WorldWideScience

Sample records for additives flavourings processing

  1. Identification of flavour additives in tobacco products to develop a flavour library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüsemann, Erna Jz; Visser, Wouter F; Cremers, Johannes Wjm; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Talhout, Reinskje

    2018-01-01

    This study combines chemical analysis and flavour descriptions of flavour additives used in tobacco products, and provides a starting point to build an extensive library of flavour components, useful for product surveillance. Headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to compare 22 commercially available tobacco products (cigarettes and roll-your-own) expected to have a characterising flavour and 6 commercially available products not expected to have a characterising flavour with 5 reference products (natural tobacco leaves and research cigarettes containing no flavour additives). The flavour components naturally present in the reference products were excluded from components present in commercially available products containing flavour additives. A description of the remaining flavour additives was used for categorisation. GC-MS measurements of the 33 tobacco products resulted in an overview of 186 chemical compounds. Of these, 144 were solely present in commercially available products. These 144 flavour additives were described using 62 different flavour descriptors extracted from flavour databases, which were categorised into eight groups largely based on the definition of characterising flavours from the European Tobacco Product Directive: fruit, spice, herb, alcohol, menthol, sweet, floral and miscellaneous. We developed a method to identify and describe flavour additives in tobacco products. Flavour additives consist of single flavour compounds or mixtures of multiple flavour compounds, and different combinations of flavour compounds can cause a certain flavour. A flavour library helps to detect flavour additives that are characteristic for a certain flavour, and thus can be useful for regulation of flavours in tobacco and related products. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 3 (FGE.10Rev3): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing an additional oxygenated functional group and lactones from chemical groups 9, 13 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 63 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, including additional two substances in this Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission...

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 8, Revision 3 (FGE.08Rev3): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 70 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565...... substances [FL-no: 12.120, 12.093, 12.094, 12.097, 12.100, 12.112, 12.116, 12.164, 12.167, 12.199, 15.007, 15.102 and 15.125 and 15.134] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 5 (FGE.08Rev5): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical groups 20 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since the publi......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since...... the publication of the last revision of this FGE, the EFSA has been requested to evaluate additional toxicological data submitted for two flavouring substances, one on supporting substance 2,5-dihydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dithiane [FL-no: 15.006], which support the evaluation of the candidate substance 2...... approach that integrates information on the structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that 59 substances do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4 (FGE.08Rev4): Aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups from chemical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 80 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 08, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since...... the publication of the last revision of this FGE, the EFSA has been requested to evaluate 10 additional substances, which have been included in the present revision of FGE.08. For the substances methyl methanethiosulphonate [FL-no: 12.159], 2-methylbutane-2-thiol [FL-no: 12.172], 2-methylpropane-2- thiol [FL.......116, 12.120, 12.164, 12.167, 12.199, 15.007, 15.102 and 15.125 and 15.134], evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  6. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids) , 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 65, Revisio n 1 (FGE.65Rev1 ) : Consideration of sulfur - substituted furan derivatives used as flavouring agents evaluated by JECFA (59th, meeting) structurally related to a subgroup of substances within the group of ‘ Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side - chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14’ evaluated by JECFA in FGE.13Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances’ based on the MSDI approach for 32 of the furan derivatives. For one substance [FL-no: 13.056] a request for additional toxicity data still remains. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications...

  7. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 91, Re vision 2 (FGE.91Rev2): Consid eration of simple aliphatic and aromatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 68th meetings, ) structurally related to aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 201Rev1: 2-Alkylated, aliphatic, acyclic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and precursors, with or without additional double-bonds, from chemical subgroup 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 1 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 201, the additional data on genotoxicity submitted by the Industry on two substances, 2-methylpent-2-enal....... The Panel therefore concluded that further data are required in order to clarify the genotoxic potential of this subgroup. The Panel considers the Comet assay with [FL-no: 05.095] as test material and performed on liver, blood and first site of contact, as a preferred option to further investigate...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 13, Revision 2 (FGE.13 Rev2) Furfuryl and furan derivatives with and without additional side-chain substituents and heteroatoms from chemical group 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 27 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 13, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Three...

  10. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2 (FGE.10Rev2): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing, an additional oxygenated functional group and lactones from chemical groups 9, 13 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 61 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None...

  11. SUSY in processes with flavour violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matak, P.

    2009-01-01

    I this work we present our first results of the calculation of the branching ratio for rare B 0 s meson di-muon decay. High energy physicists studied flavour changing processes in past decades very intensively. The reason is large sensitivity of such a processes on the contributions of the beyond Standard Model theories, where the amplitudes of flavour changing processes could be enhanced up to several orders by the new particle content. Most of their contributions come from extended Higgs sector. As an example of such a theory and we could say the most favourite one, is the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We choose the B 0 s → μ + μ - decay because of its experimental accessibility at LHC. Observation of this process will probably be one of the first signals of new particle physics. We started in our work with short introduction to the idea of supersymmetry, including its motivation in particle physics. Then, in the second chapter, we present the proper calculation of the decay amplitude and branching ration. In all calculations we used MS-renormalization scheme. (author)

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 24, Revision 2 (FGE.24Rev2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 24 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 24, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision.......002, 14.023, 14.094, 14.107, 14.138, 14.145, 14.163 and 14.169], for which additional data were requested, are no longer supported by Industry for use as flavouring substances in Europe and will therefore not be considered any further. None of the 24 substances were considered to have genotoxic potential...

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 3 (FGE.74Rev3): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally, related to Aliphatic and Alicyclic Mono-, Di-, Tri-, and Polysulphides with or wi thout Additional Oxygenated Functional Groups from Chemical Group 20 evaluated by EFSA in FGE.08Rev5 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... approach. For 10 candidate substances in FGE.74Rev3 [FL-no: 12.009, 12.013, 12.020, 12.023, 12.045, 12.074, 12.155, 12.169, 12.241 and 12.280] evaluated through the Procedure, the Panel concluded that additional toxicity data are required....

  14. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 303 (FGE.303): Spilanthol from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured....... In conclusion, for the candidate substance spilanthol [FL-no: 16.121] additional data on chemical defined material are required as a 28 day study is not considered sufficient to deriving a NOAEL....

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 305 (FGE.305): L - Methionylglycine of chemical group 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance, the dipeptide L-methionylglycine [FL-no: 17.037], in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 305, using the Procedure in Commission...... data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that for the flavouring substance, evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. The present evaluation of the candidate substance L-methionylglycine [FL-no: 17.037] is only applicable for its...... use in foods that are not heated or intended to be heated. Besides the safety assessment of the flavouring substance, the specifications for the material of commerce have also been considered. Adequate specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the material of commerce have...

  16. The effect of addition of selected vegetables on the microbiological, textural and flavour profile properties of yoghurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najgebauer-Lejko, Dorota; Tabaszewska, Małgorzata; Grega, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables, apart from having high nutritional value, also contain considerable amounts of dietary fibre and other components, which may affect physico-chemical properties of fermented milks, e.g. viscosity, texture, susceptibility to syneresis, flavour profile etc. The present work was established to study the effect of selected vegetables addition on the rheological, textural, microbiological and flavour profile parameters of yoghurts. The vegetable preparations (carrot, pumpkin, broccoli and red sweet pepper) were added (10% w/w) to the processed cow's milk fermented with DVS yoghurt culture. Texture profile analysis, determination of viscosity, susceptibility to syneresis and descriptive flavour evaluation were conducted at the 1st, 7th and 14th day after production. Additionally, microbiological studies were performed for 28 days, at 7-day intervals. The highest apparent viscosity and adhesiveness were obtained for the carrot yoghurt, whereas yoghurt with pumpkin was the least susceptible to syneresis. The other texture parameters were not affected by the addition of vegetables. Broccoli and red sweet pepper flavours were dominating in the fermented milks fortified with these vegetables, whereas carrot and pumpkin flavours were less distinctive. Yoghurt supplemented with red sweet pepper got the highest sensoric acceptability. The number of starter bacteria was not influenced by the vegetable additives, except for pumpkin yoghurt, which contained lower population of lactobacilli. Among all tested vegetables, carrot additive had the greatest potential to improve yoghurt structure, whereas red sweet pepper imparted the most acceptable flavour.

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 Revision 1 (FGE.208Rev1): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the a,b-unsaturation in ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of flavouring substances from subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 Revision 1 (FGE.208Rev1). The Flavour Industry has provided additional...

  18. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 304, Revision 1 (FGE.304Rev1): Four carboxamides from Chemical Groups 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate four flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 304, Revision 1 (FGE.304Rev1) using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565....../2000. This revision is made due to a re-evaluation of one flavouring substance N-(2-(pyridine-2-yl)ethyl)-3-p-menthanecarboxamide [FL-no: 16.118], as a 90-day dietary rat study has become available. One of the original five flavouring substances [FL-no: 16.124], for which additional data were requested, is no longer...

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 300 (FGE.300): One cyclo-aliphatic amide from chemical group 33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate a flavouring substance in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 300 using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substance...... that for the substance [FL-no: 16.115] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of this flavouring substance, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. The composition of the stereoisomeric...

  20. EFSA EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 304 (FGE.304): Five carboxamides from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate five flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 304, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the substances...... were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel...... concluded that the three substances [FL-no: 16.117, 16.123 and 16.125] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. For the remaining two candidate substances [FL-no: 16.118 and 16.124], no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional...

  1. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 210, Revision 1 (FGE.210Rev1): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 13 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 210 (FGE.210) and one additional substance [FL-no: 07.225] in this revis...

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 7, Revision 4 (FGE.07Rev4): Saturated and unsaturated aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and esters of secondary alcohols and saturated linear or branched

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 49 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 07, including additional five substances in this Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission ...

  3. The effect of tobacco ingredients on smoke chemistry. Part I: Flavourings and additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard R; Pereira da Silva, José R; Smith, Graham

    2004-01-01

    The effects of 450 tobacco ingredients added to tobacco on the forty-four "Hoffmann analytes" in mainstream cigarette smoke have been determined. These analytes are believed by regulatory authorities in the USA and Canada to be relevant to smoking-related diseases. They are based on lists published by D. Hoffmann and co-workers of the American Health Foundation in New York. The ingredients comprised 431 flavours, 1 flavour/solvent, 1 solvent, 7 preservatives, 5 binders, 2 humectants, 2 process aids and 1 filler. The cigarettes containing mixtures of the ingredients were smoked using the standard ISO smoking machine conditions. The levels of the "Hoffmann analytes" in the smoke from the test cigarettes containing the ingredient mixture were compared to those from control cigarettes without the ingredients. In practice, flavouring ingredients are typically added to tobacco that also contains casing ingredients and reconstituted tobacco materials. In order to keep the tobacco mixtures as authentic as possible, three comparisons have been made in this study. These are: (a) control cigarette containing a typical US blended, cased tobacco incorporating reconstituted tobacco versus test cigarettes that had flavouring ingredients added to this tobacco; (b) control cigarette containing tobacco only versus test cigarettes with the tobacco cased and incorporating flavourings; (c) control cigarette containing tobacco only versus test cigarette incorporating additives made in an experimental sheet material. The significances of differences between the test and control cigarettes were determined using both the variability of the data on the specific occasion of the measurement, and also taking into account the long-term variability of the analytical measurements over the one-year period in which analyses were determined in the present study. This long-term variability was determined by measuring the levels of the 44 "Hoffmann analytes" in a reference cigarette on many occasions

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, Revision 1: Bi- and tricyclic secondary, ketones and related esters from chemical groups 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate six flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 47, including an additional two substances in this Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission...... Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 309 (FGE.309): Sodium Diacetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate sodium diacetate [FL-no: 16.073] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 309, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. However, although...... on Food. Based on this group ADI, the use as sodium diacetate as a flavouring substance at the current levels of dietary intake raises no safety concern....

  6. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 93, Revision 1 (FGE.93Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The two substances 5-ethyl-4-methyl-2-(2-methylpropyl)-thiazoline [FL-no: 15.130] and 5-ethyl-4-methyl-2......-(2-butyl)-thiazoline [FL-no: 15.131], which are 3-thiazolines, are structural similar to two other 3-thiazolines in FGE.21Rev1 for which the Panel has expressed a genotoxicity concern, and accordingly the Procedure should not be applied to these two substances until adequate genotoxicity data become......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 3 (FGE.17Rev3): Pyrazine derivatives from chemical group 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 28 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, including seven additional substances considered in this Revision 3, using the Procedure...... in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. From the in vitro data available, genotoxic potential is indicated for the flavouring substances quinoxaline [FL-no: 14.147] and 2- methylquinoxaline [FL-no: 14.139]. Therefore, the Panel decided that the Procedure could not be applied to these two substances, until...... adequate data showing absence of genotoxicity are provided. For one substance [FL-no: 14.051] no intake data are available preventing it from being evaluated through the Procedure. The remaining 25 substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2): Primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, acid, and esters from chemical group 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... group 7. Seven of the nine flavouring substances possess one or more chiral centres and additionally, and due to the presence of a double bond, one of these substances can exist as geometric isomer. For two of these substances, the stereoisomeric composition has not been specified. The nine flavouring...... at the use level reported by the Industry, especially in those cases where the annual production values were reported to be small. In consequence, the Panel had reservations about the data on use and use levels provided and the intake estimates obtained by the MSDI approach. In the absence of more precise...

  9. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids ), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 200 (FGE.200): 74 α , β -unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 1.1.1 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 74 flavouring substances from subgroup 1.1.1 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 200 (FGE.200). The Flavour Industry has...... provided additional genotoxicity studies for one representative substance in FGE.200, namely hex-2(trans)-enal [FL-no 05.073], and for other two substances in the same subgroup, namely 2-dodecenal [05.037] and 2-nonenal [05.171]. The Panel has evaluated these data and concluded that the concern still...... remains with respect to genotoxicity for the substances of this subgroup and their three representative substances. The Panel confirms, the need for an in vivo Comet assay performed in duodenum and liver for hex-2(trans)-enal [FL-no: 05.073]. For the two other representative substances of subgroup 1...

  10. Enhancing and accelarating flavour formation by salt-tolerant yeasts in Japanese soy-sauce processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der C.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    In soy-sauce processes salt-tolerant yeasts are very important for the flavour formation. This flavour formation is, however, slow and poorly understood. In the last decades, a concerted research effort has increased the understanding and resulted in the derivation of mutants with an enhanced

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 96 (FGE.96): Consideration of 88 flavouring substances considered by EFSA for which EU production volumes / anticipated production volumes have been submitted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present FGE.96 concerns 88 JECFA-evaluated substances from different FGEs. Common for all the 88 substances was that for none of them European production volumes were available at the time for the first consideration...... have been calculated and based on these MSDI values the substances have been re-considered by the stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism...

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 215 (FGE.215): Seven α,β-Unsaturated Cinnamyl Ketones from subgroup 3.2 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of flavouring substances from subgroup 3.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 215 (FGE.215). The Flavour Industry has pro...

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4): primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters from chemical groups 1 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 12 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4), including two additional substances, using the Procedure in Commission...... Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present revision includes two additional flavouring substances: 12-beta-santalen-14-ol [FL-no: 02.216] and 12-alpha-santalen-14-ol [FL-no: 02.217]. None of the substances was considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach...

  14. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 82, Revision 1 (FGE.82Rev1): Consideration of Epoxides evaluated by the JECFA (65 th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of five epoxides evaluated by the JECFA at the 65th meeting in 2005. This revision is made due to inclusion of one additional substance, beta-ionone epoxide [FL-no: 07.170], cleared...... for genotoxicity concern and due to additional toxicity data have become available for beta-caryophyllene epoxide [FL-no: 16.043]. Since publication of FGE.82 one substance epoxy oxophorone [FL-no: 16.051] is no longer supported for use as flavouring substances in Europe by Industry and will therefore...

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 222: Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for alpha,betaunsaturated furyl derivatives with the α,β-unsaturation in the side chain from subgroup 4.6 of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of six flavouring substances from subgroup 4.6 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 222. The Flavour Industry have provided...... additional genotoxicity studies for two representative substances, 3-(2-furyl)acrylaldehyde [FL-no: 13.034] and 4-(2-furyl)but-3-en-2-one [FL-no: 13.044], in FGE.222. Based on these new data the Panel could not rule out a clastogenic and aneugenic potential for the two substances and a in vivo Comet assay...

  16. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 18, Revision 2 (FGE.18Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols, aromatic tertiary alcohols and their esters from

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 32 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 18, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None...... concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. For the remaining four substances [FL-no: 02.146, 02.185, 02.191 and 09.669] no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances...

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 226 (FGE.226): Consideration of genotoxicity data on one α,β-unsaturated aldehyde from chemical subgroup 1.1.1(b) of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance from subgroup 1.1.1(b) of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 226. The Flavour Industry has...... provided additional genotoxicity studies for the substance [FL-no: 16.071] in FGE.226. Based on these new data the Panel concluded that 4,5-epoxydec-2(trans)-enal did not induce gene mutations in bacterial cells but was positive in an in vitro micronucleus assay, so, 4,5-epoxydec-2(trans...

  18. Flavoured co-annihilation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... The amount of flavour mixing permissible is constrained by flavour violating τ → μ or τ → e processes. For RR mass insertions, the constraints from flavour violation are not strong enough in ... symmetric grand unified theories due to RGE running from the Planck scale to the GUT scale generates RR flavour ...

  19. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 5 (FGE.21Rev5): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 41 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 5, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision......-propionylthiophene [FL-no: 15.097]. These data on 2-pentylthiophene [FL-no: 15.096] should cover 2-butylthiophene [FL-no: 15.045], 2-hexylthiophene [FL-no: 15.076] and 2-octylthiophene [FL-no: 15.093]. For two of the substances [FL-no: 15.060 and 15.119] the Panel concluded that additional genotoxicity data...... are required. The remaining 39 substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure–activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that the 39...

  20. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 2 (FGE.25Rev2): Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from chemical group 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 37 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 25, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None.......021, 01.022, 01.023, 01.030, 01.031, 01.032, 01.035, 01.036, 01.037, 01.042, 01.043, 01.044, 01.047, 01.050, 01.051, 01.052, 01.053, 01.055, 01.056, 01.058, 01.059, 01.060, 01.064, 01.066, 01.067, 01.070 and 10.078] no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety...

  1. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 3 (FGE.21Rev3): Thiazoles, thiophenes, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical groups 29 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 59 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, including an additional three substances in this Revision 3, using the Procedure...... in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Since the publication of the last revision of this FGE, the EFSA has been requested to evaluate three additional substances [FL-no: 15.057, 15.079 and 15.135], which have been included in the present revision of FGE.21. Seven of the substances [FL-no: 15.060, 15.......092, 15.093, 15.094, 15.096, 15.097, 15.106, 15.107, 15.129 and 15.135] evaluated through the Procedure, no appropriate NOAEL was available and additional data are required. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials , Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 224 (FGE.224): Consideration of genotoxic potential for two α,β - unsaturated thiophenes from subgroup 5.2 of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of two flavouring substances from subgroup 5.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 224 (FGE.224). The Flavour Industry has...... provided additional genotoxicity studies for one of the two substances in FGE.224, namely 5-methyl-2-thiophenecarbaldehyde [FL-no: 15.004]. The data requested by EFSA for the other substance, 3-acetyl-2,5-dimethylthiophene [FL-no: 15.024] of FGE.224 will be provided subsequently according to the Flavour...... are still pending and no conclusion could be drawn in the present FGE. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  3. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 216, Revision 1 (FGE.216Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated 2-Phenyl -2-Alkenals from Subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of five flavouring substances from subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19. In the Flavouring Group Evaluation 216 (FGE.216) additional genotoxicity...... data were requested. Additional genotoxicity studies have now been provided for the representative substance 2-phenylcrotonaldehyde [FL-no: 05.062]. Based on these new data the Panel concluded that the concern for genotoxicity could not be ruled out and requests a proof of sufficient systemic exposure...

  4. EFSA CEF Panel (Panel on Food Contac t Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids , 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 2 07 (FGE.2 07 )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance, 2,6-dimethyl-2,5,7-octatriene-1-ol acetate [FL-no: 09.931], from subgroup 1.1.2 of FGE.19, which......-no: 09.034] and santalyl phenylacetate [FL-no: 09.712] from FGE.19 subgroup 2.1 for which 2,6-dimethyl-2,5,7-octatriene-1-ol acetate [FL-no: 09.931] is representative. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 310 (FGE.310): Rebaudioside A from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate rebaudioside A [FL-no: 16.113], a steviol glycoside. The substance was not considered to have genotoxic potential. Since a comprehensive and adequate...

  6. Risk assessment of "other substances" – D-Glucurono-γ-lactone. Opinion of the Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids, Materials in Contact with Food and Cosmetics of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Husøy, Trine; Bruzell, Ellen Merete; Granum, Berit; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Rohloff, Jens; Wicklund, Trude; Steffensen, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (Vitenskapskomiteen for mattrygghet, VKM) has, at the request of the Norwegian Food Safety Authority (Mattilsynet; NFSA), assessed the risk of "other substances" in food supplements and energy drinks sold in Norway. VKM has assessed the risk of doses given by NFSA. These risk assessments will provide NFSA with the scientific basis while regulating the addition of “other substances” to food supplements and other foods. "Other substances" a...

  7. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids) , 2016. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 90, Revision 1 (FGE.90Rev1): consideration of six substances evaluated by JECFA (68th meeting) structurally related to aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic saturated and unsaturated tertiary alcohols, aromatic tertiary alcohols and their esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.18Rev1 and FGE.75Rev1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of EFSA was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further evaluation is necessary...... refined exposure estimation and to judge whether a re-evaluation according to the Procedure is needed....

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 3 (FGE.06Rev3): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 50 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 6, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the subs......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 50 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 6, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None...... of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity...... of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. For one substance [FL-no: 09.938] an identity test is missing and for two substances [FL-no: 05.226 and 09.950] the range of the specific gravity is too wide. Additional, the stereoisomeric mixture has not been...

  9. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 74, Revision 1 (FGE.74Rev1): Consideration of Simple Aliphatic Sulphides and Thiols evaluated by the JECFA (53rd and 61st meeting) Structurally related

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs....... The Panel concluded that the 18 substances in the JECFA flavouring group of simple aliphatic sulphides and thiols are structurally related to the group of 66 aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, and polysulphides with or without additional oxygenated functional groups evaluated by EFSA in the Flavouring...... Group Evaluation 08, Revision 1(FGE.08Rev1). The Panel agrees with the outcome of the application of the Procedure performed by the JECFA for eight of the 18 aliphatic sulphides and thiols [FL-no: 12.179, 12.198, 12.212, 12.238, 12.239, 12.255, 12.257 and 12.291]. For two tertiary thiols, 2-methyl-4...

  10. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific O pinion Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4 (FGE.23Rev4): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision...... is made due to the inclusion of one additional flavouring substance, 2S-cis-tetrahydro-4-methyl-2-(2-methyl-1-propenyl)-2H-pyran [FL-no: 13.170]. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates...... also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 21 candidate substances. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 3, Revision 2 (FGE.03Rev2): Acetals of branched- and straight-chain aliphatic saturated primary alcohols and branched- and straight-chain saturated or unsaturated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance, acetaldehyde ethyl isopropyl acetal [FL-no: 06.137], structurally related to the 58 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group...

  12. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Ai ds (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 (FGE.208): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the α , β - unsaturation in ring / side - chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance from subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 208. The Flavour Industry has provided a...

  13. Simplification of flavour combinatorics in evaluation of hadronic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Ernst E.; Ilyin, Viacheslav A.; Skachkova, Anne N.

    2000-05-01

    A serious computational problem in the evaluation of hadronic collision processes is connected with the large number of partonic subprocesses included in the calculation. These are from the quark and gluon content of the initial hadrons, and from CKM quark mixing. For example, there are 180 subprocesses which contribute to the W + 2 jets process, and 292 subprocesses in W + 3 jets production at the LHC, even when quarks from only the first two generations are taken into account. We propose a simple modification of the rules for evaluation of cross sections and distributions, which avoids multiplication of channels from the mixture of quark states. The method is based on a unitary rotation of down quarks, thus, transporting the mixing matrix elements from vertices of Feynman diagrams to the parton distribution functions (PDF). As a result, one can calculate cross sections with significantly fewer subprocesses. For the example mentioned above, with the new rules, one need evaluate only 21 and 33 subprocesses, respectively. The matrix elements of the subprocesses are calculated without quark mixing but with a modified PDF convolution which depends on the quark mixing angle, and on the topologies of gauge invariant classes of diagrams. The proposed method has been incorporated into the CompHEP program and checked with various examples.

  14. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 4 (FGE.21Rev4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 59 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision...... is made due to the inclusion of the assessment of new toxicity data on one supporting substance 5,6-dihydro-2,4,6-tris(2-methylpropyl)-4H-1,3,5-dithiazine [FL-no: 15.113], which is considered to be structurally related to the candidate substances 2-butyl-4-methyl(4H)pyrrolidino[1,2d]-1,3,5-dithiazine [FL......-no: 15.135]. Furthermore, new in vitro genotoxicity studies have become available on the supporting substance 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline [FL-no: 15.010], which is considered to be structurally related to and a supportive substance for 2-methyl-2-thiazoline [FL-no: 15.086]. Eighteen of the original 59...

  15. Risk assessment of flavouring substances used in foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norby, Karin; Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Greve, Krestine

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present project, the FLAVIS project, is to perform risk assessment of chemically defined flavouring substances. The evaluations are then presented to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for final adoption in its Scientific Panel on food additives, flavourings, processing aids...... the EU Commission (DG SANCO) plans to issue the first European Positive list on flavouring substances. The project is financial supported by EFSA and the Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research....

  16. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 78, Revision 2 (FGE.78Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic and alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... 1-methylnaphthalene [FL-no: 01.014] is in the process of being deleted from the Union List. This revision is owing to additional genotoxicity data on β-caryophyllene [FL-no: 01.007] and 90-day studies in rats on β-caryophyllene [FL-no: 01.007] and myrcene [FL-no: 01.008]. The substances were...

  17. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 16 alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by the JECFA at the 59th meeting in 2002. The revision is made due to consideration of one additional...

  18. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 86, Revision 2 (FGE.86Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA (65th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 30 aliphatic and arylalkyl amines and amides evaluated by JECFA at the 65th meeting in 2005. This revision is required owing to additional available toxicity data on piperine [FL...

  19. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 94, Revision 2 (FGE.94Rev2): Consideration of aliphatic amines and amides evaluated in an addendum to the group of aliphatic and aromatic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 12 aliphatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA at the 68th meeting in 2007. This revision is required owing to additional toxicity data on 3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[2...

  20. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 3 (FGE.73Rev3): Consideration of alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th and 63rd meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... of one additional substance, beta-ionyl acetate [FL-no: 09.305] cleared for genotoxicity concern in FGE.213Rev1. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern...

  1. Experimental constraints from flavour changing processes and physics beyond the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersabeck, M.; Gligorov, V. V.; Serra, N.

    2012-08-01

    Flavour physics has a long tradition of paving the way for direct discoveries of new particles and interactions. Results over the last decade have placed stringent bounds on the parameter space of physics beyond the Standard Model. Early results from the LHC, and its dedicated flavour factory LHCb, have further tightened these constraints and reiterate the ongoing relevance of flavour studies. The experimental status of flavour observables in the charm and beauty sectors is reviewed in measurements of CP violation, neutral meson mixing, and measurements of rare decays.

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 2 (FEG.17Rev2): Pyrazine derivatives from chemical group 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 17, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. From the in vitro...... data available, genotoxic potential is indicated for the flavouring substances quinoxaline [FL-no: 14.147] and 2-methylquinoxaline [FL-no: 14.139]. Therefore, the Panel decided that the Procedure could not be applied to these two substances, so adequate genotoxicity data should be provided. For one...... substance [FL-no: 14.051] no intake data are available preventing it from being evaluated through the Procedure. The remaining 18 substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold...

  3. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 2 (FGE.220Rev1): α,β-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 10 flavouring substances from subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 220 (FGE.220). FGE.220 is subdivided int...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 3 (FGE.09Rev3): Secondary alicyclic saturated and unsaturated alcohols, ketones and esters containing secondary alicyclic alcohols from chemical group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 17 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the subs...

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 4 (FGE.09Rev4): Secondary alicyclic saturated and unsaturated alcohols, ketones and esters containing secondary alicyclic alcohols from chemical group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present revi...

  6. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 213, Revision 2 (FGE.213Rev2): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF Panel) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 26 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.7 of FGE.19 in Flavouring Group Evaluation (FGE) 213. In the first v...

  7. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 5 (FGE.09Rev5): Secondary alicyclic saturated and unsaturated alcohols, ketones and esters containing secondary alicyclic alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 5, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present revi...

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF) ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 4 (FGE.06Rev4 ): Straight - and branched - chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters from chemical groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 56 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 6, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision is...

  9. Understanding flavour at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Huge progress in flavour physics has been achieved by the two B-factories and the Tevatron experiments. This progress has, however, deepened the new physics flavour puzzle: If there is new physics at the TeV scale, why aren't flavour changing neutral current processes enhanced by orders of magnitude compared to the standard model predictions? The forthcoming ATLAS and CMS experiments can potentially solve this puzzle. Perhaps even more surprisingly, these experiments can potentially lead to progress in understanding the standard model flavour puzzle: Why is there smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters? Thus, a rich and informative flavour program is awaiting us not only in the flavour-dedicated LHCb experiment, but also in the high-pT ATLAS and CMS experiments.

  10. Gauged Lepton Flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, R.; Gavela, M.B.; Grinstein, B.; Merlo, L.; Quilez, P.

    2016-12-22

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; requiring in addition a phenomenologically viable setup leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplings are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavor Violation. In all cases, the $\\mu-\\tau$ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.

  11. Japan Flavour and Fragrance Materials Association's (JFFMA) safety assessment of food-flavouring substances uniquely used in Japan that belong to the class of aliphatic primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, acetals and esters containing additional oxygenated functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenji; Hasegawa-Baba, Yasuko; Sekiya, Fumiko; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Mirokuji, Yoshiharu; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Shinpei; Ono, Atsushi; Nakajima, Madoka; Degawa, Masakuni; Ozawa, Shogo; Shibutani, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio

    2017-09-01

    We performed a safety evaluation using the procedure devised by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) of the following four flavouring substances that belong to the class of 'aliphatic primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, acetals, and esters containing additional oxygenated functional groups' and are uniquely used in Japan: butyl butyrylacetate, ethyl 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoate, 3-hydroxyhexanoic acid and methyl hydroxyacetate. Although no genotoxicity study data were found in the published literature, none of the four substances had chemical structural alerts predicting genotoxicity. All four substances were categorised as class I by using Cramer's classification. The estimated daily intake of each of the four substances was determined to be 0.007-2.9 μg/person/day by using the maximised survey-derived intake method and based on the annual production data in Japan in 2001, 2005 and 2010, and was determined to be 0.250-600.0 μg/person/day by using the single-portion exposure technique and based on average-use levels in standard portion sizes of flavoured foods. Both of these estimated daily intake ranges were below the threshold of toxicological concern for class I substances, which is 1800 μg/person/day. Although no information from in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies for the four substances was available, these substances were judged to raise no safety concerns at the current levels of intake.

  12. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 22, Revision 1 (FGE.22Rev1): Ring substituted phenolic substances from chemical groups 21 and 25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that these 27 candidate substances do not give rise to safety......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 28 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 22, Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substance 3......,4-methylenedioxyphenol [FL-no: 04.080] was reported to have a genotoxic potential in vitro, while in vivo studies were not available. Therefore, the Panel concluded that the Procedure could not be applied to this substance until adequate genotoxicity data become available. The remaining 27 substances were evaluated...

  13. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Flavouring Group Evaluation 46, Revision 1 (FGE.46Rev1): Ammonia and three ammonium salts from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... that the substance does not induce tumours. Ammonia is a substance that is readily absorbed in the gut. It is produced endogenously in amounts that far exceed those that are to be ingested as flavourings. The three ammonium salts are expected to give rise to ammonium ion and chloride or hydrogen sulphide. Ammonia...... is expected to be transported by the portal circulation to the liver and metabolised to urea by the Krebs urea cycle and subsequently excreted by the kidneys. Hydrogen sulphide is a substance that is produced endogenously. The major pathway for sulphide metabolism is oxidation to sulphate and excretion...

  14. Meat flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosset, R.; Liger, P.; Roussel-Ciquard, N.

    1978-01-01

    For the consumer, meat is characterized by a certain number of organoleptic qualities; among them, flavour -that is to say the association of both odour and taste- plays a leading part. This property is based upon a great number of chemical components: some volatile components are responsible for the aroma and some non-volatile ones for the taste. These substances are either made or released during the heating of the meat on account of components called precursors which are produced during the aging of the meat. The two main reactions which preside over the elaboration of flavour are: the Maillard's reaction and the autooxidation reactions. Meat flavour is associated with the animal characteristics; it is influenced by the ante- and post mortem treatments as well as by the technological treatments for storing it. The use of synthetical flavours is to be considered as possible in the future [fr

  15. Reduction of saltiness and acrylamide levels in palm sugar-like flavouring through buffer modification and the addition of calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Phui Yee; Tan, Chin Ping; Abas, Faridah; Ho, Chun Wai; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan

    2013-06-10

    Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF) is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO₄) buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of the level found in original PSLF. A further decrease (~25%) in the sodium content was achieved by removing monobasic sodium phosphate (NaH₂PO₄) from the buffer system. Meanwhile, the addition of CaCl₂ at 20-40 mg/L reduced the acrylamide content in PSLF by as much as 58%. A CaCl₂ concentration of 20 mg/mL was most favourable as it most efficiently suppressed acrylamide formation while providing an acceptably high flavour yield in PSLF. In view of the high acrylamide content in PSLF, additional work is necessary to further reduce the amount of acrylamide by controlling the asparagine concentration in the precursor mixture.

  16. Reduction of Saltiness and Acrylamide Levels in Palm Sugar-Like Flavouring through Buffer Modification and the Addition of Calcium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Aida Wan Mustapha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO4 buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of the level found in original PSLF. A further decrease (~25% in the sodium content was achieved by removing monobasic sodium phosphate (NaH2PO4 from the buffer system. Meanwhile, the addition of CaCl2 at 20–40 mg/L reduced the acrylamide content in PSLF by as much as 58%. A CaCl2 concentration of 20 mg/mL was most favourable as it most efficiently suppressed acrylamide formation while providing an acceptably high flavour yield in PSLF. In view of the high acrylamide content in PSLF, additional work is necessary to further reduce the amount of acrylamide by controlling the asparagine concentration in the precursor mixture.

  17. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied...... of MR products, regardless the presence of reducing sugars and the cooking method.......The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied....... FES reduced cooking loss and increased water content in sous-vide samples. FES and cooking method showed a marked effect on browning development, both on the meat surface and within. FES led to tougher and chewier texture in sous-vide cooked lamb, and enhanced flavour scores of sous-vide samples more...

  18. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2 (FGE.21Rev2): Thiazoles, thiophene, thiazoline and thienyl derivatives from chemical group 29. Miscellaneous substances from chemical group 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 56 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Seven of the su......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 56 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 21, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. Seven...... of commerce have also been considered. For two substances are an identity test lacking and for one has the stereoisomeric composition to be specified....

  19. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 2 (FGE.06Rev2): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... and 4, Annex I of the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present Flavouring Group Evaluation deals with 48 straight- and branched-chain unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters. Eight of the 48 flavouring substances possess a chiral centre [FL-no: 02.170, 02.175, 05...... in the commercial flavouring material. Forty-six candidate substances are classified into structural class I. The remaining two substances [FL-no: 05.143 and 09.884] are classified into structural class II. Thirty-eight of the flavouring substances in the present group have been reported to occur naturally...

  20. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); ScientificOpinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 205, (FGE.205): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 13 α,β-unsaturated aliphatic ketones with terminal double bonds and precursors from chemical subgroup 1.2.2 of FGE.19 by EFSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 205, the additional data on genotoxicity submitted by the Industry on two representative substances, oct-1-en-3-one [FL...... with a steep toxicity curve, and with a very narrow concentration range resulting in mutagenicity. Both substances were also tested in mammalian cells for gene mutations at the hprt locus and for structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in the micronucleus assay. Also in mammalian cells the test...... substances were highly cytotoxic. The Panel considered that the positive effects in the bacterial mutagenicity assays of the two representative substances cannot be overruled by the one negative and one equivocal gene mutation test in mammalian cells and the Panel recommend that an in vivo Comet assay...

  1. Flavour violation in general supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chankowski, P H; Pokorski, Stefan; Chankowski, Piotr H.; Lebedev, Oleg; Pokorski, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    We reappraise the flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) problem in string--derived supergravity models. We overview and classify possible sources of flavour violation and find that the problem often does not arise in classes of models which generate hierarchical Yukawa matrices. In such models, constraints from the K- and D-meson systems leave room for substantial flavour non-universality of the soft terms. The current B-physics experiments only begin to probe its natural range. Correlations among different observables can allow one to read off the chirality structure of flavour violating sources. We briefly discuss the lepton sector where the problem of FCNC is indeed serious and perhaps points at an additional symmetry or flavour universality.

  2. Processing of bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix using natural smoke flavouring as coadjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Augusto Gonçalves

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix constitutes the main fishing resource in Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil coast in the autumn, winter and spring months. Considering that this fish is highly perishable, to have its shelf life increased an adequate treatment and processing are needed as soon as its capture occurs. Its use in the elaboration of a smoked product can represent considerable economic growth, if compared to its current "in natura" or frozen commercialization. A bluefish base smoked product was elaborated using natural smoke flavouring (known commercially as liquid smoke defining the adjusted technological characteristics during the processing. The best form of liquid smoke application (immersion or sprinkling was chosen sensorially by hedonic scale. The sprinkling of liquid smoke in the concentration of 20% on unskinned bluefish fillets showed better acceptance in the sensorial evaluation. A daily 49.5ºC pay-drying of 45 minutes before the liquid smoke application favored its larger penetration in the bluefish muscle. The thermal treatment used (52.8ºC for 45 minutes; 67ºC for 45 minutes and 80.8ºC for two and a half hours was enough to get a product with good sensorial acceptance. The final yield of the used processing was of 39.58%, similar with the yield shown by other authors of other commercial species. The product must be kept under freezing temperature.A anchova constitui o principal recurso pesqueiro na costa do Rio Grande do Sul nos meses de outono, inverno e primavera. Conside-rando que este pescado é altamente perecível, para poder prolongar sua vida-de-prateleira necessita-se de um tratamento e processamento adequados tão logo ocorra sua captura. Sua utilização na elaboração de um produto defumado pode representar um crescimento econômico considerável, se comparado com sua atual comercialização na forma "in natura" ou congelada. Foi elaborado um produto defumado à base de anchova utilizando aroma natural de fuma

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 301 (FGE.301): A sulphur substituted pyrimidin-derivative and its hydrochloride salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate two flavouring substances, 4-amino-5,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2(1H)-one [FL-no: 16.116] and 4-amino-5,6-dimethylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2(1H...... on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that the two substances [FL-no: 16.116 and 16.120] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis...

  4. Flavour-active wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordente, Antonio G; Curtin, Christopher D; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2012-11-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can influence wine style. This review explores recent progress towards understanding the range of 'flavour phenotypes' that wine yeast exhibit, and how this knowledge has been used to develop novel flavour-active yeasts. In addition, emerging opportunities to augment these phenotypes by engineering yeast to produce so-called grape varietal compounds, such as monoterpenoids, will be discussed.

  5. Odour and flavour thresholds of gasoline additives (MTBE, ETBE and TAME) and their occurrence in Dutch drinking water collection areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wezel, A.; Puijker, L.; Vink, C.; Versteegh, A.; de Voogt, P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of ETBE (ethyl-tert-butylether) as gasoline additive has recently grown rapidly. Contamination of aquatic systems is well documented for MTBE (methyl-tert-butylether), but less for other gasoline additives. Due to their mobility they may easily reach drinking water collection areas. Odour

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 11, Revision 2 (FGE.11Rev2): Aliphatic dialcohols, diketones, and hydroxyketones from chemical groups 8 and 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Scientific Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) was asked to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs in the Member States. In particular...... is a tertiary alcohol) [FL-no: 07.097, 07.165 and 07.184] all belonging to chemical groups 8 and 10. One of the 12 candidate substances possesses four chiral centres [FL-no: 06.134] two possesses two chiral centres [FL-no: 02.133 and 07.168] and four substances possesses one chiral centre [FL-no: 07.097, 07...... the annual production values were reported to be small. In consequence, the Panel had reservations about the data on use and use levels provided and the intake estimates obtained by the MSDI approach. In the absence of more precise information that would enable the Panel to make a more realistic estimate...

