WorldWideScience

Sample records for additional energetic objects

  1. Non-additive compositional curvature energetics of lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodt, A.J.; Venable, R.M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface in turn govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and will thus underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. The letter describes observations from simulations of unexpected non-additive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature. PMID:27715135

  2. Object attributes combine additively in visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, R T; Arun, S P

    2016-01-01

    We perceive objects as containing a variety of attributes: local features, relations between features, internal details, and global properties. But we know little about how they combine. Here, we report a remarkably simple additive rule that governs how these diverse object attributes combine in vision. The perceived dissimilarity between two objects was accurately explained as a sum of (a) spatially tuned local contour-matching processes modulated by part decomposition; (b) differences in internal details, such as texture; (c) differences in emergent attributes, such as symmetry; and (d) differences in global properties, such as orientation or overall configuration of parts. Our results elucidate an enduring question in object vision by showing that the whole object is not a sum of its parts but a sum of its many attributes.

  3. DNA-energetics-based analyses suggest additional genes in prokaryotes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garima Khandelwal; Jalaj Gupta; B Jayaram

    2012-07-01

    We present here a novel methodology for predicting new genes in prokaryotic genomes on the basis of inherent energetics of DNA. Regions of higher thermodynamic stability were identified, which were filtered based on already known annotations to yield a set of potentially new genes. These were then processed for their compatibility with the stereo-chemical properties of proteins and tripeptide frequencies of proteins in Swissprot data, which results in a reliable set of new genes in a genome. Quite surprisingly, the methodology identifies new genes even in well-annotated genomes. Also, the methodology can handle genomes of any GC-content, size and number of annotated genes.

  4. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  5. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of chemistry and detonation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L; Bukowski, Eric J

    2017-01-20

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser has been used to ablate, atomize, ionize, and excite milligram quantities of metal-doped energetic materials that undergo exothermic reactions in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion in the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The method enables the estimation of detonation velocities based on the measured laser-induced air-shock velocities and has previously been demonstrated for organic military explosives. Here, the LASEM technique has been extended to explosive formulations with metal additives. A comparison of the measured laser-induced air-shock velocities for TNT, RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by the thermochemical code CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time (<10  μs) participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that while Al is mostly inert at early times in the detonation event (confirmed from large-scale detonation testing), B is active-and reducing the amount of hydrogen present during the early chemical reactions increases the resulting estimated detonation velocities.

  6. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of detonation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer; Bukowski, Eric

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser with sufficient energy to exceed the breakdown threshold of a material generates a laser-induced plasma with high peak temperatures, pressures, and shock velocities. Depending on the laser parameters and material properties, nanograms to micrograms of material is ablated, atomized, ionized and excited in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion into the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The estimated detonation velocities using LASEM agree well with published experimental values. A comparison of the measured shock velocities for various energetic materials including RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that reducing the amount of hydrogen present in B formulations increases the resulting detonation velocities

  7. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  8. Surface characterization of an energetic material, pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN), having a thin coating achieved through a starved addition microencapsulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, C.M.

    1986-05-07

    The objective of this research was to: (1) determine the nature of a thin coating on an explosive material which was applied using a starved addition microencapsulation technique, (2) understand the coating/crystal bond, and (3) investigate the wettability/adhesion of plastic/solvent combinations using the coating process. The coating used in this work was a Firestone Plastic Company copolymer (FPC-461) of vinylchloride/trifluorochloroethylene in a 1.5/1.0 weight ratio. The energetic explosive examined was pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN). The coating process used was starved addition followed by a solvent evaporation technique. Surface analytical studies, completed for characterization of the coating process, show (1) evidence that the polymer coating is present, but not continuous, over the surface of PETN; (2) the average thickness of the polymer coating is between 16-32 A and greater than 44 A, respectively, for 0.5 and 20 wt % coated PETN; (3) no changes in surface chemistry of the polymer or the explosive material following microencapsulation; and (4) the presence of explosive material on the surface of 0.5 wt % FPC-461 coated explosives. 5 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Additive manufacturing. Continuous liquid interface production of 3D objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumbleston, John R; Shirvanyants, David; Ermoshkin, Nikita; Janusziewicz, Rima; Johnson, Ashley R; Kelly, David; Chen, Kai; Pinschmidt, Robert; Rolland, Jason P; Ermoshkin, Alexander; Samulski, Edward T; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-03-20

    Additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing use time-consuming, stepwise layer-by-layer approaches to object fabrication. We demonstrate the continuous generation of monolithic polymeric parts up to tens of centimeters in size with feature resolution below 100 micrometers. Continuous liquid interface production is achieved with an oxygen-permeable window below the ultraviolet image projection plane, which creates a "dead zone" (persistent liquid interface) where photopolymerization is inhibited between the window and the polymerizing part. We delineate critical control parameters and show that complex solid parts can be drawn out of the resin at rates of hundreds of millimeters per hour. These print speeds allow parts to be produced in minutes instead of hours.

  10. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with Two Photons and Additional Energetic Objects at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Kosice, IEF; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-10-01

    The authors present results of a search for anomalous production of two photons together with an electron, muon, {tau} lepton, missing transverse energy, or jets using p{bar p} collision data from 1.1-2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The event yields and kinematic distributions are examined for signs for new physics without favoring a specific model of new physics. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. The search employs several new analysis techniques that significantly reduce instrumental backgrounds in channels with an electron and missing transverse energy.

  11. The Effect of Processing Additives on Energetic Disorder in Highly Efficient Organic Photovoltaics : A Case Study on PBDTTT-C-T:PC71BM

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Feng; Himmelberger, Scott; Andersson, Mattias; Hanifi, David; Xia, Yuxin; Zhang, Shaoqing; Wang, Jianpu; Hou, Jianhui; Salleo, Alberto; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Energetic disorder, an important parameter affecting the performance of organic photovoltaics, is significantly decreased upon the addition of processing additives in a highly efficient benzodithiophene-based copolymer blend (PBDTTT-C-T:PC71BM). Wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements suggest that the origin of this reduced energetic disorder is due to increased aggregation and a larger average fullerene domain size together with purer phases. Funding Agencies|Swedish Res...

  12. Measurement of New Energetic Parameters for the Objective Characterization of AN Opera House

    Science.gov (United States)

    STANZIAL, D.; BONSI, D.; PRODI, N.

    2000-04-01

    Following a rigorous approach to the energetic analysis of sound fields, the measurement of new quantities for the physical description of the behavior of sound in enclosed spaces has been carried out inside an Italian opera house. A first set of measures has been performed during the steady state, allowing the study of the new discovered property calledsound intensity polarization , which accounts for the amount of energy oscillating thorugh the measurement point. Then, in order to accomplish a complete statistical study of the transient field behaviour, the full set of quantities involved in the energy continuity equation (total sound energy density and intensity) has been obtained by means of the extension of the classical Schroeder's method to the quantities depending also on the air particle velocity solution of the wave equation. Finally, two newly defined field indicators, accounting for the local amount of sound energy radiation and the balance between the potential and kinetic parts of the total sound energy density, have been investigated.

  13. Multi-Objective and Multi-Constrained Non-Additive Shortest Path Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Pisinger, David

    of this paper is to give a general framework for dominance tests for problems involving a number of non-additive criteria. These dominance tests can help eliminate paths in a dynamic programming framework when using multiple objectives. Results on real-life multi-objective problems containing non......Shortest path problems appear as subproblems in numerous optimization problems. In most papers concerning multiple objective shortest path problems, additivity of the objective is a de-facto assumption, but in many real-life situations objectives and criteria, can be non-additive. The purpose...

  14. Multi-Objective and Multi-Constrained Non-Additive Shortest Path Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Pisinger, David

    2011-01-01

    of this paper is to give a general framework for dominance tests for problems involving a number of non-additive criteria. These dominance tests can help to eliminate paths in a dynamic programming framework when using multiple objectives. Results on real-life multi-objective problems containing non......Shortest path problems appear as subproblems in numerous optimization problems. In most papers concerning multiple objective shortest path problems, additivity of the objective is a de-facto assumption, but in many real-life situations objectives and criteria, can be non-additive. The purpose...

  15. Convenient synthesis of energetic polynitro materials including (NO2)3CCH2CH2NH3-salts via Michael addition of trinitromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axthammer, Quirin J; Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Scharf, Regina; Unger, Cornelia C

    2016-12-21

    The nucleophilic Michael addition of nitroform with acrylamide creates a variety of energetic products. Several interesting compounds with a trinitromethyl group were synthesized, among them salts containing the trinitropropylammonium cation, [(NO2)3CCH2CH2NH3]X. Owing to their positive oxygen balance, the suitability of these compounds as potential high-energy dense oxidizers (HEDOs) in energetic formulations was investigated and discussed. Furthermore, numerous important and reactive compounds for the continuing synthesis of molecules with a high oxygen balance are presented. All compounds were fully characterized, including multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, vibrational analysis (IR, Raman), elemental analysis, as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction. Thermal stabilities were studied using differential scanning calorimetry and sensitivity data against friction, impact and electrostatic discharge were collected. The energies of formation were calculated using Gaussian 09 and energetic properties, such as the specific impulse and detonation velocity, were predicted with the EXPLO5 (V6.02) computer code.

  16. Terahertz imaging and tomography as efficient instruments for testing polymer additive manufacturing objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraud, J B; Obaton, A F; Bou-Sleiman, J; Recur, B; Balacey, H; Darracq, F; Guillet, J P; Mounaix, P

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technology is not only used to make 3D objects but also for rapid prototyping. In industry and laboratories, quality controls for these objects are necessary though difficult to implement compared to classical methods of fabrication because the layer-by-layer printing allows for very complex object manufacturing that is unachievable with standard tools. Furthermore, AM can induce unknown or unexpected defects. Consequently, we demonstrate terahertz (THz) imaging as an innovative method for 2D inspection of polymer materials. Moreover, THz tomography may be considered as an alternative to x-ray tomography and cheaper 3D imaging for routine control. This paper proposes an experimental study of 3D polymer objects obtained by additive manufacturing techniques. This approach allows us to characterize defects and to control dimensions by volumetric measurements on 3D data reconstructed by tomography.

  17. Parameterizing complex reactive force fields using multiple objective evolutionary strategies (MOES): Part 2: transferability of ReaxFF models to C-H-N-O energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Betsy M; Larentzos, James P; Byrd, Edward F C; Weingarten, N Scott

    2015-02-10

    The Multiple Objective Evolutionary Strategies (MOES) algorithm was used to parametrize force fields having the form of the reactive models ReaxFF (van Duin, A. C. T.; Dasgupta, S.; Lorant, F.; Goddard, W. A. J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 9396) and ReaxFF-lg (Liu, L.; Liu, Y.; Zybin, S. V.; Sun, H.; Goddard, W. A. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 11016) in an attempt to produce equal or superior ambient state crystallographic structural results for cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Promising candidates were then subjected to molecular dynamics simulations of five other well-known conventional energetic materials to assess the degree of transferability of the models. Two models generated through the MOES search were shown to have performance better than or as good as ReaxFF-lg in describing the six energetic systems modeled. This study shows that MOES is an effective and efficient method to develop complex force fields.

  18. Preliminary results of simulation of hypo magnetic conditions and variations in energetic range of cosmic rays in ground-based experiments on plant objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisheva, Natalia; Petrashova, Dina; Shchegolev, Boris

    The most dangerous for the astronauts and cosmonauts are the cosmic rays and drastic decrease of the tension of geomagnetic field (GMF) on the Earth orbit and in the open space. The tension in the interplanetary magnetic field is 10 nT, whereas the tension of GMF is 10 (4) nT on the Earth surface. We carried out the preliminary experiments for study the effects of hypo magnetic conditions and variations in energetic range of cosmic rays (CR) on the plant objects (Vigna radiata, Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa and A. fistulosum, Cucumis sativis). GMF was weakened by using special shielding chamber made on the basis of the amorphous alloy magnetic material. The camera is able to weaken the GMF from 48 μT till 0.192 μT. Modulation of the energetic range of the neutron component of secondary CR was performed with using of the shielding by graphite and by paraffin. The influence of hypo magnetic field and the neutron intensity were studied on the germination of seeds, the growth, the length and the side branches of the roots in the experimental samples. We found that the sensitivity to the hypo magnetic field and to the variations in energetic range of neutrons can vary from object to object. For instance, exposure of the hypo magnetic field on black bean and mung bean stimulated the growth of the roots while do not affect on the white bean. Likewise sensitivity of Phaseolus vulgaris (black and white bean) and Vigna radiata (mung bean) to exposure of nucleon component of cosmic rays on the Earth's surface are differed. It was found that modification of energetic range of CR by using graphite shielding leads to a change in sign of correlation between the length of roots in all experimental samples and the nucleon component of CR compared with the control samples. This is evidence that physiology of biological objects significantly are modified in hypo magnetic environment, as well as under exposure of the CR in different energetic ranges during the space flights. Our

  19. Metrology test object for dimensional verification in additive manufacturing of metals for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Matthew G; Kopacz, Alexander J; Nikolov, Hristo N; Holdsworth, David W

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing continues to increase in popularity and is being used in applications such as biomaterial ingrowth that requires sub-millimeter dimensional accuracy. The purpose of this study was to design a metrology test object for determining the capabilities of additive manufacturing systems to produce common objects, with a focus on those relevant to medical applications. The test object was designed with a variety of features of varying dimensions, including holes, cylinders, rectangles, gaps, and lattices. The object was built using selective laser melting, and the produced dimensions were compared to the target dimensions. Location of the test objects on the build plate did not affect dimensions. Features with dimensions less than 0.300 mm did not build or were overbuilt to a minimum of 0.300 mm. The mean difference between target and measured dimensions was less than 0.100 mm in all cases. The test object is applicable to multiple systems and materials, tests the effect of location on the build, uses a minimum of material, and can be measured with a variety of efficient metrology tools (including measuring microscopes and micro-CT). Investigators can use this test object to determine the limits of systems and adjust build parameters to achieve maximum accuracy.

  20. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  1. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Objects Including Amorphous Metal Using Techniques Akin to Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including amorphous metals using techniques akin to additive manufacturing. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes an amorphous metal includes: applying a first layer of molten metallic alloy to a surface; cooling the first layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a first layer including amorphous metal; subsequently applying at least one layer of molten metallic alloy onto a layer including amorphous metal; cooling each subsequently applied layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a layer including amorphous metal prior to the application of any adjacent layer of molten metallic alloy; where the aggregate of the solidified layers including amorphous metal forms a desired shape in the object to be fabricated; and removing at least the first layer including amorphous metal from the surface.

  2. Fluid mechanics of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of droplets – a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a survey of principles of additive manufacturing of metal objects by accretion of molten metal droplets, focusing on fluid-mechanical problems that deserve being investigated. The main problem is slowness of manufacturing due to necessarily small size of added droplets. Increase of droplet repetition rate calls for basic research of the phenomena that take place inside and around the droplets: ballistics of their flight, internal flowfield with heat and mass transfer, oscillation of surfaces, and the ways to elimination of satellite droplets.

  3. Formulation, Casting, and Evaluation of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic and Novel Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Desain, John D.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Borduin, Russell; Koo, Joseph H.; Brady, Brian B.; Curtiss, Thomas J.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    This investigation studied the inclusion of various additives to paraffin wax for use in a hybrid rocket motor. Some of the paraffin-based fuels were doped with various percentages of LiAlH4 (up to 10%). Addition of LiAlH4 at 10% was found to increase regression rates between 7 - 10% over baseline paraffin through tests in a gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor. Mass burn rates for paraffin grains with 10% LiAlH4 were also higher than those of the baseline paraffin. RDX was also cast into a paraffin sample via a novel casting process which involved dissolving RDX into dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent and then drawing a vacuum on the mixture of paraffin and RDX/DMF in order to evaporate out the DMF. It was found that although all DMF was removed, the process was not conducive to generating small RDX particles. The slow boiling generated an inhomogeneous mixture of paraffin and RDX. It is likely that superheating the DMF to cause rapid boiling would likely reduce RDX particle sizes. In addition to paraffin/LiAlH4 grains, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were cast in paraffin for testing in a hybrid rocket motor, and assorted samples containing a range of MWNT percentages in paraffin were imaged using SEM. The fuel samples showed good distribution of MWNT in the paraffin matrix, but the MWNT were often agglomerated, indicating that a change to the sonication and mixing processes were required to achieve better uniformity and debundled MWNT. Fuel grains with MWNT fuel grains had slightly lower regression rate, likely due to the increased thermal conductivity to the fuel subsurface, reducing the burning surface temperature.

  4. Metabolic and energetic aspects of biohydrogen production of Clostridium tyrobutyricum: The effects of hydraulic retention time and peptone addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Lin, Che-An; Liu, I-Chun; Wu, Chao-Wei; Cheng, Hai-Hsuan

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the microbial metabolism and energy demand in fermentative biohydrogen production using Clostridium tyrobutyricum FYa102 at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) over a period of 1-18 h. The hydrogen yield shows a positive correlation with the butyrate yield, the B/A ratio, and the Y(H2)/2(Y(HAc)+Y(HBu)) ratio, but a negative correlation with the lactate yield. A decrease in HRT, which is accompanied by an increased biomass growth, tends to decrease the B/A ratio, due presumably to a higher energy demand for microbial growth. The production of lactate at a low HRT, however, may involve an unfavorable change in e(-) equiv distribution to result in a reduced hydrogen production. Finally, the relatively high hydrogen yields observed in the bioreactor with the peptone addition may be ascribed to the utilization of peptone as an additional energy and/or amino-acid source, thus reducing the glucose demand for biomass growth during the hydrogen production process.

  5. Addition of Bases to the 5'-end of Human Telomeric DNA: Influences on Thermal Stability and Energetics of Unfolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Hayden

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Telomeric DNA has been intensely investigated for its role in chromosome protection, aging, cell death, and disease. In humans the telomeric tandem repeat (TTAGGGn is found at the ends of chromosomes and provides a novel target for the development of new drugs in the treatment of age related diseases such as cancer. These telomeric sequences show slight sequence variations from species to species; however, each contains repeats of 3 to 4 guanines allowing the G-rich strands to fold into compact and stable nuclease resistant conformations referred to as G-quadruplexes. The focus of this manuscript is to examine the effects of 5'-nucleotides flanking the human telomeric core sequence 5'-AGGG(TTAGGG 3-3' (h-Tel22. Our studies reveal that the addition of the 5'-flanking nucleotides (5'-T, and 5'-TT results in significant changes to the thermodynamic stability of the G-quadruplex structure. Our data indicate that the observed changes in stability are associated with changes in the number of bound waters resulting from the addition of 5'-flanking nucleotides to the h-Tel22 sequence as well as possible intermolecular interactions of the 5' overhang with the core structure.

  6. Transition states and energetics of nucleophilic additions of thiols to substituted α,β-unsaturated ketones: substituent effects involve enone stabilization, product branching, and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenske, Elizabeth H; Petter, Russell C; Zhu, Zhendong; Houk, K N

    2011-06-17

    CBS-QB3 enthalpies of reaction have been computed for the conjugate additions of MeSH to six α,β-unsaturated ketones. Compared with addition to methyl vinyl ketone, the reaction becomes 1-3 kcal mol(-1) less exothermic when an α-Me, β-Me, or β-Ph substituent is present on the C=C bond. The lower exothermicity for the substituted enones occurs because the substituted reactant is stabilized more by hyperconjugation or conjugation than the product is stabilized by branching. Substituent effects on the activation energies for the rate-determining step of the thiol addition (reaction of the enone with MeS(-)) were also computed. Loss of reactant stabilization, and not steric hindrance, is the main factor responsible for controlling the relative activation energies in the gas phase. The substituent effects are further magnified in solution; in water (simulated by CPCM calculations), the addition of MeS(-) to an enone is disfavored by 2-6 kcal mol(-1) when one or two methyl groups are present on the C=C bond (ΔΔG(‡)). The use of CBS-QB3 gas-phase energies in conjunction with CPCM solvation corrections provides kinetic data in good agreement with experimental substituent effects. When the energetics of the thiol additions were calculated with several popular density functional theory and ab initio methods (B3LYP, MPW1PW91, B1B95, PBE0, B2PLYP, and MP2), some substantial inaccuracies were noted. However, M06-2X (with a large basis set), B2PLYP-D, and SCS-MP2 gave results within 1 kcal mol(-1) of the CBS-QB3 benchmark values.

  7. Accelerometry-based gait analysis, an additional objective approach to screen subjects at risk for falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senden, R; Savelberg, H H C M; Grimm, B; Heyligers, I C; Meijer, K

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated whether the Tinetti scale, as a subjective measure for fall risk, is associated with objectively measured gait characteristics. It is studied whether gait parameters are different for groups that are stratified for fall risk using the Tinetti scale. Moreover, the discriminative power of gait parameters to classify elderly according to the Tinetti scale is investigated. Gait of 50 elderly with a Tinneti>24 and 50 elderly with a Tinetti≤24 was analyzed using acceleration-based gait analysis. Validated algorithms were used to derive spatio-temporal gait parameters, harmonic ratio, inter-stride amplitude variability and root mean square (RMS) from the accelerometer data. Clear differences in gait were found between the groups. All gait parameters correlated with the Tinetti scale (r-range: 0.20-0.73). Only walking speed, step length and RMS showed moderate to strong correlations and high discriminative power to classify elderly according to the Tinetti scale. It is concluded that subtle gait changes that have previously been related to fall risk are not captured by the subjective assessment. It is therefore worthwhile to include objective gait assessment in fall risk screening.

  8. Dense energetic nitraminofurazanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dennis; Klapötke, Thomas M; Reymann, Marius; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-05-19

    3,3'-Diamino-4,4'-bifurazane (1), 3,3'-diaminoazo-4,4'-furazane (2), and 3,3'-diaminoazoxy-4,4'-furazane (3) were nitrated in 100 % HNO3 to give corresponding 3,3'-dinitramino-4,4'-bifurazane (4), 3,3'-dinitramino-4,4'-azofurazane (5) and 3,3'-dinitramino-4,4'-azoxyfurazane (6), respectively. The neutral compounds show very imposing explosive performance but possess lower thermal stability and higher sensitivity than hexogen (RDX). More than 40 nitrogen-rich compounds and metal salts were prepared. Most compounds were characterized by low-temperature X-ray diffraction, all of them by infrared and Raman spectroscopy, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Calculated energetic performances using the EXPLO5 code based on calculated (CBS-4M) heats of formation and X-ray densities support the high energetic performances of the nitraminofurazanes as energetic materials. The sensitivities towards impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge were also explored. Additionally the general toxicity of the anions against vibrio fischeri, representative for an aquatic microorganism, was determined.

  9. Energetic particle physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Zonca; G.Y. Fu; S.J. Wang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The confinement properties of energetic (EsslMeV) ions are a crucial aspect of burning plasmas since they are present both as fast particles generated via additional heating and current drive systems as well as charged fusion products. In the first case, successful plasma operations rely on the possibility of controlling plasma current and flow profiles via neutral beam injection (NBI) and plasma temperature profiles by both NBI and ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH). In the second case, fusion alpha particles must provide a significant fraction of the local power density, which is ultimately necessary for the sustainment of the plasma burning.

  10. A New Method for Finding Optical Aberrations on the Basis of Analysis of the Object Hologram Without Additional Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkivsky, V. A.; Moiseev, A. A.; Shilyagin, P. A.; Shabanov, D. V.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Gelikonov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new method of compensating for the wavefront aberrations during the image processing. The method employs the digital-holography potential. The developed algorithms allow one to find the wavefront distortions caused by the optical-path nonuniformities during the interference recording of images without additional measurements (i.e., without using the reference point source and measuring the wavefront distortions). The possibility of decreasing the wavefront aberrations from tens to several radians using digital methods is demonstrated.

  11. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  12. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  13. Helioseismic Effects of Energetic Transients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    Photospheric and chromospheric signatures related to large, energetic transients such as flares and CMEs, have been extensively reported during the last several years. In addition, energetic solar transients are expected to cause helioseismic effects. Some of the recent results are reviewed here; in particular, the helioseismic effects of the powerful flares in superactive region, NOAA 10486, including the 4B/X17 superflare of October 28, 2003. We also examine the temporal variations of power in low- modes during the period May 1995–October 2005, and compare with daily, disk-integrated flare- and CME-indices to infer the effect of transients on the scale of whole solar disk.

  14. Energetics of Si(001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, H.J.W.

    2000-01-01

    A classical thermodynamic description of a surface requires the introduction of a number of energetic parameters related to the surface steps. These parameters are the step free energy, the kink creation energy, and the energetic and entropic interactions between steps. This review will demonstrate

  15. Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Péter

    Energetic particles recorded in the Earth environment and in interplanetary space have a multitude of origins, i.e. acceleration and propagation histories. At early days practically all sufficiently energetic particles were considered to have come either from solar flares or from interstellar space. Later on, co-rotating interplanetary shocks, the termination shock of the supersonic solar wind, planetary bow shocks and magnetospheres, and also coronal mass ejections (CME) were recognized as energetic particle sources. It was also recognized that less energetic (suprathermal) particles of solar origin and pick-up ions have also a vital role in giving rise to energetic particles in interplanetary disturbances. The meaning of the term "solar energetic particles" (SEP) is now somewhat vague, but essentially it refers to particles produced in disturbances fairly directly related to solar processes. Variation of intensity fluctuations with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to extremes of time variation, i.e. to very quiet periods and to large events. While quiet-time fluxes are expected to shed light on some basic coronal processes, large events dominate the fluctuation characteristics of cumulated fluence, and the change of that fluctuation with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle may also provide important clues. Mainly ISEE-3 and long-term IMP-8 data will be invoked. Energetic and suprathermal particles that may never escape into interplanetary space may play an important part in heating the corona of the sun.

  16. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  17. An Automated Software Package for the KISS Objective-Prism Survey for Emission-Line Galaxies. II. Recent Additions and Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattare, L. M.; Salzer, J. J.

    1996-05-01

    We present an update on the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS) project. KISS is a wide-field survey for extragalactic emission-line objects being carried out with the Burrell Schmidt at Kitt Peak. While we are utilizing the classical objective-prism technique to find strong-lined star-forming galaxies and AGNs, the use of CCD detectors and automated reduction software promise to make KISS a powerful tool for the study of activity in galaxies. We are currently completing our first survey strip (100 square degrees). The data consist of deep (to B = 20) objective-prism images, deep direct images in both B and V, and small-format photometric calibration images of each field. The KISS reduction package was designed to run under the IRAF image processing environment, and will eventually grow to be a complete IRAF package. Tasks added to the package over the past year include precise astrometry and photometry modules. The astrometry routines utilize the HST Guide Star Catalog to perform a full plate solution on the direct image of each Schmidt field, and then assign accurate equatorial coordinates to each object in the field. The photometry module performs aperture photometry on the direct images for all objects in the KISS database catalog, and provides routines to transfer the photometry calibration from the small-format images taken under photometric conditions to the large-format survey images. Extensive tests and modifications have also been carried out on the pre-existing software described by Herrero & Salzer (1995) in order to better fine-tune the reduction procedures and parameter settings. In addition to presenting a complete description of the new software, we describe the current status of the survey and present some preliminary characteristics of the sample. Other members of the KISS project include V. Lipovetsky & A. Kniazev (S.A.O.), T. Boroson (NOAO/USGP), T. Thuan (U. Virginia), J. Moody (BYU), Y. Izotov (Ukrainian Acad. Sci.), and J. Herrero

  18. Nanostructured energetic materials using sol-gel methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillotson, T M; Simpson, R L; Hrubesh, L W; Gash, A E; Thomas, I M; Poco, J F

    2000-09-27

    The fundamental differences between energetic composites and energetic materials made from a monomolecular approach are the energy density attainable and the energy release rates. For the past 4 years, we have been exploiting sol-gel chemistry as a route to process energetic materials on a microstructural scale. At the last ISA conference, we described four specific sol-gel approaches to fabricating energetic materials and presented our early work and results on two methods - solution crystallization and powder addition. Here, we detail our work on a third approach, energetic nanocomposites. Synthesis of thermitic types of energetic nanocomposites are presented using transition and main group metal-oxide skeletons. Results on characterization of structure and performance will also be given.

  19. Mechanics and energetics in tool manufacture and use: a synthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyu; Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-11-06

    Tool manufacture and use are observed not only in humans but also in other animals such as mammals, birds and insects. Manufactured tools are used for biomechanical functions such as effective control of fluids and small solid objects and extension of reaching. These tools are passive and used with gravity and the animal users' own energy. From the perspective of evolutionary biology, manufactured tools are extended phenotypes of the genes of the animal and exhibit phenotypic plasticity. This incurs energetic cost of manufacture as compared to the case with a fixed tool. This paper studies mechanics and energetics aspects of tool manufacture and use in non-human beings. Firstly, it investigates possible mechanical mechanisms of the use of passive manufactured tools. Secondly, it formulates the energetic cost of manufacture and analyses when phenotypic plasticity benefits an animal tool maker and user. We take a synthetic approach and use a controlled physical model, i.e. a robot arm. The robot is capable of additively manufacturing scoop and gripper structures from thermoplastic adhesives to pick and place fluid and solid objects, mimicking primates and birds manufacturing tools for a similar function. We evaluate the effectiveness of tool use in pick-and-place and explain the mechanism for gripper tools picking up solid objects with a solid-mechanics model. We propose a way to formulate the energetic cost of tool manufacture that includes modes of addition and reshaping, and use it to analyse the case of scoop tools. Experiment results show that with a single motor trajectory, the robot was able to effectively pick and place water, rice grains, a pebble and a plastic box with a scoop tool or gripper tools that were manufactured by itself. They also show that by changing the dimension of scoop tools, the energetic cost of tool manufacture and use could be reduced. The work should also be interesting for engineers to design adaptive machines.

