WorldWideScience

Sample records for additives flavourings processing

  1. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 3 (FGE.10Rev3): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing an additional oxygenated functional group and lactones from chemical groups 9, 13 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 63 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, including additional two substances in this Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission R...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered. For four substances evaluated through the Procedure, the stereoisomeric composition has not been specified sufficiently....

  2. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids) , 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 65, Revisio n 1 (FGE.65Rev1 ) : Consideration of sulfur - substituted furan derivatives used as flavouring agents evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to a subgroup of substances within the group of ‘ Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side - chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14’ evaluated by JECFA in FGE.13Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 33 substances, the information is adequate....

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 201Rev1: 2-Alkylated, aliphatic, acyclic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and precursors, with or without additional double-bonds, from chemical subgroup 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 1 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 201, the additional data on genotoxicity submitted by the Industry on two substances, 2-methylpent-2-enal....... The Panel therefore concluded that further data are required in order to clarify the genotoxic potential of this subgroup. The Panel considers the Comet assay with [FL-no: 05.095] as test material and performed on liver, blood and first site of contact, as a preferred option to further investigate...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 13, Revision 2 (FGE.13 Rev2) Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side-chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 27 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 13, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Three of the su...... of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 24 flavouring substances evaluated through the Procedure....

  5. Impact of sterile neutrinos in lepton flavour violating processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Romeri, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    We discuss charged lepton flavour violating processes occurring in minimal extensions of the Standard Model via the addition of sterile fermions. We firstly investigate the possibility of their indirect detection at a future high-luminosity Z-factory (such as FCC-ee). Rare decays such as Z → l 1 ± l 2 ± can indeed be complementary to low-energy (high-intensity) observables of lepton flavour violation. We further consider a sterile neutrino-induced charged lepton flavour violating process occurring in the presence of muonic atoms: their (Coulomb enhanced) decay into a pair of electrons μ¯e¯ → e¯e¯. Our study reveals that, depending on their mass range and on the active-sterile mixing angles, sterile neutrinos can give significant contributions to the above mentioned observables, some of them even lying within present and future sensitivity of dedicated cLFV experiments and of FCC-ee.

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 8, Revision 3 (FGE.08Rev3): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical groups 20 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 70 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. For the substan......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for eightteen substances information on specifications is lacking....

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 5 (FGE.08Rev5): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical groups 20 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since the publi...... substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for three substances, evaluated through the Procedure, information on the specifications is lacking....

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 303 (FGE.303): Spilanthol from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    is not considered sufficient to evaluate chronic effects of the substance. Accordingly, additional data are required for the candidate substance. According to the practice of the Panel, a minimum requirement to provide an adequate NOAEL for flavourings in the Procedure is a 90-day study. In order to determine......The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, Revision 1: Bi- and tricyclic secondary, ketones and related esters from chemical groups 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate six flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, including an additional two substances in this Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commissi...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity fo the materials of commerce have been provided for all six candidate substances....

  10. Lepton flavour violating processes in an S_3-symmetric model

    CERN Document Server

    Mondragón, A; Peinado, E

    2008-01-01

    A variety of lepton flavour violating effects related to the recent discovery of neutrino oscillations and mixings is here systematically discussed in terms of an S_3-flavour permutational symmetry. After presenting some relevant results on lepton masses and mixings, previously derived in a minimal S_3-invariant extension of the Standard Model, we compute the branching ratios of some selected flavour-changing neutral current processes (FCNC) as well as the contribution of the exchange of neutral flavour-changing scalar to the anomaly of the magnetic moment of the muon. We found that the minimal S_3-invariant extension of the Standard Model describes successfully masses and mixings, as well as, all flavour changing neutral current processes in excellent agreement with experiment.

  11. Flavon-induced connections between lepton flavour mixing and charged lepton flavour violation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Pascoli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In leptonic flavour models with discrete flavour symmetries, couplings between flavons and leptons can result in special flavour structures after they gain vacuum expectation values. At the same time, they can also contribute to the other lepton-flavour-violating processes. We study the flavon-induced LFV 3-body charged lepton decays and radiative decays and we take as example the $A_4$ discrete symmetry. In $A_4$ models, a $Z_3$ residual symmetry roughly holds in the charged lepton sector for the realisation of tri-bimaximal mixing at leading order. The only processes allowed by this symmetry are $\\tau^-\\to \\mu^+ e^- e^-, e^+ \\mu^- \\mu^-$, and the other 3-body and all radiative decays are suppressed by small $Z_3$-breaking effects. These processes also depend on the representation the flavon is in, whether pseudo-real (case i) or complex (case ii). We calculate the decay rates for all processes for each case and derive their strong connection with lepton flavour mixing. In case i, sum rules for the branching...

  12. S_3-flavour symmetry as realized in lepton flavour violating processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mondragón, A; Peinado, E

    2007-01-01

    A variety of lepton flavour violating effects related to the recent discovery of neutrino oscillations and mixings is here systematically discussed in terms of an S_3-flavour permutational symmetry. After a brief review of some relevant results on lepton masses and mixings, that had been derived in the framework of a Minimal S_3-Invariant Extension of the Standard Model, we derive explicit analytical expressions for the matrices of the Yukawa couplings and compute the branching ratios of some selected flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) processes, as well as, the contribution of the exchange of neutral flavour changing scalars to the anomaly of the muon's magnetic moment as functions of the masses of the charged leptons and the neutral Higgs bosons. We find that the S_3 x Z_2 flavour symmetry and the strong mass hierarchy of the charged leptons strongly suppress the FCNC processes in the leptonic sector well below the present experimental upper bounds by many orders of magnitude. The contribution of FCNC ...

  13. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4 (FGE.08Rev4): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical groups 20 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .116, 12.120, 12.164, 12.167, 12.199, 15.007, 15.102 and 15.125 and 15.134], evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  14. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 3 (FGE.17Rev3): Pyrazine derivatives from chemical group 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 28 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, including seven additional substances considered in this Revision 3, using the Procedure in...... substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for one substance [FL-no: 14.102], the composition of mixture has not been specified sufficiently....

  15. Relationships between volatile and non-volatile metabolites and attributes of processed potato flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Wayne L; Shepherd, Tom; Verrall, Susan R; McNicol, James W; Taylor, Mark A

    2010-10-01

    Although the flavour of processed potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) is important to consumers, the blend of volatile and non-volatile metabolites that impact on flavour attributes is not well-defined. Additionally, it is important to understand how potato flavour changes during storage. In this study, quantitative descriptive analysis of potato samples by a trained taste panel was undertaken, comparing tubers from S. tuberosum group Phureja with those from S. tuberosum group Tuberosum, both at harvest and following storage. The cooked tuber volatile profile was analysed by solid phase micro extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis in sub-samples of the tubers that were assessed by taste panels. A range of non-volatile metabolites including the major umami compounds, glycoalkaloids and sugars was also measured in tuber sub-samples. Correlation and principal component analyses revealed differences between the potato cultivars and storage conditions and demonstrated associations of metabolites with the different sensory attributes. PMID:20678781

  16. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 216, Revision 1 (FGE.216Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated 2-Phenyl -2-Alkenals from Subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of five flavouring substances from subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19. In the Flavouring Group Evaluation 216 (FGE.216) additional genotoxicity...

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 50, Revision 1 (FGE.50Rev1): Consideration of pyrazine derivatives evaluated by JECFA (57th meeting) structurally related to pyrazine derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.17Rev2 (2010)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Adequate specifications for the materials of commerce are available for all 41 flavouring substances....

  18. Green tea flavour determinants and their changes over manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Rana, Mohammad M; Liu, Guo-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Da-Xiang; Wu, Fu-Guang; Li, Xin-Bao; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Flavour determinants in tea infusions and their changes during manufacturing processes were studied using Camellia sinensis cultivars 'Bai-Sang Cha' ('BAS') possessing significant floral scents and 'Fuding-Dabai Cha' ('FUD') with common green tea odour. Metabolite profiling based on odour activity threshold revealed that 'BAS' contained higher levels of the active odorants β-ionone, linalool and its two oxides, geraniol, epoxylinalool, decanal and taste determinant catechins than 'FUD' (pmanufacturing processes, the levels of linalool and geraniol decreased whereas those of β-ionone, linalool oxides, indole and cis-jasmone increased. Compared with pan-fire treatment, steam treatment reduced the levels of catechins and proportion of geraniol, linalool and its derivatives, consequently, reducing catechin-related astringency and monoterpenol-related floral scent. Our study suggests that flavour determinant targeted modulation could be made through genotype and manufacturing improvements. PMID:27374591

  19. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 4 (FGE.21Rev4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 59 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision i...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 41 candidate substances...

  20. Green tea flavour determinants and their changes over manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Rana, Mohammad M; Liu, Guo-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Da-Xiang; Wu, Fu-Guang; Li, Xin-Bao; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Flavour determinants in tea infusions and their changes during manufacturing processes were studied using Camellia sinensis cultivars 'Bai-Sang Cha' ('BAS') possessing significant floral scents and 'Fuding-Dabai Cha' ('FUD') with common green tea odour. Metabolite profiling based on odour activity threshold revealed that 'BAS' contained higher levels of the active odorants β-ionone, linalool and its two oxides, geraniol, epoxylinalool, decanal and taste determinant catechins than 'FUD' (psteam treatment reduced the levels of catechins and proportion of geraniol, linalool and its derivatives, consequently, reducing catechin-related astringency and monoterpenol-related floral scent. Our study suggests that flavour determinant targeted modulation could be made through genotype and manufacturing improvements.

  1. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 82, Revision 1 (FGE.82Rev1): Consideration of Epoxides evaluated by the JECFA (65 th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for four substances, the information is adequate; but for the substance [FL-no: 07.170] further information on stereoisomerism is required....

  2. In vivo monitoring of strawberry flavour release from model custards: effect of texture and oral processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprea, E.; Biasioli, F.; Gasperi, F.; Tilmann, M.D.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of oral processing protocols and food texture on in vivo flavour release was evaluated by nose-space analysis. Nose-space analysis was carried out by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, and strawberry-flavoured custards were prepared with 0.1% (w/w) and 1.0% (w/w) carboxymeth

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 309 (FGE.309): Sodium Diacetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate sodium diacetate [FL-no: 16.073] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 309, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. However, although...

  4. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 1 (FGE.77Rev1): Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... toxicological data are still required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been evaluated, and the information is considered adequate for all the substances....

  5. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4): primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters from chemical groups 1 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 12 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4), including two additional substances, using the Procedure in Commission...... of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 12 candidate substances....

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 51, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to alicyclic ketones secondary alcohols and related esters in FGE.09Rev3 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 20 substances, the information is adequate....

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2 (FGE.10Rev2): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing an additional oxygenated functional group and lactones from chemical groups 9, 13 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    . The Panel concluded that the 61 substances do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. For four...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 16 substances, the information is adequate....

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 86, Revision 2 (FGE.86Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA (65th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), and to decide whether further eva...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 30 substances, the information is adequate....

  10. Food contact materials, flavouring substances and smoke flavourings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel K-H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The EFSA Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC Panel and the subsequent Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF Panel have undertaken evaluations of the safety of flavourings (both chemically defined substances and mixtures such as smoke flavourings and food contact materials (FCM, as well as assessments on other substances used in food. The major progress in methodologies for the evaluation of the safety of these substances is highlighted in this article. By December 2011, scientific opinions had been adopted for 247 substances for food contact materials, mainly plastics. Adoption of a series of opinions on active and/or intelligent packaging substances and on recycling processes of plastics is planned between July 2012 and December 2013. Panel opinions, EFSA statements/reports and guidance documents were published on specific issues and on substances for which there was an urgent request for safety evaluation (for example isopropylthioxanthone (ITX, bisphenol A (BPA, phthalates, epoxidised soybean oil (ESBO, benzophenone and 4-methylbenzophenone. By 2009, the AFC and CEF Panels had completed the safety review of 2 067 flavourings substances used in the EU. Additional data, which were requested for 404 substances, are currently under evaluation or have been generated. Eleven smoke flavourings have been evaluated, and the CEF Panel has prepared a guidance document on the future data required for the evaluation of flavourings.

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 22, Revision 1 (FGE.22Rev1): Ring substituted phenolic substances from chemical groups 21 and 25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 28 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 22, Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substance 3...... concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Adequate specifications for the materials of commerce are available for all 27 flavouring substances evaluated through the Procedure....

  12. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 2 (FGE.25Rev2): Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from chemical group 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 37 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the sub...... assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. For five substances, the composition of the stereoisomeric mixture has to be specified further....

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 72, Revision 1 (FGE.72Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic, branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids, and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (61st meeting) structurally related to branched- and straight-chain unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of these and straight-chain aliphatic saturated alcohols evaluated by EFSA in FGE.05Rev2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further......” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 23 substances, the information is adequate...

  14. EFSA Panel on F ood Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 63, Revision 2 (FGE.63Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59 th and 6 9 th meeting s ) structurally related to saturated and unsaturated aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and esters of secondary alcohols and saturated linear or branched - chain carboxylic acids evaluated by EFSA in FGE.07 Rev4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 20 substances, the information is adequate. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  15. Applied biocatalysis for the synthesis of natural flavour compounds--current industrial processes and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, J; Etschmann, M M W; Sell, D; Hilmer, J M; Rabenhorst, J

    2004-03-01

    The industrial application of biocatalysis for the production of natural flavour compounds is illustrated by a discussion of the production of vanillin, gamma-decalactone, carboxylic acids, C6 aldehydes and alcohols ('green notes'), esters, and 2-phenylethanol. Modern techniques of molecular biology and process engineering, such as heterologous expression of genes, site-directed mutagenesis, whole-cell biocatalysis in biphasic systems, and cofactor regeneration for in vitro oxygenation, may result in more biocatalytic processes for the production of flavour compounds in the future. PMID:15127786

  16. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 3 (FGE.74Rev3): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally related to Aliphatic and Alicyclic Mono-, Di-, Tri-, and Polysulphides with or wi thout Additional Oxygenated Functional Groups from Chemical Group 20 evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    concluded that they would pose “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered for the substances evaluated through...

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 2 (FGE.73Rev2). Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev3 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 18 substances, the information is adequate....

  18. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2): Primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, acid, and esters from chemical group 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    in the Member States. In particular, the Panel was requested to evaluate nine flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2), using the Procedure as referred to in the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. These nine flavouring substances belong to chemical group 7...... group 7. Seven of the nine flavouring substances possess one or more chiral centres and additionally, and due to the presence of a double bond, one of these substances can exist as geometric isomer. For two of these substances, the stereoisomeric composition has not been specified. The nine flavouring...... substances [FL-no: 02.134, 02.186, 08.135, 09.342, 09.670 and 09.829] more reliable exposure data are required. On the basis of such additional data, these flavouring substances should be reconsidered along the steps of the Procedure. Following this procedure additional toxicological data might become...

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); ScientificOpinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 205, (FGE.205): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 13 α,β-unsaturated aliphatic ketones with terminal double bonds and precursors from

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 205, the additional data on genotoxicity submitted by the Industry on two representative substances, oct-1-en-3-one [FL...... on the first site of contact (e.g. the stomach) and on the liver is requested on the most potent of the representative substances, pent-1-en-3-one....

  20. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 87, Revision 2 (FGE.87Rev2): Consideration of bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.47Rev1 (2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered for the substances evaluated through the Procedure and for all 19 substances, the information is adequate....

  1. Additive Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Duvenaud, David; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a Gaussian process model of functions which are additive. An additive function is one which decomposes into a sum of low-dimensional functions, each depending on only a subset of the input variables. Additive GPs generalize both Generalized Additive Models, and the standard GP models which use squared-exponential kernels. Hyperparameter learning in this model can be seen as Bayesian Hierarchical Kernel Learning (HKL). We introduce an expressive but tractable parameterization of the kernel function, which allows efficient evaluation of all input interaction terms, whose number is exponential in the input dimension. The additional structure discoverable by this model results in increased interpretability, as well as state-of-the-art predictive power in regression tasks.

  2. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 3 (FGE.11Rev3): Aliphatic dialcohols, diketones, and hydroxyketones from chemical groups 8 and 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 11 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substances ......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all candidate substances....

  3. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 300, Revision 1 (FGE.300Rev1): One cyclo-aliphatic amide from chemical group 33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate a flavouring substance,cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-cyclohexyl)-amide [FL-no: 16.115] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 300, Revision...... of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have been provided for the candidate substance....

  4. Towards the identification of new physics through quark flavour violating processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Andrzej J; Girrbach, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    We outline a systematic strategy that should help in this decade to identify new physics (NP) beyond the standard model (SM) by means of quark flavour violating processes, and thereby extend the picture of short distance physics down to scales as short as 10(-20) m and even shorter distance scales corresponding to energies of 100 TeV. Rather than using all of the possible flavour-violating observables that will be measured in the coming years at the LHC, SuperKEKB and in Kaon physics dedicated experiments at CERN, J-PARC and Fermilab, we concentrate on those observables that are theoretically clean and very sensitive to NP. Assuming that the data on the selected observables will be very precise, we stress the importance of correlations between these observables as well as of future precise calculations of non-perturbative parameters by means of lattice QCD simulations with dynamical fermions. Our strategy consists of twelve steps, which we will discuss in detail while illustrating the possible outcomes with the help of the SM, models with constrained minimal flavour violation (CMFV), MFV at large and models with tree-level flavour changing neutral currents mediated by neutral gauge bosons and scalars. We will also briefly summarize the status of a number of concrete models. We propose DNA charts that exhibit correlations between flavour observables in different NP scenarios. Models with new left-handed and/or right-handed currents and non-MFV interactions can be distinguished transparently in this manner. We emphasize the important role of the stringent CMFV relations between various observables as standard candles of flavour physics. The pattern of deviations from these relations may help in identifying the correct NP scenario. The success of this program will be very much facilitated through direct signals of NP at the LHC, even if the LHC will not be able to probe the physics at scales shorter than 4 × 10(-20) m. We also emphasize the importance of lepton

  5. Flavour characterization of fresh and processed pennywort (Centella asiatica L.) juices

    OpenAIRE

    Wongfhun, Pronprapa; Gordon, Michael Harry; Apichartsrangkoon, Arunee

    2010-01-01

    The flavour characteristics of fresh and processed pennywort juices treated by pasteurization, sterilization and high pressure processing (HPP) were investigated by using solid-phase micro-extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons comprised the major class of volatile components present and the juices had a characteristic smell due to the presence of volatile compounds including β-caryophyllene, humulene, E-β-farnesene, α-copaene, alloaromadendr...

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Flavouring Group Evaluation 46, Revision 1 (FGE.46Rev1): Ammonia and three ammonium salts from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... or optical isomers. Two of the flavouring substances are classified into structural class I and two are classified into structural class III according to the decision tree approach presented by Cramer et al. (1978). The flavouring substance ammonia in the present group has been reported to occur naturally...... substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured at the use...

  7. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids ), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 200 (FGE.200): 74 α , β -unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 1.1.1 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 74 flavouring substances from subgroup 1.1.1 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 200 (FGE.200). The Flavour Industry has...... remains with respect to genotoxicity for the substances of this subgroup and their three representative substances. The Panel confirms, the need for an in vivo Comet assay performed in duodenum and liver for hex-2(trans)-enal [FL-no: 05.073]. For the two other representative substances of subgroup 1...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 226 (FGE.226): Consideration of genotoxicity data on one α,β-unsaturated aldehyde from chemical subgroup 1.1.1(b) of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance from subgroup 1.1.1(b) of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 226. The Flavour Industry has provi...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials , Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 224 (FGE.224): Consideration of genotoxic potential for two α,β - unsaturated thiophenes from subgroup 5.2 of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of two flavouring substances from subgroup 5.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 224 (FGE.224). The Flavour Industry has...

  10. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 310 (FGE.310): Rebaudioside A from chemical group 30

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Lund, Pia; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2011-01-01

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate rebaudioside A [FL-no: 16.113], a steviol glycoside. The substance was not considered to have genotoxic potential. Since a comprehensive and adequate toxicological database, including human studies, is available for steviol glycosides, the Panel based its evaluation of rebaudioside A on a comparison of the ADI of 4 mg/kg bw, expressed as steviol, establ...

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 96 (FGE.96): Consideration of 88 flavouring substances considered by EFSA for which EU production volumes / anticipated production volumes have been submitted on request by DG SANCO. Addendum to FGE. 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 68, 69, 70, 71, 73, 76, 77, 79, 80, 83, 84, 85 and 87

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... of commerce have also been considered and for eight stereoisomeric substances [FL-no: 06.040, 08.073, 09.371, 09.780, 10.050, 13.060, 13.161 and 16.039], the stereoisomeric composition has to be specified further....

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 91, Re vision 2 (FGE.91Rev2): Consid eration of simple aliphatic and aromatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 68th meetings) structurally related to aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    related substance. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 44 substances, the information is adequate. For candidate substance 3-(methylthio)heptenal [FL-no: 12.273], which contains 5 to7 % of an α......,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 2-(E)-heptenal, with a possible genotoxic potential, the Panel cannot conclude that the material of commerce for this candidate substance is not of safety concern, until either this component is cleared with respect to a concern for genotoxicity, or this component is removed from the commercial...

  13. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia;

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied...

  14. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 301 (FGE.301): A sulphur substituted pyrimidin-derivative and its hydrochloride salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate two flavouring substances, 4-amino-5,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2(1H)-one [FL-no: 16.116] and 4-amino-5,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2(1H)-one...

  15. Experimental constraints from flavour changing processes and physics beyond the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersabeck, M.; Gligorov, V. V.; Serra, N.

    2012-08-01

    Flavour physics has a long tradition of paving the way for direct discoveries of new particles and interactions. Results over the last decade have placed stringent bounds on the parameter space of physics beyond the Standard Model. Early results from the LHC, and its dedicated flavour factory LHCb, have further tightened these constraints and reiterate the ongoing relevance of flavour studies. The experimental status of flavour observables in the charm and beauty sectors is reviewed in measurements of CP violation, neutral meson mixing, and measurements of rare decays.

  16. Experimental constraints from flavour changing processes and physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersabeck, M.; Gligorov, V.V. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Serra, N. [University of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-15

    Flavour physics has a long tradition of paving the way for direct discoveries of new particles and interactions. Results over the last decade have placed stringent bounds on the parameter space of physics beyond the Standard Model. Early results from the LHC, and its dedicated flavour factory LHCb, have further tightened these constraints and reiterate the ongoing relevance of flavour studies. The experimental status of flavour observables in the charm and beauty sectors is reviewed in measurements of CP violation, neutral meson mixing, and measurements of rare decays. (orig.)

  17. EFSA CEF Penal (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2 (FGE.212Rev2): α,β-Unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 24 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2. The Panel concluded in ...

  18. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 213, Revision 1 (FGE.213Rev1): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α , β -Unsaturated Alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 26 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.7 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 213. In the first version of FGE.213 the...

  19. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 93, Revision 1 (FGE.93Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    and agrees with the JECFA conclusion, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all five substances...

  20. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 76, Revision 1 (FGE.76Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    as flavouring substances, as these substances could not be evaluated because of concern with respect to genotoxicity. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 26 substances, the information is adequate....

  1. Gauged Lepton Flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, R; Gavela, M B; Grinstein, B; Merlo, L; Quilez, P

    2016-01-01

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; requiring in addition a phenomenologically viable setup leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplings are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavor Violation. In all cases, the $\\mu-\\tau$ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.

  2. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 24, Revision 2 (FGE.24Rev2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 24 candidate substances....

  3. Reduction of Saltiness and Acrylamide Levels in Palm Sugar-Like Flavouring through Buffer Modification and the Addition of Calcium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Aida Wan Mustapha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO4 buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of the level found in original PSLF. A further decrease (~25% in the sodium content was achieved by removing monobasic sodium phosphate (NaH2PO4 from the buffer system. Meanwhile, the addition of CaCl2 at 20–40 mg/L reduced the acrylamide content in PSLF by as much as 58%. A CaCl2 concentration of 20 mg/mL was most favourable as it most efficiently suppressed acrylamide formation while providing an acceptably high flavour yield in PSLF. In view of the high acrylamide content in PSLF, additional work is necessary to further reduce the amount of acrylamide by controlling the asparagine concentration in the precursor mixture.

  4. Reconciling $(g-2)_\\mu$ and charged lepton flavour violating processes through a doubly charged scalar

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabortty, Joydeep; Mondal, Subhadeep; Srivastava, Tripurari

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the phenomenological consequences of a doubly charged scalar which may belong to different uncoloured scalar multiplets. This doubly charged scalar couples to the charged leptons as well as gauge bosons, which we parametrize in a model independent way. Restricting ourselves in the regime of conserved charged-parity (CP), we assume only a few non-zero Yukawa couplings ($y_{\\mu \\ell}$, where $\\ell=e,\\mu,\\tau$) between the doubly charged scalar and the charged leptons. Our choices allow the doubly charged scalar to impinge low-energy processes like anomalous magnetic moment of muon and a few possible charged lepton flavour violating (CLFV) processes. These same Yukawa couplings are also instrumental in producing same-sign di-lepton signatures at the LHC. In this article we examine the impact of individual contributions from the diagonal and off-diagonal Yukawa couplings in the light of muon $(g-2)$ excess. Subsequently, we use the derived information to inquire the possible CLFV proc...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 3 (FGE.21Rev3): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .092, 15.093, 15.094, 15.096, 15.097, 15.106, 15.107, 15.129 and 15.135] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 2 (FEG.17Rev2): Pyrazine derivatives from chemical group 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. For the remaining substance [FL-no: 14.052] additional toxicity data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for two substances...

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 300 (FGE.300): One cyclo-aliphatic amide from chemical group 33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    that for the substance [FL-no: 16.115] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of this flavouring substance, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. The composition of the stereoisomeric...

  8. Meat flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the consumer, meat is characterized by a certain number of organoleptic qualities; among them, flavour -that is to say the association of both odour and taste- plays a leading part. This property is based upon a great number of chemical components: some volatile components are responsible for the aroma and some non-volatile ones for the taste. These substances are either made or released during the heating of the meat on account of components called precursors which are produced during the aging of the meat. The two main reactions which preside over the elaboration of flavour are: the Maillard's reaction and the autooxidation reactions. Meat flavour is associated with the animal characteristics; it is influenced by the ante- and post mortem treatments as well as by the technological treatments for storing it. The use of synthetical flavours is to be considered as possible in the future

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 Revision 1 (FGE.208Rev1): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the a,b-unsaturation in ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of flavouring substances from subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 Revision 1 (FGE.208Rev1). The Flavour Industry has provided additional...... genotoxicity studies on p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al [FL-no: 05.117], the representative substance for FGE.19 subgroup 2.2. This substance was tested in vivo in a combined micronucleus assay in bone marrow and Comet assay in liver and duodenum. It did not induce any increase in micronucleated polychromatic...... erythrocytes of the bone marrow of male rats in the micronucleus test and it did not induce DNA damage in duodenum of the same animals as analysed by the Comet assay. The Comet assay performed in liver shows a positive result and therefore the Panel concluded that p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al [FL-no: 05...

  10. EFSA EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 304 (FGE.304): Five carboxamides from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all five candidate substances....

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 305 (FGE.305): L - Methionylglycine of chemical group 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    use in foods that are not heated or intended to be heated. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the material of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have...

  12. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2 (FGE.21Rev2): Thiazoles, thiophene, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical group 29. Miscellaneous substances from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 56 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Seven of the su...... of commerce have also been considered. For two substances are an identity test lacking and for one has the stereoisomeric composition to be specified....

  13. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 18, Revision 2 (FGE.18Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols, aromatic tertiary alcohols and their esters from chemical groups 6 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 32 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 18, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the sub......, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for six substances information is lacking....

  14. Flavour Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    奎斯特国际有限公司

    2004-01-01

    @@ A good flavour must taste realistic and natural as well as performing under tough conditions, says Mairi Coia. In conjunction with texture or mouthfeel, flavour is the most important aspect of food. It is the one thing can bring consumers back to a product again and again - or not, as the case may be. In short, taste is the number one attribute in food and that is why the global fiavour business is worth A5 billion every year as manufacturers strive to make food taste better and fresher for longer.

  15. Phenomenological aspects of flavoured dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Flavour symmetries in the dark sector are a theoretically motivated and phenomenologically appealing concept. The dark matter particle can be stabilised with the help of flavour symmetries, without the need to introduce an additional discrete symmetry by hand. Apart from the usual searches in direct and indirect detection experiments and high energy colliders, flavoured dark matter generally also gives rise to new flavour violating interactions leading to interesting signatures in rare meson decays. This proceedings article reviews a simplified model of flavoured dark matter in which the dark matter coupling to quarks constitutes a new source of flavour violation, so that the model goes beyond Minimal Flavour Violation. Particular emphasis is put on the discussion of its phenomenological implications in flavour, collider and direct detection experiments.

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Ai ds (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 (FGE.208): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the α , β - unsaturation in ring / side - chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance from subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 208. The Flavour Industry has provided....... In order to clarify the genotoxic potential of this substance, the Panel considered that further in vivo testing should be performed. To address this, an in vivo Comet assay, considering the first site of contact (e.g. stomach or duodenum) and liver, should be carried out according to the Scientific Report...

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 400 (FGE.400): 3-(1- ((3,5-dimethylisoxazol-4-yl)methyl)-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-1-(3-hydroxybenzyl)imidazolidine-2,4-dione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) of EFSA was requested to deliver a scientific opinion on the implications for human health of the flavouring substance 3-(1-((3,5-dimethylisoxazol-4-yl)methyl)-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-1-(3-hydroxybenzyl)imidazolidine-2......,4-dione [FL-no: 16.127], in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 400 (FGE.400), according to Regulation (EC) No 1331/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council. The substance has not been reported to occur in natural source materials of botanical or animal origin. It is intended to be used as a flavour...

  18. Flavour violation in general supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chankowski, P H; Pokorski, Stefan; Chankowski, Piotr H.; Lebedev, Oleg; Pokorski, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    We reappraise the flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) problem in string--derived supergravity models. We overview and classify possible sources of flavour violation and find that the problem often does not arise in classes of models which generate hierarchical Yukawa matrices. In such models, constraints from the K- and D-meson systems leave room for substantial flavour non-universality of the soft terms. The current B-physics experiments only begin to probe its natural range. Correlations among different observables can allow one to read off the chirality structure of flavour violating sources. We briefly discuss the lepton sector where the problem of FCNC is indeed serious and perhaps points at an additional symmetry or flavour universality.

  19. Release of hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of flavour-active volatile phenols during the beer production process

    OpenAIRE

    Vanbeneden, Nele

    2007-01-01

    Among the flavour-active volatile phenols in beer, most of them originate from the raw materials used in the brewing process. Only some of them can be formed by yeast activity, namely 4-vinylguaiacol (4VG) and 4-vinylphenol (4VP). The presence of these volatile phenolic compounds is considered undesirable when present in excessive concentration in bottom-fermented pilsner beers, hence the term “phenolic off-flavour” (POF). It is attributed to beers with a strong medicinal, clove-like aroma. D...

  20. Risk assessment of flavouring substances used in foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norby, Karin; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Greve, Krestine;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present project, the FLAVIS project, is to perform risk assessment of chemically defined flavouring substances. The evaluations are then presented to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for final adoption in its Scientific Panel on food additives, flavourings, processing aids...... and materials in contact with food. The regulatory background for the work is found in the European Parliament and Council Regulation No. 2232/96 laying down a procedure for the establishment of a list of flavouring substances the use of which will be authorised to the exclusion of all others in the EU...... the approach developed by the “Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives” (JECFA) and referred to in Commission Regulation EC No. 1565/2000. First, the 2800 flavouring substances are divided into groups of structurally related substances. The Procedure is then a stepwise approach that integrates...

  1. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia; Henle, Thomas; Antequera, Teresa; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied. FES reduced cooking loss and increased water content in sous-vide samples. FES and cooking method showed a marked effect on browning development, both on the meat surface and within. FES led to tougher and chewier texture in sous-vide cooked lamb, and enhanced flavour scores of sous-vide samples more markedly than in roasted ones. FES added meat showed higher contents of furosine; 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural did not reach detectable levels. N-ε-carboxymethyllysine amounts were rather low and not influenced by the studied factors. Cooked meat seems to be a minor dietary source of MR products, regardless the presence of reducing sugars and the cooking method.

  2. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia; Henle, Thomas; Antequera, Teresa; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied. FES reduced cooking loss and increased water content in sous-vide samples. FES and cooking method showed a marked effect on browning development, both on the meat surface and within. FES led to tougher and chewier texture in sous-vide cooked lamb, and enhanced flavour scores of sous-vide samples more markedly than in roasted ones. FES added meat showed higher contents of furosine; 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural did not reach detectable levels. N-ε-carboxymethyllysine amounts were rather low and not influenced by the studied factors. Cooked meat seems to be a minor dietary source of MR products, regardless the presence of reducing sugars and the cooking method. PMID:25172739

  3. Flavour Compounds in Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravasio, Davide Antonio

    Fungi produce a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during their primary or secondary metabolism and with a wide range of functions. The main focus of this research work has been put on flavour molecules that are produced during fermentation processes, mainly esters and alcohols derived...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 3 (FGE.20Rev3): Benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, a related acetal, benzoic acids, and related esters from chemical groups 23 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 3 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, the SCF Opinion on benzoic acid. Furthermore information on stereoisomeric composition for two substa...

  5. Processing of bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix using natural smoke flavouring as coadjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Augusto Gonçalves

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix constitutes the main fishing resource in Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil coast in the autumn, winter and spring months. Considering that this fish is highly perishable, to have its shelf life increased an adequate treatment and processing are needed as soon as its capture occurs. Its use in the elaboration of a smoked product can represent considerable economic growth, if compared to its current "in natura" or frozen commercialization. A bluefish base smoked product was elaborated using natural smoke flavouring (known commercially as liquid smoke defining the adjusted technological characteristics during the processing. The best form of liquid smoke application (immersion or sprinkling was chosen sensorially by hedonic scale. The sprinkling of liquid smoke in the concentration of 20% on unskinned bluefish fillets showed better acceptance in the sensorial evaluation. A daily 49.5ºC pay-drying of 45 minutes before the liquid smoke application favored its larger penetration in the bluefish muscle. The thermal treatment used (52.8ºC for 45 minutes; 67ºC for 45 minutes and 80.8ºC for two and a half hours was enough to get a product with good sensorial acceptance. The final yield of the used processing was of 39.58%, similar with the yield shown by other authors of other commercial species. The product must be kept under freezing temperature.A anchova constitui o principal recurso pesqueiro na costa do Rio Grande do Sul nos meses de outono, inverno e primavera. Conside-rando que este pescado é altamente perecível, para poder prolongar sua vida-de-prateleira necessita-se de um tratamento e processamento adequados tão logo ocorra sua captura. Sua utilização na elaboração de um produto defumado pode representar um crescimento econômico considerável, se comparado com sua atual comercialização na forma "in natura" ou congelada. Foi elaborado um produto defumado à base de anchova utilizando aroma natural de fuma

  6. Counting Processes in Simple Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Ola; Hedenborg, Maj-Lene

    1980-01-01

    The cognitive processes of seven children solving arithmetic problems were accurately classified as reconstructive or reproductive according to the child's verbal report of his thought processes. Classifications of thought processes by means of verbal reports can also be used to improve the analysis of latencies. (SB)

  7. Flavour equilibration studies of quark-gluon plasma with non-zero baryon density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Sen

    2009-12-01

    Flavour equilibration for a thermally equilibrated but chemically non-equilibrated quark-gluon plasma is presented. Flavour equilibration is studied enforcing baryon number conservation. In addition to the usual processes like single additional gluon production $gg \\rightleftharpoons ggg$ and its reverse and quark–antiquark pair production by gluon pair fusion $gg \\rightleftharpoons q_{i}q_{i}^{-}$ and reverse thereof, processes like quark-flavour interchanging $q_{i}q_{i}^{-} \\rightleftharpoons q_{j}q_{j}^{-}$ is also considered. The degree of equilibration is studied comparatively for various reactions/constraints that are being considered.

  8. Production of Japanese Soy-Sauce Flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der C.

    2001-01-01

    The salt-tolerant yeasts Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis are important for the formation of flavour in Japanese soy-sauce processes. In these processes Z. rouxii produces the flavour components ethanol, higher alcohols and 4-hydroxyfuranones, while C. versatilis is responsible for th

  9. Spontaneous CP violation and neutral flavour conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions for one-loop stability of neutral flavour conservation in SU(2)LxU(1) models with spontaneous CP violation are analysed. In addition to previously known cases there is an essentially unique two-generation model with two Higgs doublets where neutral flavour conservation is guaranteed to all orders by a non-standard CP symmetry. (orig.)

  10. Reduction of Saltiness and Acrylamide Levels in Palm Sugar-Like Flavouring through Buffer Modification and the Addition of Calcium Chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Aida Wan Mustapha; Chun Wai Ho; Faridah Abas; Chin Ping Tan; Phui Yee Tan

    2013-01-01

    Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF) is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO4) buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of ...