  7. Production of Japanese soy-sauce flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der C.

    2001-01-01

    The salt-tolerant yeasts Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis are important for the formation of flavour in Japanese soy-sauce processes. In these processes Z. rouxii produces the flavour components ethanol, higher

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, Revision 3 (FGE.20Rev3): Benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, a related acetal, benzoic acids, and related esters from chemical groups 23 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider in this revision 3 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 20, the SCF Opinion on benzoic acid. Furthermore information on stereoisomeric composition for two...... substances [FL-no: 06.104 and 09.570] and new information to support the re-allocation of the structural class for the candidate substance piperonyl alcohol [FL-no: 02.205] has been submitted. The 41 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 20 were evaluated using the Procedure in Commission...... Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 30, Revision 1 (FGE.30Rev1): 4-Prop-1-enylphenol and 2-methoxy-4-(prop- 1enyl)phenyl 3-methylbutyrate from chemical group 17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate two flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 30, Revision 1, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None...... of the substances were considered to have genotoxic potential. The two substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel...... concluded that the two substances [FL-no: 04.097, 09.894] do not give rise to safety concerns at their levels of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been...

  10. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 217, Revision 1 (FGE.217Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.1 of FGE.19: Lactones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 12 flavouring substances from subgroup 4.1 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 217 (FGE.217). In FGE.217, 6-methylcouma......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 12 flavouring substances from subgroup 4.1 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 217 (FGE.217). In FGE.217, 6...... that 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.023] does not give rise to concern with respect to genotoxicity and can accordingly, together with the structurally related substance, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.030] for which it is a representative, be evaluated using...... the Procedure. For 3,4-dimethyl-5-pentylidenefuran-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.042] and furan-2(5H)-one [FL-no: 10.066] the concern for genotoxicity could not be ruled out and a combined micronucleus and Comet assay is requested for these two substances, covering the remaining seven substances [FL-no: 10.034, 10...

  11. Flavoured co-annihilation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    annihilating part- ners of the neutralino is the lightest stau, ˜τ1. In the presence of flavour violation in the right-handed sector, the co-annihilating partner would be a flavour mixed state. The flavour effect is two-fold: (a) It changes the ...

  12. Flavour mixings in flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmuller, Wilfried; Schweizer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    A multiplicity of quark-lepton families can naturally arise as zero-modes in flux compactifications. The flavour structure of quark and lepton mass matrices is then determined by the wave function profiles of the zero-modes. We consider a supersymmetric SO(10) x U(1) model in six dimensions compactified on the orbifold T 2 =Z 2 with Abelian magnetic flux. A bulk 16-plet charged under the U(1) provides the quark-lepton generations whereas two uncharged 10-plets yield two Higgs doublets. Bulk anomaly cancellation requires the presence of additional 16- and 10-plets. The corresponding zero-modes form vectorlike split multiplets that are needed to obtain a successful flavour phenomenology. We analyze the pattern of flavour mixings for the two heaviest families of the Standard Model and discuss possible generalizations to three and more generations.

  13. Heavy Higgs searches: flavour matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Juste, Aurelio; Paul, Ayan

    2018-01-01

    We point out that the stringent lower bounds on the masses of additional electrically neutral and charged Higgs bosons crucially depend on the flavour structure of their Yukawa interactions. We show that these bounds can easily be evaded by the introduction of flavour-changing neutral currents in the Higgs sector. As an illustration, we study the phenomenology of a two Higgs doublet model with a Yukawa texture singling out the third family of quarks and leptons. We combine constraints from low-energy flavour physics measurements, LHC measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson rates, and LHC searches for new heavy Higgs bosons. We propose novel LHC searches that could be performed in the coming years to unravel the existence of these new Higgs bosons.

  14. Heavy Higgs searches. Flavour matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, Stefania; Paul, Ayan

    2017-10-01

    We point out that the stringent lower bounds on the masses of additional electrically neutral and charged Higgs bosons crucially depend on the flavour structure of their Yukawa interactions. We show that these bounds can easily be evaded by the introduction of flavour-changing neutral currents in the Higgs sector. As an illustration, we study the phenomenology of a two Higgs doublet model with a Yukawa texture singling out the third family of quarks and leptons. We combine constraints from low-energy flavour physics measurements, LHC measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson rates, and LHC searches for new heavy Higgs bosons. We propose novel LHC searches that could be performed in the coming years to unravel the existence of these new Higgs bosons.

  15. Improvement in shelf life of minimally processed cilantro leaves through integration of kinetin pretreatment and packaging interventions: Studies on microbial population dynamics, biochemical characteristics and flavour retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitha, K; Shivashankara, K S; Sudhakar Rao, D V; Oberoi, Harinder Singh; Roy, T K; Bharathamma, H

    2017-04-15

    Effect of integrating optimized combination of pretreatment with packaging on shelf life of minimally processed cilantro leaves (MPCL) was appraised through analysis of their sensory attributes, biochemical characteristics, microbial population and flavour profile during storage. Minimally pretreated cilantro leaves pretreated with 50ppm kinetin and packed in 25μ polypropylene bags showed a shelf life of 21days. Optimized combination helped in efficiently maintaining sensory parameters, flavour profile, and retention of antioxidants in MPCL until 21days. Studies conducted on the effect of optimized combination on microbial population and flavour profile revealed that among different microorganisms, pectinolysers had a significant effect on spoilage of MPCL and their population of ⩽3.59logcfu/g was found to be acceptable. Principal component analysis of headspace volatiles revealed that (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-hexadecenal, (E)-2-tetradecenal & (E)-2-tetradecen-1-ol in stored samples clustered with fresh samples and therefore, could be considered as freshness indicators for MPCL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Processing of bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix using natural smoke flavouring as coadjuvant

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves,Alex Augusto; Prentice-Hernández,Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) constitutes the main fishing resource in Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) coast in the autumn, winter and spring months. Considering that this fish is highly perishable, to have its shelf life increased an adequate treatment and processing are needed as soon as its capture occurs. Its use in the elaboration of a smoked product can represent considerable economic growth, if compared to its current "in natura" or frozen commercialization. A bluefish base smoked prod...

  17. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 76, Revision 1 (FGE.76Rev1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present opinion concerns a group of 26 sulphur-containing heterocyclic compounds evaluated by the JECFA at the 59th meeting in 2008. This revision is made due to the inclusion of one additional substance, 5-methyl-2...

  18. Discrete flavour groups, θ 13 and lepton flavour violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, Guido; Feruglio, Ferruccio; Merlo, Luca; Stamou, Emmanuel

    2012-08-01

    Discrete flavour groups have been studied in connection with special patterns of neutrino mixing suggested by the data, such as Tri-Bimaximal mixing (groups A 4, S 4…) or Bi-Maximal mixing (group S 4…) etc. We review the predictions for sin θ 13 in a number of these models and confront them with the experimental measurements. We compare the performances of the different classes of models in this respect. We then consider, in a supersymmetric framework, the important implications of these flavour symmetries on lepton flavour violating processes, like μ → eγ and similar processes. We discuss how the existing limits constrain these models, once their parameters are adjusted so as to optimize the agreement with the measured values of the mixing angles. In the simplified CMSSM context, adopted here just for indicative purposes, the small tan β range and heavy SUSY mass scales are favoured by lepton flavour violating processes, which makes it even more difficult to reproduce the reported muon g - 2 discrepancy.

  19. Discrete Flavour Groups, \\theta_13 and Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Merlo, Luca; Stamou, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Discrete flavour groups have been studied in connection with special patterns of neutrino mixing suggested by the data, such as Tri-Bimaximal mixing (groups A4, S4...) or Bi-Maximal mixing (group S4...) etc. We review the predictions for sin(\\theta_13) in a number of these models and confront them with the experimental measurements. We compare the performances of the different classes of models in this respect. We then consider, in a supersymmetric framework, the important implications of these flavour symmetries on lepton flavour violating processes, like \\mu -> e gamma and similar processes. We discuss how the existing limits constrain these models, once their parameters are adjusted so as to optimize the agreement with the measured values of the mixing angles. In the simplified CMSSM context, adopted here just for indicative purposes, the small tan(beta) range and heavy SUSY mass scales are favoured by lepton flavour violating processes, which makes it even more difficult to reproduce the reported muon g-2...

  20. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh D. Jayasena

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for

  1. Sustainability Assessment of Additive Manufacturing Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lunetto, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes were developed in the 1980s to reduce the time for the realization of prototypes. Nowadays, AM processes are considered as real manufacturing techniques suitable to build end-use products. As for any new technology, research efforts aiming to process planning and optimization within a sustainable development framework are needed. In particular, the application of the sustainable manufacturing principles requires the creation of products that use processes...

  2. Flavour formation by lactic acid bacteria and biochemical flavour profiling of cheese products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Smit, B.A.; Engels, W.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Flavour development in dairy fermentations, most notably cheeses, results from a series of (bio)chemical processes in which the starter cultures provide the enzymes. Particularly the enzymatic degradation of proteins (caseins) leads to the formation of key-flavour components, which contribute to the

  3. EFSA CEF Penal (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2 (FGE.212Rev2): α,β-Unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 24 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2. The Panel concluded...... genotoxicity data from the Industry, the Panel concluded that the genotoxic potential could be ruled out for the 11 isophorone derivatives [FL-no: 02.083, 02.101, 07.035, 07.098, 07.126, 07.129, 07.172, 07.175, 07.196, 07.202 and 07.255] and the two vetiveryl derivatives [FL-no: 02.214 and 09.821] in FGE.212...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 1 (FGE.220Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... substances could not be evaluated through the Procedure. The Panel recognised that the studies which provided indications for germ cell genotoxicity were of limited validity. For this reason a robust GLP-controlled cytogenetic investigation in mouse spermatocytes according to the OECD guideline 483...

  5. Flavour Physics and Implication for New Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Isidori, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Flavour physics represents one of the most interesting and, at the same time, less understood sector of the Standard Theory. On the one hand, the peculiar pattern of quark and lepton masses, and their mixing angles, may be the clue to some new dynamics occurring at high-energy scales. On the other hand, the strong suppression of flavour-changing neutral-current processes, predicted by the Standard Theory and confirmed by experiments, represents a serious challenge to extend the Theory. This article reviews both these aspects of flavour physics from a theoretical perspective.

  6. Cern Academic Training programme 2011 - Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES   4, 5, 6 and 7 April 2011 Flavour Physics and CP Violation Dr. Yosef Nir (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel 11:00-12:00 - 4, 6 and 7 April - Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant 5 April - Bldg. 80-1-001 - Globe 1st Floor   The B-factories have led to significant progress in our understanding of CP violation and of flavour physics. Yet, two flavour puzzles remain. The standard model flavour puzzle is the question of why there is smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters. The new physics flavour puzzle is the question of why TeV-scale new physics was not signalled in flavour changing neutral current processes. The high pT experiments, ATLAS and CMS, are likely to shed light on these puzzles. As concerns CP violation, the LHC will lead to progress on the puzzle of the baryon asymmetry as well.  

  7. Flavour-flavour learning occurs automatically and only in hungry participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Fletcher, Hollie Z

    2008-01-28

    A novel flavour may become liked if it is presented repeatedly and in combination with a second flavour that is already liked. Conceptually, this 'flavour-flavour learning' is important, because it can account for many of our everyday food and flavour preferences. However, relatively little is known about the underlying process because learning paradigms have lacked reliability. Based on previous research we explored whether learning is determined by three variables; i) hunger state, ii) demand and contingency awareness, and iii) dietary restraint. Participants (male n=15/female n=15) consumed three different and novel-tasting fruit teas. One of the teas had a non-caloric sweetener added (CS+) and two were unsweetened (CS-). Before and after this training the participants ranked their preference for unsweetened versions of the three teas. We found that the training increased preference for the CS+ relative to the CS- teas. However, this effect was only found in hungry participants. We also found little evidence that learning was related to whether the participants could identify (recognition test) the specific tea that had been sweetened during training, suggesting that the underlying process is automatic and it operates outside conscious awareness. Learning was not predicted by dietary restraint (measured using the DEBQ-R scale). Together, these findings provide further evidence for a linkage between flavour-flavour learning and flavour-nutrient learning.

  8. Improvements in the Flavour of Soy Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of biochemical and technological similarities and dissimilarities between soy cheese and Cheddar cheese is presented to provide guidelines for the improvements in the flavour of soy cheese. Processing technology as well as the final product of soy cheese have many similarities with Cheddar in terms of appearance, texture, mouth feel, chemical nature, biochemical processes, etc. Soy protein has many useful amino acids like Asp, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Trp, Tyr, Val, etc., which are precursors of flavouring compounds and the right choice of microbial cultures is necessary to benefit from them. Using low levels of sodium chloride, without the use of ethanol, and introducing new milk cheese starter and non-starter cultures like Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (formerly L. lactis ssp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus lactis var. maltigenes and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris that enhance flavour will be helpful to improve the flavour of soy cheese.

  9. Flavour alignment in physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuninger, Carolin Barbara

    2012-11-21

    extension of the Standard Model where a second Higgs doublet is added. In such models, there are two Yukawa matrices for each fermion type. Going to the mass basis, one of them is diagonalized and together with the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs forms the mass matrix of the quarks. The other Yukawa matrix however is not diagonal. It couples two quarks and one of the mass eigenstates of the two Higgs doublets. Flavour violating processes can thus occur via the exchange of a neutral scalar. If the two Yukawa matrices were aligned for some reason this would not happen. However, the alignment can only be imposed at one energy scale and will be spoiled when evolving the couplings down to a lower scale. It is shown that in spite of this effect, alignment of the Yukawa couplings provides sufficient protection from flavour changing neutral currents to be in agreement with present experimental bounds. Another, more ambitious, extension of the Standard Model are warped extra dimensions. In these models spacetime consists of a slice of five-dimensional Anti-de Sitter space (the ''bulk'') sandwiched in between two flat four-dimensional boundaries (the ''branes''). The Higgs is assumed to live on one of the branes while all other particles are allowed to spread into the bulk. Particles that propagate in the bulk have a ''KK tower'' of heavier particles associated with them in the effective four-dimensional theory. In the bulk fermions have a vector-like mass term in addition to their Yukawa couplings to the Higgs. Via different localizations of the quarks' wave functions in the bulk, the huge differences in their masses can be explained. However, since the wave function profiles of the quarks are non-universal for the different flavours, so are the couplings to the KK excitations of gauge bosons. Rotating to the mass basis therefore introduces off-diagonal elements in these couplings and thus flavour changing

  10. Flavour Tagging at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Grabalosa Gandara, M

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the most possible accurate knowledge of the flavour at production of the reconstructed B meson is required. This poster summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. We use same side an opposite side algorithms to establish wheter the meson contained a b or a b\\bar quark. The final decision is obtained through a combination of several methods. The use of control channels, decays to a flavour specific final state, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction \\omega (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as input for the determination of CKM unitary triangle angles.

  11. Cerus process modified with glass addition (Vitrocerus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboleda, P.A.; Rodriguez, D.S.; Prado, M.O.

    2009-01-01

    A processing method for spent fuels type Mtr from research reactors has developed in Nuclear Materials Division of Bariloche Atomic Center, this process involved the creation of ceramic matrix containing fuel and natural uranium in an isotopic solution, this project has named CERUS (Spanish acronym of 'Ceramización de Elementos Radioactivos en Uranio Sinterizado': Ceramming of radioactive elements with sintered uranium ). This process works with reduced volumes than a conventional vitrification, however because of some issues on the material resistance; we propose the addition of small amounts of glass with the idea to enhance the lixiviation properties of the final material. In this process is not considered the reprocessing possibility of the spent fuel. (author)

  12. Heavy Flavour Production

    CERN Document Server

    Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1995-01-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour production in QCD. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results for top and bottom production are given. Selected topics in charm production are also discussed.

  13. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  14. Correlations between high-p(T) and flavour physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hurth, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Squark and gluino decays are governed by the same mixing matrices as the contributions to flavour violating loop transitions of B-mesons. This allows for possible direct correlations between flavour non-diagonal observables in B and high-p_T physics. The present bounds on squark mixing, induced by the low-energy data on b to s transitions, still allow for large contributions to flavour violating squark decays at tree level. Due to the restrictions in flavour tagging at the LHC, additional information from future flavour experiments will be necessary to interpret those LHC data properly. Also the measurement of correlations between various squark decay modes at a future ILC would provide information about the flavour violating parameters.

  15. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 313, (FGE.313): α,β-unsaturated 3(2H)-furanone derivatives from chemical group 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    .175] in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 313 (FGE.313), using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The substances were considered in FGE.220, and revisions hereof, not to have genotoxic potential. They were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on the structure......–activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel concluded that the two flavouring substances [FL-no: 13.117, 13.119] do not give rise to safety concerns at their level of dietary intake, estimated on the basis of the Maximised...... the Modified Theoretical Added Maximum Daily Intakes (mTAMDIs) are above the thresholds for their structural class, more reliable exposure data are required for a re-evaluation....

  16. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 66, Revision 1 (FGE.66Rev1): Consideration of Furfuryl Alcohol and Related Flavouring Substances Evaluated by JECFA (55th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 14 flavouring substances in the Revision 1 of Flavouring Group Evaluation 66, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the s...

  17. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 2 (FGE.23Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... ether, three are alicyclic hydrocarbons with an ether side chain, two are ethers containing a benzene moiety, eight are phenol ethers and one is a naphthol ether. Five of the 19 candidate substances possess one or more chiral centres and three can exist as geometrical isomers. For one substance [FL...... by the Industry, especially in those cases where the annual production values were reported to be small. In consequence, the Panel had reservations about the data on use and use levels provided and the intake estimates obtained by the MSDI approach. In the absence of more precise information that would enable...

  18. Overview of existing European food consumption databases: critical aspects in relation to their use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Donne, Cinzia; Piccinelli, Raffaela; Sette, Stefania; Leclercq, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    A critical analysis of existing food consumption databases was performed with particular regard for their current and potential use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials. Within the European Food Consumption Validation project (EFCOVAL), a questionnaire on critical aspects of such datasets was developed and administered to researchers responsible for the collection/analysis of national food consumption data in European countries. Information collected was complemented through a review of the literature and of grey publications in order to provide an inventory of the main food consumption surveys performed in Europe from 1994 to 2007, for a total of 23 countries and 37 surveys. It appeared that existing European food consumption surveys have as a main objective the assessment of nutrient intake in the population. On the other hand, most of the databases were shown to be used also for the purpose of dietary exposure assessment.

  19. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 59, Revision 1 (FGE.59Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic and aromatic ethers evaluated by JECFA (61st meeting and 63rd meeting) structurally related to aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.23 Rev2 (2010)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further......, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for two substances, are information on the composition...

  20. Charged-lepton flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This write-up on a talk at the 2011 Lepton–Photon symposium in Mumbai, India, summarizes recent results in the charged-lepton flavour sector. Searches for charged-lepton flavour violation, lepton electric dipole moments and flavour-conserving CP violation are reviewed here. Recent progress in -lepton physics ...

  1. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC'workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays'and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  2. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC' workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays' and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  3. New trends in beer flavour compound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Iglesias, Cristina; Montero, Olimpio; Sancho, Daniel; Blanco, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    As the beer market is steadily expanding, it is important for the brewing industry to offer consumers a product with the best organoleptic characteristics, flavour being one of the key characteristics of beer. New trends in instrumental methods of beer flavour analysis are described. In addition to successfully applied methods in beer analysis such as chromatography, spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry or electronic nose and tongue techniques, among others, sample extraction and preparation such as derivatization or microextraction methods are also reviewed. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Linear flavour violation and anomalies in B physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripaios, Ben [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge,J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Nardecchia, Marco [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge,J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); DAMTP, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Renner, Sophie [DAMTP, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-14

    We propose renormalizable models of new physics that can explain various anomalies observed in decays of B-mesons to electron and muon pairs. The new physics states couple to linear combinations of Standard Model fermions, yielding a pattern of flavour violation that gives a consistent fit to the gamut of flavour data. Accidental symmetries prevent contributions to baryon- and lepton-number-violating processes, as well as enforcing a loop suppression of new physics contributions to flavour violating processes. Data require that the new flavour-breaking couplings are largely aligned with the Yukawa couplings of the SM and so we also explore patterns of flavour symmetry breaking giving rise to this structure.

  5. Alcohol-flavoured tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackler, Robert K; VanWinkle, Callie K; Bumanlag, Isabela M; Ramamurthi, Divya

    2018-05-01

    In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned characterising flavours in cigarettes (except for menthol) due to their appeal to teen starter smokers. In August 2016, the agency deemed all tobacco products to be under its authority and a more comprehensive flavour ban is under consideration. To determine the scope and scale of alcohol-flavoured tobacco products among cigars & cigarillos, hookahs and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Alcohol-flavoured tobacco products were identified by online search of tobacco purveyors' product lines and via Google search cross-referencing the various tobacco product types versus a list of alcoholic beverage flavours (eg, wine, beer, appletini, margarita). 48 types of alcohol-flavoured tobacco products marketed by 409 tobacco brands were identified. Alcohol flavours included mixed drinks (n=25), spirits (11), liqueurs (7) and wine/beer (5). Sweet and fruity tropical mixed drink flavours were marketed by the most brands: piña colada (96), mojito (66) and margarita (50). Wine flavours were common with 104 brands. Among the tobacco product categories, brands offering alcohol-flavoured e-cigarettes (280) were most numerous, but alcohol-flavoured products were also marketed by cigars & cigarillos (88) and hookah brands (41). Brands by major tobacco companies (eg, Philip Morris, Imperial Tobacco) were well represented among alcohol-flavoured cigars & cigarillos with five companies offering a total of 17 brands. The widespread availability of alcohol-flavoured tobacco products illustrates the need to regulate characterising flavours on all tobacco products. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Flavon-induced lepton flavour violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keus, Venus

    2017-07-01

    ATLAS and CMS have observed a flavor violating decay of the Higgs to muon and tau. The fact that flavour violating couplings of the Higgs boson are exactly zero in the Standard Model suggests the mixing of the Higgs with another scalar with flavour violating couplings. We use the flavon field from the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism, responsible for generating the lepton Yukawa matrices, for this purpose. The parameter space is constrained from experimental bounds on charged lepton flavor violation in other processes, however, we show that a substantial region of parameter space survives these bounds while producing a large enough Br(h → μτ).

  7. Future flavour physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The current status of flavour physics and the prospects for present and future experiments will be reviewed. Measurements in B‐physics, in which sensitive probes of new physics are the CKM angle γ, the Bs mixing phase ϕs, and the branching ratios of the rare decays B(s)0→μ+μ− , will be highlighted. Topics in charm and kaon physics, in which the measurements of ACP and the branching ratios of the rare decays K→πνν¯ are key measurements, will be discussed. Finally the complementarity of the future heavy flavour experiments, the LHCb upgrade and Belle‐II, will be summarised. PMID:26877543

  8. Sending more process data without additional cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licht, H.; Roiha, R.; Rodych, M.

    1997-01-01

    The as-built data transmission capability in CANDU plants is fully employed. Long delays and high cost make it often not feasible to retrofit plant equipment with additional sensors and bring the data to the office. One of the reasons is the unavoidable addition of data transmission cables. This presentation describes the results of work performed in 1996/97 to network sensors using existing plant infrastructure. To provide an alternative solution, a general purpose data transmission system is being developed. It sends data over existing plant infrastructure such as power wiring and the telephone system. Its components are based on PC technology packaged in a 'black box', using special hardware and software to appear to the user as a very simple, low cost, device. Its drawback is its rather limited transmission speed. This design is in marked contrast to the complexity of present commercial data transmission systems. A point-to-point system has been demonstrated. A networked system is under development. (author)

  9. [About flavouring substances and flavouring preparations regulation in the field of manufacturing of flavourings and foodstuffs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantseva, O V; Shatrov, G N

    2013-01-01

    In article are given substantiation for modification of contemporary list of biologically active substances with undesirable toxicological qualities (namely included in this list of menthofuran, methyleugenol (4-Allyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene), teucrin A, capsaicin, estragol1 (-Allyl-4-methoxybenzene) and excluded from the list of quinine, santonin, berberin) and developing the list of plants--natural sources of flavourings substances. The new criteria of European Union for including into the relevant for using in/on foodstuff list of flavouring substances, which was published in the Comission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 872/2012 concerning flavourings, listed the 11 flavouring substances for which have been established indexes of foodstuffs in manufacturing, which there are could using and criteria of their safety (caffeine, theobromine, neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, rebaudioside A, d-camphor, three quinine salts (FL 14.011, FL 14.152 and FL 14.155), glycyrrhizic acid and its ammoniated form, ammonium chloride, discussed the possibility of using R- and S-isomers of flavouring substances and L- and D-forms of aminoacids for preparing of flavours, are discussed. Improving of the system of safety using of flavourings in Russian Federation, harmonized with demands of European Union and FAQ/WHO, are, at first, connected with the necessity of reevaluation of the list flavouring substances, which could be use in/on foodstuff, developing of list of the plants--natural sources of flavourings substances and preparations and regulations of using flavourings preparations which can include biologically active substances.

  10. Flavour tagging performance in LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabalosa Gandara, Marc

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the best possible determination of the flavour of the B-meson is necessary. This report summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. The flavour tagging is obtained through a combination of several methods, based on different signatures. The use of control channels, which are decays to flavour-specific final states, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction ω (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as an input for the determination of CKM unitarity triangle angles.

  11. Two approaches towards the flavour puzzle. Dynamical minimal flavour violation and warped extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Michaela E.

    2010-08-16

    The minimal-flavour-violating (MFV) hypothesis considers the Standard Model (SM) Yukawa matrices as the only source of flavour violation. In this work, we promote their entries to dynamical scalar spurion fields, using an effective field theory approach, such that the maximal flavour symmetry (FS) of the SM gauge sector is formally restored at high energy scales. The non-vanishing vacuum expectation values of the spurions induce a sequence of FS breaking and generate the observed hierarchy in the SM quark masses and mixings. The fact that there exists no explanation for it in the SM is known as the flavour puzzle. Gauging the non-abelian subgroup of the spontaneously broken FS, we interpret the associated Goldstone bosons as the longitudinal degrees of freedom of the corresponding massive gauge bosons. Integrating out the heavy Higgs modes in the Yukawa spurions leads directly to flavour-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) at tree level. The coefficients of the effective four-quark operators, resulting from the exchange of heavy flavoured gauge bosons, strictly follow the MFV principle. On the other hand, the Goldstone bosons associated with the global abelian symmetry group behave as weakly coupled axions which can be used to solve the strong CP problem within a modified Peccei-Quinn formalism. Models with a warped fifth dimension contain five-dimensional (5D) fermion bulk mass matrices in addition to their 5D Yukawa matrices, which thus represent an additional source of flavour violation beyond MFV. They can address the flavour puzzle since their eigenvalues allow for a different localisation of the fermion zero mode profiles along the extra dimension which leads to a hierarchy in the effective four-dimensional (4D) Yukawa matrices. At the same time, the fermion splitting introduces non-universal fermion couplings to Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge boson modes, inducing tree-level FCNCs. Within a Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection (RSc model) we carefully work

  12. Flavour Tagging with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems require knowledge of the b quark production flavour. This identification is performed by the Flavour Tagging.

  13. Further developments in the Flavour Les Houches Accord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, F.; Heinemeyer, S.; Arbey, A.; Bharucha, A.; Goto, T.; Haisch, U.; Kraml, S.; Muhlleitner, M.; Reuter, J.; Slavich, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Flavour Les Houches Accord (FLHA) specifies a standard set of conventions for flavour-related parameters and observables such as Wilson coefficients, form factors, decay tables, etc, using the generic SUSY Les Houches Accord (SLHA) file structure. The accord provides a model-independent interface between codes evaluating and/or using flavour related observables. We present here a few clarifications and improvements to the accord. In addition, we provide instructions for a new block concerning the electric and magnetic dipole moments. (authors)

  14. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio, E-mail: feruglio@pd.infn.it; Paradisi, Paride, E-mail: paride.paradisi@pd.infn.it [Sezione di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ‘G. Galilei’, INFN, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea, E-mail: pattori@physik.uzh.ch [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, 8057, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-08

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ→e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis.

  15. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' G. Galilei' , Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ → e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis. (orig.) 7.

  16. DESY: Theory with flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckl, R.

    1989-01-01

    Last year, the annual Theory Workshop at the German DESY Laboratory in Hamburg had 'Flavour Physics' as its main theme. The sighting by the UA1 experiment at CERN's proton-antiproton collider and by the ARGUS team at DESY of 'oscillations' in the electrically neutral B mesons carrying the beauty quantum number, and the measurement at CERN of a new parameter in the delicate violation of combined particle-antiparticle and left-right symraetry (CP) in the decays of neutral kaons have made this subject particularly topical

  17. Value addition and processed products of three indigenous fruits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The products made in this study were shown to be viable, of good quality and good sources of income for rural communities. The fruit flavour from marula and monkey orange can be utilized in the dairy and other soft drink industries for making yoghurts, sour milk, ice cream, juices and jams. Key words: Indigenous fruits, ...

  18. Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-06-27

    An introductory overview of the Standard Model description of flavour is presented. The main emphasis is put on present tests of the quark-mixing matrix structure and the phenomenological determination of its parameters. Special attention is given to the experimental evidences of CP violation and their important role in our understanding of flavour dynamics.

  19. Process chain modeling and selection in an additive manufacturing context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Stolfi, Alessandro; Mischkot, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new two-dimensional approach to modeling manufacturing process chains. This approach is used to consider the role of additive manufacturing technologies in process chains for a part with micro scale features and no internal geometry. It is shown that additive manufacturing...... evolving fields like additive manufacturing....

  20. Unoriented quivers with flavour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Massimo; Inverso, Gianluca; Morales, Jose Francisco [I.N.F.N. Sezione di Roma “TorVergata” andDipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “TorVergata”,Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Pacifici, Daniel Ricci [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova andI.N.F.N. Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padova (Italy)

    2014-01-23

    We discuss unoriented quivers with flavour that arise from D3-branes at local orbifold singularities, in the presence of Ω-planes and non-compact D7-branes. We produce a wide class of unoriented quiver gauge theories, including new instances of N=1 superconformal theories. We then consider unoriented D-brane instanton corrections of both ‘gauge’ and ‘exotic’ kinds. In particular, we show that conformal symmetry can be dynamically broken via the generation of exotic superpotentials. Finally we discuss aspects of the recently proposed N=1 remnant of N=4 S-duality. We identify new candidate dual pairs for the ℂ{sup 3}/ℤ{sub n} series of unoriented quiver gauge theories with n odd.

  1. Flavour physics at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeva B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some selected results of the LHCb experiment, running at the LHC with ppcollisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV, are reported here, after operation with a total integratedluminosity of 3.0 fb−1 (Run 1. We focus on the most recent analyses on flavour physics,that include measurements of the CKM invariant phases γ and β, precision determination of the quark coupling strength Vub, observation of the very rare decays B0(s→μ+μ−, search for new physics in the anomalous branching ratio of B→D*τv̄, and precision angular analysis of the rare decays B0→K*0μ+μ− and B0s→ϕμ+μ−. Detailed comparisons are performed in all cases with the predictions of the Standard Model, and a fewinteresting tensions are observed.

  2. Meat flavour in pork and beef - From animal to meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaslyng, Margit D; Meinert, Lene

    2017-10-01

    An intense meat flavour is greatly appreciated by consumers. Meat flavour is generated during the cooking process through a complex series of chemical reactions between precursors, intermediate reaction products and degradation products. The content and nature of the precursors present in the meat are affected by several factors including genetics, feed, handling of the live animals and subsequent handling of the meat. The fatty acid composition can easily be altered though feeding, especially in monogastric animals, while the carbohydrate content is more closely related to genetics (pigs), feeding in the last days before slaughter and handling at slaughter (both ante and post mortem). Ageing of the meat is not particularly important for the flavour, unless the meat is dry-aged. In comparison, cooking is crucial for the development of flavour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Traffic generated by a semi-Markov additive process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Blom (Joke); M.R.H. Mandjes (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe consider a semi-Markov additive process $A(\\cdot)$, i.e., a Markov additive process for which the sojourn times in the various states have general (rather than exponential) distributions. Letting the L\\'evy processes $X_i(\\cdot)$, which describe the evolution of $A(\\cdot)$ while

  4. Flavour physics: status and prospects

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The flavour physics sector provides accurate measurements of Standard Model (SM) parameters and probes the existence of new particles at energy scales well beyond the reach of direct detection. In the light of the Tevatron and B-factories legacy, as well as the LHC run I data, I will review what flavour physics tells us today about the SM and about possible physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). I will then present the progress anticipated from the LHC run II, as well as from NA62 and Belle II, before discussing the experimental challenges that we need to overcome in order to produce precise flavour measurements in high luminosity environments, such as those to be faced at the LHC Run III and at the HL-LHC. I will conclude by discussing how future flavour measurements will guide direct searches for BSM physics, whether deviations from the SM picture are observed or not.

  5. Flavoured Dark Matter moving left

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Das, Satrajit; Kast, Simon

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of a simplified model of flavoured Dark Matter (DM), with a dark fermionic flavour triplet coupling to the left-handed SU(2) L quark doublets via a scalar mediator. The DM-quark coupling matrix is assumed to constitute the only new source of flavour and CP violation, following the hypothesis of Dark Minimal Flavour Violation. We analyse the constraints from LHC searches, from meson mixing data in the K, D, and B d,s meson systems, from thermal DM freeze-out, and from direct detection experiments. Our combined analysis shows that while the experimental constraints are similar to the DMFV models with DM coupling to right-handed quarks, the multitude of couplings between DM and the SM quark sector resulting from the SU(2) L structure implies a richer phenomenology and significantly alters the resulting impact on the viable parameter space.

  6. Flavour Physics in the LHC Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, A.

    2011-01-01

    This decade will allow to improve the resolution of the short distance scales by at least an order of magnitude, extending the picture of fundamental physics down to scales 5 x 10 -20 with the help of the LHC. Further resolution down to scales as short as 10 -21 should be possible with the help of high precision experiments in which flavour violating processes will play a prominent role. Will this increase in resolution allow us to see new particles (new animalcula) similarly to what Antoni van Leeuvenhoek saw by discovering bacteria in 1676? The basic question for particle physics is how these new animalcula will look like and which difficulties of the Standard Model (SM) they will help us to solve and which new puzzles and problems they will bring with them. I will describe what role flavour physics will play in these exciting times provided this new world is animalculated. (author)

  7. The role of smell, taste, flavour and texture cues in the identification of vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stokkom, V L; Blok, A E; van Kooten, O; de Graaf, C; Stieger, M

    2018-02-01

    It has been shown that the identification of many foods including vegetables based on flavour cues is often difficult. The effect of providing texture cues in addition to flavour cues on the identification of foods and the effect of providing taste cues only on the identification of foods have not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the role of smell, taste, flavour and texture cues in the identification of ten vegetables commonly consumed in The Netherlands (broccoli, cauliflower, French bean, leek, bell pepper, carrot, cucumber, iceberg lettuce, onion and tomato). Subjects (n = 194) were randomly assigned to one of four test conditions which differed in the sensory cues available for vegetable identification: taste, smell (orthonasal), flavour (taste and smell) and flavour-texture (taste, smell and texture). Blindfolded subjects were asked to identify the vegetable from a list of 24 vegetables. Identification was the highest in the flavour-texture condition (87.5%). Identification was significantly lower in the flavour condition (62.8%). Identification was the lowest when only taste cues (38.3%) or only smell cues (39.4%) were provided. For four raw vegetables (carrot, cucumber, onion and tomato) providing texture cues in addition to flavour cues did not significantly change identification suggesting that flavour cues were sufficient to identify these vegetables. Identification frequency increased for all vegetables when perceived intensity of the smell, taste or flavour cue increased. We conclude that providing flavour cues (taste and smell) increases identification compared to only taste or only smell cues, combined flavour and texture cues are needed for the identification of many vegetables commonly consumed in The Netherlands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Topology Optimization for Reducing Additive Manufacturing Processing Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    surrogate models for the AM process. The goal was to minimize ther- mal distortions induced during the build process to generate more readily manufac...raymond.a.wildman.civ@mail.mil>. A method is presented for combining topology optimization with an approximate additive manufacturing process model so as to reduce...manufacturing processes these distortions may cause a build to completely fail. Here, 2 approximate manufacturing models are used in conjunction with a compliance

  9. In-Process Monitoring of Additive Manufacturing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this project is the implementation of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) for in situ metal additive manufacturing process...

  10. In-Process Monitoring of Additive Manufacturing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this project is the implementation of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) for in situ metal additive manufacturing process...

  11. Modelling of additive manufacturing processes: a review and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Panagiotis; Foteinopoulos, Panagis

    2018-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a very promising technology; however, there are a number of open issues related to the different AM processes. The literature on modelling the existing AM processes is reviewed and classified. A categorization of the different AM processes in process groups, according to the process mechanism, has been conducted and the most important issues are stated. Suggestions are made as to which approach is more appropriate according to the key performance indicator desired to be modelled and a discussion is included as to the way that future modelling work can better contribute to improving today's AM process understanding.

  12. Studies on mushroom flavours 2. Flavour compounds in coprinus comatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, F Y; Wikén, T O

    1976-01-01

    In an aqueous extract of fruit bodies of Coprinus comatus 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octanol, 2-methyl-2-penten-4-olide, 1-dodecanol and caprylic acid were identified conclusively and n-butyric and isobutyric acids preliminarily. Amino-acids, nucleotides and sugars were also determined. A mixture of 37 compounds found in the extract had a stronger flavour than the natural extract. 3-Octanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octanol and 2-methyl-2-penten-4-olide were the volatiles with the strongest flavour. Mass and IR spectra of 2-methyl-2-penten-4-olide are presented.

  13. Predictive Model for Environmental Assessment in Additive Manufacturing Process

    OpenAIRE

    Le Bourhis , Florent; Kerbrat , Olivier; Dembinski , Lucas; Hascoët , Jean-Yves; Mognol , Pascal

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Additive Manufacturing is an innovative way to produce parts. However its environmental impact is unknown. To ensure the development of additive manufacturing processes it seems important to develop the concept of DFSAM (Design for Sustainable Additive Manufacturing). In fact, one of the objectives of environmental sustainable manufacturing is to minimize the whole flux consumption (electricity, material and fluids) during manufacturing step. To achieve this goal, it i...

  14. The colour and flavour 1/N expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneziano, G.

    General ideas about the colour and flavour 1/N expansions are presented in a non-specialized fashion according to both: a unified approach to meson dynamics (the basic logical scheme, lepton-hadron interactions, hadronic processes in lowest order, higher order effects and the Reggeon calculus); and a possible extension to baryons (difficulties with baryons in dual and gauge theories, possible definition of dual baryons in quantum chromodynamics, lowest order B anti-B and BB scattering: baryonium, Reggeon calculus for processes involving baryons)

  15. The role of smell, taste, flavour and texture cues in the identification of vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkom, van V.L.; Blok, A.E.; Kooten, van O.; Graaf, de C.; Stieger, M.

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that the identification of many foods including vegetables based on flavour cues is often difficult. The effect of providing texture cues in addition to flavour cues on the identification of foods and the effect of providing taste cues only on the identification of foods have not

  16. Pathwise duals of monotone and additive Markov processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sturm, A.; Swart, Jan M.

    -, - (2018) ISSN 0894-9840 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/12/2613 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : pathwise duality * monotone Markov process * additive Markov process * interacting particle system Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.854, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/SI/swart-0465436.pdf

  17. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Janssen, Niels; Smith, Stefan; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with

  18. Flavour physics from extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Martinelli, G; Scrucca, C A; Silvestrini, L

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of introducing an SU(2) global flavour symmetry in the context of flat extra dimensions. In particular we concentrate on the 5-dimensional case and we study how to obtain the flavour structure of the Standard Model quark sector compacti(ying the fifth dimension on the orbifold St/Z2 a la Scberk-Scbwarz (SS). We show that in this case it is possible to justify the five orders of magnitude among the values of the quark masses with only one parameter: the SS flavour parameter. The non-local nature of the SS symmetry breaking mechanism allows to realize this without introducing new instabilities in the theory.

  19. Design of Test Parts to Characterize Micro Additive Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Mischkot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The minimum feature size and obtainable tolerances of additive manufacturing processes are linked to the smallest volumetric elements (voxels) that can be created. This work presents the iterative design of a test part to investigate the resolution of AM processes with voxel sizes at the micro...... scale. Each design iteration reduces the test part size, increases the number of test features, improves functionality, and decreases coupling in the part. The final design is a set of three test parts that are easy to orient and measure, and that provide useful information about micro additive...... manufacturing processes....

