour universality in composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Niehoff, Christoph; Straub, David M

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether the the $2.6\\sigma$ deviation from lepton flavour universality in $B^+\\to K^+\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays recently observed at the LHCb experiment can be explained in minimal composite Higgs models. We show that a visible departure from universality is indeed possible if left-handed muons have a sizable degree of compositeness. Constraints from $Z$-pole observables are avoided by a custodial protection of the muon coupling.

  8. Determination of dimethyl selenide and dimethyl sulphide compounds causing off-flavours in bottled mineral waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadayol, Marta; Cortina, Montserrat; Guadayol, Josep M; Caixach, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Sales of bottled drinking water have shown a large growth during the last two decades due to the general belief that this kind of water is healthier, its flavour is better and its consumption risk is lower than that of tap water. Due to the previous points, consumers are more demanding with bottled mineral water, especially when dealing with its organoleptic properties, like taste and odour. This work studies the compounds that can generate obnoxious smells, and that consumers have described like swampy, rotten eggs, sulphurous, cooked vegetable or cabbage. Closed loop stripping analysis (CLSA) has been used as a pre-concentration method for the analysis of off-flavour compounds in water followed by identification and quantification by means of GC-MS. Several bottled water with the aforementioned smells showed the presence of volatile dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides, whose concentrations ranged, respectively, from 4 to 20 ng/L and from 1 to 63 ng/L. The low odour threshold concentrations (OTCs) of both organic selenide and sulphide derivatives prove that several objectionable odours in bottled waters arise from them. Microbial loads inherent to water sources, along with some critical conditions in water processing, could contribute to the formation of these compounds. There are few studies about volatile organic compounds in bottled drinking water and, at the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides causing odour problems in bottled waters.

  9. Determination of volatile organic compounds responsible for flavour in cooked river buffalo meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Luccia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavour is an important consumer attractive that directly influences the success of food products on the market. The determination of odorous molecules and their identification allows to useful knowledge for producers to valorise their own products. Buffalo meat has a different chemical composition from pork and beef and requires some cautions in cooking and processing. This work aims at the identification of volatile molecules responsible for flavours in river buffalo meat. The determination was carried out by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME technique and analysed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The most relevant results were the higher odorous impact of buffalo meat and the higher content of sulphide compounds responsible for wild aroma respect to pork and beef. These results were obtained comparing the total area of peaks detected in every chromatogram. We have also found significant differences concerning the contents of pentadecane, 1-hexanol-2 ethyl, butanoic acid, furano-2-penthyl. The origin of volatile organic compounds and their influence on the river buffalo aromas were discussed.

  10. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes.

  11. Chiral order and fluctuations in multi-flavour QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Descotes-Genon, S; Stern, J

    2003-01-01

    Multi-flavour (N_f>=3) Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) may exhibit instabilities due to vacuum fluctuations of sea q-bar q pairs. Keeping the fluctuations small would require a very precise fine-tuning of the low-energy constants L_4 and L_6 to L_4[crit](M_rho) = - 0.51 * 10^(-3), and L_6[crit](M_rho) = - 0.26 * 10^(-3). A small deviation from these critical values -- like the one suggested by the phenomenology of OZI-rule violation in the scalar channel -- is amplified by huge numerical factors inducing large effects of vacuum fluctuations. This would lead in particular to a strong N_f-dependence of chiral symmetry breaking and a suppression of multi-flavour chiral order parameters. A simple resummation is shown to cure the instability of N_f>=3 ChPT, but it modifies the standard expressions of some O(p^2) and O(p^4) low-energy parameters in terms of observables. On the other hand, for r=m_s/m > 15, the two-flavour condensate is not suppressed, due to the contribution induced by massive vacuum s-bar s pair...

  12. Extended Minimal Flavour Violating MSSM and Implications for B Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A

    2001-01-01

    Current world average of the CP asymmetry a(psi K), obtained from the rate differences in the decays B^0 -> (J/psi K_S), (J/psi K_L) and their charge conjugates, is barely compatible with the standard model (SM) predictions resulting from the unitarity of the CKM matrix. Indirect estimate of this CP asymmetry in the so-called minimal flavour violating (MFV) supersymmetric extensions of the standard model, in which the CKM matrix remains the only flavour changing structure, is similar to the one in the SM. If the present experimental trend yielding a(psi K,exp) - a(psi K,SM) d gamma as sensitive probes of the postulated flavour changing structure. This is quantified in terms of the ratio R(rho gamma/K* gamma) = 2 B(B^0 -> rho^0 gamma)/B(B^0 -> K^*0 gamma), the isospin violating ratio Delta=B(B^+ -> rho^+ gamma)/2B(B^0 -> rho^0 gamma) -1, and the CP-asymmetry in the decay rates for B^+ -> rho^+ gamma and its charge conjugate.