  11. Discrete Flavour Groups, \\theta_13 and Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Merlo, Luca; Stamou, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Discrete flavour groups have been studied in connection with special patterns of neutrino mixing suggested by the data, such as Tri-Bimaximal mixing (groups A4, S4...) or Bi-Maximal mixing (group S4...) etc. We review the predictions for sin(\\theta_13) in a number of these models and confront them with the experimental measurements. We compare the performances of the different classes of models in this respect. We then consider, in a supersymmetric framework, the important implications of these flavour symmetries on lepton flavour violating processes, like \\mu -> e gamma and similar processes. We discuss how the existing limits constrain these models, once their parameters are adjusted so as to optimize the agreement with the measured values of the mixing angles. In the simplified CMSSM context, adopted here just for indicative purposes, the small tan(beta) range and heavy SUSY mass scales are favoured by lepton flavour violating processes, which makes it even more difficult to reproduce the reported muon g-2...

  12. Local Time of Additive Levy Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We studied the problem of existence of jointly continuous local time for an additive process.Here, “local time” is understood in the sence of occupation density, and by an additive Lévy process we mean a process X={X(t), t∈Rd+)} which has the decomposition X= X1 X2 … XN. We prove that if the product of it slower index and N is greater than d, then a jointly continuous local time can be obtained via Berman's method.

  13. Dynamics of Non-supersymmetric Flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M Sohaib; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    We continue investigating the effect of the back-reaction by non-supersymmetric probes in the Kuperstein-Sonnenschein model. In the limit when the back-reaction is small, we discuss physical properties of the back-reacted geometry. We further introduce additional probe flavours in this back-reacted geometry and study in detail the phase structure of this sector when a constant electromagnetic field or a chemical potential are present. We find that the Landau pole, which serves as the UV cut-off of the background geometry, also serves as an important scale in the corresponding thermodynamics of the additional flavour sector. We note that since this additional probe flavours are indistinguishable from the back-reacting flavours, the results we obtain point to a much richer phase structure of the system.

  14. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 3 (FGE.06Rev3): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. For one substance [FL-no: 09.938] an identity test is missing and for two substances [FL-no: 05.226 and 09.950] the range of the specific gravity is too wide. Additional, the stereoisomeric mixture has not been...

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 3, Revision 2 (FGE.03Rev2): Acetals of branched- and straight-chain aliphatic saturated primary alcohols and branched- and straight-chain saturated or unsaturated aldehydes, an ester of a hemiacetal and an orthoester of formic acid, from chemical groups 1, 2 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of this flavouring substance, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered, and since the publication of FGE.03Rev1 additional information on chirality on 30 substances is made available...

  16. Cern Academic Training programme 2011 - Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES   4, 5, 6 and 7 April 2011 Flavour Physics and CP Violation Dr. Yosef Nir (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel 11:00-12:00 - 4, 6 and 7 April - Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant 5 April - Bldg. 80-1-001 - Globe 1st Floor   The B-factories have led to significant progress in our understanding of CP violation and of flavour physics. Yet, two flavour puzzles remain. The standard model flavour puzzle is the question of why there is smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters. The new physics flavour puzzle is the question of why TeV-scale new physics was not signalled in flavour changing neutral current processes. The high pT experiments, ATLAS and CMS, are likely to shed light on these puzzles. As concerns CP violation, the LHC will lead to progress on the puzzle of the baryon asymmetry as well.  

  17. Flavour Physics and Implication for New Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, Gino

    2016-10-01

    Flavour physics represents one of the most interesting and, at the same time, less understood sector of the Standard Theory. On the one hand, the peculiar pattern of quark and lepton masses, and their mixing angles, may be the clue to some new dynamics occurring at high-energy scales. On the other hand, the strong suppression of flavour-changing neutral-current processes, predicted by the Standard Theory and confirmed by experiments, represents a serious challenge to extend the Theory. This article reviews both these aspects of flavour physics from a theoretical perspective.

  18. Flavouring compounds in Indian potato snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigond, Pinky; Singh, Brajesh; Dhulia, Akshita; Chopra, Shelly; Dutt, Som

    2015-12-01

    Market for processed potato products is rising day by day. Flavour plays important role in decision making by consumers due to their preferences for better tasting food. In potato and potato products, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) are the major umami compounds which contribute towards flavour. Therefore, umami 5' nucleotides (AMP+GMP) were estimated from local potato products available as common fried products in the Indian markets and processed potato products being sold by the retailers. The analysis was also carried in raw, microwaved and pressure cooked tubers of forty seven Indian potato cultivars. Umami 5' nucleotide content ranged from 2.63 (Aloo seekh) to 8.26 μg/g FW (fried lachcha) in local potato products. In processed potato products, the content ranged from 2.72 μg/g FW (Smiles) to 14.75 μg/g FW (Aloo Bhujia). Along with aloo bhujia, umami 5' nucleotides were also high in dehydrated aloo lachcha (11.14 μg/g FW) and dehydrated potato chips (10.13 μg/g FW) and low in Smiles (2.72 μg/g FW) and Potato Shortz (3.40 μg/g FW). The study suggests that the potato products prepared solely from potato contained higher levels of umami 5' nucleotides compared to other products prepared by mixing potato with other cereals and vegetables. In Indian potato cultivars overall there was 14 % increase on microwave cooking and 31 % increase in flavouring compounds on pressure cooking. This type of study enabled in identifying better tasting cultivars for further product development and also to develop products with less addition of salt. PMID:26604408

  19. Heavy-quark mass dependence in global PDF analyses and 3- and 4-flavour parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.D. [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Stirling, W.J. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Thorne, R.S. [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Watt, G. [CERN, Theory Group, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    We study the sensitivity of our recent MSTW 2008 NLO and NNLO PDF analyses to the values of the charm- and bottom-quark masses, and we provide additional public PDF sets for a wide range of these heavy-quark masses. We quantify the impact of varying m{sub c} and m{sub b} on the cross sections for W, Z and Higgs production at the Tevatron and the LHC. We generate 3- and 4-flavour versions of the (5-flavour) MSTW 2008 PDFs by evolving the input PDFs and {alpha}{sub S} determined from fits in the 5-flavour scheme, including the eigenvector PDF sets necessary for calculation of PDF uncertainties. As an example of their use, we study the difference in the Z total cross sections at the Tevatron and LHC in the 4- and 5-flavour schemes. Significant differences are found, illustrating the need to resum large logarithms in Q{sup 2}/m{sub b}{sup 2} by using the 5-flavour scheme. The 4-flavour scheme is still necessary, however, if cuts are imposed on associated (massive) b-quarks, as is the case for the experimental measurement of Zb anti b production and similar processes. (orig.)

  20. New trends in beer flavour compound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Iglesias, Cristina; Montero, Olimpio; Sancho, Daniel; Blanco, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    As the beer market is steadily expanding, it is important for the brewing industry to offer consumers a product with the best organoleptic characteristics, flavour being one of the key characteristics of beer. New trends in instrumental methods of beer flavour analysis are described. In addition to successfully applied methods in beer analysis such as chromatography, spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry or electronic nose and tongue techniques, among others, sample extraction and preparation such as derivatization or microextraction methods are also reviewed.

  1. Flavour alignment in physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuninger, Carolin Barbara

    2012-11-21

    extension of the Standard Model where a second Higgs doublet is added. In such models, there are two Yukawa matrices for each fermion type. Going to the mass basis, one of them is diagonalized and together with the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs forms the mass matrix of the quarks. The other Yukawa matrix however is not diagonal. It couples two quarks and one of the mass eigenstates of the two Higgs doublets. Flavour violating processes can thus occur via the exchange of a neutral scalar. If the two Yukawa matrices were aligned for some reason this would not happen. However, the alignment can only be imposed at one energy scale and will be spoiled when evolving the couplings down to a lower scale. It is shown that in spite of this effect, alignment of the Yukawa couplings provides sufficient protection from flavour changing neutral currents to be in agreement with present experimental bounds. Another, more ambitious, extension of the Standard Model are warped extra dimensions. In these models spacetime consists of a slice of five-dimensional Anti-de Sitter space (the ''bulk'') sandwiched in between two flat four-dimensional boundaries (the ''branes''). The Higgs is assumed to live on one of the branes while all other particles are allowed to spread into the bulk. Particles that propagate in the bulk have a ''KK tower'' of heavier particles associated with them in the effective four-dimensional theory. In the bulk fermions have a vector-like mass term in addition to their Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. Via different localizations of the quarks' wave functions in the bulk, the huge differences in their masses can be explained. However, since the wave function profiles of the quarks are non-universal for the different flavours, so are the couplings to the KK excitations of gauge bosons. Rotating to the mass basis therefore introduces off-diagonal elements in these couplings and thus flavour changing

  2. Lepton-flavour violation in a Pati-Salam model with gauged flavour symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Thorsten; Moch, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Combining Pati-Salam (PS) and flavour symmetries in a renormalisable setup, we devise a scenario which produces realistic masses for the charged leptons. Flavour-symmetry breaking scalar fields in the adjoint representations of the PS gauge group are responsible for generating different flavour structures for up- and down-type quarks as well as for leptons. The model is characterised by new heavy fermions which mix with the Standard Model quarks and leptons. In particular, the partners for the third fermion generation induce sizeable sources of flavour violation. Focusing on the charged-lepton sector, we scrutinise the model with respect to its implications for lepton-flavour violating processes such as $\\mu \\rightarrow e\\gamma$, $\\mu\\rightarrow 3e$ and muon conversion in nuclei.

  3. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 313, (FGE.313): α,β-unsaturated 3(2H)-furanone derivatives from chemical group 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    Survey-derived Daily Intake (MSDI) approach. For the flavouring substance [FL-no: 13.175], toxicity data are required. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity...... criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for the three flavouring substances. The Panel concluded that for 2,5-dimethyl-4-ethoxyfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.117], 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.119] and 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.175] for which...

  4. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  5. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  6. Flavour Tagging at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Grabalosa Gandara, M

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the most possible accurate knowledge of the flavour at production of the reconstructed B meson is required. This poster summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. We use same side an opposite side algorithms to establish wheter the meson contained a b or a b\\bar quark. The final decision is obtained through a combination of several methods. The use of control channels, decays to a flavour specific final state, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction \\omega (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as input for the determination of CKM unitary triangle angles.

  7. Flavour alignment in physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuninger, Carolin Barbara

    2012-11-21

    extension of the Standard Model where a second Higgs doublet is added. In such models, there are two Yukawa matrices for each fermion type. Going to the mass basis, one of them is diagonalized and together with the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs forms the mass matrix of the quarks. The other Yukawa matrix however is not diagonal. It couples two quarks and one of the mass eigenstates of the two Higgs doublets. Flavour violating processes can thus occur via the exchange of a neutral scalar. If the two Yukawa matrices were aligned for some reason this would not happen. However, the alignment can only be imposed at one energy scale and will be spoiled when evolving the couplings down to a lower scale. It is shown that in spite of this effect, alignment of the Yukawa couplings provides sufficient protection from flavour changing neutral currents to be in agreement with present experimental bounds. Another, more ambitious, extension of the Standard Model are warped extra dimensions. In these models spacetime consists of a slice of five-dimensional Anti-de Sitter space (the ''bulk'') sandwiched in between two flat four-dimensional boundaries (the ''branes''). The Higgs is assumed to live on one of the branes while all other particles are allowed to spread into the bulk. Particles that propagate in the bulk have a ''KK tower'' of heavier particles associated with them in the effective four-dimensional theory. In the bulk fermions have a vector-like mass term in addition to their Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. Via different localizations of the quarks' wave functions in the bulk, the huge differences in their masses can be explained. However, since the wave function profiles of the quarks are non-universal for the different flavours, so are the couplings to the KK excitations of gauge bosons. Rotating to the mass basis therefore introduces off-diagonal elements in these couplings and thus flavour changing

  8. The flavour of natural SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Felix [SISSA/ISAS, Trieste (Italy); Kraml, Sabine; Kulkarni, Suchita; Smith, Christopher [Universite Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-09-15

    An inverted mass hierarchy in the squark sector, as in so-called ''natural supersymmetry'', requires non-universal boundary conditions at the mediation scale of supersymmetry breaking. We propose a formalism to define such boundary conditions in a basis-independent manner and apply it to generic scenarios where the third-generation squarks are light, while the first two-generation squarks are heavy and near-degenerate. We show that not only is our formalism particularly well suited to study such hierarchical squark mass patterns, but in addition the resulting soft terms at the TeV scale are manifestly compatible with the principle of minimal flavour violation, and thus automatically obey constraints from flavour physics. (orig.)

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 304, Revision 1 (FGE.304Rev1): Four carboxamides from Chemical Groups 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    .125] do not give rise to safety concern at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity...... criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all four candidate substances....

  10. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 303, Revision 1 (FGE.303Rev1): Spilanthol from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    (MSDI) approach. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the material of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have been provided for the candidate substance....

  11. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 3 (FGE.25Rev3): Aliphatic hydrocarbons from chemical group 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity and identity criteria for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 14...

  12. Supersymmetric Radiative Flavour

    OpenAIRE

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Pedro, Francisco G.

    2011-01-01

    We examine possibilities for the radiative generation of the Yukawa couplings and flavour structure in supersymmetric models in the supersymmetric phase. Not withstanding the non-renormalisation of the Wilsonian superpotential, this can occur through the 2-loop vertex renormalisation of the physical 1PI couplings. We describe this effect and construct models in which this occurs. For models attempting to reproduce the full flavour structure of the Standard Model, we analyse the tension betwee...

  13. Flavour physics and CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Nir, Y

    2010-01-01

    This is a written version of a series of lectures aimed at graduate students in particle theory/string theory/particle experiment familiar with the basics of the Standard Model. We explain the many reasons for the interest in flavour physics. We describe flavour physics and the related CP violation within the Standard Model, and explain how the B-factories proved that the Kobayashi- Maskawa mechanism dominates the CP violation that is observed in meson decays. We explain the implications of flavour physics for new physics. We emphasize the “new physics flavour puzzle”. As an explicit example, we explain how the recent measurements ofD0−D 0 mixing constrain the supersymmetric flavour structure. We explain how the ATLAS and CMS experiments can solve the new physics flavour puzzle and perhaps shed light on the standard model flavour puzzle. Finally, we describe various interpretations of the neutrino flavour data and their impact on flavour models.

  14. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 66, Revision 1 (FGE.66Rev1): Consideration of Furfuryl Alcohol and Related Flavouring Substances Evaluated by JECFA (55th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 14 flavouring substances in the Revision 1 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 66, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the s...

  15. EFSA EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 99 (FGE.99): Consideration of furanone derivatives evaluated by the JECFA (63rd, 65th and 69th meetings)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... concern at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all five substances, the information is adequate....

  16. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 5 (FGE.21Rev5): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    .108, 15.115, 15.116, 15.118 and 15.135] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the Maximised Survey-derived Daily Intake (MSDI) approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce...... have also been considered. Adequate specifications, including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce, have been provided for all 41 candidate substances....

  17. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of aliphatic and aromatic mono- and di-thiols and mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups (chemical group 20 when used as flavourings for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical group 20 consists of aliphatic and aromatic mono- and di-thiols and mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups, of which 31 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of six compounds (methanethiol, methyl propyl disulphide, dipropyl trisulphide, 3-mercaptobutan-2-one, 3-(methylthiobutanal and 3-methyl-1,2,4-trithiane because of issues related to the purity of the compounds. The FEEDAP Panel concludes that the following 25 compounds are safe for the target species at the proposed maximum dose level (0.05 mg/kg complete feed: 3-(methylthiopropionaldehyde, methyl 3-(methylthiopropionate, allylthiol, dimethyl sulphide, dibutyl sulphide, diallyl disulphide, diallyl trisulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, dipropyl disulphide, allyl isothiocyanate, dimethyl disulphide, 2-methylbenzene-1-thiol, S-methyl butanethioate, allyl methyl disulphide, 3-(methylthiopropan-1-ol, 3-(methylthiohexan-1-ol, 1-propane-1-thiol, diallyl sulphide, 2,4-dithiapentane, 2-methyl-2-(methyldithiopropanal, 2-methylpropane-1-thiol, methylsulfinylmethane, propane-2-thiol, 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane and 2-methyl-4-propyl-1,3-oxathiane. No safety concern for the consumer would arise from the use of these 25 compounds of CG 20 up to the highest safe level in feedingstuffs for all animal species, with the exception of allyl isothiocyanate. Although additional exposure to this substance through its low use level in animal feeds would not substantially increase consumer exposure, the FEEDAP Panel notes that the estimated exposure of consumers is already higher than the acceptable daily intake (ADI. All compounds should be considered irritant to skin, eyes and respiratory tract and as skin sensitisers. The proposed concentration of 0.05 mg flavour/kg feed is not expected to cause detrimental effects to the environment, except for 2-methylpropane-1-thiol, for which 0

  18. Scientific opinion of Flavouring Group Evaluation 205 Revision 1 (FGE.205Rev1): consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 13 α,β-unsaturated aliphatic ketones with terminal double bonds and precursors from chemical subgroup 1.2.2 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF Panel) was requested to consider in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 205 (FGE.205), the additional data on genotoxicity submitted by the Industry on two representative substances, oct-1-en-3-one [FL-no: 07.081]...

  19. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC' workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays' and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  20. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC'workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays'and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  1. Minimal flavour violation and beyond: Towards a flavour code for short distance dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2010-01-01

    This decade should provide the first definitive signals of New Physics (NP) beyond the Standard Model (SM) and the goal of these lectures is a review of flavour physics in various extensions of the SM that have been popular in the last ten years. After an overture, two pilot sections and a brief summary of the structure of flavour violation and CP violation in the SM, we will present the theoretical framework for weak decays that will allow us to distinguish between different NP scenarios. Subsequently we will present twelve concrete BSM models summarizing the patterns of flavour violation characteristic for each model. In addition to models with minimal flavour violation (MFV) accompanied by flavour blind phases we will discuss a number of extensions containing non-MFV sources of flavour and CP violation and, in particular, new local operators originating in right-handed charged currents and scalar currents. Next we will address various anomalies in the data as seen from the point of view of the SM that appe...

  2. Linear flavour violation and anomalies in B physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben; Renner, S A

    2015-01-01

    We propose renormalizable models of new physics that can explain various anomalies observed in decays of B-mesons to electron and muon pairs. The new physics states couple to linear combinations of Standard Model fermions, yielding a pattern of flavour violation that gives a consistent fit to the gamut of flavour data. Accidental symmetries prevent contributions to baryon- and lepton-number-violating processes, as well as enforcing a loop suppression of new physics contributions to flavour violating processes. Data require that the new flavour-breaking couplings are largely aligned with the Yukawa couplings of the SM and so we also explore patterns of flavour symmetry breaking giving rise to this structure.

  3. Additive functionals and excursions of Kuznetsov processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacène Boutabia

    2005-01-01

    semigroup of transition. In this paper, we give the excursion laws of (Xtt∈ℝ+ conditioned on the strict past and future without duality hypothesis. We study excursions of a general regenerative system and of a regenerative system consisting of the closure of the set of times the regular points of B are visited. In both cases, those conditioned excursion laws depend only on two points Xg− and Xd, where ]g,d[ is an excursion interval of the regenerative set M. We use the (FDt-predictable exit system to bring together the isolated points of M and its perfect part and replace the classical optional exit system. This has been a subject in literature before (e.g., Kaspi (1988 under the classical duality hypothesis. We define an “additive functional” for (Ytt∈ℝ with B, we generalize the laws cited before to (Ytt∈ℝ, and we express laws of pairs of excursions.

  4. Flavoured Dark Matter Beyond MFV

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2014-01-01

    We review a model of quark flavoured dark matter with new flavour violating interactions. This simplified model describes Dirac fermionic dark matter that is charged under a new U(3) flavour symmetry and couples to right-handed down quarks via a scalar mediator. The corresponding coupling matrix is assumed to be the only new source of flavour violation, which we refer to as the Dark Minimal Flavour Violation (DMFV) hypothesis. This ansatz ensures the stability of dark matter. We discuss the phenomenology of the simplest DMFV model in flavour violating observables, LHC searches, and direct dark matter detection experiments. Especially interesting is the non-trivial interplay between the constraints from the different sectors.

  5. Searching for New Physics through correlations of Flavour Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Girrbach, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The coming flavour precision era will allow to uncover various patterns of flavour violation in different New Physics scenarios. We discuss different classes of them. A simple extension of the Standard Model that generally introduces new sources of flavour and CP violation as well as right-handed currents is the addition of a U(1) gauge symmetry to the SM gauge group. In such Z' models correlations between various flavour observables emerge that could test and distinguish different Z' scenarios. A concrete model with flavour violating Z' couplings is the 331 model based on the gauge group SU(3)_C x SU(3)_L x U(1)_X. We also study tree-level FCNCs mediated by heavy neutral scalars and/or pseudo-scalars H^0(A^0). Furthermore the implications of an additional approximate global U(2)^3 flavour symmetry is shortly discussed. Finally a model with vectorlike fermions and flavour violating Z couplings is presented. We identify a number of correlations between various observables that differ from those known from cons...

  6. Two approaches towards the flavour puzzle. Dynamical minimal flavour violation and warped extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Michaela E.

    2010-08-16

    The minimal-flavour-violating (MFV) hypothesis considers the Standard Model (SM) Yukawa matrices as the only source of flavour violation. In this work, we promote their entries to dynamical scalar spurion fields, using an effective field theory approach, such that the maximal flavour symmetry (FS) of the SM gauge sector is formally restored at high energy scales. The non-vanishing vacuum expectation values of the spurions induce a sequence of FS breaking and generate the observed hierarchy in the SM quark masses and mixings. The fact that there exists no explanation for it in the SM is known as the flavour puzzle. Gauging the non-abelian subgroup of the spontaneously broken FS, we interpret the associated Goldstone bosons as the longitudinal degrees of freedom of the corresponding massive gauge bosons. Integrating out the heavy Higgs modes in the Yukawa spurions leads directly to flavour-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) at tree level. The coefficients of the effective four-quark operators, resulting from the exchange of heavy flavoured gauge bosons, strictly follow the MFV principle. On the other hand, the Goldstone bosons associated with the global abelian symmetry group behave as weakly coupled axions which can be used to solve the strong CP problem within a modified Peccei-Quinn formalism. Models with a warped fifth dimension contain five-dimensional (5D) fermion bulk mass matrices in addition to their 5D Yukawa matrices, which thus represent an additional source of flavour violation beyond MFV. They can address the flavour puzzle since their eigenvalues allow for a different localisation of the fermion zero mode profiles along the extra dimension which leads to a hierarchy in the effective four-dimensional (4D) Yukawa matrices. At the same time, the fermion splitting introduces non-universal fermion couplings to Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge boson modes, inducing tree-level FCNCs. Within a Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection (RSc model) we carefully work

  7. Charged-lepton flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andreas Hoecker

    2012-11-01

    This write-up on a talk at the 2011 Lepton–Photon symposium in Mumbai, India, summarizes recent results in the charged-lepton flavour sector. Searches for charged-lepton flavour violation, lepton electric dipole moments and flavour-conserving CP violation are reviewed here. Recent progress in -lepton physics and in the Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is also discussed.

  8. Search for new phenomena in $t\\bar{t}$ final states with additional heavy-flavour jets in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for new phenomena in $t\\bar{t}$ final states with additional heavy-flavour jets is presented. The search targets a variety of signals, including the pair production of a vector-like top quark ($T$) with a significant branching ratio to a top quark and either a Standard Model Higgs boson or a $Z$ boson; four-top-quark production, both within the Standard Model and in several new physics scenarios; and heavy Higgs bosons (neutral and charged) produced in association with, and decaying into, third generation quarks. The analysis uses $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13\\tev$ recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 13.2 fb$^{-1}$. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets, as well as the jets+$E_{\\text{T}}^{\\text{miss}}$ final state, characterised by multiple jets and lar...

  9. Flavour Tagging with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems require knowledge of the b quark production flavour. This identification is performed by the Flavour Tagging.

  10. 烹饪调味过程对加碘盐补碘效率的影响%The influence of cookery flavour process on supplement iodine efficiency of iodized salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光辉; 钟世荣

    2001-01-01

    It is discussed in the article that seasoning effects of the food salty flavour in common cooking were determined by Sickville method and iodine loss of iodized salt in common cooking was determined by the P*S blue-light photometric method,the influence of cookery flavour process on supplement iodine efficiency of iodized salt was analysed.%本文在常规烹饪盐咸味的调味过程中,分别用斯柯维法、P*S蓝光度法测定食物盐咸味的调味效果及加碘盐的碘损失情况,分析烹饪调味过程对加碘盐补碘效率的影响。

  11. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio, E-mail: feruglio@pd.infn.it; Paradisi, Paride, E-mail: paride.paradisi@pd.infn.it [Sezione di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ‘G. Galilei’, INFN, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea, E-mail: pattori@physik.uzh.ch [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, 8057, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-08

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ→e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis.

  12. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' G. Galilei' , Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ → e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis. (orig.) 7.

  13. Theory of electric dipole moments and lepton flavour violation

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Electric dipole moments and charged-lepton flavour-violating processes are extremely sensitive probes for new physics, complementary to direct searches as well as flavour-changing processes in the quark sector. Beyond the "smoking-gun" feature of a potential significant measurement, however, it is crucial to understand their implications for new physics models quantitatively. The corresponding multi-scale problem of relating the existing high-precision measurements to fundamental parameters c...

  14. Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    An introductory overview of the Standard Model description of flavour is presented. The main emphasis is put on present tests of the quark-mixing matrix structure and the phenomenological determination of its parameters. Special attention is given to the experimental evidences of CP violation and their important role in our understanding of flavour dynamics.

  15. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; L Maharana

    2004-09-01

    New neutral gauge bosons ' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson '. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes.

  16. A T' Flavour Model for Fermions and its Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We present a supersymmetric flavour model based on the T' discrete group, which explains fermion masses and mixings. The flavour symmetry, acting in the supersymmetric sector, provides well defined sfermion mass matrices and the resulting supersymmetric spectrum accounts for sufficiently light particles that could be seen at LHC. Furthermore, several contributions to FCNC processes are present and they can be useful to test the model in the present and future experiments. We will review the main results for both leptons and quarks.

  17. Application of Electrostatic Extrusion – Flavour Encapsulation and Controlled Release

    OpenAIRE

    Manojlovic, Verica; Rajic, Nevenka; Djonlagic, Jasna; Obradovic, Bojana; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this study was the development of flavour alginate formulations aimed for thermally processed foods. Ethyl vanilline was used as the model flavour compound. Electrostatic extrusion was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanilline in alginate gel microbeads. The obtained microbeads with approx. 10 % w/w of ethyl vanilline encapsulated in about 2 % w/w alginate were uniformly sized spheres of about 450 μm. Chemical characterization by H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the algi...

  18. Volatile and non-volatile compounds in ripened cheese: their formation and their contribution to flavour.

    OpenAIRE

    Engels, W.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flavour is one of the most important attributes of cheese. Cheese flavour is the result of the breakdown of milk protein, fat, lactose and citrate due to enzymes from milk, rennet and microorganisms during production and ripening of cheese. For a large part the development of flavour during the ripening of cheese is determined by the process of proteolysis of caseins. Over the past years proteolysis has been studied very extensively and as a result a wealth of information about this process h...

  19. Non-minimally flavour violating dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Flavour symmetries provide an appealing mechanism to stabilize the dark matter particle. I present a simple model of quark flavoured dark matter that goes beyond the framework of minimal flavour violation. I discuss the phenomenological implications for direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments, high energy collider searches as well as flavour violating precision data.

  20. Relic neutrino decoupling including flavour oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Gianpiero [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-1130 (United States); Miele, Gennaro [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Pastor, Sergio [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Ed. Institutos de Investigacion, Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: pastor@ific.uv.es; Pinto, Teguayco [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Ed. Institutos de Investigacion, Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Pisanti, Ofelia [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Serpico, Pasquale D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany)

    2005-11-21

    In the early universe, neutrinos are slightly coupled when electron-positron pairs annihilate transferring their entropy to photons. This process originates non-thermal distortions on the neutrino spectra which depend on neutrino flavour, larger for {nu}{sub e} than for {nu}{sub {mu}} or {nu}{sub {tau}}. We study the effect of three-neutrino flavour oscillations on the process of neutrino decoupling by solving the momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino spectra. We find that oscillations do not essentially modify the total change in the neutrino energy density, giving N{sub eff}=3.046 in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, while the small effect over the production of primordial {sup 4}He is increased by O(20%), up to 2.1x10{sup -4}. These results are stable within the presently favoured region of neutrino mixing parameters.

  1. Process chain modeling and selection in an additive manufacturing context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Stolfi, Alessandro; Mischkot, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new two-dimensional approach to modeling manufacturing process chains. This approach is used to consider the role of additive manufacturing technologies in process chains for a part with micro scale features and no internal geometry. It is shown that additive manufacturing...... can compete with traditional process chains for small production runs. Combining both types of technology added cost but no benefit in this case. The new process chain model can be used to explain the results and support process selection, but process chain prototyping is still important for rapidly...

  2. Identification and sensory evaluation of flavour enhancers in Japanese traditional dried herring (Clupea pallasii) fillet

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, A.K.M. Azad; Ogasawara, Masashi; Egi, Makoto; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2010-01-01

    Flavour-enhancing components of dried herring fillet (migaki-nishin in Japanese) were isolated and evaluated for their effects on sensory perception. Sensory evaluation revealed that addition of dried herring fillet water-soluble extracts to Japanese noodle soup significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the soup flavour characters such as thickness, mouthfulness and continuity. The extracts were fractionated by dialysis and chromatography. Fractions containing flavour enhancers were isolated by senso...

  3. Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, Peyton A; Karpinski, Clarissa D; Jessica E Brown; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids. Methods Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary fla...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 218, Revision 1 (FGE.218Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 4.2 of FGE.19: Furfural derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .001], for which there was a request for genotoxicity data in FGE.218. Flavouring Group Evaluation 218 (FGE.218) consists of furfural [FL-no: 13.018] and seven substances structurally related to furfural, 5-methylfurfural [FL-no: 13.001], furfuryl alcohol [FL-no: 13.019] and five esters of furfuryl alcohol...... is expected to be oxidised to the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde furfural. However, based on the data then available the Panel concluded that furfural is not of concern with respect to genotoxicity. Furthermore, the Panel concluded that not only furfural but also the structurally related furfuryl alcohol...... to 5-[(sulphoxy)methyl]furfural which shows genotoxic potential in vitro, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure. Accordingly, the Panel concluded that 5-methylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure either. Industry has submitted additional data on the 5...

  5. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation

  6. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  7. Additive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, David Bue; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    Denne Ph.D afhandling,?Additive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Control?, omhandler additive fremstillingsmetoder, hvilket er en familie af processer der er kendetegnet ved at de er computerstyret, de drager nytte af en høj grad af automation, og de fremstiller emner lagvis ved addition af materiale. To områder af særlig interesse er addreseret i denne afhandling. De er begge forankret i to meget forskellige områder, men tjener fælles formål. At styrke additive frems...

  8. A novel methodology of design for Additive Manufacturing applied to Additive Laser Manufacturing process

    OpenAIRE

    Ponche, Rémi; Kerbrat, Olivier; MOGNOL, Pascal; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    International audience Nowadays, due to rapid prototyping processes improvements, a functional metal part can be built directly by Additive Manufacturing. It is now accepted that these new processes can increase productivity while enabling a mass and cost reduction and an increase of the parts functionality. However, the physical phenomena that occur during these processes have a strong impact on the quality of the produced parts. Especially, because the manufacturing paths used to produce...

  9. Revisiting Lepton Flavour Universality in B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Pattori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Lepton flavour universality (LFU) in B-decays is revisited in a model-independent way by considering semileptonic operators defined at a scale Lambda above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasised. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Lambda down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGE) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and tau decays and visible lepton flavour violating (LFV) effects in the processes tau -> mu ll, tau -> mu rho, tau -> mu pi and tau -> mu eta^(') are induced.

  10. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar

    OpenAIRE

    Zong-Min Wang; Zhen-Ming Lu; Jin-Song Shi; Zheng-Hong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF....

  11. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 94, Revision 2 (FGE.94Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic amines and amides evaluated in an addendum to the group of aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA (68th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    conclusion “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach for all substances considered in this FGE. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered and for all 12...

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 2 (FGE.77Rev2): Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to Pyridine, Pyrrole, Indole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.24Rev2 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    .072 and 14.164] considered in this FGE, the Panel agrees with the JECFA conclusion, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also...

  13. Heavy flavour results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell P. J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of heavy-flavour physics results from the ATLAS experiment is presented, based on data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC during 2010. Differential cross-sections for the production of heavy flavours, charmonium and bottomonium states and D-mesons are presented and compared to various theoretical models. Results of B-hadron lifetime measurements are also reported.

  14. Searches for Lepton Flavour Violation and Lepton Number Violation in Hadron Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Seyfert, P

    2012-01-01

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, lepton flavour and lepton number are conserved quantities although no fundamental symmetry demands their conservation. I present recent results of searches for lepton flavour and lepton number violating hadron decays measured at the B factories and LHCb. In addition, the LHCb collaboration has recently performed a search for the lepton flavour violating decay $\\tau^- \\mu^- \\mu^- \\mu^+$ The obtained upper exclusion limit, that has been presented in this talk for the first time, is of the same order of magnitude as those observed at the B factories. This is the first search for a lepton flavour violating $\\tau$ decay at a hadron collider.

  15. In-Process Monitoring of Additive Manufacturing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this project is the implementation of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) for in situ metal additive manufacturing process...

  16. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Janssen, Niels; Smith, Stefan; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with

  17. Design of Test Parts to Characterize Micro Additive Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Mischkot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The minimum feature size and obtainable tolerances of additive manufacturing processes are linked to the smallest volumetric elements (voxels) that can be created. This work presents the iterative design of a test part to investigate the resolution of AM processes with voxel sizes at the micro...

  18. Manufacturability analysis to combine additive and subtractive processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kerbrat, Olivier; MOGNOL, Pascal; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology to estimate manufacturing complexity for both machining and layered manufacturing. The goal is to take into account manufacturing constraints at design stage in order to realize tools (dies and molds) by a combination of a subtractive process (high-speed machining) and an additive process (selective laser sintering). Design/methodology/approach - Manufacturability indexes are defined and calculated from th...

  19. Energy analysis of Binder-jetting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xin; METEYER, Simon; PERRY, Nicolas; ZHAO, Yaoyao Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Considering the potential for new product design possibilities and the reduction of environmental impacts, Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes are considered to possess significant advantages for automotive, aerospace and medical equipment industries. One of the commercial AM techniques is Binder-Jetting (BJ). This technique can be used to process a variety of materials including stainless steel, ceramic, polymer and glass. However, there is very limited research about this AM technology on...

  20. Energy consumption model of Binder-jetting additive manufacturing processes

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xin; METEYER, Simon; PERRY, Nicolas; ZHAO, Yaoyao Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Considering the potential for new product design possibilities and the reduction of environmental impacts, Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes are considered to possess significant advantages for automotive, aerospace and medical equipment industries. One of the commercial AM techniques is Binder-Jetting (BJ). This technique can be used to process a variety of materials including stainless steel, ceramic, polymer and glass. However, there is very limited research about this AM technology on...

  1. Fundamental Aspects of Selective Melting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Certain details of the additive manufacturing process known as selective laser melting (SLM) affect the performance of the final metal part. To unleash the full potential of SLM it is crucial that the process engineer in the field receives guidance about how to select values for a multitude of process variables employed in the building process. These include, for example, the type of powder (e.g., size distribution, shape, type of alloy), orientation of the build axis, the beam scan rate, the beam power density, the scan pattern and scan rate. The science-based selection of these settings con- stitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy, reactive, dynamic wetting followed by re-solidification. In addition, inherent to the process is its considerable variability that stems from the powder packing. Each time a limited number of powder particles are placed, the stacking is intrinsically different from the previous, possessing a different geometry, and having a different set of contact areas with the surrounding particles. As a result, even if all other process parameters (scan rate, etc) are exactly the same, the shape and contact geometry and area of the final melt pool will be unique to that particular configuration. This report identifies the most important issues facing SLM, discusses the fundamental physics associated with it and points out how modeling can support the additive manufacturing efforts.

  2. The physics of eight flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Deuzeman, A; Pallante, E

    2008-01-01

    When the flavour content of QCD is increased sufficiently, the theory develops a non-trivial infra red fixed point. Thus, for a number of flavours above a certain critical value, but not yet so high that asymptotic freedom is lost, QCD becomes a conformal field theory. The location of the lower limit of this conformal window has not yet been unequivocally determined. Using an improved lattice action, and exploiting modern algorithms allowing for larger lattices and lower quark masses, we have shown that the theory of QCD with eight flavours breaks chiral symmetry in the continuum. We present proof that the accompanying transition is thermal in nature and as a consequence, the conformal window of QCD can only start afterwards, corroborating recent analytical studies at the expense of older results.

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 2 (FGE.11Rev2): Aliphatic dialcohols, diketones, and hydroxyketones from chemical groups 8 and 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    , the substances should be reconsidered along the steps of the Procedure. Following this procedure additional toxicological data might become necessary. In order to determine whether the conclusion for the candidate substances can be applied to the materials of commerce, it is necessary to consider the available...... is not specified. Furthermore, for [FL-no: 07.097] the minimum assay is too low, so information on secondary components of [FL-no: 07.097] is missing. Thus, the final evaluation of the materials of commerce cannot be performed for four substances [FL-no: 06.134, 07.097, 07.184 and 07.260], pending further...