  20. Contribution of monophenols to beer flavour based on flavour thresholds, interactions and recombination experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterckx, Femke L; Missiaen, Jonas; Saison, Daan; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2011-06-15

    Although monophenols are known to contribute to the flavour of many foods and beverages, little is known about their influence on beer flavour. Therefore, the contribution of 11 monophenols to the overall beer flavour was studied by determining their flavour thresholds. Large differences in sensitivity were observed between individual tasters. Next, flavour interactions between monophenols were examined in nine binary mixtures, which showed that strong interactions like synergy and antagonism occur. Based on these results, the flavour contribution of the monophenols was estimated by calculating flavour units. These proved to be rather low for most of the studied monophenols. However, recombination experiments demonstrated that monophenols enriched beer flavour with spicy, smokey and vanilla flavour aspects. This showed how monophenols might influence overall flavour, even at sub-threshold concentrations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Flavour-active wine yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Christopher D.; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2012-01-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can infl...

  2. Heavy Flavour results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The available statistics of heavy flavoured particles collected in pp collisions at the LHC provides an excellent opportunity to test the standard model and probe for new physics effects. A review of selected recent studies on heavy flavours, including the angular analysis in B$^0$ $\\to$ K$^{*0}$$\\mu^+\\mu^-$, the measurements of B$^+$ hadron production cross section, as well as the quarkonium production cross sections, by the CMS experiment based on datasets collected during LHC Run I and Run II is presented.

  3. New Physics searches with Heavy Flavour observables at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, Umberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    New and recent results from the ATLAS programme of studies in electroweak physics with open beauty are presented. Flavour-Changing-Neutral-Current (FCNC) processes are sensitive to New Physics contributions, in particular through additional electroweak loop amplitudes. The angular analysis of the decay of $B_d \\to K^* \\mu \\mu$ for a number of angular coefficients are measured as a function of the invariant mass squared of the di-muon system for data collected by the ATLAS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV. A comparison is made to theoretical predictions, including for the observable $P^\\prime_5$, for which there has been recent tension between theory and experiments.

  4. Searches for new physics with heavy flavour at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Turchikhin, Semen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Flavour Changing Neutral Current processes are sensitive to New Physics contributions, in particular through additional electroweak loop amplitudes. The angular analysis of the decay of $B^0\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-K^{*0}$ is presented. A number of angular coefficients are measured as a function of the invariant mass squared of the dimuon system for data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$~TeV. Comparison is made to theoretical predictions, including for the observable $P_5^\\prime$, for which there has been recent tension between theory and experiment. ATLAS result on the study of the $B^0_{(s)}\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ rare decays is also presented.

  5. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Bruce K.; Junkin, James E.

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  6. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well known that the study of flavour physics and CP violation is very important to critically test the Standard Model and to look for possible signature of new physics beyond it. The observation of CP violation in kaon system in 1964 has ignited a lot of experimental and theoretical efforts to understand its origin and to look ...

  7. Lifetime of heavy flavour particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1985-10-01

    Recent measurements of the lifetime of the tau leptons and charm and beauty hadrons are reviewed and their significance for the couplings of the charged weak current, flavour mixing, and models relating quarks to hadron decay are discussed. 70 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is long believed that the system could be the harbinger of new physics since it is a system in which both bottom and strange quarks are the constituents. Recently, D0 and CDF announced their result for the mixing which is claimed to be the first possible new physics signature in the flavour sector. We plan to touch ...

  9. Flavour physics and CP violation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is well known that the study of flavour physics and CP violation is very important to critically test the Standard Model and to look for possible signature of new physics beyond it. The observation of CP violation in kaon system in 1964 has ignited a lot of experimental and theoretical efforts to understand its origin ...

  10. Yeast genomics on food flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung Ah

    2005-01-01

    The appearance and concentration of the fusel alcohol 3-methyl-1-butanol is important for the flavour of fermented foods. 3-Methyl-1-butanol is formed by yeast during the conversion of L-leucine. Identification of the enzymes and genes involved in the formation of 3-methyl-1-butanol is a major

  11. Photoproduction of heavy quark flavours

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1978-01-01

    Within QCD the photoproduction of new heavy flavours proceeds via photon-gluon amalgamation. The production cross sections of new particles (charm, top, bottom,...) are calculated. Photon and lepton beams are better suited than hadron beams for producing the new particles. (11 refs).

  12. Fundamental Aspects of Selective Melting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Certain details of the additive manufacturing process known as selective laser melting (SLM) affect the performance of the final metal part. To unleash the full potential of SLM it is crucial that the process engineer in the field receives guidance about how to select values for a multitude of process variables employed in the building process. These include, for example, the type of powder (e.g., size distribution, shape, type of alloy), orientation of the build axis, the beam scan rate, the beam power density, the scan pattern and scan rate. The science-based selection of these settings con- stitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy, reactive, dynamic wetting followed by re-solidification. In addition, inherent to the process is its considerable variability that stems from the powder packing. Each time a limited number of powder particles are placed, the stacking is intrinsically different from the previous, possessing a different geometry, and having a different set of contact areas with the surrounding particles. As a result, even if all other process parameters (scan rate, etc) are exactly the same, the shape and contact geometry and area of the final melt pool will be unique to that particular configuration. This report identifies the most important issues facing SLM, discusses the fundamental physics associated with it and points out how modeling can support the additive manufacturing efforts.

  13. Controlled flavour changing neutral couplings in two Higgs Doublet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Joao M.; Branco, Gustavo C.; Nebot, Miguel [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa Univ., Departamento de Fisica e Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Lisboa (Portugal); Botella, Francisco J.; Cornet-Gomez, Fernando [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Burjassot (Spain)

    2017-09-15

    We propose a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) at tree level, but under control due to the introduction of a discrete symmetry in the full Lagrangian. It is shown that in this class of models, one can have simultaneously FCNC in the up and down sectors, in contrast to the situation encountered in the renormalisable and minimal flavour violating 2HDM models put forward by Branco et al. (Phys Lett B 380:119, 1996). The intensity of FCNC is analysed and it is shown that in this class of models one can respect all the strong constraints from experiment without unnatural fine-tuning. It is pointed out that the additional sources of flavour and CP violation are such that they can enhance significantly the generation of the Baryon asymmetry of the Universe, with respect to the standard model. (orig.)

  14. Jagiellonian University Heavy flavour highlights from the LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00640989

    2017-01-01

    This document presents an overview of the flavour anomalies observed by the LHCb experiment. All results are based on the dataset collected during the full LHC Run 1 by the LHCb Collaboration. Measurements of branching fractions of several $b \\rightarrow sll$ decays are presented together with the angular analysis of $B^{0} \\rightarrow K∗ \\mu^{+}\\mu^{−}$ decays and the lepton flavour universality tests R(K) and R(D∗). In addition, a direct search for a new light scalar particle in the $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+}\\chi$ decay, with $\\chi \\rightarrow \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$, is presented.

  15. Additive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Bue

    by to an indisputable degree. The system finally showed promising results when applied indirectly to reconstruct geometries from a DLP system. In general, the system has a potential for being implemented in different AM machines and processes and provides traceable measurements of the complex parts. As the technology......This Ph.D dissertation,ffAdditive Manufacturing: Multi Material Processing and Part Quality Controlff, deal with Additive Manufacturing technologies which is a common name for a series of processes that are recognized by being computer controlled, highly automated, and manufacture objects...... age. Now, with the geometrical freedom given back to the designer and engineer, a technology stale-mate keep us from benefitting from this freedom. Parts can easily be designed and manufactured beyond the capabilities of all common industrial measurement and verification methods, the designer...

  16. Challenges for New Physics in the Flavour Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crivellin, A.

    2014-09-01

    In these proceedings I present a personal perspective of the challenges for new physics (NP) searches in the flavour sector. Since the CKM mechanism of flavour violation has been established to a very high precision, we know that physics beyond the Standard Model can only contribute sub-dominantly. Therefore, any realistic model of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) must respect the stringent constrains from flavour observables like b → sγ, B S → μ + μ - , ΔF=2 processes etc., in a first step. In a second step, it is interesting to ask the question if some deviations from the SM predictions (like the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon or recently observed discrepancies in tauonic B decays or B → K*μ + μ - ) can be explained by a model of NP without violating bounds from other observables. (author)

  17. Challenges for New Physics in the Flavour Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In these proceedings I present a personal perspective of the challenges for new physics (NP) searches in the flavour sector. Since the CKM mechanism of flavour violation has been established to a very high precision, we know that physics beyond the Standard Model can only contribute sub-dominantly. Therefore, any realistic model of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) must respect the stringent constrains from flavour observables like $b\\to s \\gamma$, $B_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$, $\\Delta F=2$ processes etc., in a first step. In a second step, it is interesting to ask the question if some deviations from the SM predictions (like the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon or recently observed discrepancies in tauonic $B$ decays or $B\\to K^*\\mu^+\\mu^-$) can be explained by a model of NP without violating bounds from other observables.

  18. Impact of Wort Amino Acids on Beer Flavour: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês M. Ferreira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The process by which beer is brewed has not changed significantly since its discovery thousands of years ago. Grain is malted, dried, crushed and mixed with hot water to produce wort. Yeast is added to the sweet, viscous wort, after which fermentation occurs. The biochemical events that occur during fermentation reflect the genotype of the yeast strain used, and its phenotypic expression is influenced by the composition of the wort and the conditions established in the fermenting vessel. Although wort is complex and not completely characterized, its content in amino acids indubitably affects the production of some minor metabolic products of fermentation which contribute to the flavour of beer. These metabolic products include higher alcohols, esters, carbonyls and sulfur-containing compounds. The formation of these products is comprehensively reviewed in this paper. Furthermore, the role of amino acids in the beer flavour, in particular their relationships with flavour active compounds, is discussed in light of recent data.

  19. Improvement of the stainless steel electropolishing process by organic additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lochynski Pawel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of organic additives on the process of surface electropolishing of AISI 304 type steel was determined. Additives were selected in initial potentiodynamic tests pursuant to the plateau analysis on the current/potential curves. The assessment of the operational effectiveness of additives consisted in determining the relationship between surface gloss after electropolishing and the mass loss of the sample and in determining surface roughness. The applied electropolishing bath consisted of a mixture of concentrated acids: H3PO4 and H2SO4, and the following organic additives were used: triethylamine, ethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, diethylene glycol monobutyl ether and glycerol. The best electropolishing result, i.e. low roughness and high gloss of stainless steel surface with a relatively low mass loss of the sample at the same time were obtained for baths containing triethanolamine.

  20. Masses and magnetic moments of triple heavy flavour baryons in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the spin-flavour structure of the constituting quarks and by defining effective mass of the confined quarks within the baryons, the magnetic moments are computed with no additional free parameters. Keywords. Hypercentral constituent quark model; charmed and beauty baryons; hyper-. Coulomb plus power potential; ...

  1. Contribution of crosslinking products in the flavour enhancer processing: the new concept of Maillard peptide in sensory characteristics of Maillard reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karangwa, Eric; Murekatete, Nicole; Habimana, Jean de Dieu; Masamba, Kingsley; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Muhoza, Bertrand; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the flavour-enhancing properties of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) for different systems consisted of different peptides (sunflower, SFP; corn, CP and soyabean SP) with, xylose and cysteine were investigated. Maillard systems from peptides of sunflower, corn and soyabean with xylose and cysteine were designated as PXC, MCP and MSP, respectively. The Maillard systems were prepared at pH of 7.4 using temperature of 120C for 2 h. Results showed that all systems were significantly different in all sensory attributes. The highest scores for mouthfulness and continuity were observed for MCP with the lowest peptides distribution between 1000 and 5000 Da, known as Maillard peptide. This revealed that the MCP with the lowest Maillard peptide content had the strongest "Kokumi" effect compared to the other MRPsand demonstrated that "kokumi effect" of MRPs was contributed by not only the "Maillard peptide" defined by the molecular weight (1000-5000 Da). Results on sensory evaluation after fractionation of PXC followed by enzymatic hydrolysis showed no significant differences between PXC, P-PXC and their hydrolysates. This observation therefore confirmed that the presence of other contributors attributed to the "Kokumi" effect rather than the Maillard peptide. It can be deduced that the unhydrolyzed crosslinking products might have contributed to the "Kokumi" effect of MRPs. The structures of four probable crosslinking compounds were proposed and the findings have provided new insights in the sensory characteristics of xylose, cysteine and sunflower peptide MRPs.

  2. Technological foundations of processing tomato pomace in feed additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yegorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Search for new types of alternative raw material for the efficient development of poultry industry and problem of waste disposal of canning industry made it necessary to develop a method of processing tomato pomace in feed additives. Materials and methods. Sampling, preparation and testing were carried out by general and specific organ oleptic and physical-technological methods of assessment and analysis of the properties of raw materials and finished products. Results. Incorporation of tomato pomace in the feed additive reduces the cost of raw materials and expenses associated with moistening of the mixture before extrusion and incorporation of chalk feed will solve the problem of calcium imbalance of laying hens. It was found that extrusion process has improved the physical properties of feed additive and showed the possibility of its use as a feed component: moisture content decreased by 34.5 %, the angle of repose increased by 11.4 %, flowability decreased by 39.7 % and bulk density decreased by 32.3 %. Conclusions. The resulting feed additive will solve the problem of diversification of raw materials, waste, calcium imbalance of laying hens and reduce expenses on compound animal feedstuff production.

  3. Cold Spraying of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Delloro, F.; Jodoin, B.

    2017-04-01

    Titanium parts are ideally suited for aerospace applications due to their unique combination of high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance. However, titanium as bulk material is expensive and challenging/costly to machine. Production of complex titanium parts through additive manufacturing looks promising, but there are still many barriers to overcome before reaching mainstream commercialization. The cold gas dynamic spraying process offers the potential for additive manufacturing of large titanium parts due to its reduced reactive environment, its simplicity to operate, and the high deposition rates it offers. A few challenges are to be addressed before the additive manufacturing potential of titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying can be reached. In particular, it is known that titanium is easy to deposit by cold gas dynamic spraying, but the deposits produced are usually porous when nitrogen is used as the carrier gas. In this work, a method to manufacture low-porosity titanium components at high deposition efficiencies is revealed. The components are produced by combining low-pressure cold spray using nitrogen as the carrier gas with low-cost titanium powder produced using the Armstrong process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured titanium components are investigated.

  4. Effect of tomato pleiotropic ripening mutations on flavour volatile biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, K.; Fray, R.G.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Graham, N.; Bradley, G.; Seymour, G.B.; Bovy, A.G.; Grierson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Ripening is a tightly controlled and developmentally regulated process involving networks of genes, and metabolites that result in dramatic changes in fruit colour, texture and flavour. Molecular and genetic analysis in tomato has revealed a series of regulatory genes involved in fruit development

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Tooling for Refrigeration Cabinet Foaming Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Brian K [ORNL; Nuttall, David [ORNL; Cukier, Michael Z [ORNL; Hile, Michael B [ORNL

    2016-07-29

    The primary objective of this project was to leverage the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and materials into a long term, quick change tooling concept to drastically reduce product lead and development timelines and costs. Current refrigeration foam molds are complicated to manufacture involving casting several aluminum parts in an approximate shape, machining components of the molds and post fitting and shimming of the parts in an articulated fixture. The total process timeline can take over 6 months. The foaming process is slower than required for production, therefore multiple fixtures, 10 to 27, are required per refrigerator model. Molds are particular to a specific product configuration making mixed model assembly challenging for sequencing, mold changes or auto changeover features. The initial goal was to create a tool leveraging the ORNL materials and additive process to build a tool in 4 to 6 weeks or less. A secondary goal was to create common fixture cores and provide lightweight fixture sections that could be revised in a very short time to increase equipment flexibility reduce lead times, lower the barriers to first production trials, and reduce tooling costs.

  6. Aspects of Leptonic Flavour Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2017-09-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations many ideas have been put forward to explain the special features of the leptonic mixing and the differences with respect to the quark sector. In this talk I review some of these proposals, emphasizing especially their predictability. In the light of the new data, I first revisit fixed-point relations among mixing angles and phases. Then I briefly comment on radiative neutrino masses. Finally I discuss the role of flavour symmetries. Given the very many existing models I focus on two classes of models. On the one hand I illustrate the ability of models based on a generalization of the anarchy idea in reproducing the main features of both the quark and the lepton spectrum, also in a GUT framework. On the other hand I discuss less ambitious but more predictive models based on discrete flavour symmetries, centered on the properties of the leptonix mixing matrix.

  7. DeepFlavour in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Flavour-tagging of jets is an important task in collider based high energy physics and a field where machine learning tools are applied by all major experiments. A new tagger (DeepFlavour) was developed and commissioned in CMS that is based on an advanced machine learning procedure. A deep neural network is used to do multi-classification of jets that origin from a b-quark, two b-quarks, a c-quark, two c-quarks or light colored particles (u, d, s-quark or gluon). The performance was measured in both, data and simulation. The talk will also include the measured performance of all taggers in CMS. The different taggers and results will be discussed and compared with some focus on details of the newest tagger.

  8. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  9. Process Modeling and Validation for Metal Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Nycz, Andrzej [ORNL; Noakes, Mark W. [ORNL; Chin, Charlie [Dassault Systemes; Oancea, Victor [Dassault Systemes

    2017-05-01

    Metal Big Area Additive Manufacturing (mBAAM) is a new additive manufacturing (AM) technology based on the metal arc welding. A continuously fed metal wire is melted by an electric arc that forms between the wire and the substrate, and deposited in the form of a bead of molten metal along the predetermined path. Objects are manufactured one layer at a time starting from the base plate. The final properties of the manufactured object are dependent on its geometry and the metal deposition path, in addition to depending on the basic welding process parameters. Computational modeling can be used to accelerate the development of the mBAAM technology as well as a design and optimization tool for the actual manufacturing process. We have developed a finite element method simulation framework for mBAAM using the new features of software ABAQUS. The computational simulation of material deposition with heat transfer is performed first, followed by the structural analysis based on the temperature history for predicting the final deformation and stress state. In this formulation, we assume that two physics phenomena are coupled in only one direction, i.e. the temperatures are driving the deformation and internal stresses, but their feedback on the temperatures is negligible. The experiment instrumentation (measurement types, sensor types, sensor locations, sensor placements, measurement intervals) and the measurements are presented. The temperatures and distortions from the simulations show good correlation with experimental measurements. Ongoing modeling work is also briefly discussed.

  10. Modeling process-structure-property relationships for additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Kafka, Orion L.; Yu, Cheng; Liu, Zeliang; Lian, Yanping; Wolff, Sarah; Cao, Jian; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents our latest work on comprehensive modeling of process-structure-property relationships for additive manufacturing (AM) materials, including using data-mining techniques to close the cycle of design-predict-optimize. To illustrate the processstructure relationship, the multi-scale multi-physics process modeling starts from the micro-scale to establish a mechanistic heat source model, to the meso-scale models of individual powder particle evolution, and finally to the macro-scale model to simulate the fabrication process of a complex product. To link structure and properties, a highefficiency mechanistic model, self-consistent clustering analyses, is developed to capture a variety of material response. The model incorporates factors such as voids, phase composition, inclusions, and grain structures, which are the differentiating features of AM metals. Furthermore, we propose data-mining as an effective solution for novel rapid design and optimization, which is motivated by the numerous influencing factors in the AM process. We believe this paper will provide a roadmap to advance AM fundamental understanding and guide the monitoring and advanced diagnostics of AM processing.

  11. Metal Big Area Additive Manufacturing: Process Modeling and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Nycz, Andrzej [ORNL; Noakes, Mark W [ORNL; Chin, Charlie [Dassault Systemes; Oancea, Victor [Dassault Systemes

    2017-01-01

    Metal Big Area Additive Manufacturing (mBAAM) is a new additive manufacturing (AM) technology for printing large-scale 3D objects. mBAAM is based on the gas metal arc welding process and uses a continuous feed of welding wire to manufacture an object. An electric arc forms between the wire and the substrate, which melts the wire and deposits a bead of molten metal along the predetermined path. In general, the welding process parameters and local conditions determine the shape of the deposited bead. The sequence of the bead deposition and the corresponding thermal history of the manufactured object determine the long range effects, such as thermal-induced distortions and residual stresses. Therefore, the resulting performance or final properties of the manufactured object are dependent on its geometry and the deposition path, in addition to depending on the basic welding process parameters. Physical testing is critical for gaining the necessary knowledge for quality prints, but traversing the process parameter space in order to develop an optimized build strategy for each new design is impractical by pure experimental means. Computational modeling and optimization may accelerate development of a build process strategy and saves time and resources. Because computational modeling provides these opportunities, we have developed a physics-based Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation framework and numerical models to support the mBAAM process s development and design. In this paper, we performed a sequentially coupled heat transfer and stress analysis for predicting the final deformation of a small rectangular structure printed using the mild steel welding wire. Using the new simulation technologies, material was progressively added into the FEM simulation as the arc weld traversed the build path. In the sequentially coupled heat transfer and stress analysis, the heat transfer was performed to calculate the temperature evolution, which was used in a stress analysis to

  12. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 401 (FGE.401): γ-Glutamyl-valyl-glycine from chemical group 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    consumption of these three endogenous amino acids through food is orders of magnitude higher than the anticipated levels of exposure from their use as flavouring substances, the Panel concluded that γ-glutamyl-valyl-glycine [FL-no: 17.038] would be of no safety concern at its estimated level of intake......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to carry out a safety assessment of one flavouring substance, γ-glutamyl-valyl-glycine [FL-no: 17.038], in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 401 (FGE.401), in accordance...... with the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1331/2008. There is no safety concern with respect to genotoxicity for the flavouring substance. It has been demonstrated that the flavouring substance, which is a tripeptide, will be hydrolysed to the three amino acids L-glutamic acid, L-valine and glycine. As the human...

  13. Non-markovian limits of additive functionals of Markov processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jara, Milton; Komorowski, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider an additive functional of an observable $V(x)$ of a Markov jump process. We assume that the law of the expected jump time $t(x)$ under the invariant probability measure $\\pi$ of the skeleton chain belongs to the domain of attraction of a subordinator. Then, the scaled limit of the functional is a Mittag-Leffler proces, provided that $\\Psi(x):=V(x)t(x)$ is square integrable w.r.t. $\\pi$. When the law of $\\Psi(x)$ belongs to a domain of attraction of a stable law the r...

  14. Heavy flavour production in perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nason, P.; Ridolfi, G.; Frixione, S.; Mangano, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The status of heavy flavour production in QCD is reviewed. Recent results on the doubly-differential cross section are discussed for the photoproduction of heavy flavours. Comparison of experimental results with theoretical calculation is discussed both for b production at hadron colliders and c production in fixed-target hadroproduction and photoproduction. The possibility of using photoproduction of heavy flavour in order to determine the gluon density in the proton is also discussed. (author). 38 refs., 8 figs

  15. Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Peyton A; Karpinski, Clarissa D; Brown, Jessica E; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F

    2016-01-01

    Background Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids. Methods Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary flavours (eg, bubble gum and cotton candy), also analysed were convenience samples of e-cigarette fluids in refill bottles from local ‘vape’ shops and online retailers. Results In many liquids, total flavour chemicals were found to be in the ∼1–4% range (10–40 mg/mL); labelled levels of nicotine were in the range of 0.6–2.4% (6 to 24 mg/mL). A significant number of the flavour chemicals were aldehydes, a compound class recognised as ‘primary irritants’ of mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Many of the products contained the same flavour chemicals: vanillin and/or ethyl vanillin was found in 17 of the liquids as one of the top three flavour chemicals, and/or at ≥0.5 mg/mL. Conclusions The concentrations of some flavour chemicals in e-cigarette fluids are sufficiently high for inhalation exposure by vaping to be of toxicological concern. Regulatory limits should be contemplated for levels of some of the more worrisome chemicals as well as for total flavour chemical levels. Ingredient labeling should also be required. PMID:25877377

  16. Sodium dichromate as a process water additive: An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutton, J.M.

    1953-03-19

    For several years-after the start-up of the Hanford Piles, little concern was felt for the quality of process water. Techniques developed by CMX and improved in the course of operating experience were substantially successful for controlling and removing pressure drop film; and corru%ion rates at the early power levels were uniformly low and not a matter of concern, particularly since slugs were not exposed for more than 250 MWD/ton. As power and exposure levels were drastically increased, however, corrosion rates began to become serious and now threaten to limit future increases. Whether or not corrosion was causing these latter problems, it was clearly imperative to seek ways to reduce the corrobivity of the water. It was recognized that subtantial savings could be made by the elimination of sodium dichromate as a process water additive. Since the rather high pH of process water was neceasary primarily to prevent dichromate reduction, the way would then be open for reducing the pH, and it was hoped that this would improve in-pile corrosion and materially reduce water treatment costs. There is a large amount of data in the project literature pertaining to the dichromate problem, and it seemed urgent in view of recent experiences to re-evaluate this information to learn whether the issues might not be clarified and firm conclusions reached. This document presents such a re-evaluation and drawn conclusions which pending the completion of experiments now in progress, will serve as a primary basis for technical recommendations concerning dichromate addition to process water at all existing 100 areas and at the 100-K areas now under construction.

  17. Supersymmetry, the flavour puzzle and rare B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, David Michael

    2010-07-14

    The gauge hierarchy problem and the flavour puzzle belong to the most pressing open questions in the Standard Model of particle physics. Supersymmetry is arguably the most popular framework of physics beyond the Standard Model and provides an elegant solution to the gauge hierarchy problem; however, it aggravates the flavour puzzle. In the first part of this thesis, I discuss several approaches to address the flavour puzzle in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model and experimental tests thereof: supersymmetric grand unified theories with a unification of Yukawa couplings at high energies, theories with minimal flavour violation and additional sources of CP violation and theories with gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking and a large ratio of Higgs vacuum expectation values. In the second part of the thesis, I discuss the phenomenology of two rare B meson decay modes which are promising probes of physics beyond the Standard Model: The exclusive B {yields} K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay, whose angular decay distribution will be studied at LHC and gives access to a large number of observables and the b{yields}s{nu}anti {nu} decays, which are in the focus of planned high-luminosity Super B factories. I discuss the predictions for these observables in the Standard Model and their sensitivity to New Physics. (orig.)

  18. Association between menthol-flavoured cigarette smoking and flavoured little cigar and cigarillo use among African-American, Hispanic, and white young and middle-aged adult smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, K; Fryer, C; Pagano, I; Jones, D; Fagan, P

    2016-11-01

    Flavour additives in cigarettes and little cigars and cigarillos (LCCs), which influence smokers' risk perceptions, may reinforce dual flavoured tobacco use. We examined the association among mentholated cigarette use, risk perceptions for flavour additives in LCCs and flavoured LCC smoking behaviour. Data from a national probability sample of 964 young and middle-aged adult current cigarette smokers were analysed. Multinomial logistic regression models examined the relationship among mentholated cigarette smoking, risk perceptions and current flavoured LCC use for the analytic sample and gender and race/ethnicity. Daily menthol cigarette smokers, compared to occasional, non-menthol smokers, had increased odds of flavoured LCC smoking (OR=1.75, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.98). This relationship was found for males, blacks/African-Americans and Hispanics/Latinos (psmokers, specifically those from vulnerable populations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Porous calcium carbonate as a carrier material to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin Johnson, Maria; Noreland, David; Gane, Patrick; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Ridgway, Cathy; Millqvist Fureby, Anna

    2017-04-19

    Two different food grade functionalised porous calcium carbonates (FCC), with different pore size and pore size distributions, were characterised and used as carrier materials to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds in aqueous solution. The loading level was varied between 1.3% by weight (wt%) and 35 wt%, where the upper limit of 35 wt% was the total maximum loading capacity of flavouring compound in FCC based on the fraction of the total weight of FCC plus flavouring compound. Flavouring compounds (l-carvone, vanillin, and curcumin) were selected based on their difference in hydrophilicity and capacity to crystallise. Release kinetic studies revealed that all flavouring compounds showed an accelerated release when loaded in FCC compared to dissolution of the flavouring compound itself in aqueous medium. The amorphous state and/or surface enlargement of the flavouring compound inside or on FCC explains the faster release. The flavouring compounds capable of crystallising (vanillin and curcumin) were almost exclusively amorphous within the porous FCC material as determined by X-ray powder diffraction one week after loading and after storing the loaded FCC material for up to 9 months at room temperature. A small amount of crystalline vanillin and curcumin was detected in the FCC material with large pores and high flavouring compound loading (≥30 wt%). Additionally, two different loading strategies were evaluated, loading by dissolving the flavouring compound in acetone or loading by a hot melt method. Porosimetry data showed that the melt method was more efficient in filling the smallest pores (<100 nm). The main factor influencing the release rate appears to be the amorphous state of the flavouring compound and the increase in exposed surface area. The confinement in small pores prevents crystallisation of the flavouring compounds during storage, providing a stable amorphous form retaining high release rate also after storage.

  20. Flavour Compounds in Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravasio, Davide Antonio

    from the catabolism of amino acids. These compounds are produced by the Ehrlich pathway. The conversion of amino acids into aroma alcohols is accomplished by three enzymatic steps: i) a transamination, ii) a decarboxylation and iii) a dehydration reaction. The transaminase and decarboxylase enzymes...... and 2-phenylacetate. The last part of this thesis presents the initial characterization of twenty non-conventional yeasts (NCY) and their potential application in fermentative processes. These strains have been selected as they have been previously isolated from various fermented food sources...

  1. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  2. Anarchic Yukawas and top partial compositeness: the flavour of a successful marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying; Flacke, Thomas; Lee, Seung J.; Parolini, Alberto; Serôdio, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    The top quark can be naturally singled out from other fermions in the Standard Model due to its large mass, of the order of the electroweak scale. We follow this reasoning in models of pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson composite Higgs, which may derive from an underlying confining dynamics. We consider a new class of flavour models, where the top quark obtains its mass via partial compositeness, while the lighter fermions acquire their masses by a deformation of the dynamics generated at a high flavour scale. One interesting feature of such scenario is that it can avoid all the flavour constraints without the need of flavour symmetries, since the flavour scale can be pushed high enough. We show that both flavour conserving and violating constraints can be satisfied with top partial compositeness without invoking any flavour symmetry for the up-type sector, in the case of the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset with top partners in the four-plet and singlet of SO(4). In the down-type sector, some degree of alignment is required if all down-type quarks are elementary. We show that taking the bottom quark partially composite provides a dynamical explanation for the hierarchy causing this alignment. We present explicit realisations of this mechanism which do not require to include additional bottom partner fields. Finally, these conclusions are generalised to scenarios with non-minimal cosets and top partners in larger representations.

  3. Anarchic Yukawas and top partial compositeness: the flavour of a successful marriage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon,F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Flacke, Thomas [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung J. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Parolini, Alberto [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Axion and Precision Physics, IBS,291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Serôdio, Hugo [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The top quark can be naturally singled out from other fermions in the Standard Model due to its large mass, of the order of the electroweak scale. We follow this reasoning in models of pseudo Nambu Goldstone Boson composite Higgs, which may derive from an underlying confining dynamics. We consider a new class of flavour models, where the top quark obtains its mass via partial compositeness, while the lighter fermions acquire their masses by a deformation of the dynamics generated at a high flavour scale. One interesting feature of such scenario is that it can avoid all the flavour constraints without the need of flavour symmetries, since the flavour scale can be pushed high enough. We show that both flavour conserving and violating constraints can be satisfied with top partial compositeness without invoking any flavour symmetry for the up-type sector, in the case of the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset with top partners in the four-plet and singlet of SO(4). In the down-type sector, some degree of alignment is required if all down-type quarks are elementary. We show that taking the bottom quark partially composite provides a dynamical explanation for the hierarchy causing this alignment. We present explicit realisations of this mechanism which do not require to include additional bottom partner fields. Finally, these conclusions are generalised to scenarios with non-minimal cosets and top partners in larger representations.

  4. First passage process of a Markov additive process, with applications to reflection problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. D'Auria; J. Ivanovs; O. Kella; M.R.H. Mandjes (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we consider the first passage process of a spectrally negative Markov additive process (MAP). The law of this process is uniquely characterized by a certain matrix function, which plays a crucial role in fluctuation theory. We show how to identify this matrix using the

  5. Flavourings: production, composition, applications, regulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziegler, Herta

    2007-01-01

    ... for the world of flavours. This 2 nd edition had initially been scheduled as homage on the occasion of his 80 th birthday in 2005, a target the large pool of authors could, however, not fulfil completely. On behalf of all authors, I would like to dedicate this edition to Mr. Erich Ziegler, whose initiative and efforts were instrumental in gathering the first group of authors. Edition 2 again represents a compendium which in its entirety is intended to familiarise the reader with the complex subject...

  6. Innovative Additive for Bitumen Based on Processed Fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiak, Michał; Kosno, Jacek; Ratajczak, Maria; Zieliński, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Various additives, admixtures and modifiers are used to improve technical properties and strength characteristics of building materials. Manufacturers of waterproofing materials, concrete, ceramics and bitumen have to use innovative, increasingly complex and costly additives, admixtures or modifiers. As a result, simple and inexpensive substances have been replaced by complex, long chain polymers, multi component resins or plastics. For economic and ecological reasons waste materials are more frequently used as additives, admixtures and modifiers. Nowadays the most commonly used physical modifiers of bitumen belong to the group of polymers - large molecular organic compounds of natural origin or being the result of planned chemical synthesis. Polymers are substances that do not chemically react with bitumen, they act as fillers or create a spatial network within bitumen (the so called physical cross-linking). The development of organic chemistry has allowed the synthesis of a number of substances chemically modifying bitumen. The most promising are heterocyclic organic compounds belonging to the group of imidazolines. The aim of the study presented in this paper was to demonstrate the suitability of processed natural and post-refining fat waste (diamidoamine dehydrate) as bitumen modifier. This paper discusses the impact of adding technical imidazoline on selected bitumen characteristics. Samples of bitumen 160/220, which is most commonly used for the production of waterproofing products, were analysed. For base bitumen and bitumen modified with technical imidazoline the following measurements were taken: measurement of the softening point by Ball and Ring method, determination of the breaking point by Fraass method and needle penetration measurement at 25°C. Later the samples were aged using TFOT laboratory method and the basic characteristics were determined again. The results showed that a small amount of imidazoline improved bitumen thermoplastic parameters at

  7. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted. Keywords. Heavy flavour; spectroscopy; potential models; exotics. PACS Nos 12.40.Yx; 14.40.Pq; 14.40.Rt; 12.39.Pn. 1. Introduction. In recent years, the investigation of hadrons containing heavy ...

  8. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-31

    Oct 31, 2014 ... ... CLEO-c, BaBar, Belle, LHC etc., the scope for theoretical extensions of the present knowledge of heavy flavour physics would be very demanding. In this context, many relevant contributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour ...

  9. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; 10.1016/j.physletb.2011.05.023

    2011-01-01

    A search for second and third generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions via the lepton flavour violating processes ep -> mu X and ep -> tau X is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full data sample taken at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt{s} = 319 GeV is used for the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 245 pb^-1 of e^+ p and 166 pb^-1 of e^- p collision data. No evidence for the production of such leptoquarks is observed in the H1 data. Leptoquarks produced in e^+- p collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to leptoquark masses of 712 GeV and 479 GeV, respectively.

  10. Clove cigar sales following the US flavoured cigarette ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnevo, Cristine D; Hrywna, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Following the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act in 2009, flavoured cigarettes, including clove cigarettes, were banned based on the rationale that such cigarettes appealed to youth. However, the ban on characterising flavours was not extended to cigars. This study reviewed industry documents from Kretek International, the parent company behind Djarum clove cigars, to document the changes in their marketing and production strategies following the flavour ban on cigarettes. To assess sales trends following the ban, data for clove cigar sales in the USA from 2009 to 2012 were analysed using Nielsen's Convenience Track retail scanner database. Additionally, data on tobacco imports to the USA from Indonesia were obtained from the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service's Global Agricultural Trade System for the years 2008-2012. In anticipation of Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) flavour ban on cigarettes and recognising the regulatory advantages of cigars, Kretek International began developing Djarum clove cigars in 2007. Immediately following the flavour ban, sales of this product increased by more than 1400% between 2009 and 2012. During this same period, tobacco imports to the USA from Indonesia, a leader in clove tobacco production, shifted from cigarettes to almost exclusively cigars. Kretek International, like other tobacco manufacturers, manipulated its products following the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act as a way to capitalise on regulatory loopholes and replace its now banned clove cigarettes. As a result, consumption of the company's Djarum clove cigars increased exponentially in recent years. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Flavour from partially resolved singularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonelli, G. [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: bonelli@sissa.it; Bonora, L. [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Ricco, A. [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    In this Letter we study topological open string field theory on D-branes in a IIB background given by non-compact CY geometries O(n)-bar O(-2-n) on P{sup 1} with a singular point at which an extra fiber sits. We wrap N D5-branes on P{sup 1} and M effective D3-branes at singular points, which are actually D5-branes wrapped on a shrinking cycle. We calculate the holomorphic Chern-Simons partition function for the above models in a deformed complex structure and find that it reduces to multi-matrix models with flavour. These are the matrix models whose resolvents have been shown to satisfy the generalized Konishi anomaly equations with flavour. In the n=0 case, corresponding to a partial resolution of the A{sub 2} singularity, the quantum superpotential in the N=1 unitary SYM with one adjoint and M fundamentals is obtained. The n=1 case is also studied and shown to give rise to two-matrix models which for a particular set of couplings can be exactly solved. We explicitly show how to solve such a class of models by a quantum equation of motion technique.

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Fo od Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Proce ssing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evalua tion 09, Revision 6 (FGE.09Rev6): Secondary alicyclic saturated and unsaturated alcohols, ketones and esters containing secondary alicyclic alcohols from chemical group 8 and 30, and an ester of a phenol derivative from chemical group 25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 22 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 6, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the subs......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 22 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 9, Revision 6, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None.......202, 07.203, 09.154, 09.520, 09.618, 09.619, 09.843, 09.935 and 09.949] more reliable exposure data are required for a re-evaluation. For two substances [FL-nos: 07.219 and 09.929] no use levels are available and these should be submitted. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances...

  13. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra Z' boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.; Maharana, L.

    2004-01-01

    New neutral gauge bosons Z' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by Z exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson Z'. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra Z' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes. (author)

  14. On the record process of time-reversible spectrally-negative Markov additive processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ivanovs; M.R.H. Mandjes (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study the record process of a spectrally-negative Markov additive process (MAP). Assuming time-reversibility, a number of key quantities can be given explicitly. It is shown how these key quantities can be used when analyzing the distribution of the all-time maximum attained by MAPs

  15. FAKTOR-FAKTOR PENGOLAHAN DAN KOMPOSISI BAHAN YANG MEMPENGARUHI CITARASA "OFF FLAVOUR" FORMULA TEMPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelis Imanningsih

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available PROCESSING FACTORS AND INGREDIENTS CONTRIBUTED IN TEMPE FORMULA'S OFF FLAVOUR.Background: Tempe Formula is processed food with tempe as the main ingredient. was previously formulated as infant formula and under five years children formula who have diarrhea problem. In later researches, tempe Fromula was found to be efective to increase nutritional satatus of severe malnourished children, to cure gastrointestinal infection of 6-24 months children, and had benefit to repair dislipldemia in adults and bone reformation of pre and post menopause women. However, this formula had off flavour that limit Its utilization. Methods: The design is laboratory experiment. The type of research is explorative. The panelist is trained panelist.Results: The result shows that off flavour component identified were beany odour, moldy odour, tangy taste and bitter taste. Tempe processing with half boiled of soybean and steam sterilization with traditional starter of mixed innoculum gave the best sensori quality. Less intensity of beany flavour and bitter taste were gained by improving the composition of palm oil and sesame oil with composition 1:1. The additon of mocca and milk flavours also reduced the beany odour of the formula. Conclusion: Improved tempe formula was determined to have higher intensity of sweetness, less intensity of saltyness, bitemess and tangy taste, and less beany, rancid, and moldy odours than original formula.Keywords: tempe formula, off flavour, processing

  16. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 212 Revision 3 (FGE.212Rev3): α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 22 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 212. Based on available genotoxicity dat...

  17. On flavourful Easter eggs for New Physics hunger and lepton flavour universality violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciuchini, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Coutinho, Antonio M. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Rome (Italy); Fedele, Marco [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Franco, Enrico; Paul, Ayan; Silvestrini, Luca; Valli, Mauro [INFN, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    Within the standard approach of effective field theory of weak interactions for ΔB = 1 transitions, we look for possibly unexpected subtle New Physics effects, here dubbed ''flavourful Easter eggs''. We perform a Bayesian global fit using the publicly available HEPfit package, taking into account state-of-the-art experimental information concerning these processes, including the suggestive measurements from LHCb of R{sub K} and R{sub K{sup *}}, the latter available only very recently. We parametrise New Physics contributions to b → s transitions in terms of shifts of Wilson coefficients of the electromagnetic dipole and semileptonic operators, assuming CP-conserving effects, but allowing in general for violation of lepton flavour universality. We show how optimistic/conservative hadronic estimates can impact quantitatively the size of New Physics extracted from the fit. With a conservative approach to hadronic uncertainties we find nonzero New Physics contributions to Wilson coefficients at the level of ∝ 3σ, depending on the model chosen. Furthermore, given the interplay between hadronic contributions and New Physics effects in the leptonic vector current, a scenario with nonstandard leptonic axial currents is comparable to the more widely advocated one with New Physics in the leptonic vector current. (orig.)