  20. Enforced Layer-by-Layer Stacking of Energetic Salts towards High-Performance Insensitive Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaheng; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-08-26

    Development of modern high-performance insensitive energetic materials is significant because of the increasing demands for both military and civilian applications. Here we propose a rapid and facile strategy called the "layer hydrogen bonding pairing approach" to organize energetic molecules via layer-by-layer stacking, which grants access to tunable energetic materials with targeted properties. Using this strategy, an unusual energetic salt, hydroxylammonium 4-amino-furazan-3-yl-tetrazol-1-olate, with good detonation performances and excellent sensitivities, was designed, synthesized, and fully characterized. In addition, the expected unique layer-by-layer structure with a high crystal packing coefficient was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Calculations indicate that the layer-stacking structure of this material can absorb the mechanical stimuli-induced kinetic energy by converting it to layer sliding, which results in low sensitivity.

  1. Energetic Particle Diagnostics for Transport Analysis 3.Escaping Fast Ion Diagnostics for the Fast Particle Transport Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Mitsutaka; Shinohara, Kouji

    Escaping energetic ion diagnostics in magnetically confined plasma experiments are described in this lecture note. Experimental results from escaping energetic ion diagnostics in TFTR, JFT-2M, CHS and W7-AS are shown. In addition to mechanism of energetic ion loss from a viewpoint of particle orbit, effect of MHD activity on energetic particle transport is reviewed.

  2. Migration on Wings Aerodynamics and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This book is an effort to explore the technical aspects associated with bird flight and migration on wings. After a short introduction on the birds migration, the book reviews the aerodynamics and Energetics of Flight and presents the calculation of the Migration Range. In addition, the authors explains aerodynamics of the formation flight and finally introduces great flight diagrams.

  3. An Ag(I) energetic metal-organic framework assembled with the energetic combination of furazan and tetrazole: synthesis, structure and energetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiao-Ni; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Yang, Qi; Han, Jing; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, San-Ping

    2016-04-28

    A novel Ag(I) energetic MOF [Ag16(BTFOF)9]n·[2(NH4)]n () assembled with Ag(iI ions and a furazan derivative, 4,4'-oxybis[3,3'-(1H-5-tetrazol)]furazan (H2BTFOF) was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized, featuring a three-dimensional porous structure incorporating ammonium cations. The thermal stability and energetic properties were determined, revealing that the 3D energetic MOF had an outstanding insensitivity (IS > 40 J), an ultrahigh detonation pressure (P) of 65.29 GPa and a detonation velocity (D) of 11.81 km cm(-3). In addition, the self-accelerating decomposition temperature (TSADT) and the critical temperature of thermal explosion (Tb) are also discussed in detail. The finding exemplifies that the assembly strategy plays a decisive role in the density and energetic properties of MOF-based energetic materials.

  4. Assessing the required additional organic inputs to soils to reach the 4 per 1000 objective at the global scale: a RothC project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Skalsky, Rastislav; Martin, Manuel; Balkovic, Juraj; Havlik, Petr; Soussana, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    The 4 per 1000 Initiative underlines the role of soil organic matter in addressing the three-fold challenge of food security, adaptation of the land sector to climate change, and mitigation of human-induced GHG emissions. It sets an ambitious global target of a 0.4% (4/1000) annual increase in top soil organic carbon (SOC) stock. The present collaborative project between the 4 per 1000 research program, INRA and IIASA aims at providing a first global assessment of the translation of this soil organic carbon sequestration target into the equivalent organic matter inputs target. Indeed, soil organic carbon builds up in the soil through different processes leading to an increased input of carbon to the system (by increasing returns to the soil for instance) or a decreased output of carbon from the system (mainly by biodegradation and mineralization processes). Here we answer the question of how much extra organic matter must be added to agricultural soils every year (in otherwise unchanged climatic conditions) in order to guarantee a 0.4% yearly increase of total soil organic carbon stocks (40cm soil depth is considered). We use the RothC model of soil organic matter turnover on a spatial grid over 10 years to model two situations for croplands: a first situation where soil organic carbon remains constant (system at equilibrium) and a second situation where soil organic matter increases by 0.4% every year. The model accounts for the effects of soil type, temperature, moisture content and plant cover on the turnover process, it is run on a monthly time step, and it can simulate the needed organic input to sustain a certain SOC stock (or evolution of SOC stock). These two SOC conditions lead to two average yearly plant inputs over 10 years. The difference between the two simulated inputs represent the additional yearly input needed to reach the 4 per 1000 objective (input_eq for inputs needed for SOC to remain constant; input_4/1000 for inputs needed for SOC to reach

  5. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  6. Energetics and the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiches, Meredith W.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Moore, Sophie E.; Ellison, Peter T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: The human immune system is an ever-changing composition of innumerable cells and proteins, continually ready to respond to pathogens or insults. The cost of maintaining this state of immunological readiness is rarely considered. In this paper we aim to discern a cost to non-acute immune function by investigating how low levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) relate to other energetic demands and resources in adolescent Gambian girls. Methodology: Data from a longitudinal study of 66 adolescent girls was used to test hypotheses around investment in immune function. Non-acute (under 2 mg/L) CRP was used as an index of immune function. Predictor variables include linear height velocity, adiposity, leptin, and measures of energy balance. Results: Non-acute log CRP was positively associated with adiposity (β = 0.16, P resources and demands. We also find support for an adaptive association between the immune system and adipose tissue. PMID:28003312

  7. Quantifying the energetics of cooperativity in a ternary protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter S; Schuck, Peter; Sundberg, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    The formation of complexes involving more than two proteins is critical for many cellular processes, including signal transduction, transcriptional control, and cytoskeleton remodeling. Energetically, these interactions cannot always be described simply by the additive effects of the individual b...

  8. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gash, A; Pantoya, M; Jr., J S; Zhao, L; Shea, K; Simpson, R; Clapsaddle, B

    2003-11-18

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology, affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites in which the metal oxide is the major component. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. Furthermore, due to the large availability of organically functionalized silanes, the silicon oxide phase can be used as a unique way of introducing organic additives into the bulk metal oxide materials. As a result, the desired organic functionality is well dispersed throughout the composite material on the nanoscale. By introducing a fuel metal into the metal oxide/silicon oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its microscale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The synthesis and characterization of these metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites and their performance as energetic materials will be discussed.

  10. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  11. Chemical Conversion of Energetic Materials to Higher Value Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, A R; Hsu, P C; Coburn, M D; Schmidt, R D; Pagoria, P F; Lee, G S

    2005-04-19

    The objective of this program is to develop new processes for the disposal of surplus energetic materials. Disposal through open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) is considered less attractive today due to environmental, cost and safety concerns. The use of energetic materials as chemical feedstocks for higher value products can provide environmentally sound and cost-effective alternatives to OB/OD. Our recent studies on the conversion of surplus energetic materials (Explosive D, TNT) to higher value products will be described.

  12. Electron correlations and silicon nanocluster energetics

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The first-principle prediction of nanocluster stable structure is often hampered by the existence of many isomer configurations with energies close to the ground state. This fact attaches additional importance to many-electron effects going beyond density functional theory (DFT), because their contributions may change a subtle energy order of competitive structures. To analyze this problem, we consider, as an example, the energetics of silicon nanoclusters passivated by hydrogen Si$_{10}$H$_{...

  13. Energetic Causal Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Cortês, Marina

    2013-01-01

    We propose an approach to quantum theory based on the energetic causal sets, introduced in Cort\\^{e}s and Smolin (2013). Fundamental processes are causal sets whose events carry momentum and energy, which are transmitted along causal links and conserved at each event. Fundamentally there are amplitudes for such causal processes, but no space-time. An embedding of the causal processes in an emergent space-time arises only at the semiclassical level. Hence, fundamentally there are no commutation relations, no uncertainty principle and, indeed, no hbar. All that remains of quantum theory is the relationship between the absolute value squared of complex amplitudes and probabilities. Consequently, we find that neither locality, nor non locality, are primary concepts, only causality exists at the fundamental level.

  14. Exploratory analysis of Spanish energetic mining accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiquel, Lluís; Freijo, Modesto; Rossell, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    Using data on work accidents and annual mining statistics, the paper studies work-related accidents in the Spanish energetic mining sector in 1999-2008. The following 3 parameters are considered: age, experience and size of the mine (in number of workers) where the accident took place. The main objective of this paper is to show the relationship between different accident indicators: risk index (as an expression of the incidence), average duration index for the age and size of the mine variables (as a measure of the seriousness of an accident), and the gravity index for the various sizes of mines (which measures the seriousness of an accident, too). The conclusions of this study could be useful to develop suitable prevention policies that would contribute towards a decrease in work-related accidents in the Spanish energetic mining industry.

  15. Advances in science and technology of modern energetic materials: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, D M; Talawar, M B; Asthana, S N; Mahulikar, P P

    2008-03-01

    Energetic materials such as explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics are widely used for both civilian and military explosives applications. The present review focuses briefly on the synthesis aspects and some of the physico-chemical properties of energetic materials of the class: (a) aminopyridine-N-oxides, (b) energetic azides, (c) high nitrogen content energetic materials, (d) imidazoles, (e) insensitive energetic materials, (f) oxidizers, (g) nitramines, (h) nitrate esters and (i) thermally stable explosives. A brief comment is also made on the emerging nitration concepts. This paper also reviews work done on primary explosives of current and futuristic interest based on energetic co-ordination compounds. Lead-free co-ordination compounds are the candidates of tomorrow's choice in view of their additional advantage of being eco-friendly. Another desirable attribute of lead free class of energetic compounds is the presence of almost equivalent quantity of fuel and oxidizer moieties. These compounds may find wide spectrum of futuristic applications in the area of energetic materials. The over all aim of the high energy materials research community is to develop the more powerful energetic materials/explosive formulations/propellant formulations in comparison to currently known benchmark materials/compositions. Therefore, an attempt is also made to highlight the important contributions made by the various researchers in the frontier areas energetic ballistic modifiers, energetic binders and energetic plasticizers.

  16. Investigations of Novel Energetic Materials to Stabilize Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-30

    and various additives were developed in the second half of the 20th Century. The earliest such propellants were asphalt -based developed at GALCIT with...Decomposition of Energetic Materials 74. Volatile Metal Isocyanates from Flash Pyrolysis of Metal-NTO and Metal-Picrate Salts and an Application Hypothesis...B. Brill, T. L. Zhang and B. C. Tappan, Thermal Decomposition of Energetic Materials 74. Volatile Metal Isocyanates from Flash Pyrolysis of Metal-NTO

  17. Stab Sensitivity of Energetic Nanolaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-05-22

    This work details the stab ignition, small-scale safety, and energy release characteristics of bimetallic Al/Ni(V) and Al/Monel energetic nanolaminate freestanding thin films. The influence of the engineered nanostructural features of the energetic multilayers is correlated with both stab initiation and small-scale energetic materials testing results. Structural parameters of the energetic thin films found to be important include the bi-layer period, total thickness of the film, and presence or absence of aluminum coating layers. In general the most sensitive nanolaminates were those that were relatively thick, possessed fine bi-layer periods, and were not coated. Energetic nanolaminates were tested for their stab sensitivity as freestanding continuous parts and as coarse powders. The stab sensitivity of mock M55 detonators loaded with energetic nanolaminate was found to depend strongly upon both the particle size of the material and the configuration of nanolaminate material, in the detonator cup. In these instances stab ignition was observed with input energies as low as 5 mJ for a coarse powder with an average particle dimension of 400 {micro}m. Selected experiments indicate that the reacting nanolaminate can be used to ignite other energetic materials such as sol-gel nanostructured thermite, and conventional thermite that was either coated onto the multilayer substrate or pressed on it. These results demonstrate that energetic nanolaminates can be tuned to have precise and controlled ignition thresholds and can initiate other energetic materials and therefore are viable candidates as lead-free impact initiated igniters or detonators.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapsaddle, B; Gash, A; Plantier, K; Pantoya, M; Jr., J S; Simpson, R

    2004-04-27

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites in which the metal oxide is the major component. By introducing a fuel metal, such as aluminum, into the metal oxide/silicon oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. In addition, due to the large availability of organically functionalized silanes, the silicon oxide phase can be used as a unique way of introducing organic additives into the bulk metal oxide materials. These organic additives can cause the generation of gas upon ignition of the materials, therefore resulting in a composite material that can perform pressure/volume work. Furthermore, the desired organic functionality is well dispersed throughout the composite material on the nanoscale with the other components, and is therefore subject to the same increased reaction kinetics. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its microscale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The synthesis and characterization of iron(III) oxide/organosilicon oxide nanocomposites and their performance as energetic materials will be discussed.

  19. Heat release mechanism of energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, N. [Third Research Center, Technical Research and development Institute (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Determination of the heat release mechanism of energetic materials is a major subject of combustion study. In order to elucidate the combustion process of various types of energetic materials a generalized combustion wave structure was proposed and the heat release process was discussed. The heat release process was significantly different between the physical structures of the materials: homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. The thermal structure of an azide polymer was evaluated to demonstrate the heat release mechanism. (author) 6 refs.

  20. Photodecomposition of energetic nitro compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mialocq, J.C.

    1989-03-14

    The photodecomposition of energetic nitrocompounds depends on the excitation energy, the light intensity which determines the mono-, bi- or multiphotonic character of the initial process and their gaseous, liquid or solid state. The initial processes of the photodecomposition of nitromethane and nitroalcanes are reviewed and their relevance to the initiation of energetic nitrocompounds detonation is discussed. The case of nitramines (dimethylnitramine and tutorial) is also briefly introduced.

  1. Highly Energetic, Low Sensitivity Aromatic Peroxy Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; Stiasny, Benedikt; Stierstorfer, Jörg; Martin, Philip D; Klapötke, Thomas M; Winter, Charles H

    2016-02-18

    The synthesis, structure, and energetic materials properties of a series of aromatic peroxy acid compounds are described. Benzene-1,3,5-tris(carboperoxoic) acid is a highly sensitive primary energetic material, with impact and friction sensitivities similar to those of triacetone triperoxide. By contrast, benzene-1,4-bis(carboperoxoic) acid, 4-nitrobenzoperoxoic acid, and 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid are much less sensitive, with impact and friction sensitivities close to those of the secondary energetic material 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. Additionally, the calculated detonation velocities of 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzoperoxoic acid exceed that of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. The solid-state structure of 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid contains intermolecular O-H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds and numerous N⋅⋅⋅O, C⋅⋅⋅O, and O⋅⋅⋅O close contacts. These attractive lattice interactions may account for the less sensitive nature of 3,5-dinitrobenzoperoxoic acid.

  2. Nonadditive Compositional Curvature Energetics of Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodt, A. J.; Venable, R. M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface, in turn, govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and thus they will underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. We describe observations from simulations of unexpected nonadditive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature.

  3. Asymmetrically substituted 5,5 `-bistriazoles - nitrogen-rich materials with various energetic functionalities

    OpenAIRE

    Dippold, Alexander A.; Klapötke, Thomas M.; Oswald, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution the synthesis and full structural and spectroscopic characterization of three asymmetrically substituted bis-1,2,4-triazoles, along with different energetic moieties like amino, nitro, nitrimino and azido moieties, is presented. Additionally, selected nitrogen-rich ionic derivatives have been prepared and characterized. This comparative study on the influence of these energetic moieties on structural and energetic properties constitutes a complete characterization includi...

  4. Zeolite synthesis: an energetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijnenburg, Martijn A; Bromley, Stefan T

    2010-11-21

    Taking |D(H(2)O)(x)|[AlSiO(4)] based materials (where D is Li, Na, K, Rb or Cs) as an archetypal aluminosilicate system, we use accurate density functional theory calculations to demonstrate how the substitution of silicon cations in silica, with pairs of aluminium and (alkali metal) cations, changes the energetic ordering of different competing structure-types. For large alkali metal cations we further show that the formation of porous aluminosilicate structures, the so-called zeolites, is energetically favored. These findings unequivocally demonstrate that zeolites can be energetic preferred reaction products, rather than being kinetically determined, and that the size of the (hydrated) cations in the pore, be it inorganic or organic, is critical for directing zeolite synthesis.

  5. Energetic materials at extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millar, David I.A. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). EaStCHEM Research School of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    This thesis describes the high-pressure structural behaviour of a series of energetic compounds that includes the widely used explosive RDX and gas generators such as sodium azide. Using a combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques, crystal structures of these compounds have been obtained under conditions of elevated pressure and temperature. Such studies present significant technical challenges associated with both data collection and analysis, especially for compounds containing conformationally flexible molecules, but the structural information obtained is crucial for enhancing the understanding of the characteristics of energetic materials. Particularly significant is the observation that a high-pressure, high-temperature form of RDX may be recovered to ambient pressure. This has implications for the discovery of new forms of energetic materials that may exhibit enhanced properties, e.g. reduced sensitivity to accidental initiation. The rich high-pressure behaviour of the simple inorganic azides is also noteworthy. All of the six compounds studied in this work were found to undergo at least one phase transition and a total of ten polymorphs have been identified at variable pressure and/or temperature. For example, at high pressure sodium azide adopts the same structure observed for the larger alkali metal azides at atmospheric conditions. The first two chapters of this thesis provide a very accessible introduction to high-pressure research and energetic materials. The subsequent chapters detail the results of these high-pressure studies of energetic materials, demonstrating excellent clarity of expression and highly developed critical analysis. The final chapter points clearly to future opportunities for extending these studies to other energetic materials and for alternative methodologies for their structural modification. (orig.)

  6. Shock Sensitivity of energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.

    1980-01-01

    Viscoplastic deformation is examined as the principal source of hot energy. Some shock sensitivity data on a proposed model is explained. A hollow sphere model is used to approximate complex porous matrix of energetic materials. Two pieces of shock sensitivity data are qualitatively compared with results of the proposed model. The first is the p2 tau law. The second is the desensitization of energetic materials by a ramp wave applied stress. An approach to improve the model based on experimental observations is outlined.

  7. The COSPIX Mission: Focusing on the Energetic and Obscured Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, P.; Goldwurm, A.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Beckmann, V; Arnaud, M.; Barcons, X.; Bomans, D.; Caballero, I.; Carrera, F.; Chaty, S.; Chenevez, J.; Claret, A.; Corbel, S.; Croston, J.; Daddi, E.; De Becker, M.; Decourchelle, A.; Elbaz, D.; Falanga, M.; Ferrari, C.; Feruglio, C.; Gotz, D.; Gouiffes, C.; Hailey, C.

    2010-01-01

    Tracing the formation and evolution of all supermassive black holes, including the obscured ones, understanding how black holes influence their surroundings and how matter behaves under extreme conditions, are recognized as key science objectives to be addressed by the next generation of instruments. These are the main goals of the COSPIX proposal, made to ESA in December 2010 in the context of its call for selection of the M3 mission. In addition, COSPIX, will also provide key measurements on the non thermal Universe, particularly in relation to the question of the acceleration of particles, as well as on many other fundamental questions as for example the energetic particle content of clusters of galaxies. COSPIX is proposed as an observatory operating from 0.3 to more than 100 keV. The payload features a single long focal length focusing telescope offering an effective area close to ten times larger than any scheduled focusing mission at 30 keV, an angular resolution better than 20 arcseconds in hard X-rays, and polarimetric capabilities within the same focal plane instrumentation. In this paper, we describe the science objectives of the mission, its baseline design, and its performances, as proposed to ESA.

  8. Energetic materials research using scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.M.H. van den; Duvalois, W.; Benedetto, G.L. Di; Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    A key-technique for the research of energetic materials is scanning electron microscopy. In this paper several examples are given of characterization studies on energetic materials, including a solid composite propellant formulation. Results of the characterization of energetic materials using scann

  9. Energetic materials research using scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.M.H. van den; Duvalois, W.; Benedetto, G.L. Di; Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    A key-technique for the research of energetic materials is scanning electron microscopy. In this paper several examples are given of characterization studies on energetic materials, including a solid composite propellant formulation. Results of the characterization of energetic materials using

  10. Object and Objective Lost?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopdrup-Hjorth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the erosion and problematization of ‘the organization’ as a demarcated entity. Utilizing Foucault's reflections on ‘state-phobia’ as a source of inspiration, I show how an organization-phobia has gained a hold within Organization Theory (OT). By attending to the history...... of this organization-phobia, the paper argues that OT has become increasingly incapable of speaking about its core object. I show how organizations went from being conceptualized as entities of major importance to becoming theoretically deconstructed and associated with all kinds of ills. Through this history......, organizations as distinct entities have been rendered so problematic that they have gradually come to be removed from the center of OT. The costs of this have been rather significant. Besides undermining the grounds that gave OT intellectual credibility and legitimacy to begin with, the organization-phobia...

  11. The location of energetic compartments affects energetic communication in cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke eBirkedal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The heart relies on accurate regulation of mitochondrial energy supply to match energy demand. The main regulators are Ca2+ and feedback of ADP and Pi. Regulation via feedback has intrigued for decades. First, the heart exhibits a remarkable metabolic stability. Second, diffusion of ADP and other molecules is restricted specifically in heart and red muscle, where a fast feedback is needed the most. To explain the regulation by feedback, compartmentalization must be taken into account. Experiments and theoretical approaches suggest that cardiomyocyte energetic compartmentalization is elaborate with barriers obstructing diffusion in the cytosol and at the level of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM. A recent study suggests the barriers are organized in a lattice with dimensions in agreement with those of intracellular structures. Here, we discuss the possible location of these barriers. The more plausible scenario includes a barrier at the level of MOM. Much research has focused on how the permeability of MOM itself is regulated, and the importance of the creatine kinase system to facilitate energetic communication. We hypothesize that at least part of the diffusion restriction at the MOM level is not by MOM itself, but due to the close physical association between the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and mitochondria. This will explain why animals with a disabled creatine kinase system exhibit rather mild phenotype modifications. Mitochondria are hubs of energetics, but also ROS production and signaling. The close association between SR and mitochondria may form a diffusion barrier to ADP added outside a permeabilised cardiomyocyte. But in vivo, it is the structural basis for the mitochondrial-SR coupling that is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-transients to regulate energetics, and for avoiding Ca2+-overload and irreversible opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

  12. Energetic materials destruction using molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-04-29

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. LLNL has built a small-scale unit to test the destruction of HE using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process. In addition to the high explosive HMX, destruction has been carried out on RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. Also destroyed was a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, destruction has been carried out on a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, and PBX-9404.

  13. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods.

  14. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1995-09-26

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center ( a partnership of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories), is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. Major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Department of Energy has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The Department of Defense has several hundred million pounds of energetic materials in its demilitarization inventory, with millions more added each year. In addition, there are vast energetic materials demilitarization inventories world-wide, including those in the former Soviet Union and eastern Bloc countries. Although recycling and reusing is the preferred method of dealing with these surplus materials, there will always be the necessity of destroying intractable or unusable energetic materials. Traditionally, open bum/open detonation (OB/OD) has been the method of choice for the destruction of energetic materials. Public concerns and increasingly stringent environmental regulations have made open burning and open detonation of energetic materials increasingly costly and nearly unacceptable. Thus, the impetus to develop environmentally sound alternatives to dispose of energetic materials is great.

  15. Nano Engineered Energetic Materials (NEEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    reactivity of the nitro group. The more perpendicular orientation of the NO2 in p- NBA leaves both oxygen atoms available to complex vapor deposited Al...different solutes have been recorded in supercritical CO2 in the past, the information on the solubility of many energetic materials including RDX is...The pH level of the solution was monitored before and after to record the ionic activity of the solution. Different amounts of dispersant and

  16. Design of Energetic Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    design of energetic ILs, is the application of robust theoretical methods for the reliable prediction of IL heats of formation, synthesis routes, phase... synthesis of the next generation of monopropellants for rocket propulsion applications. 2. Computational Methods An integrated approach...bonded complex between the neutral 1,2,4- triazole and dinitramine molecules, as shown in Figure 1. An ion pair in the presence of a single water

  17. The energetics of bouncing droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Sam; Molacek, Jan; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of the energetics of droplets bouncing on the surface of a vertically vibrating bath. We first assess the relative magnitudes of the kinetic, surface and gravitational potential energies of both the droplet and its wave field. We then seek to rationalize the transitions between the various bouncing and walking states that arise as the vibrational forcing is increased. Our results are compared with prior theoretical and experimental work.

  18. Cardiac energetics: sense and nonsense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Colin L

    2003-08-01

    1. The background to current ideas in cardiac energetics is outlined and, in the genomic era, the need is stressed for detailed knowledge of mouse heart mechanics and energetics. 2. The mouse heart is clearly different to the rat in terms of its excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and the common assumption that heart rate difference between mice and humans will account for the eightfold difference in myocardial oxygen consumption is wrong, because the energy per beat of the mouse heart is approximately one-third that of the human heart. 3. In vivo evidence suggests that there may well be an eightfold species difference in the non-beating metabolism of mice and human hearts. It is speculated that the magnitude of basal metabolism in the heart is regulatable and that, in the absence of perfusion, it falls to approximately one-quarter of its in vivo rate and that in clinical conditions, such as hibernation, it probably decreases; its magnitude may be controlled by the endothelium. 4. The active energy balance sheet is briefly discussed and it is suggested that the activation heat accounts for 20-25% of the active energy per beat and cross-bridge turnover accounts for the balance. It is argued that force, not shortening, is the major determinant of cardiac energy usage. 5. The outcome of recent cardiac modelling with variants of the Huxley and Hill/Eisenberg models is described. It has been necessary to invoke 'loose coupling' to replicate the low cardiac energy flux measured at low afterloads (medium to high velocities of shortening). 6. Lastly, some of the unexplained or 'nonsense' energetic data are outlined and eight unsolved problems in cardiac energetics are discussed.

  19. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinches, S. D. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lauber, Ph. W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Boltzmanstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Oliver, H. J. C. [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Shinohara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tani, K. [Nippon Advanced Technology Co., Ltd, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  20. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma ( r / a > 0.5 ) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  1. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  2. Association between internalizing disorders and day-to-day activities of low energetic expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosmann, Natan Pereira; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Schuch, Felipe; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Bosa, Vera Lucia; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare energetic expenditure in day-to-day activities among subjects with internalizing disorders (depression and anxiety), externalizing disorders (attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder) and healthy children and adolescents without any psychiatric diagnosis. One hundred and five (n = 105) students from a community sample were evaluated throughout a structured psychiatric interview and categorized into three groups: internalizing (n = 54), externalizing (n = 12) and typically developing controls (TDC, n = 39). Energetic expenditure was evaluated using 3-day physical activity record. Subjects with internalizing disorders performed activities with lower energetic expenditure as compared to those with externalizing disorders and TDC. Participants with externalizing disorders had more energetic expenditure variability. Our study suggests that internalizing disorders are associated with activities of low energetic expenditure in day-to-day activities, extending previous findings with physical exercise. These findings may further contribute to the understanding of the associated morbidity previously described in patients with internalizing disorders.

  3. Carbonyl-bridged energetic materials: biomimetic synthesis, organic catalytic synthesis, and energetic performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong-An; Qiu, Hao; Yang, Sa-Sha; Du, Jiang; Zhang, Tong-Lai

    2016-11-01

    In order to obtain high-performance energetic materials, in this work, carbonyl groups (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) have been newly introduced as sole bridging groups in the field of energetic materials. To this end, two tailored green methods for the synthesis of carbonyl-bridged energetic compounds have been developed for the first time. One is a biomimetic synthesis, in which the conversion route of heme to biliverdin has been used to obtain metal-containing energetic compounds. The other one is an organocatalysis, in which guanidinium serves as an energetic catalyst to afford other energetic compounds. Experimental studies and theoretical calculations have shown that carbonyl-bridged energetic compounds exhibit excellent energetic properties, which is promising for the carbonyl group as a new important and effective linker in energetic materials.

  4. Characterization of thermally degraded energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renlund, A.M.; Miller, J.C.; Trott, W.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.; Baer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Characterization of the damage state of a thermally degraded energetic material (EM) is a critical first step in understanding and predicting cookoff behavior. Unfortunately, the chemical and mechanical responses of heated EMs are closely coupled, especially if the EM is confined. The authors have examined several EMs in small-scale experiments (typically 200 mg) heated in both constant-volume and constant-load configurations. Fixtures were designed to minimize free volume and to contain gas pressures to several thousand psi. The authors measured mechanical forces or displacements that correlated to thermal expansion, phase transitions, material creep and gas pressurization as functions of temperature and soak time. In addition to these real-time measurements, samples were recovered for postmortem examination, usually with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. The authors present results on EMs (HMX and TATB), with binders (e.g., PBX 9501, PBX 9502, LX-14) and propellants (Al/AP/HTPB).