  4. Lepton flavour universality violation from composite muons

    CERN Document Server

    Stangl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe a possibility to explain the $2.6\\sigma$ deviation from lepton flavour universality observed by the LHCb collaboration in $B^+\\to K^+\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays in the context of minimal composite Higgs models. We find that a sizable degree of compositeness of partially composite muons can lead to a good agreement with the experimental data. Our construction predicts a new physics contribution to $B_s$-$\\bar{B}_s$ mixing. Additionally, it accounts for the deficit in the invisible $Z$ width measured at LEP.

  5. Heavy flavour decay properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, Ina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results on CP-violation searches in the Bs system, studied in the decay into J/psi phi, and the Bd system through the comparison of the decay time distributions in the flavour specific state J/psi K* and in the CP eigenstate J/psi KS. We additionally present new results in the search for the rare decays of Bs and Bd into mu+mu-. These searches are based on the full sample of data collected by ATLAS at 7 and 8 TeV collision energy. The consistency with the SM and with other available measurements is discussed.

  6. Nanofibrillated cellulose as an additive in papermaking process: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufi, Sami; González, Israel; Delgado-Aguilar, Marc; Tarrès, Quim; Pèlach, M Àngels; Mutjé, Pere

    2016-12-10

    During the last two decades, cellulose nanofibres (CNF) have emerged as a promising, sustainable reinforcement with outstanding potential in material sciences. Though application of CNF in papermaking is recent, it is expected to find implementation in the near future to give a broader commercial market to this type of cellulose. The present review highlights recent progress in the field of the application of cellulose nanofibres as additives in papermaking. The effect of CNF addition on the wet end process is analysed according to the type of pulp used for papermaking. According to the literature consulted, improvement in paper's overall properties after CNF addition depended not only on the type and amount of CNF applied, but also in the pulp's origin and treatment. Bulk and surface application of CNF also presented significant differences regarding paper's final properties. This review also revises the mechanisms behind CNF reinforcing effect on paper and the effect of chemically modified CNF as additives. PMID:27577906

  7. Heavy flavour at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, V

    2013-01-01

    Heavy flavour physics provides a crucial role in the validation of the Standard Model of particle physics and in the search for new phenomena beyond. This review provides a personal summary of the headline results as of May 2013 from the LHC heavy flavour community in the subject areas of heavy flavour production and spectroscopy, mixing and CP violation and rare decays.

  8. Aspects of the Flavour Expansion Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Paraskevas, M

    2015-01-01

    The Flavour Expansion Theorem, which has been recently proposed as a more general and elegant algebraic method, for the derivation of the commonly used Mass Insertion Approximation, is revisited. The theorem is reviewed, with respect to its straightforward applications in Flavour physics, and compared against the standard diagrammatic flavour basis techniques, in cases where the latter become inadequate.

  9. Flavour-active wine yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Christopher D.; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2012-01-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can infl...

  10. Flavour Changing Higgs Couplings in a Class of Two Higgs Doublet Models

    CERN Document Server

    Botella, F J; Nebot, M; Rebelo, M N

    2015-01-01

    We analyse various flavour changing processes like $t\\to hu,hc$, $h\\to \\tau e,\\tau\\mu$ as well as hadronic decays $h\\to bs,bd$, in the framework of a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour changing neutral scalar currents at tree level. These models have the remarkable feature of having these flavour-violating couplings entirely determined by the CKM and PMNS matrices as well as $\\tan\\beta$. The flavour structure of these scalar currents results from a symmetry of the Lagrangian and therefore it is natural and stable under the renormalization group. We show that in some of the models the rates of the above flavour changing processes can reach the discovery level at the LHC at 13 TeV even taking into account the stringent bounds on low energy processes, in particular $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$.

  11. Flavour-changing Higgs couplings in a class of two Higgs doublet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella, F.J. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Burjassot (Spain); Branco, G.C. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Burjassot (Spain); Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisbon (Portugal); Nebot, M. [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisbon (Portugal); Rebelo, M.N. [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisbon (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    We analyse various flavour-changing processes like t → hu, hc, h → τe, τμ as well as hadronic decays h @→ bs, bd, in the framework of a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour-changing neutral scalar currents at tree level. These models have the remarkable feature of having these flavour-violating couplings entirely determined by the CKM and PMNS matrices as well as tan β. The flavour structure of these scalar currents results from a symmetry of the Lagrangian and there fore it is natural and stable under the renormalisation group. We show that in some of the models the rates of the above flavour-changing processes can reach the discovery level at the LHC at 13 TeV even taking into account the stringent bounds on low energy processes, in particular μ @→ eγ. (orig.)

  12. Theory of electric dipole moments and lepton flavour violation

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Electric dipole moments and charged-lepton flavour-violating processes are extremely sensitive probes for new physics, complementary to direct searches as well as flavour-changing processes in the quark sector. Beyond the "smoking-gun" feature of a potential significant measurement, however, it is crucial to understand their implications for new physics models quantitatively. The corresponding multi-scale problem of relating the existing high-precision measurements to fundamental parameters can be approached model-independently to a large extent; however, care must be taken to include the uncertainties from especially nuclear and QCD calculations properly.

  13. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocelík, V.; Janssen, N.; Smith, S. N.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-07-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with different amounts of aluminum prepared by arc melting were investigated and compared with the laser beam remelted HEAs with the same composition. Attempts to form HEAs coatings with a direct laser deposition from the mixture of elemental powders were made for AlCoCrFeNi and AlCrFeNiTa composition. A strong influence of solidification rate on the amounts of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phase, their chemical composition, and spatial distribution was detected for two-phase AlCoCrFeNi HEAs. It is concluded that a high-power laser is a versatile tool to synthesize interesting HEAs with additive manufacturing processing. Critical issues are related to the rate of (re)solidification, the dilution with the substrate, powder efficiency during cladding, and differences in melting points of clad powders making additive manufacturing processing from a simple mixture of elemental powders a challenging approach.

  14. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocelík, V.; Janssen, N.; Smith, S. N.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-04-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with different amounts of aluminum prepared by arc melting were investigated and compared with the laser beam remelted HEAs with the same composition. Attempts to form HEAs coatings with a direct laser deposition from the mixture of elemental powders were made for AlCoCrFeNi and AlCrFeNiTa composition. A strong influence of solidification rate on the amounts of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phase, their chemical composition, and spatial distribution was detected for two-phase AlCoCrFeNi HEAs. It is concluded that a high-power laser is a versatile tool to synthesize interesting HEAs with additive manufacturing processing. Critical issues are related to the rate of (re)solidification, the dilution with the substrate, powder efficiency during cladding, and differences in melting points of clad powders making additive manufacturing processing from a simple mixture of elemental powders a challenging approach.

  15. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar. PMID:27241188

  16. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar.

  17. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar. PMID:27241188

  18. Update of the flavour-physics constraints in the NMSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo, Florian

    2015-01-01

    We consider the impact of several flavour-changing observables in the $B$- and the Kaon sectors on the parameter space of the NMSSM, in a minimal flavour violating version of this model. Our purpose consists in updating our previous results in arXiv:0710.3714 and designing an up-to-date flavour test for the public package NMSSMTools. We provide details concerning our implementation of the constraints in a series of brief reviews of the current status of the considered channels. Finally, we present a few consequences of these flavour constraints for the NMSSM, turning to two specific scenarios: one is characteristic of the MSSM-limit and illustrates the workings of charged-Higgs and genuinely supersymmetric contributions to flavour-changing processes; the second focus is a region where a light CP-odd Higgs is present. Strong limits are found whenever an enhancement factor - large $\\tan\\beta$, light $H^{\\pm}$, resonant pseudoscalar - comes into play.

  19. Thin-layer catalytic far-infrared radiation drying and flavour of tomato slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A far-infrared radiation (FIR catalytic laboratory dryer was designed by us and used to dry tomato. The kinetics of drying of tomato slices with FIR energy was dependent on both the distance from the heat source and the sample thickness. Numerical evaluation of the simplified Fick’s law for Fourier number showed that the effective moisture diffusivity increased from 0.193×10–9 to 1.893×10–9 m2/s, from 0.059×10–9 to 2.885×10–9 m2/s, and, from 0.170×10–9 to 4.531×10–9 m2/s for the 7, 9, and 11 mm thick slices as moisture content decreased. Application of FIR enhanced the flavour of the dried tomatoes by 36.6% when compared with the raw ones. The results demonstrate that in addition to shorter drying times, the flavour of the products can be enhanced with FIR. Therefore, FIR drying should be considered as an efficient drying method for tomato with respect to minimization of processing time, enhancement in flavour, and improvements in the quality and functional property of dried tomatoes.

  20. Technological foundations of processing tomato pomace in feed additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yegorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Search for new types of alternative raw material for the efficient development of poultry industry and problem of waste disposal of canning industry made it necessary to develop a method of processing tomato pomace in feed additives. Materials and methods. Sampling, preparation and testing were carried out by general and specific organ oleptic and physical-technological methods of assessment and analysis of the properties of raw materials and finished products. Results. Incorporation of tomato pomace in the feed additive reduces the cost of raw materials and expenses associated with moistening of the mixture before extrusion and incorporation of chalk feed will solve the problem of calcium imbalance of laying hens. It was found that extrusion process has improved the physical properties of feed additive and showed the possibility of its use as a feed component: moisture content decreased by 34.5 %, the angle of repose increased by 11.4 %, flowability decreased by 39.7 % and bulk density decreased by 32.3 %. Conclusions. The resulting feed additive will solve the problem of diversification of raw materials, waste, calcium imbalance of laying hens and reduce expenses on compound animal feedstuff production.

  1. Heavy flavours: working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gladilin, Leonid [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Scobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Tonelli, Diego [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2009-07-15

    The talks presented in the working group ''Heavy flavours'' of the DIS 2009 workshop are summarised. New and recently updated results from theory, proton antiproton and heavy ion colliders, as well from HERA and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Tooling for Refrigeration Cabinet Foaming Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian K [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nuttall, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cukier, Michael [Whirlpool Corp., Benton Harbor, MI (United States); Hile, Michael [Whirlpool Corp., Benton Harbor, MI (United States)

    2016-07-29

    The primary objective of this project was to leverage the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and materials into a long term, quick change tooling concept to drastically reduce product lead and development timelines and costs. Current refrigeration foam molds are complicated to manufacture involving casting several aluminum parts in an approximate shape, machining components of the molds and post fitting and shimming of the parts in an articulated fixture. The total process timeline can take over 6 months. The foaming process is slower than required for production, therefore multiple fixtures, 10 to 27, are required per refrigerator model. Molds are particular to a specific product configuration making mixed model assembly challenging for sequencing, mold changes or auto changeover features. The initial goal was to create a tool leveraging the ORNL materials and additive process to build a tool in 4 to 6 weeks or less. A secondary goal was to create common fixture cores and provide lightweight fixture sections that could be revised in a very short time to increase equipment flexibility reduce lead times, lower the barriers to first production trials, and reduce tooling costs.

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Tooling for Refrigeration Cabinet Foaming Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian K [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to leverage the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and materials into a long term, quick change tooling concept to drastically reduce product lead and development timelines and costs. Current refrigeration foam molds are complicated to manufacture involving casting several aluminum parts in an approximate shape, machining components of the molds and post fitting and shimming of the parts in an articulated fixture. The total process timeline can take over 6 months. The foaming process is slower than required for production, therefore multiple fixtures, 10 to 27, are required per refrigerator model. Molds are particular to a specific product configuration making mixed model assembly challenging for sequencing, mold changes or auto changeover features. The initial goal was to create a tool leveraging the ORNL materials and additive process to build a tool in 4 to 6 weeks or less. A secondary goal was to create common fixture cores and provide lightweight fixture sections that could be revised in a very short time to increase equipment flexibility reduce lead times, lower the barriers to first production trials, and reduce tooling costs.

  4. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 2 (FGE.23Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    this procedure additional toxicological data might become necessary. In order to determine whether the conclusion for the 19 candidate substances can be applied to the materials of commerce, it is necessary to consider the available specifications. Specifications including purity criteria and identity...... for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 19 flavouring substances. Information on the stereoisomeric composition is missing for one of the substances [FLno: 03.022], as Industry has informed that it occurs as a mixture of E- & Z-isomers, however, the composition of the mixture has to be specified....... Thus, the final evaluation of the materials of commerce cannot be performed for this substance, pending further information. The remaining 18 substances [FL-no: 02.247, 02.248, 03.008, 03.011, 03.012, 03.015, 03.016, 03.020, 03.024, 04.059, 04.067, 04.068, 04.069, 04.075, 04.079, 04.084, 08.127 and 09...

  5. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rukmani Mohanta; Anjan Kumar Giri

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that the study of flavour physics and CP violation is very important to critically test the Standard Model and to look for possible signature of new physics beyond it. The observation of CP violation in kaon system in 1964 has ignited a lot of experimental and theoretical efforts to understand its origin and to look for CP violation effects in other systems besides the neutral kaons. The two -factories BABAR and BELLE, along with other experiments, in the last decade or so made studies in flavour physics and CP violation a very interesting one. In this article we discuss the status and prospectives of the flavour physics associated with the strange, charm and bottom sectors of the Standard Model. The important results in kaon sector will be briefly discussed. Recently, mixing in the charm system has been observed, which was being pursued for quite some time without any success. The smallness of the mixing parameters in the charm system is due to the hierarchical structure of the CKM matrix. Interestingly, so far we have not found CP violation in the charm system but in the future, with more dedicated experiments at charm threshold, the situation could change. Many interesting observations have been made in the case of bottom mesons and some of them show some kind of deviations from that of the Standard Model expectations which are mainly associated with the → flavour changing neutral current transitions. It is long believed that the system could be the harbinger of new physics since it is a system in which both bottom and strange quarks are the constituents. Recently, D0 and CDF announced their result for the mixing which is claimed to be the first possible new physics signature in the flavour sector. We plan to touch upon all important issues pointing out both theoretical and experimental developments and future prospects in this review article.

  6. Structural order in additive processed bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James Thomas

    Considerable academic and industrial efforts have been dedicated to resolving scientific and technological issues associated with the fabrication of efficient plastic solar cells via solution deposition techniques. The most successful strategy used to generate solution processable devices implements a two component donor-acceptor type system composed of a (p-type) narrow bandgap conjugated polymer donor blended with a (n-type) fullerene acceptor. Due to the limited exciton diffusion lengths (~10 nm) inherent to these materials, efficient photoinduced charge generation requires heterojunction formation (i.e. donor/acceptor interfaces) in close proximity to the region of exciton generation. Maximal charge extraction therefore requires that donor and acceptor components form nanoscale phase separated percolating pathways to their respective electrodes. Devices exhibiting these structural characteristics are termed bulk heterojunction devices (BHJ). Although the BHJ architecture highlights the basic characteristics of functional donor-acceptor type organic solar cells, device optimization requires internal order within each phase and proper organization relative to the substrate in order to maximize charge transport efficiencies and minimize charge carrier recombination losses. The economic viability of BHJ solar cells hinges upon the minimization of processing costs; thus, commercially relevant processing techniques should generate optimal structural characteristics during film formation, eliminating the need for additional post deposition processing steps. Empirical optimization has shown that solution deposition using high boiling point additives (e.g. octanedithiol (ODT)) provides a simple and widely used fabrication method for maximizing the power conversion efficiencies of BHJ solar cells. This work will show using x-ray scattering that a small percentage of ODT (~2%) in chlorobenzene induces the nucleation of polymeric crystallites within 2 min of deposition

  7. Precipitates in Steels With Ti Additive Produced by CSP Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Yan-zhi; LIU De-lu; NI Xiao-qing

    2009-01-01

    Hot strips of low carbon steels with Ti additive [contain C 0.04%-0.07%, Si≤0. 6%, Mn≤0. 6%,Ti 0.06%-0.14% (mass percent)] produced by EAF-CSP (Electric Arc Furnaces-Compact Strip Production)process were examined by TEM, HREM and XRD. Carbonitrides with different N/C ratio were found in the samples. The varying composition of the Ti-carbonitrides resulted from the supersaturation of Ti and temperature at which the compound was formed. In the tested steel, total mass fraction of the precipitates including cementite, carbonitride and a small quantity of Fe3O4, Al2O3, Ti2 CS and AlN was about 0. 305%. XRD results showed that about a quarter of the powder extracted by electrolysis was titanium nitrides, carbonitrides and carbides. Particle arrays formed by interphase precipitation could be observed either in slabs or in hot strips. The dominant reaction mechanisms were discussed. Compared with the conventional cold charge process, small amount of Ti addition would be more effective for precipitation of fine precipitates in the steels produced by CSP process.

  8. Electroacoustics modeling of piezoelectric welders for ultrasonic additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent 3D metal printing technology which utilizes ultrasonic vibrations from high power piezoelectric transducers to additively weld similar and dissimilar metal foils. CNC machining is used intermittent of welding to create internal channels, embed temperature sensitive components, sensors, and materials, and for net shaping parts. Structural dynamics of the welder and work piece influence the performance of the welder and part quality. To understand the impact of structural dynamics on UAM, a linear time-invariant model is used to relate system shear force and electric current inputs to the system outputs of welder velocity and voltage. Frequency response measurements are combined with in-situ operating measurements of the welder to identify model parameters and to verify model assumptions. The proposed LTI model can enhance process consistency, performance, and guide the development of improved quality monitoring and control strategies.

  9. Lepton Flavour at the Electroweak Scale: A Complete A4 Model

    CERN Document Server

    Holthausen, Martin; Schmidt, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Apparent regularities in fermion masses and mixings are often associated with physics at a high flavour scale, especially in the context of discrete flavour symmetries. One of the main reasons for that is that the correct vacuum alignment requires usually some high scale mechanism to be phenomenologically acceptable. Contrary to this expectation, we present in this paper a renormalizable radiative neutrino mass model with an A4 flavour symmetry in the lepton sector, which is broken at the electroweak scale. For that we use a novel way to achieve the VEV alignment via an extended symmetry in the flavon potential proposed before by two of the authors. We discuss various phenomenological consequences for the lepton sector and show how the remnants of the flavour symmetry suppress large lepton flavour violating processes. The model naturally includes a dark matter candidate, whose phenomenology we outline. Finally, we sketch possible extensions to the quark sector and discuss its implications for the LHC, especia...

  10. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Fo od Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Proce ssing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evalua tion 35, Revision 1 (FGE.35Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate three flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 35, Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present ...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications, including complete purity criteria and identity, have been provided for all three candidate substances....

  11. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented

  12. Preservation of minimally processed 'aurora-1' peaches using additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramilo Nogueira Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 'Aurora-1' peaches establishes an interesting alternative as a minimally processed product, due to its characteristics like flavor, color, smell, and also because of its handling resistance. However, it has a short shelf life after a fresh-cut due to enzymatic browning and stone cavity collapse. The main purpose of this research was to test the additive with antioxidant effect to prevent browning in minimally processed 'Aurora-1' peaches. The minimal processing consists of washing, sanitizing, peelings and fruit stone extraction. After that, longitudinal cuts were made to obtain eight segments per fruit. The slices were immersed into the following treatment solutions: control (immersion in 2% ascorbic acid; 2% ascorbic acid + 2% calcium chloride; 1% sodium isoascorbate; 1% citric acid; 1% L-cysteine hydrochloride. The products were placed into rigid polystyrene trays branded MEIWA M-54, covered with 14 µm PVC film (OmnifilmTM and kept in cold storage at 3ºC ± 2ºC and 65% RH for twelve days, and evaluated each three days. Appraised variables were appearance, soluble solids, titratable acidity, soluble carbohydrates and reducing sugars, total and soluble pectin, ascorbic acid, and peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase enzyme activity. L-cysteine gave to the minimally processed products a shelf life of twelve days, limmited by off-flavor. The treatment with ascorbic acid was efficient to maintainthe ascorbic acid content, with a shelf-life of nine days, limited by enzymatic browning.

  13. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenzinger, Guenter; Bamberg, Joachim; Ladewig, Alexander; Hess, Thomas; Henkel, Benjamin; Satzger, Wilhelm

    2015-03-01

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  14. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenzinger, Guenter, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Bamberg, Joachim, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Ladewig, Alexander, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Hess, Thomas, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Henkel, Benjamin, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Satzger, Wilhelm, E-mail: guenter.zenzinger@mtu.de, E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de [MTU Aero Engines AG, Dachauerstrasse 665, 80995 Munich (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  15. Contribution of crosslinking products in the flavour enhancer processing: the new concept of Maillard peptide in sensory characteristics of Maillard reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karangwa, Eric; Murekatete, Nicole; Habimana, Jean de Dieu; Masamba, Kingsley; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Muhoza, Bertrand; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the flavour-enhancing properties of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) for different systems consisted of different peptides (sunflower, SFP; corn, CP and soyabean SP) with, xylose and cysteine were investigated. Maillard systems from peptides of sunflower, corn and soyabean with xylose and cysteine were designated as PXC, MCP and MSP, respectively. The Maillard systems were prepared at pH of 7.4 using temperature of 120C for 2 h. Results showed that all systems were significantly different in all sensory attributes. The highest scores for mouthfulness and continuity were observed for MCP with the lowest peptides distribution between 1000 and 5000 Da, known as Maillard peptide. This revealed that the MCP with the lowest Maillard peptide content had the strongest "Kokumi" effect compared to the other MRPsand demonstrated that "kokumi effect" of MRPs was contributed by not only the "Maillard peptide" defined by the molecular weight (1000-5000 Da). Results on sensory evaluation after fractionation of PXC followed by enzymatic hydrolysis showed no significant differences between PXC, P-PXC and their hydrolysates. This observation therefore confirmed that the presence of other contributors attributed to the "Kokumi" effect rather than the Maillard peptide. It can be deduced that the unhydrolyzed crosslinking products might have contributed to the "Kokumi" effect of MRPs. The structures of four probable crosslinking compounds were proposed and the findings have provided new insights in the sensory characteristics of xylose, cysteine and sunflower peptide MRPs. PMID:27478243

  16. Effect of tomato pleiotropic ripening mutations on flavour volatile biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, K.; Fray, R.G.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Graham, N.; Bradley, G.; Seymour, G.B.; Bovy, A.G.; Grierson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Ripening is a tightly controlled and developmentally regulated process involving networks of genes, and metabolites that result in dramatic changes in fruit colour, texture and flavour. Molecular and genetic analysis in tomato has revealed a series of regulatory genes involved in fruit development a

  17. Functional role of starch and kappa-carrageenan on the rheology and flavour of a custard dessert (COST 921 recipe)

    OpenAIRE

    González Tomás, Luis; Tárrega, Amparo; Costell, Elvira

    2005-01-01

    Flavour release and perception are complex processes in which different physico-chemical and physiological phenomena may be involved 1. Whereas flavour release is mainly governed by chemical and/or physical interactions between flavour compounds and the food matrix 2, perception is strongly influenced by physiological factors like mouth volume, saliva flow rate and air flow rate through the mouth and nose 3. In the framework of COST 921 action, the main objective of this work was to study the...

  18. B decays and lepton flavour (universality) violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellin, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb found hints for physics beyond the standard model in Bto K^*μ^+μ^- , Bto K^*μ^+μ^-/Bto K^*e^+e^- and B_stoφμ^+μ^- . In addition, the BABAR results for Bto D^{(*)}τν and the CMS excess in htoτ^±μ^∓ also point towards lepton flavour (universality) violating new physics. While Bto D^{(*)}τν and htoτ^±μ^∓ can be naturally explained by an extended Higgs sector, the probably most promising explanation for the bto sμμ anomalies is a Z' boson. Furthermore, combining a 2HDM with a gauged L_μ-L_τ symmetry allows for explaining the bto sμ^+μ^- anomalies and htoτ^±μ^∓ simultaneously, with interesting correlations to τto3μ . In the light of these deviations from the SM we also discuss the possibilities of observing lepton flavour violating B decays ( e.g. Bto K^{(*)}τ^±μ^∓ and B_stoτ^±μ^∓ in Z^' models.

  19. Processing and Quality Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing Monolayer Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Wendt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although its importance has increased significantly, Additive Manufacturing is not yet a fully accepted industrial manufacturing process for load-carrying parts. The future success of the process group depends on its standardization. This work proposes a methodology for the design, manufacturing, and quality evaluation of specimens manufactured by Fused Layer Modeling that are composed of only one layer (so-called monolayers. The processing methodology and properties of monolayers have not been studied systematically yet. A first systematic design of monolayers for mechanical testing is presented. Rectangular and circular monolayers adapted to the loads of tensile and compression testing are manufactured using different trajectory strategies. Frequently occurring macro- and microgeometrical defects are evaluated and categorized in order to optimize the part quality. This work also studies the effect of some manufacturing parameters such as the gap between print head and machine bed, trajectory strategy, bed leveling, and temperatures on part quality. The most suitable specimens are tested mechanically in tensile or compression tests. In the case of study, tensile strength values are only 8.6% lower than the values for reference tests on the unextruded filament. However, the properties deviate more strongly for compression tests which may be due to the selected specimen geometry.

  20. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  1. Neutrino Mass and Flavour Models

    CERN Document Server

    King, Stephen F

    2009-01-01

    We survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and tri-bimaximal mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. We focus in particular on models with discrete family symmetry and unification, and show how such models can also solve the SUSY flavour and CP problems. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

  2. Flavour Covariant Formalism for Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena and apply it to study the flavour-dynamics of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL). We show that this formalism provides a complete and unified description of RL, consistently accounting for three distinct physical phenomena: (i) resonant mixing and (ii) coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, as well as (iii) quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. We describe the necessary emergence of higher-rank tensors in flavour space, arising from the unitarity cuts of partial self-energies. Finally, we illustrate the importance of this formalism within a minimal Resonant $\\tau$-Genesis model by showing that, with the inclusion of all flavour effects in a consistent way, the final lepton asymmetry can be enhanced by up to an order of magnitude, when compared to previous partially flavour-dependent treatments.

  3. Patterns of Flavour Violation in the RSc Model, the LHT Model and Supersymmetric Flavour Models

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2009-01-01

    We summarize the results on patterns of flavour violation in a Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection (RSc) and compare them with those identified in the Littlest Higgs Model with T--parity (LHT) and in a number of SUSY Flavour Models. While K decays play in this presentation a prominent role, the inclusion of B physics and lepton flavour violation is crucial in the distinction between these three popular extensions of the Standard Model (SM) by means of flavour physics.

  4. Grand Unified Theories and Lepton-Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, C S

    1998-01-01

    Lepton-flavour violating processes, such as $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$, are studied in ordinary (non-SUSY) SU(5) and SUSY SU(5) grand unified theories. First given are some introductory argument on the mechanism of U.V. divergence cancellation in flavour changing neutral current processes and on the decoupling of particles with GUT scale masses . We next see that such general argument is confirmed by an explicit calculation of the amplitude of $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$ in ordinary SU(5), which shows that logarithmic divergence really cancels among diagrams and remaining finite part are suppressed by at least $1/M_{GUT}^2$. In SUSY SU(5), flavour changing slepton mass-squared term get a logarithmic correction, as recently claimed. However, when the effect of flavour changing wave function renormalization is also taken into account such logarithmic correction turns out to disappear, provided a condition is met among SUSY breaking soft masses. In SUGRA-inspired SUSY GUT, such condition is not satisfied. But the remaining logarit...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 30, Revision 1 (FGE.30Rev1): 4-Prop-1-enylphenol and 2-methoxy-4-(prop- 1enyl)phenyl 3-methylbutyrate from chemical group 17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    concluded that the two substances [FL-no: 04.097, 09.894] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 3 (FGE.23Rev3): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 20 candidate substances....

  7. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 51, Revision 2 (FGE.51Rev2): Consideration of alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to alicyclic ketones secondary alcohols and related esters in FGE.09Rev6 (2015b)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    and to finalise the evaluation. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered and are adequate for 21 substances. For [FL-no: 07.094 and 07.112], information on the solubility in water and ethanol is missing. The chemical...

  8. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016 Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 75, Revision 1 (FGE.75Rev1): Consideration of tetrahydrofuran derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to tetrahydrofuran derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.33 (2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    with the JECFA conclusion ‘No safety concern at estimated level of intake as flavouring substances’ based on the maximised survey-derived daily intake (MSDI) approach. The specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 11 substances, the information is adequate....

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 4 (FGE.06Rev4 ): Straight - and branched - chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters from chemical groups 1, 3 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    , estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided...

  10. Quark Yukawa pattern from spontaneous breaking of flavour $SU(3)^3$

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    A $SU(3)_Q \\times SU(3)_u \\times SU(3)_d$ invariant scalar potential breaking spontaneously the quark flavour symmetry can explain the standard model flavour puzzle. The approximate alignment in flavour space of the vacuum expectation values of the up and down `Yukawa fields' results as a dynamical effect. The observed quark mixing angles, the weak CP violating phase, and hierarchical quark masses can be all reproduced at the cost of introducing additional (auxiliary) scalar multiplets, but without the need of introducing hierarchical parameters.

  11. Wiener-Hopf factorizations for a multidimensional Markov additive process and their applications to reflected processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakiyo Miyazawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the framework of Neuts' matrix analytic approach to a reflected process generated by a discrete time multidimensional Markov additive process. This Markov additive process has a general background state space and a real vector valued additive component, and generates a multidimensional reflected process. Our major interest is to derive a closed form formula for the stationary distribution of this reflected process. To this end, we introduce a real valued level, and derive new versions of the Wiener-Hopf factorization for the Markov additive process with the multidimensional additive component. In particular, itis represented by moment generating functions, and we consider the domain for it to be valid.Our framework is general enough to include multi-server queues and/or queueing networks as well as non-linear time series which are currently popular in financial and actuarial mathematics. Our results yield structural results for such models. As an illustration, we apply our results to extend existing results on the tail behavior of reflected processes.A major theme of this work is to connect recent work on matrix analytic methods to classical probabilistic studies on Markov additive processes. Indeed, using purely probabilistic methods such as censoring, duality, level crossing and time-reversal (which are known in the matrix analytic methods community but date back to Arjas & Speed [2] and Pitman [29], we extend and unify existing results in both areas.

  12. Additive manufacturing of stretchable tactile sensors: Processes, materials, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatani, Morteza

    3D printing technology is becoming more ubiquitous every day especially in the area of smart structures. However, fabrication of multi-material, functional, and smart structures is problematic because of the process and material limitations. This thesis sought to develop a Direct Print Photopolymerization (DPP) fabrication technique that appreciably extends the manufacturing space for the 3D smart structures. This method employs a robotically controlled micro-extrusion of a filament equipped with a photopolymerization process. The ability to use polymers and ultimately their nanocomposites in this process is the advantage of the proposed process over the current fabrication methods in the fabrication of 3D structures featuring mechanical, physical, and electrical functionalities. In addition, this study focused to develop a printable, conductive, and stretchable nanocomposite based on a photocurable and stretchable liquid resin filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). This nanocomposite exhibited piezoresistivity, means its resistivity changes as it deforms. This property is a favorable factor in developing resistance based tactile sensors. They were also able to resist high tensile strains while they showed conductivity. Furthermore, this study offered a possible and low-cost method to have a unique and highly stretchable pressure sensitive polymer. This disruptive pressure sensitive polymer composed of an Ionic Liquid (IL) and a stretchable photopolymer embedded between two layers of Carbon Nanotube (CNTs) based stretchable electrodes. The developed IL-polymer showed both field effect property and piezoresistivity that can detect large tensile strains up 30%. In summary, this research study focused to present feasible methods and materials for printing a 3D smart structure especially in the context of flexible tactile sensors. This study provides a foundation for the future efforts in fabrication of skin like tactile sensors in three-dimensional motifs

  13. Supersymmetry, the flavour puzzle and rare B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, David Michael

    2010-07-14

    The gauge hierarchy problem and the flavour puzzle belong to the most pressing open questions in the Standard Model of particle physics. Supersymmetry is arguably the most popular framework of physics beyond the Standard Model and provides an elegant solution to the gauge hierarchy problem; however, it aggravates the flavour puzzle. In the first part of this thesis, I discuss several approaches to address the flavour puzzle in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model and experimental tests thereof: supersymmetric grand unified theories with a unification of Yukawa couplings at high energies, theories with minimal flavour violation and additional sources of CP violation and theories with gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking and a large ratio of Higgs vacuum expectation values. In the second part of the thesis, I discuss the phenomenology of two rare B meson decay modes which are promising probes of physics beyond the Standard Model: The exclusive B {yields} K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay, whose angular decay distribution will be studied at LHC and gives access to a large number of observables and the b{yields}s{nu}anti {nu} decays, which are in the focus of planned high-luminosity Super B factories. I discuss the predictions for these observables in the Standard Model and their sensitivity to New Physics. (orig.)

  14. Role of anterior piriform cortex in the acquisition of conditioned flavour preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Cristina; Martin-Signes, Mar; Risco, Severiano

    2016-01-01

    Flavour aversion learning (FAL) and conditioned flavour preference (CFP) facilitate animal survival and play a major role in food selection, but the neurobiological mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Neuroanatomical bases of CFP were examined by using Fos immunohistochemistry to record neuronal activity. Rats were trained over eight alternating one-bottle sessions to acquire a CFP induced by pairing a flavour with saccharin (grape was CS+ in Group 1; cherry in Group 2; in Group 3, grape/cherry in half of animals; Group 4, grape/cherry in water). Animals were offered the grape flavour on the day immediately after the training and their brains were processed for c-Fos. Neurons evidencing Fos-like immunoreactivity were counted in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens core, and anterior piriform cortex (aPC). Analysis showed a significantly larger number of activated cells after learning in the aPC alone, suggesting that the learning process might have produced a change in this cortical region. Ibotenic lesions in the aPC blocked flavour-taste preference but did not interrupt flavour-toxin FAL by LiCl. These data suggest that aPC cells may be involved in the formation of flavour preferences and that the integrity of this region may be specifically necessary for the acquisition of a CFP. PMID:27624896

  15. The Strong Interactions, Flavour Physics and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberi, Saba

    In this thesis we use effective field theories of the strong interactions to improve our understanding of several quantities in the Standard Model of particle physics (SM). We also examine constraints on an extension of the SM scalar sector and study the implications for the Higgs mass. We first examine an approach to extracting the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| via the relationship between the B meson decays B → X uℓnul and B → Xsgamma, where Xi is any final state hadron containing a quark of flavour i. Model dependence is reduced in this approach since the non-perturbative shape function at leading order is universal and drops out; however the perturbative expansion at next-to-leading order is found to be poorly behaved. We carry out a renormalon analysis of the relationship between these spectra to examine higher order perturbative corrections and compare the fixed-order and log expansions. Our analysis can be used to estimate the perturbative uncertainty in the extraction of |Vub|, which we show to be relatively small. Next we take a step towards the broader goal of summing large phase space logarithms from a variety of jet algorithms using Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). We develop a consistent approach to implementing arbitrary phase space constraints in SCET and demonstrate the connection between cutoffs in SCET and phase space limits. By considering several jet algorithms at next-to-leading order, we gain some insight into factorization of final state jets. In particular, we point out the connection between the ultraviolet regulator and factorization. Finally we consider a scalar sector that contains a colour-octet electroweak-doublet scalar, in addition to the SM Higgs. This extension contains the only scalar representations that Yukawa-couple to quarks and are consistent with minimal flavour violation. We examine constraints from electroweak precision data, direct production from LEPII and the Tevatron, and from flavour

  16. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  17. Anarchic Yukawas and top partial compositeness: the flavour of a successful marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Lee, Seung J.; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    The top quark can be naturally singled out from other fermions in the Standard Model due to its large mass, of the order of the electroweak scale. We follow this reasoning in models of pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson composite Higgs, which may derive from an underlying confining dynamics. We consider a new class of flavour models, where the top quark obtains its mass via partial compositeness, while the lighter fermions acquire their masses by a deformation of the dynamics generated at a high flavour scale. One interesting feature of such scenario is that it can avoid all the flavour constraints without the need of flavour symmetries, since the flavour scale can be pushed high enough. We show that both flavour conserving and violating constraints can be satisfied with top partial compositeness without invoking any flavour symmetry for the up-type sector, in the case of the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset with top partners in the four-plet and singlet of SO(4). In the down-type sector, some degree of alignment is required if all down-type quarks are elementary. We show that taking the bottom quark partially composite provides a dynamical explanation for the hierarchy causing this alignment. We present explicit realisations of this mechanism which do not require to include additional bottom partner fields. Finally, these conclusions are generalised to scenarios with non-minimal cosets and top partners in larger representations.

  18. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) and tolerable intakes, respectively, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives (including flavouring agents) and contaminants, assessments of intake, and the establishment and revision of specifications for food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and intake data on various specific food additives (diacetyltartaric and fatty acid esters of glycerol, quillaia extracts, invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, beta-carotene from Blakeslea trispora, curcumin, phosphates, diphosphates and polyphosphates, hydrogenated poly-1-decene, natamycin, D-tagatose, carrageenan, processed Eucheuma seaweed, curdlan, acetylated oxidized starch, alpha-cyclodextrin and sodium sulfate), flavouring agents and contaminants (3-chloro-1,2-propanediol, 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol, and a large number of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications of these food additives and specific flavouring agents, and further information required or desired. PMID:12564044

  19. Heavy flavour production at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Three recent results in heavy flavour production at the CMS experiment are addressed in this report. Measurements of the differential production cross sections of B hadron and quarkonium states in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV are presented. These are important tools to investigate heavy-quark production mechanisms in QCD. The dependences on transverse momentum and rapidity are investigated and comparisons with theory expectations and among different collision energies are provided. Also the new observation of $\\Upsilon(1S)\\Upsilon(1S)$ production is reported.