  18. On flavourful Easter eggs for New Physics hunger and lepton flavour universality violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuchini, Marco; Coutinho, Antonio M.; Fedele, Marco; Franco, Enrico; Paul, Ayan; Silvestrini, Luca; Valli, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Within the standard approach of effective field theory of weak interactions for ΔB = 1 transitions, we look for possibly unexpected subtle New Physics effects, here dubbed ''flavourful Easter eggs''. We perform a Bayesian global fit using the publicly available HEPfit package, taking into account state-of-the-art experimental information concerning these processes, including the suggestive measurements from LHCb of R K and R K * , the latter available only very recently. We parametrise New Physics contributions to b → s transitions in terms of shifts of Wilson coefficients of the electromagnetic dipole and semileptonic operators, assuming CP-conserving effects, but allowing in general for violation of lepton flavour universality. We show how optimistic/conservative hadronic estimates can impact quantitatively the size of New Physics extracted from the fit. With a conservative approach to hadronic uncertainties we find nonzero New Physics contributions to Wilson coefficients at the level of ∝ 3σ, depending on the model chosen. Furthermore, given the interplay between hadronic contributions and New Physics effects in the leptonic vector current, a scenario with nonstandard leptonic axial currents is comparable to the more widely advocated one with New Physics in the leptonic vector current. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of Grape, Plum and Orange Synthetic Food Flavourings Using in vivo Acute Toxicity Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ila Monize Sousa Sales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the acute toxicity of synthetic grape, plum and orange flavourings in root meristem cells of Allium cepa at the doses of 3.5, 7.0 and 14.0 mL/kg and exposure times of 24 and 48 h, and in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice treated orally for seven days with 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL/kg of flavouring. The results of the plant test showed that grape, plum and orange flavourings, at both exposure times, inhibited cell division and promoted the formation of a significant number of micronuclei and mitotic spindle changes. These alterations were observed in at least one exposure time analysed, demonstrating a significant cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic activity. In mouse bioassay, animals treated with 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL/kg of flavouring died before the seventh day of treatment. The amounts of 0.5 and 1.0 mL/kg of the three additives were cytotoxic to erythrocytes, and treatment with the grape flavouring significantly induced the formation of micronucleated cells in the bone marrow of animals. Therefore, under the study conditions, the grape, plum and orange flavouring additives promoted significant toxicity to cells of the test systems used.

  20. Precision physics with heavy-flavoured hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of flavour dynamics is one of the key aims of elementary particle physics. The last 15 years have witnessed the triumph of the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism, which describes all flavour changing transitions of quarks in the Standard Model. This important milestone has been reached owing to a series of experiments, in particular to those operating at the so-called $B$ factories, at the Tevatron, and now at the LHC. We briefly review status and perspectives of flavour physics, highlighting the results where the LHC has given the most significant contributions, notably including the recent observation of the $B_s^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay.

  1. Studies on additive properties of some processing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Malewski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of prediction of mineral processing operation by partial effects summation is analyzed. Methodological and practical aspects of the problem are discussed using laboratory studies of selected comminution and classifying operations as examples. Laboratory experiments show that the effects of examined mineral processing operation depend on simultaneously running processes of classification and comminution. The influence rate of interaction between both processes on the final results is significant, but in some cases it may be neglected. The obtained results have preliminary character and needed a further verification.

  2. COGNITIVE ARITHMETIC: Mental Processing of Addition and Multiplication

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyanto, -

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the many studies of languages processing, there have been relatively few studies of arithmetic processing in cognitive psychology. Author of textbooks for university students, such as Solso (1991), do not appear to feel a need to address cognitive arithmetic issues in their books.

  3. Quasi-relativistic fermions and dynamical flavour oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandre, Jean; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce new Lorentz-symmetry violating kinematics for a four-fermion interaction model, where dynamical mass generation is allowed, irrespectively of the strength of the coupling. In addition, these kinematics lead to a quasi-relativistic dispersion relation, in the sense that it is relativistic in both the infrared and the ultraviolet, but not in an intermediate regime, characterized by the mass $M$. For two fermions, we show that a flavour-mixing mass matrix is generated dynamically, and the Lorentz symmetric limit $M\\to\\infty$ leads to two free relativistic fermions, with flavour oscillations. This model, valid for either Dirac or Majorana fermions, can describe any set of phenomenological values for the eigen masses and the mixing angle.

  4. Characterization of beer flavour stability (EPR - spin trapping)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, A.; Liptakova, M.; Malik, F.

    1999-01-01

    The beer flavour stability is coupled with free radical degradation processes. Probably, aldehydes produced during the brewery but also generated by stalling are responsible for beer flavour as well as for its breaking down. The storing beer at the lower temperatures and in the dark place inhibits, and otherwise the rising temperature and illumination accelerate the rate of such radical processes. Beers contain naturally occurring radical scavengers - antioxidants which inhibit such unwanted reactions. Then depleting of scavengers results in the breaking down of the beer stability. EPR spin trapping technique was used as monitor such processes and for characterising so the flavour stability of beer. The probe was temperated at 60 grad C in the cavity of EPR spectrometer in the presence of spin trapping agent, N-tert.-butyl-α-phenyl nitrone (PBN) and EPR spectra were recorded for few hours. After beer antioxidants become depleted, free radicals formed by the beer degradation are scavenged by PBN spin trap and this point is characterised with a dramatically increased concentration of the free radicals trapped

  5. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives (including flavouring agents) and contaminants, assessments of intake, and the establishment and revision of specifications for food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and intake data on various specific food additives (alpha-amylase from Bacillus lichenformis containing a genetically engineered alpha-amylase gene from B. licheniformis, annatto extracts, curcumin, diacetyl and fatty acid esters of glycerol, D-tagatose, laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, mixed xylanase, beta-glucanase enzyme preparation produced by a strain of Humicola insolens, neotame, polyvinyl alcohol, quillaia extracts and xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus expressed in Fusarium venenatum), flavouring agents, a nutritional source of iron (ferrous glycinate, processed with citric acid), a disinfectant for drinking-water (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) and contaminants (cadmium and methylmercury). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives, recommendations on the flavouring agents considered, and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications and further information requested or desired.

  6. Processed foods and the consumer: additives, labeling, standards, and nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Packard, Vernal S

    1976-01-01

    ... supplements; and it brings together under one cover the health-related issues of food additives and nutrition. If I were to point to one objective of this work, it would be to guide student and consumer alike through the maze of food ingredients, regulations, and standards in order to make as clear as present knowledge allows the critical issues co...

  7. CMS Phase 1 heavy flavour identification performance and developments

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider, the identification of jets originating from heavy flavour quarks (b or c tagging) is important for searches for new physics and for measurements of standard model processes. A variety of b tagging algorithms has been developed at CMS to select b-quark jets based on variables such as the impact parameters of the charged-particle tracks, the properties of reconstructed decay vertices, and the presence or absence of a lepton, or combinations thereof. The CMS Phase 1 upgrade includes a new pixel detector with an addition layer. In consequence, the resolution of the track reconstruction is expected to improve, in particular close to the beam spot, leading to a more precise determination of the variables important for b tagging. The expected effect on the b tagging performance is presented for a selected set of existing algorithms: CSVv2, cMVAv2, and DeepCSV. The latter deep neural network based multi-classification algorithm is re-trained based on the new detector geometry, while the ...

  8. Heavy-quark mass dependence in global PDF analyses and 3- and 4-flavour parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A D; Thorne, R S; Watt, G

    2010-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of our recent MSTW 2008 NLO and NNLO PDF analyses to the values of the charm and bottom quark masses, and we provide additional public PDF sets for a wide range of these heavy-quark masses. We quantify the impact of varying m_c and m_b on the cross sections for W, Z and Higgs production at the Tevatron and the LHC. We generate 3- and 4-flavour versions of the (5-flavour) MSTW 2008 PDFs by evolving the input PDFs and alpha_S determined from fits in the 5-flavour scheme, including the eigenvector PDF sets necessary for calculation of PDF uncertainties. As an example of their use, we study the difference in the Z total cross sections at the Tevatron and LHC in the 4- and 5-flavour schemes. Significant differences are found, illustrating the need to resum large logarithms in Q^2/m_b^2 by using the 5-flavour scheme. The 4-flavour scheme is still necessary, however, if cuts are imposed on associated (massive) b-quarks, as is the case for the experimental measurement of Z b bbar production a...

  9. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 94, Revision 1 (FGE.94Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic amines and amides evaluated in an addendum to the group of aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA (68th meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 12 aliphatic amines and amides evaluated by the JECFA at the 68th meeting in 2007. This revision of the consideration is made due to additional toxicity data available for two...

  10. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 91, Revision 1 (FGE.91Rev1): Consideration of simple aliphatic and aromatic sulphides and thiols evaluated by JECFA (53rd and 68th meetings) structurally related to aliphatic and alicyclic mono-, di-, tri-, and polysulphides with or without

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    of two additional substances compared to previous version. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism and toxicity. The Panel......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...

  11. Flavour physics in the LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Gershon, Tim

    2014-01-01

    These lectures give a topical review of heavy flavour physics, in particular \\CP violation and rare decays, from an experimental point of view. They describe the ongoing motivation to study heavy flavour physics in the LHC era, the current status of the field emphasising key results from previous experiments, some selected topics in which new results are expected in the near future, and a brief look at future projects.

  12. b-flavour tagging in pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Birnkraut, Alex

    2015-01-01

    An essential ingredient of all time-dependent CP violation studies of B mesons is the ability to tag the initial flavour of the B meson. The harsh environment of 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions makes this a particularly difficult enterprise. We report progresses in the flavour tagging of B0 and Bs mesons, including developments of novel techniques like the use of an opposite side charm tagger.

  13. Study of flavour compounds from orange juices by HS-SPME and GC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Covaciu, F.; Feher, I.; Magdas, A.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The flavour of the orange juices, which gives the taste and odour of the product, is an important criterion about the products quality for consumers. A fresh single strength and two commercial orange juices (obtained from concentrate) flavour profile were studied using a selective and sensitive gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical system, after a solvent free, single step preconcentration and extraction technique, the headspace solid phase microextraction (HP-SPME). In the studied orange juices 55 flavour compounds were detected and classified as belonging to the esters, alcohols, ketones, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes chemical families. The fresh single strength orange juice was characterized by high amount of esters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Limonene and valencene were the most abundant flavours in this fresh natural orange juice. Alcohols and ketones were found in higher concentration in the commercial orange juices made from concentrate, than in the single strength products. Nevertheless, in commercial juices the most abundant flavour was limonene and α-terpineol. The results highlight clear differences between fresh singles strength orange juice and juice from concentrate. The orange juices reconstructed from concentrate, made in Romania, present low quantity of flavour compounds, suggesting the absence or a low rearomatization process, but extraneous components were not detected.

  14. Auditory contributions to flavour perception and feeding behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Charles

    2012-11-05

    This article reviews the research that has looked at the role of audition in both flavour perception and feeding behaviour in humans. The article starts by looking at early research that focused on the effect of background noise on the sensory-discriminative aspects of taste/flavour perception and on people's hedonic responses to food and beverage items. Next, I move on to look at the role of the sound made by the food (or beverage) itself. Additionally, recent studies that have started to assess the impact of food and beverage packaging sounds, not to mention food preparation sounds, on people's sensory-discriminative and hedonic responses to a variety of food and beverage products are discussed. Finally, the literature on the effect of background music and/or soundscapes on food and beverage perception/consumption are reviewed briefly. Taken together, this body of research, spanning both highly-controlled laboratory experiments and more ecologically-valid field studies, clearly demonstrates that what the consumer hears, be it the sound of the food, the sound of the packaging, the sound of the machine used to prepare that food or beverage (e.g., as in the case of the sound of a coffee machine), and even the sound of the environment in which the consumer happens to be eating and drinking can all exert a profound, if often unacknowledged, role in our feeding behaviours not to mention on our flavour perception. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lepton-flavour violating $B$ decays in generic $Z'$ models

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Matias, Joaquim; Nierste, Ulrich; Pokorski, Stefan; Rosiek, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has reported deviations from the SM expectations in $B\\to K^* \\mu^+\\mu^-$ angular observables, in $B_s\\to\\phi\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and in ratio $R(K)=Br[B\\to K \\mu^+\\mu^-]/Br[B\\to K e^+e^-]$. For all three decays, a heavy neutral gauge boson mediating $b\\to s\\mu^+\\mu^-$ transitions is a prime candidate for an explanation. As $R(K)$ measures violation of lepton-flavour universality, it is interesting to examine the possibility that also lepton flavour is violated. In this article, we investigate the perspectives to discover the lepton-flavour violating modes $B\\to K^{(*)}\\tau^\\pm\\mu^\\mp$, $B_s\\to \\tau^\\pm\\mu^\\mp$ and $B\\to K^{(*)} \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$, $B_s\\to \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$. For this purpose we consider a simplified model in which new-physics effects originate from an additional neutral gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$) with generic couplings to quarks and leptons. The constraints from $\\tau\\to3\\mu$, $\\tau\\to\\mu\

  16. The $B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^−$ decay, lepton flavour violation and lepton flavour universality at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pescatore, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays of $b$ hadrons are sensitive indirect probes of effects beyond the Standard Model. These are processes that are suppressed because they are forbidden at tree level but they can proceed via loops, where new particles can contribute in principle at the same level as the Standard Model. In particular, $b \\to s \\ell \\ell$ processes give access to many observables where effects of new physics can be observed. Recent results on these searches will be presented, including the new measurement of the $B^0_s \\to \\mu^{+} \\mu^-$ branching fraction, lepton flavour violation and lepton flavour universality measurements performed at the LHCb experiment.

  17. CFD model of laser additive manufacturing process of cylinders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tamsaout, T

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Figure 12: Temperature history and heating/cooling rates at points 1, 2, and 3 for the circular contour Figure 13: Temperature history and heating/cooling rates at points 1, 2, and 3 for hatch filling step Figure 14: Temperature history... and heating/cooling rates at point 4 (centre) for hatch filling step An important accumulation of heat in the already deposited part (cylinder) during the filling stage is observed. This accumulation can be attributed to the continuous nature of the process...

  18. Filamentous fungi for production of food additives and processing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, David B; Connerton, Ian F; MacKenzie, Donald A

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are metabolically versatile organisms with a very wide distribution in nature. They exist in association with other species, e.g. as lichens or mycorrhiza, as pathogens of animals and plants or as free-living species. Many are regarded as nature's primary degraders because they secrete a wide variety of hydrolytic enzymes that degrade waste organic materials. Many species produce secondary metabolites such as polyketides or peptides and an increasing range of fungal species is exploited commercially as sources of enzymes and metabolites for food or pharmaceutical applications. The recent availability of fungal genome sequences has provided a major opportunity to explore and further exploit fungi as sources of enzymes and metabolites. In this review chapter we focus on the use of fungi in the production of food additives but take a largely pre-genomic, albeit a mainly molecular, view of the topic.

  19. Search for lepton flavour violation in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, A. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Alexa, C. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep{yields}{mu}X and ep{yields}{tau}X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions and 13.7 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchmueller-Rueckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of {lambda}=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  20. Minimal flavour violation an effective field theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, G.; Isidori, G.; Strumia, A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a general analysis of extensions of the Standard Model which satisfy the criterion of Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV). We define this general framework by constructing a low-energy effective theory containing the Standard Model fields, with one or two Higgs doublets and, as the only source of SU(3)^5 flavour symmetry breaking, the background values of fields transforming under the flavour group as the ordinary Yukawa couplings. We analyse present bounds on the effective scale of dimension-six operators, which range between 1 and 10 TeV, with the most stringent constraints imposed by B -> X_s gamma. In this class of theories, it is possible to relate predictions for FCNC processes in B physics to those in K physics. We compare the sensitivity of various experimental searches in probing the hypothesis of MFV. Within the two-Higgs-doublet scenario, we develop a general procedure to obtain all tan(beta)-enhanced Higgs-mediated FCNC amplitudes, discussing in particular their impact in B -> l^+l^-, Delta...

  1. Following butter flavour deterioration with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cláudia R B S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2012-09-15

    Off-flavours develop naturally in butter and the process is accelerated by heat. An acoustic wave sensor was used to detect the aroma compounds evolved from heated butter and the results have shown that registered marked changes were coincident to odour changes detected by sensory analysis. The flavour compounds have also been analysed by GC/MS for identification. The response of the sensor was fully characterized in terms of the sensitivity to each of the identified compounds, and sensitivities of the system SPME/sensor were compared with the sensitivities of the system SPME/GC/MS. It was found that the sensor analytical system was more sensitive to methylketones than to fatty acids. The SPME/GC/MS system also showed the highest sensitivity to 2-heptanone, followed by 2-nonanone, but third place was occupied by undecanone and butanoic acid, to which the sensor showed moderate sensitivity. 2-heptanone was found to be an appropriate model compound to follow odour changes till the 500 h, and the lower sensitivity of the sensor to butanoic acid showed to be a positive characteristic, as saturation was prevented, and other more subtle changes in the flavour could be perceived. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Heavy Flavour Electron Elliptic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto

    Due to the large mass of the Charm and Beauty quarks, they are c reated in the very first moments of the ultra-high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions taking place at the CERN LHC, therefore, they should be unaware of the geome try of the colli- sion system and carry no azimuthal anisotropies. Similarly , the energy loss via gluon radiation for these massive quarks should be suppressed, th e so-called dead cone ef- fect. Although the observation of elliptic flow in the electro ns produced through the semileptonic decay of these heavy mesons is an indirect meas urement, throughout this thesis it will be shown that a strong correlation exists between the momentum anisotropy of the mother and daughter particles. In the low t ransverse momentum region such measurement would establish whether or not the s ystem reaches local thermal equilibrium. While at large transverse momentum, t he observation of collec- tivity for the heavy flavours can be understood only if the col lisional and radiative in-medium interaction...

  3. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

    2012-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  4. PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES OF BORON CARBIDE WITH HAFNIUM DIBORIDE ADDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sairam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of investigations on densification, mechanical and electrical properties of boron carbide (B₄C with the addition of HfB₂. High dense B₄C-HfB₂ (2.5-30 wt.% composites were prepared by hot pressing at a temperature of 2173 K with 40 MPa mechanical pressure. The B₄C-HfB₂ composite mixture exhibited a better sintering aptitude compared with monolithic B₄C. Hardness and elastic modulus of B₄C-HfB₂ composites were measured to be in the range 36-28GPa and 465-525GPa respectively. Indentation fracture toughness of B₄C increased with HfB₂ content and obtained a maximum of 7 MPa.m 1/2 at 30 wt.% HfB₂, which is ∼3 times higher than the monolithic B₄C. Crack deflection was identified to be the major toughening mechanism in the developed composite. B₄C-10wt.% HfB₂ composite exhibited a maximum electrical conductivity of 7144 Ω-1m-1 which is 26% higher than the conductivity of monolithic B₄C (5639 Ω-1m-1 at 1373 K.

  5. Search for lepton flavour violation at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-03-15

    A search for second and third generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions via the lepton flavour violating processes ep{yields}{mu}X and ep{yields}{tau}X is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full data sample taken at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=319 GeV is used for the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 245 pb{sup -1} of e{sup +}p and 166 pb{sup -1} of e{sup -}p collision data. No evidence for the production of such leptoquarks is observed in the H1 data. Leptoquarks produced in e{sup {+-}}p collisions with a coupling strength of {lambda}=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to leptoquark masses of 712 GeV and 479 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  6. New perspectives for heavy flavour physics from the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Heavy flavours represent a challenge for lattice QCD. We discuss it in very general terms. We give an idea of the significant recent progress which opens up good perspectives for high precision first principles QCD computations for flavour physics. (orig.)

  7. Flavour-Violating Gluino and Squark Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC; Porod, Werner; /Wurzburg U.

    2010-06-11

    We consider scenarios with large flavour violating entries in the squark mass matrices focusing on the mixing between second and third generation squarks. These entries govern both, flavour violating low energy observables on the one hand and squark and gluino decays on the other hand. We first discuss the constraints on the parameter space due to the recent data on B mesons from the B factories and Tevatron. We then consider flavour violating squark and gluino decays and show that they can still be typically of order 10% despite the stringent constraints from low energy data. Finally we briefly comment on the impact for searches and parameter determinations at future collider experiments such as the upcoming LHC or a future International Linear Collider.

  8. Tests of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lupato, Anna

    2018-01-01

    In the Standard Model the electroweak coupling of the gauge bosons to leptons is independent of the lepton flavour. Semileptonic and rare decays of b quarks provide an ideal laboratory to test this property. Any violation of Lepton Flavour Universality would be a clear sign of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this work a review of the Lepton Flavour Universality tests performed using data collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 at a centre of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV is presented.

  9. Searches for lepton flavour violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Charged lepton flavour is conserved within the Standard Model (SM) up to exceedingly small rates of about $10^{-50}$. This makes charged lepton flavour violation (cLFV) a very interesting place to look for hints of New Physics (NP). In fact, many NP scenarios predict cLFV to occur at rates within the reach of the experiments. Finding these transitions would mean a definite departure from the SM, while not finding them narrows the NP phase space. In this seminar, the latest LHCb results in the cLFV sector will be presented, and their implications for NP scenarios discussed.

  10. Heavy Flavour Production and Decay at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, RWL; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is taking advantage of its large integrated luminosity band sophisticated muon and dimuon triggers to make competitive measurements of heavy flavour production and decay. Inclusive production and heavy flavour jet production is discussed before turning to charm and onium production. The production and decay of individual B hadron species is then addressed, including the current best measurement of the Λb lifetime. A much improved analysis of CP related quantities in Bs decays is presented, before turning to recent results and prospects for rare B decays.

  11. Heavy-flavour production in ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Shingo

    2014-06-15

    We present measurements of heavy-flavour production in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV and in p–Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV by the ALICE Collaboration. A strong suppression of heavy-flavour production at high p{sub T} is observed in central Pb–Pb collisions, while non-zero elliptic flow is seen at low p{sub T} in semi-central collisions. The cold nuclear matter effects on the measurements in Pb–Pb collisions have been investigated in p–Pb collisions, and no large effects have been observed.

  12. An expert system for automated flavour matching - Prioritizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Bárbara Santos; Tøstesen, Marie; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2017-01-01

    Flavour matching can be viewed as trying to reproduce a specific flavour. This is a time consuming task and may lead to flavour mixtures that are too complex or too expensive to be commercialized. In order to facilitate the matching, we have developed a new mathematical model, called Prioritizer....

  13. LHCb New algorithms for Flavour Tagging at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Fazzini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The Flavour Tagging technique allows to identify the B initial flavour, required in the measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems. The identification performances at LHCb are further enhanced thanks to the contribution of new algorithms.

  14. Attributes and consumer acceptance of yoghurt flavoured with non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The value of non-cultivated indigenous fruits as flavouring agents for yoghurt has not been given sufficient attention in Swaziland. Consequently, commercial cultivated fruits are used as yoghurt flavours, resulting in higher production costs for the dessert. A study of sensory and physical characteristics of yoghurt flavoured ...

  15. High fluoride and low pH level have been detected in popular flavoured beverages in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rahim, Zubaidah HA; Bakri, Marina M; Zakir, HM; Ahmed, IA; Zulkifli, NA

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In children, excessive ingestion of fluoride from different sources including bottled drinking water and flavoured beverages or soft drinks can lead to the development of dental fluorosis. In addition, the pH level of beverages is important. Low pH can cause dental erosion. In this study we explore the fluoride content and pH level of certain popular beverages available in Malaysian supermarkets and hawkers' stalls. Methods: Bottled drinking water and selected popular flavoured...

  16. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section 713.4..., processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. (a) Declaration requirements for additionally planned activities. (1) You must declare additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2...

  17. Sweetness flavour interactions in soft drinks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahon, D.F.; Roozen, J.P.; Graaf, de C.

    1996-01-01

    Sucrose can be substituted by intense sweeteners to lower the calorie content of soft drinks. Although the sweetness is kept at the same level as much as possible, the flavour of the product often changes. This change could be due to both the mechanism of sensory perception and interactive effects

  18. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Collider and flavour physics. Coordinators: DEBAJYOTI CHOUDHURY1, ASESH K DATTA2 and ANIRBAN KUNDU3,∗. 1Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 007, India. 2Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research.

  19. Some theoretical issues in heavy flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the recent developments in heavy flavour physics will be reviewed. This will include an update on some of the Standard Model predictions, and a summary of recent measurements that may indicate the presence of new physics (NP). The focus will be on selected models of NP that are indicated by the anomalies in ...

  20. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  1. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-31

    Oct 31, 2014 ... A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understanding heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multiquark hadrons the ...

  2. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understand- ing heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure. (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multi- quark hadrons the hadron ...

  3. Safety evaluation of natural flavour complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, R.L.; Adams, T.B.; Cohen, S.M.; Doull, J.; Feron, V.J.; Goodman, J.I.; Hall, R.L.; Marnett, L.J.; Portoghese, P.S.; Waddell, W.J.; Wagner, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Natural flavour complexes (NFCs) are chemical mixtures obtained by applying physical separation methods to botanical sources. Many NFCs are derived from foods. In the present paper, a 12-step procedure for the safety evaluation of NFCs, 'the naturals paradigm', is discussed. This procedure, which is

  4. Neutrino flavour evolution through fluctuating matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Kneller, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    A neutrino propagating through fluctuating matter can experience large amplitude transitions between its states. Such transitions occur in supernovae and compact object mergers due to turbulent matter profiles and neutrino self-interactions. In this paper we study, both numerically and analytically, three-flavour neutrino transformation through fluctuating matter built from two and three Fourier modes (FMs). We find flavour transformation effects which cannot occur with just two flavours. For the case of two FMs we observe the equivalent of ‘induced transparency’ from quantum optics whereby transitions between a given pair of states are suppressed due to the presence of a resonant mode between another pair. When we add a third FM we find a new effect whereby the third mode can manipulate the transition probabilities of the two mode case so as to force complete transparency or, alternatively, restore ‘opacity’ meaning the perturbative Hamiltonian regains its ability to induce neutrino flavour transitions. In both applications we find analytic solutions are able to match the amplitude and wavenumber of the numerical results to within a few percent. We then consider a case of turbulence and show how the theory can be used to understand the very different response of a neutrino to what appears to be two, almost identical, instances of turbulence.

  5. Search for Charged Lepton Flavour Violation at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Swagata

    2017-01-01

    Lepton flavour is a conserved quantity in the standard model of particle physics, but it does not follow from an underlying gauge symmetry. After the discovery of neutrino oscillation, it has been established that lepton flavour is not conserved in the neutral sector. Thus the lepton sector is an excellent place to look for New Physics, and in this perspective the Charged Lepton Flavour Violation is interesting. Various extensions of the standard model predict lepton flavour violating decays that can be observed at LHC. This talk presents several searches for lepton flavour violation with data collected by the CMS detector.

  6. General squark flavour mixing: constraints, phenomenology and benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    De Causmaecker, Karen; Herrmann, Bjoern; Mahmoudi, Farvah; O'Leary, Ben; Porod, Werner; Sekmen, Sezen; Strobbe, Nadja

    2015-11-19

    We present an extensive study of non-minimal flavour violation in the squark sector in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We investigate the effects of multiple non-vanishing flavour-violating elements in the squark mass matrices by means of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scanning technique and identify parameter combinations that are favoured by both current data and theoretical constraints. We then detail the resulting distributions of the flavour-conserving and flavour-violating model parameters. Based on this analysis, we propose a set of benchmark scenarios relevant for future studies of non-minimal flavour violation in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  7. The supersymmetric flavour problem in 5D GUTs and its consequences for LHC phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fichet, S.; Kraml, S. [CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-09-15

    We study supersymmetric models with a GUT-sized extra dimension, where both the Higgs fields and the SUSY breaking hidden sector are localized on a 4D brane. Exponential wave function profiles of the matter fields give rise to hierarchical structures in the Yukawa couplings and soft terms. Such structures can naturally explain hierarchical fermion masses and mixings, while at the same time alleviating the supersymmetric flavour problem. We discuss two sources of supersymmetry breaking, radion mediation and brane fields, and perform a detailed numerical analysis, thoroughly taking into account the proliferation of unknown O(1) coefficients that occurs in this class of models. It turns out that additional assumptions on supersymmetry breaking are necessary to evade the stringent experimental bounds on lepton flavour violation. The favourable regions of parameter space are then examined with regards to their LHC phenomenology. They generically feature heavy gluinos and squarks beyond current bounds. Lepton flavour violation in SUSY cascade decays can give interesting signatures. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of Flavour and Volatile Flavour Compounds of Mixed Elderberry Juices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Vítová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to find the best composition for fruit drink based on elderberries with optimal flavour characteristics. For this purpose elderberry juice was mixed with various fruit juices (grape, black currant, apple, orange, carrot in various ratios, flavour was evaluated sensorially and instrumentally as the content of aroma compounds. Five flavour characteristics (sweet, acid/sour, bitter, astringent, characteristic elderberry, off-flavour, odour, texture (mouth-feel, colour and overall acceptability were evaluated sensorially using scale. Aroma compounds were extracted by solid phase microextraction and assessed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The significant differences (P < 0.05 in flavour were found between samples, which could be explained by differences in their volatile profiles. In total 57 compounds were identified in fruit juices and included 20 alcohols, 10 aldehydes, 8 ketones, 7 acids, 7 esters and 5 other compounds. Alcohols were quantitatively the most important group of all juices. The grape-elderberry juice, in optimum ratio 7:3 (70% v/v of elderberry, was proposed for practical use owing to the pleasant sweetish, elderberry flavour, and excellent other sensory characteristics.

  9. Physico-chemical change and heat stability of extra virgin olive oils flavoured by selected Tunisian aromatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, M A; Grati-Kamoun, N; Attia, H

    2009-10-01

    Objectives of this work were studying physico-chemical change and heat stability of olive oils flavoured by selected Tunisian aromatic plants. Flavoured olive oils were prepared by maceration of fresh plant materials (rosemary, lavender, sage, menthe, basil, lemon and thyme) with olive oil at a 5% w/w level for 15 days. A sensorial evaluation was applied to select more appreciate flavoured olive oils by consumers. An oxidative procedure was applied to test the stability of selected flavoured olive oils: oils samples were kept in glass bottles and heated at 60 and 130 degrees C during 55 days and 6h, respectively. The resistance to oxidation of these selected flavoured oils was compared to a control samples by measuring PV, K232 and K270 values and change in chlorophyll, carotenes and polyphénols contents. Obtained results show that addition of aromatic plants causes a slight increase in free acidity and viscosity of aromatised olive oils. L*, b* and a* values show that addition of thyme cause a great change in olive oil colours. Heat stability results shows that from selected aromatic plants, rosemary was effectiveness against oxidation followed by thyme and lemon. However, olive oil flavoured with basil exhibit a similar behaviour versus thermal oxidation then the natural olive oil.

  10. Flavour-changing neutral currents making and breaking the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archilli, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; Owen, P.; Petridis, K. A.

    2017-06-01

    The standard model of particle physics is our best description yet of fundamental particles and their interactions, but it is known to be incomplete. As yet undiscovered particles and interactions might exist. One of the most powerful ways to search for new particles is by studying processes known as flavour-changing neutral current decays, whereby a quark changes its flavour without altering its electric charge. One example of such a transition is the decay of a beauty quark into a strange quark. Here we review some intriguing anomalies in these decays, which have revealed potential cracks in the standard model—hinting at the existence of new phenomena.

  11. submitter Flavour-changing neutral currents making and breaking the standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Archilli, F; Owen, P; Petridis, K A

    2017-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics is our best description yet of fundamental particles and their interactions, but it is known to be incomplete. As yet undiscovered particles and interactions might exist. One of the most powerful ways to search for new particles is by studying processes known as flavour-changing neutral current decays, whereby a quark changes its flavour without altering its electric charge. One example of such a transition is the decay of a beauty quark into a strange quark. Here we review some intriguing anomalies in these decays, which have revealed potential cracks in the standard model—hinting at the existence of new phenomena.

  12. Changes in flavour and taste of irradiated coffee beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.; Loaharanu, S.; Vokac, L.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of changes in the smell and taste of coffee from beans submitted to irradiation for preservation is a significant gap in the programme devoted to increasing the product life time with such a process. Therefore, the main objective of the paper was to evaluate changes in aroma and flavour that can be noticed by the consumer. Coffee beans were given disinfestation doses of 50krad, producing an insect mortality rate of 98.33% +-2.89 in Araecerus fasciculatus (adult stage). The samples, provided by IBC, were from the same crop and free from pesticides. Some of the material was kept by that Institute for organoleptic tests. The remainder was sent to the National Institute of Technology for gas-chromatographic analysis. Should any significant changes be noticed, it could be assumed that the gamma-irradiation process would be rejected by the consumer. However, no significant change was observed in the most important characteristics, flavour and aroma, that might induce the consumer to reject irradiated coffee beans. (author)

  13. Multiple High-Fidelity Modeling Tools for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Development, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Despite the rapid commercialization of additive manufacturing technology such as selective laser melting, SLM, there are gaps in process modeling and material...

  14. Multiple High-Fidelity Modeling Tools for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Development, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Despite the rapid commercialization of additive manufacturing technology such as selective laser melting, SLM, there are gaps in process modeling and material...

  15. Food additives and nutrient sources added to food: developments since the creation of EFSA

    OpenAIRE

    Dusemund B; Gilbert J; Gott D; Kenigswald H; König J; Lambré C; Leblanc J-C; Mortensen A; Tobback P

    2012-01-01

    During the ten-year period since the creation of EFSA, two scientific panels of EFSA, the former Scientific Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC Panel) and the Scientific Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS Panel) have been successively responsible for the safety assessment of food additives and nutrient sources added to food. They have successfully addressed a challenging number of applications and ...

  16. Search for flavour-changing neutral currents with top quarks arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Skovpen, Kirill

    Flavour-changing neutral currents are extremely rare processes in the standard model that can be sensitive to various new physics effects. The summary of the latest experimental results from the LHC experiments is given. Preliminary results of sensitivity studies for future colliders are also discussed.

  17. Heavy flavour production and spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258787

    2012-01-01

    At the Moriond QCD conference LHCb has presented results on heavy flavour production and spectroscopy. Here the latest results are discussed, which include the first observation and measurement of the branching fraction of the hadronic decay $B^+_e \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$, the mass measurement of the excited B mesons and the mass measurement of the $\\Xi_b$ and $\\Omega_b$ baryons.

  18. Neutrino-Flavoured Sneutrino Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    March-Russell, John; McCullough, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    A simple theory of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) naturally linked to neutrino flavour physics is studied. The DM sector comprises a spectrum of mixed lhd-rhd sneutrino states where both the sneutrino flavour structure and mass splittings are determined by the associated neutrino masses and mixings. Prospects for indirect detection from solar capture are good due to a large sneutrino-nucleon cross-section afforded by the inelastic splitting (solar capture limits exclude an explanation of DAMA/LIBRA). We find parameter regions where all heavier states will have decayed, leaving only one flavour mixture of sneutrino as the candidate DM. Such regions have a unique `smoking gun' signature--sneutrino annihilation in the Sun produces a pair of neutrino mass eigenstates free from vacuum oscillations, with the potential for detection at neutrino telescopes through the observation of a hard spectrum of nu_mu and nu_tau (for a normal neutrino hierarchy). Next generation direct detection experiments can explore much of...

  19. Neutrino Masses and Lepton Flavour Violation in Thick Brane Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, G; De Gouvêa, A; Rebelo, Margarida N; Barenboim, Gabriela; Gouvea, Andre de

    2001-01-01

    We address the issue of lepton flavour violation and neutrino masses in the ``fat-brane'' paradigm, where flavour changing processes are suppressed by localising different fermion field wave-functions at different positions (in the extra dimensions) in a thick brane. We study the consequences of suppressing lepton number violating charged lepton decays within this scenario for lepton masses and mixing angles. In particular, we find that charged lepton mass matrices are constrained to be quasi-diagonal. We further consider whether the same paradigm can be used to naturally explain small Dirac neutrino masses by considering the existence of three right-handed neutrinos in the brane, and discuss the requirements to obtain phenomenologically viable neutrino masses and mixing angles. Finally, we examine models where neutrinos obtain a small Majorana mass by breaking lepton number in a far away brane and show that, if the fat-brane paradigm is the solution to the absence of lepton number violating charged lepton de...

  20. arXiv Flavour Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenik, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    These notes represent a summary of three lectures on flavour and CP violation, given at the CERNs European School of High Energy Physics in 2014. They cover flavour physics within the standard model, phenomenology of CP violation in meson mixing and decays, as well as constraints of flavour observableson physics beyond the standard model. In preparing the lectures (and consequently this summary) I drew heavily from several existing excellent and exhaustive sets of lecture notes and reviews on flavour physics and CP violation [1]. The reader is encouraged to consult those as well as the original literature for a more detailed study.

  1. Flavour tagging of $b$ mesons in $pp$ collisions at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Mueller, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Flavour tagging, i.e. the inference of the production flavour of reconstructed $b$ hadrons, is essential for precision measurements of decay time-dependent $CP$ violation and of mixing parameters in the the neutral $B$ meson systems. LHC's $pp$ collisions with their high track multiplicities constitute a challenging environment for flavour tagging and demand for new and improved strategies. We present recent progress and new developments in flavour tagging at the LHCb experiment, which will allow for a further improvement of $CP$ violation measurements in decays of $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons.

  2. First passage of time-reversible spectrally negative Markov additive processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanovs, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the first passage process of a spectrally negative Markov additive process (MAP). The focus is on the background Markov chain at the times of the first passage. This process is a Markov chain itself with a transition rate matrix Λ. Assuming time reversibility, we show that all the

  3. Characterization of additive manufacturing processes for polymer micro parts productions using direct light processing (DLP) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoudinejad, Ali; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    chains for the production of parts with micro scale features. A specifically designed direct light processing (DLP) AM machine suitable for precision printing has been used. A test part is designed having features with different sizes and aspect ratios in order to evaluate the DLP AM machine capability...

  4. Searches for flavour changing neutral currents in the top sector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00359999; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) processes are forbidden at tree level in the Standard Model and highly suppressed at higher orders. This makes FCNC one of the key processes to search for new physics since any small deviations from the Standard Model expectations could have a big impact. Both ATLAS and CMS Collaborations have designed a comprehensive strategy to search for FCNC in top quark physics both in the production and decay. The strategies followed by both collaborations are here described, using data from $pp$ collisions at the LHC collected at a centre of mass energies of 7 and 8~TeV with integrated luminosities ranging from $5~\\rm{ fb}^{-1}$ to $20.3~\\rm{ fb}^{-1}$.

  5. Flavour Independent Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    A flavour independent search for the CP-even and CP-odd neutral Higgs bosons h and A is performed in 624/pb of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209GeV. Higgs boson production through the e^+e^- -> Z h and the e^+e^- ->h A processes is considered and decays of the Higgs bosons into hadrons are studied. No significant signal is observed and 95% confidence level limits on the hZZ and hAZ couplings are derived as a function of the Higgs boson masses. Assuming the Standard Model cross section for the Higgs-strahlung process and a 100% branching fraction into hadrons, a 95% confidence level lower limit on the mass of the Higgs boson is set at 110.3GeV.

  6. Contribution of food additives to sodium and phosphorus content of diets rich in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Anna; Klinger, Andrew; Choquette, Suzanne S; Luzuriaga-McPherson, Alexandra; Bell, Emmy K; Darnell, Betty; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus-based food additives increase the total phosphorus content of processed foods. However, the extent to which these additives augment total phosphorus intake per day is unclear. To examine the contribution of phosphorus-based food additives to the total phosphorus content of processed foods, separate 4-day menus for a low-additive and additive-enhanced diet were developed using Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR) software. The low-additive diet was designed to conform to U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines for energy and phosphorus intake (∼2,000 kcal/day and 900 mg of phosphorus per day), and it contained minimally processed foods. The additive-enhanced diet contained the same food items as the low-additive diet except that highly processed foods were substituted for minimally processed foods. Food items from both diets were collected, blended, and sent for measurement of energy and nutrient intake. The low-additive and additive-enhanced diet provided approximately 2,200 kcal, 700 mg of calcium, and 3,000 mg of potassium per day on average. Measured sodium and phosphorus content standardized per 100 mg of food was higher each day of the additive-enhanced diet as compared with the low-additive diet. When averaged over the 4 menu days, the measured phosphorus and sodium contents of the additive-enhanced diet were 606 ± 125 and 1,329 ± 642 mg higher than the low-additive diet, respectively, representing a 60% increase in total phosphorus and sodium content on average. When comparing the measured values of the additive-enhanced diet to NDSR-estimated values, there were no statistically significant differences in measured versus estimated phosphorus contents. Phosphorus and sodium additives in processed foods can substantially augment phosphorus and sodium intake, even in relatively healthy diets. Current dietary software may provide reasonable estimates of the phosphorus content in processed foods. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney

  7. 41 CFR 102-38.225 - What are the additional requirements in the bid process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Bids Acceptance of Bids § 102-38.225 What are the additional requirements in the bid process? All sales except fixed price sales must contain a certification of independent price...