  5. The COSPIX mission: focusing on the energetic and obscured Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrando, P; Laurent, P; Limousin, O; Beckmann, V; Arnaud, M; Barcons, X; Bomans, D; Caballero, I; Carrera, F; Chaty, S; Chenevez, J; Chipaux, R; Christensen, F; Claret, A; Corbel, S; Croston, J; Daddi, E; De Becker, M; Decourchelle, A; Elbaz, D; Falanga, M; Ferrari, C; Feruglio, C; Götz, D; Gouiffès, C; Hailey, C; Hernanz, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Malzac, J; Martignac, J; Mattana, F; Meuris, A; Miniutti, G; Nalewajko, K; Negueruela, I; O'Dell, S; Paltani, S; Petre, R; Petrucci, P -O; Pierre, M; Pinsard, F; Ponti, G; Rauw, G; Rea, N; Renaud, M; Robert, J -L; Rodriguez, J; Rozanska, A; Santangelo, A; Sauvageot, J -L; Soldi, S; Tagger, M; Tenzer, C; Terrier, R; Trap, G; Varnière, P; Wilms, J; Zhang, W; Heras, J Zurita

    2011-01-01

    Tracing the formation and evolution of all supermassive black holes, including the obscured ones, understanding how black holes influence their surroundings and how matter behaves under extreme conditions, are recognized as key science objectives to be addressed by the next generation of instruments. These are the main goals of the COSPIX proposal, made to ESA in December 2010 in the context of its call for selection of the M3 mission. In addition, COSPIX, will also provide key measurements on the non thermal Universe, particularly in relation to the question of the acceleration of particles, as well as on many other fundamental questions as for example the energetic particle content of clusters of galaxies. COSPIX is proposed as an observatory operating from 0.3 to more than 100 keV. The payload features a single long focal length focusing telescope offering an effective area close to ten times larger than any scheduled focusing mission at 30 keV, an angular resolution better than 20 arcseconds in hard X-ray...

  6. Amination of energetic anions: high-performing energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Piercey, Davin G; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2012-08-21

    The new energetic materials 2-amino-5-nitrotetrazole (ANT, 1), 1-amino-3,4-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole (ADNT, 2), and both 1,1'-diamino-5,5'-bistetrazole and 1,2'-diamino-5,5'-bistetrazole (11DABT, 3 and 12DABT, 4) have been prepared by the amination of the parent anion with O-tosylhydroxylamine. The 5-H-tetrazolate anion has also been aminated using hydroxylamine O-sulfonic acid to both 1-aminotetrazole and 2-aminotetrazole (1AT, 5 and 2AT, 6). The prepared materials have been characterized chemically (XRD (1-4, 6·AtNO(2), 8), multinuclear NMR, IR, Raman) and as explosives (mechanical and electrostatic sensitivity) and their explosive performances calculated using the EXPLO5 computer code. The prepared N-amino energetic materials, which can also be used as new ligands for high energy-capacity transition metal complexes, exhibit high explosive performances (in the range of hexogen and octogen) and a range of sensitivities from low to extremely high.

  7. Evaluation of nanoparticles in the performance of energetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Atílio Fritz Fidel Rocco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The addition of nanosized metal particles in propulsion systems such as solid and liquid propellants, hybrid propellant and ramjet motors has recently became a major focus of research. Significant increases in the burning velocity and in the specific impulse are some of the advantages of using nano-scale energetic materials in many different types of propulsion systems. Aluminum has been largely employed as a metallic additive in energetic materials, also in a recently new propulsion system (aluminum/ice propulsion, “Alice”, and some studies show that the advantages of using nanosized aluminum instead of microsized aluminum are facilitating the ignition of the systems and allowing better incorporation of the components in the formulations and improving its homogeneity. Some of the combustion processes that require high pressures and even higher temperatures can occur in moderate conditions due to the increase of the surface area of the reactants, in this case, the metallic additive.

  8. Ammonia Oxide as a Building Block for High-Performance and Insensitive Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongxing; Mitchell, Lauren A; Imler, Gregory H; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2017-05-15

    3,5-Dinitrimino-1,2,4-triazole (2) with three protons has the potential of deprotonation to form energetic salts. Neutralization of 2 with 50 % hydroxylamine in varying molar ratios leads to the formation of the corresponding mono/dihydroxylammonium energetic salts. Additionally compound 5, an ammonia oxide adduct of dihydroxylammonium 3,5-dinitramino-1,2,4-triazolate, was prepared when excess hydroxylamine was used. The structures of 3-5 are supported by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The energetic properties of the new materials are competitive. Utilization of ammonia oxide adducts in hydroxylammonium energetic salts could lead to future practical applications as energetic materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Energetic 4,4'-Oxybis[3,3'-(1-hydroxytetrazolyl)]furazan and Its Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongxing; He, Chunlin; Imler, Gregory H; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-11-07

    Energetic compounds that incorporate multiple nitrogen-rich heterocycles are of great interest for high-density energetic materials. A facile synthetic strategy to combine an oxy bridge and furazan groups, as well as tetrazole-ols, into a molecule (5) was found. Some energetic salts based on 5 were prepared by neutralization. All of the compounds were fully characterized. Additionally, the structure of 7 has been elucidated by single-crystal XRD analysis. Physicochemical and energetic properties were also studied; these show that these newly designed energetic salts exhibit good thermal stabilities. Hydroxylammonium salt (6) has a detonation performance and sensitivities comparable with those of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Energetic particles in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Simnett, George M

    2017-01-01

    This monograph traces the development of our understanding of how and where energetic particles are accelerated in the heliosphere and how they may reach the Earth. Detailed data sets are presented which address these topics. The bulk of the observations are from spacecraft in or near the ecliptic plane. It is timely to present this subject now that Voyager-1 has entered the true interstellar medium. Since it seems unlikely that there will be a follow-on to the Voyager programme any time soon, the data we already have regarding the outer heliosphere are not going to be enhanced for at least 40 years.

  11. Nanoporous Silicon Based Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    performed at SINTEF , Norway as shown in Figure 4 (line a). 3 Annealing PSi in air at different temperatures can be used to change the surface...3h (c)PSi annealed at 500C for 0.5 h (courtesy SINTEF ) e is C d magnification bright field TEM image of PSi-Fe2O3. The inset electron...Dr. Knut Thorshaug and Dr Diplos Spyros of SINTEF Norway for DRIFTS and XPS data. REFERENCES dvanced Energetics Materials, 2004; report byA ring

  12. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  13. Hosting anions. The energetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtchen, Franz P

    2010-10-01

    Hosting anions addresses the widely spread molecular recognition event of negatively charged species by dedicated organic compounds in condensed phases at equilibrium. The experimentally accessible energetic features comprise the entire system including the solvent, any buffers, background electrolytes or other components introduced for e.g. analysis. The deconvolution of all these interaction types and their dependence on subtle structural variation is required to arrive at a structure-energy correlation that may serve as a guide in receptor construction. The focus on direct host-guest interactions (lock-and-key complementarity) that have dominated the binding concepts of artificial receptors in the past must be widened in order to account for entropic contributions which constitute very significant fractions of the total free energy of interaction. Including entropy necessarily addresses the ambiguity and fuzziness of the host-guest structural ensemble and requires the appreciation of the fact that most liquid phases possess distinct structures of their own. Apparently, it is the perturbation of the intrinsic solvent structure occurring upon association that rules ion binding in polar media where ions are soluble and abundant. Rather than specifying peculiar structural elements useful in anion binding this critical review attempts an illumination of the concepts and individual energetic contributions resulting in the final observation of specific anion recognition (95 references).

  14. The Energetics of Gravity Driven Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, L.

    2007-12-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In displacement-bounded faulting, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone. Elastic rebound is an example of displacement-bounded faulting. In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In displacement-bounded faulting the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the topography and internal stress-causing density variations is equally split between the seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity participates in the energetics of the faulting process. From the perspective of gravitational tectonics, the gravity collapse mechanism is direct and simple. The related mechanics are a little more

  15. Rural energy for development: energetic investment evaluation using multi-sectorial models and the NTICs; Energie rurale pour le developpement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentaleb, N.

    2002-12-15

    Based on field work carry out in Africa as well as on theoretical analyses from the perspective of sectoral representation of economies, this dissertation examines the impacts of energetic investments. It is divided in two main parts. The first part of the dissertation situates the role that rural energy plays for development from the standpoint of offer. In this part, the energetic situation of Southern countries is examined through rural needs and in the context of growing environmental awareness (Chapter 1). Then, the different actors in the energy sector are presented, taking into account the failure of governments to create the necessary infrastructure themselves (Chapter 2). Finally, the object of this study is investigated through what can be learned from informal economics (Chapter 3). In the second part of the dissertation, Chapter 4 examines the advantages and disadvantages of using multi-sectoral models for the subject of evaluating energetic investments. In Chapter 5, the sectoral representation is specified in a social accounting matrix. In addition, the IRIS software is presented, which has been developed in the framework of this thesis. Finally, in Chapter 6, the results of surveys realized in Burkina Faso and Morocco are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Biomechanics and energetics of running on uneven terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Alexandra S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2015-03-01

    In the natural world, legged animals regularly run across uneven terrain with remarkable ease. To gain understanding of how running on uneven terrain affects the biomechanics and energetics of locomotion, we studied human subjects (N=12) running at 2.3 m s(-1) on an uneven terrain treadmill, with up to a 2.5 cm height variation. We hypothesized that running on uneven terrain would show increased energy expenditure, step parameter variability and leg stiffness compared with running on smooth terrain. Subject energy expenditure increased by 5% (0.68 W kg(-1); Prunning on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Step width and length variability also increased by 27% and 26%, respectively (Prunning on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Calculations of gravitational potential energy fluctuations suggest that about half of the energetic increases can be explained by additional positive and negative mechanical work for up and down steps on the uneven surface. This is consistent between walking and running, as the absolute increases in energetic cost for walking and running on uneven terrain were similar: 0.68 and 0.48 W kg(-1), respectively. These results provide insight into how surface smoothness can affect locomotion biomechanics and energetics in the real world.

  17. A model of human walking energetics with an elastically-suspended load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jeffrey; Seipel, Justin

    2014-06-03

    Elastically-suspended loads have been shown to reduce the peak forces acting on the body while walking with a load when the suspension stiffness and damping are minimized. However, it is not well understood how elastically-suspended loads can affect the energetic cost of walking. Prior work shows that elastically suspending a load can yield either an increase or decrease in the energetic cost of human walking, depending primarily on the suspension stiffness, load, and walking speed. It would be useful to have a simple explanation that reconciles apparent differences in existing data. The objective of this paper is to help explain different energetic outcomes found with experimental load suspension backpacks and to systematically investigate the effect of load suspension parameters on the energetic cost of human walking. A simple two-degree-of-freedom model is used to approximate the energetic cost of human walking with a suspended load. The energetic predictions of the model are consistent with existing experimental data and show how the suspension parameters, load mass, and walking speed can affect the energetic cost of walking. In general, the energetic cost of walking with a load is decreased compared to that of a stiffly-attached load when the natural frequency of a load suspension is tuned significantly below the resonant walking frequency. The model also shows that a compliant load suspension is more effective in reducing the energetic cost of walking with low suspension damping, high load mass, and fast walking speed. This simple model could improve our understanding of how elastic load-carrying devices affect the energetic cost of walking with a load.

  18. Energetic materials and methods of tailoring electrostatic discharge sensitivity of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Wallace, Ronald S.; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Collins, Eric S.

    2016-11-01

    An energetic material comprising an elemental fuel, an oxidizer or other element, and a carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods, where the carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods are substantially homogeneously dispersed in the energetic material. Methods of tailoring the electrostatic discharge sensitivity of an energetic material are also disclosed.

  19. Formulation and Performance of Novel Energetic Nanocomposites and Gas Generators Prepared by Sol-Gel Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapsaddle, B J; Zhao, L; Prentice, D; Pantoya, M L; Gash, A E; Satcher Jr., J H; Shea, K J; Simpson, R L

    2005-03-24

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing nanostructured metal oxide materials. By introducing a fuel metal, such as aluminum, into the nanostructured metal oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. Due to the versatility of the preparation method, binary oxidizing phases can also be prepared, thus enabling a potential means of controlling the energetic properties of the subsequent nanocomposites. Furthermore, organic additives can also be easily introduced into the nanocomposites for the production of nanostructured gas generators. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its micro-scale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The unique synthesis methodology, formulations, and performance of these materials will be presented. The degree of control over the burning rate of these nanocomposites afforded by the compositional variation of a binary oxidizing phase will also be discussed. These energetic nanocomposites have the potential for releasing controlled amounts of energy at a controlled rate. Due to the versatility of the synthesis method, a large number of compositions and physical properties can be achieved, resulting in

  20. Destruction of Energetic Materials in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-25

    THERMOCHEMISTRY OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER...fringe spacing is 13.5 µm and the acoustic signal period is 28.3 ns. 138 SECTION VI THERMOCHEMISTRY OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN...validation calculation studied the solvation free energies of alkali–chloride ion pairs in liquid water. Such information can teach us about the

  1. Energetic model of metal hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova O.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on Bailey hypothesis on the link between strain hardening and elastic lattice defect energy this paper suggests a shear strength energetic model that takes into consideration plastic strain intensity and rate as well as softening related to temperature annealing and dislocation annihilation. Metal strain hardening was demonstrated to be determined only by elastic strain energy related to the energy of accumulated defects. It is anticipated that accumulation of the elastic energy of defects is governed by plastic work. The suggested model has a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data for copper up to P = 70 GPa , for aluminum up to P = 10 GPa and for tantalum up to P = 20 GPa.

  2. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  3. Exact mean field concept to compute defect energetics in random alloys on rigid lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Castin, N.; Pascuet, M. I.; Çelik, Y.

    2017-07-01

    In modern materials science modeling, the evolution of the energetics of random alloys with composition are desirable input parameters for several meso-scale and continuum scale models. When using atomistic methods to parameterize the above mentioned concentration dependent function, a mean field theory can significantly reduce the computational burden associated to obtaining the desired statistics in a random alloy. In this work, a mean field concept is developed to obtain the energetics of point-defect clusters in perfect random alloys. It is demonstrated that for a rigid lattice the concept is mathematically exact. In addition to the accuracy of the presented method, it is also computationally efficient as a small box can be used and perfect statistics are obtained in a single run. The method is illustrated by computing the formation and binding energy of solute and vacancy pairs in FeCr and FeW binaries. Also, the dissociation energy of small vacancy clusters was computed in FeCr and FeCr-2%W alloys, which are considered model alloys for Eurofer steels. As a result, it was concluded that the dissociation energy is not expected to vary by more than 0.1 eV in the 0-10% Cr and 0-2% W composition range. The present mean field concept can be directly applied to parameterize meso-scale models, such as cluster dynamics and object kinetic Monte Carlo models.

  4. Observations and Modeling of Geospace Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic particles and electric and magnetic fields from state-of-art instruments onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of the energetic particles and the fields in the inner magnetosphere and impose new challenges to any quantitative modeling of the physical processes responsible for these observations. Concurrent measurements of energetic particles by satellites in highly inclined low Earth orbits and plasma and fields by satellites in farther distances in the magnetospheres and in the up stream solar wind are the critically needed information for quantitative modeling and for leading to eventual accurate forecast of the variations of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere. In this presentation, emphasis will be on the most recent advance in our understanding of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and the missing links for significantly advance in our modeling and forecasting capabilities.

  5. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  6. Femtosecond Laser Interaction with Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Benterou, J; Lee, R; Roeske, F; Stuart, B

    2002-03-25

    Femtosecond laser ablation shows promise in machining energetic materials into desired shapes with minimal thermal and mechanical effects to the remaining material. We will discuss the physical effects associated with machining energetic materials and assemblies containing energetic materials, based on experimental results. Interaction of ultra-short laser pulses with matter will produce high temperature plasma at high-pressure which results in the ablation of material. In the case of energetic material, which includes high explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics, this ablation process must be accomplished without coupling energy into the energetic material. Experiments were conducted in order to characterize and better understand the phenomena of femtosecond laser pulse ablation on a variety of explosives and propellants. Experimental data will be presented for laser fluence thresholds, machining rates, cutting depths and surface quality of the cuts.

  7. Object crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julian M; Tjan, Bosco S

    2011-05-25

    Crowding occurs when stimuli in the peripheral fields become harder to identify when flanked by other items. This phenomenon has been demonstrated extensively with simple patterns (e.g., Gabors and letters). Here, we characterize crowding for everyday objects. We presented three-item arrays of objects and letters, arranged radially and tangentially in the lower visual field. Observers identified the central target, and we measured contrast energy thresholds as a function of target-to-flanker spacing. Object crowding was similar to letter crowding in spatial extent but was much weaker. The average elevation in threshold contrast energy was in the order of 1 log unit for objects as compared to 2 log units for letters and silhouette objects. Furthermore, we examined whether the exterior and interior features of an object are differentially affected by crowding. We used a circular aperture to present or exclude the object interior. Critical spacings for these aperture and "donut" objects were similar to those of intact objects. Taken together, these findings suggest that crowding between letters and objects are essentially due to the same mechanism, which affects equally the interior and exterior features of an object. However, for objects defined with varying shades of gray, it is much easier to overcome crowding by increasing contrast.

  8. Performance Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    objectives may direct students’ learning (Duchastel and Merrill, 1973; Kapfer , 1970; Kibler et al., 1974), since such objectives may provide...matter learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 62(1): 67-70 (1971). Kapfer , P. G. Behavioral objectives and the curriculum processor. Educational

  9. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linghua

    The Sun is capable of accelerating ions from ~ tens of keV up to tens of GeV and electrons from ~ tens of eV up to hundreds of MeVs in transient events such as flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The energized particles escaping into the interplanetary medium are referred to as Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. The great majority of SEP events are impulsive SEP events that are dominated by ~1-100 keV electrons and ~MeV/nucleon ion emissions, with enhanced 3 He/ 4 He ratios up to 10 4 times the coronal values (also called electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events). This thesis is focused on solar impulsive energetic electron events, the electron part of impulsive SEP events, using electron observations from the 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument (3DP) on the WIND spacecraft near the Earth. First, I present the first comprehensive statistical study of solar energetic electron events over almost one solar cycle. I find that the occurrence rate of solar electron events shows a strong solar-cycle variation; after correction for the background effect, the estimated occurrence frequency exhibits a good power-law distribution, and the estimated occurrence rate near the Earth is ~1000/year at solar maximum and ~30/year at solar minimum for the instrumental sensitivity (~2.9×10^-4 (cm 2 s str eV) -1 for the 40 keV channel) of WIND/3DP, about one order of magnitude larger than the observed occurrence rate. Solar energetic electron events have a one-to-one association with type III radio bursts and a poor association with flares, but a close association with 3 He- rich ion emissions. These 3 He-rich electron events also have a poor association with flares but a close (~ 60%) association with west-limb CMEs. Then I present two case studies: one investigating the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and type III radio emissions, and the second studying the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and 3 He- rich ions. For both

  10. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: IV. Coronal Mass Ejection Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass $m_{\\mathrm{cme}}$, kinetic energy $E_{\\mathrm{kin}}$, and the gravitational potential energy $E_{\\mathrm{grav}}$ of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yrs of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. The EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at $r > 2 R_{\\odot}$, while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME paramet...

  11. Numerical Analyses of Energetic Particles in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todo, Yasushi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Murakami, S. [Kyoto University, Japan; Yamamoto, T. [Kyoto University, Japan; Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto University, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Yamamoto, S. [Nagoya University, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2010-01-01

    The confinement of energetic ions generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating is studied using GNET simulation code, in which the drift kinetic equation is solved in five-dimensional phase-space. The steady-state distributions of the energetic ions are obtained, and characteristics of the energetic-ion distribution depending on the plasma heating method are shown. The magnetic configuration effect on the energetic-ion confinement is also investigated, and it is found that the energetic-ion confinement is improved by a strong inward shift of the magnetic axis position in the major radius direction. The interaction between energetic particles and Alfven eigenmodes are investigated using the MEGA code and the AE3D code. A reduced version of the MEGA code has been developed to simulate the Alfven eigenmode (AE) evolution in the Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma with NBI and collisions taken into account. The spatial profile and frequency of the AE modes in the LHD plasma are analyzed with the AE3D code. The evolution of energetic particles and AE mode amplitude and phase are followed in a self-consistent way, while the AE spatial profiles are assumed to be constant. It is demonstrated that the AE bursts can be simulated with the new code.

  12. Copper-based energetic MOFs with 3-nitro-1H-1,2,4-triazole: solvent-dependent syntheses, structures and energetic performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaoni; Zhai, Lianjie; Wang, Bozhou; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping; Gao, Shengli

    2016-11-01

    The persistent challenge in the field of energetic materials is how to synthesize energetic compounds with high density, high heat of detonation and outstanding detonation performance by gathering the maximum number of energetic groups in the smallest volume. The self-assembly of energetic groups with metal ions is crucially influenced by the solvent conditions. Here, the reaction of Cu(NO3)2·3H2O with 3-nitro-1H-1,2,4-triazole (Hntz) in aqueous ammonia under hydrothermal conditions via a self-assembly strategy yielded the Cu(i) energetic compound [Cu(ntz)]n (1). In order to further enhance the energetic property, an N3(-) anion was introduced into the system and two Cu(ii) energetic compounds, [Cu(ntz)(N3)(DMF)]n (2) and [Cu(ntz)(N3)(H2O)]n (3), were successfully synthesized under different solvent conditions. Structural analyses show that compound 1 features a compacted 3D structure framework and compounds 2-3 exhibit 1D butterfly-like chain structures. The experimental results reveal that 1 possesses attractive thermal stability up to 315.0 °C and 1-3 present excellent insensitivity. Importantly, the heat of detonation of compound 2 has been factually improved due to the abundant energetic bonds in the coordinated DMF molecules compared to 1 and lots of energies are taken away during the release of the coordinated solvent molecules in the low temperature range resulting in the obvious decreases in detonation pressure and detonation velocity for compounds 2-3, which further exemplifies that the subtle change of reaction conditions may have a crucial effect on the resultant detonation performance. In addition, the detonation performances of 1-3 calculated by both a simple method for metal-containing explosives developed by Pang et al. and the commercial program EXPLO5 v6.01, are discussed in detail.

  13. The energetic characterization of pineapple crown leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, R M; Queiroga, T S; Calixto, G Q; Almeida, H N; Melo, D M A; Melo, M A F; Freitas, J C O; Curbelo, F D S

    2015-12-01

    Energetic characterization of biomass allows for assessing its energy potential for application in different conversion processes into energy. The objective of this study is to physicochemically characterize pineapple crown leaves (PC) for their application in energy conversion processes. PC was characterized according to ASTM E871-82, E1755-01, and E873-82 for determination of moisture, ash, and volatile matter, respectively; the fixed carbon was calculated by difference. Higher heating value was determined by ASTM E711-87 and ash chemical composition was determined by XRF. The thermogravimetric and FTIR analyses were performed to evaluate the thermal decomposition and identify the main functional groups of biomass. PC has potential for application in thermochemical processes, showing high volatile matter (89.5%), bulk density (420.8 kg/m(3)), and higher heating value (18.9 MJ/kg). The results show its energy potential justifying application of this agricultural waste into energy conversion processes, implementing sustainability in the production, and reducing the environmental liabilities caused by its disposal.

  14. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  15. Combined effects of space charge and energetic disorder on photocurrent efficiency loss of field-dependent organic photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangcheol; Park, Byoungchoo; Hwang, Inchan

    2015-11-01

    The loss of photocurrent efficiency by space-charge effects in organic solar cells with energetic disorder was investigated to account for how energetic disorder incorporates space-charge effects, utilizing a drift-diffusion model with field-dependent charge-pair dissociation and suppressed bimolecular recombination. Energetic disorder, which induces the Poole-Frenkel behavior of charge carrier mobility, is known to decrease the mobility of charge carriers and thus reduces photovoltaic performance. We found that even if the mobilities are the same in the absence of space-charge effects, the degree of energetic disorder can be an additional parameter affecting photocurrent efficiency when space-charge effects occur. Introducing the field-dependence parameter that reflects the energetic disorder, the behavior of efficiency loss with energetic disorder can differ depending on which charge carrier is subject to energetic disorder. While the energetic disorder that is applied to higher-mobility charge carriers decreases photocurrent efficiency further, the efficiency loss can be suppressed when energetic disorder is applied to lower-mobility charge carriers.

  16. Agile Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Senta; Harris, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that the art-historical canon, however it is construed, has little relevance to the selection of objects for museum-based teaching. Their contention is that all objects are fundamentally agile and capable of interrogation from any number of disciplinary standpoints, and that the canon of museum education,…

  17. Energetic salt of trinitrophloroglucinol and melamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Patrick R.; Leonard, Philip W.; Lichthardt, Joseph P.; Tappan, Bryce C.; Ramos, Kyle J.

    2017-01-01

    We hope to harness the field of energetic co-crystals for development of insensitive, high-performing explosives. As demonstrated by other groups, co-crystals of energetic materials are diverse in their resultant properties versus the native materials. Herein, we discuss the synthesis, characterization, and testing of an energetic co-crystal of trinitrophloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxy-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) and melamine. Although melamine is not an energetic material, high nitrogen content and insensitivity can be of benefit in a co-crystal. Currently, trinitrophloroglucinol (TNPG) and melamine have been found to exist as a 1:1 ionic co-crystal. Characterization by NMR, IR, small-scale sensitivity, thermal stability and powder X-ray diffraction have all been used to characterize the individual compounds as well as the co-crystals developed.

  18. Safer energetic materials by a nanotechnological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Benny; Comet, Marc; Spitzer, Denis

    2011-09-01

    Energetic materials - explosives, thermites, populsive powders - are used in a variety of military and civilian applications. Their mechanical and electrostatic sensitivity is high in many cases, which can lead to accidents during handling and transport. These considerations limit the practical use of some energetic materials despite their good performance. For industrial applications, safety is one of the main criteria for selecting energetic materials. The sensitivity has been regarded as an intrinsic property of a substance for a long time. However, in recent years, several approaches to lower the sensitivity of a given substance, using nanotechnology and materials engineering, have been described. This feature article gives an overview over ways to prepare energetic (nano-)materials with a lower sensitivity.

  19. Global Positioning System (GPS) Energetic Particle Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Energetic particle data from the CXD and BDD instrument on the GPS constellation are available to the space weather research community. The release of these data...

  20. Nitramines with varying sensitivities: functionalized dipyrazolyl-N-nitromethanamines as energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaheng; He, Chunlin; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2013-07-01

    1,3-Dichloro-2-nitro-2-azapropane is an excellent precursor to dense energetic functionalized dipyrazolyl-N-nitromethanamines. This new family of energetic compounds was fully characterized by using (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR and IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, elemental analysis, and impact sensitivity tests. Additionally, single-crystal X-ray structuring was done for 3 and 5·CH3CN, which gave insight into structural characteristics. The experimentally determined densities of 2-9 fall between 1.69 and 1.90 g cm(-3). Heats of formation and detonation properties were calculated by using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 programs, respectively. The influence of different energetic moieties on the structural and energetic properties was established theoretically. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Additivity dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of naturalness of foods tend to be more influenced by the process history of a food, rather than its actual constituents. Two types of processing of a ``natural'' food are to add something or to remove something. We report in this study, based on a large random sample of individuals from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, UK and USA that additives are considered defining features of what makes a food not natural, whereas ``subtractives'' are almost never mentioned. In support of this, skim milk (with major subtraction of fat is rated as more natural than whole milk with a small amount of natural vitamin D added. It is also noted that ``additives'' is a common word, with a synonym reported by a native speaker in 17 of 18 languages, whereas ``subtractive'' is lexicalized in only 1 of the 18 languages. We consider reasons for additivity dominance, relating it to omission bias, feature positive bias, and notions of purity.

  2. Modeling the dissolution of various types of mixed energetic residues under different flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Fuller, Mark E; Schaefer, Charles E; Fu, Dafang; Jin, Yan

    2012-10-15

    Energetic residues are scattered around active ranges due to the detonation events and dissolution is usually the first step for the entry of explosive compounds into the environment. The current models for describing the dissolution are subject to limitations in either model applicability or generality. This study attempted to develop a general model that is applicable to various types of energetic residues. Experimental data that were acquired from previous reports were used for testing the developed model. The results showed that the model captured well the dissolution processes of different types of energetic residues: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), Tritonal, Composition B, Octol, and Greener Insensitive Material (GIM). Moreover, it was observed that the mass transfer coefficients of TNT, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and/or octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) that were part of the energetic residues increased quantitatively with rising flow rates. In addition, the values of resistance coefficient, a model parameter, were negligible for the drop-impingement experiments, implying that under the conditions of rainfall and/or snowmelt flow, the surface attachment effect on the dissolution of energetic residues that rest on range soils is trivial. The study herein provides a general modeling approach for various types of energetic residues with additional insights in regards to their dissolution processes.

  3. Cyanuric Acid/Epichlorohydrin Energetic Prepolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, Luís M.; Simões, Pedro; Portugal, António

    2005-01-01

    In this work new energetic prepolymers are synthesised and characterised. The structure of the prepolymers exhibits the 1,3,5-s-triazine ring with lateral chains derived from the epichlorohydrin ring opening. The chlorine atoms in these precursors are here substituted by azido groups. The presence of these groups was confirmed by FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental and thermal analysis. OH group content in the energetic prepolymers was found slightly lower than expected having in view ...