  20. Lepton flavour violation searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dawe, Edmund; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Recent results from searches for lepton flavour violation performed by ATLAS and CMS in the $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\text{TeV}$ data are presented. The search for $Z\\rightarrow e\\mu$ and lepton flavour violating heavy neutral particle decays are summarized before covering the search for $H\\rightarrow \\mu \\tau$ in greater detail.

  1. Mass Bounds for Flavour Mixing Bileptons

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, M B

    1999-01-01

    Mass bounds for doubly-charged bilepton gauge bosons are derived from constraints on fermion pair production at LEP and lepton-flavour violating charged lepton decays. The limit obtained of 700 GeV for the doubly-charged bilepton does not depend on the bilepton coupling being flavour-diagonal, unlike other bounds which have been given in the literature.

  2. Search for lepton flavour violation at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Hennekemper, E; Contreras, J G; Bruncko, D; Henderson, R C W; Martyn, H U; Rostovtsev, A; Olsson, J E; Feltesse, J; Buschhorn, G; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Patel, G D; Pandurovic, M; Picuric, I; Staykova, Z; Povh, B; Campbell, A J; Backovic, S; Nowak, G; Ceccopieri, F; Fischer, D J; Kogler, R; Raicevic, N; Nowak, K; Polifka, R; Cvach, J; Huber, F; Lendermann, V; Mehta, A; Hildebrandt, M; Barrelet, E; Sauvan, E; Bizot, J C; Eisen, E; Sauter, M; Dobre, M; Schoeffel, L; Wunsch, E; Steder, M; Muller, K; Alexa, C; Henschel, H; Kleinwort, C; Papadopoulou, T; Pascaud, C; Pahl, P; Wegener, D; Boudry, V; Zacek, J; Turnau, J; Gogitidze, N; Robmann, R; Cerny, V; Niebuhr, C; Zomer, E; De Wolf, E A; Malinovski, E; Brinkmann, M; Fedotov, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Greenshaw, T; Horisberger, R; Mikocki, S; Chekelian, V; Gabathuler, E; Dodonov, V; Morris, J V; Valkarova, A; Glazov, A; Newman, P R; Salek, D; Sefkow, E; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Grab, C; Haidt, D; Grell, B R; Tseepeldorj, B; Toll, T; Van Mechelen, P; Goerlich, L; Bystritskaya, L; Ghazaryan, S; Specka, A; Spaskov, V; Laycock, R; Kluge, T; Fleischer, M; Rotaru, M; Vazdik, Y; von den Driesch, M V; Baghdasaryan, A; Pokorny, B; Panagoulias, I; Andreev, V; Zhang, Z; Felst, R; Lipka, K; Sankey, D P C; Baghdasaryan, S; Tsakov, I; Delcourt, B; Shushkevich, S; Kenyon, I R; Hreus, T; Lebedev, A; Aaron, F D; Habib, S; Coughlan, J A; Vallee, C; Shtarkov, L N; Herbst, M; Dubak, A; Schoning, A; Zhokin, A; Stella, B; Ferencei, J; Rusakov, S; Brisson, V; Osman, S; Favart, L; Dainton, J B; Belov, P; Schmitt, S; Sopicki, P; Soloviev, Y; Zohrabyan, H; Smiljanic, I; List, B; Perez, E; Tran, T H; Milcewicz-Mika, I; List, J; Bracinik, J; Dossanov, A; Traynor, D; Diaconu, C; Klein, M; Kraemer, M; Jung, H; Eckerlin, G; Pitzl, D; Petrukhin, A; Landon, M P J; Gayler, J; Jacquet, M; Delvax, J; Jonsson, L; Grindhammer, G; Bunyatyan, A; Helebrant, C; Hiller, K H; Sykora, T; Placakyte, R; Sloan, T; Cerny, K; Ravdandorj, T; Palichik, V; Fomenko, A; Kostka, P; Truol, P; Kapichine, M; Kretzschmar, J; Marage, P; Tabasco, J E R; Morozov, A; Brandt, G; Meyer, A B; Nikitin, D; Kruger, K; Naumann, T; Janssen, X; Daum, K; Stoicea, G; Zalesak, J; Britzger, D; Meyer, J; Meyer, H; Mudrinic, M; Straumann, U; Moreau, E; Bartel, W; Reimer, P; Kiesling, C; Avila, K B C; South, D; Eliseev, A; Roosen, R; Pirumov, H; Maxfield, S J; Grebenyuk, A; Belousov, A; Makankine, A; Ozerov, D; Hoffmann, D; Urban, K; Thompson, P D; Begzsuren, K; Lange, W; Egli, S; Gouzevitch, M; Levonian, S; Radescu, V; Piec, S; Lubimov, V

    2011-01-01

    A search for second and third generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions via the lepton flavour violating processes ep -> mu X and ep -> tau X is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full data sample taken at a centre-of-mass energy root s = 319 GeV is used for the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 245 pb(-1) of e(+)p and 166 pb(-1) of e(-)p collision data. No evidence for the production of such leptoquarks is observed in the H1 data. Leptoquarks produced in e(+/-)p collisions with a coupling strength of lambda = 0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95\\% confidence level up to leptoquark masses of 712 GeV and 479 GeV, respectively.

  3. Additive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Bue

    -ended. What is to hope is that future research will tie these ends with the emerge of a fully developed system. Additive Multi Material Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing share close family bonds with CNC machine tools. State-of-the-art CNC machine tools of today are multi-axis hybrid machines....... Abendoflathes,mills,grindersinoneplatform. Ifhistoryrepeatitself, hybrid additive manufacturing machines will emerge as the field evolve. It is sought to fuel this, by developing a flexible multi material manufacturing platform that will permit fundamental research towards a second generation additive...... manufacturing system that truly will be a universally applicable manufacturing machine. A desktop sized factory. Not merely the development of such machine is undertaken, also examined is the possibility to additively manufacture complex electromechanical systems, as a step towards being able to autonomously...

  4. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives (including flavouring agents) and contaminants, assessments of intake, and the establishment and revision of specifications for food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and intake data on various specific food additives (alpha-amylase from Bacillus lichenformis containing a genetically engineered alpha-amylase gene from B. licheniformis, annatto extracts, curcumin, diacetyl and fatty acid esters of glycerol, D-tagatose, laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, mixed xylanase, beta-glucanase enzyme preparation produced by a strain of Humicola insolens, neotame, polyvinyl alcohol, quillaia extracts and xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus expressed in Fusarium venenatum), flavouring agents, a nutritional source of iron (ferrous glycinate, processed with citric acid), a disinfectant for drinking-water (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) and contaminants (cadmium and methylmercury). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives, recommendations on the flavouring agents considered, and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications and further information requested or desired.

  5. Studies on additive properties of some processing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Malewski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of prediction of mineral processing operation by partial effects summation is analyzed. Methodological and practical aspects of the problem are discussed using laboratory studies of selected comminution and classifying operations as examples. Laboratory experiments show that the effects of examined mineral processing operation depend on simultaneously running processes of classification and comminution. The influence rate of interaction between both processes on the final results is significant, but in some cases it may be neglected. The obtained results have preliminary character and needed a further verification.

  6. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  7. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  8. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 3 (FGE.73Rev3): Consideration of alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th and 63rd meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev4 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    .712] considered in this FGE and agrees with the JECFA conclusion, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered...

  9. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  10. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  11. Precision physics with heavy-flavoured hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of flavour dynamics is one of the key aims of elementary particle physics. The last 15 years have witnessed the triumph of the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism, which describes all flavour changing transitions of quarks in the Standard Model. This important milestone has been reached owing to a series of experiments, in particular to those operating at the so-called $B$ factories, at the Tevatron, and now at the LHC. We briefly review status and perspectives of flavour physics, highlighting the results where the LHC has given the most significant contributions, notably including the recent observation of the $B_s^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay.

  12. Oxidative flavour deterioration of fish oil enriched milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni Let, Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Frankel, E.N.;

    2003-01-01

    The oxidative deterioration of milk emulsions supplemented with 1.5 wt-% fish oil was investigated by sensory evaluation and by determining the peroxide value and volatile oxidation products after cold storage. Two types of milk emulsions were produced, one with a highly unsaturated tuna oil (38 wt...... emulsions, indicating that metal chelation with EDTA could inhibit the decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides in these emulsions. This study showed that an oxidatively stable milk emulsion containing highly polyunsaturated tuna fish oil could be prepared without significant fishy off-flavour development upon...... than the tuna oil emulsions, having a lower initial peroxide value (0.1 meq/kg). In the tuna oil emulsions the fishy off-flavour could not be detected throughout the storage period. Addition of 5-50 ppm EDTA significantly reduced the development of volatile oxidation products in the cod liver oil...

  13. Additional force field in cooling process of cellular Al alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Mingjun(郑明军); HE; Deping(何德坪); DAI; Ge(戴戈)

    2002-01-01

    The foaming process of Al alloy is similar to that of Al, but there is a solid-liquid state zone in the solidification process of cellular Al alloy which does not exist in the case of Al. In the unidirectional solidification of cellular Al alloy, the proportion of the solid phase gradually reduces from the solid front to the liquid front. This will introduce a force and result in a serious quick shrinkage. By the mathematic and physical mode, the solidification of the cellular Al alloy is studied. The data measured by experiment are close to the result calculated by the mode. This kind of shrinkage can be solved by suitable cooling method in appropriate growth stage. The compressive strength of the cellular Al alloy made by this way is 40% higher than that of cellular Al.

  14. SELF-INTERSECTION LOCAL TIME OF ADDITIVE LEVY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟玉泉; 胡迪鹤

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of existence of jointly continuous self-process X = {X(t), t ∈ RN+)} which has the decomposition X = X1 X2 ... Xv, eachThey prove that if Nrα> d(r - 1), then a jointly continuous local time of Z, i.e. theself-intersection local time of X, can be obtained.

  15. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  16. Azimuthal angular correlations between heavy-flavour decay particles and charged hadrons in pp collisions in ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy quarks produced in pp and heavy ion collisions are studied using heavy-flavour decay electrons and heavy-flavour mesons. Detailed understanding of the production processes and fragmentation of heavy quarks can be obtained by studying the azimuthal angular correlation of heavy-flavour hadrons. The azimuthal angular correlations of heavy-flavour mesons and charged hadrons can be used to disentangle charm and beauty-hadrons in pp collisions. In this contribution the fraction of electrons from beauty-hadron decays in the heavy-flavour decay electron yield is shown as well as the beauty production cross section in pp collisions at √S = 2.76 TeV. The measurements are compared to the predictions from next-to leading order perturbative QCD calculations. We also show the results from correlation analysis of charged D* mesons and hadrons performed using pp collision data at √S = 7 TeV

  17. Additive CAD/CAM process for dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nelson R F A; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Rekow, Elizabeth D; Smay, Jim

    2011-02-01

    This article describes the evolution of a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) process where ceramic paste is deposited in a layer-by-layer sequence using a computer numerical control machine to build up core and fixed partial denture (FPD) structures (robocasting). Al(2)O(3) (alumina) or ZrO(2) (Y-TZP) are blended into a 0.8% aqueous solution of ammonium polyacrylate in a ratio of approximately 1:1 solid:liquid. A viscosifying agent, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, is added to a concentration of 1% in the liquid phase, and then a counter polyelectrolyte is added to gel the slurry. There are two methods for robocasting crown structures (cores or FPD framework). One is for the core to be printed using zirconia ink without support materials, in which the stereolithography (STL) file is inverted (occlusal surface resting on a flat substrate) and built. The second method uses a fugitive material composed of carbon black codeposited with the ceramic material. During the sintering process, the carbon black is removed. There are two key challenges to successful printing of ceramic crowns by the robocasting technique. First is the development of suitable materials for printing, and second is the design of printing patterns for assembly of the complex geometry required for a dental restoration. Robocasting has room for improvement. Current development involves enhancing the automation of nozzle alignment for accurate support material deposition and better fidelity of the occlusal surface. An accompanying effort involves calculation of optimal support structures to yield the best geometric results and minimal material usage.

  18. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P C Vinodkumar

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understanding heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multiquark hadrons the hadron molecular states etc., also will be reviewed. Various issues and challenges in understanding the physics and dynamics of the quarks at the hadronic dimensions are highlighted. Looking into the present and future experimental prospects at different heavy flavour laboratories like BES-III, CLEO-c, BaBar, Belle, LHC etc., the scope for theoretical extensions of the present knowledge of heavy flavour physics would be very demanding. In this context, many relevant contributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted.

  19. Strong coupling, discrete symmetry and flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, Steven

    2010-01-01

    We show how two principles - strong coupling and discrete symmetry - can work together to generate the flavour structure of the Standard Model. We propose that in the UV the full theory has a discrete flavour symmetry, typically only associated with tribimaximal mixing in the neutrino sector. Hierarchies in the particle masses and mixing matrices then emerge from multiple strongly coupled sectors that break this symmetry. This allows for a realistic flavour structure, even in models built around an underlying grand unified theory. We use two different techniques to understand the strongly coupled physics: confinement in N=1 supersymmetry and the AdS/CFT correspondence. Both approaches yield equivalent results and can be represented in a clear, graphical way where the flavour symmetry is realised geometrically.

  20. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific O pinion Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4 (FGE.23Rev4): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    .068, 04.069, 04.075, 04.079, 04.084, 08.127, 09.687, 13.170 and 13.200] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have...... also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 21 candidate substances. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  1. Nitrogen addition using a gas blow in an ESR process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S.; Momoi, Y.; Kajikawa, K.

    2016-07-01

    A new nitrogen method for adding in an ESR process using nitrogen gas blown in through the electrode was investigated. Nitrogen gas blown through a center bore of the electrode enabled contact between the nitrogen gas and the molten steel directly underneath the electrode tip. A ɸ 145mm diameter, laboratory-sized PESR furnace was used for the study on the reaction kinetics. Also, we carried out a water-model experiment in order to check the injection depth of the gas blown in the slag. The water model showed that the gas did not reach the upper surface of the molten metal and flowed on the bottom surface of the electrode only. An EPMA was carried out for a droplet remaining on the tip of the electrode after melting. The molten steel from the tip of the electrode shows that nitrogen gas absorption occurred at the tip of the electrode. The mass transfer coefficient was around 1.0x10-2 cm/sec in the system. This value is almost the same as the coefficient at the molten steel free surface.

  2. Optimization of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heinicke, Kevin

    Studies of $C\\!P$ violation can be used to test the Standard Model and might give insight into New Physics. Therefore, a wide range of $C\\!P$ measurements, including time-dependent decay rate measurements, are performed with the LHCb Experiment. Many of these are subject to mixing of neutral $B$ meson states with their antiparticles. The knowledge of the initial $B$ flavour is essential in these cases which is why several Flavour Tagging algorithms are used to deduce this information from the available event properties. These algorithms must be adjusted to changes in the shape of the event properties, resulting from an upgrade of the LHC centre-of-mass energy to $\\sqrt{s} = 13\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$. To simplify this process, the Flavour Tagging software is re-implemented. The tagging power of the muon, electron and kaon tagger is measured based on $B^+ \\to J\\!/\\!\\psi K^+$ data, which is processed within the new framework. It is found to be $(0.782 ± 0.018)\\%$, $(0.243 ± 0.011)\\%$ and $(0.649 ± 0.020)\\%$ for Run 1...

  3. New Physics in the Flavour Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments observed deviations from the Standard Model (SM) in the flavour sector: LHCb found a $4-5\\,\\sigma$ discrepancy compared to the SM in $b\\to s\\mu^+\\mu^-$ transitions (recently supported by an Belle analysis) and CMS reported a non-zero measurement of $h\\to\\mu\\tau$ with a significance of $2.4\\,\\sigma$. Furthermore, BELLE, BABAR and LHCb founds hints for the violation of flavour universality in $B\\to D^{(*)}\\tau\

  4. Flavour Violation in Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Allanach, B. C.; Hiller, G; Jones, D. R. T.; Slavich, P.(LPTHE, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252, Paris, France)

    2009-01-01

    32 pages, 8 figures International audience We study squark flavour violation in the anomaly mediated supersymmetry broken (AMSB) minimal supersymmetric standard model. Analytical expressions for the three-generational squark mass matrices are derived. We show that the anomaly-induced soft breaking terms have a decreasing amount of squark flavour violation when running from the GUT to the weak scale. Taking into account inter-generational squark mixing, we work out non-trivial constraint...

  5. b-flavour tagging in pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    An essential ingredient of all time-dependent CP violation studies of B mesons is the ability to tag the initial flavour of the B meson. The harsh environment of 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions makes this a particularly difficult enterprise. We report progresses in the flavour tagging of B0 and Bs mesons, including developments of novel techniques like the use of an opposite side charm tagger.

  6. Study of flavour compounds from orange juices by HS-SPME and GC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Covaciu, F.; Feher, I.; Magdas, A.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The flavour of the orange juices, which gives the taste and odour of the product, is an important criterion about the products quality for consumers. A fresh single strength and two commercial orange juices (obtained from concentrate) flavour profile were studied using a selective and sensitive gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical system, after a solvent free, single step preconcentration and extraction technique, the headspace solid phase microextraction (HP-SPME). In the studied orange juices 55 flavour compounds were detected and classified as belonging to the esters, alcohols, ketones, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes chemical families. The fresh single strength orange juice was characterized by high amount of esters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Limonene and valencene were the most abundant flavours in this fresh natural orange juice. Alcohols and ketones were found in higher concentration in the commercial orange juices made from concentrate, than in the single strength products. Nevertheless, in commercial juices the most abundant flavour was limonene and α-terpineol. The results highlight clear differences between fresh singles strength orange juice and juice from concentrate. The orange juices reconstructed from concentrate, made in Romania, present low quantity of flavour compounds, suggesting the absence or a low rearomatization process, but extraneous components were not detected.

  7. The role of attention in flavour perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Richard J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flavour results primarily from the combination of three discrete senses: taste, somatosensation and olfaction. In contrast to this scientific description, most people seem unaware that olfaction is involved in flavour perception. They also appear poorer at detecting the olfactory components of a flavour relative to the taste and somatosensory parts. These and other findings suggest that flavour may in part be treated as a unitary experience. In this article, I examine the mechanisms that may contribute to this unification, in particular the role of attention. Drawing on recent work, the evidence suggests that concurrent gustatory and somatosensory stimulation capture attention at the expense of the olfactory channel. Not only does this make it hard to voluntarily attend to the olfactory channel, but it also can explain why olfaction goes largely unnoticed in our day-to-day experience of flavour. It also provides a useful framework for conceptualizing how the unitary experience of flavour may arise from three anatomically discrete sensory systems.

  8. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM AM Inconel 718 standards for yield stress and ultimate tensile strength, and STA yield stress, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation exceeded the ASTM standards for AM Inconel 718.

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 2 (FGE.220Rev1): α,β-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    of subgroup 4.4a, 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.119] and 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.175]. Based on the new data the Panel concluded that 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.119] does not give rise to concern with respect to genotoxicity. For 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one......, including analysis of liver. This is also applicable to 2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxyfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no:13.089] and 2,5-dimethyl-4-ethoxyfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no:13.117], which are covered by the representative substance 4-acetyl-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no:13.175]. The Flavour Industry has informed...... that 5-methylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.157] is not in common use in the flavour industry and is no longer supported....

  10. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Andreev, V; Anthonis, T; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baudrand, S; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Franke, G; Frisson, T; Gabathuler, E; Garutti, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Ginzburgskaya, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, Roland Paul; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Hussain, S; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lüders, H; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovskii, E I; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Mladenov, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Perez-Astudillo, D; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Prideaux, P; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zálesák, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, J; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2007-01-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep->mu X and ep -> tau X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e^+ p collisions and 13.7 pb^-1 for e^- p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchm"uller-R"uckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  11. Following butter flavour deterioration with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cláudia R B S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2012-09-15

    Off-flavours develop naturally in butter and the process is accelerated by heat. An acoustic wave sensor was used to detect the aroma compounds evolved from heated butter and the results have shown that registered marked changes were coincident to odour changes detected by sensory analysis. The flavour compounds have also been analysed by GC/MS for identification. The response of the sensor was fully characterized in terms of the sensitivity to each of the identified compounds, and sensitivities of the system SPME/sensor were compared with the sensitivities of the system SPME/GC/MS. It was found that the sensor analytical system was more sensitive to methylketones than to fatty acids. The SPME/GC/MS system also showed the highest sensitivity to 2-heptanone, followed by 2-nonanone, but third place was occupied by undecanone and butanoic acid, to which the sensor showed moderate sensitivity. 2-heptanone was found to be an appropriate model compound to follow odour changes till the 500 h, and the lower sensitivity of the sensor to butanoic acid showed to be a positive characteristic, as saturation was prevented, and other more subtle changes in the flavour could be perceived.

  12. Heavy Flavour production in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATLAS prepared a program for measurements of production cross sections both of b-hadrons and Onia in central proton-proton collisions at new energy 14 TeV of LHC. Dedicated triggers based on muon, di-muon or electron signatures are designed to accommodate large statistics with already first several months. Starting from semi-inclusive measurements for very early stage exclusive channels will soon dominate measurements, allowing tests of QCD in Heavy Flavour sector already with 10 pb-1. With larger statistics production polarization measurements are being prepared for J/ψ and Λb. It is expected that 30 fb-1 collected at 1033cm-2 s-1 will allow specific measurements not accessible with limited statistics of Tevatron. In particular b polarization measurement can be achieved using Λb → J/ψ Λ decay. In J/ψ a polarization measurement will allow to confirm or exclude model predictions within large interval of transverse momenta. (author)

  13. Heavy Flavour Electron Elliptic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto

    Due to the large mass of the Charm and Beauty quarks, they are c reated in the very first moments of the ultra-high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions taking place at the CERN LHC, therefore, they should be unaware of the geome try of the colli- sion system and carry no azimuthal anisotropies. Similarly , the energy loss via gluon radiation for these massive quarks should be suppressed, th e so-called dead cone ef- fect. Although the observation of elliptic flow in the electro ns produced through the semileptonic decay of these heavy mesons is an indirect meas urement, throughout this thesis it will be shown that a strong correlation exists between the momentum anisotropy of the mother and daughter particles. In the low t ransverse momentum region such measurement would establish whether or not the s ystem reaches local thermal equilibrium. While at large transverse momentum, t he observation of collec- tivity for the heavy flavours can be understood only if the col lisional and radiative in-medium interaction...

  14. The effects of flavour symmetry breaking on hadron matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, A.N.; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Pleiter, D. [Juelich Research Centre (Germany); Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ. (Australia). School of Chemistry and Physics

    2012-12-15

    By considering a flavour expansion about the SU(3)-flavour symmetric point, we investigate how flavour-blindness constrains octet baryon matrix elements after SU(3) is broken by the mass difference between the strange and light quarks. We find the expansions to be highly constrained along a mass trajectory where the singlet quark mass is held constant, which proves beneficial for extrapolations of 2+1 flavour lattice data to the physical point. We investigate these effects numerically via a lattice calculation of the flavour-conserving and flavour-changing matrix elements of the vector and axial operators between octet baryon states.

  15. The effects of flavour symmetry breaking on hadron matrix elements

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, A N; Nakamura, Y; Pleiter, D; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Zanotti, J M

    2012-01-01

    By considering a flavour expansion about the SU(3)-flavour symmetric point, we investigate how flavour-blindness constrains octet baryon matrix elements after SU(3) is broken by the mass difference between the strange and light quarks. We find the expansions to be highly constrained along a mass trajectory where the singlet quark mass is held constant, which proves beneficial for extrapolations of 2+1 flavour lattice data to the physical point. We investigate these effects numerically via a lattice calculation of the flavour-conserving and flavour-changing matrix elements of the vector and axial operators between octet baryon states.

  16. Two-Higgs-doublet models with Minimal Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Carlucci, Maria Valentina

    2010-01-01

    The tree-level flavour-changing neutral currents in the two-Higgs-doublet models can be suppressed by protecting the breaking of either flavour or flavour-blind symmetries, but only the first choice, implemented by the application of the Minimal Flavour Violation hypothesis, is stable under quantum corrections. Moreover, a two-Higgs-doublet model with Minimal Flavour Violation enriched with flavour-blind phases can explain the anomalies recently found in the Delta F = 2 transitions, namely the large CP-violating phase in B_s mixing and the tension between epsilon_K and S_\\psi_K.

  17. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...

  18. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 67, Revision 1 (FGE.67Rev.1): Consideration of 40 furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers evaluated by JECFA at the 65th meeting (JECFA, 2006b) and re-evaluated at the 69th meeting (JECFA, 2009c)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... toxicity data are requested. Besides the safety assessment of these substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have been considered. For three substances [FL-no: 13.031, 13.045 and 13.047] data on specifications / stereoisomerism are missing....

  19. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section 713.4..., processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. (a) Declaration requirements for additionally planned activities. (1) You must declare additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule...

  20. Search for lepton flavour violation at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-03-15

    A search for second and third generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions via the lepton flavour violating processes ep{yields}{mu}X and ep{yields}{tau}X is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full data sample taken at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=319 GeV is used for the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 245 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}p and 166 pb{sup -1} of e{sup -}p collision data. No evidence for the production of such leptoquarks is observed in the H1 data. Leptoquarks produced in e{sup {+-}}p collisions with a coupling strength of {lambda}=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to leptoquark masses of 712 GeV and 479 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  1. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    CERN Document Server

    de Salas, Pablo F

    2016-01-01

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, N_eff. We find a value of N_eff=3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), ...

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 1 (FGE.220Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    to the requested genotoxicity data in FGE.220 on the representative substance for subgroup 4.4b, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.010]. Flavouring Group Evaluation 220 (FGE.220) concerns 10 substances, corresponding to subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19. The 10 substances are alpha,beta-unsaturated 3(2H...... that the representative substance for subgroup 4.4b, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.010], is unable to induce adverse effects both on male rat reproductive capacity and dominant lethality. On this basis, the Panel concludes that there is no concern for this substance to induce heritable genetic damage...

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 2 (FGE.06Rev2): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    can be applied to the material of commerce, it is necessary to consider the available specifications. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for 46 of the 48 flavouring candidate substances. An ID test is missing for [FL.......203, 05.218, 08.074, 08.102, 09.377, 09.640, 09.674, 09.831, 09.884 and 09.885]. Thus, the final evaluation of the materials of commerce cannot be performed for 14 substances [FL-no: 02.152, 02.222, 05.061, 05.203, 05.218, 08.074, 08.102, 09.377, 09.640, 09.674, 09.831, 09.884, 09.885 and 09.938], pending...

  4. New perspectives for heavy flavour physics from the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, R. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Heavy flavours represent a challenge for lattice QCD. We discuss it in very general terms. We give an idea of the significant recent progress which opens up good perspectives for high precision first principles QCD computations for flavour physics. (orig.)

  5. Minimal flavour violation and SU(5)-unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimal flavour violation in its strong or weak versions, based on U(3)3 and U(2)3, respectively, allows suitable extensions of the standard model at the TeV scale to comply with current flavour constraints in the quark sector. Here we discuss considerations analogous to minimal flavour violation (MFV) in the context of SU(5)-unification, showing the new effects/constraints that arise both in the quark and in the lepton sector, where quantitative statements can be made controlled by the CKM matrix elements. The case of supersymmetry is examined in detail as a particularly motivated example. Third generation sleptons and neutralinos in the few hundred GeV range are shown to be compatible with current constraints. (orig.)

  6. Flavour-Violating Gluino and Squark Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC; Porod, Werner; /Wurzburg U.

    2010-06-11

    We consider scenarios with large flavour violating entries in the squark mass matrices focusing on the mixing between second and third generation squarks. These entries govern both, flavour violating low energy observables on the one hand and squark and gluino decays on the other hand. We first discuss the constraints on the parameter space due to the recent data on B mesons from the B factories and Tevatron. We then consider flavour violating squark and gluino decays and show that they can still be typically of order 10% despite the stringent constraints from low energy data. Finally we briefly comment on the impact for searches and parameter determinations at future collider experiments such as the upcoming LHC or a future International Linear Collider.

  7. On the origin of neutrino flavour symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    King, Stephen F

    2009-01-01

    We study classes of models which are based on some discrete family symmetry which is completely broken such that the observed neutrino flavour symmetry emerges indirectly as an accidental symmetry. For such "indirect" models we discuss the D-term flavon vacuum alignments which are required for such an accidental flavour symmetry consistent with tri-bimaximal lepton mixing to emerge. We identify large classes of suitable discrete family symmetries, namely the $\\Delta(3n^2)$ and $\\Delta(6n^2)$ groups, together with other examples such as $Z_7\\rtimes Z_3$. In such indirect models the implementation of the type I see-saw mechanism is straightforward using constrained sequential dominance. However the accidental neutrino flavour symmetry may be easily violated, for example leading to a large reactor angle, while maintaining accurately the tri-bimaximal solar and atmospheric predictions.

  8. Minimal flavour violation and SU(5)-unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Riccardo, E-mail: barbieri@sns.it; Senia, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.senia@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Minimal flavour violation in its strong or weak versions, based on U(3){sup 3} and U(2){sup 3}, respectively, allows suitable extensions of the standard model at the TeV scale to comply with current flavour constraints in the quark sector. Here we discuss considerations analogous to minimal flavour violation (MFV) in the context of SU(5)-unification, showing the new effects/constraints that arise both in the quark and in the lepton sector, where quantitative statements can be made controlled by the CKM matrix elements. The case of supersymmetry is examined in detail as a particularly motivated example. Third generation sleptons and neutralinos in the few hundred GeV range are shown to be compatible with current constraints.

  9. LHCb New algorithms for Flavour Tagging at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Fazzini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The Flavour Tagging technique allows to identify the B initial flavour, required in the measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems. The identification performances at LHCb are further enhanced thanks to the contribution of new algorithms.

  10. Heavy Flavour Production and Decay at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, RWL; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is taking advantage of its large integrated luminosity band sophisticated muon and dimuon triggers to make competitive measurements of heavy flavour production and decay. Inclusive production and heavy flavour jet production is discussed before turning to charm and onium production. The production and decay of individual B hadron species is then addressed, including the current best measurement of the Λb lifetime. A much improved analysis of CP related quantities in Bs decays is presented, before turning to recent results and prospects for rare B decays.

  11. SU(3) flavour breaking and baryon structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, A.N.; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Pleiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC); Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Shanahan, P.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stueben, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Regionales Rechenzentrum; Collaboration: QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    We present results from the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration for hyperon electromagnetic form factors and axial charges obtained from simulations using N{sub f}=2+1 flavours of O(a)-improved Wilson fermions. We also consider matrix elements relevant for hyperon semileptonic decays. We find flavour-breaking effects in hyperon magnetic moments which are consistent with experiment, while our results for the connected quark spin content indicates that quarks contribute more to the spin of the {Xi} baryon than they do to the proton.

  12. Masses and magnetic moments of triple heavy flavour baryons in hypercentral model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhavin Patel; Ajay Majethiya; P C Vinodkumar

    2009-04-01

    Triple heavy flavour baryons are studied using the hypercentral description of the three-body system. The confinement potential is assumed as hypercentral Coulomb plus power potential with power index . The ground state ($J^{P} = \\dfrac{1}{2}^{+}$ and $\\dfrac{3}{2}^{+}$) masses of heavy flavour baryons are computed for different power index, starting from 0.5 to 2.0. The predicted masses are found to attain a saturated value with respect to variation in p beyond the power index > 1.0. Using the spin-flavour structure of the constituting quarks and by defining effective mass of the confined quarks within the baryons, the magnetic moments are computed with no additional free parameters.

  13. The supersymmetric flavour problem in 5D GUTs and its consequences for LHC phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fichet, S.; Kraml, S. [CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-09-15

    We study supersymmetric models with a GUT-sized extra dimension, where both the Higgs fields and the SUSY breaking hidden sector are localized on a 4D brane. Exponential wave function profiles of the matter fields give rise to hierarchical structures in the Yukawa couplings and soft terms. Such structures can naturally explain hierarchical fermion masses and mixings, while at the same time alleviating the supersymmetric flavour problem. We discuss two sources of supersymmetry breaking, radion mediation and brane fields, and perform a detailed numerical analysis, thoroughly taking into account the proliferation of unknown O(1) coefficients that occurs in this class of models. It turns out that additional assumptions on supersymmetry breaking are necessary to evade the stringent experimental bounds on lepton flavour violation. The favourable regions of parameter space are then examined with regards to their LHC phenomenology. They generically feature heavy gluinos and squarks beyond current bounds. Lepton flavour violation in SUSY cascade decays can give interesting signatures. (orig.)

  14. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Bluemlein, J.; Kuprash, O.; Placakyte, R.; Starovoitov, P. [DESY Hamburg and Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Cooper-Sarkar, A. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Garzelli, M.V.; Moch, S.O. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Guzzi, M. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Nadolsky, P. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX (United States); Rabbertz, K. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schienbein, I. [LPSC Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Collaboration: PROSA Collaboration

    2015-08-15

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x ∝ 5 x 10{sup -6}. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits. (orig.)

  15. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x∝5 x 10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  16. $\\pi K$ Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    OpenAIRE

    Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the $\\pi K$ processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The calculation has been performed analytically but we only include analytical results for the dependence on the low-energy constants (LECs) at NNLO due to the size of the expressions. These results, together with resonance estimates of the NNLO LECs are used to obtain constraints on the Zweig rule suppressed LECs at NLO, $L_4^r$...

  17. Higgs-mediated FCNCs: Natural Flavour Conservation vs. Minimal Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J; Gori, Stefania; Isidori, Gino

    2010-01-01

    We compare the effectiveness of two hypotheses, Natural Flavour Conservation (NFC) and Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV), in suppressing the strength of flavour-changing neutral-currents (FCNCs) in models with more than one Higgs doublet. We show that the MFV hypothesis, in its general formulation, is more stable in suppressing FCNCs than the hypothesis of NFC alone when quantum corrections are taken into account. The phenomenological implications of the two scenarios are discussed analysing meson-antimeson mixing observables and the rare decays B -> mu+ mu-. We demonstrate that, introducing flavour-blind CP phases, two-Higgs doublet models respecting the MFV hypothesis can accommodate a large CP-violating phase in Bs mixing, as hinted by CDF and D0 data and, without extra free parameters, soften significantly in a correlated manner the observed anomaly in the relation between epsilon_K and S_psi_K.

  18. Elliptic flow measurement of heavy flavour decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at √(s) 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In heavy-ion collisions, charm and beauty quarks are produced in the initial hard scattering processes. They then propagate and interact strongly with the created medium, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), and thus allow to probe its properties. One way to measure heavy-quarks is via electrons from the semileptonic decays of open charm and beauty hadrons. At low transverse momentum, the level of thermalization of heavy quarks can be studied via the azimuthal anisotropy of the heavy flavour electron emission in the transverse plane, the elliptic flow, v2. At high pt, v2 provides insight on the path length dependence of parton energy-loss. In this talk we present v2 measurements of electrons from heavy flavour decays at mid rapidity with ALICE in semi-central (20-40%) Pb-Pb collisions at √(sNN)=2.76 TeV. The electrons are identified using the Time Of Flight detector and Time Projection Chamber at low momenta, as well as the Electromagnetic Calorimeter at higher momenta. The latter provides in addition the possibility to trigger on electrons in the collision. We report on the electron identification and explain how the non-heavy flavour electron background is subtracted. Finally the results are compared to different theoretical models.

  19. Food additives and nutrient sources added to food: developments since the creation of EFSA

    OpenAIRE

    Dusemund B; Gilbert J; Gott D; Kenigswald H; König J; Lambré C; Leblanc J-C; Mortensen A; Tobback P

    2012-01-01

    During the ten-year period since the creation of EFSA, two scientific panels of EFSA, the former Scientific Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC Panel) and the Scientific Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS Panel) have been successively responsible for the safety assessment of food additives and nutrient sources added to food. They have successfully addressed a challenging number of applications and ...

  20. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 91, Revision 1 (FGE.91Rev1): Consideration of simple aliphatic and aromatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by JECFA (53rd and 68th meetings) structurally related to aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev3 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    to concern for genotoxicity. So, the Panel concluded that 37 substances do not give rise to safety concern at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also...