  8. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  9. Bomb reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. Part II: Influence of the addition elements in the reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anca Abati, R.; Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1962-01-01

    This work shows the influence of uranium oxide and uranyl fluoride in the reduction of uranium with Ca and Mg. These additions are more harmful when using smaller bombs. The uranyl fluoride has influence in the reduction process; the curves yield-concentration shows two regions depending upon the salt concentration. The behaviour of this addition in these regions can be explained following the different decompositions that can take place during the reduction process. (Author) 9 refs

  10. Measurements of heavy-flavour decay leptons with ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of electrons and muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at central and forward rapidity performed by the ALICE Collaboration in p–Pb (√sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb–Pb collisions (√sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are reconstructed using several detectors of the ALICE central barrel. Muons are reconstructed using the muon spectrometer at forward rapidity (2.5 < y < 4. The nuclear modification factors in Pb–Pb (RAA and in p–Pb (RpPb collisions, and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2 in Pb– Pb collisions will be discussed. Theoretical predictions are compared with the data. In addition, the measurement of the azimuthal correlation between electrons from heavyflavour hadron decays and charged hadrons in p–Pb collisions will be shown.

  11. Oxidative flavour deterioration of fish oil enriched milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni Let, Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Frankel, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    -% of n-3 fatty acids) and one with cod liver oil (26 wt-% of n-3 fatty acids). The effect of added calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) on oxidation was also investigated. Emulsions based on cod liver oil with a slightly elevated peroxide value (1.5 meq/kg) oxidised significantly faster......The oxidative deterioration of milk emulsions supplemented with 1.5 wt-% fish oil was investigated by sensory evaluation and by determining the peroxide value and volatile oxidation products after cold storage. Two types of milk emulsions were produced, one with a highly unsaturated tuna oil (38 wt...... than the tuna oil emulsions, having a lower initial peroxide value (0.1 meq/kg). In the tuna oil emulsions the fishy off-flavour could not be detected throughout the storage period. Addition of 5-50 ppm EDTA significantly reduced the development of volatile oxidation products in the cod liver oil...

  12. A mechanistic understanding of processing additive-induced efficiency enhancement in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, Kristin

    2013-10-31

    The addition of processing additives is a widely used approach to increase power conversion efficiencies for many organic solar cells. We present how additives change the polymer conformation in the casting solution leading to a more intermixed phase-segregated network structure of the active layer which in turn results in a 5-fold enhancement in efficiency. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Production and spectroscopy in heavy flavour

    CERN Document Server

    Maevskiy, Artem; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A wide programme of studies of heavy flavour production at the LHC is performed with the ATLAS detector, which includes charm and beauty hadrons, quarkonia production in both sectors, and associated production J/psi + W, J/psi + Z and J/psi + J/psi. This talk will cover recent results, including the differential production cross-section measurement of di-Jpsi and effective cross-section from double parton scattering. Studies on the production of exotic states are also presented.

  14. New Physics Search in Flavour Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    With the running B, kaon and neutrino physics experiments, flavour physics takes centre stage within today's particle physics. We discuss the opportunities offered by these experiments in our search for new physics beyond the SM and discuss their complementarity to collider physics. We focus on rare B and kaon decays, highlighting specific observables in an exemplary mode. We also comment on the so-called B {yields} {pi}{pi} and B {yields} K{pi} puzzles. Moreover, we briefly discuss the restrictive role of long-distance strong interactions and some new tools such as QCD factorization and SCET to handle them.

  15. Validation of the FEA of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-10-01

    In order to meet requirements by automotive industry like decreasing the CO2 emissions, which reflects in reducing vehicles mass in the car body, the chassis and the powertrain, the continuous innovation and further development of existing production processes are required. In sheet metal forming processes the process limits and components characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the process limit is achieved. This contribution deals with experimental investigations of a forming process with additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Based on FEA a tool system is designed and developed by IFUM. For this purpose, the steel material HCT600 is analyzed numerically. Within the experimental investigations, the deep drawing processes, with and without the additional force transmission are carried out. Here, a comparison of the produced rectangle cups is done. Subsequently, the identical deep drawing processes are investigated numerically. Thereby, the values of the punch reaction force and displacement are estimated and compared with experimental results. Thus, the validation of material model is successfully carried out on process scale. For further quantitative verification of the FEA results the experimental determined geometry of the rectangular cup is measured optically with ATOS system of the company GOM mbH and digitally compared with external software Geomagic®QualifyTM. The goal of this paper is the verification of the transferability of the FEA model for a conventional deep drawing process to a deep drawing process with additional force transmission with a counter punch.

  16. Potential of different mechanical and thermal treatments to control off-flavour generation in broccoli puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutidou, Maria; Grauwet, Tara; Van Loey, Ann; Acharya, Parag

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this study was scientifically investigate the impact of the sequence of different thermo-mechanical treatments on the volatile profile of differently processed broccoli puree, and to investigate if any relationship persists between detected off-flavour changes and microstructural changes as a function of selected process conditions. Comparison of the headspace GC-MS fingerprinting of the differently processed broccoli purees revealed that an adequate combination of processing steps allows to reduce the level of off-flavour volatiles. Moreover, applying mechanical processing before or after the thermal processing at 90°C determines the pattern of broccoli tissue disruption, resulting into different microstructures and various enzymatic reactions inducing volatile generation. These results may aid the identification of optimal process conditions generating a reduced level of off-flavour in processed broccoli. In this way, broccoli can be incorporated as a food ingredient into mixed food products with limited implications on sensorial consumer acceptance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High performance poly(etherketoneketone) (PEKK) composite parts fabricated using Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Kishore, Vidya [ORNL; Chen, Xun [ORNL; Ajinjeru, Christine [ORNL; Duty, Chad [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hassen, Ahmed A [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    ORNL collaborated with Arkema Inc. to investigate poly(etherketoneketone) (PEKK) and its composites as potential feedstock material for Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. In this work thermal and rheological properties were investigated and characterized in order to identify suitable processing conditions and material flow behavior for BAAM process.

  18. Heavy flavour production in 13 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Braun, Svende Annelies

    2015-01-01

    This summer first data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV is collected at the LHC. This opens a new era in searches for new particles and precision tests of the Standard Model. Heavy flavour production plays an important role both as precision QCD test and as backgrounds for new particles. The first measurements of heavy flavour production are presented.

  19. Flavour democracy and the lepton-quark hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, H. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland) Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Sektion Physik); Plankl, J. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Sektion Physik)

    1990-03-22

    The mass hierarchy of the leptons and quarks is interpreted as a consequence of a coherent state phenomenon ('flavour democracy'). It is emphasized that particular forms of the mass matrices can arise from the coherent state basis. The violations of the 'flavour democracy' turn out to be relatively large. Numerical examples are presented. (orig.).

  20. Formation of flavour compounds in the Maillard reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of the Maillard reaction for food quality and focuses on flavour compound formation. The most important classes of Maillard flavour compounds are indicated and it is shown where they are formed in the Maillard reaction. Some emphasis is given on the kinetics of

  1. Flavour Independent Searches for Hadronically Decaying Neutral Higgs Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes flavour independent searches for hadronically decaying neutral Higgs bosons in the data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. The collected data-set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of around 610 pb^{-1}. The e+e- -> hA and e+e- -> hZ processes are considered, with direct Higgs boson decays into hadrons. No evidence for Higgs boson production is found, and cross-section limits are set as a function of the Higgs boson masses. No explicit assumptions are made on the underlying physics beyond the Standard Model, allowing interpretation of the data in a large class of models.

  2. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  3. Hard Fats As Additives In Palm Oil And Its Relationships To Crystallization Process And Polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira; Glazieli Marangoni; Ribeiro; Ana Paula Badan; dos Santos; Adenilson Oliveira; Cardoso; Lisandro Pavie; Kieckbusch; Theo Guenter

    2016-01-01

    The application of palm oil in fat-based product can be inappropriate due to its low crystallization rates and formation of crystalline clusters in post-processing stages. The adjustment of these properties can be achieved with the addition of hard fats, which are low-cost industrial products resulting from the process of total catalytic hydrogenation of liquid oils. During the crystallization of palm oil, these components can act as preferential nuclei in a crystalline ordering process, and ...

  4. Flavour chemicals in a sample of non-cigarette tobacco products without explicit flavour names sold in New York City in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Shannon M; Schroth, Kevin Rj; Grimshaw, Victoria; Luo, Wentai; DeGagne, Julia L; Tierney, Peyton A; Kim, Kilsun; Pankow, James F

    2018-03-01

    Youth who experiment with tobacco often start with flavoured products. In New York City (NYC), local law restricts sales of all tobacco products with 'characterising flavours' except for 'tobacco, menthol, mint and wintergreen'. Enforcement is based on packaging: explicit use of a flavour name (eg, 'strawberry') or image depicting a flavour (eg, a fruit) is presumptive evidence that a product is flavoured and therefore prohibited. However, a tobacco product may contain significant levels of added flavour chemicals even when the label does not explicitly use a flavour name. Sixteen tobacco products were purchased within NYC in 2015 that did not have explicit flavour names, along with three with flavour names. These were analysed for 92 known flavour chemicals plus triacetin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 14 of the 16 products had total determined flavour chemical levels that were higher (>0.3 mg/g) than in previously studied flavour-labelled products and of a chemical profile indicating added flavour chemicals. The results suggest that the tobacco industry has responded to sales restrictions by renaming flavoured products to avoid explicitly identifying them as flavoured. While chemical analysis is the most precise means of identifying flavours in tobacco products, federal tobacco laws pre-empt localities from basing regulations on that approach, limiting enforcement options. If the Food and Drug Administration would mandate that all tobacco products must indicate when flavourings are present above a specific level, local jurisdictions could enforce their sales restrictions. A level of 0.1 mg/g for total added flavour chemicals is suggested here as a relevant reference value for regulating added flavour chemicals in tobacco products. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Recent heavy-flavour results from ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing

    2018-02-01

    The ATLAS heavy-ion program utilizes heavy-flavour hadrons to probe the hot, dense matter formed at the LHC. Quarkonium measurements have been performed in pp, p+Pb and Pb+Pb systems to study medium effects. The Pb+Pb results show a strong suppression of charmonium productions in more central events. Proton-lead interactions show little modification of the 1S charmonium state, but seem to indicate a centrality dependence of the 2S state. Upsilons have been studied in p+Pb and are found to show decreasing behaviour in more central collisions. Inclusive muons with pT above 4 GeV have been studied to provide insight on open-flavour production, and are found to be strongly suppressed in Pb+Pb collisions with a substantial and significant elliptic flow signal. Muon-hadron correlations have also been studied in the 2016 = 8.16 TeV p+Pb data. There are clear indications of a near-side ridge, suggesting that similar mechanisms may be relevant for both the small and large systems.

  6. Use of nanotechnology in food processing, packaging and safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, lowering the costs of food additive ingredients and increasing the shelf life of food products could be achieved using this technology. The food market demands technologies, which are essential to keep market leadership in the food processing industry to produce fresh authentic, convenient and flavourful food ...

  7. Process for optimizing titanium and zirconium additions to aluminum welding consumables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvornak, M.J.; Frost, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for manufacturing an aluminum welding consumable. It comprises: creating an aluminum melt; adding to the aluminum melt solid pieces of a master alloy, comprising aluminum and a weld-enhancing additive to form a mixture, wherein the weld-enhancing additive being a material selected from the group consisting of titanium and zirconium, so that the weld-enhancing additive exists in the alloy prior to addition to the melt in the form of intermetallic particles relatively large in size and small in number, and after addition to the melt the weld-enhancing additive exists in the form of fractured intermetallic particles of refined size having dissolved fractured interfaces, casting the mixture into a chill mold to form an ingot; reducing the ingot to rods of rough wire dimension by cold rolling; annealing the reduced rods; and drawing the rods into wire

  8. Additive Manufacturing Processes: Selective Laser Melting, Electron Beam Melting and Binder Jetting-Selection Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokuldoss, Prashanth Konda; Kolla, Sri; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-06-19

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing or rapid prototyping, is gaining increasing attention due to its ability to produce parts with added functionality and increased complexities in geometrical design, on top of the fact that it is theoretically possible to produce any shape without limitations. However, most of the research on additive manufacturing techniques are focused on the development of materials/process parameters/products design with different additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser melting, electron beam melting, or binder jetting. However, we do not have any guidelines that discuss the selection of the most suitable additive manufacturing process, depending on the material to be processed, the complexity of the parts to be produced, or the design considerations. Considering the very fact that no reports deal with this process selection, the present manuscript aims to discuss the different selection criteria that are to be considered, in order to select the best AM process (binder jetting/selective laser melting/electron beam melting) for fabricating a specific component with a defined set of material properties.

  9. Additive Manufacturing Processes: Selective Laser Melting, Electron Beam Melting and Binder Jetting—Selection Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda Gokuldoss, Prashanth; Kolla, Sri; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing or rapid prototyping, is gaining increasing attention due to its ability to produce parts with added functionality and increased complexities in geometrical design, on top of the fact that it is theoretically possible to produce any shape without limitations. However, most of the research on additive manufacturing techniques are focused on the development of materials/process parameters/products design with different additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser melting, electron beam melting, or binder jetting. However, we do not have any guidelines that discuss the selection of the most suitable additive manufacturing process, depending on the material to be processed, the complexity of the parts to be produced, or the design considerations. Considering the very fact that no reports deal with this process selection, the present manuscript aims to discuss the different selection criteria that are to be considered, in order to select the best AM process (binder jetting/selective laser melting/electron beam melting) for fabricating a specific component with a defined set of material properties. PMID:28773031

  10. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor machine and plastic sacks; fermentation agents (fresh cage-luwakcoffee, “ragi tape”, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk; temperature of fermentation (room, 30 C, 35 C, and 40 C; and duration of fermentation (6, 12, and 18 hours. The experiment were replicated three times. Wet-coffee parchments were washed and sundried until moisture content reached 12%. The dried parchment was hulled and examined for the bean quality and flavors. The experiment indicated that 40 C fermentation in fermentor machine resulted in higher content of “full sour defect”. Fermentation agents significanly influenced bean size. Temperature treatment significanly influenced bulk density and bean size. The best flavor profile was obtained from fermentation in plastic sack at ambient temperature. Bacteria of fermented milk and “fresh luwak coffee” as fermentation agents resulted up to excellent flavor. Twelve hours fermentation produced best flavor of Arabica coffee compared to 6 and 18 hours. Key words: Arabica coffee, fermentation, flavour, fermentation agents

  11. EFSA Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 87 Revision 1 (FGE.87Rev1): Consideration of bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.47 (2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 17 bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters evaluated by the JECFA at the 63rd meeting in 2004. This revision of FGE.87 is made due to consideration of two additional...... substances [FL-no: 02.100 and 02.101] compared to previous version. Additionally, new information on EU production volume on two substances and information on stereoisomeric composition for 13 substances are also included. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach that integrates information...

  12. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 2 (FGE.77Rev2): Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related, to Pyridine, Pyrrole, Indole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.24Rev2 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 22 pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting). The revision of this consideration is made since additional toxicity data have become available...

  13. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 77, Revision 1 (FGE.77Rev1): Consideration of Pyridine, Pyrrole and Quinoline Derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 22 pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives evaluated by the JECFA (63rd meeting). The revision of this consideration is made since additional toxicity data have become available...

  14. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 51, Revision 2 (FGE.51Rev2): Consideration of alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (59th meeting, ) structurally related to alicyclic ketones secondary alcohols and related esters in FGE.09Rev6 (2015b)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    on metabolism and toxicity. The present consideration concerns a group of 24 alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting in 2002 and 63rd meeting in 2004). This revision is made due to inclusion of four additional substances cleared for genotoxicity concern...

  15. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 51, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by the JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to alicyclic, ketones secondary alcohols and related esters in FGE.09Rev3 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 20 alicyclic ketones and secondary alcohols and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) in 2002. This revision is made due to inclusion of seven additional substances...

  16. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2016 Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 75, Revision 1 (FGE.75Rev1): Consideration of tetrahydrofuran derivatives evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to tetrahydrofuran derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.33 (2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 10 tetrahydrofuran derivatives and one furanone derivative evaluated by the JECFA at the 63rd meeting in 2004. This revision is made due to additional toxicity data have become available...

  17. Gauge-Higgs unification with broken flavour symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olschewsky, M.

    2007-05-15

    We study a five-dimensional Gauge-Higgs unification model on the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} based on the extended standard model (SM) gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F}. The group SO(3){sub F} is treated as a chiral gauged flavour symmetry. Electroweak-, flavour- and Higgs interactions are unified in one single gauge group SU(7). The unified gauge group SU(7) is broken down to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} by orbifolding and imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The compactification scale of the theory is O(1) TeV. Furthermore, the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} is put on a lattice. This setting gives a well-defined staring point for renormalisation group (RG) transformations. As a result of the RG-flow, the bulk is integrated out and the extra dimension will consist of only two points: the orbifold fixed points. The model obtained this way is called an effective bilayered transverse lattice model. Parallel transporters (PT) in the extra dimension become nonunitary as a result of the blockspin transformations. In addition, a Higgs potential V({phi}) emerges naturally. The PTs can be written as a product e{sup A{sub y}}e{sup {eta}}e{sup A{sub y}} of unitary factors e{sup A{sub y}} and a selfadjoint factor e{sup {eta}}. The reduction 48 {yields} 35 + 6 + anti 6 + 1 of the adjoint representation of SU(7) with respect to SU(6) contains SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} leads to three SU(2){sub L} Higgs doublets: one for the first, one for the second and one for the third generation. Their zero modes serve as a substitute for the SM Higgs. When the extended SM gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} is spontaneously broken down to U(1){sub em}, an exponential gauge boson mass splitting occurs naturally. At a first step SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} x SO(3){sub F} is broken to SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} by VEVs for the selfadjoint factor e{sup {eta}}. This breaking leads to masses of flavour changing SO(3){sub F

  18. Development of a novel smoke-flavoured salmon product by sodium replacement using water vapour permeable bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, Arantxa; Fuentes, Ana; Barat, José M; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel

    2018-05-01

    Food manufacturers need to reduce sodium content to meet consumer and public health demands. In the present study, the use of sodium-free (SF) salt and KCl to develop a novel smoke-flavoured salmon product with reduced sodium content was evaluated. Fifty percent of NaCl was replaced with 50% of SF salt or 50% KCl in the salmon smoke-flavouring process, which was carried out using water vapour permeable bags. Triangle tests showed that samples with either SF salt or KCl were statistically similar to the control samples (100% NaCl). Because no sensorial advantage in using SF salt was found compared to KCl and given the lower price of KCl, the KCl-NaCl samples were selected for the next phase. The changes of physicochemical and microbial parameters in smoke-flavoured salmon during 42 days showed that partial replacement of NaCl with KCl did not significantly affect the quality and shelf-life of smoke-flavoured salmon, which was over 42 days. Smoke-flavoured salmon with 37% sodium reduction was developed without affecting the sensory features and shelf-life. This is an interesting option for reducing the sodium content in such products to help meet the needs set by both health authorities and consumers. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite scaffolds processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesavibul, Passakorn; Chantaweroad, Surapol; Laohaprapanon, Apinya; Channasanon, Somruethai; Uppanan, Paweena; Tanodekaew, Siriporn; Chalermkarnnon, Prasert; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications by using lithography-based additive manufacturing techniques has been introduced due to the abilities to control porous structures with suitable resolutions. In this research, the use of hydroxyapatite cellular structures, which are processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing machine, as a bone tissue engineering scaffold was investigated. The utilization of digital light processing system for additive manufacturing machine in laboratory scale was performed in order to fabricate the hydroxyapatite scaffold, of which biocompatibilities were eventually evaluated by direct contact and cell-culturing tests. In addition, the density and compressive strength of the scaffolds were also characterized. The results show that the hydroxyapatite scaffold at 77% of porosity with 91% of theoretical density and 0.36 MPa of the compressive strength are able to be processed. In comparison with a conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite, the scaffold did not present any cytotoxic signs while the viability of cells at 95.1% was reported. After 14 days of cell-culturing tests, the scaffold was able to be attached by pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) leading to cell proliferation and differentiation. The hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering was able to be processed by the lithography-based additive manufacturing machine while the biocompatibilities were also confirmed.

  20. Flavour symmetry breaking and tuning the strange quark mass for 2+1 quark flavours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Universidad Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Bornyakov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protovino (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2010-12-15

    QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the updown quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, which enables highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. (orig.)

  1. Numerical analysis of additive, Lévy and Feller processes with applications to option pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Christoph; Reichmann, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    We review the design and analysis of multiresolution (wavelet) methods for the numerical solution of the Kolmogoroff equations arising, among others, in financial engineering when Lévy and Feller or Additive processes are used to model the dynamics of the risky assets. In particular, the Dirichlet and free boundary problems connected to barrier and American style contracts are specified and solution algorithms based on wavelet representations of the Feller Processes' Dirichlet Forms are prese...

  2. Selected Issues of the Indicating Measurements in a Spark Ignition Engine with an Additional Expansion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Noga

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the turbocharged spark ignition engine with additional exhaust expansion in a separate cylinder, which is commonly known as the five-stroke engine. The research engine has been constructed based on the four cylinder engine in which two outer cylinders work as the fired cylinders, while two internally connected inner cylinders constitute the volume of the additional expansion process. The engine represents a powertrain realizing an ultra-expansion cycle. The purpose of the study was to find an effective additional expansion process in the five-stroke engine. Cylinder-pressure indicating measurements were carried out for one of the fired cylinders and the additional expansion cylinder. The study was performed for over 20 different points on the engine operation map. This allowed us to determine a dependence between the pressure indicated in the fired cylinders and in the additional expansion cylinders. A function of the mean pressure indicated in the additional expansion cylinder versus a brake mean effective pressure was also presented. This showed a load threshold from which the work of the cylinders of additional expansion produced benefits for the output of the experimental engine. The issues of mechanical efficiency and effective efficiency of this engine were also discussed.

  3. Processing of bituminous coal tar at high temperature with bituminous coal additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Hartmann, G.B.; Hupfer, H.; Leonhardt, P.

    1943-05-10

    In short tests, results of the effects of a bituminous coal addition to the processing of tar and pitch were obtainable. Coal used was that from the Heinitz Mines (Upper Silesian), saturated with 1--1.2% iron sulphate. On a mixture of bituminous coal tar residue and tar oil, with a relatively low level of solids and asphalt, a substitution was made for the addition of 2% alkalized iron-grude-catalyst with 20% coal. The same yield was reached using a straight-run procedure. The coal gave somewhat more gasification and additional asphalt in the sludge without increasing the solids content correspondingly. In spite of this, the carbonization results were somewhat improved, which led one to conclude that the coal addition fostered the decomposition of the tar asphalt, and, that the asphalt from the coal could be better carbonized than that out of the tar. One found, also, that the tar mixture with coal additive permitted trouble-free hydrogenation to gasoline and middle oil. Still another short test met with success. A bituminous coal tar pitch containing 24% benzene solids and 36% asphalt, which could not be processed with iron catalyst or even molybdenum-grude, was hydrogenated to gasoline and middle oil with a usable yield of .25 by a 20--25% addition of coal. Here too, the carbonization results were good. The addition of coal had no notable influence on the properties of the resulting oils. The document included test procedures. 11 tables.

  4. Process-Structure Linkages Using a Data Science Approach: Application to Simulated Additive Manufacturing Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, Evdokia; Rodgers, Theron M.; Gong, Xinyi; Cecen, Ahmet; Madison, Jonathan D.; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2017-01-01

    A novel data science workflow is developed and demonstrated to extract process-structure linkages (i.e., reduced-order model) for microstructure evolution problems when the final microstructure depends on (simulation or experimental) processing parameters. Our workflow consists of four main steps: data pre-processing, microstructure quantification, dimensionality reduction, and extraction/validation of process-structure linkages. These methods that can be employed within each step vary based on the type and amount of available data. In this paper, this data-driven workflow is applied to a set of synthetic additive manufacturing microstructures obtained using the Potts-kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) approach. Additive manufacturing techniques inherently produce complex microstructures that can vary significantly with processing conditions. Using the developed workflow, a low-dimensional data-driven model was established to correlate process parameters with the predicted final microstructure. In addition, the modular workflows developed and presented in this work facilitate easy dissemination and curation by the broader community.

  5. Hidden sources of phosphorus: presence of phosphorus-containing additives in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou-Arnal, Luis M; Arnaudas-Casanova, Laura; Caverni-Muñoz, Alberto; Vercet-Tormo, Antonio; Caramelo-Gutiérrez, Rocío; Munguía-Navarro, Paula; Campos-Gutiérrez, Belén; García-Mena, Mercedes; Moragrera, Belén; Moreno-López, Rosario; Bielsa-Gracia, Sara; Cuberes-Izquierdo, Marta

    2014-01-01

    An increased consumption of processed foods that include phosphorus-containing additives has led us to propose the following working hypothesis: using phosphate-rich additives that can be easily absorbed in processed foods involves a significant increase in phosphorus in the diet, which may be considered as hidden phosphorus since it is not registered in the food composition tables. The quantity of phosphorus contained in 118 processed products was determined by spectrophotometry and the results were contrasted with the food composition tables of the Higher Education Centre of Nutrition and Diet, those of Morandeira and those of the BEDCA (Spanish Food Composition Database) Network. Food processing frequently involves the use of phosphoric additives. The products whose label contains these additives have higher phosphorus content and higher phosphorus-protein ratio. We observed a discrepancy with the food composition tables in terms of the amount of phosphorus determined in a sizeable proportion of the products. The phosphorus content of prepared refrigerated foods hardly appears in the tables. Product labels provide little information on phosphorus content. We observed a discrepancy in phosphorus content in certain foods with respect to the food composition tables. We should educate our patients on reviewing the additives on the labels and on the limitation of processed foods. There must be health policy actions to deal with the problem: companies should analyse the phosphorus content of their products, display the correct information on their labels and incorporate it into the food composition tables. Incentives could be established to prepare food with a low phosphorus content and alternatives to phosphorus-containing additives.

  6. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220 Revision 3 (FGE.220Rev3): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated 3(2H)-Furanones from subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 10 flavouring substances from FGE.19 subgroup 4.4, in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 220 (FGE.220). FGE.220 is subdivided...... into two subgroups: subgroup 4.4a containing [FL-no: 13.089, 13.117, 13.119, 13.157 and 13.175] and subgroup 4.4b containing [13.010, 13.084 and 13.085, 13.099 and 13.176]. For both subgroups the Panel concluded that the genotoxicity alert could not be ruled out based on the data available and accordingly...... additional genotoxicity data were requested. In FGE.220, Revision 1, the Panel concluded that for the substances in subgroup 4.4b there is no concern for genotoxicity. In FGE.220, Revision 2, the Panel evaluated genotoxicity studies on two representative substances of subgroup 4.4a: 2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H...

  7. Modelling the effect of oil/fat content in food systems on flavour absorption by LLDPE.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, M.; Willige, van R.W.G.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the phenomena in food packaging interactions is flavour absorption. Absorption of flavour compounds from food products into food-packaging materials can result in loss of flavour compounds or an unbalance in the flavour profile changing a product's quality. The food matrix influences the

  8. Lepton flavour violation in a minimal S{sub 3}-invariant extension of the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondragon, A.; Mondragon, M.; Peinado, E. [IFUNAM, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    After a brief review of some relevant results on lepton masses and mixings, that had previously been derived in the framework of a Minimal S{sub 3}-Invariant Extension of the Standard Model, we derive explicit analytical expressions for the matrices of the Yukawa couplings and compute the branching ratios of some selected flavour changing neutral current processes as functions of the masses of the charged leptons and the neutral Higgs bosons. We find that the S{sub 3} X Z{sub 2} flavour symmetry and the strong mass hierarchy of the charged leptons strongly suppress the FCNC processes in the leptonic sector well below the present experimental upper bounds by many orders of magnitude. (Author)

  9. Study of Trehalose Addition on Aroma Retention in Dehydrated Strawberry Puree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draženka Komes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of dehydrated fruit products, the influence of the addition of two sugars (sucrose and trehalose on the retention of aroma components during dehydration of strawberry puree was investigated. Manual headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME, containing polydimethylsiloxane coated fibre (100 μm coupled with gas chromatography (GC-FID and GC-MS was used for the analysis of the aroma of strawberry puree dehydrated by using freeze drying and foam-mat drying. The analytes identified included esters, carbonyl compounds, terpenoids, several alcohols and acids. The results obtained in this study give further insight into the mechanisms concerning the application of trehalose as flavouring additive, due to its ability to retain and preserve the fruit volatiles responsible for the characteristic flavour of fresh fruits during dehydration processes. The best retention of aroma components in dehydrated strawberry puree was obtained by trehalose addition when combined with freeze drying.

  10. QUALITY OF MINIMALLY PROCESSED ‘FUJI’ APPLE UNDER REFRIGERATED STORAGE AND TREATMENT WITH ADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINES BATALHA MORENO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to prolong the useful life of the minimally processed ‘Fuji’ apple by applying the individual or combined additives (L-cysteine chloride, L-ascorbic acid and calcium chloride and to determine the appropriate period of storage of the whole fruit to perform the minimum processing. The experimental design was completely randomized in three-factor design with three replications. Factor A was composed of storage periods of whole apples, pre-processing, in cold chambers (20, 78, 138 and 188 days; the factor B was represented by storage periods minimum post-processing, simulating shelf life (3, 6, 9 and 12 days, and factor C was represented by chemical additives (distilled water, as control, 0.5% L-cysteine chloride, 1% L-ascorbic acid, 0.5% L-cysteine chloride along with 1% calcium chloride and 1% L-ascorbic acid together with 1% calcium chloride. The evaluated dependent variables were pulp color (L* and hº, soluble solids, titratable acidity, content of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and quantification of polyphenol oxidase. In addition, was analyzed the presence or absence of Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli. The prolongation of the storage time of ‘Fuji’ apples in a refrigerated atmosphere promotes increased susceptibility to browning and softening after processing from 78 days of storage. The use of additives in the process, helps prevent these problems, especially when combined 0.5% L-cysteine chloride with 1% calcium chloride, achieving an excellent conservation in refrigerated shelf up to 6 days. From a microbiological aspect, minimally processed apples are toxicologically safe.

  11. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 218, Revision 1 (FGE.218Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 4.2 of FGE.19: Furfural derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    to 5-[(sulphoxy)methyl]furfural which shows genotoxic potential in vitro, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure. Accordingly, the Panel concluded that 5-methylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure either. Industry has submitted additional data on the 5......)methyl]furfural and the limited in vivo genotoxicity study, the essentially negative results of the carcinogenicity study in rats and mice indicate that 5-hydroxymethylfurfural is of no concern under the conditions of intended use. This conclusion is also applicable to 5-methylfurfural, a candidate substance in the current FGE...

  12. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step. (paper)

  13. Economic trade-offs of additive manufacturing integration in injection moulding process chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalambis, Alessandro; Kerbache, Laoucine; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing has emerged as an innovative set of novel technologies capable of replacing established manufacturing processes due to fabrication of highly complex parts and its continuous improvements of efficiency and cost effectiveness. This study is based on the idea that through...

  14. Is an additional filter necessary for retransfusion of processed cell saver blood?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Adrianus J.; Gallandat Huet, R; Vermeijden, Jan; Scheeren, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Manufacturers of cell salvage devices also recommend a 40µm microfilter or a leukocyte depletion filter. Several authors use [1] and advocate [2] the use of an additional filter when retransfusing processed cell saver blood to the patient. And lastly, the AABB guidelines recommend use of

  15. Morphology Analysis and Process Research on Novel Metal Fused-coating Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wei, Zheng ying; Du, Jun; Ren, Chuan qi; Zhang, Shan; Zhang, Zhitong; Bai, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Existing metal additive manufacturing equipment has high capital costs and slow throughput printing. In this paper, a new metal fused-coating additive manufacturing (MFCAM) was proposed. Experiments of single-track formation were conducted using MFCAM to validate the feasibility. The low melting alloy was selected as the forming material. Then, the effect of process parameters such as the flow rate, deposition velocity and initial distance on the forming morphology. There is a strong coupling effect between the single track forming morphology. Through the analysis of influencing factors to improve the forming quality of specimens. The experimental results show that the twice as forming efficiency as the metal droplet deposition. Additionally, the forming morphology and quality were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscope and X-ray. The results show that the metal fused-coating process can achieve good surface morphology and without internal tissue defect.

  16. Flavour breaking effects in the pseudoscalar meson decay constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Bornyakov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The SU(3 flavour symmetry breaking expansion in up, down and strange quark masses is extended from hadron masses to meson decay constants. This allows a determination of the ratio of kaon to pion decay constants in QCD. Furthermore when using partially quenched valence quarks the expansion is such that SU(2 isospin breaking effects can also be determined. It is found that the lowest order SU(3 flavour symmetry breaking expansion (or Gell-Mann–Okubo expansion works very well. Simulations are performed for 2+1 flavours of clover fermions at four lattice spacings.

  17. Neutrino masses and mixing: a flavour symmetry roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morisi, S.; Valle, J.W.F. [AHEP Group, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio de Institutos de Paterna, Apartado 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2013-04-02

    Over the last ten years tri-bimaximal mixing has played an important role in modeling the flavour problem. We give a short review of the status of flavour symmetry models of neutrino mixing. We concentrate on non-Abelian discrete symmetries, which provide a simple way to account for the TBM pattern. We discuss phenomenological implications such as neutrinoless double beta decay, lepton flavour violation as well as theoretical aspects such as the possibility to explain quarks and leptons within a common framework, such as grand unified models. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Minimal flavour violation and neutrino masses without R-parity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcadi, G.; Di Luzio, L.; Nardecchia, M.

    2012-01-01

    symmetry breaking all the couplings of the superpotential including the R-parity violating ones. If R-parity violation is responsible for neutrino masses, our setup can be seen as an extension of MFV to the lepton sector. We analyze two patterns based on the non-abelian flavour symmetries SU(3)(4) circle...... times SU(4) and SU(3)(5). In the former case the total lepton number and the lepton flavour number are broken together, while in the latter the lepton number can be broken independently by an abelian spurion, so that visible effects and peculiar correlations can be envisaged in flavour changing charged...

  19. Sequential neural processes in abacus mental addition: an EEG and FMRI case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixuan Ku

    Full Text Available Abacus experts are able to mentally calculate multi-digit numbers rapidly. Some behavioral and neuroimaging studies have suggested a visuospatial and visuomotor strategy during abacus mental calculation. However, no study up to now has attempted to dissociate temporally the visuospatial neural process from the visuomotor neural process during abacus mental calculation. In the present study, an abacus expert performed the mental addition tasks (8-digit and 4-digit addends presented in visual or auditory modes swiftly and accurately. The 100% correct rates in this expert's task performance were significantly higher than those of ordinary subjects performing 1-digit and 2-digit addition tasks. ERPs, EEG source localizations, and fMRI results taken together suggested visuospatial and visuomotor processes were sequentially arranged during the abacus mental addition with visual addends and could be dissociated from each other temporally. The visuospatial transformation of the numbers, in which the superior parietal lobule was most likely involved, might occur first (around 380 ms after the onset of the stimuli. The visuomotor processing, in which the superior/middle frontal gyri were most likely involved, might occur later (around 440 ms. Meanwhile, fMRI results suggested that neural networks involved in the abacus mental addition with auditory stimuli were similar to those in the visual abacus mental addition. The most prominently activated brain areas in both conditions included the bilateral superior parietal lobules (BA 7 and bilateral middle frontal gyri (BA 6. These results suggest a supra-modal brain network in abacus mental addition, which may develop from normal mental calculation networks.

  20. Sequential neural processes in abacus mental addition: an EEG and FMRI case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yixuan; Hong, Bo; Zhou, Wenjing; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2012-01-01

    Abacus experts are able to mentally calculate multi-digit numbers rapidly. Some behavioral and neuroimaging studies have suggested a visuospatial and visuomotor strategy during abacus mental calculation. However, no study up to now has attempted to dissociate temporally the visuospatial neural process from the visuomotor neural process during abacus mental calculation. In the present study, an abacus expert performed the mental addition tasks (8-digit and 4-digit addends presented in visual or auditory modes) swiftly and accurately. The 100% correct rates in this expert's task performance were significantly higher than those of ordinary subjects performing 1-digit and 2-digit addition tasks. ERPs, EEG source localizations, and fMRI results taken together suggested visuospatial and visuomotor processes were sequentially arranged during the abacus mental addition with visual addends and could be dissociated from each other temporally. The visuospatial transformation of the numbers, in which the superior parietal lobule was most likely involved, might occur first (around 380 ms) after the onset of the stimuli. The visuomotor processing, in which the superior/middle frontal gyri were most likely involved, might occur later (around 440 ms). Meanwhile, fMRI results suggested that neural networks involved in the abacus mental addition with auditory stimuli were similar to those in the visual abacus mental addition. The most prominently activated brain areas in both conditions included the bilateral superior parietal lobules (BA 7) and bilateral middle frontal gyri (BA 6). These results suggest a supra-modal brain network in abacus mental addition, which may develop from normal mental calculation networks.

  1. Rare leptonic and semileptonic $b$-hadron decays and tests of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069512

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of heavy-flavoured particles provide an ideal laboratory to look for deviations from the Standard Model, and explore energy regimes beyond the LHC reach. Decays proceeding via electroweak penguin diagrams are excellent probes to search for New Physics, and $b \\to s \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ processes are particularly interesting since they give access to many observables such as branching fractions, asymmetries and angular observables. Recent results from the LHCb experiment are reviewed.

  2. Efficiency enhancement in mesogenic-phthalocyanine-based solar cells with processing additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duy Dao, Quang; Hori, Tetsuro; Fukumura, Kaoru; Masuda, Tetsuya; Kamikado, Toshiya; Fujii, Akihiko; Shimizu, Yo; Ozaki, Masanori

    2012-12-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, fabricated by spin casting processes, with phase-separated small molecules including a phthalocyanine derivative, 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2), and a fullerene derivative, 1-(3-methoxy-carbonyl)-propyl-1-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 (PCBM), have been demonstrated to have a power conversion efficiency exceeding 4.1%. The C6PcH2:PCBM BHJ surface morphology and the phase separation have been controlled by utilizing processing additives in various solvents. The effects of the processing additives on the crystallization of the discotic C6PcH2 columns in hexagonal structures have been discussed.

  3. Economic Analysis of Additive Manufacturing Integration in Injection Molding Process Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalambis, Alessandro; Kerbache, Laoucine; Tosello, Guido

    The purpose of this research is to analyze how additive manufacturing can create value when it is utilized as a supportive technology to injection molding by quantifying the cost advantages that can be obtained. Tooling for the product development phase is investigated as pilot integration area o...... disruptive way to create value in the injection molding process chain......The purpose of this research is to analyze how additive manufacturing can create value when it is utilized as a supportive technology to injection molding by quantifying the cost advantages that can be obtained. Tooling for the product development phase is investigated as pilot integration area...... of additive manufacturing with injection molding. Cost considerations are discussed through the development of a cost estimation model. The study shows that integration of additive manufacturing in the product development phase for fabrication of soft tooling is economically convenient with a cost reduction...

  4. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  5. Effects of different additives on the performance of spray dryer system during incineration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, M Y; Peng, C Y; Wu, H Y; Chiang, B C; Liu, Z S

    2002-06-01

    The spray dryer system was conventionally employed to remove the SOx, NOx, and HCl in the flue gas. However, the removal efficiency of acid gas in the practical incineration flue gas, which contains dust, heavy metals, and acid gas itself, was seldom mentioned in the literature. The alkaline sorbents possess large specific surface that was a main factor on the adsorption of heavy metals and acid gas. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was focused on the effect of different additives on the removal efficiency of acid gas and heavy metals (Cr, Cd and Pb). The mass and element size distribution of heavy metals in fly ash under different additives were also investigated. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of HCl in the spray dryer system was higher than 97.8%. The effects of additives on the removal efficiency of HCl, however, were undistinguished. In the desulfurization process, the highest removal efficiency was 71.3% when the additive of amorphous SiO2 was added in the spray dryer system. The removal efficiency was 66.0% with the additive of CaCl2 and 63.1% without any additives, respectively. It was also found that the spray dryer system could decrease the concentration of metal in fly ash but increase the amount of fly ash. In addition, amorphous SiO2 in the alkaline sorbent tended to increase the adsorption of heavy metal on reactant, because it could enhance the dispersion of alkaline sorbent.