  4. Energetic tuning in spirocyclic conjugated polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Bronstein; Frank D. King

    2016-01-01

    Precise control of the energy levels in a conjugated polymer is the key to allowing their exploitation in optoelectronic devices. The introduction of spirocycles into conjugated polymers has traditionally been used to enhance their solid state microstructure. Here we present a highly novel method of energetic tuning through the use of electronically active spirocyclic systems. By modifying the size and oxidation state of a heteroatom in an orthogonal spirocycle we demonstrate energetic fine t...

  5. Theoretical studies on nitrogen rich energetic azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghule, Vikas Dasharath; Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Jadhav, Pandurang M; Tewari, Surya P

    2011-06-01

    Different nitro azole isomers based on five membered heterocyclics were designed and investigated using computational techniques in order to find out the comprehensive relationships between structure and performances of these high nitrogen compounds. Electronic structure of the molecules have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the heat of formation has been calculated using the isodesmic reaction approach at B3LYP/6-31G* level. All designed compounds show high positive heat of formation due to the high nitrogen content and energetic nitro groups. The crystal densities of these energetic azoles have been predicted with different force fields. All the energetic azoles show densities higher than 1.87 g/cm(3). Detonation properties of energetic azoles are evaluated by using Kamlet-Jacobs equation based on the calculated densities and heat of formations. It is found that energetic azoles show detonation velocity about 9.0 km/s, and detonation pressure of 40GPa. Stability of the designed compounds has been predicted by evaluating the bond dissociation energy of the weakest C-NO(2) bond. The aromaticity using nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) is also explored to predict the stability via delocalization of the π-electrons. Charge on the nitro group is used to assess the impact sensitivity in the present study. Overall, the study implies that all energetic azoles are found to be stable and expected to be the novel candidates of high energy density materials (HEDMs).

  6. Structure of Energetic Particle Mediated Shocks Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The structure of collisionless shock waves is often modified by the presence of energetic particles that are not equilibrated with the thermal plasma (such as pickup ions [PUIs] and solar energetic particles [SEPs]). This is relevant to the inner and outer heliosphere and the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM), where observations of shock waves (e.g., in the inner heliosphere) show that both the magnetic field and thermal gas pressure are less than the energetic particle component pressures. Voyager 2 observations revealed that the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) is very broad and mediated by energetic particles. PUIs and SEPs contribute both a collisionless heat flux and a higher-order viscosity. We show that the incorporation of both effects can completely determine the structure of collisionless shocks mediated by energetic ions. Since the reduced form of the PUI-mediated plasma model is structurally identical to the classical cosmic ray two-fluid model, we note that the presence of viscosity, at least formally, eliminates the need for a gas sub-shock in the classical two-fluid model, including in that regime where three are possible. By considering parameters upstream of the HTS, we show that the thermal gas remains relatively cold and the shock is mediated by PUIs. We determine the structure of the weak interstellar shock observed by Voyager 1. We consider the inclusion of the thermal heat flux and viscosity to address the most general form of an energetic particle-thermal plasma two-fluid model.

  7. New Energetic Particle Data and Products from the GOES Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsager, Terrance; Rodriguez, Juan

    The NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) program has provided continuous, real-time measurements of the near-Earth space environment for decades. In addition to their scientific value, the GOES energetic particle measurements are the basis for a variety of space weather products and services, including the forecasting of elevated energetic particle levels, real-time knowledge of the satellite environment at geostationary orbit, and data to allow post-event analyses when satellite anomalies occur. The GOES satellites have traditionally provided measurements of high-energy electrons, protons, and alpha particles (100s of keV to 100s of MeV). Beginning with the launch of GOES-13 in 2006, the measurement capabilities were expanded to include medium-energy electrons and protons (10s to 100s of keV) with pitch angle resolution. The next generation of GOES satellites, starting with GOES-R in 2016, will include low-energy electrons and ions (10s of eV to 10s of keV) as well as energetic heavy ions. In this presentation, we will overview the GOES particle measurements available now and in the future and describe the space weather services and scientific investigations that these data support.

  8. Deep energetic trap states in organic photovoltaic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Shuttle, Christopher G.

    2011-11-23

    The nature of energetic disorder in organic semiconductors is poorly understood. In photovoltaics, energetic disorder leads to reductions in the open circuit voltage and contributes to other loss processes. In this work, three independent optoelectronic methods were used to determine the long-lived carrier populations in a high efficiency N-alkylthieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione (TPD) based polymer: fullerene solar cell. In the TPD co-polymer, all methods indicate the presence of a long-lived carrier population of ∼ 10 15 cm -3 on timescales ≤100 μs. Additionally, the behavior of these photovoltaic devices under optical bias is consistent with deep energetic lying trap states. Comparative measurements were also performed on high efficiency poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT): fullerene solar cells; however a similar long-lived carrier population was not observed. This observation is consistent with a higher acceptor concentration (doping) in P3HT than in the TPD-based copolymer. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Trusted Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; PIERSON,LYNDON G.; WITZKE,EDWARD L.

    1999-10-27

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  10. Object theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryöppy, Merja; Heiberg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    possibilities to emerge. We present a study in which the Object Theatre approach is applied to redesign socially shared everyday products that are located in public places. This project demonstrates how Object Theatre offers a broad perspective form which to explore and present product interactions....... In particular, it emphasises the understanding of a product by relating and changing perspectives, and takes into account context of use and diverse social settings....

  11. Potlining Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  12. Additivity dominance

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Judgments of naturalness of foods tend to be more influenced by the process history of a food, rather than its actual constituents. Two types of processing of a ``natural'' food are to add something or to remove something. We report in this study, based on a large random sample of individuals from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, UK and USA) that additives are considered defining features of what makes a food not natural, whereas ``subtractives'' are almost never mentioned....

  13. Sulfite Additives

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The CMA recommends that sulfites be banned as food preservatives when satisfactory and safe alternatives are available. When there is no suitable substitute strict labelling requirements on foods should be imposed for sulfite additives. The association supports the efforts of the Health Protection Branch of the Department of National Health and Welfare to regulate sulfites in the food and drug industry to prevent adverse reactions in people sensitive to sulfites. The CMA recommends that the D...

  14. Fashion Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjørn Schiermer

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to create a framework for understanding modern fashion phenomena on the basis of Durkheim's sociology of religion. It focuses on Durkheim's conception of the relation between the cult and the sacred object, on his notion of 'exteriorisation', and on his theory of the social...... symbol in an attempt to describe the peculiar attraction of the fashion object and its social constitution. However, Durkheim's notions of cult and ritual must undergo profound changes if they are to be used in an analysis of fashion. The article tries to expand the Durkheimian cult, radically enlarging...... it without totally dispersing it; depicting it as held together exclusively by the sheer 'force' of the sacred object. Firstly, the article introduces the themes and problems surrounding Durkheim's conception of the sacred. Next, it briefly sketches an outline of fashion phenomena in Durkheimian categories...

  15. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  16. An energetic analysis of a Chinese type bio digester in Brazil; Uma analise energetica de um biodigestor tipo chines no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raad, Antonio; Moreira, Marco A.R.G.; Rebello, Renata B.M. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1996-12-31

    The energetic analysis has proved to be an important instrument for the evaluation of energetic alternatives concerning strategies objectives through the analysis of a Chinese type bio digester in the Brazilian use situation this work demonstrates that the technology is viable for Brazilian countryside areas 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Assessment of the energetics of human labor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampietro, M. (Istituto Nazionale della Nutrizione, Rome (Italy)); Pimentel, D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The energetic analysis of farming systems implies an assessment of the energetics of human labor. The energy cost of 1 h of human labor is generally estimated according to its physiological requirement (the hierarchical level at which the assessment is made is at the individual level). A different way of describing the interaction between human society and the ecosystem is presented (assessment referred to the society level). The shift from the individual level to the societal level provides a new perspective when assessing the energetic efficiency of farming. For example, the power level of the system becomes a new and important parameter to consider. Numerical examples illustrate the proposed approach. 4 figs., 12 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Energetic Tuning in Spirocyclic Conjugated Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Bronstein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of the energy levels in a conjugated polymer is the key to allowing their exploitation in optoelectronic devices. The introduction of spirocycles into conjugated polymers has traditionally been used to enhance their solid state microstructure. Here we present a highly novel method of energetic tuning through the use of electronically active spirocyclic systems. By modifying the size and oxidation state of a heteroatom in an orthogonal spirocycle we demonstrate energetic fine tuning in both the absorption and emission of a conjugated polymer. Furthermore, the synthesis of highly novel triplet-decker spirocyclic conjugated polymers is presented. This new method of energetic manipulation in a conjugated polymer paves the way for future application targeted synthesis of polymers with electronically active spirocycles.

  19. Spin foam models as energetic causal sets

    CERN Document Server

    Cortês, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Energetic causal sets are causal sets endowed by a flow of energy-momentum between causally related events. These incorporate a novel mechanism for the emergence of space-time from causal relations. Here we construct a spin foam model which is also an energetic causal set model. This model is closely related to the model introduced by Wieland, and this construction makes use of results used there. What makes a spin foam model also an energetic causal set is Wieland's identification of new momenta, conserved at events (or four-simplices), whose norms are not mass, but the volume of tetrahedra. This realizes the torsion constraints, which are missing in previous spin foam models, and are needed to relate the connection dynamics to those of the metric, as in general relativity. This identification makes it possible to apply the new mechanism for the emergence of space-time to a spin foam model.

  20. Energetic particle pressure in intense ESP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We study three intense energetic storm particle (ESP) events in which the energetic particle pressure PEP exceeded both the pressure of the background thermal plasma Pth and the pressure of the magnetic field PB. The region upstream of the interplanetary shocks associated with these events was characterized by a depression of the magnetic field strength coincident with the increase of the energetic particle intensities and, when plasma measurements were available, a depleted solar wind density. The general feature of cosmic-ray mediated shocks such as the deceleration of the upstream background medium into which the shock propagates is generally observed. However, for those shocks where plasma parameters are available, pressure balance is not maintained either upstream of or across the shock, which may result from the fact that PEP is not included in the calculation of the shock parameters.

  1. Energetic deposition of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Busaidy, M S K

    2001-01-01

    deposited films. The primary aim of this thesis was to study the physical effect of energetic deposition metal thin films. The secondary aim is to enhance the quality of the films produced to a desired quality. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements from a high-energy synchrotron radiation source were carried out to study and characterise the samples. Optical Profilers Interferometery, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Medium energy ion spectroscopy (MEIS), and the Electron microscope studies were the other main structural characterisation tools used. AI/Fe trilayers, as well as multilayers were deposited using a Nordico planar D.C. magnetron deposition system at different voltage biases and pressures. The films were calibrated and investigated. The relation between energetic deposition variation and structural properties was intensely researched. Energetic deposition refers to the method in which the deposited species possess higher kinetic energy and impact ...

  2. Objective becoming

    CERN Document Server

    Skow, Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Bradford Skow presents an original defense of the 'block universe' theory of time, often said to be a theory according to which time does not pass. Along the way, he provides in-depth discussions of alternative theories of time, including those in which there is 'robust passage' of time or 'objective becoming': presentism, the moving spotlight theory of time, the growing block theory of time, and the 'branching time' theory of time. Skow explains why the moving spotlight theory is the best of these arguments, and rebuts several popular arguments against the thesis that time passes. He surveys the problems that the special theory of relativity has been thought to raise for objective becoming, and suggests ways in which fans of objective becoming may reconcile their view with relativistic physics. The last third of the book aims to clarify and evaluate the argument that we should believe that time passes because, somehow, the passage of time is given to us in experience. He isolates three separate arguments thi...

  3. Reapplication of energetic materials at fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.; Sinquefield, S.; Huey, S.; Lipkin, J.; Shah, D.; Ross, J.; Sclippa, G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K. [Reaction Engineering Internaional, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This investigation addresses the combustion-related aspects of the reapplication of energetic materials as fuels in boilers as an economically viable and environmentally acceptable use of excess energetic materials. The economics of this approach indicate that the revenues from power generation and chemical recovery approximately equal the costs of boiler modification and changes in operation. The primary tradeoff is the cost of desensitizing the fuels against the cost of open burn/open detonation (OB/OD) or other disposal techniques. Two principal combustion-related obstacles to the use of energetic-material-derived fuels are NO{sub x} generation and the behavior of metals. NO{sub x} measurements obtained in this investigation indicate that the nitrated components (nitrocellulose, nitroglycerin, etc.) of energetic materials decompose with NO{sub x} as the primary product. This can lead to high uncontrolled NO{sub x} levels (as high as 2600 ppM on a 3% O{sub 2} basis for a 5% blend of energetic material in the fuel). NO{sub x} levels are sensitive to local stoichiometry and temperature. The observed trends resemble those common during the combustion of other nitrogen containing fuels. Implications for NO{sub x} control strategies are discussed. The behavior of inorganic components in energetic materials tested in this investigation could lead to boiler maintenance problems such as deposition, grate failure, and bed agglomeration. The root cause of the problem is the potentially extreme temperature generated during metal combustion. Implications for furnace selection and operation are discussed.

  4. Device for Detecting highly energetic photons

    OpenAIRE

    Chemissani Road, Mokhtar; Álvarez Pastor, José; Sánchez Sánchez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    A device (10) for detecting highly energetic photons, comprising one or more pixelated solid-state detectors (11) for detecting the highly energetic photons; means for providing a high voltage for polarizing said solid-state detectors; one or more pixelated readout elements (30), a readout element being connected to each of said one or more pixelated solid-state detectors (11); an input/output element (12) connected to said readout elements (30) for data input and output; and a base layer (13...

  5. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  6. Dynamical simulations of radiation damage induced by 10 keV energetic recoils in UO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X. F.; Gao, T.; Long, Chongsheng; Li, JiuKai; Jiang, Gang; Xiao, Hongxing

    2011-08-01

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations to simulate the primary damage state induced by 10 keV energetic recoils in UO 2. The numbers versus time and the distance distributions for the displaced uranium and oxygen atoms were investigated with the energetic recoils accelerated along four different directions. The simulations suggest that the direction of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) has no effect on the final primary damage state. In addition, it was found that atomic displacement events consisted of replacement collision sequences in addition to the production of Frenkel pairs. The spatial distribution of defects introduced by 10 keV collision cascades was also presented and the results were similar to that of energetic recoils with lower energy.

  7. Surviving Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Murjas, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Surviving Objects (2012) is a devised multi-media practice-as-research performance based on extensive interviews conducted with my elderly mother and recorded on a hand-held device. Our conversations concern her experiences as a child refugee following violent deportation by the Soviet Army from Eastern Poland to Siberia (1941), and her subsequent route, via Persia, to a British-run refugee camp in Northern Rhodesia, where she remained for 6 years before arriving in the UK. In order to aid my...

  8. The Reactivity of Energetic Materials At Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E

    2006-10-23

    shock conditions, for example, energetic materials undergo rapid heating to a few thousand degrees and are subjected to a compression of hundreds of kilobars, resulting in almost 30% volume reduction. Complex chemical reactions are thus initiated, in turn releasing large amounts of energy to sustain the detonation process. Clearly, understanding of the various chemical events at these extreme conditions is essential in order to build predictive material models. Scientific investigations into the reactive process have been undertaken over the past two decades. However, the sub-{micro}s time scale of explosive reactions, in addition to the highly exothermic conditions of an explosion, make experimental investigation of the decomposition pathways difficult at best. More recently, new computational approaches to investigate condensed-phase reactivity in energetic materials have been developed. Here we focus on two different approaches to condensed-phase reaction modeling: chemical equilibrium methods and atomistic modeling of condensed-phase reactions. These are complementary approaches to understanding the chemical reactions of high explosives. Chemical equilibrium modeling uses a highly simplified thermodynamic picture of the reaction process, leading to a convenient and predictive model of detonation and other decomposition processes. Chemical equilibrium codes are often used in the design of new materials, both at the level of synthesis chemistry and formulation. Atomistic modeling is a rapidly emerging area. The doubling of computational power approximately every 18 months has made atomistic condensed-phase modeling more feasible. Atomistic calculations employ far fewer empirical parameters than chemical equilibrium calculations. Nevertheless, the atomistic modeling of chemical reactions requires an accurate global Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Traditionally, such a surface is constructed by representing the potential energy surface with an analytical fit

  9. Objective thermomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fülöp, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    An irreversible thermodynamical theory of solids is presented where the kinematic quantities are defined in an automatically objective way. Namely, auxiliary elements like reference frame, reference time and reference configuration are avoided by formulating the motion of the continuum on spacetime directly, utilizing the Weyl-Matolcsi description of spacetime. This restricts the range of definable kinematic quantities heavily. Solids are distinguished from fluids by possessing not only an instantaneous metric tensor but a relaxed metric, too, that represents the natural geometric structure of the solid. The comparison of the instantaneous metric to the relaxed one is the basis of the definition of the elastic state variable, the elastic deformedness tensor. Thermal expansion is conceived as the temperature dependence of the relaxed metric. As opposed to this reversible type of change, plasticity means an irreversible change in the relaxed metric, and is describable via a plastic change rate tensor. The relat...

  10. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  11. Energetic utilization of dietary fiber in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnen, M.M.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The energetic utilization of fermentable dietary fiber (fDF) of different fiber sources and its relation to physical activity and housing conditions was studied in three experiments. In all experiments the daily intake of digestible nutrients, nitrogen and energy balances, heat production, and activ

  12. Energetics of the Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John A.

    1983-01-01

    The use of semiconductors as electrodes for electrochemistry requires an understanding of both solid-state physics and electrochemistry, since phenomena associated with both disciplines are seen in semiconductor/electrolyte systems. The interfacial energetics of these systems are discussed. (JN)

  13. Energetics of geostrophic adjustment in rotating flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Fang; Rongsheng, Wu

    2002-09-01

    Energetics of geostrophic adjustment in rotating flow is examined in detail with a linear shallow water model. The initial unbalanced flow considered first falls tinder two classes. The first is similar to that adopted by Gill and is here referred to as a mass imbalance model, for the flow is initially motionless but with a sea surface displacement. The other is the same as that considered by Rossby and is referred to as a momentum imbalance model since there is only a velocity perturbation in the initial field. The significant feature of the energetics of geostrophic adjustment for the above two extreme models is that although the energy conversion ratio has a large case-to-case variability for different initial conditions, its value is bounded below by 0 and above by 1 / 2. Based on the discussion of the above extreme models, the energetics of adjustment for an arbitrary initial condition is investigated. It is found that the characteristics of the energetics of geostrophic adjustment mentioned above are also applicable to adjustment of the general unbalanced flow under the condition that the energy conversion ratio is redefined as the conversion ratio between the change of kinetic energy and potential energy of the deviational fields.

  14. ENERGETIC CHARGE OF AN INFORMATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova T.M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Main laws of technical thermodynamics are universal and could be applied to processes other than thermodynamic ones. The results of the comparison of peculiarities of irreversible informational and thermodynamic processes are presented in the article and a new term “Infopy” is used. A more precise definition of “infopy” as an energetic charge is given in the article.

  15. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Alper, B.; Berk, H. L.; Borba, D. N.; Breizman, B. N.; Challis, C. D.; Classen, I.G.J.; Edlund, E. M.; Eriksson, J.; Fasoli, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Gassner, T.; Ghantous, K.; Goloborodko, V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hacquin, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hellesen, C.; Kiptily, V. G.; Kramer, G. J.; Lauber, P.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Nabais, F.; Nazikian, R.; Nyqvist, R.; Osakabe, M.; C. Perez von Thun,; Pinches, S. D.; Podesta, M.; Porkolab, M.; Shinohara, K.; Schoepf, K.; Todo, Y.; Toi, K.; VanZeeland, M. A.; Voitsekhovich, I.; White, R. B.; Yavorskij, V.; ITPA EP TG Contributors,; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfvén instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discus

  16. Major minority: energetic particles in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breizman, B. N.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes advances made in the field of energetic-particle physics since the topical review of Alfvén eigenmode observations in toroidal plasmas (Wong 1999 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 R1-R56). The development of plasma confinement scenarios with reversed magnetic shear and significant population of energetic particles, and the development of novel energetic-particle diagnostics were the main milestones in the past decade, and these are the main experimental subjects of this review. The theory of Alfvén cascade eigenmodes in reversed-shear tokamaks and its use in magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy are presented. Based on experimental observations and nonlinear theory of energetic-particle instabilities in the near-threshold regime, the frequency-sweeping events for spontaneously formed phase-space holes and clumps and the evolution of the fishbone oscillations are described. The multi-mode scenarios of enhanced particle transport are discussed and a brief summary is given of several engaging research topics that are beyond the authors' direct involvement.

  17. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dunwei Wang; Stafford Sheehan; Sa Zhou; Yongjing Lin; Xiaohua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews...

  18. Compatibility testing of energetic materials, which technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, W.P.C. de; Schrader, M.A.; Steen, A.C. van der

    1999-01-01

    Compatibility is an important safety aspect related to the production and storage of energetic materials. To test different combinations of materials a simple test method with clear criteria is advisable. At the last ESTAC the use of microcalorimetry and the vacuum stability test for the

  19. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  20. Global Energetics of Large Solar Eruptive Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Emslie, A. G.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moore, C. S.; Share, G. H.; Shih, A. Y.; Vourlidas, A.; Welsch, B.

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated the energetics of the larger solar eruptive events recorded with a variety of spacecraft instruments between February 2002 and December 2006. All of the energetically important components of the flares and of the accompanying coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles have been evaluated as accurately as the observations allow. These components include the following : (1) the total energy in the high temperature plasma determined from the RHESSI thermal X-ray observations; (2) the total energies in accelerated electrons above 20 keV and ions above 1 MeV from RHESSI hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations, respectively; (3) the potential and kinetic energies of the CME from SOHO/LASCO observations; (4) the solar energetic particle (SEP) energy estimates from in situ measurements on ACE, GOES, and SOHO; (5) the total radiated energy from the SORCEITSI measurements where available, and otherwise from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The results are assimilated and discussed relative to the probable amount of non potential magnetic energy estimated to be available in the flaring active regions from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms.

  1. Energetic utilisation of refuse derived fuels from landfill mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheut, Martin; Quicker, Peter

    2017-02-19

    The residence of municipal solid waste within a landfill body results in a significant change of material properties. Experiences with the energetic utilisation of the burnable fractions from formerly landfilled waste are hardly documented, the influence of refuse derived fuels (RDF) from such materials on the performance of modern waste-to-energy plants is not sufficiently described in scientific literature. Therefore this study focuses on the energetic utilisation of refuse derived fuel from landfilled waste, processed in a mechanical waste treatment facility, and the impact of the material on the operation of the incineration plant. Additionally, the possibility of direct combustion of non-pre-treated excavated landfill material has been evaluated in the same facility. First, sampling and analysis of the fuel has been carried out. Based on this, a large-scale combustion experiment was planned and conducted in an industrial waste-to-energy plant. Steam mass flow rate, concentration of harmful substances in the raw gas, as well as total emissions of the facility have been monitored in detail. Furthermore, the influence of the landfilled material on the additive consumption has been determined. The combustion residues (bottom ash) were also sampled and analysed. Based on the evaluation of operating data and analysis of both fuel and residue, suitable thermal treatment approaches for the refuse-derived fuel and the non-pre-treated excavated material have been assessed.

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF ENERGETIC HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD PULSARS WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, D.; Abdo, A. A. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Kerr, M.; Den Hartog, P. R.; Romani, R. W.; Watters, K.; Craig, H. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); DeCesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gotthelf, E. V.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Kaspi, V. M.; Livingstone, M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Burgay, M. [INAF-Cagliari Astronomical Observatory, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Freire, P. C. C., E-mail: dmnparent@gmail.com, E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2011-12-20

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations from the high-magnetic-field rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119-6127 using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve of PSR J1119-6127 shows a single, wide peak offset from the radio peak by 0.43 {+-} 0.02 in phase. Spectral analysis suggests a power law of index 1.0 {+-} 0.3{sup +0.4}{sub -0.2} with an energy cutoff at 0.8 {+-} 0.2{sup +2.0}{sub -0.5} GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We discuss the emission models of PSR J1119-6127 and demonstrate that despite the object's high surface magnetic field-near that of magnetars-the field strength and structure in the {gamma}-ray emitting zone are apparently similar to those of typical young pulsars. Additionally, we present upper limits on the {gamma}-ray pulsed emission for the magnetically active PSR J1846-0258 in the supernova remnant Kesteven 75 and two other energetic high-B pulsars, PSRs J1718-3718 and J1734-3333. We explore possible explanations for the non-detection of these three objects, including peculiarities in their emission geometry.

  3. Observations of Energetic High Magnetic Field Pulsars with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Parent, D; Hartog, P R Den; Baring, M G; DeCesar, M E; Espinoza, C M; Gotthelf, E V; Harding, A K; Johnston, S; Kaspi, V M; Livingstone, M; Romani, R W; Stappers, B W; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Abdo, A A; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; Craig, H A; Freire, P C C; Giordano, F; Guillemot, L; Hobbs, G; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Noutsos, A; Possenti, A; Smith, D A

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from the high-magnetic-field rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119-6127 using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1119-6127 shows a single, wide peak offset from the radio peak by 0.43 pm 0.02 in phase. Spectral analysis suggests a power law of index 1.0 pm 0.3 with an energy cut-off at 0.8 pm 0.2 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We discuss the emission models of PSR J1119-6127 and demonstrate that despite the object's high surface magnetic field---near that of magnetars---the field strength and structure in the gamma-ray emitting zone are apparently similar to those of typical young pulsars. Additionally, we present upper limits on the \\gam-ray pulsed emission for the magnetically active PSR J1846-0258 in the supernova remnant Kesteven 75 and two other energetic high-B pulsars, PSRs J1718-3718 and J1734-3333. We explore possible explanations for the non-detection of these three objects, ...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of GAP/BAMO copolymers applied at high energetic composite propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bernt Kempa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of these studies was the synthesis and characterization of new energetic binders and their use in some propellant formulations. Following the working plan elaborated, the synthesis and characterization of the following compounds has been done successfully:• GAP;• energetic Monomer BAMO;• energetic Binders;• copolymer GAP/PolyBAMO.The scale up for the synthesis of copolymer GAP/PolyBAMO and PolyBAMO using GAP as initiator has been done and they were fully characterized by IR, (¹H, ¹³C NMR-spectroscopy, GPC, elemental analysis, OH-functionality, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and sensitivity tests (friction, impact. For this two scale up synthesis some propellant formulations were carried out and the results of mechanical and burning properties have been compared with GAP propellants.

  5. The development of agro-residue densified fuel in China based on energetics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longjian; Xing, Li; Han, Lujia

    2010-05-01

    Agro-residue is one of the important biomass resources in China and its efficient utilization is crucial for providing bio-energy, releasing risk of environmental pollution, and enhancing rural incomes. Densification is one of the important utilization routes of agro-residues. The objective of this paper is to explore the development of agro-residue densified fuel in China based on energetics analysis. The energetical property and energy potential of main agro-residues in China were firstly analyzed and then the development of agro-residue densified fuel in every region was evaluated based on energetics analysis. The results show that the main agro-residues in China are good feedstocks as densified fuel and they constitute enormous energy potential for developing densified fuel. However, the situation of every region should be considered for the development of agro-residue densified fuel. The primary energy embodied per unit of useful energy indicates that most of the regions in China are suitable for developing agro-residue densified fuel as it is energetically advantageous compared with coal, whereas only about 25% of regions near coal production locations are not suitable as they are less energetically advantageous.

  6. Modeling the Reactions of Energetic Materials in the Condensed Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Lewis, J P

    2003-12-03

    High explosive (HE) materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Although the history of HE materials is long, condensed-phase properties are poorly understood. Understanding the condensed-phase properties of HE materials is important for determining stability and performance. Information regarding HE material properties (for example, the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of the constituents in plastic-bonded explosive, or PBX, formulations) is necessary in efficiently building the next generation of explosives as the quest for more powerful energetic materials (in terms of energy per volume) moves forward. In addition, understanding the reaction mechanisms has important ramifications in disposing of such materials safely and cheaply, as there exist vast stockpiles of HE materials with corresponding contamination of earth and groundwater at these sites, as well as a military testing sites The ability to model chemical reaction processes in condensed phase energetic materials is rapidly progressing. Chemical equilibrium modeling is a mature technique with some limitations. Progress in this area continues, but is hampered by a lack of knowledge of condensed phase reaction mechanisms and rates. Atomistic modeling is much more computationally intensive, and is currently limited to very short time scales. Nonetheless, this methodology promises to yield the first reliable insights into the condensed phase processes responsible for high explosive detonation. Further work is necessary to extend the timescales involved in atomistic simulations. Recent work in implementing thermostat methods appropriate to shocks may promise to overcome some of these difficulties. Most current work on energetic material reactivity assumes that electronically adiabatic processes dominate. The role of excited states is becoming clearer, however. These states are not accessible in perfect

  7. Energetics of the protein-DNA-water interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marabotti Anna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the energetics of the interaction between protein and DNA we analyzed 39 crystallographically characterized complexes with the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions computational model. HINT is an empirical free energy force field based on solvent partitioning of small molecules between water and 1-octanol. Our previous studies on protein-ligand complexes demonstrated that free energy predictions were significantly improved by taking into account the energetic contribution of water molecules that form at least one hydrogen bond with each interacting species. Results An initial correlation between the calculated HINT scores and the experimentally determined binding free energies in the protein-DNA system exhibited a relatively poor r2 of 0.21 and standard error of ± 1.71 kcal mol-1. However, the inclusion of 261 waters that bridge protein and DNA improved the HINT score-free energy correlation to an r2 of 0.56 and standard error of ± 1.28 kcal mol-1. Analysis of the water role and energy contributions indicate that 46% of the bridging waters act as linkers between amino acids and nucleotide bases at the protein-DNA interface, while the remaining 54% are largely involved in screening unfavorable electrostatic contacts. Conclusion This study quantifies the key energetic role of bridging waters in protein-DNA associations. In addition, the relevant role of hydrophobic interactions and entropy in driving protein-DNA association is indicated by analyses of interaction character showing that, together, the favorable polar and unfavorable polar/hydrophobic-polar interactions (i.e., desolvation mostly cancel.