  13. A Bio-Inspired Herbal Tea Flavour Assessment Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Zawatil Isqi Zakaria

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Herbal-based products are becoming a widespread production trend among manufacturers for the domestic and international markets. As the production increases to meet the market demand, it is very crucial for the manufacturer to ensure that their products have met specific criteria and fulfil the intended quality determined by the quality controller. One famous herbal-based product is herbal tea. This paper investigates bio-inspired flavour assessments in a data fusion framework involving an e-nose and e-tongue. The objectives are to attain good classification of different types and brands of herbal tea, classification of different flavour masking effects and finally classification of different concentrations of herbal tea. Two data fusion levels were employed in this research, low level data fusion and intermediate level data fusion. Four classification approaches; LDA, SVM, KNN and PNN were examined in search of the best classifier to achieve the research objectives. In order to evaluate the classifiers’ performance, an error estimator based on k-fold cross validation and leave-one-out were applied. Classification based on GC-MS TIC data was also included as a comparison to the classification performance using fusion approaches. Generally, KNN outperformed the other classification techniques for the three flavour assessments in the low level data fusion and intermediate level data fusion. However, the classification results based on GC-MS TIC data are varied.

  14. A Grand Delta(96) x SU(5) Flavour Model

    CERN Document Server

    King, Stephen F; Stuart, Alexander J

    2012-01-01

    Recent results from the Daya Bay and RENO reactor experiments have measured the smallest lepton mixing angle and found it to have a value of theta_13 approximately 9 degrees. This result presents a new challenge for the existing paradigms of discrete flavour symmetries which attempt to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. Here we propose a Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory of Flavour based on Delta(96) x SU(5), together with a U(1) x Z3 symmetry, including a full discussion of Delta(96) in a convenient basis. The Grand Delta(96) x SU(5) Flavour Model relates the quark mixing angles and masses in the form of the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin relation and realises the Georgi-Jarlskog mass relations between the charged leptons and down-type quarks. We predict a Bi-trimaximal (not Tri-bimaximal) form of neutrino mixing matrix, which, after including charged lepton corrections with zero phase, leads to the following GUT scale predictions for the atmospheric, solar, and reactor mixing angles: theta_23=36...

  15. Hints for new sources of flavour violation in meson mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The recent results by the Fermilab Lattice and MILC collaborations on the hadronic matrix elements entering $B_{d,s}-\\bar B_{d,s}$ mixing show a significant tension of the measured values of the mass differences $\\Delta M_{d,s}$ with their SM predictions. We review the implications of these results in the context of Constrained Minimal Flavour Violation models. In these models, the CKM elements $\\gamma$ and $|V_{ub}|/|V_{cb}|$ can be determined from $B_{d,s}-\\bar B_{d,s}$ mixing observables, yielding a prediction for $\\gamma$ below its tree-level value. Determining subsequently $|V_{cb}|$ from the measured value of either $\\Delta M_s$ or $\\varepsilon_K$ gives inconsistent results, with the tension being smallest in the Standard Model limit. This tension can be resolved if the flavour universality of new contributions to $\\Delta F = 2$ observables is broken. We briefly discuss the case of $U(2)^3$ flavour models as an illustrative example.

  16. Kadanoff–Baym approach to flavour mixing and oscillations in resonant leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhupal Dev, P.S. [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Millington, Peter [Physik Department T70, James-Franck-Straße, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Pilaftsis, Apostolos [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Teresi, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.teresi@manchester.ac.uk [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    We describe a loopwise perturbative truncation scheme for quantum transport equations in the Kadanoff–Baym formalism, which does not necessitate the use of the so-called Kadanoff–Baym or quasi-particle ansaetze for dressed propagators. This truncation scheme is used to study flavour effects in the context of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL), showing explicitly that, in the weakly-resonant regime, there exist two distinct and pertinent flavour effects in the heavy-neutrino sector: (i) the resonant mixing and (ii) the oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours. Moreover, we illustrate that Kadanoff–Baym and quasi-particle ansaetze, whilst appropriate for the flavour-singlet dressed charged-lepton and Higgs propagators of the RL scenario, should not be applied to the dressed heavy-neutrino propagators. The use of these approximations for the latter is shown to capture only flavour oscillations, whilst discarding the separate phenomenon of flavour mixing.