  6. Physical evaluations of Co-Cr-Mo parts processed using different additive manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Saiful Anwar Che; Mohamed, Siti Rohaida; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan; Noar, Nor Aida Zuraimi Md

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, additive manufacturing with highly design customization has gained an important technique for fabrication in aerospace and medical fields. Despite the ability of the process to produce complex components with highly controlled architecture geometrical features, maintaining the part's accuracy, ability to fabricate fully functional high density components and inferior surfaces quality are the major obstacles in producing final parts using additive manufacturing for any selected application. This study aims to evaluate the physical properties of cobalt chrome molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloys parts fabricated by different additive manufacturing techniques. The full dense Co-Cr-Mo parts were produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) with default process parameters. The density and relative density of samples were calculated using Archimedes' principle while the surface roughness on the top and side surface was measured using surface profiler. The roughness average (Ra) for top surface for SLM produced parts is 3.4 µm while 2.83 µm for DMLS produced parts. The Ra for side surfaces for SLM produced parts is 4.57 µm while 9.0 µm for DMLS produced parts. The higher Ra values on side surfaces compared to the top faces for both manufacturing techniques was due to the balling effect phenomenon. The yield relative density for both Co-Cr-Mo parts produced by SLM and DMLS are 99.3%. Higher energy density has influence the higher density of produced samples by SLM and DMLS processes. The findings of this work demonstrated that SLM and DMLS process with default process parameters have effectively produced full dense parts of Co-Cr-Mo with high density, good agreement of geometrical accuracy and better surface finish. Despite of both manufacturing process yield that produced components with higher density, the current finding shows that SLM technique could produce components with smoother surface quality compared to DMLS

  7. Biochemical effect of chocolate colouring and flavouring like substances on thyroid function and protein biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Saadany, S S

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic chocolate colourant, flavourant and the mixture of both were administered to healthy adult male albino rats to evaluate their effect on the nucleic acids metabolism, i.e. deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids (DNA and RNA), total serum protein, thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) and nuclease enzymes, i.e. cytoplasmic- and mitochondrial deoxyribonuclease and ribonuclease (DNase and RNase) in brain, liver, and kidneys. Also, the activity of the fundamental enzymes of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, i.e. cytoplasmic and mitochondrial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD and 6-PGD), as well as total lipids and cholesterol contents in the same organs were studied. Ingestion of the studied food additives significantly increased serum protein, RNA and T4 hormone, while, DNA and T3 hormone were insignificantly elevated. In connection with this, the hydrolytic enzymes of nucleic acids (DNase and RNase activities) were stimulated by all studied food additives and in all mentioned organs. The activity of G-6-PD and 6-PGD in both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial fractions of all studied organs were increased. The highest increase was noticed in rats fed on diets supplemented with the mixture of both colourant and flavourant followed by colourant then flavourant, respectively.

  8. Influence of dimethylpolysiloxane addition to edible oils: dependence on the main variables of the frying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge, N.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in the absence of food to define the influence of significant variables of the frying process, i.e. oil unsaturation, temperature, surface-to-oil volume ratio, type of heating and dimethylpolysiloxane (DMPS addition. Special emphasis was placed on clarifying the action of the addition of low concentrations of DMPS to frying oils. From statistical evaluation based on the content of polar compounds, the strong influence of the variables surface-to-oil volume ratio, DMPS addition and oil unsaturation was deduced. However, changes due to 10ºC difference in temperature were not significant. Analysis of two-way interactions demonstrated that interactions between type of heating/DMPS addition, type of heating/oil unsaturation, surface-to-oil volume ratio/DMPS addition and surface-to-oiI volume ratio/oil unsaturation were significant, thus indicating the complexity of the frying process. Finally, it was found that increase in specific groups of compounds formed through oxidative polymerization as well as loss of natural antioxidants depended mainly on the total content of polar compounds and, at a second level, on the oil unsaturation.

  9. Additional ion bombardment in PVD processes generated by a superimposed pulse bias voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olbrich, W.; Kampschulte, G.

    1993-01-01

    The superimposed pulse bias voltage is a tool to apply an additional ion bombardment during deposition in physical vapour deposition (PVD) processes. It is generated by the combination of a d.c. ground voltage and a higher d.c. pulse voltage. Using a superimposed pulse bias voltage in ion-assisted PVD processes effects an additional all-around ion bombardment on the surface with ions of higher energy. Both metal and reactive or inert-gas ions are accelerated to the surface. The basic principles and important characteristics of this newly developed process such as ion fluxes or deposition rates are shown. Because of pulsing the high voltage, the deposition temperature does not increase much. The adhesion, structure, morphology and internal stresses are influenced by these additional ion impacts. The columnar growth of the deposited films could be suppressed by using the superimposed pulse bias voltage without increasing the deposition temperature. Different metallizations (Cr and Cu) produced by arc and sputter ion plating are investigated. Carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxy are coated with PVD copper films for further treatment in electrochemical processes. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of non-volatile additives on the process of distillation of hydrocarbon mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.Б. Степанов

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available  The given results of researches of influence of nonvolatile additives on processes of distillation of individual hydrocarbons and their mixes, including petroleum and mineral oil. With the help of the developed computer system of the continuous control of distillation it is shown, that at the presence of small amounts of the additive decrease of temperature of the beginning of boiling of hydrocarbons is observed, their speeds of banish and exits of light fuel mineral oil grow during initial oil refining

  11. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  12. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee’s evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for 10 food additives (Allura Red AC; carob bean gum; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid (OSA)– modified gum arabic; pectin; Quinoline Yellow; rosemary extract; steviol glycosides; tartrazine; and xanthan gum) and five groups of flavouring agents (alicyclic, alicyclic-fused and aromatic-fused ring lactones; aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; cinnamyl alcohol and related substances; and tetrahydrofuran and furanone derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: aspartame; cassia gum; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol (CITREM); modified starches; octanoic acid; starch sodium octenyl succinate; and total colouring matters. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee’s recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives, including flavouring agents, considered at this meeting.

  13. Type of sweet flavour carrier affects thyroid axis activity in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałkowska-Goździk, Ewelina; Bigos, Anna; Rosołowska-Huszcz, Danuta

    2018-03-01

    Non-nutritive sweeteners are the most widely used food additives worldwide. However, their metabolic outcomes are still a matter of controversy and their effect on the thyroid activity, a key regulator of metabolism, has not been previously studied. Therefore, we aim to determine the influence of the sweet type flavour carrier on selected parameters of thyroid axis activity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 105) were divided into 3 groups fed ad libitum for three weeks isocaloric diets (3.76 ± 0.5 kcal/g): two with the same sweet flavour intensity responded to 10% of sucrose (with sucrose-SC-and sucralose-SU) and one non-sweet diet (NS). To evaluate the post-ingested effects, animals were euthanised at fast and 30, 60, 120, 180 min after meal. The results obtained indicate that both the presence and the type of sweet taste flavour carrier affect thyroid axis activity both at fasting and postprandial state. Compared to diet with sucrose which stimulates thyroid axis activity, sucralose addition diminishes thyroid hormone synthesis as thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity, plasma thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3) concentration was lower than in SC and NS while in non-sweet diet the lowest level of hepatic deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) and the highest reverse T3 (rT3) level indicate on altered thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism. Both the presence and the type of sweet flavour carrier have a significant impact on thyroid axis activity. Our findings suggest that this organochlorine sweetener is metabolically active and might exacerbate metabolic disorders via an adverse effect on thyroid hormone metabolism.

  14. EFSA Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 78, Revision 1 (FGE.78Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic and alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons evaluated by JECFA (63rd meeting) structurally related to aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons evaluated by EFSA in FGE.25Rev2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... NOAEL was available for the substance itself or on a structurally related compound and therefore further data were required. Additional data (long term study of toxicity, mutagenicity studies and new tonnage figure) have now become available for beta-myrcene [FL-no: 01.008] and the present revision...... of FGE.78, FGE.78Rev1, includes the evaluation of these data. The substances were evaluated through a stepwise approach (the Procedure) that integrates information on structure-activity relationships, intake from current uses, toxicological threshold of concern, and available data on metabolism...

  15. The effects of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction in a SNCR process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiangtao; Yu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yufei; Zhu, Xiuming

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction during the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process were carried out in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The effects of reaction temperature (Tr), water vapor, Na/K additives (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3) and flyash characteristics on NO reduction were analyzed. The results indicated that NO removal efficiency shows a pattern of increasing first and decreasing later with the increase of the temperature at Tr=850-1150°C. Water vapor can improve the performance of NO reduction, and the NO reduction of 70.5% was obtained while the flue gas containing 4% water vapor at 950°C. Na/K additives have a significant promoting effect on NO reduction and widen the SNCR temperature window, the promoting effect of the test additives is ordered as Na2CO3>KCl>NaCl. NO removal efficiency with 125ppm Na2CO3 and 4% water vapor can reach up to 84.9% at the optimal reaction temperature. The additive concentration has no significant effects on NO reduction while its concentration is above 50ppm. Addition of circulating fluidized combustion (CFB) flyash deteriorates NO reduction significantly. However, CFB flyash and Na/K additives will get a coupling effect on NO reduction during the SNCR process, and the best NO reduction can reach 72.3% while feeding Na2CO3-impregnated CFB flyash at 125ppm Na2CO3 and Tr=950°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of heavy-flavour jets with the CMS detector in pp collisions at 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-12-19

    Many measurements and searches for physics beyond the standard model at the LHC rely on the efficient identification of heavy-flavour jets, i.e. jets originating from bottom or charm quarks. In this paper, the discriminating variables and the algorithms used for heavy-flavour jet identification during the first years of operation of the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, are presented. Heavy-flavour jet identification algorithms have been improved compared to those used previously at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. For jets with transverse momenta in the range expected in simulated $\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$ events, these new developments result in an efficiency of 68% for the correct identification of a b jet for a probability of 1% of misidentifying a light-flavour jet. The improvement in relative efficiency at this misidentification probability is about 15%, compared to previous CMS algorithms. In addition, for the first time algorithms have been developed to identify jets containing two b hadrons in Lorentz-boosted event topologies, as well as to tag c jets. The large data sample recorded in 2016 at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV has also allowed the development of new methods to measure the efficiency and misidentification probability of heavy-flavour jet identification algorithms. The heavy-flavour jet identification efficiency is measured with a precision of a few per cent at moderate jet transverse momenta (between 30 and 300 GeV) and about 5% at the highest jet transverse momenta (between 500 and 1000 GeV).

  17. Flavour Geometry and Effective Yukawa Couplings in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Lee, Jae Sik; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2010-01-01

    We present a new geometric approach to the flavour decomposition of an arbitrary soft supersymmetry-breaking sector in the MSSM. Our approach is based on the geometry that results from the quark and lepton Yukawa couplings, and enables us to derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a linearly-independent basis of matrices related to the completeness of the internal [SU(3) x U(1)]^5 flavour space. In a second step, we calculate the effective Yukawa couplings that are enhanced at large values of tan(beta) for general soft supersymmetry-breaking mass parameters. We highlight the contributions due to non-universal terms in the flavour decompositions of the sfermion mass matrices. We present numerical examples illustrating how such terms are induced by renormalization-group evolution starting from universal input boundary conditions, and demonstrate their importance for the flavour-violating effective Yukawa couplings of quarks.

  18. Euroopa Liidu 7. Raamprogrammi projekt FLAVOURE / Marge Malbe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Malbe, Marge, 1968-

    2011-01-01

    2009. a sai Eesti Maaviljeluse Instituut 843,270.00 € suuruse Euroopa Liidu finantseeringu 3 aastat kestva projekti FLAVOURE (Food and Feed Laboratory of Varied and Outstanding Research in Estonia) läbiviimiseks ja koordineerimiseks

  19. Flavour and collider interplay for SUSY at LHC7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calibbi, L.; Hodgkinson, R.N.; Vives, O.; Jones Perez, J.; Masiero, A.

    2012-01-01

    The current 7 TeV run of the LHC experiment shall be able to probe gluino and squark masses up to values larger than 1 TeV. Assuming that hints for SUSY are found in the jets plus missing energy channel by the end of a 5 fb -1 run, we explore the flavour constraints on three models with a CMSSM-like spectrum: the CMSSM itself, a seesaw extension of the CMSSM, and Flavoured CMSSM. In particular, we focus on decays that might have been measured by the time the run is concluded, such as B s →μμ and μ→e γ. We also analyse constraints imposed by neutral meson bounds and electric dipole moments. The interplay between collider and flavour experiments is explored through the use of three benchmark scenarios, finding the flavour feedback useful in order to determine the model parameters and to test the consistency of the different models. (orig.)

  20. Structure-property relationships in flavour-barrier membranes with reduced high-temperature diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-01-01

    Encapsulation is used to decrease the premature release of volatile flavour ingredients while offering protection against environmental damage such as oxidation, light-induced reactions, etc. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) is investigated here as a 'smart,' temperature responsive membrane for flavour encapsulation and delivery. Gel films were synthesized and characterized by diffusion and small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. Increasing temperature typically increases the diffusion rate across a membrane; HPC, however, can be tailored to give substantially improved elevated temperature properties. Scattering results indicate processing conditions have a significant impact on membrane morphology (micro phase separation). Under certain synthetic conditions, micro phase separation is mitigated and the membranes show temperature-independent diffusivity between 25 C and 60 C.

  1. Evaluation of polymer micro parts produced by additive manufacturing processes using vat photopolymerization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoudinejad, Ali; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    . A specifically designed vat photopolymerization AM machine suitable for precision printing has been developed, built and validated. In order to evaluate the AM machine capability a test part is designed having features with different sizes and aspect ratios. The printing parameters selected for the evaluation......Micro manufacturing scale feature production by Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes for the direct production of miniaturized polymer components is analysed in this work. The study characterizes the AM processes for polymer micro parts productions using the vat photopolymerization method...

  2. Additive manufacturing of titanium alloys in the biomedical field: processes, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Francesco; Calignano, Flaviana; Aversa, Alberta; Marchese, Giulio; Lombardi, Mariangela; Biamino, Sara; Ugues, Daniele; Manfredi, Diego

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties and biocompatibility of titanium alloy medical devices and implants produced by additive manufacturing (AM) technologies - in particular, selective laser melting (SLM), electron beam melting (EBM) and laser metal deposition (LMD) - have been investigated by several researchers demonstrating how these innovative processes are able to fulfil medical requirements for clinical applications. This work reviews the advantages given by these technologies, which include the possibility to create porous complex structures to improve osseointegration and mechanical properties (best match with the modulus of elasticity of local bone), to lower processing costs, to produce custom-made implants according to the data for the patient acquired via computed tomography and to reduce waste.

  3. Advanced Process Chains for Prototyping and Pilot Production based on Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischkot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ). With technological progress and the development of new processes, AM technology now starts to become a serious option for mass production. It enables new options for material choice, shape and internal structure. Productivity in production of e.g. metal parts can be increased due to mass and cost reduction......For many years, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has been a well-established production technology used mainly for rapid prototyping. But the need for increased flexibility and economic low volume production led to the discovery of Additive Manufacturing as a suitable fabrication technique (Mellor 2013...... and better parts functionality (Ponche 2014). Also, the use of AM ma-chines for spare parts can potentially reduce costs and downtime, and lead to a higher robustness to supply chain disruptions (Khajavi 2013). Control and optimization of the involved process chains are crucial for a fast and robust...

  4. Cost estimation of a specifically designed direct light processing (DLP) additive manufacturing machine for precision printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalambis, Alessandro; Davoudinejad, Ali; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to a portfolio of novel manufacturing technologies based on a layer-by-layer fabrication method.The market and industrial application of additive manufacturing technologies as an established manufacturing process have increasedexponentially in the last years...... creating new opportunities for manufacturers in a variety of industrial sectors. AM is an essentialprototyping technique for product design and development that is used in many different fields. However, the suitability of AMapplications in actual production in an industrial context needs to be determined....... This study, presents a cost estimation model forprecision printing with a specifically designed Digital Light Processing (DLP) AM machine built and validated at the Technical Universityof Denmark. The model presented in this study can be easily adapted and applied to estimate within a high level...

  5. Measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmacher, Marc

    2013-06-15

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The data is reconstructed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the full data sample of 2010 is used. Three types of jet flavours, bottom, charm and light, are distinguished and thus six possible flavour combinations are identified in the dijet events. Kinematic variables, based on the properties of displaced decay vertices and optimised for jet flavour identification, are employed in an event-based likelihood fit. Multidimensional templates derived from Monte Carlo are used to measure the fractions of the six dijet flavour states as functions of the leading jet transverse momentum in the range 40 GeV to 500 GeV and jet rapidity vertical stroke y vertical stroke <2.1. The fit results agree with the predictions of leading- and next-to-leading-order calculations, with the exception of the dijet fraction composed of a bottom and a light flavour jet, which is underestimated by all models at large transverse jet momenta. In addition, the difference between bottom jet production rates in leading and subleading jets is measured and found to be consistent with the next-to-leadingorder predictions. The ability to identify jets containing two b-hadrons is demonstrated and used to identify a deficiency in the predictions of leading order Monte Carlo for the contribution of these jets to dijet production.

  6. Measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events in proton-proton collisions at √(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmacher, Marc

    2013-06-01

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the flavour composition of dijet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy √(s)=7 TeV. The data is reconstructed with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the full data sample of 2010 is used. Three types of jet flavours, bottom, charm and light, are distinguished and thus six possible flavour combinations are identified in the dijet events. Kinematic variables, based on the properties of displaced decay vertices and optimised for jet flavour identification, are employed in an event-based likelihood fit. Multidimensional templates derived from Monte Carlo are used to measure the fractions of the six dijet flavour states as functions of the leading jet transverse momentum in the range 40 GeV to 500 GeV and jet rapidity vertical stroke y vertical stroke <2.1. The fit results agree with the predictions of leading- and next-to-leading-order calculations, with the exception of the dijet fraction composed of a bottom and a light flavour jet, which is underestimated by all models at large transverse jet momenta. In addition, the difference between bottom jet production rates in leading and subleading jets is measured and found to be consistent with the next-to-leadingorder predictions. The ability to identify jets containing two b-hadrons is demonstrated and used to identify a deficiency in the predictions of leading order Monte Carlo for the contribution of these jets to dijet production.

  7. Flavour-symmetric type-II Dirac neutrino seesaw mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Lamprea, J. M.; Peinado, Eduardo; Valle, Jose W. F.

    2018-04-01

    We propose a Standard Model extension with underlying A4 flavour symmetry where small Dirac neutrino masses arise from a Type-II seesaw mechanism. The model predicts the "golden" flavour-dependent bottom-tau mass relation, requires an inverted neutrino mass ordering and non-maximal atmospheric mixing angle. Using the latest neutrino oscillation global fit [1] we derive restrictions on the oscillation parameters, such as a correlation between δCP and mνlightest.

  8. The Effect Of Additional Detergent In Crude Palm Oil In The Process Of Separation Stearin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezekyah Hasibuan, Vina; aini, Nur; Febriyanti; Ayubi Pane, Salahudin Al

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to find out how much stearin is formed from the addition of detergent and to understand the process of separation of crude olein with crude stearin from raw material of crude palm oil (CPO). Using a detergent fractionation system, detergent fractionation is a continuous crystallization of oil with controlled cooling and the separation of fractions by weight or centrifuge after supplementing surfactant.

  9. 3D-Printing: How Additive Manufacturing impacts Supply Chain Business Processes and Management Components

    OpenAIRE

    Oettmeier, Katrin; Hofmann, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The business implications of additive manufacturing (AM) are explored; specific focus thereby lies on the impact of AM technology adoption in customized parts production. Design/methodology/approach Based on two explorative case studies from the hearing aid industry, the impact of AM technology adoption on supply chain business processes and management components is analyzed. General systems theory and a supply chain management framework serve as theoretical underpinning....

  10. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N. [Nanophase Technologies Corp., Darien, IL (United States); Chen, Nan [Illinois Superconductor Corp., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  11. Global volatile profile of virgin olive oils flavoured by aromatic/medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perestrelo, R; Silva, C; Silva, P; Câmara, J S

    2017-07-15

    The global volatile profile of commercial virgin olive oils and flavoured olive oils with aromatic/medicinal plants, was established using liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-qMS). More than 60 volatile organic compounds (VOCs belonging to different groups were identified using both methods. Olive oils volatile profile was slightly influenced by maceration process, which occurred at room temperature (20±2°C) for 15days. The predominant differences were observed in terpenoids group, since some of them were only identified in the flavoured olive oils, while others showed an increase with the maceration process. VOCs mass transfer from plants to olive oils could explain the observed results. Principal components analysis (PCA) applied to LLME/GC-qMS data allowed to distinguish the olive oils. The flavoured oils would increase the use of olive oil among consumers as consequence of the improvement of its aromatic profile and healthy properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A one-pot glycerol-based additive-blended ethyl biodiesel production: a green process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Fabio G; Macedo, Alexandra; Archilha, Marcos Vinicios L R; Wendler, Edison P; Dos Santos, Alcindo A

    2013-09-01

    N-methyl-2-pyrrolidonium methyl sulfonate, a Brønsted acid ionic liquid, promoted the transesterification of soybean oil with ethanol giving a high quality fatty acid ethyl ester. At the end of the reaction, after distillation of excess of ethanol, spontaneous phase separation took place. While the clear upper phase corresponded to the ethyl ester, the lower phase was composed of a mixture of glycerol byproduct and the catalyst. By addition of a stoichiometric amount of appropriated reagents to the resulting mixture, a new ionic liquid-catalyzed process allows the conversion of the glycerol into less polar derivatives, and consequent migration to the ethyl esters phase. This work demonstrated that emulsion, phase separation and contamination problems were completely avoided and the glycerol could be incorporated into the biodiesel as additives in a single step. The whole process involves two renewable starting materials, ethanol and vegetable oil, allowing a total green additive-blended biodiesel production process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of the coke addition and the heating time on the efficiency of chlorination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masduki, B.; Indrati, Y. T.; Wahyuadi, J.; Triswanto, I. H.

    1998-01-01

    The preparation of mixed pellet, ZrO 2 , coke and sucrose, for chlorinating process of ZrO 2 pellet has been performed. In this experiments the studied parameters were coke addition and the heating time. The addition of coke was 9.72 grams, 10.5 grams and 11 for the mixture of the 87 grams ZrO 2 and 3.5 grams sucrose. The purpose of the coke addition is to from ZrC, which is corresponding to Kroll process with carbon-chlor methos. The weight of cokes had been calculated beyond the stoichiometry. The heating times was held in 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes at the temperature of 100 o C that was below the evaporation coke temperature of 315 o C. The result show that the efficiency of chlorinating of ZrO 2 pellet could be reached of 82.16% with the addition of coke mass of 11 grams at the heating temperature of 100 o C with the heating time of 20 minutes

  14. Particle physics and cosmology beyond the Standard Model: inflation, dark matter and flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtier, L.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis has been focusing on beyond the Standard Model aspects of particle physics and their implication in cosmology. We have gone through this work along the timeline of the Universe History focusing on three major topics that are the inflationary period, the dark matter relic density production and detection, and finally the question of flavor changing constraints on low energy supersymmetric theories. In the first part of this thesis, after reviewing the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of both the Big Bang theory and the theory of Inflation we will study in detail how describing Inflation in a high energy supersymmetric theory. The second part of this thesis is dedicated to dark matter. We have studied phenomenological aspects of simple models, extending the present Standard Model with simple abelian symmetries, by assuming that the constituent of dark matter would be able to exchange information with the visible sector by the help of a mediator particle. We have studied in particular possible interactions of heavy or light dark matter with respectively the strong and the electroweak sectors of the Standard Model. Our models are strongly constrained of course by experiments. The third part of this work will be dedicated to a different aspect of beyond Standard Model theories, that is the treatment of the flavour changing processes of particle physics. The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), as one of these possible enlargement of the Standard Model, introduces new processes of flavour changing that are highly constrained by experiment. We present some works in which we consider the possibility of adding so called Dirac Gauginos to the MSSM to render flavour changing weaker in the theory, and propose different flavour patterns theories

  15. Dark matter within the minimal flavour violation ansatz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Honorez, Laura; Merlo, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Minimal Flavour Violation hypothesis can provide an attractive framework for Dark Matter (DM). We consider scalar DM candidates carrying flavour quantum numbers and whose representation under the flavour group guarantees DM stability. They interact with the Standard Model fields through Higgs portal at renormalisable level and also to quarks through dimension-6 operators. We provide a systematic analysis of the viable parameter space for the DM fields, which are triplet of the flavour group, considering several DM-quark interactions. In this framework, we analyse in which cases the viable parameter space differs from Higgs portal models thanks to the underlying flavour structure. In contrast to minimal Higgs portal scenarios, we find that light DM in the GeV mass range as well as heavier candidates above Higgs resonance could be allowed by colliders, direct and indirect DM detection searches as well as flavour constraints. The large mass regime above m t could even be beyond the reach of future experiments such as Xenon 1T

  16. Evaluation of certain food additives. Fifty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) for humans, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives, the assessment of intake of food additives, and the establishment and revision of specifications, including comments concerning enzyme preparations derived from genetically modified microorganisms and limits for heavy metals. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological data on specific food additives, including enzyme preparations (alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase and maltogenic amylase), flavouring agents (trans-anethole, furfural and menthol), food colours (curcumin and riboflavin from genetically modified Bacillus subtilis), glazing agents (medium- and low-viscosity mineral oils), preservatives (sulfur dioxide and sulfites), a sweetening agent (stevioside), thickening agents (carrageenan, processed Eucheuma seaweed and enzymatically hydrolysed sodium carboxymethyl cellulose), gamma-cyclodextrin, glucono-delta-lactone and the calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium salts of gluconic acid, and polyglycitol syrup. The Committee also evaluated the safety of various groups of flavouring agents and assessed the intake of specific food additives, including benzoates, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), sulfites and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives considered, changes in the status of specifications for these substances and specific flavouring agents, and further toxicological studies and other information required or desired.

  17. Effects of titanium addition to the niobium core on the composite-processed Nb3Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Toshihisa; Iijima, Yasuo; Itoh, Kikuo; Tachikawa, Kyoji

    1986-01-01

    Effects of titanium addition to the niobium core on the composite-processed Nb 3 Sn superconductor have been investigated. Composites consisting of a Nb-0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 at% Ti alloy core and a Cu-7 at% Sn alloy matrix were fabricated into single-core and 16-core multifilamentary wires, and then heattreated to form Nb 3 Sn layers. An enhanced formation rate of Nb 3 Sn layer with increasing titanium content has been observed, while the Nb 3 Sn grain size slightly increases with the titanium addition. The titanium addition of 1 - 2 at% to the niobium core produces a small increase in T c , and further titanium addition decreases it. The addition of titanium to the core increases H c2 by 4 T in accordance with the increase in the normal state resistivity. H c2 of about 25 T has been obtained at 4.2 K by the titanium addition. J c 's of Nb 3 Sn at high fields (H > 13 T) are remarkably increased by the titanium addition, which is mainly attributed to the enhancement in H c2 . J c of 1.1 x 10 9 A/m 2 and overall J c of 2.0 x 10 8 A/m 2 have been obtained at 4.2 K and 16 T for a single core wire and a 160-core multifilamentary wire, respectively. The Nb-Ti/Cu-Sn composite wire seems to be quite promising for applications in high magnetic fields ranging from 12 to 16 T. (author)

  18. Flavour blindness and patterns of flavour symmetry breaking in lattice simulations of up, down and strange quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Univ. Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Bornyakov, V. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protovino (Russian Federation); Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2011-02-15

    QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the up-down quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, first for the general 1+1+1 flavour case and then for the 2+1 flavour case (when two quark flavours are mass degenerate). These enable highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results for the 2+1 flavour case confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. Singlet quantities remain constant which allows the lattice spacing to be determined from hadron masses (without necessarily being at the physical point). Furthermore an extension of this programme to include partially quenched results is also given. (orig.)

  19. Potential of fluorescence spectroscopy for the characterisation of maple syrup flavours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, Bernard; Clément, Alain; Lagacé, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup has high maket value. It is produced in North East America from the heat-evaporated sap of Acer saccharum Marshall. For marketing purposes, there is interest in defining its flavour profile in a consistent and repeatable manner. An experiment was undertaken to explore the potential of autofluorescence of maple syrup induced at 275 and 360 nm to characterise flavours. A mixed data factor analysis revealed two independent groups of variables. One represents early season woody and late season empyreumatic flavours. The other is related to off-flavour, confectionery and maple flavours. Maple and confectionery flavours are subtle, difficult to distinguish and opposed to off-flavour. There were clear relationships among the two groups and fluorescence profiles. For each of the five basic flavours, discriminant models based on partial least squares regressions were developed. For each sample of syrup, flavours combined to form flavour profiles, and the results from the five discriminant models were aggregated to reproduce these profiles. For excitation at 275 nm, the woody/off-flavour and confectionery/empyreumatic/maple flavour profiles were classified correctly 86 and 78% of the time (cross-validation) respectively. Induced autofluorescence spectra were shown to contain information related to maple syrup flavours. This fluorescence-flavour relationship is not considered quantitative yet, and further research avenues are proposed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407355; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In high-energy physics experiments, online selection is crucial to identify the few interesting collisions from the large data volume processed. In the overall ATLAS trigger strategy, b-jet triggers are designed to identify heavy-flavour content in real-time and, in particular, provide the only option to efficiently record events with fully hadronic final states containing b-jets. In doing so, two different, but related, challenges are faced. The physics goal is to optimise as far as possible the rejection of light jets from multijet processes, while retaining a high efficiency on selecting jets from beauty, and maintaining affordable trigger rates without raising jet energy thresholds. This maps into a challenging computing task, as charged tracks and their corresponding vertexes must be reconstructed and analysed for each jet above the desired threshold, regardless of the increasingly harsh pile-up conditions. The performance of b-jet triggers during the LHC Run 1 data-taking campaigns is presented, togethe...

  1. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407355; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In high-energy physics experiments, online selection is crucial to identify the few interesting collisions from the large data volume processed. In the overall ATLAS trigger strategy, b-jet triggers are designed to identify heavy-flavour content in real-time and, in particular, provide the only option to efficiently record events with fully hadronic final states containing b-jets. In doing so, two different, but related, challenges are faced. The physics goal is to optimise as far as possible the rejection of light jets from multijet processes, while retaining a high efficiency on selecting jets from beauty, and maintaining affordable trigger rates without raising jet energy thresholds. This maps into a challenging computing task, as charged tracks and their corresponding vertexes must be reconstructed and analysed for each jet above the desired threshold, regardless of the increasingly harsh pile-up conditions. The performance of b-jet triggers during the LHC Run 1 data-taking campaigns is presented, togethe...

  2. MC rate at NLO for heavy flavour photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll, Tobias

    2010-02-01

    A Monte Carlo at next-to-leading order (MC rate at NLO) has been constructed for the production of heavy quark flavours in photoproduction. As such, it is the rst Monte Carlo event generator with next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy for a process in lepton hadron scattering. In order to construct such an MC rate at NLO, the matrix element for the process has to be calculated at NLO and then be matched with a parton shower. When doing this, it is important that none of the parton configurations produced are doubly counted. In this thesis, the concept of a Monte Carlo event generator will be explained, with emphasis on the HERWIG parton shower. Also, different techniques of calculating matrix elements at NLO accuracy will be explained. It will then be shown how the NLO calculation can be matched with the HERWIG parton shower in an MC rate at NLO without double counting, producing unweighted events at NLO-accuracy. Many comparisons are made between the MC rate at NLO here constructed, the HERWIG Monte Carlo and the FMNR NLO calculation. Also many comparisons are made to HERA data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments. It is shown that all HERA data with heavy quarks produced in photoproduction can be described by the MC rate at NLO program constructed in this thesis. (orig.)

  3. MC rate at NLO for heavy flavour photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toll, Tobias

    2010-02-15

    A Monte Carlo at next-to-leading order (MC rate at NLO) has been constructed for the production of heavy quark flavours in photoproduction. As such, it is the rst Monte Carlo event generator with next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy for a process in lepton hadron scattering. In order to construct such an MC rate at NLO, the matrix element for the process has to be calculated at NLO and then be matched with a parton shower. When doing this, it is important that none of the parton configurations produced are doubly counted. In this thesis, the concept of a Monte Carlo event generator will be explained, with emphasis on the HERWIG parton shower. Also, different techniques of calculating matrix elements at NLO accuracy will be explained. It will then be shown how the NLO calculation can be matched with the HERWIG parton shower in an MC rate at NLO without double counting, producing unweighted events at NLO-accuracy. Many comparisons are made between the MC rate at NLO here constructed, the HERWIG Monte Carlo and the FMNR NLO calculation. Also many comparisons are made to HERA data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments. It is shown that all HERA data with heavy quarks produced in photoproduction can be described by the MC rate at NLO program constructed in this thesis. (orig.)

  4. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Varni, Carlo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment includes a well-developed trigger system that allows a selection of events which are thought to be of interest, while achieving a high overall rejection against less interesting processes. An important part of the online event selection is the ability to distinguish between jets arising from heavy-flavour quarks (b- and c-jets) and light jets (jets from u-, d-, s- and gluon jets) in real-time. This is essential for many physics analysis that include processes with large jet multiplicity and b-quarks in the final state. An overview of the b-jet triggers with a description of the application and performance of the offline Multivariate (MV2) b-tagging algorithms at High Level Trigger (HLT) in Run 2 will be presented. During 2016 b-jet trigger menu and algorithms were adapted to use The Fast Tracker (FTK) system which will be commissioned in 2017. We will show initial expected performance of newly designed triggers and compare it with the existing HLT chains.

  5. REAL-TIME FLAVOUR TAGGING SELECTION IN ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bokan, Petar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment includes a well-developed trigger system that allows a selection of events which are thought to be of interest, while achieving a high overall rejection against less interesting processes. An important part of the online event selection is the ability to distinguish between jets arising from heavy-flavour quarks (b- and c-jets) and light jets (jets from u-, d-, s- and gluon jets) in real-time. This is essential for many physics analysis that include processes with large jet multiplicity and b-quarks in the final state. Many changes were implemented to the ATLAS online b-jet selection for the Run-2 of the LHC. An overview of the b-jet trigger strategy and performance during 2015 data taking is presented. The ability to use complex offline Multivariate (MV2) b-tagging algorithms directly at High Level Trigger (HLT) was tested in this period. Details on online tagging algorithms are given together with the plans on how to adapt to the new high-luminosity and increased pileup conditions by ex...

  6. Perspectives for detecting lepton flavour violation in left-right symmetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonilla, Cesar [AHEP Group, Instituto de Física Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de València,Edificio de Institutos de Paterna, C/Catedratico José Beltrán 2,E-46980 Paterna (València) (Spain); Krauss, Manuel E.; Opferkuch, Toby [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics & Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn,Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Porod, Werner [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astronomie, Universität Würzburg,Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2017-03-06

    We investigate lepton flavour violation in a class of minimal left-right symmetric models where the left-right symmetry is broken by triplet scalars. In this context we present a method to consistently calculate the triplet-Yukawa couplings which takes into account the experimental data while simultaneously respecting the underlying symmetries. Analysing various scenarios, we then calculate the full set of tree-level and one-loop contributions to all radiative and three-body flavour-violating fully leptonic decays as well as μ−e conversion in nuclei. Our method illustrates how these processes depend on the underlying parameters of the theory. To that end we observe that, for many choices of the model parameters, there is a strong complementarity between the different observables. For instance, in a large part of the parameter space, lepton flavour violating τ-decays have a large enough branching ratio to be measured in upcoming experiments. Our results further show that experiments coming online in the immediate future, like Mu3e and BELLE II, or longer-term, such as PRISM/PRIME, will probe significant portions of the currently allowed parameter space.

  7. Anomaly-free models for flavour anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Tunney, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    We explore the constraints imposed by the cancellation of triangle anomalies on models in which the flavour anomalies reported by LHCb and other experiments are due to an extra U(1)^' gauge boson Z^' . We assume universal and rational U(1)^' charges for the first two generations of left-handed quarks and of right-handed up-type quarks but allow different charges for their third-generation counterparts. If the right-handed charges vanish, cancellation of the triangle anomalies requires all the quark U(1)^' charges to vanish, if there are either no exotic fermions or there is only one Standard Model singlet dark matter (DM) fermion. There are non-trivial anomaly-free models with more than one such `dark' fermion, or with a single DM fermion if right-handed up-type quarks have non-zero U(1)^' charges. In some of the latter models the U(1)^' couplings of the first- and second-generation quarks all vanish, weakening the LHC Z^' constraint, and in some other models the DM particle has purely axial couplings, weakening the direct DM scattering constraint. We also consider models in which anomalies are cancelled via extra vector-like leptons, showing how the prospective LHC Z^' constraint may be weakened because the Z^' → μ ^+ μ ^- branching ratio is suppressed relative to other decay modes.

  8. Vitrification of F006 plating waste sludge by Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Solidification into glass of nickel-on-uranium plating wastewater treatment plant sludge (F006 Mixed Waste) has been demonstrated at the Savannah River She (SRS). Vitrification using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), greatly enhanced the solubility and retention of heavy metals In glass. The bench-scale tests using RASP achieved 76 wt% waste loading In both soda-lime-silica and borosilicate glasses. The RASP has been Independently verified by a commercial waste management company, and a contract awarded to vitrify the approximately 500,000 gallons of stored waste sludge. The waste volume reduction of 89% will greatly reduce the disposal costs, and delisting of the glass waste is anticipated. This will be the world's first commercial-scale vitrification system used for environmental cleanup of Mixed Waste. Its stabilization and volume reduction abilities are expected to set standards for the future of the waste management Industry

  9. Computer simulation of low-temperature composites sintering processes for additive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovpinets, A. O.; Leytsin, V. N.; Dmitrieva, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    This is impact research of mixture raw components characteristics on the low-temperature composites structure formation during the sintering process. The obtained results showed that the structure determination of initial compacts obtained after thermal destruction of the polymer binder lets quantify the concentrations of main components and the refractory crystalline product of thermal destruction. Accounting for the distribution of thermal destruction refractory product allows us to refine the forecast of thermal stresses in the matrix of sintered composite. The presented results can be considered as a basis for optimization of initial compositions of multilayer low-temperature composites obtained by additive technologies.

  10. Estimation of Spectral Exponent Parameter of 1/f Process in Additive White Background Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Ergintav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An extension to the wavelet-based method for the estimation of the spectral exponent, γ, in a 1/fγ process and in the presence of additive white noise is proposed. The approach is based on eliminating the effect of white noise by a simple difference operation constructed on the wavelet spectrum. The γ parameter is estimated as the slope of a linear function. It is shown by simulations that the proposed method gives reliable results. Global positioning system (GPS time-series noise is analyzed and the results provide experimental verification of the proposed method.

  11. Thermoplastic starch/polyester films: effects of extrusion process and poly (lactic acid) addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Marianne Ayumi; Olivato, Juliana Bonametti; Garcia, Patrícia Salomão; Müller, Carmen Maria Olivera; Grossmann, Maria Victória Eiras; Yamashita, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable films were produced using the blown extrusion method from blends that contained cassava thermoplastic starch (TPS), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with two different extrusion processes. The choice of extrusion process did not have a significant effect on the mechanical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP) or viscoelasticity of the films, but the addition of PLA decreased the elongation, blow-up ratio (BUR) and opacity and increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and viscoelastic parameters of the films. The films with 20% PLA exhibited a lower WVP due to the hydrophobic nature of this polymer. Morphological analyses revealed the incompatibility between the polymers used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Log-normal distribution from a process that is not multiplicative but is additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Hideaki

    2013-10-01

    The central limit theorem ensures that a sum of random variables tends to a Gaussian distribution as their total number tends to infinity. However, for a class of positive random variables, we find that the sum tends faster to a log-normal distribution. Although the sum tends eventually to a Gaussian distribution, the distribution of the sum is always close to a log-normal distribution rather than to any Gaussian distribution if the summands are numerous enough. This is in contrast to the current consensus that any log-normal distribution is due to a product of random variables, i.e., a multiplicative process, or equivalently to nonlinearity of the system. In fact, the log-normal distribution is also observable for a sum, i.e., an additive process that is typical of linear systems. We show conditions for such a sum, an analytical example, and an application to random scalar fields such as those of turbulence.

  13. 3D Machine Vision and Additive Manufacturing: Concurrent Product and Process Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, Ismet P

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing environment rapidly changes in turbulence fashion. Digital manufacturing (DM) plays a significant role and one of the key strategies in setting up vision and strategic planning toward the knowledge based manufacturing. An approach of combining 3D machine vision (3D-MV) and an Additive Manufacturing (AM) may finally be finding its niche in manufacturing. This paper briefly overviews the integration of the 3D machine vision and AM in concurrent product and process development, the challenges and opportunities, the implementation of the 3D-MV and AM at POLMAN Bandung in accelerating product design and process development, and discusses a direct deployment of this approach on a real case from our industrial partners that have placed this as one of the very important and strategic approach in research as well as product/prototype development. The strategic aspects and needs of this combination approach in research, design and development are main concerns of the presentation.