  8. Compatibility testing of energetic materials at TNO-PML and MIAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam-La Haye, E.L.M.; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Miszczak, M.; Szymanowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Compatibility is an important property for energetic materials and their additives such as a casing material or a binder. If these substances are incompatible an extra risk is introduced in handling and storage of ammunition and explosives. As part of a co-operation program between the Dutch TNO-PML

  9. Energetics of Brazilian ethanol: Comparison between assessment approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Triana, Carlos Ariel, E-mail: carlos.ramirez.triana@gmail.com [Faculty of Bussiness Administration, Economics and Accounting, Politecnico Grancolombiano, Calle 57 3-00 Este, Bogota, Postal Code 110231 (Colombia)

    2011-08-15

    As with any other bioenergy product, bioethanol production requires fossil fuel inputs; hence the alleged benefits of energy security and carbon mitigation depend on the extent to which these inputs are capable of drawing a substantive bioenergetic yield. Brazilian ethanol, made out of sugarcane, has been reported as the most efficient gasoline substitute that is commercially available nowadays. For that reason it has been the object of several analyses on the energetics, i.e. energy balances. These studies surprisingly vary widely according with the scholar approach and are not fully comparable among them due to divergences in the assessment method. This paper standardises results of the four most prominent authors in the field, establishing a point of comparison and drawing some light on the energetics studies on biofuels. The main result is shown in , which homogenises the outcomes for referred studies in terms of unit of assessment in the energy input analysis. Subsequently, this information is also charted () explaining the source of divergence among authors. This work ends with a short reference and comparison to some energy balance studies carried out on feedstocks of diverse nature, highlighting the potential that sugarcane-based bioethanol represents nowadays. - Highlights: > Distribution stage could reduce energy ratio but its contribution is not significant. > In Pimentel and Patzek there is an evident impact of the industrial stage. > A coincidence across the studies was the major impact of the agricultural stage. > Brazilian technology to produce ethanol was proved the most energy efficient one.

  10. Energetic statistics of Baleares Islands in 1993. Estatistiques energetiques de les Illes Balears 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the energetic and demand. It is focussed to analyze the energetic fuel (natural gas). The environment, and energetic supplies. Statistical data of energetic production, distribution and consumption in 1992 and 1993 are introduced.

  11. Energetic-ion-driven global instabilities in stellarator/helical plasmas and comparison with tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Todo, Yasushi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of energetic-ion-driven global instabilities such as Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) and their impact on energetic ions and bulk plasma is crucially important for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas and in the future for deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma experiments. Various types of global modes and their associated enhanced energetic ion transport are commonly observed in toroidal plasmas. Toroidicity-induced AEs and ellipticity-induced AEs, whose gaps are generated through poloidal mode coupling, are observed in both tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas. Global AEs and reversed shear AEs, where toroidal couplings are not as dominant were also observed in those plasmas. Helicity induced AEs that exist only in 3D plasmas are observed in the large helical device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7 Advanced Stellarator plasmas. In addition, the geodesic acoustic mode that comes from plasma compressibility is destabilized by energetic ions in both tokamak and LHD plasmas. Nonlinear interaction of these modes and their influence on the confinement of the bulk plasma as well as energetic ions are observed in both plasmas. In this paper, the similarities and differences in these instabilities and their consequences for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas are summarized through comparison with the data sets obtained in LHD. In particular, this paper focuses on the differences caused by the rotational transform profile and the 2D or 3D geometrical structure of the plasma equilibrium. Important issues left for future study are listed.

  12. The energetics of nut consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Nuts are a nutrient-rich food group. Depending on the type, they may provide substantive concentrations of Vitamin E, magnesium, folate, essential fatty acids, fiber and protein to the diet. They also contain potentially important phytochemicals. By mechanisms yet to be identified, they are reported to improve postprandial lipid profiles and may hold other health benefits. However, they are also energy dense so a theoretical contributor to positive energy balance and weight gain. However, epidemiological studies have consistently revealed an inverse association between the frequency of nut consumption and BMI. Further, intervention trials demonstrate less than predicted weight gain following inclusion of nuts in the diet. The mechanisms for these observations are currently under study. Candidates include strong satiety effects, promotion of energy expenditure and/or inefficient energy utilization. Recent trials have revealed support for each. Inclusion of nuts in the diet results in strong satiety effects as revealed by robust compensatory dietary responses that offset approximately 65-75% of the energy they provide. Several trials note increased energy expenditure that may account for an additional 10% of their energy yield. Limited bioaccessibility results in a loss of 5-15% of energy. Taken together, these findings largely account for the energy provided by nuts and explain the epidemiological and clinical observations. Thus, current knowledge suggests moderate nut consumption does not pose a threat for weight gain.

  13. Energetics of the AK13 Semi-Local Kohn-Sham Exchange Energy Functional

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmaa, A

    2016-01-01

    The recent non-empirical semi-local exchange functional of Armiento and K\\"ummel, the AK13 [PRL 111, 036402 (2013)] incorporates a number of features reproduced by higher-order theory. The AK13 potential behaves analogously with the discontinuous jump associated with the derivative discontinuity at integer particle numbers. Recent works have established that AK13 gives a qualitatively improved orbital description compared to other semi-local methods, and reproduces a band structure closer to higher-order theory. However, its energies and energetics are inaccurate. The present work further investigates the deficiency in energetics. In addition to AK13 results, we find that applying the local-density approximation (LDA) non-self-consistently on the converged AK13 density gives very reasonable energetics with equilibrium lattice constants and bulk moduli well described across 14 systems. We also confirm that the attractive orbital features of AK13 are retained even after full structural relaxation. Hence, the de...

  14. Kuiper Binary Object Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nazzario, R C; Covington, C; Kagan, D; Hyde, T W

    2005-01-01

    It has been observed that binary Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) exist contrary to theoretical expectations. Their creation presents problems to most current models. However, the inclusion of a third body (for example, one of the outer planets) may provide the conditions necessary for the formation of these objects. The presence of a third massive body not only helps to clear the primordial Kuiper Belt but can also result in long lived binary Kuiper belt objects. The gravitational interaction between the KBOs and the third body causes one of four effects; scattering into the Oort cloud, collisions with the growing protoplanets, formation of binary pairs, or creation of a single Kuiper belt object. Additionally, the initial location of the progenitors of the Kuiper belt objects also has a significant effect on binary formation.

  15. Acceleration and transport of energetic particles from the sun to the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin

    Energetic particles are a major constituent of the heliosphere. They consist of the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), which penetrate the heliosphere from interstellar space, solar energetic particles (SEPs) produced by active regions at the Sun, and numerous populations accelerated within the heliosphere. They extend over the entire energy range from ~ 1 keV/nucleon characteristic of the solar wind to ~ GeV/nucleon energies of the GCRs and the highest energy SEPs. The energetic particle populations are both transient, such as SEPs, and approximately stationary, such as the energetic ions upstream of Earth’s bow shock. Most of these populations are directly or indirectly associated with shock waves, which are ubiquitous in the supersonic solar wind. In addition to the “diffuse,” “intermediate,” and “field aligned beam” distributions upstream of Earth’s bow shock, are similar distributions at the planets with strong magnetic fields, “energetic storm particle” events at interplanetary traveling shocks, and “corotating ion events” at corotating interaction regions in the solar wind. Although the pressure of these energetic particle enhancements is generally small compared with that of the solar wind, their pressure gradients can excite large enhancements of hydromagnetic waves, which in turn increase the rates of particle acceleration. Outstanding issues in shock acceleration are seed particle injection rates, acceleration at nearly perpendicular shocks, and the origin(s) of extreme variability in SEP event intensity. In addition to shocks, magnetic reconnection results in particle acceleration, notably of impulsive SEPs at the Sun, and solar wind compressions or turbulence may be responsible for partial acceleration of the “quiet time” suprathermal ion tails in the solar wind. Of particular current interest are the “termination shock particles” and “anomalous” cosmic rays, which are primarily accelerated at the solar wind termination

  16. Energetic and exergetic Improvement of geothermal single flash cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nazari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed analysis of a new method for improving energetic and exergetic efficiencies of single flash cycle. The thermodynamic process of the new method consists of extracting a fraction of hot wellhead geothermal brine for the purpose of superheating saturated steam entering the turbine. Computer programming scripts were developed and optimized based on mathematical proposed models for the different components of the systems. The operating parameters such as separator temperature, geofluid wellhead enthalpy and geothermal source temperature are varied to investigate their effects on both net power output and turbine exhaust quality of the systems. Also, full exergy assessment was performed for the new design. The results of separator temperature optimization revealed that specific net power output of the new design can be boosted up to 8% and turbine exhaust quality can be diminished up to 50% as compared to common single flash cycle. In addition, for wells with higher discharge enthalpy, superheating process improve specific net power output even up to 10%. Finally, it was observed that the overall system exergy efficiency was approximately raised 3%. Article History: Received January 5th 2016; Received in revised form June 25th 2016; Accepted July 3rd 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Nazari, N. and Porkhial, S. (2016. Energetic and Exergetic Improvement of Geothermal Single Flash Cycle. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(2,129-138. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.2.129-138 

  17. Theoretical studies on energetic materials bearing pentaflurosulphyl (SF5) groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Xiao-Hong; Cui Hong-Ling; Ju Wei-Wei; Li Tong-Wei; Zhang Rui-Zhou; Yong Yong-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Heats of formation (HOF) for a series of energetic materials containing SF5 group were studied by density functional theory. Results show that HOFs increase with the augmention of field effects of substituted groups. Addition of furazan or furoxan ring increases HOF of the energetic materials. All the SF5-containing compounds have densities which are ∼0.19 g/cm3 higher than those containing -NH2 group. S-F bond is the trigger bond for the thermolysis process in the title compounds and bond dissociation energies of the weakest bonds range from 351.1 to 388.3 kJ/mol. Detonation velocities (D) and pressures (P) are evaluated by Kamlet-Jacobs equations with the calculated densities and HOFs. Results show that increasing the amount of furazan rings results in a larger D and P. Considering the detonation performance and thermal stability, eight compounds may be considered as potential candidates for high-energy density materials.

  18. Energetics of nonequilibrium solidification in Al-Sm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S. H.; Napolitano, R. E.

    2008-11-01

    Solution-based thermodynamic modeling, aided by first-principles calculations, is employed here to examine phase transformations in the Al-Sm binary system which may give rise to product phases that are metastable or have a composition that deviates substantially from equilibrium. In addition to describing the pure undercooled Al liquid with a two-state model that accounts for structural ordering, thermodynamic descriptions of the fcc phase, and intermediate compounds ( Al4Sm-β , Al11Sm3-α , Al3Sm-δ , and Al2Sm-σ ) are reanalyzed using special quasirandom structure and first-principles calculations. The possible phase compositions are presented over a range of temperatures using a “Baker-Cahn” analysis of the energetics of solidification and compared with reports of rapid solidification. The energetics associated with varying degrees of chemical partitioning are quantified and compared with experimental observations of the metastable Al11Sm3-α primary phase and reports of amorphous solids.

  19. Potential energetic effects of mountain climbers on foraging grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.; Kendall, K.C.; Picton, H.D.

    1999-01-01

    Most studies of the effects of human disturbance on grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) have not quantified the energetic effects of such interactions. In this study, we characterized activity budgets of adult grizzly bears as they foraged on aggregations of adult army cutworm moths (Euxoa auxiliaris) in the alpine of Glacier National Park, Montana, during 1992, 1994, and 1995. We compared the activity budgets of climber-disturbed bears to those of undisturbed bears to estimate the energetic impact of climber disturbance. When bears detected climbers, they subsequently spent 53% less time foraging on moths, 52% more time moving within the foraging area, and 23% more time behaving aggressively, compared to when they were not disturbed. We estimated that grizzly bears could consume approximately 40,000 moths/day or 1,700 moths/hour. At 0.44 kcal/moth, disruption of moth feeding cost bears approximately 12 kcal/minute in addition to the energy expended in evasive maneuvers and defensive behaviors. To reduce both climber interruption of bear foraging and the potential for aggressive bear-human encounters, we recommend routing climbers around moth sites used by bears or limiting access to these sites during bear-use periods.

  20. Energetic protons from a disappearing solar filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S.W.; Cliver, E.W.; Cane, R.E.; McGuire, H.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A solar energetic (E> 50MeV) particle (SEP) event observed at 1 AU began about 1500 UT on 1981 December 5. This event was associated with a fast coronal mass ejection observed with the Solwind coronagraph on the P78-1 satellite. No metric type II or type IV burst was observed, but a weak interplanetary type II burst was observed with the low-frequency radio experimentation ISEE-3 satellite. The mass ejection was associated with the eruption of a large solar quiescent filament that lay well away from any active regions. The eruption resulted in a H-alpha double-ribbon structure which straddled the magnetic inversion line. No impulsive phase was obvious in either the H-alpha or the microwave observations. The event indicates that neither a detectable impulsive phase nor a strong or complex magnetic field is necessary for the production of energetic ions.

  1. Mitochondrial network energetics in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aon, Miguel A; Cortassa, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    At the core of eukaryotic aerobic life, mitochondrial function like 'hubs' in the web of energetic and redox processes in cells. In the heart, these networks-extending beyond the complex connectivity of biochemical circuit diagrams and apparent morphology-exhibit collective dynamics spanning several spatiotemporal levels of organization, from the cell, to the tissue, and the organ. The network function of mitochondria, i.e., mitochondrial network energetics, represents an advantageous behavior. Its coordinated action, under normal physiology, provides robustness despite failure in a few nodes, and improves energy supply toward a swiftly changing demand. Extensive diffuse loops, encompassing mitochondrial-cytoplasmic reaction/transport networks, control and regulate energy supply and demand in the heart. Under severe energy crises, the network behavior of mitochondria and associated glycolytic and other metabolic networks collapse, thereby triggering fatal arrhythmias.

  2. Formation of energetic materials using supercritical fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teipel, U.; Kroeber, H.; Krause, H.H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Pfinztal (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    A new field of applications of compressed gases is the formation of solid particles with well-defined properties, e.g. the particle size, the particle size distribution, the particle shape, the specific surface area and free of solvent inclusions. It is possible to process moderately solids like energetic materials which are difficult to comminute due to their sensitivity to mechanical or thermal stress. The characteristics of compressed gases allow to vary the morphology of solid particles in a wide range. A pilot plant is presented, which has been built to prepare fine particles by the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS process) and precipitation by a compressed fluid antisolvent (PCA process). In this contribution the micronization of different energetic materials by the RESS and PCA processes will be under investigation. (orig.)

  3. HAWC and Solar Energetic Transient Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, A.; Ryan, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC's primary purpose is the study of both galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. The HAWC instrument will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors whose counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site ( ˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effect of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic rays, known as Forbush Decreases (FDs). The Milagro experiment, the HAWC predecessor, successfully observed GLEs and the HAWC engineering array "VAMOS" already observed a FD. HAWC will be sensitive to γ rays and neutrons produced during large solar flares. In this work, we present the instrument and discuss its capability to observe solar energetic events. i. e., flares and CMEs.

  4. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  5. Energetic oxygen atom material degradation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study designed to test potential Shuttle surface materials for the extents of degradation and mass loss expected to be suffered in space from the velocity impacts of ambient oxygen atoms, a novel technique was developed for generation of a high flux of energetic oxygen atoms. The generation technique involves laser-induced breakdown of molecular oxygen followed by a rapid expansion of energetic oxygen atoms. The high-velocity streams developed in an evacuated hypersonic nozzle have average O-atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s, with an estimated total production of 10 to the 18th atoms per pulse over pulse durations of several microseconds. Results on preliminary material degradation tests conducted with this test facility have been reported by Caledonia et al. (1987). Diagrams of the experimental setup are included.

  6. Energetics of nanocrystalline TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, M. R.; Navrotsky, A.; Zhang, H. Z.; Banfield, J. F.; Elder, S. H.; Zaban, A.; Borse, P. H.; Kulkarni, S. K.; Doran, G. S.; Whitfield, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    The energetics of the TiO2 polymorphs (rutile, anatase, and brookite) were studied by high temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry. Relative to bulk rutile, bulk brookite is 0.71 ± 0.38 kJ/mol (6) and bulk anatase is 2.61 ± 0.41 kJ/mol higher in enthalpy. The surface enthalpies of rutile, brookite, and anatase are 2.2 ± 0.2 J/m2, 1.0 ± 0.2 J/m2, and 0.4 ± 0.1 J/m2, respectively. The closely balanced energetics directly confirm the crossover in stability of nanophase polymorphs inferred by Zhang and Banfield (7). An amorphous sample with surface area of 34,600 m2/mol is 24.25 ± 0.88 kJ/mol higher in enthalpy than bulk rutile. PMID:11880610

  7. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets.

  8. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, S E; Berk, H L; Borba, D N; Breizman, B N; Challis, C D; Classen, I G J; Edlund, E M; Eriksson, J; Fasoli, A; Fredrickson, E D; Fu, G Y; Garcia-Munoz, M; Gassner, T; Ghantous, K; Goloborodko, V; Gorelenkov, N N; Gryaznevich, M P; Hacquin, S; Heidbrink, W W; Hellesen, C; Kiptily, V G; Kramer, G J; Lauber, P; Lilley, M K; Lisak, M; Nabais, F; Nazikian, R; Nyqvist, R; Osakabe, M; von Thun, C Perez; Pinches, S D; Podesta, M; Porkolab, M; Shinohara, K; Schoepf, K; Todo, Y; Toi, K; Van Zeeland, M A; Voitsekhovich, I; White, R B; Yavorskij, V; TG, ITPA EP; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfven instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discusses progress in interpreting the observed phenomena. A multi-machine comparison is presented giving information on the performance of both diagnostics and modelling tools for different plasma conditions outlining expectations for ITER based on our present knowledge.

  9. Energetics of nearby stellar bow shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, Paula

    2012-01-01

    The latest survey of stellar bow shocks (Peri et al. 2012) lists 28 candidates detected at IR wavelengths, associated with massive, early-type stars up to 3 kpc, along with the geometrical parameters of the structures found. I present here some considerations on the energetics involved, after the estimation of stellar wind power, infrared flux, stellar bolometric luminosity and radio flux limits for each source. The best candidates for relativistic particle acceleration are highlighted.

  10. Energetic Particles Dynamics in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Ryou, A.S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Alexeev, I. I.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the drift paths of energetic particles in Mercury's magnetosphere by tracing their motion through a model magnetic field. Test particle simulations solving the full Lorentz force show a quasi-trapped energetic particle population that gradient and curvature drift around the planet via "Shabansky" orbits, passing though high latitudes in the compressed dayside by equatorial latitudes on the nightside. Due to their large gyroradii, energetic H+ and Na+ ions will typically collide with the planet or the magnetopause and will not be able to complete a full drift orbit. These simulations provide direct comparison for recent spacecraft measurements from MESSENGER. Mercury's offset dipole results in an asymmetric loss cone and therefore an asymmetry in particle precipitation with more particles precipitating in the southern hemisphere. Since the planet lacks an atmosphere, precipitating particles will collide directly with the surface of the planet. The incident charged particles can kick up neutrals from the surface and have implications for the formation of the exosphere and weathering of the surface

  11. Calculation of the energetics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Harding, L.B.; Shepard, R.L.; Harrison, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    To calculate the energetics of chemical reactions we must solve the electronic Schroedinger equation for the molecular conformations of importance for the reactive encounter. Substantial changes occur in the electronic structure of a molecular system as the reaction progresses from reactants through the transition state to products. To describe these changes, our approach includes the following three elements: the use of multiconfiguration self-consistent field wave functions to provide a consistent zero-order description of the electronic structure of the reactants, transition state, and products; the use of configuration interaction techniques to describe electron correlation effects needed to provide quantitative predictions of the reaction energetics; and the use of large, optimized basis sets to provide the flexibility needed to describe the variations in the electronic distributions. With this approach we are able to study reactions involving as many as 5--6 atoms with errors of just a few kcal/mol in the predicted reaction energetics. Predictions to chemical accuracy, i.e., to 1 kcal/mol or less, are not yet feasible, although continuing improvements in both the theoretical methodology and computer technology suggest that this will soon be possible, at least for reactions involving small polyatomic species. 4 figs.

  12. Sol-Gel Manufactured Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2005-05-17

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  13. Energetic particle investigation using the ERNE instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Torsti

    Full Text Available During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, nuclei and electrons accelerated to high energies are injected into interplanetary space. These accelerated particles can be detected at the SOHO satellite by the ERNE instrument. From the data produced by the instrument, it is possible to identify the particles and to calculate their energy and direction of propagation. Depending on variable coronal/interplanetary conditions, different kinds of effects on the energetic particle transport can be predicted. The problems of interest include, for example, the effects of particle properties (mass, charge, energy, and propagation direction on the particle transport, the particle energy changes in the transport process, and the effects the energetic particles have on the solar-wind plasma. The evolution of the distribution function of the energetic particles can be measured with ERNE to a better accuracy than ever before. This gives us the opportunity to contribute significantly to the modeling of interplanetary transport and acceleration. Once the acceleration/transport bias has been removed, the acceleration-site abundance of elements and their isotopes can be studied in detail and compared with spectroscopic observations.

  14. Radiation Hydrodynamics Modeling of Hohlraum Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Ogden S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to model the energetics in NIF Hohlraums have been made with varying degrees of success, with discrepancies of 0-25% being reported for the X-ray flux (10-25% for the NIC ignition platform hohlraums). To better understand the cause(s) of these discrepancies, the effects of uncertainties in modeling thermal conduction, laser-plasma interactions, atomic mixing at interfaces, and NLTE kinetics of the high-Z wall plasma must be quantified. In this work we begin by focusing on the NLTE kinetics component. We detail a simulation framework for developing an integrated HYDRA hohlraum model with predefined tolerances for energetics errors due to numerical discretization errors or statistical fluctuations. Within this framework we obtain a model for a converged 1D spherical hohlraum which is then extended to 2D. The new model is used to reexamine physics sensitivities and improve estimates of the energetics discrepancy. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Fundamental energetic limits of radio communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudais, Jean-Yves

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of the energy consumption of a radiocommunication requires to analyse the life cycle of the elements used. However, this analysis does not specify the energetic limits. Theoretical approaches allow one to draw these limits, which are known in multiple cases of information transmission. However, the answers are not always satisfactory, in particular in the case of time-varying channels. After a brief presentation of the notion of energetic limits of a radiocommunication, and beginning with a global approach, we show that, contrary to the published results, the energetic limits always differ from zero if the physical constraints are correctly expressed. xml:lang="fr" Cependant, les réponses ne sont pas toujours satisfaisantes, particulièrement dans le cas de canaux variants dans le temps. Après une rapide présentation des notions d'énergie limite d'une radiocommunication, et en commençant par une approche globale du problème, nous montrons que, contrairement aux résultats publiés, les limites énergétiques sont toujours différentes de zéro si les contraintes physiques sont correctement exprimées.

  16. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Regents of the University of Michigan; Lu, Wei [Regents of the University of Michigan

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  17. Mammalian energetics. Flexible energetics of cheetah hunting strategies provide resistance against kleptoparasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantlebury, David M; Mills, Michael G L; Wilson, Rory P; Wilson, John W; Mills, Margaret E J; Durant, Sarah M; Bennett, Nigel C; Bradford, Peter; Marks, Nikki J; Speakman, John R

    2014-10-03

    Population viability is driven by individual survival, which in turn depends on individuals balancing energy budgets. As carnivores may function close to maximum sustained power outputs, decreased food availability or increased activity may render some populations energetically vulnerable. Prey theft may compromise energetic budgets of mesopredators, such as cheetahs and wild dogs, which are susceptible to competition from larger carnivores. We show that daily energy expenditure (DEE) of cheetahs was similar to size-based predictions and positively related to distance traveled. Theft at 25% only requires cheetahs to hunt for an extra 1.1 hour per day, increasing DEE by just 12%. Therefore, not all mesopredators are energetically constrained by direct competition. Other factors that increase DEE, such as those that increase travel, may be more important for population viability. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Mammalian energetics. Instantaneous energetics of puma kills reveal advantage of felid sneak attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Terrie M; Wolfe, Lisa; Davis, Tracy; Kendall, Traci; Richter, Beau; Wang, Yiwei; Bryce, Caleb; Elkaim, Gabriel Hugh; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2014-10-03

    Pumas (Puma concolor) live in diverse, often rugged, complex habitats. The energy they expend for hunting must account for this complexity but is difficult to measure for this and other large, cryptic carnivores. We developed and deployed a physiological SMART (species movement, acceleration, and radio tracking) collar that used accelerometry to continuously monitor energetics, movements, and behavior of free-ranging pumas. This felid species displayed marked individuality in predatory activities, ranging from low-cost sit-and-wait behaviors to constant movements with energetic costs averaging 2.3 times those predicted for running mammals. Pumas reduce these costs by remaining cryptic and precisely matching maximum pouncing force (overall dynamic body acceleration = 5.3 to 16.1g) to prey size. Such instantaneous energetics help to explain why most felids stalk and pounce, and their analysis represents a powerful approach for accurately forecasting resource demands required for survival by large, mobile predators.

  19. Disposal of energetic materials by alkaline pressure hydrolysis and combined techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunte, G.; Krause, H.H.; Hirth, T. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Pfinztal-Berghausen (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Due to the reduction of armament and especially due to the German reunification we are met by objective of the diposal of energetic materials. Environmentally friendly disposal methods available for the different propellants, explosives and pyrotechnics are urgently needed. The main component of gun and rocket propellants is the energetic polymer nitrocellulose. One method to dispose nitrocellulose containing propellants is the combination of rapid chemical destruction by pressure hydrolysis and the biological degradation of the reaction mixture. The study describes the results of pressure hydrolysis of different gun and rocket propellants. Under alkaline conditions (propellant to NaOH ratio 2.3:1; reaction temperature 150 C; pressure below 30 bar) biological degradable reaction products were formed. The main products in the liquid phase were simple mono- and dicarboxylic acids. Dependent on the reaction conditions 30-50% of the nitrogen content of the propellants was transformed to nitrite and nitrate. The gaseous nitrogen containing products were N{sub 2} (16-46%), N{sub 2}O (2-23%), NO{sub x} (0-5%). Overall 40%-60% of the propellant nitrogen was transformed to gaseous products. In the solid residues a nitrogen content between 2% and 9% was found. The residues were mostly due to additives used in propellant manufacturing. In the case of nitrocellulose pressure hydrolysis below 30 bar and reaction temperature about 150 C are sufficient. (orig.) [Deutsch] Nicht zuletzt aufgrund der in den letzten Jahren erfolgten Abruestungsmassnahmen sowie auch der Wiedervereinigung beider deutscher Staaten ergab sich die Problematik der Entsorgung von energetischen Materialien. Alternativ zur Verbrennung besteht Bedarf an der Entwicklung von Entsorgungsverfahren, die eine umweltfreundliche Entsorgung von Treibladungspulvern, Raketenfesttreibstoffen oder pyrotechnischen Komponenten ermoeglichen. Eine interessante Methode zur Beseitigung von auf Nitrocellulose basierenden

  20. Dose spectra from energetic particles and neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Bancroft, Chris; Bloser, Peter; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James; Smith, Sonya; Spence, Harlan; Mazur, Joe; Zeitlin, Cary

    2013-10-01

    spectra from energetic particles and neutrons (DoSEN) are an early-stage space technology research project that combines two advanced complementary radiation detection concepts with fundamental advantages over traditional dosimetry. DoSEN measures not only the energy but also the charge distribution (including neutrons) of energetic particles that affect human (and robotic) health in a way not presently possible with current dosimeters. For heavy ions and protons, DoSEN provides a direct measurement of the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra behind shielding material. For LET measurements, DoSEN contains stacks of thin-thick Si detectors similar in design to those used for the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation. With LET spectra, we can now directly break down the observed spectrum of radiation into its constituent heavy-ion components and through biologically based quality factors that provide not only doses and dose rates but also dose equivalents, associated rates, and even organ doses. DoSEN also measures neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV, which requires enough sensitive mass to fully absorb recoil particles that the neutrons produce. DoSEN develops the new concept of combining these independent measurements and using the coincidence of LET measurements and neutron detection to significantly reduce backgrounds in each measurement. The background suppression through the use of coincidence allows for significant reductions in size, mass, and power needed to provide measurements of dose, neutron dose, dose equivalents, LET spectra, and organ doses. Thus, we introduce the DoSEN concept: a promising low-mass instrument that detects the full spectrum of energetic particles, heavy ions, and neutrons to determine biological impact of radiation in space.