  1. General squark flavour mixing: constraints, phenomenology and benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    De Causmaecker, Karen; Herrmann, Bjoern; Mahmoudi, Farvah; O'Leary, Ben; Porod, Werner; Sekmen, Sezen; Strobbe, Nadja

    2015-01-01

    We present an extensive study of non-minimal flavour violation in the squark sector in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We investigate the effects of multiple non-vanishing flavour-violating elements in the squark mass matrices by means of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scanning technique and identify parameter combinations that are favoured by both current data and theoretical constraints. We then detail the resulting distributions of the flavour-conserving and flavour-violating model parameters. Based on this analysis, we propose a set of benchmark scenarios relevant for future studies of non-minimal flavour violation in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  2. Safety evaluation of natural flavour complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, R.L.; Adams, T.B.; Cohen, S.M.; Doull, J.; Feron, V.J.; Goodman, J.I.; Hall, R.L.; Marnett, L.J.; Portoghese, P.S.; Waddell, W.J.; Wagner, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Natural flavour complexes (NFCs) are chemical mixtures obtained by applying physical separation methods to botanical sources. Many NFCs are derived from foods. In the present paper, a 12-step procedure for the safety evaluation of NFCs, 'the naturals paradigm', is discussed. This procedure, which is

  3. Heavy flavour physics at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of results in heavy flavour physics from Run 1 of the LHC is presented. Topics discussed include spectroscopy, mixing, CP violation and rare decays of charmed and beauty hadrons. The results are consistent with Standard Model predictions, although several puzzles and hints of discrepancies demand further investigation with larger data samples

  4. Constraining multi-Higgs flavour models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Felipe, R.; Silva, Joao P. [Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro 1, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa-ISEL, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Ivanov, I.P. [Universite de Liege, IFPA, Liege (Belgium); Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent (Belgium); Nishi, C.C. [Universidade Federal do ABC-UFABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Serodio, Hugo [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Burjassot (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    To study a flavour model with a non-minimal Higgs sector one must first define the symmetries of the fields; then identify what types of vacua exist and how they may break the symmetries; and finally determine whether the remnant symmetries are compatible with the experimental data. Here we address all these issues in the context of flavour models with any number of Higgs doublets. We stress the importance of analysing the Higgs vacuum expectation values that are pseudo-invariant under the generators of all subgroups. It is shown that the only way of obtaining a physical CKM mixing matrix and, simultaneously, non-degenerate and non-zero quark masses is requiring the vacuum expectation values of the Higgs fields to break completely the full flavour group, except possibly for some symmetry belonging to baryon number. The application of this technique to some illustrative examples, such as the flavour groups Δ(27), A{sub 4} and S{sub 3}, is also presented. (orig.)

  5. Sweetness flavour interactions in soft drinks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahon, D.F.; Roozen, J.P.; Graaf, de C.

    1996-01-01

    Sucrose can be substituted by intense sweeteners to lower the calorie content of soft drinks. Although the sweetness is kept at the same level as much as possible, the flavour of the product often changes. This change could be due to both the mechanism of sensory perception and interactive effects o

  6. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debajyoti Choudhury; Asesh K Datta; Anirban Kundu

    2009-01-01

    The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  7. The Revival of Kaon Flavour Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2016-01-01

    After years of silence we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade the revival of kaon flavour physics. This is not only because of the crucial measurements of the branching ratios for the rare decays $K^+\\to\\pi^+\

  8. Search for new flavour production at PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topological distribution of hadrons from the reaction e+e- → multihadrons has been studied at PETRA energies between √ s = 22 and 31.6 GeV. No evidence is seen for spherical events which would be expected if massive particles bearing new flavours were produced. (orig.)

  9. Multiple High-Fidelity Modeling Tools for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Despite the rapid commercialization of additive manufacturing technology such as selective laser melting, SLM, there are gaps in process modeling and material...

  10. Physico-chemical change and heat stability of extra virgin olive oils flavoured by selected Tunisian aromatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, M A; Grati-Kamoun, N; Attia, H

    2009-10-01

    Objectives of this work were studying physico-chemical change and heat stability of olive oils flavoured by selected Tunisian aromatic plants. Flavoured olive oils were prepared by maceration of fresh plant materials (rosemary, lavender, sage, menthe, basil, lemon and thyme) with olive oil at a 5% w/w level for 15 days. A sensorial evaluation was applied to select more appreciate flavoured olive oils by consumers. An oxidative procedure was applied to test the stability of selected flavoured olive oils: oils samples were kept in glass bottles and heated at 60 and 130 degrees C during 55 days and 6h, respectively. The resistance to oxidation of these selected flavoured oils was compared to a control samples by measuring PV, K232 and K270 values and change in chlorophyll, carotenes and polyphénols contents. Obtained results show that addition of aromatic plants causes a slight increase in free acidity and viscosity of aromatised olive oils. L*, b* and a* values show that addition of thyme cause a great change in olive oil colours. Heat stability results shows that from selected aromatic plants, rosemary was effectiveness against oxidation followed by thyme and lemon. However, olive oil flavoured with basil exhibit a similar behaviour versus thermal oxidation then the natural olive oil. PMID:19635520

  11. Phenomenological Implications of an S4 x SU(5) SUSY GUT of Flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Dimou, Maria; Luhn, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the low energy phenomenological implications of an SU(5) Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory (SUSY GUT) whose flavour structure is controlled by the family symmetry S4 x U(1), which provides a good description of all quark and lepton masses, mixings as well as CP violation. Although the model closely mimics Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV) as shown in arXiv:1511.07886, here we focus on the differences. We first present numerical estimates of the low energy mass insertion parameters, including canonical normalisation and renormalisation group running, for well-defined ranges of SUSY parameters and compare the naive model expectations to the numerical scans and the experimental bounds. Our results are then used to estimate the predictions for Electric Dipole Moments (EDMs), Lepton Flavour Violation (LFV), B and K meson mixing as well as rare B decays. The largest observable deviations from MFV come from the LFV process mu --> e gamma and the EDMs.

  12. Heavy-flavour correlations in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are produced in initial hard scattering processes in heavy-ion collisions, before the formation of a strongly interacting medium, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Insight into the effects of the medium on charm and beauty production can be obtained by measuring the angular correlations between open heavy-flavour hadrons and charged particles. In Pb–Pb collisions, the azimuthal correlation can provide information on the way heavy quarks lose energy in the QGP and is sensitive to possible modifications of the charm parton shower and hadronisation in the presence of the medium. The observed double-ridge long-range correlations in p–Pb collisions for light-flavour hadrons could originate from a collective expansion of the system, as well as from gluon saturation in the initial state (colour glass condensate). The same effect can be studied for heavier quarks via the correlation between heavy-flavour hadrons (or their decay electrons) and charged particles

  13. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of $B^0$ mesons using pions and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Two new algorithms for use in the analysis of $pp$ collision are developed to identify the flavour of $B^0$ mesons at production using pions and protons from the hadronization process. The algorithms are optimized and calibrated on data, using $B^0 \\rightarrow D^- \\pi^+$ decays from $pp$ collision data collected by LHCb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The tagging power of the new pion algorithm is 60 % greater than the previously available one; the algorithm using protons to identify the flavour of a $B^0$ meson is the first of its kind.

  14. New algorithms for identifying the flavour of $B^0$ mesons using pions and protons

    CERN Document Server

    LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Two new algorithms for use in the analysis of $pp$ collision are developed to identify the flavour of $B^0$ mesons at production using pions and protons from the hadronization process. The algorithms are optimized and calibrated on data, using $B^0 \\rightarrow D^- \\pi^+$ decays from $pp$ collision data collected by LHCb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The tagging power of the new pion algorithm is 60% greater than the previously available one; the algorithm using protons to identify the flavour of a $B^0$ meson is the first of its kind.

  15. Changes in flavour and taste of irradiated coffee beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of changes in the smell and taste of coffee from beans submitted to irradiation for preservation is a significant gap in the programme devoted to increasing the product life time with such a process. Therefore, the main objective of the paper was to evaluate changes in aroma and flavour that can be noticed by the consumer. Coffee beans were given disinfestation doses of 50krad, producing an insect mortality rate of 98.33% +-2.89 in Araecerus fasciculatus (adult stage). The samples, provided by IBC, were from the same crop and free from pesticides. Some of the material was kept by that Institute for organoleptic tests. The remainder was sent to the National Institute of Technology for gas-chromatographic analysis. Should any significant changes be noticed, it could be assumed that the gamma-irradiation process would be rejected by the consumer. However, no significant change was observed in the most important characteristics, flavour and aroma, that might induce the consumer to reject irradiated coffee beans. (author)

  16. Changes in Flavour and Taste of Irradiated Coffee Beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of changes in the smell and taste of coffee from beans submitted to irradiation for preservation is a significant gap in the programme devoted to increasing the product life time with such a process. Therefore, the main objective of the paper was to evaluate changes in aroma and flavour that can be noticed by the consumer. Coffee beans were given disinfestation doses of 50 krad, producing an insect mortality rate of 98.33% ± 2.89 in Araecerus fasciculatus (adult stage). The samples, provided by IBC, were from the same crop and free from pesticides. Some of the material was kept by that Institute for organoleptic tests. The remainder was sent to the National Institute of Technology for gas-chromatographic analysis. Should any significant changes be noticed, it could be assumed that the gamma-irradiation process would be rejected by the consumer. However, no significant change was observed in the most important characteristics, flavour and aroma, that might induce the consumer to reject irradiated coffee beans. (author)

  17. Thermo-mechanical analysis of wire and arc additive manufacturing process

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, J

    2012-01-01

    Conventional manufacturing processes often require a large amount of machining and cannot satisfy the continuously increasing requirements of a sustainable, low cost, and environmentally friendly modern industry. Thus, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has become an important industrial process for the manufacture of custom-made metal workpieces. Among the different AM processes, Wire and Arc Additive Manufacture (WAAM) has the ability to manufacture large, low volume metal work-p...

  18. Neutrino observables from predictive flavour patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebola, Luis M.; Emmanuel-Costa, David [Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas - CFTP, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Felipe, Ricardo Gonzalez [Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas - CFTP, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); ISEL - Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Instituto Politecnico de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    We look for predictive flavour patterns of the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix that are compatible with current neutrino oscillation data. Our search is based on the assumption that the neutrino mass matrix contains equal elements and a minimal number of parameters, in the flavour basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal and real. Three unique patterns that can successfully explain neutrino observables at the 3σ confidence level with just three physical parameters are presented. Neutrino textures described by four and five parameters are also studied. The predictions for the lightest neutrino mass, the effective mass parameter in neutrinoless double beta decays and for the CP-violating phases in the leptonic mixing are given. (orig.)

  19. Neutrino observables from predictive flavour patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cebola, Luis M; Felipe, Ricardo Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    We look for predictive flavour patterns of the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix that are compatible with current neutrino oscillation data. Our search is based on the assumption that the neutrino mass matrix contains equal elements and a minimal number of parameters, in the flavour basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal and real. Three unique patterns that can successfully explain neutrino observables at the $3\\sigma$ confidence level with just three physical parameters are presented. Neutrino textures described by four and five parameters are also studied. The predictions for the lightest neutrino mass, the effective mass parameter in neutrinoless double beta decays and the CP-violating phases in the leptonic mixing are given.

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of the use of amino acids (chemical group 34) when used as flavourings for all animal species

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2014-01-01

    Chemical group (CG) 34 comprises amino acids, of which 20 are currently authorised for use as flavours in food. The FEEDAP Panel was unable to perform an assessment of D,L-valine because of the lack of data on its purity. The Panel cannot conclude on the use of these compounds in water for drinking. In the absence of any information on the microbial strains or substrates used for the production of the additives, and with little information on the manufacturing process, the Panel cannot ascert...

  1. Application Cases and Integration of Additive Manufacturing Processes into Conventional Process Chains by the Example of Tool Repair Using the Con-trolled Metal Build-Up Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wimmer, Felix

    2015-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis an overview of the most common Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes and a valid classification scheme outside of the classification of conventional ma-chining processes is presented. Advantages and shortcomings of these processes are briefly explained and application cases from the industry are given. Transitioning from the shortcom-ings of current Additive Manufacturing processes the so called “hybrid additive subtractive” processes are introduced.The concep...

  2. Some theoretical issues in heavy flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    2012-11-01

    Some of the recent developments in heavy flavour physics will be reviewed. This will include an update on some of the Standard Model predictions, and a summary of recent measurements that may indicate the presence of new physics (NP). The focus will be on selected models of NP that are indicated by the anomalies in the current data. Observables that can potentially yield signatures of specific physics beyond the Standard Model will be pointed out.

  3. Flavour democracy calls for the fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is argued with the help of an illustrative mode, that the inter species hierarchy among the fermion masses and the quark mixing angles can be accommodated naturally in the standard model with (approximate) flavour democracy provided there are four families of sequential quark-leptons with all members of the fourth family having roughly equal masses. The special problem of light neutrino masses (if any) and possible solutions are also discussed. (author). 15 refs

  4. Extracting gamma Through Flavour-Symmetry Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischer, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A brief overview of flavour-symmetry strategies to extract the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle is given, focusing on B --> pi K modes and the B_d --> pi^+ pi^-, B_s --> K^+ K^- system. We discuss also a variant of the latter approach for the e^+ e^- B-factories, where B_s --> K^+ K^- is replaced by B_d --> pi^{+/-} K^{+/-}.

  5. Flavour of fundamental particles and prime numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discreteness and continuity as described by the ratio of the discreteness of the n's and the continuous spread of n/2n, which is directly connected with the width and lifetimes of fundamental particles, the flavours of fundamental particles can be directly obtained. The behaviour of beta decay and the energy levels of light nuclei can also be predicted. The appearance of primes also seems to suggest that further application of reductionism to fundamental particles is not possible

  6. Lepton flavour violation in the RS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, Paul; Beneke, Martin [Physik Department T31, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Rohrwild, Juergen [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    We consider charged lepton flavour observables in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with and without custodial protection.To this end, we apply a fully five dimensional (5D) framework to calculate the matching coefficients of the effective field theory at the electroweak scale. This enables us to compute predictions for the radiative decay μ → eγ as well as the decay μ → 3e and μ → e conversion in nuclei.

  7. Dark matter and observable Lepton Flavour Violation

    OpenAIRE

    Heurtier, Lucien; Teresi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Seesaw models with leptonic symmetries allow right-handed (RH) neutrino masses at the electroweak scale, or even lower, at the same time having large Yukawa couplings with the Standard Model leptons, thus yielding observable effects at current or near-future lepton-flavour-violation (LFV) experiments. These models have been previously considered also in connection to low-scale leptogenesis, but the combination of observable LFV and successful leptogenesis has appeared to be difficult to achie...

  8. Including heavy flavour production in PDF fits

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Cooper-Sarkar

    2007-01-01

    AT HERA heavy quarks may contribute up to 30% of the structure function $F_2$. The introduction of heavy quarks requires an extension of the DGLAP formalism. The effect of using different heavy flavour number schemes, and different approaches to the running of $\\alpha_s$, are compared using the ZEUS PDF fit formalism. The potential of including charm data in the fit is explored, using $D^*$ double differential cross-sections rather than the inclusive quantity $F_2^{c\\bar{c}}$.

  9. Bimaximal Neutrino Mixing with Discrete Flavour Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, Luca

    2011-01-01

    In view of the fact that the data on neutrino mixing are still compatible with a situation where Bimaximal mixing is valid in first approximation and it is then corrected by terms of order of the Cabibbo angle, we present examples where these properties are naturally realized. The models are supersymmetric in 4-dimensions and based on the discrete non-Abelian flavour symmetry S4.

  10. Neutrino-Flavoured Sneutrino Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    March-Russell, John; McCullough, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    A simple theory of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) naturally linked to neutrino flavour physics is studied. The DM sector comprises a spectrum of mixed lhd-rhd sneutrino states where both the sneutrino flavour structure and mass splittings are determined by the associated neutrino masses and mixings. Prospects for indirect detection from solar capture are good due to a large sneutrino-nucleon cross-section afforded by the inelastic splitting (solar capture limits exclude an explanation of DAMA/LIBRA). We find parameter regions where all heavier states will have decayed, leaving only one flavour mixture of sneutrino as the candidate DM. Such regions have a unique `smoking gun' signature--sneutrino annihilation in the Sun produces a pair of neutrino mass eigenstates free from vacuum oscillations, with the potential for detection at neutrino telescopes through the observation of a hard spectrum of nu_mu and nu_tau (for a normal neutrino hierarchy). Next generation direct detection experiments can explore much of...

  11. Neutrino-flavoured sneutrino dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    March-Russell, John; McCabe, Christopher; McCullough, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    A simple theory of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) naturally linked to neutrino flavour physics is studied. The DM sector comprises a spectrum of mixed lhd-rhd sneutrino states where both the sneutrino flavour structure and mass splittings are determined by the associated neutrino masses and mixings. Prospects for indirect detection from solar capture are good due to a large sneutrino-nucleon cross-section afforded by the inelastic splitting (solar capture limits exclude an explanation of DAMA/LIBRA). We find parameter regions where all heavier states will have decayed, leaving only one flavour mixture of sneutrino as the candidate DM. Such regions have a unique ‘smoking gun’ signature — sneutrino annihilation in the Sun produces a pair of neutrino mass eigenstates free from vacuum oscillations, with the potential for detection at neutrino telescopes through the observation of a hard spectrum of ν μ and ν τ (for a normal neutrino hierarchy). Next generation direct detection experiments can explore much of the parameter space through both elastic and inelastic scattering. We show in detail that the observed neutrino masses and mixings can arise as a consequence of supersymmetry breaking effects in the sneutrino DM sector, consistent with all experimental constraints.

  12. Flavour Condensate and the Dark Sector of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tarantino, Walter

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the development of a nonperturbative quantum field theoretical approach to flavour physics, with special attention to cosmological applications. Neutrino flavour oscillation is nowadays a fairly well-established experimental fact. However, the formulation of flavour oscillations in a relativistic field theoretical framework presents non-trivial difficulties. A nonperturbative approach for building flavour states has been proposed by Blasone, Vitiello and coworkers. The formalism implies a non-trivial physical vacuum (called "flavour vacuum"), which might act as a source of Dark Energy. Furthermore, such a vacuum has been recognized as the effective vacuum state arising in the low energy limit of a string theoretical model, D-particle Foam Model. In the attempt of probing the observable phenomenology of the D-particle foam model, a simple toy model (two scalars with mixing \\`a la Blasone & Vitiello on a adiabatically expanding background) has been studied, proving that the flavour...

  13. The effect of silane addition timing on mixing processability and properties of silica reinforced rubber compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee-Hoon; Jin, Hyun-Ho; Ha, Sung-Ho; Jang, Suk-Hee; Kang, Yong-Gu; Han, Min-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed to determine an optimum balance between processability and performance of a highly loaded silica compound. The experiments evaluated 4 different silane injection times. All mixing related to silane addition was conducted with a scaled up "Tandem" mixer line. With exception to silane addition timing, almost all operating conditions were controlled between experimental features. It was found that when the silane addition was introduced earlier in the mixing cycle both the reaction was more complete and the bound rubber content was higher. But processability indicators such as sheet forming and Mooney plasticity were negatively impacted. On the other hand, as silane injection was delayed to later in the mixing process the filler dispersion and good sheet forming was improved. However both the bound rubber content and Silane reaction completion were decreased. With the changes in silane addition time, the processability and properties of a silica compound can be controlled.

  14. REPRESENTATION OF ADDITIVE FUNCTIONALS AND LOCAL TIMES FOR JUMP MARKOV PROCESSES AND THEIR FUNCTIONAL LIMIT THEOREM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋义文; 刘禄勤

    2003-01-01

    The representation of additive functionals and local times for jump Markovprocesses are obtained. The results of uniformly functional moderate deviation and theirapplications to birth-death processes are also presented.

  15. APPLICABILITY ANALYSIS OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING PROCESSES IN THE FABRICATION OF ANATOMICALLY SHAPED LATTICE SCAFFOLDS

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena Milovanović; Miloš Stojković; Miroslav Trajanović

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturing of anatomically shaped scaffolds for bonе tissue recovery as well as other similar anatomically shaped implants represents a major challenge for modern manufacturing technologies. The complexity of anatomically shaped lattice scaffolds for bone tissue recovery requires involvement of so-called additive manufacturing processes.This paper brings out the criterial matrix for the assessment of additive manufacturing processes applicability in the case of bone tissue scaffold manufac...

  16. A mechanistic understanding of processing additive-induced efficiency enhancement in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, Kristin

    2013-10-31

    The addition of processing additives is a widely used approach to increase power conversion efficiencies for many organic solar cells. We present how additives change the polymer conformation in the casting solution leading to a more intermixed phase-segregated network structure of the active layer which in turn results in a 5-fold enhancement in efficiency. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effects of flavour absorption on foods and their packaging materials

    OpenAIRE

    Willige, van, R.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: flavour absorption, scalping, packaging, food matrix, lldpe, ldpe, pp, pc, pet, pen,b-lactoglobulin, casein, pectin, cmc, lactose, saccharose, oil, modelling, storage, oxygen permeability, taste perception, sensory quality.Absorption of flavour compounds by linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) was studied in model systems representing differences in composition of the food matrix. Proteins,b-lactoglobuline and casein, were able to bind flavours, resulting in suppression of absorp...

  18. Flavour tagging of $b$ mesons in $pp$ collisions at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Mueller, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Flavour tagging, i.e. the inference of the production flavour of reconstructed $b$ hadrons, is essential for precision measurements of decay time-dependent $CP$ violation and of mixing parameters in the the neutral $B$ meson systems. LHC's $pp$ collisions with their high track multiplicities constitute a challenging environment for flavour tagging and demand for new and improved strategies. We present recent progress and new developments in flavour tagging at the LHCb experiment, which will allow for a further improvement of $CP$ violation measurements in decays of $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons.

  19. Leptonic minimal flavour violation in warped extra dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhishek M Iyer; Sudhir K Vempati

    2012-10-01

    Lepton mass hierarchies and lepton flavour violation are revisited in the framework of Randall–Sundrum models. Models with Dirac-type as well as Majorana-type neutrinos are considered. The five-dimensional -parameters are fit to the charged lepton and neutrino masses and mixings using 2 minimization. Leptonic flavour violation is shown to be large in these cases. Schemes of minimal flavour violation are considered for the cases of an effective LLHH operator and Dirac neutrinos and are shown to significantly reduce the limits from lepton flavour violation.

  20. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process

  1. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  2. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  3. Additives effects on crystallization and morphology in a novel caustic aluminate solution decomposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying ZHANG; Sbili ZHENG; Yifei ZHANG; Hongbin XU; Yi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    A novel process of caustic aluminate solution decomposition by alcohol medium was developed by the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences in order to solve the problem of low decomposi-tion ratio in the traditional Bayer seeded hydrolysis process. In this research, effects of additives on the crystallization ratio, secondary particle size and morphol-ogy of aluminum hydroxide in the new process were studied to obtain high-quality products. On the basis of primary selection of additives, an orthogonal design L9(34)was used as a chemometric method to investigate the effects of additives. The studied parameters include the reaction style, quantity of additives, caustic soda concen-tration, as well as the combination manner. The crystal-lization ratios of sodium aluminate solution and crystal size of aluminum hydroxide, determined by ICP-OES, SEM and MLPSA (Malvern Laser Particle Size Analyzer), were used to evaluate the effects of the additives. The results showed that different combination manners could promote agglomeration or dispersion. An additive composed by Tween 80 and PEG 200 could promote agglomeration,while a spot of PEG species had a relatively strong dispersion effect. However, the additives had little effects on the crystallization ratios. According to the Raman spectra result, the added alcohol medium might serve as a kind of solvent.

  4. Status of the ALICE experiment and first results on heavy flavour production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALICE experiment is the LHC detector mainly dedicated to the study of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in Pb-Pb collisions. The detector has started the data taking less than one year ago, delivering immediately relevant results. An overview of the first physics results obtained in the first six month of running of the experiment will be summarized, giving special emphasis to heavy flavour measurements. Heavy flavours are ideal probes to explore both the formation and properties of the QGP, since they experience the full collision history and are expected to be copiously produced at LHC, much more than at any other collider. With ALICE we will measure heavy flavours down to small transverse momentum, combining hadronic and leptonic channels, both at central and forward rapidity. In particular, in the central rapidity region, it is possible to exclusively reconstruct open charm mesons and baryons via hadronic decay channels. Furthermore, the good identification of electrons allows to measure the production both of charmonium and open beauty. First results from p-p collisions at 7 TeV will be shown, including the clear signals of open and hidden charm hadrons reconstructed at ALICE. These data provide interesting insight into QCD processes in a new energy regime, are important as a baseline for the Pb-Pb program and demonstrate the potential for heavy flavour cross section measurements with the ALICE detector.

  5. Neutrino Masses at LHC: Minimal Lepton Flavour Violation in Type-III See-saw

    CERN Document Server

    Eboli, O J P; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C

    2011-01-01

    We study the signatures of minimal lepton flavour violation in a simple Type-III see--saw model in which the flavour scale is given by the new fermion triplet mass and it can be naturally light enough to be produced at the LHC. In this model the flavour structure of the couplings of the triplet fermions to the Standard Model leptons can be reconstructed from the neutrino mass matrix and the smallness of the neutrino mass is associated with a tiny violation of total lepton number. Characteristic signatures of this model include suppressed lepton number violation decays of the triplet fermions, absence of displaced vertices in their decays and predictable lepton flavour composition of the states produced in their decays. We study the observability of these signals in the processes $pp\\rightarrow 3\\ell + 2j +\\Sla{E_T}$ and $pp\\rightarrow 2\\ell + 4j$ with $\\ell =e$ or $\\mu$ taking into account the present low energy data on neutrino physics and the corresponding Standard Model backgrounds. Our results indicate th...

  6. Measurements of heavy-flavour decay leptons with ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of electrons and muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at central and forward rapidity performed by the ALICE Collaboration in p–Pb (√sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb–Pb collisions (√sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are reconstructed using several detectors of the ALICE central barrel. Muons are reconstructed using the muon spectrometer at forward rapidity (2.5 < y < 4. The nuclear modification factors in Pb–Pb (RAA and in p–Pb (RpPb collisions, and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2 in Pb– Pb collisions will be discussed. Theoretical predictions are compared with the data. In addition, the measurement of the azimuthal correlation between electrons from heavyflavour hadron decays and charged hadrons in p–Pb collisions will be shown.

  7. Test of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lionetto, Federica

    2016-01-01

    This contribution presents the $R_D{\\ast}$ and $R_K$ measurements, which are a clean probe of lepton flavour universality, and the angular analyses of the $B^0 \\to K^\\ast {0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to K^\\ast{0} ~e^+ e^-$ decays, which allow to search for New Physics in rare decays proceeding through ${\\text a} ~b \\to s \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ transition. All measurements have been performed by the LHCb collaboration using the full statistics of LHC Run I. An overview of the ongoing and future measurements is given in the conclusions.

  8. Flavour perception of oxidation in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, M M; Nute, G R; Hughes, S I; Enser, M; Wood, J D; Richardson, R I

    2006-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is a major factor in meat quality. In order to relate human perceptions of lipid oxidation, as determined by a trained taste panel, to a chemical measurement of oxidation, we studied meat from animals with a wide range of potential oxidation through differences in their PUFA composition and by displaying the meat in high oxygen modified atmosphere packs for varying lengths of time. Meat was obtained from 73 Angus- and Charolais-cross steers from different trials that had been raised on 10 different diets: grass silage (high in C18:3, n-3), cereal concentrate (high in C18:2, n-6), three diets with 3% added fat consisting of three levels of protected lipid supplement (high in C18:2, n-6 and C18:3, n-3, ratio 1:1), a control with Megalac(®) (relatively saturated), three diets with three levels of inclusion of protected fish oil (high in C20:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3) plus a constant amount of unprotected fish oil and a final diet with an unprotected fish oil control. The longissimus dorsi muscle was excised from the left carcass side, aged vacuum packaged for 10-13 days depending on the projects and frozen for less than eight months. TBARS and sensory analyses were performed on steaks displayed for 0, 4 or 9 days under simulated retail conditions, exposed to light in modified atmosphere packaging (CO(2):O(2); 25:75). Meat oxidation increased throughout display for each of the diets, as shown by a rise in TBARS values. This increase was not linear, differences between 0 and 4 days of display were smaller than between 4 and 9 days of display. The lowest TBARS and lowest increment occurred in the two control diets and the grass-fed animals, probably due to the more saturated fat of meat from animals fed the control diets and the higher content of vitamin E. Sensory attributes were also influenced by time of display. Positive attributes, such as beef flavour or overall liking, decreased throughout display, whereas negative attributes, such as abnormal and

  9. Effective theories with broken flavour symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of Ovrut and Schnitzer on effective theories derived from a non Abelian Gauge Theory is generalised to include the physically interesting case of broken flavour symmetry. The calculations are performed at the 1-loop level. It is shown that at an intermediate stage in the calculations two distinct renormalised gauge coupling constants appear, one describing gauge field coupling to heavy particles and the other describing coupling to light particles. Appropriately modified Slavnov-Taylor identities are shown to hold. A simple alternative to the Ovrut-Schnitzer rules for calculating with effective theories is also considered

  10. New Physics Search in Flavour Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    With the running B, kaon and neutrino physics experiments, flavour physics takes centre stage within today's particle physics. We discuss the opportunities offered by these experiments in our search for new physics beyond the SM and discuss their complementarity to collider physics. We focus on rare B and kaon decays, highlighting specific observables in an exemplary mode. We also comment on the so-called B {yields} {pi}{pi} and B {yields} K{pi} puzzles. Moreover, we briefly discuss the restrictive role of long-distance strong interactions and some new tools such as QCD factorization and SCET to handle them.

  11. Two-Higgs Leptonic Minimal Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Botella, F J; Nebot, M; Rebelo, M N

    2011-01-01

    We construct extensions of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublets, where there are flavour changing neutral currents both in the quark and leptonic sectors, with their strength fixed by the fermion mixing matrices $V_{CKM}$ and $V_{PMNS}$. These models are an extension to the leptonic sector of the class of models previously considered by Branco, Grimus and Lavoura, for the quark sector. We consider both the cases of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos and identify the minimal discrete symmetry required in order to implement the models in a natural way.

  12. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor machine and plastic sacks; fermentation agents (fresh cage-luwakcoffee, “ragi tape”, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk; temperature of fermentation (room, 30 C, 35 C, and 40 C; and duration of fermentation (6, 12, and 18 hours. The experiment were replicated three times. Wet-coffee parchments were washed and sundried until moisture content reached 12%. The dried parchment was hulled and examined for the bean quality and flavors. The experiment indicated that 40 C fermentation in fermentor machine resulted in higher content of “full sour defect”. Fermentation agents significanly influenced bean size. Temperature treatment significanly influenced bulk density and bean size. The best flavor profile was obtained from fermentation in plastic sack at ambient temperature. Bacteria of fermented milk and “fresh luwak coffee” as fermentation agents resulted up to excellent flavor. Twelve hours fermentation produced best flavor of Arabica coffee compared to 6 and 18 hours. Key words: Arabica coffee, fermentation, flavour, fermentation agents

  13. B flavour tagging using charm decays at the LHCb experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is described for tagging the flavour content at production of neutral B mesons in the LHCb experiment. The algorithm exploits the correlation of the flavour of a B meson with the charge of a reconstructed secondary charm hadron from the decay of the other b hadron produced in the proton

  14. Flavour democracy and the lepton-quark hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass hierarchy of the leptons and quarks is interpreted as a consequence of a coherent state phenomenon ('flavour democracy'). It is emphasized that particular forms of the mass matrices can arise from the coherent state basis. The violations of the 'flavour democracy' turn out to be relatively large. Numerical examples are presented. (orig.)

  15. Heavy flavour production in 13 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Braun, Svende Annelies

    2015-01-01

    This summer first data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV is collected at the LHC. This opens a new era in searches for new particles and precision tests of the Standard Model. Heavy flavour production plays an important role both as precision QCD test and as backgrounds for new particles. The first measurements of heavy flavour production are presented.

  16. Heat and storage effects on the flavour of peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Kayati, S M; Fadel, H H; Abdel Mageed, M; Farghal, S A

    1998-12-01

    Two peanut varieties, Giza 4 and Giza 5 were subjected to different heat treatments such as drying in solar drier at air speed 0.5 and 2 m/sec with average temperature 45 and 60 degrees C and heating in oven at 120 and 150 degrees C. The sensory evaluation of the two varieties showed insignificant differences among varieties and heating processes. A correlation between the sensory and instrumental data was found. The high sensory scores of samples heated at 150 degrees C were attributed to the presence of high concentration of pyrazines which were thought to contribute to flavour and aroma of fresh roasted peanut. A comparative study between the main chemical classes retained in peanut samples after storage for 3 months at room temperature showed that the aldehydes derived lipids increased significantly in the solar dried samples. The antioxidative components produced via Maillard reaction resulted in oxidative stability of the samples heated in oven.

  17. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future. PMID:22253243

  18. Tri-Bimaximal Neutrino Mixing and Discrete Flavour Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Merlo, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We review the application of non-Abelian discrete groups to Tri-Bimaximal (TB) neutrino mixing, which is supported by experiment as a possible good first approximation to the data. After summarizing the motivation and the formalism, we discuss specific models, mainly those based on A4 but also on other finite groups, and their phenomenological implications, including the extension to quarks. The recent measurements of \\theta_13 favour versions of these models where a suitable mechanism leads to corrections to \\theta_13 that can naturally be larger than those to \\theta_12 and \\theta_23. The virtues and the problems of TB mixing models are discussed, also in connection with lepton flavour violating processes, and the different approaches are compared.

  19. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  20. Factors influencing the flavour of game meat: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethling, J; Hoffman, L C; Muller, M

    2016-03-01

    Flavour is a very important attribute contributing to the sensory quality of meat and meat products. Although the sensory quality of meat includes orthonasal and retronasal aroma, taste, as well as appearance, juiciness and other textural attributes, the focus of this review is primarily on flavour. The influence of species, age, gender, muscle anatomical location, diet, harvesting conditions, ageing of meat, packaging and storage, as well as cooking method on the flavour of game meat are discussed. Very little research is available on the factors influencing the flavour of the meat derived from wild and free-living game species. The aim of this literature review is thus to discuss the key ante- and post-mortem factors that influence the flavour of game meat, with specific focus on wild and free-living South African game species.

  1. Flavour constraints on multi-Higgs-doublet models: Yukawa alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    In multi-Higgs-doublet models, the alignment in flavour space of all Yukawa matrices coupling to a given right-handed fermion guarantees the absence of tree-level flavour-changing neutral couplings, while introducing new sources of CP violation. With N Higgs doublets (and no right-handed neutrinos) the Yukawa Lagrangian is characterized by the fermion masses, the CKM quark mixing matrix and 3(N-1) complex couplings. Quantum corrections break the alignment, generating a minimal-flavour-violation structure with flavour-blind phases. The aligned multi-Higgs-doublet models lead to a rich and viable phenomenology with an interesting hierarchy of flavour-changing neutral current effects, suppressing them in light-quark systems while allowing potentially relevant signals in heavy-quark transitions.

  2. Is an additional filter necessary for retransfusion of processed cell saver blood?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Adrianus J.; Gallandat Huet, R; Vermeijden, Jan; Scheeren, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Manufacturers of cell salvage devices also recommend a 40µm microfilter or a leukocyte depletion filter. Several authors use [1] and advocate [2] the use of an additional filter when retransfusing processed cell saver blood to the patient. And lastly, the AABB guidelines recommend use of

  3. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step. (paper)

  4. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  5. Sequential neural processes in abacus mental addition: an EEG and FMRI case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixuan Ku

    Full Text Available Abacus experts are able to mentally calculate multi-digit numbers rapidly. Some behavioral and neuroimaging studies have suggested a visuospatial and visuomotor strategy during abacus mental calculation. However, no study up to now has attempted to dissociate temporally the visuospatial neural process from the visuomotor neural process during abacus mental calculation. In the present study, an abacus expert performed the mental addition tasks (8-digit and 4-digit addends presented in visual or auditory modes swiftly and accurately. The 100% correct rates in this expert's task performance were significantly higher than those of ordinary subjects performing 1-digit and 2-digit addition tasks. ERPs, EEG source localizations, and fMRI results taken together suggested visuospatial and visuomotor processes were sequentially arranged during the abacus mental addition with visual addends and could be dissociated from each other temporally. The visuospatial transformation of the numbers, in which the superior parietal lobule was most likely involved, might occur first (around 380 ms after the onset of the stimuli. The visuomotor processing, in which the superior/middle frontal gyri were most likely involved, might occur later (around 440 ms. Meanwhile, fMRI results suggested that neural networks involved in the abacus mental addition with auditory stimuli were similar to those in the visual abacus mental addition. The most prominently activated brain areas in both conditions included the bilateral superior parietal lobules (BA 7 and bilateral middle frontal gyri (BA 6. These results suggest a supra-modal brain network in abacus mental addition, which may develop from normal mental calculation networks.

  6. Sequential neural processes in abacus mental addition: an EEG and FMRI case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yixuan; Hong, Bo; Zhou, Wenjing; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2012-01-01

    Abacus experts are able to mentally calculate multi-digit numbers rapidly. Some behavioral and neuroimaging studies have suggested a visuospatial and visuomotor strategy during abacus mental calculation. However, no study up to now has attempted to dissociate temporally the visuospatial neural process from the visuomotor neural process during abacus mental calculation. In the present study, an abacus expert performed the mental addition tasks (8-digit and 4-digit addends presented in visual or auditory modes) swiftly and accurately. The 100% correct rates in this expert's task performance were significantly higher than those of ordinary subjects performing 1-digit and 2-digit addition tasks. ERPs, EEG source localizations, and fMRI results taken together suggested visuospatial and visuomotor processes were sequentially arranged during the abacus mental addition with visual addends and could be dissociated from each other temporally. The visuospatial transformation of the numbers, in which the superior parietal lobule was most likely involved, might occur first (around 380 ms) after the onset of the stimuli. The visuomotor processing, in which the superior/middle frontal gyri were most likely involved, might occur later (around 440 ms). Meanwhile, fMRI results suggested that neural networks involved in the abacus mental addition with auditory stimuli were similar to those in the visual abacus mental addition. The most prominently activated brain areas in both conditions included the bilateral superior parietal lobules (BA 7) and bilateral middle frontal gyri (BA 6). These results suggest a supra-modal brain network in abacus mental addition, which may develop from normal mental calculation networks.