  14. Seafood-like flavour obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of the protein by-products of seaweed (Gracilaria sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohakunjit, Natta; Selamassakul, Orrapun; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin

    2014-09-01

    An enzymatic bromelain seaweed protein hydrolysate (eb-SWPH) was characterised as the precursor for thermally processed seafood flavour. Seaweed (Gracilaria fisheri) protein after agar extraction was hydrolysed using bromelain (enzyme activity=119,325 U/g) at 0-20% (w/w) for 0.5-24 h. Optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined using response surface methodology. The proposed model took into account the interaction effect of the enzyme concentration and hydrolysis time on the physicochemical properties and volatile components of eb-SWPH. The optimal hydrolysis conditions for the production of eb-SWPH were 10% bromelain for 3h, which resulted in a 38.15% yield and a 62.91% degree of hydrolysis value. Three free amino acids, arginine, lysine, and leucine, were abundant in the best hydrolysate. Ten volatile flavours of the best eb-SWPH were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The predominant odourants were hexanal, hexanoic acid, nonanoic acid, and dihydroactinidiolide. The thermally processed seafood flavour produced from eb-SWPH exhibited a roasted seafood-like flavouring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H 2 ) and ammonia (NH 3 ) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H 2 and NH 3 could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H 2 and NH 3 (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed

  16. Assessing the potential contributions of additional retention processes to PFAS retardation in the subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusseau, Mark L

    2018-02-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the transport and fate of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the subsurface is critical for accurate risk assessments and design of effective remedial actions. A multi-process retention model is proposed to account for potential additional sources of retardation for PFAS transport in source zones. These include partitioning to the soil atmosphere, adsorption at air-water interfaces, partitioning to trapped organic liquids (NAPL), and adsorption at NAPL-water interfaces. An initial assessment of the relative magnitudes and significance of these retention processes was conducted for two PFAS of primary concern, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and an example precursor (fluorotelomer alcohol, FTOH). The illustrative evaluation was conducted using measured porous-medium properties representative of a sandy vadose-zone soil. Data collected from the literature were used to determine measured or estimated values for the relevant distribution coefficients, which were in turn used to calculate retardation factors for the model system. The results showed that adsorption at the air-water interface was a primary source of retention for both PFOA and PFOS, contributing approximately 50% of total retention for the conditions employed. Adsorption to NAPL-water interfaces and partitioning to bulk NAPL were also shown to be significant sources of retention. NAPL partitioning was the predominant source of retention for FTOH, contributing ~98% of total retention. These results indicate that these additional processes may be, in some cases, significant sources of retention for subsurface transport of PFAS. The specific magnitudes and significance of the individual retention processes will depend upon the properties and conditions of the specific system of interest (e.g., PFAS constituent and concentration, porous medium, aqueous chemistry, fluid saturations, co-contaminants). In cases wherein these

  17. Design Process Control for Improved Surface Finish of Metal Additive Manufactured Parts of Complex Build Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikdam Jamal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal additive manufacturing (AM is increasingly used to create complex 3D components at near net shape. However, the surface finish (SF of the metal AM part is uneven, with surface roughness being variable over the facets of the design. Standard post-processing methods such as grinding and linishing often meet with major challenges in finishing parts of complex shape. This paper reports on research that demonstrated that mass finishing (MF processes are able to deliver high-quality surface finishes (Ra and Sa on AM-generated parts of a relatively complex geometry (both internal features and external facets under select conditions. Four processes were studied in this work: stream finishing, high-energy (HE centrifuge, drag finishing and disc finishing. Optimisation of the drag finishing process was then studied using a structured design of experiments (DOE. The effects of a range of finishing parameters were evaluated and optimal parameters and conditions were determined. The study established that the proposed method can be successfully applied in drag finishing to optimise the surface roughness in an industrial application and that it is an economical way of obtaining the maximum amount of information in a short period of time with a small number of tests. The study has also provided an important step in helping understand the requirements of MF to deliver AM-generated parts to a target quality finish and cycle time.

  18. The influence of catalytic additives on kinetics of coal gasification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubek Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic coal gasification is a process that has the potential to become one of the efficient industrial technology of energy production. For this reason, the subject of this study was to analyze the kinetics of catalytic gasification of ‘Janina’ coal with steam. Isothermal measurements were performed at 800 °C, 900 °C, 950 °C and 1000 °C at a pressure of 1 MPa using cations of sodium, potassium and calcium as catalysts. During examination the thermovolumetric method was used. This method allows to determine the formation rates of a gaseous product such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide as well as their contribution to the resulting gas. Moreover, the influence of catalysts on the kinetics of CO and H2 formation at various temperatures was determined and the kinetics parameters were calculated with the use of isoconversional model, Random Pore Model and Grain Model. The obtained results confirmed the positive effect of catalysts on the coal gasification process. The catalytic measurements were characterized by higher reaction rate and shorter duration of the process, and the calculated values of the kinetic parameters were lower than for the gasification process without the addition of catalysts.

  19. Heavy flavour and quarkonia measurement with ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gallus, Petr; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Charm and bottom quarks provide a powerful tool to study the properties of the hot, dense medium created in heavy ion collisions, and in particular may help differentiate between initial and final state effects in large collision systems. Measurements of open heavy flavour particle and quarkonia production, including their prompt and non-prompt components, and their correlations with light hadrons, build a path to understanding how heavy quarks propagate through the quark-gluon plasma. Additionally, an important component in these studies is the comparison between large and small collision systems. In this talk, ATLAS presents results on measurements of quarkonia production in PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV, including separated prompt and non-prompt particle yields and a new measurement of the anisotropic flow of the J/Psi. The flow measurement provides information on the stage at which charmonium states are formed during the system evolution, thus giving insights on the effects that modify their production. Add...

  20. Characterization and Processing Behavior of Heated Aluminum-Polycarbonate Composite Build Plates for the FDM Additive Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri L. Messimer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most essential components of the fused deposition modeling (FDM additive manufacturing (AM process is the build plate, the surface upon which the part is constructed. These are typically made from aluminum or glass, but there are clear disadvantages to both and restrictions on which materials can be processed on them successfully. This study examined the suitability of heated aluminum-polycarbonate (AL-PC composite print beds for FDM, looking particularly at the mechanical properties, thermal behavior, deformation behavior, bonding strength with deposited material, printing quality, and range of material usability. Theoretical examination and physical experiments were performed for each of these areas; the results were compared to similar experiments done using heated aluminum and aluminum-glass print beds. Ten distinct materials (ABS, PLA, PET, HIPS, PC, TPU, PVA, nylon, metal PLA, and carbon-fiber PLA were tested for printing performance. The use of a heated AL-PC print bed was found to be a practical option for most of the materials, particularly ABS and TPU, which are often challenging to process using traditional print bed types. Generally, the results were found to be equivalent to or superior to tempered glass and superior to standard aluminum build plates in terms of printing capability.

  1. Characterization of semi-solid processing of aluminium alloy 7075 with Sc and Zr additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogal, Ł., E-mail: l.rogal@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dutkiewicz, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Atkinson, H.V. [The University of Leicester, Department of Engineering University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, L.; Czeppe, T. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Modigell, M. [RWTH Aachen—Department of Mechanical Process Engineering, 55 Templergraben St., Aachen (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    For thixoforming (semi-solid processing) it is necessary to have a fine globular microstructure in a semi-solid range. Here this has been obtained for 7075 aluminium alloy by addition of modifying agents: 0.5 weight % of scandium and zirconium. The thixoforming process was carried out at 632 °C which gave about 23 volume % of liquid phase. The microstructure of the thixo-formed part (a rotor) consisted of globular grains surrounded by precipitates of secondary phase. The average hardness of thixo-formed parts was 105 HV{sub 5} and the tensile strength 300 MPa. T6 heat treatments were performed with solutionisation at 450 °C for 30 min and 10 h. In both cases the ageing time was set as 18 h at 120 °C. The heat treatments led to an increase in average tensile strength up to 495 MPa. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis enabled the identification of precipitates of the metastable dispersoids of L1{sub 2}–Al{sub 3} (Zr, Sc) and η′ (MgZn{sub 2}) phases in the alloy after the thixoforming and T6 treatment. The measurements of rheological properties of 7075Al alloy with Sc and Zr additions in the semi-solid range indicated an increase of particle size and spheroidization leading to an observable decrease of viscosity during isothermal shearing. A shear rate jump experiment showed that with increasing shear rate the viscosity rapidly falls.

  2. Scientific opinion of Flavouring Group Evaluation 205 Revision 1 (FGE.205Rev1): consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 13 α,β-unsaturated aliphatic ketones with terminal double bonds and precursors from chemical subgroup 1.2.2 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    The EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF Panel) was requested to consider in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 205 (FGE.205), the additional data on genotoxicity submitted by the Industry on two representative substances, oct-1-en-3-one [FL-no: 07...... curve and with a very narrow concentration range resulting in mutagenicity. Both substances were also tested in mammalian cells for gene mutations at the hprt locus and for structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in the micronucleus assay. Also in mammalian cells, the test substances were...... highly cytotoxic. The Panel considered that the positive effects in the bacterial mutagenicity assays of the two representative substances cannot be overruled by the one negative and one equivocal gene mutation test in mammalian cells. Therefore, the Panel recommended to test the most potent...

  3. EFFECT OF STARCH ADDITION ON THE PERFORMANCE AND SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION OF UASB PROCESS TREATING METHANOLIC WASTEWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng; Kobayashi, Takuro; Takahashi, Shintaro; Li, Yu-You; Omura, Tatsuo

    A mesophilic(35℃) UASB reactor treating synthetic wastewater containing methanol with addition of starch was continuously operated for over 430 days by changing the organic loading rate from 2.5 to 120kg-COD/m3.d. The microbial community structure of the granules was analyzed with the molecular tools and its metabolic characteristics were evaluated using specific methanogenic activity tests. The process was successfully operated with over 98% soluble COD removal efficiency at VLR 30kg-COD/m3.d for approximately 300 days, and granulation satisfactory proceeded. The results of cloning and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis suggest that groups related the genus Methanomethylovorans and the genus Methanosaeta were predominant in the reactor although only the genus Methanomethylovorans was predominant in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater in the previous study. Abundance of the granules over 0.5 mm in diameter in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater with addition of starch was 3 times larger than that in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. Specific methanogenic activity tests in this study indicate that the methanol-methane pathway and the methanol-H2/CO2-methane pathway were predominant, and however, there was a certain level of activity for acetate-methane pathway unlike the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. These results suggest addition of starch might be responsible for diversifying the microbial community and encouraging the granulation.

  4. Identification of heavy-flavour jets with the CMS detector in pp collisions at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Thomas-wilsker, Joshuha; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Sijing; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; El-khateeb, Esraa; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Teroerde, Marius; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Defranchis, Matteo Maria; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Lapsien, Tobias; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; El Morabit, Karim; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Baginyan, Andrey; Golunov, Alexey; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kashunin, Ivan; Korenkov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Trofimov, Vladimir; Yuldashev, Bekhzod S; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Shtol, Dmitry; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Reichmann, Michael; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Köseoglu, Ilknur; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Hiltbrand, Joshua; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    Many measurements and searches for physics beyond the standard model at the LHC rely on the efficient identification of heavy-flavour jets, i.e. jets originating from bottom or charm quarks. In this paper, the discriminating variables and the algorithms used for heavy-flavour jet identification during the first years of operation of the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, are presented. Heavy-flavour jet identification algorithms have been improved compared to those used previously at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. For jets with transverse momenta in the range expected in simulated $ \\mathrm{t\\bar{t}} $ events, these new developments result in an efficiency of 68% for the correct identification of a b jet for a probability of 1% of misidentifying a light-flavour jet. The improvement in relative efficiency at this misidentification probability is about 15%, compared to previous CMS algorithms. In addition, for the first time algorithms have been developed t...

  5. QUALITATIVE PECULIARITIES OF THE FLAVOURED WINES AND OF THE VERMOUTH TYPE WINES, OBTAINED FROM THE SAUVIGNON BLANC VARIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Elena CULEA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the dynamics of the physical-chemical parameters of flavoured wines and vermouth type wines, obtained by the addition of hydroalcoholic macerates from plants to the Sauvignon Blanc wine variety, we analyzed certain physical and chemical characteristics (D 20 20, Alcool %, Total dry extract g/l, Free sugar g/l, Unreducing extract g /l, Total Acidity g/l C4H6O6, Free SO2 mg/l Total SO2 mg/l for 9 samples. Compared to the main wine parameters, the tested parameters had the following evolution: Alcoholic strength, Free sugar and Density increased in vermouth type wines, Total acidity decreased slightly in flavoured wines and more obvious in vermouth type wines. The total dry extract increased sharply in vermouth type wines and the unreducing extract decreased sharply in vermouth type wines. The amount of Free SO2 was higher in flavoured wines, but Total SO2 had lower values, both for flavoured wines and vermouth type wines, comparative to Sauvignon Blanc wine. Plants macerates added to the Sauvignon Blanc basic wine, influenced most of the physical-chemical parameters and provided new qualitative features to resulting beverages.

  6. Production of heavy flavours with associated jets at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kind, O.M.

    2006-12-15

    Inclusive cross-sections for the production of open beauty and charm in ep collisions at HERA recorded with the ZEUS detector in the years 1996-2000 are measured. The data is restricted to photoproduction processes, i. e. collision events with small four-momentum transfers squared, Q{sup 2} {approx}0. Two associated jets with transverse energies E{sub t}>7(6)GeV and pseudo-rapidities vertical stroke {eta} vertical stroke <2.5 are required. The flavour is tagged by the identification of electrons and positrons from semi-leptonic decays of the heavy quark. For this a likelihood method is developed, mainly consisting of energy loss measurements in the central drift chamber of the detector and some other discriminant variables. The fractions of beauty and charm production are determined by a fit of Monte Carlo templates to the data. The total measured production cross-section for b anti b production is 820{+-}150{sup +20}{sub -30} pb for centre-of-mass energies {radical}(S{sub ep})=300 GeV and 1170{+-}130{sup +30}{sub -100} pb for {radical}(S{sub ep})=318 GeV. The total cross-section for charm production is given as well as differential cross-sections for b anti b and c anti c production. (orig.)

  7. Printing Outside the Box: Additive Manufacturing Processes for Fabrication of Large Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Majid; Peters, Warren

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of propulsion elements. Liquid rocket engines (LREs) are comprised of a thrust chamber and nozzle extension as illustrated in figure 1 for the J2X upper stage engine. Development of the J2X engine, designed for the Ares I launch vehicle, is currently being incorporated on the Space Launch System. A nozzle extension is attached to the combustion chamber to obtain the expansion ratio needed to increase specific impulse. If the nozzle extension could be printed as one piece using free-form additive manufacturing (AM) processes, rather than the current method of forming welded parts, a considerable time savings could be realized. Not only would this provide a more homogenous microstructure than a welded structure, but could also greatly shorten the overall fabrication time. The main objective of this study is to fabricate test specimens using a pulsed arc source and solid wire as shown in figure 2. The mechanical properties of these specimens will be compared with those fabricated using the powder bed, selective laser melting technology at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. As printed components become larger, maintaining a constant temperature during the build process becomes critical. This predictive capability will require modeling of the moving heat source as illustrated in figure 3. Predictive understanding of the heat profile will allow a constant temperature to be maintained as a function of height from substrate while printing complex shapes. In addition, to avoid slumping, this will also allow better control of the microstructural development and hence the properties. Figure 4 shows a preliminary comparison of the mechanical properties obtained.

  8. On-farm implementation of a starter culture for improved cocoa bean fermentation and its influence on the flavour of chocolates produced thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeber, Timothy; Papalexandratou, Zoi; Gobert, William; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2012-06-01

    Cocoa bean fermentations controlled by means of starter cultures were introduced on several farms in two different cocoa-producing regions (West Africa and Southeast Asia). Two starter culture mixtures were tested, namely one composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae H5S5K23, Lactobacillus fermentum 222, and Acetobacter pasteurianus 386B (three heaps and one box), and another composed of L. fermentum 222 and A. pasteurianus 386B (seven heaps and one box). In all starter culture-added cocoa bean fermentation processes, the inoculated starter culture species were able to outgrow the natural contamination of the cocoa pulp-bean mass and they prevailed during cocoa bean fermentation. The application of both added starter cultures resulted in fermented dry cocoa beans that gave concomitant milk and dark chocolates with a reliable flavour, independent of cocoa-producing region or fermentation method. The addition of the lactic acid bacterium (LAB)/acetic acid bacterium (AAB) starter culture to the fermenting cocoa pulp-bean mass accelerated the cocoa bean fermentation process regarding citric acid conversion and lactic acid production through carbohydrate fermentation. For the production of a standard bulk chocolate, the addition of a yeast/LAB/AAB starter culture was necessary. This enabled an enhanced and consistent ethanol production by yeasts for a successful starter culture-added cocoa bean fermentation process. This study showed possibilities for the use of starter cultures in cocoa bean fermentation processing to achieve a reliably improved fermentation of cocoa pulp-bean mass that can consistently produce high-quality fermented dry cocoa beans and flavourful chocolates produced thereof. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biovanillin from agro wastes as an alternative food flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamzuri, Nur Ain; Abd-Aziz, Suraini

    2013-02-01

    This review provides an overview of biovanillin production from agro wastes as an alternative food flavour. Biovanillin is one of the widely used flavour compounds in the foods, beverages and pharmaceutical industries. An alternative production approach for biovanillin as a food flavour is hoped for due to the high and variable cost of natural vanillin as well as the limited availability of vanilla pods in the market. Natural vanillin refers to the main organic compound that is extracted from the vanilla bean, as compared to biovanillin, which is produced biologically by microorganisms from a natural precursor such as ferulic acid. Biovanillin is also reviewed as a potential bioflavour produced by microbial fermentation in an economically feasible way in the near future. In fact, we briefly discuss natural, synthetic and biovanillin and the types of agro wastes that are useful as sources for bioconversion of ferulic acid into biovanillin. The subsequent part of the review emphasizes the current application of vanillin as well as the utilization of biovanillin as an alternative food flavour. The final part summarizes biovanillin production from agro wastes that could be of benefit as a food flavour derived from potential natural precursors. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Exposure, health information and flavour-masking strategies for improving the sensory quality of probiotic juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckow, T; Sheehan, V; Fitzgerald, G; Delahunty, C

    2006-11-01

    Probiotics are live microbial food supplements, which have been shown to exert numerous health benefits. Research has identified that probiotics cause perceptible off-flavours that often contribute to consumer dissatisfaction. This research consisted of three objectives. Firstly, to confirm whether probiotics have a significant effect on the sensory quality and the consumer acceptance of juices. Secondly, to evaluate whether the addition of tropical juices masks probiotic off-flavours, thereby increasing consumer liking. Thirdly, to determine whether non-sensory factors (i.e., repeated exposure, and health information) have an impact on consumer liking. Three orange juice products were manufactured for analysis; Control juice, juice containing probiotics, and juice containing probiotics and tropical fruit juices (10% v/v). Descriptive sensory analysis using a trained panel (n=8) determined that probiotic juices possessed unique 'medicinal' characteristics. Using labelled affective magnitude scales, consumers (n=116) evaluated their 'overall liking' of the three juices in a randomised order in the laboratory. Once assigned into one of three balanced exposure groups, each consumer took home seven, 100mL bottles of one of the juices, and consumed one bottle each day for 7 days. After each in-home consumption, consumers evaluated their 'overall liking' to familiarize themselves with the juice. Furthermore, half of the consumers were provided with information about the presence and the health benefits of probiotics, while the other half of consumers received no information. After 7 days of in-home usage, consumers returned to the laboratory for post-exposure sensory testing, where they re-evaluated their 'overall liking' of the three juices in a randomised order. Results showed that tropical juices were effective in masking the off-flavours associated with probiotic ingredients, and that consumer liking for the probiotic juice containing tropical juice flavours was

  11. Consolidation & Factors Influencing Sintering Process in Polymer Powder Based Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, M. B.; Elangovan, K.

    2017-08-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is two decade old technology; where parts are build layer manufacturing method directly from a CAD template. Over the years, AM techniques changes the future way of part fabrication with enhanced intricacy and custom-made features are aimed. Commercially polymers, metals, ceramic and metal-polymer composites are in practice where polymers enhanced the expectations in AM and are considered as a kind of next industrial revolution. Growing trend in polymer application motivated to study their feasibility and properties. Laser sintering, Heat sintering and Inhibition sintering are the most successful AM techniques for polymers but having least application. The presentation gives up selective sintering of powder polymers and listed commercially available polymer materials. Important significant factors for effective processing and analytical approaches to access them are discussed.

  12. Exploring the effects of ZVI addition on resource recovery in the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puyol, D.; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Segura, Y.

    2018-01-01

    not compensate the costs of ZVI purchase, and (b) ZVI dramatically decreases the P recovery potential in the digestate of the AD systems. This is the first study to experimentally and mathematically describe the effect of ZVI on biogas production/composition and on the fate of phosphorus compounds, and its......The influence of Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) addition on the potential resource recovery during the anaerobic digestion (AD) of domestic waste sludge is assessed. Potentially recoverable resources analyzed were nutrients such as struvite to recover P, and energy as biogas to recover C. Short term...... (biochemical methane potential tests, BMP) and long term (AD1, AD2) experiments are conducted using two types of set-up (batch, continuous). Process data (influent, effluent and biogas) is continuously collected and the dry digested sludge is analyzed by XPS. A mathematical model is developed based...

  13. THE VISCOSITY OF PROCESSED CHEESE SAUCES DEPENDING ON ADDITION TYPE AND CONCENTRATION OF 1-MONOGLYCERIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahula Janiš

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study viscosity of processed cheese sauces with 1-monoglycerides (MAG addition. Six types of 1-monoglycerides (1-monocaprin, C10:0; 1-monolaurin, C12:0; 1-monomyristin, C14:0; 1-monopalmitin, C16:0; 1-monostearin, C18:0; 1-monoolein, C18:1 in concentration of 0.25 and 0.50% w/w were used. Control samples were prepared without MAG but with lecithin. The lowest values of viscosity were found in control samples. The viscosity increased with extending of chain fatty acid in the molecule of monoglycerides. The highest viscosity was found in samples with 1-monomyristin.doi:10.5219/183

  14. The S{sub 3} flavour symmetry: Neutrino masses and mixings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Canales, F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias de la Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Mondragon, A.; Mondragon, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-04-02

    In this work, we discuss the neutrino masses and mixings as the realization of an S{sub 3} flavour permutational symmetry in two models, namely the Standard Model and an extension of the Standard Model with three Higgs doublets. In the S{sub 3} Standard Model, mass matrices of the same generic form are obtained for the neutrino and charged leptons when the S{sub 3} flavour symmetry is broken sequentially according to the chain S{sub 3L} x S{sub 3R} contains S{sub 3}{sup diag} contains S{sub 2}. In the minimal S{sub 3}-symmetric extension of the Standard Model, the S{sub 3} symmetry is left unbroken, and the concept of flavour is extended to the Higgs sector by introducing in the theory three Higgs fields which are SU(2) doublets. In both models, the mass matrices of the neutrinos and charged leptons are reparametrized in terms of their eigenvalues, and exact, explicit analytical expressions for the neutrino mixing angles as functions of the masses of neutrinos and charged leptons are obtained. In the case of the S{sub 3} Standard Model, from a {chi}{sup 2} fit of the theoretical expressions of the lepton mixing matrix to the values extracted from experiment, the numerical values of the neutrino mixing angles are obtained in excellent agreement with experimental data. In the S{sub 3} extension of the Standard Model, if two of the right handed neutrinos masses are degenerate, the reactor and atmospheric mixing angles are determined by the masses of the charged leptons, yielding {theta}{sub 23} in excellent agreement with experimental data, and {theta}{sub 13} different from zero but very small. If the masses of the three right handed neutrinos are assumed to be different, then it is possible to get {theta}{sub 13}also in very good agreement with experimental data. We also show the branching ratios of some selected flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) process as well as the contribution of the exchange of a neutral flavour changing scalar to the anomaly of the

  15. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]. Taking into account the constraints from [Formula: see text] processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours [Formula: see text], which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in [Formula: see text] decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the [Formula: see text] constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for [Formula: see text] with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of [Formula: see text]. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of indirect measurements and

  16. Inclusive tagging of B-flavour at LHCb [Vidyo

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important procedure needed for the study of CP violation in Beauty sector is the tagging of the flavour of neutral B-mesons at production. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present a proposal to upgrade current flavour tagging strategy in LHCb experiment. This strategy consists of inclusive tagging ensemble methods (i.e: the use inclusive information about the event without a firm selection rule), which are combined using a probabilistic model for each event. The probabilistic model uses all reconstructed tracks and secondary vertices to obtain well-determined probability of B flavour at production. Such approach reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus has the potential to increase the overall performance.

  17. Signatures of top flavour-changing dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondt, Jorgen d'; Mariotti, Alberto; Moortgat, Seth; Tziveloglou, Pantelis

    2015-12-01

    We develop the phenomenology of scenarios in which a dark matter candidate interacts with a top quark through flavour-changing couplings, employing a simplified dark matter model with an s-channel vector-like mediator. We study in detail the top-charm flavour-changing interaction, by investigating the single top plus large missing energy signature at the LHC as well as constraints from the relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We present strategies to distinguish between the top-charm and top-up flavour-changing models by taking advantage of the lepton charge asymmetry as well as by using charm-tagging techniques on an extra jet. We also show the complementarity between the LHC and canonical dark matter experiments in exploring the viable parameter space of the models.

  18. Silver Nanocube and Nanobar Growth via Anisotropic Monomer Addition and Particle Attachment Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongdong; Wu, Zhigang; Song, Miao; Chun, Jaehun; Schenter, Gregory K; Li, Dongsheng

    2018-01-30

    Understanding the growth mechanism of noble metal nanocrystals during solution synthesis is of significant importance for shape and property control. However, much remains unknown about the growth pathways of metal nanoparticles due to the lack of direct observation. Using an in situ transmission electron microscopy technique, we directly observed Ag nanocube and nanobar growth in an aqueous solution through both classical monomer-by-monomer addition and nonclassical particle attachment processes. During the particle attachment process, Ag nanocubes and nanobars were formed via both oriented and nonoriented attachment. Our calculations, along with the dynamics of the observed attachment, showed that the van der Waals force overcomes hydrodynamic and friction forces and drives the particles toward each other at separations of 10-100 nm in our experiments. During classical growth, anisotropic growth was also revealed, and the resulting unsymmetrical shape constituted an intermediate state for Ag nanocube growth. We hypothesized that the temporary symmetry breaking resulted from different growth rates on (001) surfaces due to a local surface concentration variation caused by the imbalance between the consumption of Ag + near the surface and the diffusion of Ag + from the bulk to the surface.

  19. Silver Nanocube and Nanobar Growth via Anisotropic Monomer Addition and Particle Attachment Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Dongdong [Physical; Wu, Zhigang [School; Song, Miao [Physical; Chun, Jaehun [Physical; Schenter, Gregory K. [Physical; Li, Dongsheng [Physical

    2018-01-11

    Understanding the growth mechanism of noble metal nanocrystals during solution synthesis is of significant importance for shape and property control. However, much remains unknown about the growth pathways of metal nanoparticles due to lack of direct observation. Using an in-situ transmission electron microscopy technique, we directly observed Ag nanocube and nanobar growth in aqueous solution through both classical monomer-by-monomer addition and non-classical particle attachment processes. During the particle attachment process, Ag nanocubes and nanobars formed via both oriented and non-oriented attachment. Our calculations, along with dynamics of the observed attachment, showed that van der Waals force overcame hydrodynamic and friction forces and drove the particles toward each other. During classical growth, an anisotropic growth was also revealed, and the resulting unsymmetrical shape constituted an intermediate state for Ag nanocube growth. We hypothesized that the temporary symmetry breaking resulted from different growth rates on {001} surfaces due to a local surface concentration variation caused by the imbalance between the consumption of Ag+ near the surface and the diffusion of Ag+ from bulk to surface.

  20. Synthesis mechanism of nanoporous Sn3O4 nanosheets by hydrothermal process without any additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun-Hua; Tan, Rui-Qin; Yang, Ye; Xu, Wei; Li, Jia; Shen, Wen-Feng; Wu, Guo-Qiang; Zhu, You-Liang; Yang, Xu-Feng; Song, Wei-Jie

    2015-06-01

    Nanoporous anorthic-phase Sn3O4 nanosheets are successfully fabricated via a hydrothermal process without any additives. With the pH value of the precursor increasing from 2.0 to 11.8, the valence of the precursor changes from mixed valence (the ratio of Sn2+ to Sn4+ is 2.7:1) to pure bivalent, and the product transformed from Sn3O4 to SnO mesocrystals. When doping SbCl3 to the alkaline precursor, the valence of the precursor shows mixed valence with the ratio of Sn2+ to Sn4+ being 2.6:1 and Sn3O4 is synthesized after the hydrothermal process. The valence state of Sn species in the precursor is the key factor of the formation of Sn3O4. The synthesis mechanism is discussed and proposed. These experimental results expand the knowledge base that can be used to guide technological applications of intermediate tin oxide materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21377063, 51102250, 21203226, and 21205127) and the Personnel Training Foundation of Quzhou University (Grant No. BSYJ201412).

  1. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  2. Minimal flavour violation in the quark and lepton sector and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, S.L.

    2008-01-07

    We address to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in a framework that generalizes the quark minimal flavour violation hypothesis to the lepton sector. We study the impact of CP violation present at low and high energies and investigate the existence of correlations among leptogenesis and lepton flavour violation. Further we present an approach alternative to minimal flavour violation where the suppression of flavour changing transitions involving quarks and leptons is governed by hierarchical fermion wave functions. (orig.)

  3. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements of $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production is fundamental. This is known as "flavour tagging" and at LHCb it is performed with several algorithms. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. Also the performances of the flavour tagging algorithms in the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  4. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements in $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production ("Flavour Tagging") is fundamental. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. The performances of the flavour tagging algorithms on the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  5. Event displays with heavy flavour jets from 2016 CMS data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A broad range of physics analyses at CMS rely on the efficient identification of heavy flavour jets. Identification of these objects is a challenging task, especially in the presence of a large number of multiple interactions per bunch crossing. The presented summary contains a set of graphical displays of reconstructed events in data collected by CMS in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV in 2016. The displays highlight the main properties of heavy flavour jets in several event topologies, including QCD multijet, top quark pair, W+c and boosted H to bb.

  6. Non-thermal Unruh radiation for flavour neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasone, M.; Lambiase, G.; Luciano, G. G.

    2018-01-01

    In the quantum field theory framework, both flavour mixing and Unruh effect have been shown to arise from Bogoliubov transformations connecting inequivalent Hilbert spaces. In the present work, we study how these transformations combine when field mixing for an accelerated observer (Rindler observer) is considered. In particular, a simplified two–flavour model involving Dirac neutrino fields is analyzed. In spite of such basic setting, we find that the spectrum of Unruh radiation gets significantly modified, losing its characteristic thermal behaviour. Exploiting this result, the possibility of fixing new constraints on the neutrino squared mass differences is investigated.

  7. FlavBit : a GAMBIT module for computing flavour observables and likelihoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernlochner, F.U.; Chrząszcz, M.; Dal, L.A.; Farmer, B.; Jackson, P.; Kvellestad, A.; Mahmoudi, F.; Putze, A.; Rogan, C.; Scott, P.; Serra, N.; Weniger, C.; White, M.

    2017-01-01

    Flavour physics observables are excellent probes of new physics up to very high energy scales. Here we present FlavBit, the dedicated flavour physics module of the global-fitting package GAMBIT. FlavBit includes custom implementations of various likelihood routines for a wide range of flavour

  8. Volatile and non-volatile compounds in ripened cheese : their formation and their contribution to flavour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.J.M.

    1997-01-01


    Flavour is one of the most important attributes of cheese. Cheese flavour is the result of the breakdown of milk protein, fat, lactose and citrate due to enzymes from milk, rennet and microorganisms during production and ripening of cheese. For a large part the development of flavour

  9. Flavour development in pork. Influence of flavour precursor concentrations in longissimus dorsi from pigs with different raw meat qualities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Lene; Tikk, Kaja; Tikk, Meelis

    2009-01-01

    Flavour development and overall eating quality of pan-fried pork chops of longissimus dorsi from eight different raw meat qualities aged for 4 and IS days were assessed by a trained sensory panel. The raw meat qualities were obtained through combinations of strategic feeding/fasting (control vs....... low glycogen concentration), slaughter live-weight (84 kg vs. 110 kg), and gender (female vs. castrate). The flavour development was investigated for possible correlation with the concentrations of selected individual flavour precursors present in the raw meat: rnonosaccharides, IMP and degradation...... products, fatty acids, lactate and thiamine. Differences in precursor concentrations between the raw Meat qualities were observed with feeding/fasting and ageing as the main factors with the largest influence of all experimental factors. However, the concentrations of the precursors could not explain...

  10. Viability of probiotic Lactobacillus casei in yoghurt: defining the best processing step to its addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Nataly Simões; Carneiro, Isadora; da Silva, Alisson Santana; Honjoya, Edson Renato; de Santana, Elsa Helena Walter; Aragon-Alegro, Lina Casale; de Souza, Cínthia Hoch Batista

    2013-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms capable of producing beneficial effects on its host when consumed in adequate amounts. To exert these effects, foods must contain probiotic microorganisms in populations above 10(6) CFU/g or mL throughout its shelf life. One of the strategies to ensure high population of probiotics in fermented milk is to add them during or after the fermentation process separately from the starter cultures. The objective of this study was to investigate the behavior of the probiotic microorganism Lactobacillus casei added to yoghurt in different stages of production. Yoghurts with L. casei were produced at different stages: before addition of starter (Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus), added together with this culture and at the end of fermentation. Yoghurt without probiotic added was produced as a control. The products were stored at 4 degrees C and analyzed after 1, 7, 14 and 21 days of storage. In these periods, the populations ofprobiotic and starter cultures were enumerated and the parameters pH and acidity were analyzed. The results were evaluated using analysis of variance and Tukey's test, both at 5% significance level. L. casei remained viable in populations of more than 10(8) CFU / g during 21 days of storage, which is suitable to define the formulations as probiotics. When the different stages of the addition of probiotics in yoghurts were evaluated there was no statistical difference between the formulations (p < 0.05) for populations of L. casei except for the first day of storage.

  11. Development of magnetodielectric materials to be used in additive manufacturing processes for high-frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Paul Emerson, II

    Electrical devices for very-high frequency (VHF, 0.03 -- 0.3 GHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 0.3 -- 3.0 GHz) are commonly used for communications. However, the wavelengths, lambda, of these frequency bands correspond to lengths between 10 and 0.1 m, resulting in prohibitively large devices. Materials with an index of refraction, n, greater than 1 can be used to effectively shrink these devices by a factor of 1/ n. In this thesis, magnetodielectric materials (MDM), where n ≥1, have been made to be used in additive manufacturing processes with strict particle size requirements and were developed using various methods, such as polyol reduction and conventional ceramic solid state processing. These materials were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), to determine their crystalline, physical, and direct current (DC) magnetization properties. The techniques used to synthesize the MDM yielded particles that were chemically similar, but had drastically different physical properties which heavily influences their high-frequency electromagnetic properties. These materials were then uniformly dispersed into a non-conducting medium, such as a low-electrical loss polymer or resin, and formed into composite samples with variable volumetric loading. These composite samples were measured using several techniques to characterize the frequency-dependent electromagnetic (EM) properties, such as relative permeability, relative permittivity, and their respective losses. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were performed using these MDM-composites to design a spiral antenna to be used at approximately 585 MHz.

  12. New possibilities using additive manufacturing with materials that are difficult to process and with complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Anders; Hellsing, Maja S.; Rennie, Adrian R.

    2017-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) opens the possibility of creating new designs and manufacturing objects with new materials rapidly and economically. Particularly for use with polymers and polymer composites, simple printers can make high quality products, and these can be produced easily in offices, schools and in workshops and laboratories. This technology has opened a route for many to test ideas or to make custom devices. It is possible to easily manufacture complex geometries that would be difficult or even impossible to create with traditional methods. Naturally this technology has attracted attention in many fields that include the production of medical devices and prostheses, mechanical engineering as well as basic sciences. Materials that are highly problematic to machine can be used. We illustrate process developments with an account of the production of printer parts to cope with polymer fillers that are hard and abrasive; new nozzles with ruby inserts designed for such materials are durable and can be used to print boron carbide composites. As with other materials, complex parts can be printed using boron carbide composites with fine structures, such as screw threads and labels to identify materials. General ideas about design for this new era of manufacturing customised parts are presented.

  13. New possibilities using additive manufacturing with materials that are difficult to process and with complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Anders; Hellsing, Maja S; Rennie, Adrian R

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) opens the possibility of creating new designs and manufacturing objects with new materials rapidly and economically. Particularly for use with polymers and polymer composites, simple printers can make high quality products, and these can be produced easily in offices, schools and in workshops and laboratories. This technology has opened a route for many to test ideas or to make custom devices. It is possible to easily manufacture complex geometries that would be difficult or even impossible to create with traditional methods. Naturally this technology has attracted attention in many fields that include the production of medical devices and prostheses, mechanical engineering as well as basic sciences. Materials that are highly problematic to machine can be used. We illustrate process developments with an account of the production of printer parts to cope with polymer fillers that are hard and abrasive; new nozzles with ruby inserts designed for such materials are durable and can be used to print boron carbide composites. As with other materials, complex parts can be printed using boron carbide composites with fine structures, such as screw threads and labels to identify materials. General ideas about design for this new era of manufacturing customised parts are presented. (invited comment)

  14. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbold, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  15. Characteristics of dry- and brine-salted salmon later treated with liquid smoke flavouring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. MARTINEZ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of smoke flavourings for the processing of salmon has begun to substitute traditional smoking methods. This review examines the quality issues associated with salted salmon ‘smoked’ by this technique along the salting and smoking steps. Firstly, the evidence is examined to determine whether dry or brine salting is better for salmon flesh destined to be treated by liquid smoking. Secondly, influence of liquid smoking on the sensorial, physicochemical and textural characteristics of the flesh are described, as are its effects on potential spoilage organisms.;

  16. Theoretical aspects of heavy-flavour production at ultra-high cosmic ray energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main theoretical aspects of heavy-flavour production at ultra-high cosmic ray energies are reviewed, with particular emphasis in the new dynamical effects which are expected to be present in the kinematical range probed by the IceCube and Pierre Auger Observatories. The gluon saturation effects for heavy quark production and the contribution of double parton scattering processes are analysed. Finally, the intrinsic heavy quark hypothesis is presented and some of its phenomenological implications at high energies are discussed.

  17. Use of locally available flavouring materials in suppressing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... effect of blending soymilk with pineapple, banana, lemongrass, honey or sugar on acceptability of the resulting blends. Sensory evaluation ... Banana-flavoured blends resulted in phase separation that accounted for the relatively low acceptance. Soymilk ...

  18. Physicochemical parameters related to organoleptic properties of flavour components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, M.H.; Gemert, L.J. van

    1986-01-01

    Straight chain, saturated and unsarurated, aldehydes are important constituents of citrus fruit, dairy, vegetable, meat and other flavours. For instance, alkanals and 2-alkenals (C6 to C14) have been detected and quantified in Bitter Orange Oil. The organoleptic qualities and threshold values of

  19. LHCb results on flavour physics and implications to BSM

    CERN Document Server

    Langenbruch, C

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC. Precision measurements of CP violation and the study of rare decays of hadrons containing beauty and charm quarks constitute powerful searches for New Physics. A selection of recent LHCb results and their implications to physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed.

  20. Nothing in Biology makes Sense without the Flavour of Mathematics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. Nothing in Biology makes Sense without the Flavour of Mathematics. H A Ranganath. General Article Volume 8 Issue 3 March 2003 pp 49-56. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Heavy Flavour Cross Section Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Chris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS measurements of heavy flavour production are presented using b-hadron decays to the D*muX final state, inclusive D(*) meson production, inclusive electron and muon production and b-jet tagging. The results are compared with QCD calculations. This is a review talk prepared for the BEACH 2012 conference, 23-28 July 2012.

  2. Effect of irradiation on the flavour of Iraqi dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaddou, H.; Al-Hakim, M.