  1. Solar Energetic Particle Studies with PAMELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravar, U.; Christian, E. R.; deNolfo, Georgia; Ryan, J. M.; Stochaj, S.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the high-energy solar energetic particles (SEPs) may conceivably be found in composition signatures that reflect the elemental abundances of the low corona and chromosphere vs. the high corona and solar wind. The presence of secondaries, such as neutrons and positrons, could indicate a low coronal origin of these particles. Velocity dispersion of different species and over a wide energy range can be used to determine energetic particle release times at the Sun. Together with multi-wavelength imaging, in- situ observations of a variety of species, and coverage over a wide energy range provide a critical tool in identifying the origin of SEPs, understanding the evolution of these events within the context of solar active regions, and constraining the acceleration mechanisms at play. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA)instrument, successfully launched in 2006 and expected to remain operational until at least the beginning of 2012, measures energetic particles in the same energy range as ground-based neutron monitors, and lower energies as well. It thus bridges the gap between low energy in-situ observations and ground-based Ground Level Enhancements (GLE) observations. It can measure the charge (up to Z=6) and atomic number of the detected particles, and it can identify and measure positrons and detect neutrons-an unprecedented array of data channels that we can bring to bear on the origin of high-energy SEPs. We present prelimiary results on the for the 2006 December 13 solar flare and GLE and the 2011 March 21 solar flare, both registering proton and helium enhancements in PAMELA. Together with multi- spacecraft contextual data and modeling, we discuss the PAMELA results in the context of the different acceleration mechanisms at play.

  2. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  3. Energetics of Synchronization in Coupled Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Izumida, Yuki; Seifert, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the energetics of synchronization in coupled oscillators by unifying the nonequilibrium aspects with the nonlinear dynamics via stochastic thermodynamics. We derive a concise and universal expression of the energy dissipation rate using nonlinear-dynamics quantities characterizing synchronization, and elucidate how synchronization/desynchronization between the oscillators affects it. We apply our theory to hydrodynamically-coupled Stokes spheres rotating on circular trajectories that may be interpreted as the simplest model of synchronization of coupled oscillators in a biological system, revealing that the oscillators gain the ability to do more work on the surrounding fluid as the degree of phase synchronization increases.

  4. The energetic potential of bioethanol in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Károly Lakatos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The basis of the bioethanol production is the agriculture, mostly the corn and wheat growing. With the analysis of their domesticharvest results, the process of the starch formation and the chemical-thermodynamical processes of the alcohol’s fermantation,we calculate the annual amount of the producible bioethanol on average and it’s energy. We determine the specific values of the CO2cycle. We examine the energetic possibilities of total substitution of the 2 billion litres of domestic petrol consumption with bioethanol.

  5. The Energetic Particle Experiment (EPE) on THOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Vainio, Rami; Steinhagen, Jan

    2016-07-01

    THOR is one of the remaining three candidate mission for ESA's M4 launch in 2026. The Energetic Particle Experiment (EPE) will measure electrons (ions) from 20 keV (20 keV/nuc) to 700 keV (20 MeV) with excellent pitch-angle resolution and a very high cadence. This will allow us to understand how turbulence dissipates and how particles are energized in this process, thus shedding light on this ubiquitous astrophysical process. We will present the design and current status of EPE.

  6. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunwei Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews this exciting new class of materials and covers topics from controlled syntheses to applications in photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and electrical charge storage. Mechanisms responsible for the improved performance are discussed. The prospect of their applications in a broader energy-related field is analyzed.

  7. Environmentally compatible next generation green energetic materials (GEMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talawar, M B; Sivabalan, R; Mukundan, T; Muthurajan, H; Sikder, A K; Gandhe, B R; Rao, A Subhananda

    2009-01-30

    This paper briefly reviews the literature work reported on the environmentally compatible green energetic materials (GEMs) for defence and space applications. Currently, great emphasis is laid in the field of high-energy materials (HEMs) to increase the environmental stewardship along with the deliverance of improved performance. This emphasis is especially strong in the areas of energetic materials, weapon development, processing, and disposal operations. Therefore, efforts are on to develop energetic materials systems under the broad concept of green energetic materials (GEMs) in different schools all over the globe. The GEMs program initiated globally by different schools addresses these challenges and establishes the framework for advances in energetic materials processing and production that promote compliance with environmental regulations. This review also briefs the principles of green chemistry pertaining to HEMs, followed by the work carried out globally on environmentally compatible green energetic materials and allied ingredients.

  8. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  9. Biocidal Energetic Materials for the Destruction of Spore Forming Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-13-52 Biocidal Energetic Materials for the Destruction of Spore Forming Bacteria Distribution Statement A...Z39.18 00-07-2015 Technical N/A Biocidal Energetic Materials for the Destruction of Spore Forming Bacteria HDTRA1-10-1-0108 Emily M. Hunt, Ph.D. West...understand the interaction between spore forming bacteria and thermite reactions and products and to exploit energetic material reactions with

  10. High Strain Rate Experiments of Energetic Material Binder

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel Mendoza, Roberto; Harr, Michael; Chen, Weinong

    2016-01-01

    Energetic materials, in particular HMX, is widely used in many applications as polymer bonded explosives (PBX) and rocket propellant. However, when damaged, HMX is known to be an unstable substance which renders it a hazardous material and in some cases unreliable. Finding critical mechanical conditions at high rates that render various forms of energetic materials as unreliable would be vital to understand the effects that vibrations and compression forces have on energetic materials. A bett...

  11. Functional Object Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raket, Lars Lau

    -effect formulations, where the observed functional signal is assumed to consist of both fixed and random functional effects. This thesis takes the initial steps toward the development of likelihood-based methodology for functional objects. We first consider analysis of functional data defined on high......-dimensional Euclidean spaces under the effect of additive spatially correlated effects, and then move on to consider how to include data alignment in the statistical model as a nonlinear effect under additive correlated noise. In both cases, we will give directions on how to generalize the methodology to more complex...

  12. Sequential electrolytic oxidation and reduction of aqueous phase energetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, David M; Sale, Tom C

    2005-12-01

    Contamination of soils and groundwater with energetic compounds has been documented at many former ammunition manufacturing plants and ranges. Recent research at Colorado State University (CSU) has demonstrated the potential utility of electrolytic degradation of organic compounds using an electrolytic permeable reactive barrier (e-barrier). In principle, an electrolytic approach to degrade aqueous energetic compounds such as hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) can overcome limitations of management strategies that involve solely oxidation or reduction, through sequential oxidation-reduction or reduction-oxidation. The objective of this proof-of-concept research was to evaluate transformation of aqueous phase RDX and TNT in flow-through electrolytic reactors. Laboratory experiments were conducted using six identical column reactors containing porous media and expanded titanium-mixed-metal-oxide electrodes. Three columns tested TNT transformation and three tested RDXtransformation. Electrode sequence was varied between columns and one column for each contaminant acted as a no-voltage control. Over 97% of TNT and 93% of RDX was transformed in the reactors under sequential oxidation-reduction. Significant accumulation of known degradation intermediates was not observed under sequential oxidation-reduction. Removal of approximately 90% of TNT and 40% of RDX was observed under sequential reduction-oxidation. Power requirements on the order of 3 W/m2 were measured during the experiment. This suggests that an in-situ electrolytic approach may be cost-practical for managing groundwater contaminated with explosive compounds.

  13. Energetic cost of active branchial ventilation in the sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, J F; Lomholt, J P

    1983-01-01

    1. Sharksuckers use active branchial ventilation when swimming or at rest in stationary water. When attached to a moving object or when placed in a water current, they shift to ram gill ventilation as water velocity exceeds a certain threshold. 2. Water velocities required for the transition from......, no further increase in oxygen consumption was observed. 5. It is concluded that the energetic cost of active ventilation in sharksuckers is lower than has previously been reported for fish in general....

  14. Using energetic budgets to assess the effects of environmental stress on corals: are we measuring the right things?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, M. P.

    2013-03-01

    Historically, the response of marine invertebrates to their environment, and environmentally induced stress, has included some measurement of their physiology or metabolism. Eventually, this approach developed into comparative energetics and the construction of energetic budgets. More recently, coral reefs, and scleractinian corals in particular, have suffered significant declines due to climate change-related environmental stress. In addition to a number of physiological, biophysical and molecular measurements to assess "coral health," there has been increased use of energetic approaches that have included the measurement of specific biochemical constituents (i.e., lipid concentrations) as a proxy for energy available to assess the potential outcomes of environmental stress on corals. In reading these studies, there appears to be some confusion between energy budgets and carbon budgets. Additionally, many assumptions regarding proximate biochemical composition, metabolic fuel preferences and metabolic quotients have been made, all of which are essential to construct accurate energy budgets and to convert elemental composition (i.e., carbon) to energy equivalents. Additionally, models of energetics such as the metabolic theory of ecology or dynamic energy budgets are being applied to coral physiology and include several assumptions that are not appropriate for scleractinian corals. As we assess the independent and interactive effects of multiple stressors on corals, efforts to construct quantitative energetic budgets should be a priority component of realistic multifactor experiments that would then improve the use of models as predictors of outcomes related to the effects of environmental change on corals.

  15. Multidimensional DDT modeling of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Hertel, E.S.; Bell, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    To model the shock-induced behavior of porous or damaged energetic materials, a nonequilibrium mixture theory has been developed and incorporated into the shock physics code, CTH. The foundation for this multiphase model is based on a continuum mixture formulation given by Baer and Nunziato. This multiphase mixture model provides a thermodynamic and mathematically-consistent description of the self-accelerated combustion processes associated with deflagration-to-detonation and delayed detonation behavior which are key modeling issues in safety assessment of energetic systems. An operator-splitting method is used in the implementation of this model, whereby phase diffusion effects are incorporated using a high resolution transport method. Internal state variables, forming the basis for phase interaction quantities, are resolved during the Lagrangian step requiring the use of a stiff matrix-free solver. Benchmark calculations are presented which simulate low-velocity piston impact on a propellant porous bed and experimentally-measured wave features are well replicated with this model. This mixture model introduces micromechanical models for the initiation and growth of reactive multicomponent flow that are key features to describe shock initiation and self-accelerated deflagration-to-detonation combustion behavior. To complement one-dimensional simulation, two-dimensional numerical calculations are presented which indicate wave curvature effects due to the loss of wall confinement. This study is pertinent for safety analysis of weapon systems.

  16. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-10

    ignition mechanismwas joule heating of the Al core as opposed to dielectric heating of the alumina shell. The ESD ignition sensitivity of aluminum...density gradients. A Nichrome resistive heating wire is placed within the tube with a pinched center that acts as a point heat source that is in...containing no CNT and the samples with 3.08, and 3.8 vol.% CNT were tested for flame speeds to determine CNT effect on resistive wire ignition and

  17. Asymmetrically substituted 5,5'-bistriazoles--nitrogen-rich materials with various energetic functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Alexander A; Klapötke, Thomas M; Oswald, Michaela

    2013-08-21

    In this contribution the synthesis and full structural and spectroscopic characterization of three asymmetrically substituted bis-1,2,4-triazoles, along with different energetic moieties like amino, nitro, nitrimino and azido moieties, is presented. Additionally, selected nitrogen-rich ionic derivatives have been prepared and characterized. This comparative study on the influence of these energetic moieties on structural and energetic properties constitutes a complete characterization including IR, Raman and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray crystallographic measurements were performed and provide insight into structural characteristics as well as inter- and intramolecular interactions. The standard enthalpies of formation were calculated for all compounds at the CBS-4M level of theory, revealing highly positive heats of formation for all compounds. The detonation parameters were calculated using the EXPLO5 program and compared to the common secondary explosive RDX as well as recently published symmetric bistriazoles. As expected, the measured sensitivities to mechanical stimuli and decomposition temperatures strongly depend on the energetic moiety of the triazole ring. All compounds were characterized in terms of sensitivities (impact, friction, electrostatic) and thermal stabilities, the ionic derivatives were found to be thermally stable, insensitive compounds.

  18. Energetic recovery in porcine grafts by minimally invasive liver oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Thomas; Scott, William E; Rizzari, Michael D; Suszynski, Thomas M; Luer, Bastian; Efferz, Patrik; Papas, Klearchos K; Paul, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Gaseous insufflation of oxygen via the venous vascular system has proven to be an effective tool for preventing anoxic tissue injury after extended time periods of ischemic liver preservation. Most experimental studies so far have been undertaken in rat models and include a series of pinpricks into postsinusoidal venules as an outlet for the insufflated gas. Here, we describe a simplified technique for minimally invasive liver oxygenation in porcine grafts, representing a hassle-free access to organ oxygenation without vascular lesions. We retrieved livers from Landrace pigs and cold-stored them in histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution. Subsequent to 18 h preservation, we treated some livers for an additional 2 h with gaseous oxygen, insufflated via silicone tubing inserted into the suprahepatic caval vein. Gas pressure was limited to 18 mm Hg. We occluded the infrahepatic caval vein with a bulldog clamp. Gas bubbles left the graft via the portal vein. We assessed liver integrity by energetic tissue status and by controlled in vitro reperfusion with autologous blood. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated homogeneous gas distribution in the persufflated tissue without major shunting. Biochemical analyses revealed effective and homogeneous restoration of energetic homeostasis in the ischemic graft before reperfusion. Sinusoidal endothelial clearance of hyaluronic acid was significantly improved upon reperfusion, as was hepatic arterial flow. Parenchymal enzyme loss was concordantly mitigated after minimally invasive liver oxygenation. Our results indicate that gaseous oxygen persufflation of the porcine liver is possible without tissue trauma, and significantly enhances post-preservation recovery of the graft. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Almberg, Emily S.; Haase, Catherine G; Hudson, Peter J.; Maloney, Shane K; Metz, Matthew C; Munn, Adam J; Nugent, Paul; Putzeys, Olivier; Stahler, Daniel R.; Stewart, Anya C; Smith, Doug W.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites, by definition, extract energy from their hosts and thus affect trophic and food web dynamics even when the parasite may have limited effects on host population size. We studied the energetic costs of mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) in wolves (Canis lupus) using thermal cameras to estimate heat losses associated with compromised insulation during the winter. We combined the field data of known, naturally infected wolves with data set on captive wolves with shaved patches of fur as a positive control to simulate mange-induced hair loss. We predict that during the winter in Montana, more severe mange infection increases heat loss by around 5.2 to 12 MJ per night (1240 to 2850 kcal, or a 65% to 78% increase) for small and large wolves, respectively accounting for wind effects. To maintain body temperature would require a significant proportion of a healthy wolf's total daily energy demands (18-22 MJ/day). We also predict how these thermal costs may increase in colder climates by comparing our predictions in Bozeman, Montana to those from a place with lower ambient temperatures (Fairbanks, Alaska). Contrary to our expectations, the 14°C differential between these regions was not as important as the potential differences in wind speed. These large increases in energetic demands can be mitigated by either increasing consumption rates or decreasing other energy demands. Data from GPS-collared wolves indicated that healthy wolves move, on average, 17 km per day, which was reduced by 1.5, 1.8 and 6.5 km for light, medium, and severe hair loss. In addition, the wolf with the most hair loss was less active at night and more active during the day, which is the converse of the movement patterns of healthy wolves. At the individual level mange infections create significant energy demands and altered behavioral patterns, this may have cascading effects on prey consumption rates, food web dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and scavenger communities.

  20. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2017-08-19

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere energetics and dynamics (TIMED). The TIMED mission and science program report of the science definition team. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A Science Definition Team was established in December 1990 by the Space Physics Division, NASA, to develop a satellite program to conduct research on the energetics, dynamics, and chemistry of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere/ionosphere. This two-volume publication describes the TIMED (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics) mission and associated science program. The report outlines the scientific objectives of the mission, the program requirements, and the approach towards meeting these requirements.

  2. High performance HTPB-based energetic nanomaterial with CuO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, José Luis; Mosquera, Gonzalo; París, Rodrigo

    2009-12-01

    This work describes the first example to demonstrate the enhancement of performances of composite highly energetic materials by mean of employing standard CuO nano-powder as burning rate catalyst in comparison to micro-fillers. The solid composite propellants with CuO microparticles are less stable due to oversensitivity to pressure variations, but the nano-structured composite propellant yields high stable burning rates over a broad pressure range. In addition, the incorporation of CuO nanoparticles in the formulations of these energetic materials also improves their combustion and thermal properties, according to the characterization obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These results indicate the excellent benefits found in using these nanoparticles as additive for solid rocket propulsion applications.

  3. The minimal energetic requirement of sustained awareness after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Mortensen, Kristian Nygaard; Thibaut, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    % of normal cortical activity represents the minimal energetic requirement for the presence of conscious awareness. Overall, the cerebral metabolic rate accounted for the current level, or imminent return, of awareness in 94% of the patient population, suggesting a global energetic threshold effect...

  4. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Marino, E.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Scholtes, G.J.H.G.; Duvalois, W.; Roelands, C.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive contain

  5. Particle coating – a novel trend in energetic materials engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new energetic materials with enhanced blast properties requires better understanding of factors as particle type, size and particle/matrix distribution. The ability of growing a coating on particles opens new possibilities in energetic materials engineering. Functionalities as

  6. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Marino, E.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Scholtes, G.J.H.G.; Duvalois, W.; Roelands, C.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive

  7. Shear initiated reactions in energetic and reactive materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuken, B.; Martinez Pacheco, M.; Verbeek, H.J.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Katgerman, L.

    2006-01-01

    Deformation of energetic materials may cause undesired reactions and therefore hazardous situations. The deformation of an energetic material and in particular shear deformation is studied in this paper. Understanding of the phenomena leading to shear initiation is not only necessary to explain for

  8. Shear initiated reactions in energetic and reactive materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuken, B.; Martinez Pacheco, M.; Verbeek, H.J.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Katgerman, L.

    2006-01-01

    Deformation of energetic materials may cause undesired reactions and therefore hazardous situations. The deformation of an energetic material and in particular shear deformation is studied in this paper. Understanding of the phenomena leading to shear initiation is not only necessary to explain for

  9. Energetic Quantum Limit in Large-Scale Interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.; Gorodetsky, Mikhail L.; Khalili, Farid Ya.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1999-01-01

    For each optical topology of an interferometric gravitational wave detector, quantum mechanics dictates a minimum optical power (the ``energetic quantum limit'') to achieve a given sensitivity. For standard topologies, when one seeks to beat the standard quantum limit by a substantial factor, the energetic quantum limit becomes impossibly large. Intracavity readout schemes may do so with manageable optical powers.

  10. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  11. Utilization of FEP energetics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederking, T.H.K.; Abbassi, P.; Afifi, F.; Khandhar, P.K.; Ono, D.Y.; Chen, W.E.W.

    1987-12-01

    The research and development work on Fountain Effect Pump Systems (FEP systems) has been of interest in the competition between mechanical pumps for He II and FEP units. The latter do not have moving parts. In the course of the work, the energetics have been addressed using one part of a simple four-changes-of-state cycle. One option is the FEP ideal change of state at constant chemical potential (mu). The other option is the two-state sequence mu-P with a d mu=0 state change followed by an isobar. Questions of pump behavior, of flow rate response to temperature difference at the hot end, and related questions of thermodynamic cycle completion and heat transfer have been addressed. Porous media data obtained elucidate differences between vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) and Zero Net Mass Transfer (ZNMF).

  12. ENERGETIC PARTICLE ANISOTROPIES AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florinski, V.; Le Roux, J. A. [Department of Space Sciences, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jokipii, J. R. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Alouani-Bibi, F. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    In 2012 August the Voyager 1 space probe entered a distinctly new region of space characterized by a virtual absence of heliospheric energetic ions and magnetic fluctuations, now interpreted as a part of the local interstellar cloud. Prior to their disappearance, the ion distributions strongly peaked at a 90° pitch angle, implying rapid escape of streaming particles along the magnetic field lines. Here we investigate the process of particle crossing from the heliosheath into the interstellar space, using a kinetic approach that resolves scales of the particle's cyclotron radius and smaller. It is demonstrated that a 'pancake' pitch-angle distribution naturally arises at a tangential discontinuity separating a weakly turbulent plasma from a laminar region with a very low pitch-angle scattering rate. The relatively long persistence of gyrating ions is interpreted in terms of field line meandering facilitating their cross-field diffusion within the depletion region.

  13. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  14. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Interactions in Energetic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M A; Moore, D S

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering of electromagnetic waves in anisotropic energetic materials. Nonlinear light-matter interactions in molecular crystals result in frequency-conversion and polarization changes. Applied electromagnetic fields of moderate intensity can induce these nonlinear effects without triggering chemical decomposition, offering a mechanism for non-ionizing identification of explosives. We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute such two-dimensional Raman spectra in the terahertz range for planar slabs made of PETN and ammonium nitrate. We discuss third-harmonic generation and polarization-conversion processes in such materials. These observed far-field spectral features of the reflected or transmitted light may serve as an alternative tool for stand-off explosive detection.

  15. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  16. The Two Sources of Solar Energetic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Reames, Donald V

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for two different physical mechanisms for acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) arose 50 years ago with radio observations of type III bursts, produced by outward streaming electrons, and type II bursts from coronal and interplanetary shock waves. Since that time we have found that the former are related to "impulsive" SEP events from impulsive flares or jets. Here, resonant stochastic acceleration, related to magnetic reconnection involving open field lines, produces not only electrons but 1000-fold enhancements of 3He/4He and of (Z>50)/O. Alternatively, in "gradual" SEP events, shock waves, driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), more democratically sample ion abundances that are even used to measure the coronal abundances of the elements. Sometimes residual impulsive suprathermal ions contribute to the seed population for shock acceleration, complicating the abundance picture, but this process has now been modeled theoretically. Initially, impulsive events define a poi...

  17. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  18. Diabetes: energetics, development and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B C; Cajigal, A

    2001-07-01

    The recent emergence of the thrifty phenotype as an explanation for metabolic efficiency has brought evolutionary perspectives on diabetes, as represented by the thrifty genotype, under scrutiny. However, the logic of natural selection along with evidence from non-human primates supports the role for energetic constraints in the evolution of metabolic efficiency, particularly in skeletal muscle physiology. Environmental fluctuation during human evolution would have provided selective pressures for the development of efficient skeletal muscle starting prenatally and continuing throughout the lifespan. Such mechanisms including, glucose transporters, mitochondrial gene expression, leptin receptors and uncoupling proteins, should be present in all humans, though some living populations may exhibit particular 'thriftier' alleles. A focus on physical activity and the factors underlying efficient muscle physiology has implications for prevention of diabetes in both developing and developed societies. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  19. Energetic electron spectra in Saturn's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2011-07-01

    The differential spectra of energetic electrons (27-400 keV) in Saturn's plasma sheet can be characterized by power law or kappa distributions. Using all available fluxes from 2005 to 2010, fits to these distributions reveal a striking and consistent pattern of radial dependence in Saturn's plasma sheet (∣z∣ constant throughout the Cassini mission. Inward of about 10 RS, the presence of the electron radiation belts and losses of lower-energy electrons to the gas and grain environment give rise to the very hard spectra in the inner magnetosphere, while the hard spectra in the outer magnetosphere may derive from auroral acceleration at high latitudes. The gradual softening of the spectra from 20 to 10 RS is explained by inward radial diffusion.

  20. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...

  1. An energetic basis of equine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMiken, D F

    1983-04-01

    Although different physiological and behavioural attributes are needed for various types of equine competition, successful racing depends primarily on the animal's metabolic ability to convert chemical energy to mechanical energy--the function of muscle. Components of these energetic processes include the rate, efficiency and interaction of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in muscle and the supply and utilisation of fuel. In anaerobic work like racing, fatigue processes may be largely regarded as a function of an intramuscular fuel (phosphogen) depletion, despite the fact that substrates are supplied via the circulation. Physical work capacity in the horse depends then mainly on the rate of aerobic metabolism and the capacity of the anaerobic processes to supply energy for continued muscle contraction. Underlying these processes are physiological limitations of the cardiovascular system and the ultrastructure and biochemistry of muscle. A model is proposed whereby prediction of equine performance is based entirely on parameters of energy metabolism.

  2. Energetic Particle Diffusion In Critically Balanced Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Laitinen, T; Kelly, J; Marsh, M; 10.1088/0004-637X/764/2/168

    2013-01-01

    Observations and modelling suggest that the fluctuations in magnetised plasmas exhibit scale-dependent anisotropy, with more energy in the fluctuations perpendicular to the mean magnetic field than in the parallel fluctuations and the anisotropy increasing at smaller scales. The scale-dependence of the anisotropy has not been studied in full-orbit simulations of particle transport in turbulent plasmas so far. In this paper, we construct a model of critically balanced turbulence, as suggested by \\cite{GoSr1995}, and calculate energetic particle spatial diffusion coefficients using full-orbit simulations. The model uses an enveloped turbulence approach, where each 2-dimensional wave mode with wavenumber $k_\\perp$ is packed into envelopes of length $L$ following the critical balance condition, $L\\propto k_\\perp^{-2/3}$, with the wave mode parameters changing between envelopes. Using full-orbit particle simulations, we find that both the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients increase by a factor 2, co...

  3. Towards coherent control of energetic material initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Direct optical initiation (DOI) of energetic materials using coherent control of localized energy deposition requires depositing energy into the material to produce a critical size hot spot, which allows propagation of the reaction and thereby initiation, The hot spot characteristics needed for growth to initiation can be studied using quantum controlled initiation (QCI). Achieving direct quantum controlled initiation (QCI) in condensed phase systems requires optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to coherently guide the energy flow along the desired paths. As a test of our quantum control capabilities we have successfully demonstrated our ability to control the reaction pathway of the chemical system stilbene. An acousto-optical modulator based pulse shaper was used at 266 nm, in a shaped pump/supercontinuum probe technique, to enhance and suppress th relative yields of the cis- to trans-stilbene isomerization. The quantum control techniques tested in the stilbene experiments are currently being used to investigate QCI of the explosive hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB).

  4. Energetics of the quantum graphity universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Samuel A.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2014-12-01

    Quantum graphity is a background independent model for emergent geometry, in which space is represented as a dynamical graph. The high-energy pregeometric starting point of the model is usually considered to be the complete graph; however, we also consider the empty graph as a candidate pregeometric state. The energetics as the graph evolves from either of these high-energy states to a low-energy geometric state is investigated as a function of the number of edges in the graph. Analytic results for the slope of this energy curve in the high-energy domain are derived, and the energy curve is determined exactly for small number of vertices N . To study the whole energy curve for larger (but still finite) N , an epitaxial approximation is introduced. This work may open the way to compare predictions from quantum graphity with observations of the early Universe, making the model falsifiable.

  5. Energetics of the Quantum Graphity Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Samuel A

    2014-01-01

    Quantum graphity is a background independent model for emergent geometry, in which space is represented as a complete graph. The high-energy pre-geometric starting point of the model is usually considered to be the complete graph, however we also consider the empty graph as a candidate pre-geometric state. The energetics as the graph evolves from either of these high-energy states to a low-energy geometric state is investigated as a function of the number of edges in the graph. Analytic results for the slope of this energy curve in the high-energy domain are derived, and the energy curve is plotted exactly for small number of vertices $N$. To study the whole energy curve for larger (but still finite) $N$, an epitaxial approximation is used. It is hoped that this work may open the way for future work to compare predictions from quantum graphity with observations of the early universe, making the model falsifiable.