  7. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  8. Effects of different additives on the performance of spray dryer system during incineration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, M Y; Peng, C Y; Wu, H Y; Chiang, B C; Liu, Z S

    2002-06-01

    The spray dryer system was conventionally employed to remove the SOx, NOx, and HCl in the flue gas. However, the removal efficiency of acid gas in the practical incineration flue gas, which contains dust, heavy metals, and acid gas itself, was seldom mentioned in the literature. The alkaline sorbents possess large specific surface that was a main factor on the adsorption of heavy metals and acid gas. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was focused on the effect of different additives on the removal efficiency of acid gas and heavy metals (Cr, Cd and Pb). The mass and element size distribution of heavy metals in fly ash under different additives were also investigated. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of HCl in the spray dryer system was higher than 97.8%. The effects of additives on the removal efficiency of HCl, however, were undistinguished. In the desulfurization process, the highest removal efficiency was 71.3% when the additive of amorphous SiO2 was added in the spray dryer system. The removal efficiency was 66.0% with the additive of CaCl2 and 63.1% without any additives, respectively. It was also found that the spray dryer system could decrease the concentration of metal in fly ash but increase the amount of fly ash. In addition, amorphous SiO2 in the alkaline sorbent tended to increase the adsorption of heavy metal on reactant, because it could enhance the dispersion of alkaline sorbent. PMID:12118621

  9. Influence of sweetener stevia on the quality of strawberry flavoured fresh yoghurt

    OpenAIRE

    Katarina Lisak; Irena Jeličić; Ljubica Tratnik; Rajka Božanić

    2011-01-01

    Stevia is a natural, non energetic sweetener, 200-300 times sweeter than sucrose, and is obtained by leaves extraction of the Stevia rebaudiana. According to the low energy value of stevia to sweeten food products, it is a great possibility of its use in the dairy industry. This study examined the differences in the sweetness of the strawberry flavoured yoghurt with the addition of sucrose, stevia and equal portions of sucrose and stevia; each combination was used at three different concentra...

  10. Gauge-Higgs unification with broken flavour symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olschewsky, M.

    2007-05-15

    We study a five-dimensional Gauge-Higgs unification model on the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} based on the extended standard model (SM) gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F}. The group SO(3){sub F} is treated as a chiral gauged flavour symmetry. Electroweak-, flavour- and Higgs interactions are unified in one single gauge group SU(7). The unified gauge group SU(7) is broken down to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} by orbifolding and imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The compactification scale of the theory is O(1) TeV. Furthermore, the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} is put on a lattice. This setting gives a well-defined staring point for renormalisation group (RG) transformations. As a result of the RG-flow, the bulk is integrated out and the extra dimension will consist of only two points: the orbifold fixed points. The model obtained this way is called an effective bilayered transverse lattice model. Parallel transporters (PT) in the extra dimension become nonunitary as a result of the blockspin transformations. In addition, a Higgs potential V({phi}) emerges naturally. The PTs can be written as a product e{sup A{sub y}}e{sup {eta}}e{sup A{sub y}} of unitary factors e{sup A{sub y}} and a selfadjoint factor e{sup {eta}}. The reduction 48 {yields} 35 + 6 + anti 6 + 1 of the adjoint representation of SU(7) with respect to SU(6) contains SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} leads to three SU(2){sub L} Higgs doublets: one for the first, one for the second and one for the third generation. Their zero modes serve as a substitute for the SM Higgs. When the extended SM gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} is spontaneously broken down to U(1){sub em}, an exponential gauge boson mass splitting occurs naturally. At a first step SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} is broken to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} by VEVs for the selfadjoint factor e{sup {eta}}. This breaking leads to masses of flavour changing SO(3){sub F

  11. Gauge-Higgs unification with broken flavour symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a five-dimensional Gauge-Higgs unification model on the orbifold S1/Z2 based on the extended standard model (SM) gauge group SU(2)L x U(1)Y x SO(3)F. The group SO(3)F is treated as a chiral gauged flavour symmetry. Electroweak-, flavour- and Higgs interactions are unified in one single gauge group SU(7). The unified gauge group SU(7) is broken down to SU(2)L x U(1)Y x SO(3)F by orbifolding and imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The compactification scale of the theory is O(1) TeV. Furthermore, the orbifold S1/Z2 is put on a lattice. This setting gives a well-defined staring point for renormalisation group (RG) transformations. As a result of the RG-flow, the bulk is integrated out and the extra dimension will consist of only two points: the orbifold fixed points. The model obtained this way is called an effective bilayered transverse lattice model. Parallel transporters (PT) in the extra dimension become nonunitary as a result of the blockspin transformations. In addition, a Higgs potential V(Φ) emerges naturally. The PTs can be written as a product eAyeηeAy of unitary factors eAy and a selfadjoint factor eη. The reduction 48 → 35 + 6 + anti 6 + 1 of the adjoint representation of SU(7) with respect to SU(6) contains SU(2)L x U(1)Y x SO(3)F leads to three SU(2)L Higgs doublets: one for the first, one for the second and one for the third generation. Their zero modes serve as a substitute for the SM Higgs. When the extended SM gauge group SU(2)L x U(1)Y x SO(3)F is spontaneously broken down to U(1)em, an exponential gauge boson mass splitting occurs naturally. At a first step SU(2)L x U(1)Y x SO(3)F is broken to SU(2)L x U(1)Y by VEVs for the selfadjoint factor eη. This breaking leads to masses of flavour changing SO(3)F gauge bosons much above the compactification scale. Such a behaviour has no counterpart within the customary approximation scheme of an ordinary orbifold theory. This way tree-level flavour-changing-neutral-currents are

  12. Flavour oscillations and CP asymmetry in semileptonic Bs0 decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beale, Steven Thomas; /York U., Canada

    2010-01-01

    The B{sub s}{sup 0} meson spontaneously transforms into its antiparticle ({bar B}{sub s}{sup 0}). These 'flavour oscillations' occur periodically with a frequency that may be measured. The oscillation frequency is related to the fundamental parameters of the electroweak interaction. Measuring the frequency provides a constraint on the electroweak quark coupling parameter V{sub ts} and improves the constraint on V{sub td}. Furthermore, the amplitude of the oscillation process may be slightly different in B{sub s}{sup 0} and {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons due to CP violating nature of the weak interaction. This 'asymmetry' is expected to be small (a{sub fs}{sup SM,s} = (2.06 {+-} 0.57) {center_dot} 10{sup -5}), but may be enhanced (a{sub fs}{sup s} {approx_equal} {Omicron}(1%)) by new sources of CP violation. This thesis describes a search for B{sub s}{sup 0} flavour oscillations and charge asymmetry in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}X (D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} K*{sup 0}K{sup -}) decay mode using 5.0 fb{sup -1} of D0 data. A lower limit is placed on the oscillation frequency, {Delta}m{sub s} > 9.9 ps{sup -1} with an expected sensitivity to oscillations below 14.8 ps{sup -1}. The charge asymmetry is measured to be a{sub fs}{sup s} = 0.018 {+-} 0.025(stat) {+-} 0.002(syst). A combination of these measurements with other decay modes is also presented.

  13. Influence of dimethylpolysiloxane addition to edible oils: dependence on the main variables of the frying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge, N.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in the absence of food to define the influence of significant variables of the frying process, i.e. oil unsaturation, temperature, surface-to-oil volume ratio, type of heating and dimethylpolysiloxane (DMPS addition. Special emphasis was placed on clarifying the action of the addition of low concentrations of DMPS to frying oils. From statistical evaluation based on the content of polar compounds, the strong influence of the variables surface-to-oil volume ratio, DMPS addition and oil unsaturation was deduced. However, changes due to 10ºC difference in temperature were not significant. Analysis of two-way interactions demonstrated that interactions between type of heating/DMPS addition, type of heating/oil unsaturation, surface-to-oil volume ratio/DMPS addition and surface-to-oiI volume ratio/oil unsaturation were significant, thus indicating the complexity of the frying process. Finally, it was found that increase in specific groups of compounds formed through oxidative polymerization as well as loss of natural antioxidants depended mainly on the total content of polar compounds and, at a second level, on the oil unsaturation.

  14. Advanced Process Chains for Prototyping and Pilot Production based on Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischkot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For many years, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has been a well-established production technology used mainly for rapid prototyping. But the need for increased flexibility and economic low volume production led to the discovery of Additive Manufacturing as a suitable fabrication technique (Mellor 2013...... and better parts functionality (Ponche 2014). Also, the use of AM ma-chines for spare parts can potentially reduce costs and downtime, and lead to a higher robustness to supply chain disruptions (Khajavi 2013). Control and optimization of the involved process chains are crucial for a fast and robust...

  15. Development of bus body rubber profiles with additives from renewable sources: Part I – Additives characterization and processing and cure properties of elastomeric compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bus body rubber profiles with additives from renewable sources. • Soybean oil, vulcanization activator from ethanol production and cereal loading filler. • Physical, chemical and thermal characterization of the additives. • Processing and cure properties of elastomeric compositions. • Components commonly used by the rubber industry can be replaced by these additives. - Abstract: The goal of this work was to characterize additives from renewable sources aiming replace the components that are traditionally used by the rubber industry in a formulation with terpolymer of ethylene–propylene–diene (EPDM). Soybean oil (MD600®) was used as a plasticizer. The vulcanization activator (MDECR®) was a sub-product from cellulosic ethanol production, while the loading filler (MDCO®) was obtained from cereals. Firstly, the physical, chemical and thermal properties of these additives were investigated. Thus, a standard composition used for bus body rubber profiles and compositions containing varying proportions of these additives were prepared. The acceleration system was added in a laboratory two-roll mill after the elastomeric compositions were processed in a torque rheometer. The elastomeric compositions were characterized by their cure properties, Mooney viscosities, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The addition of these additives led to a decrease in the viscosity, work, energy and Mooney viscosity of each composition, thus improving its processability. The curing characteristics of elastomeric compositions were affected by the addition of MD600® and MDECR®, leading to lower vulcanization time, while the cure properties were not affected by the addition of MDCO®

  16. Modelling the effect of oil/fat content in food systems on flavour absorption by LLDPE.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, M.; Willige, van R.W.G.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the phenomena in food packaging interactions is flavour absorption. Absorption of flavour compounds from food products into food-packaging materials can result in loss of flavour compounds or an unbalance in the flavour profile changing a product's quality. The food matrix influences the amou

  17. Electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile (PAN solution: Effect of conductive additive and filler on the process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning utilizes electric forces and hence the electrical properties of the solution have an effect the process. The study examined the effect of conductive additive and filler on the electrospinning process with polyacrylonitrile (PAN. Electrospinning trials were performed using a pure PAN solution, a salt-containing solution, and a solution containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs. Different nozzle sizes were used, and the spinning voltage and distance were also varied. The composition of the solution had a greater effect on fibre diameter than varying the process parameters. Conductivity of the solution increased the probability of process problems such as the formation of three-dimensional (3D structures and the occurrence of larger, micro-sized fibres. When the viscosity of the solution was increased, as was the case with the PAN/CNT solution, the severity of the problems became less acute than with the PAN/Salt solution.

  18. Flavour symmetry breaking and tuning the strange quark mass for 2+1 quark flavours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Universidad Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Bornyakov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protovino (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the updown quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, which enables highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. (orig.)

  19. Flavour-changing neutral currents in the flavour-blind MSSM at large tanβ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A popular way to avoid too large FCNC in supersymmetric models is the assumption of minimal flavour violation (MFV), where SUSY is broken by a flavour-blind mechanism. We study how loop effects which are enhanced at large tanβ can circumvent the MFV constraint to generate new FCNCs. We show that these effects can be resummed to all orders in perturbation theory in analogy to the tanβ-enhanced corrections to the bottom mass. This procedure yields new Feynman rules which automatically contain the enhanced effects without resorting to the decoupling limit. We also include the enhanced bottom-mass corrections and clarify their dependence on the input scheme. Finally, we study contributions to FCNC observables in B physics resulting from the new Feynman rules

  20. LOCAL TIME ANALYSIS OF ADDITIVE LEVY PROCESSES WITH DIFFERENT L(E)VY EXPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Yuquan

    2009-01-01

    Let X_1,…, XN be independent, classical Lévy processes on R~d with Lévy exponents ψ_1,…, ψ_N, respectively. The corresponding additive Lévy process is defined as the following N-parameter random field on R~d, X(t)(△=) X_1(t_1) +…+ X_N(t_N),(A) t∈R~N_+.Under mild regularity conditions on the ψ_i's, we derive estimate for the local and uniform moduli of continuity of local times of X={X(t); t∈R~N_+}.

  1. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N. [Nanophase Technologies Corp., Darien, IL (United States); Chen, Nan [Illinois Superconductor Corp., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  2. Leachate Treatment by Batch Decant Activated Sludge Process and Powdered Activated Carbon Addition

    OpenAIRE

    Y Hashempur; R Rezaei Kalantary; Jaafarzadeh, N.; Jorfi, S.

    2009-01-01

    "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Direct biodegradation of landfill leachate is too difficult because of high concentrations of COD and NH3 and also the presence of toxic compounds. The main objective of this study was to application of Strurvite precipitation as a pretreatment stage, in order to remove inhibitors of biodegradation before the batch decant activated sludge process with addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC)."nMaterials and Methods: Strurvite precipitated leachate was intro...

  3. Additive manufacture of an aluminium alloy: processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Aboulkhair, Nesma T.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of aluminium alloys using selective laser melting (SLM) is of research interest nowadays because of its potential benefits in industry sectors such as aerospace and automotive. However, in order to demonstrate the credibility of aluminium SLM for industrial needs, a comprehensive understanding of the interrelation between the process parameters, produced microstructure, and mechanical behaviour is still needed. This thesis aims at contributing to developing this compreh...

  4. The effects of the coke addition and the heating time on the efficiency of chlorination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of mixed pellet, ZrO2, coke and sucrose, for chlorinating process of ZrO2 pellet has been performed. In this experiments the studied parameters were coke addition and the heating time. The addition of coke was 9.72 grams, 10.5 grams and 11 for the mixture of the 87 grams ZrO2 and 3.5 grams sucrose. The purpose of the coke addition is to from ZrC, which is corresponding to Kroll process with carbon-chlor methos. The weight of cokes had been calculated beyond the stoichiometry. The heating times was held in 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes at the temperature of 100oC that was below the evaporation coke temperature of 315oC. The result show that the efficiency of chlorinating of ZrO2 pellet could be reached of 82.16% with the addition of coke mass of 11 grams at the heating temperature of 100oC with the heating time of 20 minutes

  5. Improvement of a grass-clover silage-fed biogas process by the addition of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, A.; Jarlsvik, T. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultual Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Mathisen, B. [Swedish Inst. of Agricultural Engineering, Uppsala (Sweden)] Svensson, B.H. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    1997-12-31

    Batch assays were performed with samples from a silage-fed mesophilic biogas process accumulating acetate to examine if the addition of single trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum) or a mixture of trace elements could improve the process. The results from the batch assays led to the addition of cobalt to reach a concentration of 0.2 mg L{sup -1}. This made it possible to increase the organic loading rate (OLR) above that in a parallel process not receiving any extra cobalt. Problems with low gas production and decreasing pH were overcome by the daily supply of this single element in small amounts. Acetate conversion to methane was improved, which was confirmed by increased specific methanogenic activity (SMA) with acetate as a substrate. As a consequence, an OLR of 7.0 g VS L{sup -1} was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20 days with an equivalent increase in methane production. Without cobalt addition, an OLR of 5.0 g VS L{sup -1} day{sup -1} with an HRT of 20 days was reached after 70 weeks operation. (Author)

  6. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 213, Revision 2 (FGE.213Rev2): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.7 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    . Moreover, the Panel reconsidered the available data on p-mentha-1,4(8)-dien-3-one [FL-no: 07.127], based on new data on the structurally related substance pulegone, and concluded that additional genotoxicity data are needed to rule out the concern for genotoxicity of p-mentha-1,4(8)-dien-3-one [FL-no: 07.127]....

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 222: Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for alpha,betaunsaturated furyl derivatives with the α,β-unsaturation in the side chain from subgroup 4.6 of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    additional genotoxicity studies for two representative substances, 3-(2-furyl)acrylaldehyde [FL-no: 13.034] and 4-(2-furyl)but-3-en-2-one [FL-no: 13.044], in FGE.222. Based on these new data the Panel could not rule out a clastogenic and aneugenic potential for the two substances and a in vivo Comet assay...

  8. Application of Electrostatic Extrusion – Flavour Encapsulation and Controlled Release

    OpenAIRE

    Branko Bugarski; Viktor Nedovic; Bojana Obradovic; Jasna Djonlagic; Nevenka Rajic; Verica Manojlovic

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this study was the development of flavour alginate formulationsaimed for thermally processed foods. Ethyl vanilline was used as the model flavourcompound. Electrostatic extrusion was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanilline inalginate gel microbeads. The obtained microbeads with approx. 10 % w/w of ethylvanilline encapsulated in about 2 % w/w alginate were uniformly sized spheres of about450 μm. Chemical characterization by H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the algina...

  9. Minimal flavour violation and neutrino masses without R-parity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcadi, G.; Di Luzio, L.; Nardecchia, M.

    2012-01-01

    symmetry breaking all the couplings of the superpotential including the R-parity violating ones. If R-parity violation is responsible for neutrino masses, our setup can be seen as an extension of MFV to the lepton sector. We analyze two patterns based on the non-abelian flavour symmetries SU(3)(4) circle...... times SU(4) and SU(3)(5). In the former case the total lepton number and the lepton flavour number are broken together, while in the latter the lepton number can be broken independently by an abelian spurion, so that visible effects and peculiar correlations can be envisaged in flavour changing charged...

  10. Neutrino masses and mixing: a flavour symmetry roadmap

    CERN Document Server

    Morisi, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last ten years tri-bimaximal mixing has played an important role in modeling the flavour problem. We give a short review of the status of flavour symmetry models of neutrino mixing. We concentrate on non-Abelian discrete symmetries, which provide a simple way to account for the TBM pattern. We discuss phenomenological implications such as neutrinoless double beta decay, lepton flavour violation as well as theoretical aspects such as the possibility to explain quarks and leptons within a common framework, such as grand unified models.

  11. The supersymmetric flavour problem in 5D GUTs and its consequences for LHC phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Brummer, Felix; Kraml, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    We study supersymmetric models with a GUT-sized extra dimension, where both the Higgs fields and the SUSY breaking hidden sector are localized on a 4D brane. Exponential wave function profiles of the matter fields give rise to hierarchical structures in the Yukawa couplings and soft terms. Such structures can naturally explain hierarchical fermion masses and mixings, while at the same time alleviating the supersymmetric flavour problem. We discuss two sources of supersymmetry breaking, radion mediation and brane fields, and perform a detailed numerical analysis, thoroughly taking into account the proliferation of unknown O(1) coefficients that occurs in this class of models. It turns out that additional assumptions on supersymmetry breaking are necessary to evade the stringent experimental bounds on lepton flavour violation. The favourable regions of parameter space are then examined with regards to their LHC phenomenology. They generically feature heavy gluinos and squarks beyond current bounds. Lepton flavo...

  12. Implications of lepton flavour violation on long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Soumya, C

    2016-01-01

    Non-standard neutrino interactions (NSIs), the sub-leading effects in the flavour transitions of neutrinos, play a crucial role in the determination of the various unknowns in neutrino oscillations, such as neutrino mass hierarchy, Dirac CP violating phase and the octant of atmospheric mixing angle. In view of the recent experimental observation of several lepton flavor universality (LFU) violating observables in $B$ decays, we study the possible implications of these interactions in the determination of various neutrino oscillation parameters. We consider the model with an additional $Z'$ boson (which is quite successful in explaining the observed LFU anomalies) and analyze its effect in the lepton flavour violating (LFV) $\\tau$ decays, i.e., $\\tau^- \\to e^- e^+ e^-$ and $\\tau^- \\to e^- \\pi^0$. From the present upper bounds of these decay rates, we obtain the constraints on the new physics parameters, which are related to the corresponding NSI parameters in the neutrino sector by $SU(2)_L$ symmetry. These ne...

  13. CP violation versus flavour in supersymmetric theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, S.; Branco, G. C.; Khalil, S.

    2003-09-01

    We show that the quark flavour structure and CP violating phenomena are strongly correlated in supersymmetric theories. For a generic pattern of supersymmetry breaking the two broad categories of Yukawa couplings, democratic and hierarchical textures, have entirely different phenomenological implications. With hierarchical Yukawas, the rephasing invariant phase, arg(VusVcbVcb∗Vcs∗), in the CKM mixing matrix has to be of order unity, while the SUSY CP violating phases are severely constrained by electric dipole moments, giving rise to the so-called SUSY CP problem. With democratic Yukawas, all experimental CP results can be accommodated with small values for the CKM and SUSY CP violating phases (i.e., CP can be considered as an approximate symmetry at the high energy scale). We also show that within this scenario, an entirely real CKM matrix in supersymmetric models is still allowed by the present experimental results.

  14. CP violation versus flavour in supersymmetric theories

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Khalil, S

    2003-01-01

    We show that the quark flavour structure and CP violating phenomena are strongly correlated in supersymmetric theories. For a generic pattern of supersymmetry breaking the two broad categories of Yukawa couplings, democratic and hierarchical textures, have entirely different phenomenological implications. With hierarchical Yukawas, the rephasing invariant phase, arg(V_us V_cb V_cb^* V_cs^*), in the CKM mixing matrix has to be of order unity, while the SUSY CP violating phases are severely constrained by electric dipole moments, giving rise to the so-called SUSY CP problem. With democratic Yukawas, all experimental CP results can be accommodated with small values for the CKM and SUSY CP violating phases (i.e., CP can be considered as an approximate symmetry at the high energy scale). We also show that within this scenario, an entirely real CKM matrix in supersymmetric models is still allowed by the present experimental results.

  15. Heavy flavour decay properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00235989; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the results on CP-violation searches in the $B_s$ system, studied in the $B_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\phi$ decay and the $B_d$ system through the comparison of the decay time distributions in the flavour specific state $J/\\psi\\ K^*$ and in the CP eigenstate $J/\\psi\\ K_s$. We also present new results in the search for the rare decays of $B_d$ and $B_s$ into $\\mu^+\\mu^-$. All results are based on the full sample of data collected during LHC Run 1 by ATLAS at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The consistency with the SM and with other available measurements is discussed.

  16. Effects of Excess Yttrium Addition on YBCO Thin Films Prepared by TFA-MOD Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [YBa2Cu3O7-x]thin films were fabricated on LaAlO3(100) substrate by TFA-MOD process. Yttrium-excess (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20 at%) coating solution was prepared by adding extra amount of yttrium into a stoichiometric(Y:Ba:Cu=1:2:3) TFA precursor solution. Results are presented concerning the influence of excess yttrium additions on the microstructure development and superconducting properties of YBa2Cu3O7-x film. Large sized CuO particles was observed by SEM EDS investigation. The addition of excess yttrium affected little on Tc of YBa2Cu3O7-xfilm. Jc of YBCO film was enhanced with excess yttrium addition. Jc maximum of 2.21 MA/cm2 (77 K, self field) appeared with the 15 at% addition of excess yttrium. With further yttrium addition up to 20 at %, Jc decreased down to 0.9 MA/cm2.

  17. Patterns of Flavour Violation in Models with Vector-Like Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Bobeth, Christoph; Celis, Alejandro; Jung, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We study the patterns of flavour violation in renormalizable extensions of the Standard Model (SM) that contain vector-like quarks (VLQs) in a single complex representation of either the SM gauge group G_SM or G_SM' = G_SM x U(1)_{L_mu - L_tau}. We first decouple VLQs in the (1 - 10) TeV range and then at the electroweak scale also Z, Z' gauge bosons and additional scalars to study the resulting phenomenology that depends on the relative size of Z- and Z'-induced flavour-changing neutral currents, as well as the size of |Delta F|=2 contributions. In addition to rare decays like M--> l^+l^-, M--> M' l^+l^-, M--> M' vv with M = K, B_s, B_d and |Delta F|=2 observables we analyze the ratio epsilon'/epsilon which appears in the SM to be significantly below the data. We study patterns and correlations between various flavour observables in VLQ models with left-handed (LH) and right-handed currents (RH) including experimental constraints. Among the highlights are large new physics (NP) effects in Kaon observables in...

  18. Measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmacher, Marc

    2013-06-15

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The data is reconstructed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the full data sample of 2010 is used. Three types of jet flavours, bottom, charm and light, are distinguished and thus six possible flavour combinations are identified in the dijet events. Kinematic variables, based on the properties of displaced decay vertices and optimised for jet flavour identification, are employed in an event-based likelihood fit. Multidimensional templates derived from Monte Carlo are used to measure the fractions of the six dijet flavour states as functions of the leading jet transverse momentum in the range 40 GeV to 500 GeV and jet rapidity vertical stroke y vertical stroke <2.1. The fit results agree with the predictions of leading- and next-to-leading-order calculations, with the exception of the dijet fraction composed of a bottom and a light flavour jet, which is underestimated by all models at large transverse jet momenta. In addition, the difference between bottom jet production rates in leading and subleading jets is measured and found to be consistent with the next-to-leadingorder predictions. The ability to identify jets containing two b-hadrons is demonstrated and used to identify a deficiency in the predictions of leading order Monte Carlo for the contribution of these jets to dijet production.

  19. Leachate Treatment by Batch Decant Activated Sludge Process and Powdered Activated Carbon Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Hashempur

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Direct biodegradation of landfill leachate is too difficult because of high concentrations of COD and NH3 and also the presence of toxic compounds. The main objective of this study was to application of Strurvite precipitation as a pretreatment stage, in order to remove inhibitors of biodegradation before the batch decant activated sludge process with addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC."nMaterials and Methods: Strurvite precipitated leachate was introduced to a bench scale batch decant activated sludge reactor with hydraulic retention times of 6 and 12 hour. PAC was added to aeration tank directly at the rate of 3.5 g/L."nResults:TCOD, SCOD, NH3 and P removal efficiency with addition of PAC in HRT of 6 h were 90,87, 98.3 and 94 % respectively and 96, 95, 99.2 and 98.7 5 in HRT of 12 h."nConcusion:According to obtained data from this work, it can be concluded that Strurvite precipitation before batch decant activated sludge process and simultaneous addition of PAC is promising technology for leachate treatment and can meet effluent standards for discharge to the receiving waters.

  20. Suppressing Lepton Flavour Violation in a Soft-Wall Extra Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A soft-wall warped extra dimension allows one to relax the tight constraints imposed by electroweak data in conventional Randall-Sundrum models. We investigate a setup, where the lepton flavour structure of the Standard Model is realised by split fermion locations. Bulk fermions with general locations are not analytically tractable in a soft-wall background, so we follow a numerical approach to perform the Kaluza-Klein reduction. Lepton flavour violation is induced by the exchange of Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons. We find that rates for processes such as muon-electron conversion are significantly reduced compared to hard-wall models, allowing for a Kaluza-Klein scale as low as 2 TeV. Accommodating small neutrino masses forces one to introduce a large hierarchy of scales into the model, making pressing the question of a suitable stabilisation mechanism.

  1. Investigation of the microbial community in a microbiological additive used in a manure composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakase, Shiho; Sasaki, Hiraku; Itoh, Kikuji; Otawa, Kenichi; Kitazume, Osamu; Nonaka, Jun; Satoh, Masaaki; Sasaki, Takako; Nakai, Yutaka

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the fate of microorganisms by using cultivation methods as well as DNA analyses in a commercial microbiological additive (MA) in the course of the composting. Almost all the predominant species in the microbial succession during composting process determined by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) were in disagreement with those determined by the clone library method. None of the microbial species in the composting stages corresponded to the microorganisms identified in the MA either by the cultivation method or DNA analysis. The results in regard to predominant microorganisms of the MA detected from the liquid medium by the PCR-DGGE did not correspond with those detected from the MA itself and composting processes. Although no evidence was found that predominant species in the MA itself dominate in the composting process, predominant species diversity in the MA itself was markedly changed after culturing at different thermophilic temperatures. These results suggested that cultivable microorganisms in the MA did not become predominant in the composting process: however, some microorganisms that are detected from the MA itself by the DNA analysis may act effectively in the composting process.

  2. SO(10) models with flavour symmetries: classification and examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Lavoura, L.

    2016-10-01

    Renormalizable SO(10) grand unified theory (GUT) models equipped with flavour symmetries are a popular framework for addressing the flavour puzzle. Usually, the flavour symmetry group has been an ad hoc choice, and no general arguments limiting this choice were known. In this paper, we establish the full list of flavour symmetry groups which may be enforced, without producing any further accidental symmetry, on the Yukawa-coupling matrices of an SO(10) GUT with arbitrary numbers of scalar multiplets in the {{10}}, \\bar{{{126}}}, and {{120}} representations of SO(10). For each of the possible discrete non-Abelian symmetry groups, we present examples of minimal models which do not run into obvious contradiction with the phenomenological fermion masses and mixings.

  3. Euroopa Liidu 7. Raamprogrammi projekt FLAVOURE / Marge Malbe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Malbe, Marge, 1968-

    2011-01-01

    2009. a sai Eesti Maaviljeluse Instituut 843,270.00 € suuruse Euroopa Liidu finantseeringu 3 aastat kestva projekti FLAVOURE (Food and Feed Laboratory of Varied and Outstanding Research in Estonia) läbiviimiseks ja koordineerimiseks

  4. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 217, Revision 1 (FGE.217Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.1 of FGE.19: Lactones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    the Procedure. Additional data on genotoxicity for the three representative substances, 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.023], 3,4-dimethyl-5-pentylidenefuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.042] and furan-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.066], have now been provided. Based on the new data, the Panel concluded...... that 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.023] does not give rise to concern with respect to genotoxicity and can accordingly, together with the structurally related substance, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.030] for which it is a representative, be evaluated using...... the Procedure. For 3,4-dimethyl-5-pentylidenefuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.042] and furan-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.066] the concern for genotoxicity could not be ruled out and a combined micronucleus and Comet assay is requested for these two substances, covering the remaining seven substances [FL-no: 10.034, 10...

  5. Lepton Flavour Violation via the K\\"ahler Potential in Compactified M-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Sebastian A R

    2015-01-01

    We use lepton-flavour violating (LFV) processes as a probe of higher-order corrections to the K\\"ahler potential in compactified M-theory. We consider a generic K\\"ahler potential with higher-order terms coupling visible sector fields to fields in the hidden sector of the compactified theory. Such terms generally give rise to potentially large flavour-violating effects. Unless there are suppressions, the size of the resulting off-diagonal terms in the K\\"ahler potential may be at odds with experimental results. The rare decay $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e$ conversion in nuclei probe the size of the potential flavour non-diagonality of the higher-order terms for realistic spectra in the M-theory compactification. We consider a parameterisation of the higher-order corrections in terms of a small parameter $\\epsilon$. By analysing various textures for the higher-order corrections, we find current bounds on $\\epsilon$ from the LFV processes. The constraint from the neutral kaon mass difference $\\Delta m_K$ is...

  6. Characterization of Ti and Co based biomaterials processed via laser based additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu

    Titanium and Cobalt based metallic materials are currently the most ideal materials for load-bearing metallic bio medical applications. However, the long term tribological degradation of these materials still remains a problem that needs a solution. To improve the tribological performance of these two metallic systems, three different research approaches were adapted, stemming out four different research projects. First, the simplicity of laser gas nitriding was utilized with a modern LENS(TM) technology to form an in situ nitride rich later in titanium substrate material. This nitride rich composite coating improved the hardness by as much as fifteen times and reduced the wear rate by more than a magnitude. The leaching of metallic ions during wear was also reduced by four times. In the second research project, a mixture of titanium and silicon were processed on a titanium substrate in a nitrogen rich environment. The results of this reactive, in situ additive manufacturing process were Ti-Si-Nitride coatings that were harder than the titanium substrate by more than twenty times. These coatings also reduced the wear rate by more than two magnitudes. In the third research approach, composites of CoCrMo alloy and Calcium phosphate (CaP) bio ceramic were processed using LENS(TM) based additive manufacturing. These composites were effective in reducing the wear in the CoCrMo alloy by more than three times as well as reduce the leaching of cobalt and chromium ions during wear. The novel composite materials were found to develop a tribofilm during wear. In the final project, a combination of hard nitride coating and addition of CaP bioceramic was investigated by processing a mixture of Ti6Al4V alloy and CaP in a nitrogen rich environment using the LENS(TM) technology. The resultant Ti64-CaP-Nitride coatings significantly reduced the wear damage on the substrate. There was also a drastic reduction in the metal ions leached during wear. The results indicate that the three

  7. Formation of Amino Acid Derived Cheese Flavour Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), among them Lactococcus lactis, are often used for the fermentation of milk into various products, such as cheeses. For their growth and maintenance LAB metabolise milk sugar, protein and fat into various low molecular compounds, which sometimes have strong flavour characteristics. This thesis focuses on the production of one class of these compounds as a model system: aldehydes, in particular the key-flavour compounds 3-methylbutanal and 2-methyl propanal, which ar...

  8. Rare decays of flavoured mesons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2016-01-01

    In absence of strong, direct signs of New Physics at the LHC, rare decays of heavy flavoured hadrons constitute an ideal laboratory for indirectly exploring energies beyond those of the LHC in order to look for deviations from the Standard Model. The main results regarding flavour changing neutral current transitions obtained at the LHC are presented here, with particular emphasis put on $b \\to s$ transitions, in which tensions with the Standard Model have been observed.

  9. The negative binomial distribution in quark jets with fixed flavour

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto GiovanniniTurin U. & INFN, Turin; Sergio Lupia(Munich, Max Planck Inst.); Roberto Ugoccioni(Lund U.)

    2015-01-01

    We show that both the multiplicity distribution and the ratio of factorial cumulants over factorial moments for 2-jet events in e+e- annihilation at the Z^0 peak can be well reproduced by the weighted superposition of two negative binomial distributions, associated to the contribution of $b\\bar b$ and light flavoured events respectively. The negative binomial distribution is then suggested to describe the multiplicity distribution of 2-jet events with fixed flavour.

  10. Signatures of top flavour-changing dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    D’Hondt, Jorgen; Mariotti, Alberto; Mawatari, Kentarou; Moortgat, Seth; Tziveloglou, Pantelis; Van Onsem, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    We develop the phenomenology of scenarios in which a dark matter candidate interacts with a top quark through flavour-changing couplings, employing a simplified dark matter model with an s -channel vector-like mediator. We study in detail the top-charm flavour-changing interaction, by investigating the single top plus large missing energy signature at the LHC as well as constraints from the relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We present strategies to disti...

  11. Impact on odorant partition coefficients and flavour perception

    OpenAIRE

    Rusu, Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Foods are complex multi-component systems which are composed of volatile and non-volatile substances. The flavour profile of a food is an important criterion for the selection of our foodstuffs. The main objective of this study was the clarification of the complex relationships of the flavour release as a function of the composition of the food matrix at molecular level. Therefore the influence of matrix effects onto the partition coefficients, odour activity values and sens...

  12. 3D Machine Vision and Additive Manufacturing: Concurrent Product and Process Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing environment rapidly changes in turbulence fashion. Digital manufacturing (DM) plays a significant role and one of the key strategies in setting up vision and strategic planning toward the knowledge based manufacturing. An approach of combining 3D machine vision (3D-MV) and an Additive Manufacturing (AM) may finally be finding its niche in manufacturing. This paper briefly overviews the integration of the 3D machine vision and AM in concurrent product and process development, the challenges and opportunities, the implementation of the 3D-MV and AM at POLMAN Bandung in accelerating product design and process development, and discusses a direct deployment of this approach on a real case from our industrial partners that have placed this as one of the very important and strategic approach in research as well as product/prototype development. The strategic aspects and needs of this combination approach in research, design and development are main concerns of the presentation.

  13. 3D Machine Vision and Additive Manufacturing: Concurrent Product and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Ismet P.

    2013-06-01

    The manufacturing environment rapidly changes in turbulence fashion. Digital manufacturing (DM) plays a significant role and one of the key strategies in setting up vision and strategic planning toward the knowledge based manufacturing. An approach of combining 3D machine vision (3D-MV) and an Additive Manufacturing (AM) may finally be finding its niche in manufacturing. This paper briefly overviews the integration of the 3D machine vision and AM in concurrent product and process development, the challenges and opportunities, the implementation of the 3D-MV and AM at POLMAN Bandung in accelerating product design and process development, and discusses a direct deployment of this approach on a real case from our industrial partners that have placed this as one of the very important and strategic approach in research as well as product/prototype development. The strategic aspects and needs of this combination approach in research, design and development are main concerns of the presentation.