    1978-01-01

    A method was developed to study the effect of gamma irradiation on the flavour of dates that involved low temperature distillation under reduced pressure. The distillate was freeze concentrated before solvent extraction. Zahdi dates were given three doses of 50, 100 and 150krad. Combined treatments of heat plus irradiation were also applied: 50krad+50 0 C, 100krad+50 0 C and 150krad+50 0 C. Flavour analyses were carried out immediately after irradiation and after 3 weeks of storage. Both the acid and non-acid fractions of the distillates were found to retain the initial aroma. Gas-chromatography was used to separate the fractions into their various constituents. The volatile free fatty acids isolated form data distillates are C 6 , C 8 , C 9 , C 10 , C 11 , C 12 , C 14 , C 16 , C 18 , Csub(18:2) and C 20 . Increases in the quantity of most of the free fatty acid contents of dates over those of controls were noticed. This increase did not impart any odd flavour to the product, indicating that the free fatty acids are present in concentrations below their threshold values. Little change was noticed when the non-acid fractions were separated by gas-chromatography, indicating that irradiation at this low level and the combined heat and irradiation treatments used in this experiment have no effect on the flavour of the product. (author)

  3. Effects of flavour absorption on foods and their packaging materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willige, van R.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: flavour absorption, scalping, packaging, food matrix, lldpe, ldpe, pp, pc, pet, pen,b-lactoglobulin, casein, pectin, cmc, lactose, saccharose, oil, modelling, storage, oxygen permeability, taste perception,

  4. Formation of Amino Acid Derived Cheese Flavour Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), among them Lactococcus lactis, are often used for the fermentation of milk into various products, such as cheeses. For their growth and maintenance LAB metabolise milk sugar, protein and fat into various low molecular compounds, which sometimes have strong flavour

  5. Linear Collider Flavour Identification status report: Sensors for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration is continuing the work to develop column-parallel CCDs (CPCCD) and CMOS readout chips to be used in the vertex detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The CPCCD achieves several orders of magnitude faster readout than conventional CCDs ...

  6. LHCb : Search for Lepton Flavour Violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Rives Molina, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations has re-opened the case for searches of lepton-flavour violating decays. We report on recent results on searches for short or long-lived Majorana heavy neutrinos in B&arr;μμπ and τ→μμμ decays

  7. SU(2) Gauge Theory with Two Fundamental Flavours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Rudy; Drach, Vincent; Hansen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the continuum spectrum of the SU(2) gauge theory with $N_f=2$ flavours of fermions in the fundamental representation. This model provides a minimal template which is ideal for a wide class of Standard Model extensions featuring novel strong dynamics that range from composite...

  8. On flavour and naturalness of composite Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the interplay of the constraints imposed on flavour-symmetric Composite Higgs models by Naturalness considerations and the constraints derived from Flavour Physics and Electroweak Precision Tests. Our analysis is based on the Effective Field Theory which describes the Higgs as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson and also includes the composite fermionic resonances. Within this approach one is able to identify the directions in the parameter space where the U(3)-symmetric flavour models can pass the current experimental constraints, without conflicting with the light Higgs mass. We also derive the general features of the U(2)-symmetric models required by the experimental bounds, in case of elementary and totally composite t R . An effect in the Zb-barb coupling, which can potentially allow for sizable deviations in Z→b-barb decay parameters without modifying flavour physics observables, is identified. We also present the analysis of the mixed scenario, where the top quark mass is generated due to Partial Compositeness while the light quark masses are Technicolor-like.

  9. Volatile flavour components of grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez, A.J.; Maarse, H.; Bemelmans, J.M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The qualitative analysis of volatile flavour components in grapefruit juice (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen) was performed using a gas chromatography/mass spectro‐metry/computer system which allowed the identification of 58 components, 25 of them being reported for the first time. The aroma concentrates

  10. Hip-Hop and Bongo Flavour Music in Contemporary Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... used as instruments to innovate and produce change, this article argues that Bongo Flavour and hip-hop are not only music genres, but also cultural expressions necessary for the understanding of a substantial part of contemporary Tanzanian youths. The focus here is on young male artists living in urban environments.

  11. Texture and flavour memory in foods : an incidental learning experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, J.; Köster, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    Memory plays a major role in the formation of food expectations. How accessible and how accurate is incidentally acquired and stored product information? In the present experiment the memory for variations in texture (and flavour) was tested with a new and ecologically valid method. Subjects (N =

  12. Texture and flavour memory in foods : an incidental learning experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, J.; Koster, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    Memory plays a major role in the formation of food expectations. How accessible and how accurate is incidentally acquired and stored product information? In the present experiment the memory for variations in texture (and flavour) was tested with a new and ecologically valid method. Subjects (N=69:

  13. Leptonic minimal flavour violation in warped extra dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-10

    Oct 10, 2012 ... Abstract. Lepton mass hierarchies and lepton flavour violation are revisited in the framework of. Randall–Sundrum models. Models with Dirac-type as well as Majorana-type neutrinos are con- sidered. The five-dimensional c-parameters are fit to the charged lepton and neutrino masses and mixings using χ2 ...

  14. Quark-flavour phenomenology of models with extended gauge symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, Maria Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Gauge invariance is one of the fundamental principles of the Standard Model of particles and interactions, and it is reasonable to believe that it also regulates the physics beyond it. In this thesis we have studied the theory and phenomenology of two New Physics models based on gauge symmetries that are extensions of the Standard Model group. Both of them are particularly interesting because they provide some answers to the question of the origin of flavour, which is still unexplained. Moreover, the flavour sector represents a promising field for the research of indirect signatures of New Physics, since after the first run of LHC we do not have any direct hint of it yet. The first model assumes that flavour is a gauge symmetry of nature, SU(3) 3 f , spontaneously broken by the vacuum expectation values of new scalar fields; the second model is based on the gauge group SU(3) c x SU(3) L x U(1) X , the simplest non-abelian extension of the Standard Model group. We have traced the complete theoretical building of the models, from the gauge group, passing through the nonanomalous fermion contents and the appropriate symmetry breakings, up to the spectra and the Feynman rules, with a particular attention to the treatment of the flavour structure, of tree-level Flavour Changing Neutral Currents and of new CP-violating phases. In fact, these models present an interesting flavour phenomenology, and for both of them we have analytically calculated the contributions to the ΔF=2 and ΔF=1 down-type transitions, arising from new tree-level and box diagrams. Subsequently, we have performed a comprehensive numerical analysis of the phenomenology of the two models. In both cases we have found very effective the strategy of first to identify the quantities able to provide the strongest constraints to the parameter space, then to systematically scan the allowed regions of the latter in order to obtain indications about the key flavour observables, namely the mixing parameters of

  15. On-line process monitoring of coffee roasting by resonant laser ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry: bridging the gap from industrial batch roasting to flavour formation inside an individual coffee bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz-Schünemann, R; Dorfner, R; Yeretzian, C; Streibel, T; Zimmermann, R

    2013-12-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) enables the fast and sensitive on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC) formed during coffee roasting. On the one hand, REMPI-TOFMS was applied to monitor roasting gases of an industrial roaster (1500 kg/h capacity), with the aim of determining the roast degree in real-time from the transient chemical signature of VOCs. On the other hand, a previously developed μ-probe sampling device was used to analyse roasting gases from individual coffee beans. The aim was to explore fundamental processes at the individual bean level and link these to phenomena at the batch level. The pioneering single-bean experiments were conducted in two configurations: (1) VOCs formed inside a bean were sampled in situ, i.e. via a drilled μ-hole, from the interior, using a μ-probe (inside). (2) VOCs were sampled on-line in close vicinity of a single coffee bean's surface (outside). The focus was on VOCs originating from hydrolysis and pyrolytic degradation of chlorogenic acids, like feruloyl quinic acid and caffeoyl quinic acid. The single bean experiments revealed interesting phenomena. First, differences in time-intensity profiles between inside versus outside (time shift of maximum) were observed and tentatively linked to the permeability of the bean's cell walls material. Second, sharp bursts of some VOCs were observed, while others did exhibit smooth release curves. It is believed that these reflect a direct observation of bean popping during roasting. Finally, discrimination between Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora was demonstrated based on high-mass volatile markers, exclusively present in spectra of Coffea arabica. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Assessment of dietary exposure to flavouring substances via consumption of flavoured teas. Part 1: occurrence and contents of monoterpenes in Earl Grey teas marketed in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Anne-Marie; Yu, Lu; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Estimations of dietary exposure via the consumption of flavoured foods play a central role in the safety evaluation of flavouring substances. To assess uncertainties, actual data regarding the occurrence and concentration levels of flavouring substances were determined in commercially available flavoured foods, using Earl Grey tea as an example. The contents of the consistently occurring monoterpenes linalyl acetate, linalool, limonene, β-pinene and γ-terpinene were determined in 90 tea samples purchased in 10 European Union member states. Rather narrow frequency distributions were observed for the major compounds linalyl acetate and linalool. The factors (1) country of purchase, (2) source of the products (national/international brands versus private label brands versus speciality tea shops), and (3) enantiomeric purities of the flavouring substances had no significant impact on the contents of the flavouring substances. Only in teas sold as loose leaves were the median contents of linalyl acetate and linalool (66% and 39%, respectively) higher than in teas offered in tea bags. Significant losses of flavouring substances were observed on storage of teas, indicating an impact of the type of packaging and the flavouring technology on the contents of flavouring substances in the product finally consumed.

  17. Extremes of Markov-additive processes with one-sided jumps, with queueing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Dieker (Ton); M.R.H. Mandjes (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractThrough Laplace transforms, we study the extremes of a continuous-time Markov-additive pro- cess with one-sided jumps and a finite-state background Markovian state-space, jointly with the epoch at which the extreme is ‘attained’. For this, we investigate discrete-time Markov-additive

  18. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    The paper investigates the effect of adding an external carbon source on the rate of denitrification in an alternating activated sludge process including biological P removal. Two carbon sources were examined, acetate and hydrolysate derived from biologically hydrolyzed sludge. Preliminary batch...... that external carbon source addition may serve as a suitable control variable to improve process performance....... process, the addition of either carbon source to the anoxic zone also resulted in an instantaneous and fairly reproducible increase in the denitrification rate. Some release of phosphate associated with the carbon source addition was observed. With respect to nitrogen removal, these results indicate...

  19. Certification of Additive Manufacturing Processing Parameters through Physics-Based Predictive Simulation of Process-Defects-Microstructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is a next generation technology for cost-effective and accelerated way of manufacturing complex-shaped...

  20. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Flavour Esters through Immobilized Lipase Mediated Transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Garlapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of methyl butyrate and octyl acetate through immobilized Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 3562 lipase mediated transesterification was studied under solvent-free conditions. The effect of different transesterification variables, namely, molarity of alcohol, reaction time, temperature, agitation, addition of water, and enzyme amount on molar conversion (% was investigated. A maximum molar conversion of 70.42% and 92.35% was obtained in a reaction time of 14 and 12 h with the transesterification variables of 0.6 M methanol in vinyl butyrate and 2 M octanol in vinyl acetate using 80 U and 60 U immobilized lipase with the agitation speed of 200 rpm and 0.2% water addition at 32°C and 36°C for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. The immobilized enzyme has retained good relative activity (more than 95% up to five and six recycles for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. Hence, the present investigation makes a great impingement in natural flavour industry by introducing products synthesized under solvent-free conditions to the flavour market.

  1. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Flavour Esters through Immobilized Lipase Mediated Transesterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rintu

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of methyl butyrate and octyl acetate through immobilized Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 3562 lipase mediated transesterification was studied under solvent-free conditions. The effect of different transesterification variables, namely, molarity of alcohol, reaction time, temperature, agitation, addition of water, and enzyme amount on molar conversion (%) was investigated. A maximum molar conversion of 70.42% and 92.35% was obtained in a reaction time of 14 and 12 h with the transesterification variables of 0.6 M methanol in vinyl butyrate and 2 M octanol in vinyl acetate using 80 U and 60 U immobilized lipase with the agitation speed of 200 rpm and 0.2% water addition at 32°C and 36°C for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. The immobilized enzyme has retained good relative activity (more than 95%) up to five and six recycles for methyl butyrate and octyl acetate, respectively. Hence, the present investigation makes a great impingement in natural flavour industry by introducing products synthesized under solvent-free conditions to the flavour market. PMID:23819043

  2. Changes in the viability of Strongyloides ransomi larvae (Nematoda, Rhabditida under the influence of synthetic flavourings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Boyko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of pigs globally is Strongyloides ransomi Schwartz and Alicata 1930. It usually causes aggravation of physiological indicators of its hosts and damage to their immune system. Also it is a good modelling object for the evaluation of the antiparasitic activity of new antihelminthic drugs. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the effect of flavouring additives with flower odour (benzaldehyde, citral, D-limonene and β-ionone upon the viability of S. ransomi larvae. The mortality rate was calculated for 24 hours exposure at four concentrations of each substance (10, 1, 0.1 и 0.01 g/l with eight replications. The lowest LD50 values were obtained for citral (97 mg/l and benzaldehyde (142 mg/l. These substances are recommended for further evaluation of their antihelminthic effect in experiments using laboratory animals. Unlike other substances, the effect of β-ionone and D-limonene even at a concentration of 10 g/l after 24 hours caused the death of <50% of S. ransomi larvae. The study of flavouring additives with flowery odour, which are permitted to be used in food for humans and also to be used in cosmetics, is a promising field for research aimed at the development of new antiparasitic drugs.

  3. Heavy flavour production and heavy flavour mixing at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eijk, B. van.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis some results of the proton-antiproton-collision experiment UA1 with the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron are presented and interpreted. Ch. 1 contians a general introduction to the physics motivations behind the proton-antiproton-collider project, a brief description of the CERN facilities and a summary of collider and UA1 physics achievements. Furthermore the concept of studying heavy flavours via their weak decays into muons is introduced. Ch. 2 gives a brief overview of the UA1 experimental set-up, while those parts of the detector that are relevant for the analysis, presented in this thesis, is discussed in some more detail. Ch. 3 contains a short introduction to, and motivation for the use of Monte Carlo techniques in event simulations, while Ch. 4 describes the framework of the recently developed 'EUROJET' event generator. In Ch. 5 a treatment is given of the theoretical background and concepts like 'quark-mixing' and 'CP-violation' are explained, also other useful definitions and formulae are introduced on which the later analysis of the same-sign to opposite-sign dimuon ratio is built. Data collection and event reconstruction is the subject of Ch. 6, while a detailed comparison between the theoretical models and experimentally obtained distributions is given in Ch. 7. Finally, in Ch. 8 some concluding remarks are made. 182 refs.; 81 figs.; 9 tabs

  4. Prediction of the Fiber Orientation State and the Resulting Structural and Thermal Properties of Fiber Reinforced Additive Manufactured Composites Fabricated Using the Big Area Additive Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Russell

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF include large material deposition rates and the addition of chopped carbon fibers to the filament feedstock. During processing, the flow field within the polymer melt orients the fiber suspension, which is important to quantify as the underlying fiber orientation influences the mechanical and thermal properties. This paper investigates the correlation between processing conditions and the resulting locally varying thermal-structural properties that dictate both the final part performance and part dimensionality. The flow domain includes both the confined and unconfined flow indicative of the extruder nozzle within the FFF deposition process. The resulting orientation is obtained through two different isotropic rotary diffusion models, the model by Folgar and Tucker and that of Wang et al., and a comparison is made to demonstrate the sensitivity of the deposited bead’s spatially varying orientation as well as the final processed part’s thermal-structural performance. The results indicate the sensitivity of the final part behavior is quite sensitive to the choice of the slowness parameter in the Wang et al. model. Results also show the need, albeit less than that of the choice of fiber interaction model, to include the extrudate swell and deposition within the flow domain.

  5. Application of chitooligosaccharides as antioxidants in beer to improve the flavour stability by protecting against beer staling during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Luan, Bo; Sun, Zhen; Yang, Chao; Yu, Zhimin; Li, Xianzhen

    2017-02-01

    To improve beer flavour stability by adding chitooligosaccharides that prevent formation of staling compounds and also scavenge radicals in stale beer. Chitooligosaccharides, at 0.001-0.01%, inhibited the formation of staling compounds in forced aged beer. The formation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, trans-2-nonenal and phenylacetaldehyde were decreased by 105, 360 and 27%, respectively, when compared with those in stale beer without chitooligosaccharide addition. The capability of chitooligosaccharides to prevent staling compound formation depended on their molecular size (2 or 3 kDa). The DPPH/hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in fresh beer significantly lower than that in forced aged beer in the presence of chitooligosaccharides. When compared with stale beer without added chitooligosaccharides, the radical scavenging activity could be increased by adding chitooligosaccharides to forced aged beer. Chitooligosaccharides play an active part in the prevention of beer flavour deterioration by inhibiting the formation of staling compounds and increasing radical scavenging activity.

  6. Application of power addition as modelling technique for flow processes: Two case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Wet, P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available through diaphragm valve and the fluidisation of a packed bed, are analysed as case studies. Empirical results are investigated for possible asymptotic bounds where after power addition is applied to the functional dependencies. The outcome is compared...

  7. Microstructures of iron aluminides processed by additive layer manufacturing and spark plasma sintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, A.; Palm, M.; Senceková, L.; Rolink, G.; Weisheit, A.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), s. 610-614 ISSN 1213-2489 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Intermetallics * Laser additive manufacturing * Powder metallurgy Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  8. Assessment of dietary intake of flavouring substances within the procedure for their safety evaluation: advantages and limitations of estimates obtained by means of a per capita method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, D; Leclercq, C

    2005-01-01

    The procedure for the safety evaluation of flavourings adopted by the European Commission in order to establish a positive list of these substances is a stepwise approach which was developed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and amended by the Scientific Committee on Food. Within this procedure, a per capita amount based on industrial poundage data of flavourings, is calculated to estimate the dietary intake by means of the maximised survey-derived daily intake (MSDI) method. This paper reviews the MSDI method in order to check if it can provide conservative intake estimates as needed at the first steps of a stepwise procedure. Scientific papers and opinions dealing with the MSDI method were reviewed. Concentration levels reported by the industry were compared with estimates obtained with the MSDI method. It appeared that, in some cases, these estimates could be orders of magnitude (up to 5) lower than those calculated considering concentration levels provided by the industry and regular consumption of flavoured foods and beverages. A critical review of two studies which had been used to support the statement that MSDI is a conservative method for assessing exposure to flavourings among high consumers was performed. Special attention was given to the factors that affect exposure at high percentiles, such as brand loyalty and portion sizes. It is concluded that these studies may not be suitable to validate the MSDI method used to assess intakes of flavours by European consumers due to shortcomings in the assumptions made and in the data used. Exposure assessment is an essential component of risk assessment. The present paper suggests that the MSDI method is not sufficiently conservative. There is therefore a clear need for either using an alternative method to estimate exposure to flavourings in the procedure or for limiting intakes to the levels at which the safety was assessed.

  9. [Comprehensive Assessment of Psychiatric Residents: An Addition to the Program Admission Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, E Jaramillo G; Elena, Martín C

    2012-01-01

    The training of medical specialists is a long and complex process. Its purpose is to guarantee the society that they are the right professionals to meet the health needs of the population. The first step to ensure this objective is the admission process. In psychiatry this process, monitoring resident students and the criteria for each one are different in each country. Admission in Colombia is a heterogeneous process, not standardized, which varies greatly from one university to another, even between private and public universities. At the National University of Colombia, the admissions process is handled by the Admissions Office and includes: a written test for which you must obtain a minimum score, a resume rating and an interview. The Teaching Committee and the Department of Psychiatry considered the admission procedure in general to be good, but in need of refinement. Due to the experience of some teachers and given the current rules, a "comprehensive assessment" for master and doctoral students was required and in 1996 it was decided that this method of assessment for admission to a specialization in Psychiatry would serve to complement the admission process. The article describes the experience of the process and its outcomes, strengths and weaknesses. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation of Non-Destructive Evaluation and Process Monitoring in DLP-based Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Iaroslav; Verron, Sylvain; Garan, Maryna; Šafka, Jiří; Moučka, Michal

    2017-04-01

    This article describes a method of in-situ process monitoring in the digital light processing (DLP) 3D printer. It is based on the continuous measurement of the adhesion force between printing surface and bottom of a liquid resin bath. This method is suitable only for the bottom-up DPL printers. Control system compares the force at the moment of unsticking of printed layer from the bottom of the tank, when it has the largest value in printing cycle, with theoretical value. Implementation of suggested algorithm can make detection of faults during the printing process possible.

  11. Flavour Independent $h^{0}A^{0}$ Search and Two Higgs Doublet Model Interpretation of Neutral Higgs Boson Searches at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2005-01-01

    Upper limits on the cross-section of the pair-production process e+e- -> h0A0 assuming 100% decays into hadrons, are derived from a new search for the h0A0 -> hadrons topology, independent of the hadronic flavour of the decay products. Searches for the neutral Higgs bosons h0 and A0, are used to obtain constraints on the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM(11)) with no CP violation in the Higgs sector and no additional non Standard Model particles besides the five Higgs bosons. The analysis combines LEP1 and LEP2 data collected with the OPAL detctor up to the highest available centre-of-mass energies. The searches are sensitive to the h0, A0 -> qq, gg,tau+tau- and h0 -> A0A0 decay modes of the Higgs bosons. The 2HDM(II) parameter space is explored in a detailed scan. Large regions of the 2HDM(II) parameter space are excluded at the 95% CL in the (mh, mA), (mh, tanb) and (mA, tanb) planes, using both direct neutral Higgs boson searches and indirect limits derived from Standard Model high precision measuremen...

  12. Aluminium content of some processed foods, raw materials and food additives in China by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Li, Ke; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fen; Dai, Jing-Jing; Li, Hua-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The level of aluminium in 178 processed food samples from Shenzhen city in China was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Some processed foods contained a concentration of up to 1226 mg/kg, which is about 12 times the Chinese food standard. To establish the main source in these foods, Al levels in the raw materials were determined. However, aluminium concentrations in raw materials were low (0.10-451.5 mg/kg). Therefore, aluminium levels in food additives used in these foods was determined and it was found that some food additives contained a high concentration of aluminium (0.005-57.4 g/kg). The results suggested that, in the interest of public health, food additives containing high concentrations of aluminium should be replaced by those containing less. This study has provided new information on aluminium levels in Chinese processed foods, raw materials and a selection of food additives.

  13. The mechanical problems on additive manufacturing of viscoelastic solids with integral conditions on a surface increasing in the growth process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, D. A.; Manzhirov, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    Quasistatic mechanical problems on additive manufacturing aging viscoelastic solids are investigated. The processes of piecewise-continuous accretion of such solids are considered. The consideration is carried out in the framework of linear mechanics of growing solids. A theorem about commutativity of the integration over an arbitrary surface increasing in the solid growing process and the time-derived integral operator of viscoelasticity with a limit depending on the solid point is proved. This theorem provides an efficient way to construct on the basis of Saint-Venant principle solutions of nonclassical boundary-value problems for describing the mechanical behaviour of additively formed solids with integral satisfaction of boundary conditions on the surfaces expanding due to the additional material influx to the formed solid. The constructed solutions will retrace the evolution of the stress-strain state of the solids under consideration during and after the processes of their additive formation. An example of applying the proved theorem is given.

  14. Effects of Alkali Concentration and Conching Temperature on Flavour, Hardness and Colour of Chocolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnawi Jati

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkalization is an addition of alkali into cocoa mass to improve product quality in terms of flavour and colour appearance. Sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate are usual to be added into cocoa cotyledon prior to roasting. A study has been carried out to evaluate the effects of alkalization proceeded upon conching on chocolate sensory properties, hardness and colour. Re sponse Surface Methodology design at alkali concentrations of 1—15 g kg -1 and conching temperature of 40—80 oC have been used in the study. Parameters evaluated were sensory properties, particle size, hardness and colour. Results of the study showed that alkali concentration significantly influenced aroma, overall preference, particle size and hardness; meanwhile, conching temperature showed significant influence on aroma, taste, appearance, overall preference and texture of chocolate. Alkali concentration and conching temperature showed interactively influence on aroma and overall preference. A good quality of chocolate could be found at the alkali concentration of 8—15 g kg -1 and conching temperature of 74—80 oC. Key words: cocoa bean, chocolate, flavour, conching, alkalization, colour, particle size, texture.

  15. Solving the flavour problem in supersymmetric Standard Models with three Higgs families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howl, R.; King, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    We show how a non-Abelian family symmetry Δ 27 can be used to solve the flavour problem of supersymmetric Standard Models containing three Higgs families such as the Exceptional Supersymmetric Standard Model (E 6 SSM). The three 27-dimensional families of the E 6 SSM, including the three families of Higgs fields, transform in a triplet representation of the Δ 27 family symmetry, allowing the family symmetry to commute with a possible high energy E 6 symmetry. The Δ 27 family symmetry here provides a high energy understanding of the Z 2 H symmetry of the E 6 SSM, which solves the flavour changing neutral current problem of the three families of Higgs fields. The main phenomenological predictions of the model are tri-bi-maximal mixing for leptons, two almost degenerate LSPs and two almost degenerate families of colour triplet D-fermions, providing a clear prediction for the LHC. In addition the model predicts PGBs with masses below the TeV scale, and possibly much lighter, which appears to be a quite general and robust prediction of all models based on the D-term vacuum alignment mechanism.

  16. Effect of Feldspar Additive and Process Condition on the Formation of Ceramic of Flyash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herry Poernomo; Djoko Sardjono, Ign.

    2002-01-01

    The process of ceramic formation from the two components namely flyash and feldspar as an alternative for the initial preparation of radioactive waste immobilization has been experimentally investigated. The process variables were : the weight ratio of flyash/feldspar : 50/50 -100/0, hydraulic press formation of flyash pellet : 25 -75 kN and the firing temperature: 1000 - 1300 o C with the firing rate in the furnace at 250 o C. The stage of processes covered the mixing of flyash-feldspar, pelletization, firing of pellet, physical analysis including porosity and compressive strength. The experimental results show that the quality of the best ceramic was at the process condition as the following : the ratio weight of flyash/feldspar was 50/50, the hydraulic press of pellet was 75 kN and the firing temperature of 1300 o C with the compressive strength of ceramic pellet of 27.5 kN/cm 2 and the porosity of 0.014. XRD analysis of mineral for the ceramic at the above condition processes showed that ceramic consist of minerals with the composition of 63.51 % mullite, 25.18 % alpha quartz/cristobalite and 10.51 % feldspar. (author)

  17. Integration of Fiber-Reinforced Polymers in a Life Cycle Assessment of Injection Molding Process Chains with Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Bey, Niki; Mischkot, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies applied to injection molding process chain have acquired an increasingly important role in the context of tool inserts production, especially by vat polymerization. Despite the decreased lifetime during their use in the injection molding process, the inserts come...... with improvements in terms of production time, costs, exibility, as well as potentially improved environmental performance as compared to conventional materials in a life cycle perspective.This contribution supports the development of additively manufactured injection molding inserts with the use of fiber......-reinforced vat polymerization technology. The life cycle assessment of the prototyping process chain for rapid prototyping with high exibility provides a base for industrial applications in injection molding....

  18. Quantum resonant leptogenesis and minimal lepton flavour violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); De Simone, Andrea [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Isidori, Gino [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56100 Pisa (Italy); Masina, Isabella; Riotto, Antonio, E-mail: cirigliano@lanl.gov, E-mail: andreads@mit.edu, E-mail: Gino.Isidori@lnf.infn.it, E-mail: imasina@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: riotto@mail.cern.ch [CERN, Department of Physics, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-01-15

    It has recently been shown that the quantum Boltzmann equations may be relevant for the leptogenesis scenario. In particular, they lead to a time-dependent CP asymmetry which depends upon the previous dynamics of the system. This memory effect in the CP asymmetry is particularly important in resonant leptogenesis where the asymmetry is generated by the decays of nearly mass-degenerate right-handed neutrinos. We study the impact of the non-trivial time evolution of the CP asymmetry in the so-called minimal lepton flavour violation framework where the charged-lepton and the neutrino Yukawa couplings are the only irreducible sources of lepton flavour symmetry breaking and resonant leptogenesis is achieved. We show that significant quantitative differences arise with respect to the case in which the time dependence of the CP asymmetry is neglected.

  19. Flavour-enhanced cortisol release during gum chewing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hasegawa

    Full Text Available There is some evidence to suggest that chewing gum reduces chronic stress. However, it remains controversial how the taste and odour properties of chewing gum influence stress. The present study was designed to investigate this issue in human subjects. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested salivary cortisol concentration, which is thought to be a stress marker, in 96 adults who chewed gum with different combinations of taste and odour. Subjects could discriminate between the types of gum without prior information. Salivary cortisol concentrations were highest and lowest for the subjects who chewed the most flavourful gum and the least flavourful gum, respectively. These findings suggest that the salivary cortisol level during gum chewing is not a marker of negative emotions (i.e., stressful conditions as traditionally considered but, rather, an index of positive emotions that can facilitate biological responses to overcome stressful conditions.

  20. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brümmer, Felix [SISSA/ISAS,Via Bonomea 265, Trieste I-34136 (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); McGarrie, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); National Institute for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics,and Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg, WITS 2050 (South Africa); Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); CERN Theory Division,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-04-10

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3){sub F} symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3){sub F} is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3){sub F} breaking.

  1. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Felix [International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); McGarrie, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). School of Physics and Centre for Theoretical Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.

    2014-04-15

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3){sub F} symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3){sub F} is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3){sub F} breaking.

  2. Quantum Resonant Leptogenesis and Minimal Lepton Flavour Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Isidori, Gino; Masina, Isabella; Riotto, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the quantum Boltzmann equations may be relevant for the leptogenesis scenario. In particular, they lead to a time-dependent CP asymmetry which depends upon the previous dynamics of the system. This memory effect in the CP asymmetry is particularly important in resonant leptogenesis where the asymmetry is generated by the decays of nearly mass-degenerate right-handed neutrinos. We study the impact of the non-trivial time evolution of the CP asymmetry in the so-called Minimal Lepton Flavour Violation framework where the charged-lepton and the neutrino Yukawa couplings are the only irreducible sources of lepton-flavour symmetry breaking and resonant leptogenesis is achieved. We show that significant quantitative differences arise with respect to the case in which the time dependence of the CP asymmetry is neglected.

  3. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-26

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  4. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1979-10-30

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  5. Conceptual approach for an in-line quality control system in Additive Manufacturing Powder Bed Fusion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulga Simina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing is one of the genuine hopes for the forth industrial revolution since digital data is controlling the whole layered production process. At the same time the geometric freedom and tool-free production assures a high degree of individualisation. But to be the driving force behind a new industrial revolution, a qualification of additive manufacturing processes is necessary so that the resulting products meet the required quality and safety standards in the different fields of application such as in handling technology or medical technology. This paper will discuss a conceptual approach for the development of an in-line quality control system in Additive Manufacturing Powder Bed Fusion processes using the example of the Selective Laser Sintering process.

  6. Novel additives in radiation polymerisation processes. Significance of molecular weight data in their application to grafting, curing and composite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.; Mohajerani, S.; Viengkhou, V.; Loo-Teck NG

    1995-01-01

    The role of additives in accelerating rates of reaction has been investigated in the following related radiation polymerisation processes, i.e simple homopolymerisation, grafting, WPC formation and curing. Additives used include mineral acid, polyfunctional monomers, urea and thermal and photochemical initiators. Molecular weight analysis carried out on the polymers formed in the presence of the additives indicate that both chemical and physical processes are involved in the mechanism of the polymerisation reaction. Chemical processes (free radicals) lead to an enhancement in initial rate of polymerisation whilst the physical parameter involves partitioning of reagents during reaction. Both chemical and physical processes are shown to act in concert to influence both polymer yield and properties

  7. External Carbon Source Addition as a Means to Control an Activated Sludge Nutrient Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    In alternating type activated sludge nutrient removal processes, the denitrification rate can be limited by the availability of readily-degradable carbon substrate. A control strategy is proposed by which an easily metabolizable COD source is added directly to that point in the process at which...... denitrification momentarily occurs. This approach serves to increase the denitrification rate on demand, thereby allowing the accumulation of nitrate and nitrite during periods of peak nitrogen loading to be reduced or avoided. A pilot plant demonstration of the control strategy using acetate as COD source...

  8. Processing of pure titanium containing titanium-based reinforcing ceramics additives using spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondiu Olayinka DUROWOJU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The densification behaviour, microstructural changes and hardness characteristics during spark plasma sintering of CP-Ti reinforced with TiC, TiN, TiCN and TiB2 were investigated. Commercially pure Ti powders were dry mixed with varied amounts (2.5 and 5 wt. % of the ceramic additives using a T2F Turbula mixer for 5 h and at a speed of 49 rpm. The blended composite powders were then sintered using spark plasma sintering system (model HHPD-25 from FCT Germany at a heating rate of 100oC min-1, dwell time of 5 min and sintering temperature of 950ºC. The sintering of CP-Ti was used as a base study to select the proper spark plasma sintering temperature for full density. Densification was monitored through analysis of the recorded punch displacement and the measured density of the sintered samples using Archimedes method. High densities ranging from 97.8% for 5% TiB2 addition to 99.6% for 5% TiCN addition were achieved at a relatively low temperature of 950°C. Microstructural analyses show a uniform distribution of the additives and finer structure showing their inhibitive effect on grain growth. An improved hardness was observed in all the cases with highest values obtained with TiCN as a result of the combined effect of TiC and TiN. A change in the fracture mode from trans granular to intergranular was also observed.

  9. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  10. Prediction of processing parameters of secondary polyethylene with iron carboxylates in the preparation of prooxidants’ additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Korchagin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rheological behavior of additives - pro-oxidants, representing a polymer matrix including iron carboxylates is considered in the article. The additives of prooxidants based on: high-pressure polyethylene (PVD of PVD 158030-020, secondary linear high-pressure polyethylene (LDPE and secondary PVD with an iron carboxylate content of 5.0% (by weight were used as the objects of the research. The study was carried out on a high-power capillary rheometer called Smart RHEO 1000 by the firm Ceast at a temperature of 130 to 190 °C using two capillaries with a diameter d = 1 mm and a length l = 5 and l = 30 mm, respectively, in the shear rate range from 100 to 300 s-1 with a step of 50 s-1. The study showed that for all investigated pro-oxidant additives, a linear dependence of the flow curves in double logarithmic coordinates is observed in the full velocity and temperature ranges. With increasing temperature, the dependence of the effective viscosity on the shear rate decreases synchronously, that is, in the double logarithmic coordinates, the flow curves are completely invariant with respect to the construction and the geometric parameters of the capillary irrespective of the form of the polymer matrix. The unstable flow regime was noted for the additives of prooxidants based on primary thermoplastics and occurred at a shear rate exceeding 250 s-1 and a temperature below 150 °C. For a longer capillary, the viscosity and shear stress efficiency indicators were reduced, the identity with the behavior of the primary thermoplastic was manifested, consistent with theoretical representations of the behavior of the macrochain under conditions of their formation on a longer forming tool.

  11. Enhanced flavour extraction in continuous liquid-liquid extractors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Apps, P

    2005-08-12

    Full Text Available , Determination of 1,2,3- Trichloropropane in Drinking Water by Continuous Liquid?Liquid Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, California Department of Health Services, Berkeley, 2002, p. 1. [11] A. Buettner, P. Schieberle, J. Agric. Food Chem. 47...: Sample preparation; Liquid?liquid extraction; Solvent extraction; Aroma; Flavour; Fruit; Guava; Pineapple; Gas chromatography; Mass spectrometry 1. Introduction ?Sample preparation is one of the most critical aspects of the analysis of complex matrices...

  12. The pT spectrum in heavy-flavour hadroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.; Nason, P.

    1998-03-01

    The Authors consider the transverse-momentum distribution of heavy flavours in hadronic collisions. The authors present a formalism in which large transverse-momentum logarithms are summed at the next-to-leading level, and mass effects are included exactly up to order α S 3 , so as to retain predictivity at both small and large transverse momenta. As an example, the Authors apply our formalism to b production at the Tevatron

  13. Test of Lepton Flavour Universality in $K^{+} \\to l^{+}\

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzeroni, C.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Dyulendarova, M.; Frabetti, P.L.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Marinova, E.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrie, M.; Wahl, H.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retiere, F.

    2011-04-04

    A precision test of lepton flavour universality has been performed by measuring the ratio RK of kaon leptonic decay rates K+ --> e+nu and K+ --> mu+nu in a sample of 59813 reconstructed K+ --> e+nu candidates with (8.71 +- 0.24)% background contamination. The result RK = (2.487 +- 0.013) * 10^{-5} is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  14. Phenomenology of geometrical flavour interactions at TeV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwald, A.; Schrempp, F.; Wetterich, C.

    1990-10-01

    We investigate the experimental signatures of the recently proposed 'geometrical' production of many W. Z. Higgs and (primordial) fermions (nω ≅ αω -1 ≅ 30) with a relatively large cross section. Such events, if they exist, should be seen at the LHC (SSC) provided that the (parton) threshold energy for the onset of geometrical flavour production is below 11 (28) TeV. (orig.)

  15. Working group report: Low energy and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Low energy and flavour physics. Coordinators: AMOL DIGHE1 and ANIRBAN KUNDU2. Participants: K Agashe3, B Anantanarayan4, A Chandra1, A Datta5, P K Das6,. S P Das5, A Dighe1, R Forty7, D K Ghosh8, Y -Y Keum9, A Kundu2, N Mahajan6,. S Majhi6, G Mazumdar1, K Mazumdar1, P Mehta6 ...

  16. Development of coatings for ultrasonic additive manufacturing sonotrode using laser direct metal deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyanth S, Niyanth [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Jordan, Brian H [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    ORNL partnered with Fabrisonic, LLC to develop galling resistant hard facing coatings on sonotrodes used to fabricate 3D printed materials using ultrasonic additive manufacturing. The development and deployment of a coated sonotrode is expected to push the existing state of the art to facilitate the solidstate additive manufacturing of hard steels and titanium alloys. To this effect a structurally amorphous stainless steel material and cobalt chrome material were deposited on the sonotrode material. Both the deposits showed good adhesion to the substrate. The coatings made using the structurally amorphous steel materials showed cracking during the initial trials and cracking was eliminated by deposition on a preheated substrate. Both the coatings show hardness in excess of 600 HVN. Thus the phase 1 of this project has been used to identify suitable materials to use to coat the sonotrode. Despite the fact that successful deposits were obtained, the coatings need to be evaluated by performing detailed galling tests at various temperatures. In addition field tests are also necessary to test the stability of these coatings in a high cycle ultrasonic vibration mode. If awarded, phase 2 of the project would be used to optimize the composition of the deposit material to maximize galling resistance. The industrial partner would then use the coated sonotrode to fabricate builds made of austenitic stainless steel to test the viability of using a coated sonotrode.

  17. The additive nonparametric and semiparametric Aalen model as the rate function for a counting process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas Harder

    2002-01-01

    for the rate function, i.e., the instantaneous probability of an event conditional on only a selected set of covariates. When the rate function for the counting process is of Aalen form we show that the usual Aalen estimator can be used and gives almost unbiased estimates. The usual martingale based variance...

  18. Deep Learning in Flavour Tagging at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lanfermann, Marie Christine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A novel higher-level flavour tagging algorithm called DL1 has been developed using a neural network at the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We have investigated the potential of Deep Learning in flavour tagging using inputs from lower-level taggers. A systematic grid search over architectures and the training hyperparameter space is presented. In this novel neural network approach, the training is performed on multiple output nodes, which provides a highly flexible tagger. The DL1 studies presented show that the obtained neural network improves discrimination against both $light-flavour$-jets and $c$-jets, and also provides a better performing $c$-tagger. The performance for arbitrary background mixtures can be adjusted after the training according to the to the needs of the physics analysis. The resulting DL1 tagger is described and a detailed set of performance plots presented, obtained from simulated $t\\overline{t}$ events at $\\sqrt(s)$=13 TeV and the Run-2 data taking conditions where t...

  19. Deep Learning in Flavour Tagging at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lanfermann, Marie Christine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A novel higher-level flavour tagging algorithm called DL1 has been developed using a neural network at the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We have investigated the potential of Deep Learning in flavour tagging using higher-level inputs from lower-level physics-motivated taggers. A systematic grid search over architectures and the training hyperparameter space is presented. In this novel neural network approach, the jet flavours are treated on an equal footing while training with multiple output nodes, which provides a highly flexible tagger. The DL1 studies presented show that the obtained neural network improves discrimination against both light-jets and c-jets, and also provides a novel c-tagging possibility. The performance for arbitrary background mixtures can be fine-tuned after the training by using iso-efficiency lines of constant signal efficiency, according to the to the needs of the physics analysis. The resulting DL1 tagger is described and a detailed set of performance plots pr...

  20. Determination of volatile organic compounds responsible for flavour in cooked river buffalo meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Luccia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavour is an important consumer attractive that directly influences the success of food products on the market. The determination of odorous molecules and their identification allows to useful knowledge for producers to valorise their own products. Buffalo meat has a different chemical composition from pork and beef and requires some cautions in cooking and processing. This work aims at the identification of volatile molecules responsible for flavours in river buffalo meat. The determination was carried out by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME technique and analysed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The most relevant results were the higher odorous impact of buffalo meat and the higher content of sulphide compounds responsible for wild aroma respect to pork and beef. These results were obtained comparing the total area of peaks detected in every chromatogram. We have also found significant differences concerning the contents of pentadecane, 1-hexanol-2 ethyl, butanoic acid, furano-2-penthyl. The origin of volatile organic compounds and their influence on the river buffalo aromas were discussed.