  6. Estimation of economic and energetic expenses of soil tillage and soil management systems for the edible beans culture; Estimativas dos custos economicos e energeticos de sistemas de preparo e de manejo do solo para a cultura do feijao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boller, Walter; Gamero, Carlos A. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas

    1997-12-31

    Soil tillage objectives to afford adequate conditions for field crop establishment and production, and contribute with a significant portion of the farming expenses. Conservation tillage aiming to protect the soil against erosion, save labor and fuel by preparing a seedbed. The purpose of these experiment was to estimate the economic and the energetic costs of three soil tillage systems (conventional tillage - disk plowing followed by harrowing twice, rotavation by means of a rotavator and chiselling using a chisel plow combined with stalk-cutting disks and a fitting roll), in combination with four pre-tillage soil cover conditions (black oats, rye, forage radish and fallow). The experiment was carried out during the years 1993/1994, in a heavy clay soil classified as Terra Roxa Estruturada, in the country of Botucatu, Sao Paulo state, Brazil. The fuel consumption in a time and in a area unity were determined through field measurements. Timetable economic and energetic expenses of every mechanized agricultural operation were estimated by means of calculation. The results showed that the replacement of conventional tillage by rotavation or by chiselling allow respectively economize 60,2 and 42,3% of the fuel consumption per unit of tilled area. The additional expenses of utilization of black oats or rye, in combination with rotavating or chiselling respectively a production of 22,65 and 26,73 kg/ha of edible beams. Soil cover crops utilization imply in a 2,2 to 6,0 upper energy requirement than the conventional tillage system in combination with fallow. The implantation of winter crops with the exclusive finality of produce vegetable biomass for soil coverage showed be feasible from economic standpoint, however it was disadvantageous under the energetic standpoint. The utilization of a portion of the biomass produced by soil cover crops for livestock feeding can decisively contribute towards the equilibrium of the energetic balance and to increase the economic

  7. Energetic dose: Beyond fire and flint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Rattner, B.; Cohen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional and bioenergetic interactions influence exposure to environmental chemicals and may affect the risk realized when wildlife are exposed in the field. Here, food-chain analysis focuses on prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and the evaluation of chemical risks associated with paraquat following 10-d dietary exposures. Reproductive effects were measured in 60-d trials that followed exposures to paraquat-tainted feed: control (untainted feed); 21 mg paraquat/kg feed; 63 mg paraquat/kg feed; and feed-restricted control (untainted feed restricted to 60% baseline consumption). Reproductive success was evaluated in control and treated breeding pairs, and a preliminary bioenergetics analysis was completed in parallel to derive exposure dose. Although reproductive performance differed among groups, feed-restriction appeared to be the dominant treatment effect observed in these 10-d feeding exposure/limited reproductive trials. Exposure dose ranged from 3.70-3.76 to 9.41-11.51 mg parquat/kg BW/day at 21 and 63 mg paraquat/kg feed stock exposures, respectively. Energetic doses as ug paraquat/kcal yielded preliminary estimates of energetic costs associated with paraquat exposure, and were similar within treatments for both sexes, ranging from 4.2-5.5 and 13.1-15.0 ug paraquat/kcal for voles exposed to 21 mg/kg feed stock and 63 mg/kg feed stock, respectively. Given the increasing likelihood that environmental chemicals will be found in wildlife habitat at 'acceptable levels', the critical role that wildlife nutrition plays in evaluating ecological risks should be fully integrated into the assessment process. Tools applied to the analysis of risk must gain higher resolution than the relatively crude methods we currently bring to the process.

  8. Energetic particle perspective of the magnetopause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.J.; Fritz, T.A.; Wilken, B.; Keppler, E.

    1979-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of energetic (>24 keV) particle data obtained from the Isee satellites during a series of magnetopause crossings which occurred at 0000--0400 hours UT (approx.1030 hours LT) on November 20, 1977. The primary energetic particle data used are the three-dimensional distributions obtained from the Isee A satellite. Correlative magnetic field measurements are used to relate the particle behavior to magnetic field characteristics at and earthward of the magnetopause. We find that to first order the magnetopause can be regarded as a perfectly absorbing boundary for trapped >24-keV particles, that it is nearly alway in motion, and that boundary waves are often present. We find that the observed dayside magnetopause motion is consistent with a large-scale radial motion having an approx.10-min period plus superimposed boundary waves with a 90- to 150-s period. More qualitatively, we find that the data require a third and longer period (approx. 30 min) magnetopause motion upon which the above, shorter-period motions are superimposed. It is concluded that the radial gradient to the magnetopause observed in the directional, >24-keV, dayside, near-equatorial, magnetospherically trapped particle flux is due to internal magnetospheric processes. Just outside the magnetopause in the magnetosheath we observe a broad (approximately hemispherical) field-aligned flow of >24-keV ions away from the magnetosphere. The absolute intensity and spectral characteristics of this flow and its reltion to the magnetopause and the trapped particle population indicate that it is formed by the leakage of trapped particles from the radiation belts onto magnetosheath field lines as their trajectories move to within two gyroradii of the magnetopause.

  9. COAL’S ROLE IN THE WORLD ENERGETIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei ROTH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The world energy needs are on the rise, and they come from developing economies, especially the emerging ones such as China or India with high demographic and economic growth rates. These countries future demand for energy will shape the world’s energetic system. They will require considerable quantities of energy to fuel their demanding economies. The last decade has shown that the world’s energetic needs are being reoriented from West to East. Coal represents an available, secure and competitive energetic resource which can help the growing need for energy. However it is not that flexible as gas or renewables and it has also a greater impact upon environment due to its greenhouse gas emissions in the context of climate change. For these reasons coal is being less used for the energetic needs of the developed economies. Will the current attributes of coal be sufficient to maintain coal’s place in the world energetic mix?

  10. Nanostructured energetic composites: synthesis, ignition/combustion modeling, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Torabi, Mohsen; Lu, Jian; Shen, Ruiqi; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-03-12

    Nanotechnology has stimulated revolutionary advances in many scientific and industrial fields, particularly in energetic materials. Powder mixing is the simplest and most traditional method to prepare nanoenergetic composites, and preliminary findings have shown that these composites perform more effectively than their micro- or macro-sized counterparts in terms of energy release, ignition, and combustion. Powder mixing technology represents only the minimum capability of nanotechnology to boost the development of energetic material research, and it has intrinsic limitations, namely, random distribution of fuel and oxidizer particles, inevitable fuel pre-oxidation, and non-intimate contact between reactants. As an alternative, nanostructured energetic composites can be prepared through a delicately designed process. These composites outperform powder-mixed nanocomposites in numerous ways; therefore, we comprehensively discuss the preparation strategies adopted for nanostructured energetic composites and the research achievements thus far in this review. The latest ignition and reaction models are briefly introduced. Finally, the broad promising applications of nanostructured energetic composites are highlighted.

  11. Energetic optimisation of foraging honeybees: flexible change of strategies in response to environmental challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Heterothermic insects like honeybees, foraging in a variable environment, face the challenge of keeping their body temperature high to enable immediate flight and to promote fast exploitation of resources. Because of their small size they have to cope with an enormous heat loss and, therefore, high costs of thermoregulation. This calls for energetic optimisation which may be achieved by different strategies. An 'economizing' strategy would be to reduce energetic investment whenever possible, for example by using external heat from the sun for thermoregulation. An 'investment-guided' strategy, by contrast, would be to invest additional heat production or external heat gain to optimize physiological parameters like body temperature which promise increased energetic returns. Here we show how honeybees balance these strategies in response to changes of their local microclimate. In a novel approach of simultaneous measurement of respiration and body temperature foragers displayed a flexible strategy of thermoregulatory and energetic management. While foraging in shade on an artificial flower they did not save energy with increasing ambient temperature as expected but acted according to an 'investment-guided' strategy, keeping the energy turnover at a high level (∼56-69 mW). This increased thorax temperature and speeded up foraging as ambient temperature increased. Solar heat was invested to increase thorax temperature at low ambient temperature ('investment-guided' strategy) but to save energy at high temperature ('economizing' strategy), leading to energy savings per stay of ∼18-76% in sunshine. This flexible economic strategy minimized costs of foraging, and optimized energetic efficiency in response to broad variation of environmental conditions.

  12. MONITORING OF ENERGETIC PARTICLE ENVIRONMENT INSIDE THE CHINA-BRAZIL EARTH RESOURCE SATELLITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On 14 October 1999, the Chinese-Brazil earth resource satellite (CBERS-1) was launched in China. On board of the satellite there was an instrument designed at Peking University to detect the energetic particle radiation inside the satellite so the radiation fluxes of energetic particles in the cabin can be monitored continuously. Inside a satellite cabin, radiation environment consists of ether penetrated energetic particles or secondary radiation from satellite materials due to the interactions with primary cosmic rays.Purpose of the detectors are twofold, to monitor the particle radiation in the cabin and also to study the space radiation environment The data can be used to study the radiation environment and their effects on the electronics inside the satelhte cabin. On the other hand, the data are useful in study of geo-space energetic particle events such as solar proton events, particle precipitation and variations of the radiation belt since there should be some correlation between the radiation situation inside and outside the satellite.The instrument consists of two semi-conductor detectors for protons and electrons respectively. Each detector has two channels of energy ranges. They are 0.5-2MeV and ≥2MeV for electrons and 5-30MeV and 30-60MeV for protons. Counting rate for all channels are up to 104/(cm2@s)and power consumption is about 2.5 W. There are also the additional functions of CMOS TID (total integrated dose) effect and direct SEU monitoring. The data of CBMC was first sent back on Oct. 17 1999 and it's almost three years from then on. The detector has been working normally and the quality of data is good.The preliminary results of data analysis of CBMC not only reveal the effects of polar particle precipitation and radiation belt on radiation environment inside a satellite, but also show some important features of the geo-space energetic particle radiation.As one of the most important parameters of space weather, the energetic charged

  13. Sound objects – Auditory objects – Musical objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The auditory system transforms patterns of sound energy into perceptual objects but the precise definition of an ‘auditory object’ is much debated. In the context of music listening, Pierre Schaeffer argued that ‘sound objects’ are the fundamental perceptual units in ‘musical objects......’. In this paper, I review recent neurocognitive research suggesting that the auditory system is sensitive to structural information about real-world objects. Instead of focusing solely on perceptual sound features as determinants of auditory objects, I propose that real-world object properties are inherent...

  14. Sound objects – Auditory objects – Musical objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The auditory system transforms patterns of sound energy into perceptual objects but the precise definition of an ‘auditory object’ is much debated. In the context of music listening, Pierre Schaeffer argued that ‘sound objects’ are the fundamental perceptual units in ‘musical objects......’. In this paper, I review recent neurocognitive research suggesting that the auditory system is sensitive to structural information about real-world objects. Instead of focusing solely on perceptual sound features as determinants of auditory objects, I propose that real-world object properties are inherent...

  15. Object Identity in Database Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天柱

    1995-01-01

    The concept of object identity and implementation of object identity in some systems have been explained in literature.Based on an analysis on the idea of data scheme in ANSI/X3/SPARC,this paper presents the concept of full-identity,which includes entity identity,conceptual object identity,and internal object identity,In addition,the equality of objects,which is richer and more practical,is discussed based on the full identity of objects.Therefore,the semantics and constructions of the identity for the complex objects are fully observed,and some appliactions in object management,version management,and user interface are found.Also,it could support the combination of O-O model with V-O model.

  16. Energetic and relativistic nuclei and electron experiment of the SOHO mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtonen, E. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Peltonen, J. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Peltonen, P. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Eronen, T. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Hoisko, E. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Louhola, M. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Lumme, M. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Nieminen, A. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Riihonen, E. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Teittinen, M. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Torsti, J. [Turku Univ. (Finland). Space Res. Lab.; Ahola, K. [VTT Automation, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Holmlund, C. [VTT Automation, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Kelhae, V. [VTT Automation, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Leppaelae, K. [VTT Electronics, Box 1100, FIN-90571 Oulu (Finland); Ruuska, P. [VTT Electronics, Box 1100, FIN-90571 Oulu (Finland); Stroemmer, E. [VTT Electronics, Box 1100, FIN-90571 Oulu (Finland); Verkasalo, R. [VTT Electronics, Box 1100, FIN-90571 Oulu (Finland); Koivula, E. [Collab Ky, Laentinen Pitkaekatu 37, FIN-20100 Turku (Finland); Moilanen, M. [Smartech Oy, Hermiankatu 8 C, FIN-33720 Tampere (Finland)

    1997-06-01

    The design of the ERNE experiment of the ESA and NASA collaborative SOHO mission is described. ERNE will investigate the sun by measuring energetic particles. Starting from the design objectives, as determined by the scientific goals of the experiment, and from the adopted basic solutions, the design and structure of the instrument are presented in detail. The fundamental technical aspects encountered in building a space instrument are briefly considered. The methods of implementation of scientifically the most important parts of the instrument, the sensors for measuring energetic particles and the associated electronics, are thoroughly explained. Both hardware and software are examined. The pre-flight calibrations of the instrument are described and the performance of the instrument in space is demonstrated. (orig.).

  17. Is necessary the generation and implementation of an educational plan about the energetic issue?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutin, A.; Turchetti, E.; Montesano, J.; Dipietro, A. [Universidad Catolica Argentina, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicomatematicas e Ingenieria, Avenida Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500, CP 1107, C.A.B.A. (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The intention of the present Paper is to warn of a possible scenario, in reference to the knowledge the population has about the energetic matter, we designed different techniques to know their opinions, ideas and suggestions. The final result of the first stage sheds light on the fact that there is a generalized interest in the energetic theme, but the knowledge about it, is nearly none. Different opinions prove the need to deepen the results obtained and the responsibilities that fall to us as researchers and professors. It is impossible to sustain over time changes in habits of the population in the use of energy, without having created and launched a project with: clear objectives and specific methodologies and techniques, taking into account the areas, regions and socioeconomic situation, in order to carry it out in time. (author)

  18. The energetics of ultra-endurance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzer, Stefano; Salvadego, Desy; Rejc, Enrico; Buglione, Antonio; Antonutto, Guglielmo; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico

    2012-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of long-lasting endurance events on the energy cost of running (C(r)), and the role of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), its fractional utilisation (F) and C(r) in determining the performance. Ten healthy runners (age range 26-59 years) participated in an ultra-endurance competition consisting of three running laps of 22, 48 and 20 km on three consecutive days in the North-East of Italy. Anthropometric characteristics and VO(2max) by a graded exercise test on a treadmill were determined 5 days before and 5 days after the competition. In addition, C(r) was determined on a treadmill before and after each running lap. Heart rate (HR) was recorded throughout the three laps. Results revealed that mean C(r) of the individual laps did not increase significantly with lap number (P = 0.200), thus ruling out any chronic lap effect. Even so, however, at the end of lap 3, C(r) was 18.0% (P increase of C(r-mean) during the competition yields to marked worsening of the performance, and (2) the three variables F, VO(2max) and C(r-mean) combined as described above explaining 87% of the total competition time variance.

  19. Quasi-objects, Cult Objects and Fashion Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjørn Schiermer

    2011-01-01

    This article attempts to rehabilitate the concept of fetishism and to contribute to the debate on the social role of objects as well as to fashion theory. Extrapolating from Michel Serres’ theory of the quasi-objects, I distinguish two phenomenologies possessing almost opposite characteristics....... These two phenomenologies are, so I argue, essential to quasi-object theory, yet largely ignored by Serres’ sociological interpreters. They correspond with the two different theories of fetishism found in Marx and Durkheim, respectively. In the second half of the article, I introduce the fashion object...... as a unique opportunity for studying the interchange between these two forms of fetishism and their respective phenomenologies. Finally, returning to Serres, I briefly consider the theoretical consequences of introducing the fashion object as a quasi-object....

  20. Environmentally Responsible Energetic Materials: Another Look at the Styphnates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Adam; Angliss, Timothy; Proud, William

    2009-06-01

    Lead Styphnate (lead 2,4,6-trinitroresorcinate) has many applications as a primary explosive, most notably in priming compositions. Its largest drawback, however, is the toxicity of lead. Heavy metals often feature in primary explosives, providing favourable density, bonding, and reaction products; but, the toxic nature of heavy metals makes these explosives of limited use. Current research efforts are being made to design new energetic materials (such as those based around the 5-nitrotetrazole molecule), but familiar energetics can still be of use. The styphnate anion provides many favourable energetic qualities (such as a ring structure and nitro groups), and while the lead salt has proven its usefulness, other metallic styphnates also provide a range of energetic qualities. This paper reports on ignition thresholds, energetic output, and thermal properties of the following salts of trinitroresorcinol: Barium, Bismuth, Calcium, Copper, Lithium, and Lead. Such information provides a list of characterized energetic materials, but also insight into how metal cations can control measurable energetic effects at the molecular and crystal level.

  1. THE ENERGETIC ENVIRONMENT AND THE DENSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN ULIRGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Vega

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We t the near-infrared to radio spectral energy distributions of a sample of 30 luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with models that include both starburst and AGN components. The aim of the work was to determine important physical parameters for this kind of objects such as the optical depth towards the luminosity source, the star formation rate, the star formation efficiency and the AGN fraction. We found that although about half of our sample have best- t models that include an AGN component, only 30% have an AGN which accounts for more than 10% of the infrared luminosity whereas all have an energetically dominant starburst. Our models also determine the mass of dense molecular gas. Assuming that this mass is that traced by the HCN molecule, we reproduce the observed linear relation between HCN luminosity and infrared luminosity found by Gao & Solomon (2004. However, our derived conversion factor between HCN luminosity and the mass of dense molecular gas is a factor of 2 smaller than that assumed by these authors. Finally, we nd that the star formation efficiency falls as the starburst ages.

  2. The energetic environment and the dense interstellar medium in ULIRGs

    CERN Document Server

    Vega, O; Bressan, A; Granato, G L; Silva, L; Panuzzo, P

    2009-01-01

    We fit the near-infrared to radio spectral energy distributions of a sample of 30 luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with models that include both starburst and AGN components. The aim of the work was to determine important physical parameters for this kind of objects such as the optical depth towards the luminosity source, the star formation rate, the star formation efficiency and the AGN fraction. We found that although about half of our sample have best-fit models that include an AGN component, only 30 % have an AGN which accounts for more than 10 % of the infrared luminosity whereas all have an energetically dominant starburst. Our models also determine the mass of dense molecular gas. Assuming that this mass is that traced by the HCN molecule, we reproduce the observed linear relation between HCN luminosity and infrared luminosity found by Gao and Solomon (2004). However, our derived conversion factor between HCN luminosity and the mass of dense molecular gas is a factor of 2 smaller than that...

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies of N-rich energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhen; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2016-10-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of molecular anionic energetic materials (EMs) DAAF (3,3'-diamino-4,4'-azoxyfurazan), FOX-7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene), 5,5'-BT (5,5'-bistetrazole), and 1,5'-BT (1,5'-bistetrazole) are explored employing anionic photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The electron binding energies of the observed anionic, energetic material related species are determined and their corresponding anionic structures are assigned. Decomposition reactions for negatively charged EMs can proceed with different energy barriers, and thus mechanisms, from those for their related neutral EMs. Reactivity based on the anionic initial fragments of these EM species further reinforces their respective highly reactive and explosive nature. Fragment ions of the form EM(-)-H-X (X = N2, N2+NH, …) are additionally observed. Detection of such species suggests that EM(-)-H could serve as promising new candidates for EMs, assuming that such species are synthetically available, perhaps as energetic salts. Vertical detachment energies for transitions to the ground and first triplet electronic excited states of neutral matrix dye anion DCM(-) are additionally determined.

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies of N-rich energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhen; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2016-10-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of molecular anionic energetic materials (EMs) DAAF (3,3'-diamino-4,4'-azoxyfurazan), FOX-7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene), 5,5'-BT (5,5'-bistetrazole), and 1,5'-BT (1,5'-bistetrazole) are explored employing anionic photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The electron binding energies of the observed anionic, energetic material related species are determined and their corresponding anionic structures are assigned. Decomposition reactions for negatively charged EMs can proceed with different energy barriers, and thus mechanisms, from those for their related neutral EMs. Reactivity based on the anionic initial fragments of these EM species further reinforces their respective highly reactive and explosive nature. Fragment ions of the form EM--H-X (X = N2, N2+NH, …) are additionally observed. Detection of such species suggests that EM--H could serve as promising new candidates for EMs, assuming that such species are synthetically available, perhaps as energetic salts. Vertical detachment energies for transitions to the ground and first triplet electronic excited states of neutral matrix dye anion DCM- are additionally determined.

  5. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on the New Horizons Mission

    CERN Document Server

    McNutt, Ralph L; Gurnee, Reid S; Hill, Matthew E; Cooper, Kim A; Andrews, G Bruce; Keath, Edwin P; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Mitchell, Donald G; Tossman, Barry; Bagenal, Fran; Boldt, John D; Bradley, Walter; Devereux, William S; Ho, George C; Jaskulek, Stephen E; LeFevere, Thomas W; Malcom, Horace; Marcus, Geoffrey A; Hayes, John R; Moore, G Ty; Williams, Bruce D; Wilson, Paul; Brown, L E; Kusterer, M; Vandegriff, J

    2007-01-01

    The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) comprises the hardware and accompanying science investigation on the New Horizons spacecraft to measure pick-up ions from Pluto's outgassing atmosphere. To the extent that Pluto retains its characteristics similar to those of a "heavy comet" as detected in stellar occultations since the early 1980s, these measurements will characterize the neutral atmosphere of Pluto while providing a consistency check on the atmospheric escape rate at the encounter epoch with that deduced from the atmospheric structure at lower altitudes by the ALICE, REX, and SWAP experiments on New Horizons. In addition, PEPSSI will characterize any extended ionosphere and solar wind interaction while also characterizing the energetic particle environment of Pluto, Charon, and their associated system. First proposed for development for the Pluto Express mission in September 1993, what became the PEPSSI instrument went through a number of development stages to meet the...

  6. Detection of lower tropospheric responses to solar energetic particles at midlatitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, K A; Harrison, R G

    2014-06-06

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) occasionally contribute additional atmospheric ionization beyond that arising from the usual galactic cosmic ray background. During an SEP event associated with a solar flare on April 11, 2013, the vertical ionization rate profile obtained using a balloon-borne detector showed enhanced ionization with a 26% increase at 20 km, over Reading, United Kingdom. Fluctuations in atmospheric electrical parameters were also detected at the surface, beneath the balloon's trajectory. As no coincident changes in geomagnetism occurred, the electrical fluctuations are very likely to be associated with increased ionization, as observed by the balloon measurements. The lack of response of surface neutron monitors during this event indicates that energetic particles that are not detected at the surface by neutron monitors can nevertheless enter and influence the atmosphere's weather-generating regions.

  7. Analysis of hohlraum energetics of the SG series and the NIF experiments with energy balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoli Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic energy balance model is applied to analyze the hohlraum energetics data from the Shenguang (SG series laser facilities and the National Ignition Facility (NIF experiments published in the past few years. The analysis shows that the overall hohlraum energetics data are in agreement with the energy balance model within 20% deviation. The 20% deviation might be caused by the diversity in hohlraum parameters, such as material, laser pulse, gas filling density, etc. In addition, the NIF's ignition target designs and our ignition target designs given by simulations are also in accordance with the energy balance model. This work confirms the value of the energy balance model for ignition target design and experimental data assessment, and demonstrates that the NIF energy is enough to achieve ignition if a 1D spherical radiation drive could be created, meanwhile both the laser plasma instabilities and hydrodynamic instabilities could be suppressed.

  8. New high-nitrogen energetic materials for gas generators in space ordnance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.S.; Lee, Kien-Yin; Hiskey, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    High-nitrogen nitroheterocyclic energetic compounds are used as explosives, propellants, and gas generants when safe, thermally stable, cool-burning energetic materials are desired. A series of compounds are compared for sensitivity properties and calculated burn performance. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations by NASA/Lewis rocket propellant and Blake gun propellant codes gave flame temperatures, average molecular weight, and identity of the equilibrium burn products for ambient, rocket, and gun pressure environments. These compounds were subjected to calculations both as monopropellants and as 50/50 weight ratio mixtures with ammonium nitrate (AN). Special attention was paid to calculated toxic products such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, and how these were affected by the addition of an oxidizer AN. Several compounds were noted for further calculations of a formulation ad experimental evaluation.

  9. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinylacetylene and for a number of isomers Of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinylacetylene.

  10. Aggregating and Disaggregating Flexibility Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Valsomatzis, Emmanouil; Hose, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific and commercial domains we encounter flexibility objects, i.e., objects with explicit flexibilities in a time and an amount dimension (e.g., energy or product amount). Applications of flexibility objects require novel and efficient techniques capable of handling large amounts...... energy data management and discuss strategies for aggregation and disaggregation of flex-objects while retaining flexibility. This paper further extends these approaches beyond flex-objects originating from energy consumption by additionally considering flex-objects originating from energy production...... and aiming at energy balancing during aggregation. In more detail, this paper considers the complete life cycle of flex-objects: aggregation, disaggregation, associated requirements, efficient incremental computation, and balance aggregation techniques. Extensive experiments based on real-world data from...

  11. Energetic pathway sampling in a protein interaction domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hultqvist, Greta; Haq, S. Raza; Punekar, Avinash S.;

    2013-01-01

    The affinity and specificity of protein-ligand interactions are influenced by energetic crosstalk within the protein domain. However, the molecular details of such intradomain allostery are still unclear. Here, we have experimentally detected and computationally predicted interaction pathways...... changes may reshape energetic signaling. The results were analyzed in the context of other members of the PDZ family, which were found to contain distinct interaction pathways for different peptide ligands. The data reveal a fascinating scenario whereby several energetic pathways are sampled within one...

  12. Voyager 1: energetic ions and electrons in the jovian magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, R E; Cook, W R; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Gehrels, N; Stone, E C; Trainor, J H; Schardt, A W; Conlon, T; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1979-06-01

    The observations of the cosmic-ray subsystem have added significantly to our knowledge of Jupiter's magnetosphere. The most surprising result is the existence of energetic sulfur, sodium, and oxygen nuclei with energies above 7 megaelectron volts per nucleon which were found inside of Io's orbit. Also, significant fluxes of similarly energetic ions reflecting solar cosmic-ray composition were observed throughout the magnetosphere beyond 11 times the radius of Jupiter. It was also found that energetic protons are enhanced by 30 to 70 percent in the active hemisphere. Finally, the first observations were made of the magnetospheric tail in the dawn direction out to 160 Jupiter radii.

  13. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  14. Study of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) Using Largely Separated Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-31

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0102 Study of solar energetic particles (SEPs) using largely separated spacecraft Jinhye Park KYUNG HEE UNIVERSITY, RESEARCH...energetic particles (SEPs) using largely separated spacecraft 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-13-1-4066 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F...Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are one of the main activities in terms of space weather forecast. SEPs could

  15. Energetic costs of calcification under ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Christopher; Finnegan, Seth; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic ocean acidification threatens to negatively impact marine organisms that precipitate calcium carbonate skeletons. Past geological events, such as the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction, together with modern experiments generally support these concerns. However, the physiological costs of producing a calcium carbonate skeleton under different acidification scenarios remain poorly understood. Here we present an idealized mathematical model to quantify whole-skeleton costs, concluding that they rise only modestly (up to ˜10%) under acidification expected for 2100. The modest magnitude of this effect reflects in part the low energetic cost of inorganic, calcium carbonate relative to the proteinaceous organic matrix component of skeletons. Our analysis does, however, point to an important kinetic constraint that depends on seawater carbonate chemistry, and we hypothesize that the impact of acidification is more likely to cause extinctions within groups where the timescale of larval development is tightly constrained. The cheapness of carbonate skeletons compared to organic materials also helps explain the widespread evolutionary convergence upon calcification within the metazoa.

  16. Temporal Evolution of Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Donald J.; Dalla, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may be released into the interplanetary medium and near-Earth locations. The energy spectra of SEP events at 1 AU are typically averaged over the entire event or studied in a few snapshots. In this article we analyze the time evolution of the energy spectra of four large selected SEP events using a large number of snapshots. We use a multi-spacecraft and multi-instrument approach for the observations, obtained over a wide SEP energy range. We find large differences in the spectra at the beginning of the events as measured by different instruments. We show that over time, a wave-like structure is observed traveling through the spectra from the highest energies to the lowest energies, creating an "arch" shape that then straightens into a power law later in the event, after times on the order of 10 hours. We discuss the processes that determine SEP intensities and their role in shaping the spectral time evolution.

  17. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  18. Energetic characteristics of transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojewódka, Andrzej; Bełzowski, Janusz; Wilk, Zenon; Staś, Justyna

    2009-11-15

    Ten transition metal nitrate and perchlorate complexes of hydrazine and ethylenediamine were synthesized, namely [Cu(EN)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Co(EN)(3)](ClO(4))(3), [Ni(EN)(3)](ClO(4))(2), [Hg(EN)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Cr(N(2)H(4))(3)](ClO(4))(3), [Cd(N(2)H(4))(3)](ClO(4))(2), [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2), [Co(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(3), [Zn(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2), and [Cd(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2) based on the lines of the literature reported methods. All of them were tested with applying underwater detonation test and further compared to the typical blasting explosives: RDX, HMX, TNT and PETN. From the above presented complexes [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2) (called NHN) and [Co(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(3) (called CoHN) are known as primary explosives and can be used as the standard explosives. Explosion parameters, such as shock wave overpressure, shock wave energy equivalent and bubble energy equivalent, were determined. Evaluated energetic characteristics of the tested compounds are comparable to those of the classic high explosives and are even enhanced in some cases.

  19. Energetics of ascent: insects on inclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full, R J; Tullis, A

    1990-03-01

    Small animals use more metabolic energy per unit mass than large animals to run on a level surface. If the cost to lift one gram of mass one vertical meter is constant, small animals should require proportionally smaller increases in metabolic cost to run uphill. To test this hypothesis on very small animals possessing an exceptional capacity for ascending steep gradients, we measured the metabolic cost of locomotion in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, running at angles of 0, 45 and 90 degrees to the horizontal. Resting oxygen consumption (VO2rest) was not affected by incline angle. Steady-state oxygen consumption (VO2ss) increased linearly with speed at all angles of ascent. The minimum cost of locomotion (the slope of the VO2ss versus speed function) increased with increasing angle of ascent. The minimum cost of locomotion on 45 and 90 degrees inclines was two and three times greater, respectively, than the cost during horizontal running. The cockroach's metabolic cost of ascent greatly exceeds that predicted from the hypothesis of a constant efficiency for vertical work. Variations in stride frequency and contact time cannot account for the high metabolic cost, because they were independent of incline angle. An increase in the metabolic cost or amount of force production may best explain the increase in metabolic cost. Small animals, such as P. americana, can easily scale vertical surfaces, but the energetic cost is considerable.