  14. Scanning laser ultrasound and wavenumber spectroscopy for in-process inspection of additively manufactured parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new in-process laser ultrasound inspection technique for additive manufacturing. Ultrasonic energy was introduced to the part by attaching an ultrasonic transducer to the printer build-plate and driving it with a single-tone, harmonic excitation. The full-field response of the part was measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer after each printer layer. For each scan, we analyzed both the local amplitudes and wavenumbers of the response in order to identify defects. For this study, we focused on the detection of delamination between layers in a fused deposition modeling process. Foreign object damage, localized heating damage, and the resulting delamination between layers were detected in using the technique as indicated by increased amplitude and wavenumber responses within the damaged area.

  15. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  16. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H2) and ammonia (NH3) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H2 and NH3 could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H2 and NH3 (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed

  17. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  18. Lepton-flavour violating $B$ decays in generic $Z^\\prime$ models

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Matias, Joaquim; Nierste, Ulrich; Pokorski, Stefan; Rosiek, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has reported deviations from the SM expectations in $B\\to K^* \\mu^+\\mu^-$ angular observables, in $B_s\\to\\phi\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and in ratio $R(K)=Br[B\\to K \\mu^+\\mu^-]/Br[B\\to K e^+e^-]$. For all three decays, a heavy neutral gauge boson mediating $b\\to s\\mu^+\\mu^-$ transitions is a prime candidate for an explanation. As $R(K)$ measures violation of lepton-flavour universality, it is interesting to examine the possibility that also lepton flavour is violated. In this article, we investigate the perspectives to discover the lepton-flavour violating modes $B\\to K^{(*)}\\tau^\\pm\\mu^\\mp$, $B_s\\to \\tau^\\pm\\mu^\\mp$ and $B\\to K^{(*)} \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$, $B_s\\to \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$. For this purpose we consider a simplified model in which new-physics effects originate from an additional neutral gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$) with generic couplings to quarks and leptons. The constraints from $\\tau\\to3\\mu$, $\\tau\\to\\mu\

  19. Characterization of semi-solid processing of aluminium alloy 7075 with Sc and Zr additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogal, Ł., E-mail: l.rogal@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dutkiewicz, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Atkinson, H.V. [The University of Leicester, Department of Engineering University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, L.; Czeppe, T. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Modigell, M. [RWTH Aachen—Department of Mechanical Process Engineering, 55 Templergraben St., Aachen (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    For thixoforming (semi-solid processing) it is necessary to have a fine globular microstructure in a semi-solid range. Here this has been obtained for 7075 aluminium alloy by addition of modifying agents: 0.5 weight % of scandium and zirconium. The thixoforming process was carried out at 632 °C which gave about 23 volume % of liquid phase. The microstructure of the thixo-formed part (a rotor) consisted of globular grains surrounded by precipitates of secondary phase. The average hardness of thixo-formed parts was 105 HV{sub 5} and the tensile strength 300 MPa. T6 heat treatments were performed with solutionisation at 450 °C for 30 min and 10 h. In both cases the ageing time was set as 18 h at 120 °C. The heat treatments led to an increase in average tensile strength up to 495 MPa. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis enabled the identification of precipitates of the metastable dispersoids of L1{sub 2}–Al{sub 3} (Zr, Sc) and η′ (MgZn{sub 2}) phases in the alloy after the thixoforming and T6 treatment. The measurements of rheological properties of 7075Al alloy with Sc and Zr additions in the semi-solid range indicated an increase of particle size and spheroidization leading to an observable decrease of viscosity during isothermal shearing. A shear rate jump experiment showed that with increasing shear rate the viscosity rapidly falls.

  20. Flavour development of East Midlands cheeses and evaluation of flavour producing microorganisms in a small scale real-cheese model

    OpenAIRE

    Whiley, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Stilton is a blue-veined cheese made from pasteurised milk. The diversity of the microflora found within the cheese helps develop the unique flavour and aroma of Stilton compared to other blue cheese. However, this flora is not controlled and so product may be variable. A small-scale cheese model was developed to allow examination of the effect of different microflora on flavour production in a controlled way. Texture analysis, water activity and viable count of the cheese models were comp...

  1. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 1 (FGE.77Rev1: Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting structurally related to Pyridine, Pyrrole, Indole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.24Rev2 (2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA, and to decide whether further evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 22 pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives evaluated by the JECFA (63rd meeting. The revision of this consideration is made since additional toxicity data have become available for isoquinoline [FL-no: 14.001], pyrrole [FL-no: 14.041] and 2-acetylpyrrole [FL-no: 14.047]. The toxicity data on 2-acetylpyrrole should also cover 2-propionylpyrrole [FL-no: 14.068]. Further, additional genotoxicity data on 6-methylquinoline [FL-no: 14.042] have become available. The Panel concluded that for 6-methylquinoline [FL-no: 14.042], the new genotoxicity data did not clear the concern with respect to genotoxicity in vitro and accordingly the substance is not evaluated through the Procedure. For 18 substances [FL-no: 14.001, 14.004, 14.007, 14.030, 14.038, 14.039, 14.041, 14.047, 14.058, 14.059, 14.060, 14.061, 14.065, 14.066, 14.068, 14.071, 14.072 and 14.164] considered in this FGE, the Panel agrees with the JECFA conclusion, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. For three substances [FL-no: 13.134, 14.045 and 14.046], additional toxicological data are still required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been evaluated, and the information is considered adequate for all the substances.

  2. Flavour blindness and patterns of flavour symmetry breaking in lattice simulations of up, down and strange quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Univ. Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Bornyakov, V. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protovino (Russian Federation); Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2011-02-15

    QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the up-down quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, first for the general 1+1+1 flavour case and then for the 2+1 flavour case (when two quark flavours are mass degenerate). These enable highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results for the 2+1 flavour case confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. Singlet quantities remain constant which allows the lattice spacing to be determined from hadron masses (without necessarily being at the physical point). Furthermore an extension of this programme to include partially quenched results is also given. (orig.)

  3. Implication of Higgs mediated Flavour Changing Neutral Currents with Minimal Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Rebelo, M N

    2015-01-01

    We analise phenomenological implications of two Higgs doublet models with Higgs flavour changing neutral currents suppressed in the quark sector by small entries of the Cabibbo-Kokayashi-Maskawa matrix. This suppression occurs in a natural way since it is the result of a symmetry applied to the Lagrangian. These type of models were proposed some time ago by Branco Grimus and Lavoura. Our results clearly show that these class of models allow for new physical scalars, with masses which are reachable at the LHC. The imposed symmetry severely reduces the number of free parameters and allows for predictions. Therefore these models can eventually be proved right or eliminated experimentally.

  4. Impacts of Antifoam Additions and Argon Bubbling on Defense Waste Processing Facility Reduction/Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe+2/ΣFe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  5. Statistical properties of a filtered Poisson process with additive random noise: Distributions, correlations and moment estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun; Rypdal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The filtered Poisson process is often used as a reference model for intermittent fluctuations in physical systems. Here, this process is extended by adding a noise term, either as a purely additive term to the process or as a dynamical term in a stochastic differential equation. The moments, probability density function, auto- correlation function and power spectral density are derived and used to compare the effects of the different noise terms. Monte-Carlo studies of synthetic time series are used to investigate the accuracy of parameter estimation and to identify methods for separating the noise types. It is shown that the probability density function and the three lowest moments provide accurate estimations of the parameters, but are unable to separate the noise types. The auto-correlation function and the power spectral density also provide methods for estimating the model parameters, as well as being capable of determining the noise type. The number of times the signal passes a prescribed threshold in t...

  6. The use of charcoal as an alternate internal fuel addition in the pelletising process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vining, K.R.; Firth, A.R.; Douglas, J.D.; Garden, J.F. [Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organization, Clayton South, Victoria (Australia)

    2007-07-01

    Solid fuels are often combined with ground iron ore fines during the pelletizing process in order to reduce maximum firing temperatures and amounts of burner fuel required, as well as to pellet strength. Coke and coal both contribute to raised levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the pelletization process. Various minerals have been investigated as an alternative to coke and coal. The use of wood biomass and wood char is a suitable alternative to coke and coal, as it is a renewable energy source, has a low ash content, and can reduce GHG emissions from the iron and steel-making process. The results of an experimental testwork program conducted to compare the behaviour of fired pellets containing traditional solid fuels and charcoal were presented. Physical properties of the pellets were compared in terms of their tumble and abrasion indices, reduction properties, and compressive strength. Pellet microstructures were also compared. The aim of the project was to demonstrate that biomass is an adequate replacement for both coke and coal. Chemical analyses were conducted, and surface area and specific reactivity was measured. A pot grate test was conducted. Results of the study showed that the use of charcoal or anthracite resulted in green balls with a higher moisture content than Black Pine charcoal. Various firing regimes were used during the experiments. Results showed that charcoal performed better than coke breeze due to its faster reactivity. Further testing is needed to determine optimal combinations of basicity, firing temperature, and internal fuel additions. 4 refs., 8 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Acidic electrolyzed water efficiently improves the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. cv. Mopan) wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanqi; Zhu, Baoqing; Li, Yao; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Bolin; Fan, Junfeng

    2016-04-15

    The ability of acidic (AcW) and alkaline electrolyzed waters (AlW) to improve the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) wine was evaluated. Wines made with AcW (WAcW) were significantly better than wines made with AlW or pure water (PW) in aroma, taste, and colour. Volatile analysis showed that WAcW has high alcohol and ester contents, including 2-phenylethanol, isopentanol, isobutanol, ethyl dodecanoate, phenethyl acetate, and butanedioic acid diethyl ester. The total amino acid content of persimmon slurry soaked with AcW reached 531.2 mg/l, which was much higher than those of the slurries soaked in AlW (381.3 mg/l) and PW (182.7 mg/l). The composition of major amino acids in the AcW-soaked slurry may contribute to the strong ester flavour of WAcW. This is the first report to suggest that electrolyzed functional water (EFW) can be used to improve wine flavour, leading to the possible use of EFW in food processing.

  8. Anatomy of flavour-changing Z couplings in models with partial compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Straub, David M

    2013-01-01

    In models with partially composite quarks, the couplings of quarks to the Z boson generically receive non-universal corrections that are not only constrained by electroweak precision tests but also lead to flavour-changing neutral currents at tree level. The impact of these flavour-changing couplings on rare K and B decays is studied in two-site models for three scenarios: an anarchic strong sector with two different choices of fermion representations both leading to a custodial protection of the Z->bb coupling, and for a strong sector invariant under a U(2)^3 flavour symmetry. In the complete numerical analysis, all relevant constraints from Delta(F)=2 processes are taken into account. In all scenarios, visible effects in rare K and B decays like K->pi nu anti-nu, B(s)->mu+mu- and B->K*mu+mu- are possible that can be scrutinized experimentally in the near future. Characteristic correlations between observables allow to distinguish the different cases. To sample the large parameter space of the anarchic model...

  9. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bogavac, Danijela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In high-energy physics experiments, online selection is crucial to identify the few interesting collisions from the large data volume processed. In the overall ATLAS trigger strategy, b-jet triggers are designed to identify heavy-flavour content in real-time and, in particular, provide the only option to efficiently record events with fully hadronic final states containing b-jets. In doing so, two different, but related, challenges are faced. The physics goal is to optimise as far as possible the rejection of light jets from multijet processes, while retaining a high efficiency on selecting jets from beauty, and maintaining affordable trigger rates without raising jet energy thresholds. This maps into a challenging computing task, as charged tracks and their corresponding vertexes must be reconstructed and analysed for each jet above the desired threshold, regardless of the increasingly harsh pile-up conditions. The performance of b-jet triggers during the LHC Run 1 data-taking campaigns is presented, togethe...

  10. MC rate at NLO for heavy flavour photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toll, Tobias

    2010-02-15

    A Monte Carlo at next-to-leading order (MC rate at NLO) has been constructed for the production of heavy quark flavours in photoproduction. As such, it is the rst Monte Carlo event generator with next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy for a process in lepton hadron scattering. In order to construct such an MC rate at NLO, the matrix element for the process has to be calculated at NLO and then be matched with a parton shower. When doing this, it is important that none of the parton configurations produced are doubly counted. In this thesis, the concept of a Monte Carlo event generator will be explained, with emphasis on the HERWIG parton shower. Also, different techniques of calculating matrix elements at NLO accuracy will be explained. It will then be shown how the NLO calculation can be matched with the HERWIG parton shower in an MC rate at NLO without double counting, producing unweighted events at NLO-accuracy. Many comparisons are made between the MC rate at NLO here constructed, the HERWIG Monte Carlo and the FMNR NLO calculation. Also many comparisons are made to HERA data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments. It is shown that all HERA data with heavy quarks produced in photoproduction can be described by the MC rate at NLO program constructed in this thesis. (orig.)

  11. Flavour kinetics in an expanding quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phenomenological model for the expansion of a quark-gluon plasma is presented and applied to ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The flavour kinetics is described by rate equations allowing the abundances of the different constituents of the system to be out of equilibrium. The basic constituents are the quarks and gluons in the plasma phase and hadrons in the hadronic phase. Besides ordinary kinetic processes within the two phases (inelastic collisions), we construct a model for the confinement mechanism which is based on the string phenomenology of hadronization. The latter aspect constitutes the novel and essential part of the paper. Abundances of the various hadrons have been calculated for a baryon poor and a baryon rich scenario. The results show that during the hadronization process, the original quark content is roughly doubled. The resulting hadron abundances are found to depend on the hadronization mechanism, while the subsequent hadronic reactions do not have a significant effect on the final hadronic abundances. We find a K-/π- ratio as much as a factor 6 larger than in panti p collisions. (orig.)

  12. REAL-TIME FLAVOUR TAGGING SELECTION IN ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bokan, Petar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment includes a well-developed trigger system that allows a selection of events which are thought to be of interest, while achieving a high overall rejection against less interesting processes. An important part of the online event selection is the ability to distinguish between jets arising from heavy-flavour quarks (b- and c-jets) and light jets (jets from u-, d-, s- and gluon jets) in real-time. This is essential for many physics analysis that include processes with large jet multiplicity and b-quarks in the final state. Many changes were implemented to the ATLAS online b-jet selection for the Run-2 of the LHC. An overview of the b-jet trigger strategy and performance during 2015 data taking is presented. The ability to use complex offline Multivariate (MV2) b-tagging algorithms directly at High Level Trigger (HLT) was tested in this period. Details on online tagging algorithms are given together with the plans on how to adapt to the new high-luminosity and increased pileup conditions by ex...

  13. Seafood-like flavour obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein by-products of seaweed (Gracilaria sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohakunjit, Natta; Selamassakul, Orrapun; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin

    2014-09-01

    An enzymatic bromelain seaweed protein hydrolysate (eb-SWPH) was characterised as the precursor for thermally processed seafood flavour. Seaweed (Gracilaria fisheri) protein after agar extraction was hydrolysed using bromelain (enzyme activity=119,325 U/g) at 0-20% (w/w) for 0.5-24 h. Optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined using response surface methodology. The proposed model took into account the interaction effect of the enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the physicochemical properties and volatile components of eb-SWPH. The optimal hydrolysis conditions for the production of eb-SWPH were 10% bromelain for 3h, which resulted in a 38.15% yield and a 62.91% degree of hydrolysis value. Three free amino acids, arginine, lysine, and leucine, were abundant in the best hydrolysate. Ten volatile flavours of the best eb-SWPH were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The predominant odourants were hexanal, hexanoic acid, nonanoic acid, and dihydroactinidiolide. The thermally processed seafood flavour produced from eb-SWPH exhibited a roasted seafood-like flavouring.

  14. Seafood-like flavour obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein by-products of seaweed (Gracilaria sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohakunjit, Natta; Selamassakul, Orrapun; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin

    2014-09-01

    An enzymatic bromelain seaweed protein hydrolysate (eb-SWPH) was characterised as the precursor for thermally processed seafood flavour. Seaweed (Gracilaria fisheri) protein after agar extraction was hydrolysed using bromelain (enzyme activity=119,325 U/g) at 0-20% (w/w) for 0.5-24 h. Optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined using response surface methodology. The proposed model took into account the interaction effect of the enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the physicochemical properties and volatile components of eb-SWPH. The optimal hydrolysis conditions for the production of eb-SWPH were 10% bromelain for 3h, which resulted in a 38.15% yield and a 62.91% degree of hydrolysis value. Three free amino acids, arginine, lysine, and leucine, were abundant in the best hydrolysate. Ten volatile flavours of the best eb-SWPH were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The predominant odourants were hexanal, hexanoic acid, nonanoic acid, and dihydroactinidiolide. The thermally processed seafood flavour produced from eb-SWPH exhibited a roasted seafood-like flavouring. PMID:24731327

  15. Dark matter and observable Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Heurtier, Lucien

    2016-01-01

    Seesaw models with leptonic symmetries allow right-handed (RH) neutrino masses at the electroweak scale, or even lower, at the same time having large Yukawa couplings with the Standard Model leptons, thus yielding observable effects at current or near-future lepton-flavour-violation (LFV) experiments. These models have been previously considered also in connection to low-scale leptogenesis, but the combination of observable LFV and successful leptogenesis has appeared to be difficult to achieve unless the leptonic symmetry is embedded into a larger one. In this paper, instead, we follow a different route and consider a possible connection between large LFV rates and Dark Matter (DM). We present a model in which the same leptonic symmetry responsible for the large Yukawa couplings guarantees the stability of the DM candidate, identified as the lightest of the RH neutrinos. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry, caused by a Majoron-like field, also provides a mechanism to produce the observed relic density ...

  16. Flavour physics in the soft wall model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Paul R.; Huber, Stephan J.; Jäger, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    We extend the description of flavour that exists in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model to the soft wall (SW) model in which the IR brane is removed and the Higgs is free to propagate in the bulk. It is demonstrated that, like the RS model, one can generate the hierarchy of fermion masses by localising the fermions at different locations throughout the space. However, there are two significant differences. Firstly the possible fermion masses scale down, from the electroweak scale, less steeply than in the RS model and secondly there now exists a minimum fermion mass for fermions sitting towards the UV brane. With a quadratic Higgs VEV, this minimum mass is about fifteen orders of magnitude lower than the electroweak scale. We derive the gauge propagator and despite the KK masses scaling as m_n^2 ˜ n , it is demonstrated that the coefficients of four fermion operators are not divergent at tree level. FCNC's amongst kaons and leptons are considered and compared to calculations in the RS model, with a brane localised Higgs and equivalent levels of tuning. It is found that since the gauge fermion couplings are slightly more universal and the SM fermions typically sit slightly further towards the UV brane, the contributions to observables such as ɛ K and Δ m K , from the exchange of KK gauge fields, are significantly reduced.

  17. Flavour singlets in gauge theory as Permutations

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Gauge-invariant operators can be specified by equivalence classes of permutations. We develop this idea concretely for the singlets of the flavour group $SO(N_f)$ in $U(N_c)$ gauge theory by using Gelfand pairs and Schur-Weyl duality. The singlet operators, when specialised at $N_f =6$, belong to the scalar sector of ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM. A simple formula is given for the two-point functions in the free field limit of $g_{YM}^2 =0$. The free two-point functions are shown to be equal to the partition function on a 2-complex with boundaries and a defect, in a topological field theory of permutations. The permutation equivalence classes are Fourier transformed to a representation basis which is orthogonal for the two-point functions at finite $N_c , N_f$. Counting formulae for the gauge-invariant operators are described. The one-loop mixing matrix is derived as a linear operator on the permutation equivalence classes.

  18. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-07-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150{degrees}C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs.

  19. The application of solvent-additive SAGD processes in reservoirs with associated basal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.; Riva, D.; Edmunds, N.; Solanki, S. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Within the oil sands project developments areas of northern Alberta and Saskatchewan, most thermal projects have associated basal water of varying thickness. More associated basal water will be encountered as these projects continue to develop more resource. Basal water can be either in the form of primarily water sand with low oil saturation, a transition zone of lower oil saturation than the main reservoir, or a mixture of both. This paper outlined the results of a simulation and optimization study on the application of solvent-additive steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process to reservoirs with associated basal water. It is thought that ideal solvent application to SAGD in reservoirs will likely involve time variations in both rate and composition of the solvent, which is also the case for reservoirs with associated basal water, resulting in an optimization problem that has a significant number of dimensions, and is quite nonlinear. In order to address such problems, genetic algorithms can be effective. The paper discussed the optimization of a simple clastic reservoir with associated basal water. Specific topics that were addressed in the paper included SAGD with associated basal water; solvent addition; project optimization; and the reservoir model description including operating constraints and objective function. It was concluded that solvent retention is not excessive with basal water, and migration of solvent outside the steam chamber area is not significant if pressure is controlled. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  20. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150 degrees C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150 degrees C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150 degrees C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs

  1. Fuzzy Control of Nitrate Recirculation and External Carbon Addition in A/O Nitrogen Removal Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马勇; 彭永臻; 王淑莹; 王晓莲

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of effluent water must be taken into account for the design and operation of wastewater treatment plants. In addition, the requirement for effluent quality is becoming strict.Therefore, intelligent control approaches are recently required in removing biological nutrient. In this study, fuzzy control has been successfully applied to improve the nitrogen removal. Experimental results showed that a close relationship between nitrate concentration and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at the end of anoxic zone was found for anoxic/oxic (A/O) nitrogen removal process treating synthetic wastewater. ORP can be used as online fuzzy control parazneter of nitrate recirculation and external carbon addition. The established fuzzy logic controller that includes two inputs and one output can maintain ORP value at-86 mV and -90 mV by adjusting the nitrate recirculation flow and external carbon dosage respectively to realize the optimal control of nitrogen removal, improving the effluent quality and reducing the operating cost.

  2. PROCESSING OF MULTI-DIGIT ADDITIONS IN HIGH MATH-ANXIOUS INDIVIDUALS: PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ISABEL eNÚÑEZ-PEÑA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA and low-math anxious (LMA individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. They also took longer and made more errors than their LMA peers. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources towards emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may invest more attentional resources during the arithmetical

  3. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF FOOD ADDITIVES FROM PUMPKIN PROCESSING SECONDARY RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupin G. A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data characterizing the composition of macro and micronutrients from secondary resources of pumpkin processing – pumpkin pomace. We have found that extracts of pumpkin are valuable raw materials for the production of food additives, as they contain proteins, dietary fiber, including pectin and protopectin, minerals, as well as such biologically active substances as vitamin C, β- carotene and P-active substances using nuclear magnetic relaxation, it is shown that pretreatment of pomace pumpkin in the microwave electromagnetic field of certain parameters before IR drying allows to transfer part of the bound moisture free moisture, that allows to intensify the subsequent process IR drying. We have developed an innovative technology of production of food supplements from pumpkin extracts, which is protected by Russian patent for the invention and having the “know-how” status. The article presents data describing the organoleptic and physical and chemical indicators of quality nutritional supplements, formulated according to the developed technological regimes

  4. New pyrometallurgical process of EAF dust treatment with CaO addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairaksa-Fujimoto, Romchat; Inoue, Yosuke; Umeda, Naoyoshi; Itoh, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The non-carbothermic zinc pyrometallurgical processing of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust was investigated on a laboratory scale. The main objective of this process was to convert highly stable zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), which accounts for more than half of total zinc in the EAF dust, into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 by CaO addition. The EAF dust was mixed with CaO powder in various ratios, pressed into pellets, and heated in a muffle furnace in air at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1100°C for a predetermined holding time. All ZnFe2O4 was transformed into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 at a minimum temperature of 900°C within 1 h when sufficient CaO to achieve a Ca/Fe molar ratio of 1.1 was added. However, at higher temperatures, excess CaO beyond the stoichiometric ratio was required because it was consumed by reactions leading to the formation of compounds other than ZnFe2O4. The evaporation of halides and heavy metals in the EAF dust was also studied. These components could be preferentially volatilized into the gas phase at 1100°C when CaO was added.

  5. New pyrometallurgical process of EAF dust treatment with CaO addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romchat Chairaksa-Fujimoto; Yosuke Inoue; Naoyoshi Umeda; Satoshi Itoh; Tetsuya Nagasaka

    2015-01-01

    The non-carbothermic zinc pyrometallurgical processing of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust was investigated on a laboratory scale. The main objective of this process was to convert highly stable zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), which accounts for more than half of total zinc in the EAF dust, into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 by CaO addition. The EAF dust was mixed with CaO powder in various ratios, pressed into pellets, and heated in a muffle furnace in air at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1100°C for a predetermined holding time. All ZnFe2O4 was transformed into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 at a minimum temperature of 900°C within 1 h when sufficient CaO to achieve a Ca/Fe molar ratio of 1.1 was added. However, at higher temperatures, excess CaO beyond the stoichiometric ratio was required because it was consumed by reactions leading to the formation of compounds other than ZnFe2O4. The evaporation of halides and heavy metals in the EAF dust was also studied. These components could be pref-erentially volatilized into the gas phase at 1100°C when CaO was added.

  6. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  7. Post Processing Methods used to Improve Surface Finish of Products which are Manufactured by Additive Manufacturing Technologies: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, N. N.; Mulay, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes open the possibility to go directly from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to a physical prototype. These prototypes are used as test models before it is finalized as well as sometimes as a final product. Additive Manufacturing has many advantages over the traditional process used to develop a product such as allowing early customer involvement in product development, complex shape generation and also save time as well as money. Additive manufacturing also possess some special challenges that are usually worth overcoming such as Poor Surface quality, Physical Properties and use of specific raw material for manufacturing. To improve the surface quality several attempts had been made by controlling various process parameters of Additive manufacturing and also applying different post processing techniques on components manufactured by Additive manufacturing. The main objective of this work is to document an extensive literature review in the general area of post processing techniques which are used in Additive manufacturing.

  8. Single top-quark production through flavour changing neutral currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) processes are highly suppressed in the Standard Model due to Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani (GIM) mechanism. However, in some extensions of the Standard Model such as supersymmetry (SUSY) and the 2-Higgs doublet model, the FCNC contributes at tree level, enhancing the branching ratio significantly. The FCNC are searched for in single top-quark production where a u(c)-quark interacts with a gluon, producing a single top-quark with no associated quark production. The data collected by the ATLAS detector during year 2012 is used with a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ∝20 fb-1. The candidate signal events are selected by requiring one lepton, muon or electron, missing transverse momentum and exactly one jet originating from a b-quark in the final state. The separation between the signal and background events is enhanced by using neural network algorithms. The cross section upper limit at 95% C.L. is calculated following most frequently statistical approach using a binned likelihood method calculated from the full neural network output.

  9. Production of heavy flavours with associated jets at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kind, O.M.

    2006-12-15

    Inclusive cross-sections for the production of open beauty and charm in ep collisions at HERA recorded with the ZEUS detector in the years 1996-2000 are measured. The data is restricted to photoproduction processes, i. e. collision events with small four-momentum transfers squared, Q{sup 2} {approx}0. Two associated jets with transverse energies E{sub t}>7(6)GeV and pseudo-rapidities vertical stroke {eta} vertical stroke <2.5 are required. The flavour is tagged by the identification of electrons and positrons from semi-leptonic decays of the heavy quark. For this a likelihood method is developed, mainly consisting of energy loss measurements in the central drift chamber of the detector and some other discriminant variables. The fractions of beauty and charm production are determined by a fit of Monte Carlo templates to the data. The total measured production cross-section for b anti b production is 820{+-}150{sup +20}{sub -30} pb for centre-of-mass energies {radical}(S{sub ep})=300 GeV and 1170{+-}130{sup +30}{sub -100} pb for {radical}(S{sub ep})=318 GeV. The total cross-section for charm production is given as well as differential cross-sections for b anti b and c anti c production. (orig.)

  10. Mass Insertions vs. Mass Eigenstates calculations in Flavour Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Dedes, A; Rosiek, J; Suxho, K; Tamvakis, K

    2015-01-01

    We present and prove a theorem of matrix analysis, the Flavour Expansion Theorem (or FET), according to which, an analytic function of a Hermitian matrix can be expanded polynomially in terms of its off-diagonal elements with coefficients being the divided differences of the analytic function and arguments the diagonal elements of the Hermitian matrix. The theorem is applicable in case of flavour changing amplitudes. At one-loop level this procedure is particularly natural due to the observation that every loop function in the Passarino-Veltman basis can be recursively expressed in terms of divided differences. FET helps to algebraically translate an amplitude written in mass eigenbasis into flavour mass insertions, without performing diagrammatic calculations in flavour basis. As a non-trivial application of FET up to a third order, we demonstrate its use in calculating strong bounds on the real parts of flavour changing mass insertions in the up- squark sector of the MSSM from neutron Electric Dipole Moment...

  11. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard W^± and Z^0 gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }, KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν }, K_L→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ X_sγ , B_{s,d}→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ν bar{ν }, and \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon . Taking into account the constraints from Δ F=2 processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν } and KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-) ≥ B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-)_SM, which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^- decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of

  12. The S{sub 3} flavour symmetry: Neutrino masses and mixings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Canales, F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias de la Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Mondragon, A.; Mondragon, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-04-02

    In this work, we discuss the neutrino masses and mixings as the realization of an S{sub 3} flavour permutational symmetry in two models, namely the Standard Model and an extension of the Standard Model with three Higgs doublets. In the S{sub 3} Standard Model, mass matrices of the same generic form are obtained for the neutrino and charged leptons when the S{sub 3} flavour symmetry is broken sequentially according to the chain S{sub 3L} x S{sub 3R} contains S{sub 3}{sup diag} contains S{sub 2}. In the minimal S{sub 3}-symmetric extension of the Standard Model, the S{sub 3} symmetry is left unbroken, and the concept of flavour is extended to the Higgs sector by introducing in the theory three Higgs fields which are SU(2) doublets. In both models, the mass matrices of the neutrinos and charged leptons are reparametrized in terms of their eigenvalues, and exact, explicit analytical expressions for the neutrino mixing angles as functions of the masses of neutrinos and charged leptons are obtained. In the case of the S{sub 3} Standard Model, from a {chi}{sup 2} fit of the theoretical expressions of the lepton mixing matrix to the values extracted from experiment, the numerical values of the neutrino mixing angles are obtained in excellent agreement with experimental data. In the S{sub 3} extension of the Standard Model, if two of the right handed neutrinos masses are degenerate, the reactor and atmospheric mixing angles are determined by the masses of the charged leptons, yielding {theta}{sub 23} in excellent agreement with experimental data, and {theta}{sub 13} different from zero but very small. If the masses of the three right handed neutrinos are assumed to be different, then it is possible to get {theta}{sub 13}also in very good agreement with experimental data. We also show the branching ratios of some selected flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) process as well as the contribution of the exchange of a neutral flavour changing scalar to the anomaly of the

  13. Heavy Neutrinos and Lepton Flavour Violation in Left-Right Symmetric Models at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Das, S P; Kittel, O; Valle, J W F

    2012-01-01

    We discuss lepton flavour violating processes induced in the production and decay of heavy right-handed neutrinos at the LHC. Such particles appear in left-right symmetrical extensions of the Standard Model as the messengers of neutrino mass generation, and can have masses at the TeV scale. We determine the expected sensitivity on the right-handed neutrino mixing matrix, as well as on the right-handed gauge boson and heavy neutrino masses. By comparing the sensitivity of the LHC with that of searches for low energy LFV processes, we identify favourable areas of the parameter space to explore the complementarity between LFV at low and high energies.

  14. η'-π mass splitting in full QCD from negative flavour numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    η'-π splitting in full QCD can be estimated extrapolating from negative to positive flavour numbers. Our results show a flavour dependence consistent with the Witten Veneziano formula based on the U(1) anomaly. (orig.)

  15. Continuous Digital Light Processing (cDLP): Highly Accurate Additive Manufacturing of Tissue Engineered Bone Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David; Jonathan, Wallace; Siblani, Ali; Wang, Martha O; Kim, Kyobum; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2012-03-01

    Highly accurate rendering of the external and internal geometry of bone tissue engineering scaffolds effects fit at the defect site, loading of internal pore spaces with cells, bioreactor-delivered nutrient and growth factor circulation, and scaffold resorption. It may be necessary to render resorbable polymer scaffolds with 50 μm or less accuracy to achieve these goals. This level of accuracy is available using Continuous Digital Light processing (cDLP) which utilizes a DLP(®) (Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX) chip. One such additive manufacturing device is the envisionTEC (Ferndale, MI) Perfactory(®). To use cDLP we integrate a photo-crosslinkable polymer, a photo-initiator, and a biocompatible dye. The dye attenuates light, thereby limiting the depth of polymerization. In this study we fabricated scaffolds using the well-studied resorbable polymer, poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) as a dye, Irgacure(®) 819 (BASF [Ciba], Florham Park, NJ) as an initiator, and diethyl fumarate as a solvent to control viscosity. PMID:23066427

  16. The influence of various solute additions on the process of vacancy clustering in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with thin foils of binary aluminium-based alloys containing various amounts of magnesium, silver, germanium, silicon and zinc in solid solution, prepared from quenced bulk specimens. The influence of the various solute additions on the process of vacancy clustering in aluminium has been investigated, primarily with the aid of the transmission electron microscope. In the first chapter the purpose of the project is explained and placed in proper perspective. A brief introduction to transmission electron microscopy is presented in the second chapter. The third and fourth chapters comprise a literature survey to summarize the present state of development of the field of vacancy clustering covered by this disseration, including an introduction to some basic concepts needed for a full appreciation of the results. The following chapter describes the experimental procedure, where a detailed description is presented of concepts such as annealing and minimum annealing time, specimen preparation, quenching rate measurement, thickness measurement of the foil, and the calculation methods for the vacancy concentration and vacancy-solute binding energy. The results and discussion are presented in chapter six, where three main aspects of the vacancy cluster observed in this study examined, viz. (1) Classification of the various vacancy cluster observed according to their incidence and structural relationship. (2) Measurements are made of the vacancy concentration and of the binding energies between vancancies and solute atoms in aluminium-based alloys. (3) Finally, the experimentally observed size distribution of vacancy clusters in the various alloys are presented

  17. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbold, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  18. The neutron EDM vs up and charm flavour violation

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We derive a strong bound on the chromo-electric dipole moment of the charm quark, and we quantify its impact on models that allow for a sizeable flavour violation in the up quark sector. In particular we show how the constraints coming from the charm and up CEDMs limit the size of new physics contributions to direct flavour violation in D meson decays. We also specialize our analysis to the cases of split-families Supersymmetry and composite Higgs models. The results we expose motivate an increase in experimental sensitivity to fundamental hadronic dipoles, and a further exploration of the SM contribution to both flavour violating D decays and nuclear electric dipole moments.

  19. A U(2)^3 flavour symmetry in Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    A U(2)^3 flavour symmetry acting on the first two generations of quarks partially explains the hierarchies of the yukawa couplings, and provides a natural embedding for Supersymmetry with heavier first two generations, where collider constraints are not in conflict with the requirement of naturalness and the SUSY CP problem is solved. Within this context a specific pattern of flavour symmetry breaking is considered. The K, B_d and B_s mixing amplitudes show a definite correlation that can resolve existing tensions in the CKM fit, pointing in this way to sbottom and gluino masses below about 1.5 TeV. Potentially sizeable contributions to both indirect and direct CP violation in B decays are allowed, even in the absence of flavour-blind phases. In case some effects are observed, the peculiar pattern in Delta(F) = 2 and Delta(B) = 1 observables may allow to distinguish between this and other models.

  20. Signatures of top flavour-changing dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hondt, Jorgen; Mawatari, Kentarou; Moortgat, Seth; Tziveloglou, Pantelis; Van Onsem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    We develop the phenomenology of scenarios in which a dark matter candidate interacts with a top quark through flavour-changing couplings, employing a simplified dark matter model with an s-channel vector-like mediator. We study in detail the top-charm flavour-changing interaction, by investigating the single top plus large missing energy signature at the LHC as well as constraints from the relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We present strategies to distinguish between the top-charm and top-up flavour-changing models by taking advantage of the lepton charge asymmetry as well as by using charm-tagging techniques on an extra jet. We also show the complementarity between the LHC and canonical dark matter experiments in exploring the viable parameter space of the models.

  1. Heavy flavour measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo Castellanos, Javier [service de physique nucleaire - SPhN, IRFU, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The main purpose of ALICE is to investigate the properties of a state of deconfined nuclear matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy flavour measurements will play a crucial role in this investigation. The physics programme of ALICE has started by studying proton-proton collisions at unprecedented high energies. We will present the first results on open heavy flavour and quarkonia in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at both mid- and forward-rapidities. We will conclude with the prospects for heavy flavour and quarkonium measurements in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. (author)

  2. Lepton Mixing Predictions from (Generalised) CP and Discrete Flavour Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Neder, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    An important class of flavour groups, that are subgroups of $U(3)$ and that predict experimentally viable lepton mixing parameters including Majorana phases, is the $\\Delta(6n^2)$ series. The most well-known member is $\\Delta(24)=S_4$. I present results of several extensive studies of lepton mixing predictions obtained in models with a $\\Delta(6n^2)$ flavour group that preserve either the full residual $Z_2\\times Z_2$ or a $Z_2$ subgroup for neutrinos and can include a generalised CP symmetry. Predictions include mixing angles and Dirac CP phase generally; and if invariance under a generalised CP symmetry is included, also Majorana phases. For this, the interplay of flavour group and generalised CP symmetry has to be studied carefully.