  17. Kadanoff–Baym approach to flavour mixing and oscillations in resonant leptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Bhupal Dev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a loopwise perturbative truncation scheme for quantum transport equations in the Kadanoff–Baym formalism, which does not necessitate the use of the so-called Kadanoff–Baym or quasi-particle ansaetze for dressed propagators. This truncation scheme is used to study flavour effects in the context of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL, showing explicitly that, in the weakly-resonant regime, there exist two distinct and pertinent flavour effects in the heavy-neutrino sector: (i the resonant mixing and (ii the oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours. Moreover, we illustrate that Kadanoff–Baym and quasi-particle ansaetze, whilst appropriate for the flavour-singlet dressed charged-lepton and Higgs propagators of the RL scenario, should not be applied to the dressed heavy-neutrino propagators. The use of these approximations for the latter is shown to capture only flavour oscillations, whilst discarding the separate phenomenon of flavour mixing.

  18. Kadanoff-Baym Approach to Flavour Mixing and Oscillations in Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    We describe a loopwise perturbative truncation scheme for quantum transport equations in the Kadanoff-Baym formalism, which does not necessitate the use of the so-called Kadanoff-Baym or quasi-particle ansaetze for dressed propagators. This truncation scheme is used to study flavour effects in the context of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL), showing explicitly that, in the weakly-resonant regime, there exist two distinct and pertinent flavour effects in the heavy-neutrino sector: (i) the resonant mixing and (ii) the oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours. Moreover, we illustrate that Kadanoff-Baym and quasi-particle ansaetze, whilst appropriate for the flavour-singlet dressed charged-lepton and Higgs propagators of the RL scenario, should not be applied to the dressed heavy-neutrino propagators. The use of these approximations for the latter is shown to capture only flavour oscillations, whilst discarding the separate phenomenon of flavour mixing.

  19. Process for improving mechanical properties of epoxy resins by addition of cobalt ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A resin product useful as an adhesive, composite or casting resin is described as well as the process used in its preparation to improve its flexural strength mechanical property characteristics. Improved flexural strength is attained with little or no change in density, thermal stability or moisture resistance by chemically incorporating 1.2% to 10.6% by weight Co(3) ions in an epoxidized resin system.

  20. Poly(ether ester) Ionomers as Water-Soluble Polymers for Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkanen, Allison M; Zawaski, Callie; Stevenson, André T; Dickerman, Ross; Whittington, Abby R; Williams, Christopher B; Long, Timothy E

    2017-03-28

    Water-soluble polymers as sacrificial supports for additive manufacturing (AM) facilitate complex features in printed objects. Few water-soluble polymers beyond poly(vinyl alcohol) enable material extrusion AM. In this work, charged poly(ether ester)s with tailored rheological and mechanical properties serve as novel materials for extrusion-based AM at low temperatures. Melt transesterification of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, 8k) and dimethyl 5-sulfoisophthalate afforded poly(ether ester)s of sufficient molecular weight to impart mechanical integrity. Quantitative ion exchange provided a library of poly(ether ester)s with varying counterions, including both monovalent and divalent cations. Dynamic mechanical and tensile analysis revealed an insignificant difference in mechanical properties for these polymers below the melting temperature, suggesting an insignificant change in final part properties. Rheological analysis, however, revealed the advantageous effect of divalent countercations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+)) in the melt state and exhibited an increase in viscosity of two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, time-temperature superposition identified an elevation in modulus, melt viscosity, and flow activation energy, suggesting intramolecular interactions between polymer chains and a higher apparent molecular weight. In particular, extrusion of poly(PEG8k-co-CaSIP) revealed vast opportunities for extrusion AM of well-defined parts. The unique melt rheological properties highlighted these poly(ether ester) ionomers as ideal candidates for low-temperature material extrusion additive manufacturing of water-soluble parts.