  3. Fermion masses and mixing in $\\Delta(27)$ flavour model

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    An extension of the Standard Model (SM) based on the non-Abelian discrete group $\\Delta(27)$ is considered. The $\\Delta(27)$ flavour symmetry is spontaneously broken only by gauge singlet scalar fields, therefore our model is free from any flavour changing neural current. We show that the model accounts simultaneously for the observed quark and lepton masses and their mixing. In the quark sector, we find that the up quark mass matrix is flavour diagonal and the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix arises from down quarks. In the lepton sector, we show that the charged lepton mass matrix is almost diagonal. We also adopt type-I seesaw mechanism to generate neutrino masses. A deviated mixing matrix from tri-bimaximal Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS), with $\\sin\\theta_{13} \\sim 0.13$ and $\\sin^2 \\theta_{23} \\sim 0.41$, is naturally produced.

  4. Neutrino Mixings and the S4 Discrete Flavour Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzocchi, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Discrete non-Abelian Symmetries have been extensively used to reproduce the lepton mixings. In particular, the S4 group turned out to be suitable to describe predictive mixing patterns, such as the well-known Tri-Bimaximal and the Bimaximal schemes, which all represent possible first approximations of the experimental lepton mixing matrix. We review the main application of the S4 discrete group as a flavour symmetry, first dealing with the formalism and later with the phenomenological implications. In particular, we summarize the main features of flavour models based on S4, commenting on their ability in reproducing a reactor angle in agreement with the recent data and on their predictions for lepton flavour violating transitions.

  5. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements in $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production ("Flavour Tagging") is fundamental. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. The performances of the flavour tagging algorithms on the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  6. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements of $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production is fundamental. This is known as "flavour tagging" and at LHCb it is performed with several algorithms. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. Also the performances of the flavour tagging algorithms in the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  7. Minimal flavour violation in the quark and lepton sector and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, S.L.

    2008-01-07

    We address to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in a framework that generalizes the quark minimal flavour violation hypothesis to the lepton sector. We study the impact of CP violation present at low and high energies and investigate the existence of correlations among leptogenesis and lepton flavour violation. Further we present an approach alternative to minimal flavour violation where the suppression of flavour changing transitions involving quarks and leptons is governed by hierarchical fermion wave functions. (orig.)

  8. Volatile and non-volatile compounds in ripened cheese: their formation and their contribution to flavour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flavour is one of the most important attributes of cheese. Cheese flavour is the result of the breakdown of milk protein, fat, lactose and citrate due to enzymes from milk, rennet and microorganisms during production and ripening of cheese. For a large part the development of flavour during the ripe

  9. Running of the SF-coupling with four massless flavours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the status of different determinations of αs, motivating a precise and reliable computation from lattice QCD. In order to suppress perturbative errors, the non-perturbative computation has to reach high energy scales μ. Such results already exist in the SF-scheme for Nf=0;2 and Nf=3. We recently added the running with four massless flavours in a range of α from about 0.07 to 0.3. It is based on our recent determination of the Sheikholeslami Wohlert coefficient in the four-flavour theory. (orig.)

  10. Pulsars: Macro-nuclei with 3-flavour symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2015-01-01

    A pulsar-like compact star is the rump left behind after a supernova where normal baryonic matter is intensely compressed by gravity, but the real state of such compressed baryonic matter is still not well understood because of the non-perturbative nature of the fundamental color interaction. We argue that pulsars could be of condensed matter of quark clusters, i.e., "quark-cluster stars" which distinguish from conventional neutron and quark stars. In comparison with 2-flavour symmetric micro-nuclei, a quark-cluster star could simply be considered as a macro-nucleus with 3-flavour symmetry. New research achievements both theoretical and observational are briefly presented.

  11. Novel tomato flavours introduced by plastidial terpenoid pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, Beat; Niederberger, Peter; Pétiard, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Until recently breeding efforts centred on high-yield production while sacrificing flavour and taste quality traits of mass produced food products, such as tomatoes. The recent publication of Davidovich-Rikanati et al. demonstrates the technical feasibility of the genetical engineering of pathways in tomato plants to modify their fruit flavour profile in a proof-of-concept approach. The reported work ranks among an increasing number of reported successful modifications of edible plants with a focus on the benefits to end-consumers.

  12. Gauge Invariants and Correlators in Flavoured Quiver Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Mattioli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the construction of holomorphic gauge invariant operators for general quiver gauge theories with flavour symmetries. Using a characterisation of the gauge invariants in terms of equivalence classes generated by permutation actions, along with representation theory results in symmetric groups and unitary groups, we give a diagonal basis for the 2-point functions of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic operators. This involves a generalisation of the previously constructed Quiver Restricted Schur operators to the flavoured case. The 3-point functions are derived and shown to be given in terms of networks of symmetric group branching coefficients. The networks are constructed through cutting and gluing operations on the quivers.

  13. A study on effective use of heat transfer additives in the process of steam condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemuri, Srinivas; Kim, Kwang J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Kang, Yong Tae [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Systems Engineering, KyungHee University, KyungHee (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    It is well known that the additives in absorption chillers play a significant role in increasing absorber performance. Realizing that the additives in absorption chillers circulate throughout the system including the condensers, we investigated the effect of additives in the condenser. Reported herein are the results of the experimental and theoretical investigations done by using effective heat transfer additives for enhancing heat transfer coefficient in condensation of steam over a horizontal copper (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) tube surface. By using effective additives, the condensation heat transfer coefficient can be enhanced as much as 1.47 times when compared to filmwise condensation. The steam condensation, which occurred in our experiments while using effective additives, was mostly pseudo-dropwise like. In our experiments, we noted that the use of heat transfer additive such as 2-ethoxyethanol for steam condensation was highly effective. This increase in heat transfer coefficient can be attributed to concept of Marangoni effect. It is understood that this surface convection is caused by local variations in the interfacial tension. So far there has been very little noted literature available on the theoretical aspect of surface tension effect on enhancing heat transfer rate in steam condensation. In the current research we try to explain the surface tension effect for enhancing heat transfer rate in steam condensation using effective heat transfer additives. (author)

  14. High fluoride and low pH level have been detected in popular flavoured beverages in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rahim, Zubaidah HA; Bakri, Marina M; Zakir, HM; Ahmed, IA; Zulkifli, NA

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In children, excessive ingestion of fluoride from different sources including bottled drinking water and flavoured beverages or soft drinks can lead to the development of dental fluorosis. In addition, the pH level of beverages is important. Low pH can cause dental erosion. In this study we explore the fluoride content and pH level of certain popular beverages available in Malaysian supermarkets and hawkers’ stalls. Methods: Bottled drinking water and selected popu...

  15. Neutrinos and Lepton Flavour Violation in the Left-Right Twin Higgs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Abada, Asmaa

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the lepton sector of the Left-Right Twin Higgs Model. This model offers an alternative way to solve the "little hierarchy" problem of the Standard Model. We show that one can achieve an effective see-saw to explain the origin of neutrino masses and that this model can accommodate the observed neutrino masses and mixings. We have also studied the lepton flavour violation process l_1 -> l_2 \\gamma and discussed how the experimental bound from these branching ratios constrains the scale of symmetry breaking of this Twin Higgs model.

  16. Neutrinos and Lepton Flavour Violation in the Left-Right Twin Higgs Model

    OpenAIRE

    Abada, Asmaa; Hidalgo, Irene

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the lepton sector of the Left-Right Twin Higgs Model. This model offers an alternative way to solve the "little hierarchy" problem of the Standard Model. We show that one can achieve an effective see-saw to explain the origin of neutrino masses and that this model can accommodate the observed neutrino masses and mixings. We have also studied the lepton flavour violation process l_1 -> l_2 \\gamma and discussed how the experimental bound from these branching ratios constrains the sca...

  17. Perinatal flavour learning and adaptation to being weaned: all the pig needs is smell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije Oostindjer

    Full Text Available Perinatal flavour learning through the maternal diet is known to enhance flavour preference and acceptance of flavoured food in many species, yet still little is known about the mechanism underlying perinatal flavour learning. Previously we found positive effects of perinatal flavour learning on food intake, growth and behaviour of piglets postweaning, but no increased preference for the flavour. This suggests that flavour learning in pigs works through a reduction of weaning stress by the presence of the familiar flavour instead. The aim of this study was to investigate whether perinatal flavour learning reduces stress at weaning, and whether the effect is stronger when the familiar flavour is present in the food. Sows were offered an anethol-flavoured diet (Flavour treatment or control diet (Control treatment during late gestation and lactation. Flavour and Control piglets were provided with anethol either in their food (Food treatment or in the air (Air treatment after weaning. Preweaning and postweaning treatments did not affect food intake, preference or growth in the first two weeks postweaning but flavour treatment reduced the latency to eat (24 versus 35 hours, P = 0.02 and within-pen variation in growth (SD within-pen: 0.7 versus 1.2 kg, P<0.001. Salivary cortisol levels tended to be lower four and seven hours postweaning for Flavour piglets compared to Control piglets (4 hours: 2.5 versus 3.0 ng/ml, P = 0.05, 7 hours: 3.1 versus 3.4 ng/ml, P = 0.08. Flavour piglets played more and showed less damaging behaviours than Control piglets, indicating that the familiar flavour reduced stress around weaning. Few interaction effects were found between preweaning and postweaning treatment, and no effects of postweaning treatment. We conclude that in the newly weaned pig, perinatal flavour learning results in a reduction of stress when the familiar flavour is present, regardless of providing the flavour in the food or in the air.

  18. New physics search with flavour in the LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Hurth, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    We give a status report on quark flavour physics in view of the latest data from the B factories and the LHC, and discuss the impact of the latest experimental results on new physics in the MFV framework. We also show some examples of the implications in supersymmetry.

  19. A taste of dark matter: flavour constraints on pseudoscalar mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Dolan; F. Kahlhoefer; C. McCabe; K. Schmidt-Hoberg

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter interacting via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar can induce observable signals in indirect detection experiments and experience large self-interactions while evading the strong bounds from direct dark matter searches. The pseudoscalar mediator will however induce flavour-changing int

  20. Formation of Amino Acid Derived Cheese Flavour Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), among them Lactococcus lactis, are often used for the fermentation of milk into various products, such as cheeses. For their growth and maintenance LAB metabolise milk sugar, protein and fat into various low molecular compounds, which sometimes have strong flavour charact

  1. LHCb results on flavour physics and implications to BSM

    CERN Document Server

    Langenbruch, C

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC. Precision measurements of CP violation and the study of rare decays of hadrons containing beauty and charm quarks constitute powerful searches for New Physics. A selection of recent LHCb results and their implications to physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed.

  2. LHCb results on flavour physics and implications to BSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC. Precision measurements of CP violation and the study of rare decays of hadrons containing beauty and charm quarks constitute powerful searches for New Physics. A selection of recent LHCb results and their implications to physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed.

  3. The flavour of supersymmetry: Phenomenological implications of sfermion mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Arana-Catania, M

    2013-01-01

    We study the phenomenological implications of sfermion flavour mixing in supersymmetry in the context of Non-Minimal Flavour Violation (NMFV). We study the general flavour mixing hypothesis, parametrizing the squark and slepton mass matrices by a complete set of delta^XY_ij (X,Y=L,R; i,j= t,c,u or b,s,d for squarks/1,2,3 for sleptons). With respect to the squark sector, we study the behaviour of the B-physics observables BR(B -> Xs gamma), BR(Bs -> mu+ mu-) and delta M_B_s and update the constraints to the delta parameters coming from them. We present one-loop corrections to the Higgs boson masses in the MSSM with NMFV in the squark sector, and taking into account the previous constraints we evaluate them, finding sizable corrections, exceeding sometimes tens of GeV for the light Higgs boson. These corrections might be used to set further constraints on the delta parameters from the Higgs boson mass measurement. With respect to the slepton sector, we explore the implications on charged lepton flavour violatin...

  4. Effects of flavour absorption on foods and their packaging materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willige, van R.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: flavour absorption, scalping, packaging, food matrix, lldpe, ldpe, pp, pc, pet, pen,b-lactoglobulin, casein, pectin, cmc, lactose, saccharose, oil, modelling, storage, oxygen permeability, taste perception, sensory quality.Abso

  5. The role of flavon cross couplings in leptonic flavour mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoli, Silvia; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2016-06-01

    In models with discrete flavour symmetries, flavons are critical to realise specific flavour structures. Leptonic flavour mixing originates from the misalignment of flavon vacuum expectation values which respect different residual symmetries in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. Flavon cross couplings are usually forbidden, in order to protect these symmetries. Contrary to this approach, we show that cross couplings can play a key role and give raise to necessary corrections to flavour-mixing patterns, including a non-zero value for the reactor angle and CP violation. For definiteness, we present two models based on A 4. In the first model, all flavons are assumed to be real or pseudo-real, with 7 real degrees of freedom in the flavon sector in total. A sizable reactor angle associated with nearly maximal CP violation is achieved, and, as both originate from the same cross coupling, a sum rule results with a precise prediction for the value of the Dirac CP-violating phase. In the second model, the flavons are taken to be complex scalars, which can be connected with supersymmetric models and multi-Higgs models. The complexity properties of flavons provide new sources for generating the reactor angle. Models in this new approach introduce very few degrees of freedom beyond the Standard Model and can be more economical than those in the framework of extra dimension or supersymmetry.

  6. Heavy Flavour Production at the electron-proton collider HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    An overview over the recent heavy flavour results of the H1 and ZEUS collaborations is presented. Various techniques to tag the heavy quark, which allow to explore different phase space regions, are employed. Predictions of pertubative QCD are compared to the charm and beauty production data. Charm and beauty fractions of the proton structure function $F_2$ are

  7. Selected results on heavy flavour physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Matthew

    Selected results from the LHCb experiment in the domain of heavy flavour particle physics are presented. These results are split into two groups: the first concerns searches for new physics in the decays of charmed hadrons, and the second consists of studies of the spectroscopy of baryons.

  8. The role of flavon cross couplings in leptonic flavour mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Pascoli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In models with discrete flavour symmetries, flavons are critical to realise specific flavour structures. Leptonic flavour mixing originates from the misalignment of flavon vacuum expectation values which respect different residual symmetries in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. Flavon cross couplings are usually forbidden, in order to protect these symmetries. Contrary to this approach, we show that cross couplings can play a key role and give raise to necessary corrections to flavour-mixing patterns, including a non-zero value for the reactor angle and CP violation. For definiteness, we present two models based on $A_4$. In the first model, all flavons are assumed to be real or pseudo-real, with 7 real degrees of freedom in the flavon sector in total. A sizable reactor angle associated with nearly maximal CP violation is achieved, and, as both originate from the same cross coupling, a sum rule results with a precise prediction for the value of the Dirac CP-violating phase. In the second model, the fla...

  9. LHCb : Search for Lepton Flavour Violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Rives Molina, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations has re-opened the case for searches of lepton-flavour violating decays. We report on recent results on searches for short or long-lived Majorana heavy neutrinos in B&arr;μμπ and τ→μμμ decays

  10. Benchmarking metal powder bed Additive Manufacturing processes (SLM and EBM) to build flat overhanging geometries without supports

    OpenAIRE

    Mumtaz, K.A.; Hopkinson, N; Stapleton, D.; I. Todd; Derguti, F.; Vora, P.

    2012-01-01

    Metal powder Additive Manufacturing (AM) allows complex parts to be build from commercial materials. Several industries such as automotive, aerospace and medical have interests in using these technologies. However in metal powder AM, supports/ anchors are required to be melted in place to avoid process failure due to upward warping of flat overhanging geometries. This leads to additional melting of materials, processing time and thus increasing costs of parts build. A series of experiments we...

  11. Influence of water quality on the presence of off-flavour compounds (geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinet, Julien; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sérodes, Jean

    2010-12-01

    Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol are off-flavour compounds related to poor organoleptics and a decrease in consumer satisfaction with drinking water. The relationship between these off-flavour compounds and 39 parameters of water quality (chemical, physical and biological) for three different surface waters from lotic systems that supply potable water to Quebec City and Lévis (Canada) was studied using principal component analysis. The objective of this study was to show that a multidimensional approach with principal component analysis using the component matrix serves to differentiate the processes involved in the appearance of the olfactory compounds from those not involved or little involved and to extract the most representative data of these processes. Our study shows that the presence of geosmin can be explained, in the case of the water studied, by a process associated primarily with the eutrophication of water and, to a lesser degree, by an allochthonous origin. However, the presence of 2-methylisoborneol may be linked to two processes with different origins, but of equal importance: a winter origin - most likely allochthonous - involving anthropic contributions and an autochthonous bacterial origin.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of feeder and lint slide moisture addition on ginning, fiber quality, and textile processing of western cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of moisture addition at the gin stand feeder conditioning hopper and/or the battery condenser slide on gin performance and Western cotton fiber quality and textile processing. The test treatments included no moisture addition, feeder hopper hum...

  13. Quark-flavour phenomenology of models with extended gauge symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauge invariance is one of the fundamental principles of the Standard Model of particles and interactions, and it is reasonable to believe that it also regulates the physics beyond it. In this thesis we have studied the theory and phenomenology of two New Physics models based on gauge symmetries that are extensions of the Standard Model group. Both of them are particularly interesting because they provide some answers to the question of the origin of flavour, which is still unexplained. Moreover, the flavour sector represents a promising field for the research of indirect signatures of New Physics, since after the first run of LHC we do not have any direct hint of it yet. The first model assumes that flavour is a gauge symmetry of nature, SU(3)3f, spontaneously broken by the vacuum expectation values of new scalar fields; the second model is based on the gauge group SU(3)c x SU(3)L x U(1)X, the simplest non-abelian extension of the Standard Model group. We have traced the complete theoretical building of the models, from the gauge group, passing through the nonanomalous fermion contents and the appropriate symmetry breakings, up to the spectra and the Feynman rules, with a particular attention to the treatment of the flavour structure, of tree-level Flavour Changing Neutral Currents and of new CP-violating phases. In fact, these models present an interesting flavour phenomenology, and for both of them we have analytically calculated the contributions to the ΔF=2 and ΔF=1 down-type transitions, arising from new tree-level and box diagrams. Subsequently, we have performed a comprehensive numerical analysis of the phenomenology of the two models. In both cases we have found very effective the strategy of first to identify the quantities able to provide the strongest constraints to the parameter space, then to systematically scan the allowed regions of the latter in order to obtain indications about the key flavour observables, namely the mixing parameters of the

  14. Study of the presence of some food additives in non alcoholic beverages in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Kostik, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Food additives are used in the modern food industry for maintaining food quality as well as promoting food safety. Additives are used in foods to replace the taste lost in processing, enhance their texture or appearance, prolong the shelf life, and stop food from decaying. They are also used to enhance the flavour, to give an extra taste to the food products and to make foods more appealing. The use of food additives in foodstuffs is regulated by European legislation and only authorised ad...

  15. External Carbon Source Addition as a Means to Control an Activated Sludge Nutrient Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik;

    1994-01-01

    In alternating type activated sludge nutrient removal processes, the denitrification rate can be limited by the availability of readily-degradable carbon substrate. A control strategy is proposed by which an easily metabolizable COD source is added directly to that point in the process at which...

  16. Femtosecond Laser Post-Processing of Metal Parts Produced by Laser Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Mingareev Ilya; Bonhoff Tobias; El-Sherif Ashraf F.; Richardson Martin

    2013-01-01

    High-repetition rate femtosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. This novel approach can be used to postprocess parts made of heat-sensitive materials, and to attain the designed net shape with micrometer precision.

  17. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Flavour Esters through Immobilized Lipase Mediated Transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Garlapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of methyl butyrate and octyl acetate through immobilized Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 3562 lipase mediated transesterification was studied under solvent-free conditions. The effect of different transesterification variables, namely, molarity of alcohol, reaction time, temperature, agitation, addition of water, and enzyme amount on molar conversion (% was investigated. A maximum molar conversion of 70.42% and 92.35% was obtained in a reaction time of 14 and 12 h with the transesterification variables of 0.6 M methanol in vinyl butyrate and 2 M octanol in vinyl acetate using 80 U and 60 U immobilized lipase with the agitation speed of 200 rpm and 0.2% water addition at 32°C and 36°C for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. The immobilized enzyme has retained good relative activity (more than 95% up to five and six recycles for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. Hence, the present investigation makes a great impingement in natural flavour industry by introducing products synthesized under solvent-free conditions to the flavour market.

  18. Free and attached cells of Bacillus subtilis as starters for production of a soup flavouring (“ogiri egusi”)

    OpenAIRE

    Peter-Ikechukwu, A. I.; Ahaotu, I.; Owuamanam, C. I.; Ogueke, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This Bacillus subtilis has been identified to be the main fermenting bacterium during indigenous production of “ogiri egusi”; a traditional soup flavouring rich in protein. Evaluation of the use of starter and broth cultures of this bacterium in the production of ‘ogiri egusi’ was therefore undertaken with the view to improve the fermentation process and quality of product. Methodology and Results: Cowpea granules in association with Bacillus subtilis cells were developed as starter cul...

  19. Aluminium content of some processed foods, raw materials and food additives in China by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Li, Ke; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fen; Dai, Jing-Jing; Li, Hua-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The level of aluminium in 178 processed food samples from Shenzhen city in China was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Some processed foods contained a concentration of up to 1226 mg/kg, which is about 12 times the Chinese food standard. To establish the main source in these foods, Al levels in the raw materials were determined. However, aluminium concentrations in raw materials were low (0.10-451.5 mg/kg). Therefore, aluminium levels in food additives used in these foods was determined and it was found that some food additives contained a high concentration of aluminium (0.005-57.4 g/kg). The results suggested that, in the interest of public health, food additives containing high concentrations of aluminium should be replaced by those containing less. This study has provided new information on aluminium levels in Chinese processed foods, raw materials and a selection of food additives.

  20. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  1. Surfactants as additives for NO{sub x} reduction during SNCR process with urea solution as reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayoub, Muhammad [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kwangwoon University (Korea, Republic of); Irfan, Muhammad Faisal, E-mail: muhammadfipk@um.edu.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yoo, Kyung-Seun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kwangwoon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} We study SNCR process using urea as a reducing agent for NO{sub x} reduction. {yields} We improve NO{sub x} reduction efficiency by adding the different types of additives. {yields} We introduce new additives: surfactants and blends of alkali metal with organic group. {yields} Anionic surfactants give maximum efficiency and max. range for temperature window. - Abstract: NO{sub x} reduction from gas stream by selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) using urea as a reducing agent was performed in this study. A Pilot-scale experimental system was designed and constructed to evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction efficiency and temperature window of the process. Particularly, different types of additives were added during SNCR process to improve NO{sub x} reduction efficiency and enlarge temperature window. The addition of additives was based on organic compounds like alcoholic group (CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OH) and metallic compounds like alkali metals (NaOH, KOH and LiOH). Some newly introduced additives, such as surfactants and different blends of alkali metal NaOH (1%) with organic group or surfactants were also added to assess the effect of these mixed additives on NO{sub x} reduction efficiency and reaction temperature window during SNCR process. Main focus was laid on surfactants as an additive because of their cost effectiveness and availability. Basically, surfactants have both organic and metallic parts which provide -OH free radicals from both ends (organic and metallic) to enhance the reaction mechanism and improve the NO{sub x} reduction at low temperature. Different types of surfactants (anionic, cationic, amphitricha, long chain, short chain and with different functional groups attached to chains) were tested as an additive during SNCR process. Anionic surfactants (SPES, APS, LAS and SPS) gave maximum efficiency for NO{sub x} reduction and provided maximum range for the temperature window.

  2. From lab to industrial: PZT nanoparticles synthesis and process control for application in additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsien-Lin

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) nanoparticles hold many promising current and future applications, such as PZT ink for 3-D printing or seeds for PZT thick films. One common method is hydrothermal growth, in which temperature, duration time, or mineralizer concentrations are optimized to produce PZT nanoparticles with desired morphology, controlled size and size distribution. A modified hydrothermal process is used to fabricate PZT nanoparticles. The novelty is to employ a high ramping rate (e.g., 20 deg C/min) to generate abrupt supersaturation so as to promote burst nucleation of PZT nanoparticles as well as a fast cooling rate (e.g., 5 deg C/min) with a controlled termination of crystal growth. As a result, PZT nanoparticles with a size distribution ranging from 200 nm to 800 nm are obtained with cubic morphology and good crystallinity. The identification of nanoparticles is confirmed through use of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). XRD patterns are used to compare sample variations in their microstructures such as lattice parameter. A cubic morphology and particle size are also examined via SEM images. The hydrothermal process is further modified with excess lead (from 20% wt. to 80% wt.) to significantly reduce amorphous phase and agglomeration of the PZT nanoparticles. With a modified process, the particle size still remains within the 200 nm to 800 nm. Also, the crystal structures (microstructure) of the samples show little variations. Finally, a semi-continuous hydrothermal manufacturing process was developed to substantially reduce the fabrication time and maintained the same high quality as the nanoparticles prepared in an earlier stage. In this semi-continuous process, a furnace is maintained at the process temperature (200 deg C), whereas autoclaves containing PZT sol are placed in and out of the furnace to control the ramp-up and cooling rates. This setup eliminates an extremely time-consuming step of cooling down the furnace, thus saving tremendous amount of

  3. Thermo-mechanical analysis of Wire and Arc Additive Layer Manufacturing process on large multi-layer parts

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, J.; Colegrove, Paul A.; Mehnen, Jorn; Ganguly, Supriyo; Sequeira Almeida, P. M.; Wang, F.; Williams, Stewart W.

    2011-01-01

    Wire and Arc Additive Layer Manufacturing (WAALM) is gaining increasing popularity as the process allows the production of large custom-made metal workpieces with high deposition rates. The high power input of the welding process, causes significant residual stress and distortion of the workpiece. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the multi-layer wall structure made by the WAALM process. A 3D thermo-elastic–plastic transient model and a model based on a...

  4. Mechanical Properties of Additive Manufactured Ti-6Al-4V Using Wire and Powder Based Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1986 several techniques of building up geometries layer by layer have been developed and successfully commercialized under numerous trade names. Today, not only prototypes are realized by these techniques, but serial production parts are envisaged. To achieve this progress, the development activities have to focus on the reliability and output material quality. Particularly for aerospace applications, the material quality is an all-dominant factor. In this paper, an electron beam based powder-bed process and a laser based wire-feed process are investigated. Microstructure, chemical composition, static tensile and high cycle fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V samples are presented and evaluated from an aerospace application point of view. The static tensile properties resulting from both processes are mostly comparable to properties of cast or wrought material depending on post heat treatment and test direction. Fatigue limits of all samples are similar to those of wrought material. The impurity levels of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and hydrogen are below the maximum level of plate material (AMS 4911L). The wire-feed process leads to a material with fewer impurities than the powder-bed process.

  5. Effect of Additive on Sulfur-fixation Process of Sulfur-fixation Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jun-lin; QIU Jian-rong; ZHAO Gai-ju; LOU Jin-ping; HAN Chun-hua

    2003-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of desulfurization product is directly related to its high-temperatureresistant ability. Effects of the additive on the sulfur-fixation efficiency of the Ba-sulfur-fixation agent and also on the crystallization behavior of the sulfur-fixation product were studied when CaCO3 and BaCO3 were used as the desulfurization agent and MgO and SrCO3 used as the assistant sulfur-fixation agent. The result shows that increase of sulfur-fixation capability for the additive is not owe to their directly react to form sulfate or interact with CaCO3 and BaCO3 to form composite mineral heat-resistant in high temperature, but owe to their activation to sulfur-fixation reaction of the sulfur-fixation agent.

  6. Additive effects of aging and HIV infection on category verbal fluency : an analysis of component processes

    OpenAIRE

    Iudicello, Jennifer E.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in the management of HIV infection have resulted in a growing population of older adults living with HIV. Both aging and HIV infection have been independently associated with central nervous system changes and corresponding declines in neurocognitive functioning. Poorer semantic verbal fluency output is also common in both HIV infection and healthy older adults, although, the possible additive effects of these risk factors are unknown. The present study aimed to examine the combined ...

  7. Harnessing reversible oxidative addition: application of diiodinated aromatic compounds in the carboiodination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, David A; Lischka, Matthias; Lautens, Mark

    2013-09-27

    An I for an I: Conditions for the intramolecular carboiodination and the simultaneous convergent intramolecular carboiodination/intermolecular Heck reaction of various diiodoarenes were developed. The ability of the Pd(0)/QPhos catalyst/ligand combination to undergo reversible oxidative addition allows these reactions to proceed well, thus increasing both the appeal and utility of this class of substrates in site-selective cross-coupling reactions.

  8. How Additive Manufacturing can Support the Assembly System Design Process

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Matilda; Sandberg, Robin

    2016-01-01

    In product manufacturing, assembly approximately represents 50% of the total work hours. Therefore, an efficient and fast assembly system is crucial to get competitive advantages at the global market and have the right product quality. Today, the verification of the assembly system is mostly done by utilizing software based simulation tools even though limitations have been identified. The purpose of this thesis is to identify when the use of additive manufacturing technology could be used in...

  9. Interatomic interaction of additive elements and their influence on the processes in the double metal solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Рябікіна, Марина Анатоліівна; Мірошниченко, Вікторія Ігорівна; Ткаченко, Костянтин Ігорович; Ткаченко, Ніна Валеріївна

    2016-01-01

    Modern industry uses a lot of elements as additives to improve the service characteristics of metal products that are to be used for various purposes. These elements can be divided into two groups: the first group includes the elements interacting with iron and improving its characteristics (alloying elements), and the second group includes the elements, that modify the characteristics of the structure and properties in an undesirable direction. These are trace elements: S, P, O, As, and othe...

  10. Denitrification potential enhancement by addition of external carbon sources in a pre-denitrification process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yong-zhen; MA Yong; WANG Shu-ying

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the denitrification potential enhancement by addition of external carbon sources and to estimate the denitrification potential for the predenitrification system using nitrate utilization rate(NUR)batch tests.It is shown that the denitrification potential Can be substantially increased with the addition of three external carbon sources,i.e.methanol,ethanol,and acetate.and the denitrification rates of ethanol,acetate,and methanol reached up to 9.6,12,and 3.2 mgN/(gVSS·h),respectively,while mat of starch wastewater was only 0.74 mgN/(gVSS·h).By comparison,ethanol was found to be the best extemal carbon source.NUR batch tests with starch wastewater and waste ethanol were carried out.The denitrification potential increased from 5.6 to 16.5 mg NO.-N/L owing to waste ethanol addition.By means of NUR tests,the wastewater characteristics and kinetic parameters can be estimated.which are used to determine the denitrification potential of wastewater,to calculate the denitrification potential of the plant and to predict the nitrate effluent quality,as well as provide information for developing carbon dosage conlxol strategy.

  11. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1979-10-30

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  12. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-26

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  13. Heavy flavour production and heavy flavour mixing at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis some results of the proton-antiproton-collision experiment UA1 with the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron are presented and interpreted. Ch. 1 contians a general introduction to the physics motivations behind the proton-antiproton-collider project, a brief description of the CERN facilities and a summary of collider and UA1 physics achievements. Furthermore the concept of studying heavy flavours via their weak decays into muons is introduced. Ch. 2 gives a brief overview of the UA1 experimental set-up, while those parts of the detector that are relevant for the analysis, presented in this thesis, is discussed in some more detail. Ch. 3 contains a short introduction to, and motivation for the use of Monte Carlo techniques in event simulations, while Ch. 4 describes the framework of the recently developed 'EUROJET' event generator. In Ch. 5 a treatment is given of the theoretical background and concepts like 'quark-mixing' and 'CP-violation' are explained, also other useful definitions and formulae are introduced on which the later analysis of the same-sign to opposite-sign dimuon ratio is built. Data collection and event reconstruction is the subject of Ch. 6, while a detailed comparison between the theoretical models and experimentally obtained distributions is given in Ch. 7. Finally, in Ch. 8 some concluding remarks are made. 182 refs.; 81 figs.; 9 tabs

  14. Information-Theoretic Capacity and Error Exponents of Stationary Point Processes under Random Additive Displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Anantharam, Venkat

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the Shannon regime for the random displacement of stationary point processes. Let each point of some initial stationary point process in $\\R^n$ give rise to one daughter point, the location of which is obtained by adding a random vector to the coordinates of the mother point, with all displacement vectors independently and identically distributed for all points. The decoding problem is then the following one: the whole mother point process is known as well as the coordinates of some daughter point; the displacements are only known through their law; can one find the mother of this daughter point? The Shannon regime is that where the dimension $n$ tends to infinity and where the logarithm of the intensity of the point process is proportional to $n$. We show that this problem exhibits a sharp threshold: if the sum of the proportionality factor and of the differential entropy rate of the noise is positive, then the probability of finding the right mother point tends to 0 with $n$ for all point...

  15. Decays of Z Boson into Pseudoscalar Meson Pair of Different Flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Chia, Swee-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the process Z-zero to M1 M2, where M1 and M2 are pseudoscalar mesons with quark contents of q1 q-bar and q-bar q2 respectively. At the quark level, the process-zero to q1 q2-bar, where q1 and q2 are quarks of different flavours, receives contribution only from the Z-penguin. In order to fold the quark-level process to the hadronic process, we make the fundamental assumption that the vertex of type M q q-bar can be approximated by an effective constant gamma 5 coupling. With this assumption, estimates are obtained for the cross-sections for the following processes: Z-zero to K-minus pi-plus, Z-zero to B-minus K-plus.

  16. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes. PMID:21704354

  17. Flavour Independent $h^{0}A^{0}$ Search and Two Higgs Doublet Model Interpretation of Neutral Higgs Boson Searches at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von, J H; Krogh, A; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2005-01-01

    Upper limits on the cross-section of the pair-production process e+e- -> h0A0 assuming 100% decays into hadrons, are derived from a new search for the h0A0 -> hadrons topology, independent of the hadronic flavour of the decay products. Searches for the neutral Higgs bosons h0 and A0, are used to obtain constraints on the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM(11)) with no CP violation in the Higgs sector and no additional non Standard Model particles besides the five Higgs bosons. The analysis combines LEP1 and LEP2 data collected with the OPAL detctor up to the highest available centre-of-mass energies. The searches are sensitive to the h0, A0 -> qq, gg,tau+tau- and h0 -> A0A0 decay modes of the Higgs bosons. The 2HDM(II) parameter space is explored in a detailed scan. Large regions of the 2HDM(II) parameter space are excluded at the 95% CL in the (mh, mA), (mh, tanb) and (mA, tanb) planes, using both direct neutral Higgs boson searches and indirect limits derived from Standard Model high precision measuremen...

  18. Impact of flavouring substances on the aggregation behaviour of dissolved barley β-glucans in a model beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupetz, M; Sacher, B; Becker, T

    2016-06-01

    Structural polymers such as cereal β-glucan may cause various processing problems in beverage industry depending on concentration, molar size distribution and agglomeration behaviour. In this context, influences of the beer volatiles dodecanoic acid, octyl butanoate, ethyl decanoate and decyl acetate on molar mass and radii of barley β-glucan were investigated in ethanolic (4% w/w) model solution. After addition of 100mg/l ethyl decanoate and decyl acetate to the β-glucan solution, a wider-ranging molar mass distribution could be observed by means of asymmetric field-flow-fractionation. Due to agglomeration, average molar mass of β-glucan standard (MW=6.8×10(6)g/mol) increased by 2×10(6)g/mol (P<0.05) in solution containing decyl acetate. Furthermore, a significant growth (P<0.05) from 86 to 102 nm in gyration radius was measured. The obtained results elucidate the importance of fatty acid derived flavouring substance composition in beer regarding the aggregation behaviour of β-glucan. PMID:27083361

  19. Continuous Digital Light Processing (cDLP): Highly Accurate Additive Manufacturing of Tissue Engineered Bone Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, David; Wallace, Jonathan; Siblani, Ali; Wang, Martha O.; Kim, Kyobum; Mikos, Antonios G.; Fisher, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly accurate rendering of the external and internal geometry of bone tissue engineering scaffolds effects fit at the defect site, loading of internal pore spaces with cells, bioreactor-delivered nutrient and growth factor circulation, and scaffold resorption. It may be necessary to render resorbable polymer scaffolds with 50 μm or less accuracy to achieve these goals. This level of accuracy is available using Continuous Digital Light processing (cDLP) which utilizes a DLP® (Texas Instrumen...

  20. Measurements of heavy-flavour production and azimuthal anisotropy in Pb--Pb collisions with the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dubla, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks, i.e. charm or beauty, are unique probes of the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. Due to their large masses, heavy quarks are produced at the initial stage of the collision, almost exclusively via hard partonic scattering processes. Therefore, they are expected to experience the full collision history propagating through the QCD medium losing energy via elastic and inelastic collisions with the medium constituents. The ALICE collaboration has measured the production of open heavy-flavour hadrons via their hadronic and semi-electronic decays at mid-rapidity and in the semi-muonic decay channel at \\mbox{forward rapidity} in pp, p--Pb and Pb--Pb collisions. In this talk the latest results on the open \\mbox{heavy-flavour nuclear modification factor, $R_\\mathrm{AA}$, and elliptic flow, $v_{2}$, are presented}.