  20. Running Economy from a Muscle Energetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Fletcher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The economy of running has traditionally been quantified from the mass-specific oxygen uptake; however, because fuel substrate usage varies with exercise intensity, it is more accurate to express running economy in units of metabolic energy. Fundamentally, the understanding of the major factors that influence the energy cost of running (Erun can be obtained with this approach. Erun is determined by the energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we approach the study of Erun from that perspective. The amount of energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction is dependent on the force, duration, shortening, shortening velocity, and length of the muscle. These factors therefore dictate the energy cost of running. It is understood that some determinants of the energy cost of running are not trainable: environmental factors, surface characteristics, and certain anthropometric features. Other factors affecting Erun are altered by training: other anthropometric features, muscle and tendon properties, and running mechanics. Here, the key features that dictate the energy cost during distance running are reviewed in the context of skeletal muscle energetics.

  1. Neutronization and Energetics of Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitenzahl, I. R.; Peng, F.; Townsley, D. M.; Calder, A. C.

    2005-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae are critical distance indicators for cosmology. The lightcurves are powered by the decay of radioactive nickel and cobalt isotopes. The amount of nickel produced in the supernova event depends on the detailed trajectories of the hydrodynamic evolution of the explosion. A key ingredient in numerical simulations of the deflagration phase of Type Ia supernovae is the nuclear flame model. A realistic model must accurately describe the nuclear energy released, the timescale on which the energy release occurs, and the changes in composition that constitute the burning. Once the flame has passed, the hot products of the burning constitute a nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) abundance distribution. Since the NSE abundances, and hence derived quantities such as the mean binding energy per nucleon, are functions of the density, temperature and electron fraction, it is important to continuously adjust the NSE state of the ashes during the hydrodynamic evolution of the star. Weak interactions influence the energetics and evolution via the change in degeneracy pressure due to captured electrons, the energy losses carried away by neutrinos, and the readjustment of the NSE state following a change in the electron fraction. We have developed a NSE-based model, which implements these features for a hydrodynamical evolution code.

  2. Large gradual solar energetic particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir; Giacalone, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Solar energetic particles, or SEPs, from suprathermal (few keV) up to relativistic (˜ few GeV) energies are accelerated near the Sun in at least two ways: (1) by magnetic reconnection-driven processes during solar flares resulting in impulsive SEPs, and (2) at fast coronal-mass-ejection-driven shock waves that produce large gradual SEP events. Large gradual SEP events are of particular interest because the accompanying high-energy ({>}10s MeV) protons pose serious radiation threats to human explorers living and working beyond low-Earth orbit and to technological assets such as communications and scientific satellites in space. However, a complete understanding of these large SEP events has eluded us primarily because their properties, as observed in Earth orbit, are smeared due to mixing and contributions from many important physical effects. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge of these important phenomena, and summarizes some of the key questions that will be addressed by two upcoming missions—NASA’s Solar Probe Plus and ESA’s Solar Orbiter. Both of these missions are designed to directly and repeatedly sample the near-Sun environments where interplanetary scattering and transport effects are significantly reduced, allowing us to discriminate between different acceleration sites and mechanisms and to isolate the contributions of numerous physical processes occurring during large SEP events.

  3. Energetics of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, P; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate if solar coronal mass ejections are driven mainly by coupling to the ambient solar wind, or through the release of internal magnetic energy. Methods: We examine the energetics of 39 flux-rope like coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun using data in the distance range $\\sim$ 2--20 $R_{{\\o}dot}$ from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This comprises a complete sample of the best examples of flux-rope CMEs observed by LASCO in 1996-2001. Results: We find that 69% of the CMEs in our sample experience a clearly identifiable driving power in the LASCO field of view. For these CMEs which are driven, we examine if they might be deriving most of their driving power by coupling to the solar wind. We do not find conclusive evidence in favor of this hypothesis. On the other hand, we find that their internal magnetic energy is a viable source of the required driving power. We have estimated upper and lower limits on the power th...

  4. Linking energetics and overwintering in temperate insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-12-01

    Overwintering insects cannot feed, and energy they take into winter must therefore fuel energy demands during autumn, overwintering, warm periods prior to resumption of development in spring, and subsequent activity. Insects primarily consume lipids during winter, but may also use carbohydrate and proteins as fuel. Because they are ectotherms, the metabolic rate of insects is temperature-dependent, and the curvilinear nature of the metabolic rate-temperature relationship means that warm temperatures are disproportionately important to overwinter energy use. This energy use may be reduced physiologically, by reducing the slope or elevation of the metabolic rate-temperature relationship, or because of threshold changes, such as metabolic suppression upon freezing. Insects may also choose microhabitats or life history stages that reduce the impact of overwinter energy drain. There is considerable capacity for overwinter energy drain to affect insect survival and performance both directly (via starvation) or indirectly (for example, through a trade-off with cryoprotection), but this has not been well-explored. Likewise, the impact of overwinter energy drain on growing-season performance is not well understood. I conclude that overwinter energetics provides a useful lens through which to link physiology and ecology and winter and summer in studies of insect responses to their environment.

  5. Energetics, lifestyle, and reproduction in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibly, Richard M; Witt, Christopher C; Wright, Natalie A; Venditti, Chris; Jetz, Walter; Brown, James H

    2012-07-03

    Theoretical and empirical studies of life history aim to account for resource allocation to the different components of fitness: survival, growth, and reproduction. The pioneering evolutionary ecologist David Lack [(1968) Ecological Adaptations for Breeding in Birds (Methuen and Co., London)] suggested that reproductive output in birds reflects adaptation to environmental factors such as availability of food and risk of predation, but subsequent studies have not always supported Lack's interpretation. Here using a dataset for 980 bird species (Dataset S1), a phylogeny, and an explicit measure of reproductive productivity, we test predictions for how mass-specific productivity varies with body size, phylogeny, and lifestyle traits. We find that productivity varies negatively with body size and energetic demands of parental care and positively with extrinsic mortality. Specifically: (i) altricial species are 50% less productive than precocial species; (ii) species with female-only care of offspring are about 20% less productive than species with other methods of parental care; (iii) nonmigrants are 14% less productive than migrants; (iv) frugivores and nectarivores are about 20% less productive than those eating other foods; and (v) pelagic foragers are 40% less productive than those feeding in other habitats. A strong signal of phylogeny suggests that syndromes of similar life-history traits tend to be conservative within clades but also to have evolved independently in different clades. Our results generally support both Lack's pioneering studies and subsequent research on avian life history.

  6. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  7. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-01

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX's energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the "mini" solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  8. Object-Extended OLAP Querying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben Bach; Gu, Junmin; Shoshani, Arie

    2009-01-01

    inherent in data in non-standard applications are not accommodated well by OLAP systems. In contrast, object database systems are built to handle such complexity, but do not support OLAP-type querying well. This paper presents the concepts and techniques underlying a flexible, "multi-model" federated...... system that enables OLAP users to exploit simultaneously the features of OLAP and object systems. The system allows data to be handled using the most appropriate data model and technology: OLAP systems for dimensional data and object database systems for more complex, general data. This allows data...... analysis on the OLAP data to be significantly enriched by the use of additional object data. Additionally, physical integration of the OLAP and the object data can be avoided. As a vehicle for demonstrating the capabilities of the system, a prototypical OLAP language is defined and extended to naturally...

  9. Combining energetic and informational masking for speech identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Gerald; Mason, Christine R.; Gallun, Frederick J.

    2005-08-01

    This study examined combinations of energetic and informational maskers in speech identification. Speech targets and maskers (speech or noise) were processed and filtered into sets of 15 narrow frequency bands. The target was the sum of eight randomly selected bands. More masking occurred for speech maskers than for spectrally matched noise maskers regardless of whether the masker bands overlapped the target bands. The greater effect of the speech maskers was interpreted as due to informational masking. When the masker was comprised of nonoverlapping bands of speech, the addition of bands of noise overlapping the speech masker, but not the speech target, reduced the overall amount of masking. Surprisingly, presenting the noise to the ear contralateral to the target and masker produced an even greater release from masking. The contralateral noise was apparently sufficient to cause a slight change in the image of the ipsilateral speech masker, possibly pulling it away from the target enough to allow the focus of attention on the target. This finding is consistent with the interpretation that in some conditions small binaural differences may be sufficient to cause, or significantly strengthen, the perceptual segregation of sounds.

  10. Two-Photon Absorption in Conjugated Energetic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A; Sifain, Andrew E; Nelson, Tammie; Myers, Thomas W; Veauthier, Jacqueline M; Chavez, David E; Scharff, R Jason; Tretiak, Sergei

    2016-07-07

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was used to investigate the relationship between molecular structure and the one- and two-photon absorption (OPA and TPA, respectively) properties of novel and recently synthesized conjugated energetic molecules (CEMs). The molecular structures of CEMs can be strategically altered to influence the heat of formation and oxygen balance, two factors that can contribute to the sensitivity and strength of an explosive material. OPA and TPA are sensitive to changes in molecular structure as well, influencing the optical range of excitation. We found calculated vertical excitation energies to be in good agreement with experiment for most molecules. Peak TPA intensities were found to be significant and on the order of 10(2) GM. Natural transition orbitals for essential electronic states defining TPA peaks of relatively large intensity were used to examine the character of relevant transitions. Modification of molecular substituents, such as additional oxygen or other functional groups, produces significant changes in electronic structure, OPA, and TPA and improves oxygen balance. The results show that certain molecules are apt to undergo nonlinear absorption, opening the possibility for controlled, direct optical initiation of CEMs through photochemical pathways.

  11. Nonlinear interplay of Alfven instabilities and energetic particles in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Biancalani, A; Cole, M; Di Troia, C; Lauber, Ph; Mishchenko, A; Scott, B; Zonca, F

    2016-01-01

    The confinement of energetic particles (EP) is crucial for an efficient heating of tokamak plasmas. Plasma instabilities such as Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) can redistribute the EP population making the plasma heating less effective, and leading to additional loads on the walls. The nonlinear dynamics of toroidicity induced AE (TAE) is investigated by means of the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell code ORB5, within the NEMORB project. The nonperturbative nonlinear interplay of TAEs and EP due to the wave-particle nonlinearity is studied. In particular, we focus on the nonlinear modification of the frequency, growth rate and radial structure of the TAE, depending on the evolution of the EP distribution in phase space. For the ITPA benchmark case, we find that the frequency increases when the growth rate decreases, and the mode shrinks radially. This nonlinear evolution is found to be correctly reproduced by means of a quasilinear model, namely a model where the linear effects of the nonlinearly modified EP distri...

  12. Energetic conditions of effective recycling of composite castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jackowski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The most reasonable way of recycling the metal composite materials consists in separation of the components. In case of the composites with saturated reinforcement it is the only recycling method. The process of separation of the components always undergoes in the presence of an additional liquid phase called a recycling medium. In a three-phase system including the material of composite reinforcement – liquid composite matrix – liquid recycling medium, an important role for the recycling process is played by the changes in energy values at the interfacial surfaces. Proper choice of the recycling medium enables simultaneous process of transition of the reinforcing phase particles into the environment (the suspension composites or also simultaneous outflow of the metal matrix from the reinforcement capillaries (the composites with saturated reinforcement. Moreover, a very important role in recycling of composite materials with saturated reinforcement is played by geometry of the reinforcement material capillaries. Energetic conditions render impossible simultaneous outflow of the matrix from the capillaries of varying and irregular geometry. It means that a choice of proper recycling medium is necessary condition for the recycling process, although not always a sufficient one.

  13. Benchmarking an unstructured grid sediment model in an energetic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jesse E.; Baptista, António M.

    2017-02-01

    A sediment model coupled to the hydrodynamic model SELFE is validated against a benchmark combining a set of idealized tests and an application to a field-data rich energetic estuary. After sensitivity studies, model results for the idealized tests largely agree with previously reported results from other models in addition to analytical, semi-analytical, or laboratory results. Results of suspended sediment in an open channel test with fixed bottom are sensitive to turbulence closure and treatment for hydrodynamic bottom boundary. Results for the migration of a trench are very sensitive to critical stress and erosion rate, but largely insensitive to turbulence closure. The model is able to qualitatively represent sediment dynamics associated with estuarine turbidity maxima in an idealized estuary. Applied to the Columbia River estuary, the model qualitatively captures sediment dynamics observed by fixed stations and shipborne profiles. Representation of the vertical structure of suspended sediment degrades when stratification is underpredicted. Across all tests, skill metrics of suspended sediments lag those of hydrodynamics even when qualitatively representing dynamics. The benchmark is fully documented in an openly available repository to encourage unambiguous comparisons against other models.

  14. Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, P C; Almberg, E S; Haase, C G; Hudson, P J; Maloney, S K; Metz, M C; Munn, A J; Nugent, P; Putzeys, O; Stahler, D R; Stewart, A C; Smith, D W

    2016-08-01

    Parasites, by definition, extract energy from their hosts and thus affect trophic and food web dynamics even when the parasite may have limited effects on host population size. We studied the energetic costs of mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) in wolves (Canis lupus) using thermal cameras to estimate heat losses associated with compromised insulation during the winter. We combined the field data of known, naturally infected wolves with a data set on captive wolves with shaved patches of fur as a positive control to simulate mange-induced hair loss. We predict that during the winter in Montana, more severe mange infection increases heat loss by around 5.2-12 MJ per night (1,240-2,850 kcal, or a 65-78% increase) for small and large wolves, respectively, accounting for wind effects. To maintain body temperature would require a significant proportion of a healthy wolf's total daily energy demands (18-22 MJ/day). We also predict how these thermal costs may increase in colder climates by comparing our predictions in Bozeman, Montana to those from a place with lower ambient temperatures (Fairbanks, Alaska). Contrary to our expectations, the 14°C differential between these regions was not as important as the potential differences in wind speed. These large increases in energetic demands can be mitigated by either increasing consumption rates or decreasing other energy demands. Data from GPS-collared wolves indicated that healthy wolves move, on average, 17 km per day, which was reduced by 1.5, 1.8, and 6.5 km for light, medium, and severe hair loss. In addition, the wolf with the most hair loss was less active at night and more active during the day, which is the converse of the movement patterns of healthy wolves. At the individual level, mange infections create significant energy demands and altered behavioral patterns, this may have cascading effects on prey consumption rates, food web dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and scavenger communities.

  15. Atomic and magnetic configurational energetics by the generalized perturbation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei V.; Shallcross, Sam; Simak, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that, using the generalized perturbation method (GPM) with screened Coulomb interactions that ensures its consistency with the force theorem, one is able to obtain effective interactions that yield an accurate and physically transparent description of configurational energetics...

  16. The effect of solar energetic particles on the Martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Omar Hussain Al; Lillis, Robert; Fillingim, Matthew; Lee, Christina

    2016-10-01

    The precipitation of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) into the Martian atmosphere causes several effects, one of the most important of which is ionization. However, the importance of this process to the global structure and dynamics for the Martian ionosphere is currently not well understood. The MAVEN spacecraft carries instrumentation which allow us to examine this process. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) measures the densities of planetary ions in the Mars ionosphere (O+,CO2+ and O2+). The Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) detector measures the fluxes of energetic protons and electrons. In this project, we examine the degree to which the density of ions in the Martian ionosphere is affected by the precipitation of energetic particles, under conditions of different SEP ion and electron fluxes and at various solar zenith angles. We will present statistical as well as case studies.

  17. Cascaded Soliton Compression of Energetic Femtosecond Pulses at 1030 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved.......We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved....

  18. THE ENERGETIC AGGREGATION AND RELEASE IN THE HEAVY RAIN REGION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-guang; LIU Hai-tao; LIU Yan-ying

    2006-01-01

    Using the new formula of moist available energy (MAE), the value of the MAE's key terms of three heavy rainfall cases in Guangdong province in 1998 was calculated. The energetic aggregation and energetic discharge are analyzed. It shows that the value of the key terms in the formula appears different feature clearly in the different precipitation period, as well as the function of each term presents in the heavy rain region.

  19. Effect of Energetic Ion on Spatial Distribution of Recombining Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A.; Daibo, A.; Kitajima, S.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.

    Spatial distribution of electron density is considered. By using a one-dimensional recombining plasma model, effects of transient energetic ion flux are investigated. The time response of the system against the transient flux is dominated by the recombination frequency. The magnitude of modification of the spatial distribution is determined by the ratio between the ionization due to the energetic ion and the recombination of the bulk plasma.

  20. Mitochondria and Energetic Depression in Cell Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Zierz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of almost all diseases. Acquired or inherited mutations of the mitochondrial genome DNA may give rise to mitochondrial diseases. Another class of disorders, in which mitochondrial impairments are initiated by extramitochondrial factors, includes neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes resulting from typical pathological processes, such as hypoxia/ischemia, inflammation, intoxications, and carcinogenesis. Both classes of diseases lead to cellular energetic depression (CED, which is characterized by decreased cytosolic phosphorylation potential that suppresses the cell’s ability to do work and control the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and its redox state. If progressing, CED leads to cell death, whose type is linked to the functional status of the mitochondria. In the case of limited deterioration, when some amounts of ATP can still be generated due to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, mitochondria launch the apoptotic cell death program by release of cytochrome c. Following pronounced CED, cytoplasmic ATP levels fall below the thresholds required for processing the ATP-dependent apoptotic cascade and the cell dies from necrosis. Both types of death can be grouped together as a mitochondrial cell death (MCD. However, there exist multiple adaptive reactions aimed at protecting cells against CED. In this context, a metabolic shift characterized by suppression of OXPHOS combined with activation of aerobic glycolysis as the main pathway for ATP synthesis (Warburg effect is of central importance. Whereas this type of adaptation is sufficiently effective to avoid CED and to control the cellular redox state, thereby ensuring the cell survival, it also favors the avoidance of apoptotic cell death. This scenario may underlie uncontrolled cellular proliferation and growth, eventually resulting in carcinogenesis.

  1. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985 to 1986. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology.

  2. Energetic aspects of boring tools wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarová Edita

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available In the process of rock desintegration a boring tool is subjected to the wear. From a viewpoint of the bit wear, changes on the contact of operating tool with rock at its one-shot and rerun load or overload by external forces are technically significant. Theis change results in the degradation of bit working properties and the output of desintegration also decreases. In the major part of cases, together with the bit wear, the contact area of a tool with a rock massifs enhanced and this fact causes an increase of fines (dust creation during the desintegration. The wear is always connected with a friction, forces action, deformation, damage, and the increased mechanical work consumption. As to energetic aspects of bit wear, the wear was observed as a function of bore length and in the most of cases as a dependence of the operating time. A linear dependence between the wear intensity (bit wear per unit of bore length and the specific energy of desintegration (energy consumed per volume unit of desintegrated rock was experimentally verified. Thus, the changes of bit wear can be implicitly observed by monitoring the specific energy. At the same time, the specific energy is a function of input parameters of the desintegration process and in the field of applicable external forces it shows an extreme (minimum. Therefore, the specific energy is useful for the extreme optimisation of the rock desintegration process from the viewpoint of the bit wear. It was mathematically proven that the tool output at the desintegration exponentially decreases with the amount of work consumed in the rock desintegration. The derivation of this knowledge comes out from the Krendelev equation.

  3. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  4. MESSENGER observations of energetic electron acceleration in Mercury's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Ryan; Slavin, James A.; Baker, Daniel; Raines, Jim; Lawrence, David

    2016-10-01

    Energetic particle bursts within Mercury's magnetosphere have been a source of curiosity and controversy since Mariner 10's flybys. Unfortunately, instrumental effects prevent an unambiguous determination of species, flux, and energy spectrum for the Mariner 10 events. MESSENGER data taken by the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) have now shown that these energetic particle bursts are composed entirely of electrons. EPS made directional measurements of these electrons from ~30 to 300 keV at 3 s resolution, and while the energy of these electrons sometimes exceeded 200 keV, the energy distributions usually exhibited a cutoff near 100 keV. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has also provided measurements of these electron events, at higher time resolution (10 ms) and energetic threshold (> 50 keV) compared to EPS. We focus on GRS electron events near the plasma sheet in Mercury's magnetotail to identify reconnection-associated acceleration mechanisms. We present observations of acceleration associated with dipolarization events (betratron acceleration), flux ropes (Fermi acceleration), and tail loading/unloading (X-line acceleration). We find that the most common source of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetosphere are dipolarization events similar to those first observed by Mariner 10. Further, a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry is found with dipolarization-associated energetic particle bursts being more common on the dawn side of the magnetotail.

  5. Experimental Study on Reaction Characteristics of PTFE/Ti/W Energetic Materials under Explosive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal/fluoropolymer composites represent a new category of energetic structural materials that release energy through exothermic chemical reactions initiated under shock loading conditions. This paper describes an experiment designed to study the reaction characteristics of energetic materials with low porosity under explosive loading. Three PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene/Ti/W mixtures with different W contents are processed through pressing and sintering. An inert PTFE/W mixture without reactive Ti particles is also prepared to serve as a reference. Shock-induced chemical reactions are recorded by high-speed video through a narrow observation window. Related shock parameters are calculated based on experimental data, and differences in energy release are discussed. The results show that the reaction propagation of PTFE/Ti/W energetic materials with low porosity under explosive loading is not self-sustained. As propagation distance increases, the energy release gradually decreases. In addition, reaction failure distance in PTFE/Ti/W composites is inversely proportional to the W content. Porosity increased the failure distance due to higher shock temperature.

  6. Experimental Study on Reaction Characteristics of PTFE/Ti/W Energetic Materials under Explosive Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Chunlan; Wang, Zaicheng; Luo, Puguang

    2016-11-18

    Metal/fluoropolymer composites represent a new category of energetic structural materials that release energy through exothermic chemical reactions initiated under shock loading conditions. This paper describes an experiment designed to study the reaction characteristics of energetic materials with low porosity under explosive loading. Three PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)/Ti/W mixtures with different W contents are processed through pressing and sintering. An inert PTFE/W mixture without reactive Ti particles is also prepared to serve as a reference. Shock-induced chemical reactions are recorded by high-speed video through a narrow observation window. Related shock parameters are calculated based on experimental data, and differences in energy release are discussed. The results show that the reaction propagation of PTFE/Ti/W energetic materials with low porosity under explosive loading is not self-sustained. As propagation distance increases, the energy release gradually decreases. In addition, reaction failure distance in PTFE/Ti/W composites is inversely proportional to the W content. Porosity increased the failure distance due to higher shock temperature.

  7. Energetic multifunctionalized nitraminopyrazoles and their ionic derivatives: ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-04-15

    Diverse functionalization was introduced into the pyrazole framework giving rise to a new family of ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials. By incorporating extended cationic interactions, nitramine-based ionic derivatives exhibit good energetic performance and enhanced molecular stability. Performance parameters including heats of formation and detonation properties were calculated by using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 v6.01 programs, respectively. It is noteworthy to find that 5-nitramino-3,4-dinitropyrazole, 4, has a remarkable measured density of 1.97 g cm(-3) at 298 K, which is consistent with its crystal density (2.032 g cm(-3), 150 K), and ranks highest among azole-based CHNO compounds. Energetic evaluation indicates that, in addition to the molecular compound 4, some ionic derivatives, 9, 11, 12, 17, 19, and 22, also have high densities (1.83-1.97 g cm(-3)), excellent detonation pressures and velocities (P, 35.6-41.6 GPa; vD, 8880-9430 m s(-1)), as well as acceptable impact and friction sensitivities (IS, 4-30 J; FS, 40-240 N). These attractive features highlight the application potential of nitramino hydrogen-bonded interactions in the design of advanced energetic materials.

  8. Energetic Materials Effects on Essential Soil Processes: Decomposition of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) Litter in Soil Contaminated with Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    GRASS (DACTYLIS GLOMERATA) LITTER IN SOIL CONTAMINATED WITH ENERGETIC MATERIALS ECBC-TR-1199 Roman G. Kuperman Ronald T. Checkai Michael Simini...of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) Litter in Soil Contaminated with Energetic Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...soils using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 8330A. The results showed that soil contamination with 2,4-DNT or NG can inhibit litter

  9. Object recognition memory in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Zacnicte; Morrill, Adam; Holcombe, Adam; Johnston, Travis; Gallup, Joshua; Fouad, Karim; Schalomon, Melike; Hamilton, Trevor James

    2016-01-01

    The novel object recognition, or novel-object preference (NOP) test is employed to assess recognition memory in a variety of organisms. The subject is exposed to two identical objects, then after a delay, it is placed back in the original environment containing one of the original objects and a novel object. If the subject spends more time exploring one object, this can be interpreted as memory retention. To date, this test has not been fully explored in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish possess recognition memory for simple 2- and 3-dimensional geometrical shapes, yet it is unknown if this translates to complex 3-dimensional objects. In this study we evaluated recognition memory in zebrafish using complex objects of different sizes. Contrary to rodents, zebrafish preferentially explored familiar over novel objects. Familiarity preference disappeared after delays of 5 mins. Leopard danios, another strain of D. rerio, also preferred the familiar object after a 1 min delay. Object preference could be re-established in zebra danios by administration of nicotine tartrate salt (50mg/L) prior to stimuli presentation, suggesting a memory-enhancing effect of nicotine. Additionally, exploration biases were present only when the objects were of intermediate size (2 × 5 cm). Our results demonstrate zebra and leopard danios have recognition memory, and that low nicotine doses can improve this memory type in zebra danios. However, exploration biases, from which memory is inferred, depend on object size. These findings suggest zebrafish ecology might influence object preference, as zebrafish neophobia could reflect natural anti-predatory behaviour.

  10. Selecting a Reference Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jared E.; Carlson, Laura A.; Hill, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    One way to describe the location of an object is to relate it to another object. Often there are many nearby objects, each of which could serve as a candidate to be the reference object. A common theoretical assumption is that features that make a given object salient relative to the candidate set are instrumental in determining which is selected.…

  11. Packing interface energetics in different crystal forms of the λ Cro dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Logan S; Miyashita, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    Variation among crystal structures of the λ Cro dimer highlights conformational flexibility. The structures range from a wild type closed to a mutant fully open conformation, but it is unclear if each represents a stable solution state or if one may be the result of crystal packing. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate the energetics of crystal packing interfaces and the influence of site-directed mutagenesis on them in order to examine the effect of crystal packing on wild type and mutant Cro dimer conformation. Replica exchange MD of mutant Cro in solution shows that the observed conformational differences between the wild type and mutant protein are not the direct consequence of mutation. Instead, simulation of Cro in different crystal environments reveals that mutation affects the stability of crystal forms. Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area binding energy calculations reveal the detailed energetics of packing interfaces. Packing interfaces can have diverse properties in strength, energetic components, and some are stronger than the biological dimer interface. Further analysis shows that mutation can strengthen packing interfaces by as much as ∼5 kcal/mol in either crystal environment. Thus, in the case of Cro, mutation provides an additional energetic contribution during crystal formation that may stabilize a fully open higher energy state. Moreover, the effect of mutation in the lattice can extend to packing interfaces not involving mutation sites. Our results provide insight into possible models for the effect of crystallization on Cro conformational dynamics and emphasize careful consideration of protein crystal structures.

  12. Incipient motion in gravel bed rivers due to energetic turbulent flow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos

    2013-04-01

    This contribution reviews recent developments and contributions in the field of incipient motion and entrainment of coarse sediment grains due to the action of near bed turbulent flows. Specifically, traditional shear based spatio-temporally averaged concepts and instantaneous stress tensor criteria are contrasted to the newly proposed flow event based impulse and energy criteria. The energy criterion, suggests that only sufficiently energetic turbulent events can remove a particle from its resting position on the bed surface and result on its entrainment downstream. While the impulse and energy criteria are interconnected through the energy-impulse equation, the later appears to be more versatile and appropriate for generalising to sediment transport. These flow event based criteria have a sound physical basis for describing the intermittent character of particle entrainment as inherited by near boundary turbulence at near threshold conditions. These criteria can be derived from fundamental laws of physics such as Newtonian classical mechanics and the Lagrange equations respectively. The energetic events that are capable of performing geomorphic work at the scale of individual particles are shown to follow a power law, meaning that more energetic events (capable of removing larger stones) are expected to occur less frequently. In addition, this paper discusses the role of the coefficient of energy transfer efficiency introduced in the energy equation for particle entrainment. A preliminary investigation from analysis of a series of mobile grain flume experiments illustrates that different signatures of turbulence or sequence of flow structures may have different effectiveness towards particle transport. Characteristic cases of specific energetic flow events and the associated particle response are shown and classified with regard to the time required for complete entrainment. Finally these findings are commented with respect to the implications for sediment

  13. Simulating polar bear energetics during a seasonal fast using a mechanistic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D Mathewson

    Full Text Available In this study we tested the ability of a mechanistic model (Niche Mapper™ to accurately model adult, non-denning polar bear (Ursus maritimus energetics while fasting during the ice-free season in the western Hudson Bay. The model uses a steady state heat balance approach, which calculates the metabolic rate that will allow an animal to maintain its core temperature in its particular microclimate conditions. Predicted weight loss for a 120 day fast typical of the 1990s was comparable to empirical studies of the population, and the model was able to reach a heat balance at the target metabolic rate for the entire fast, supporting use of the model to explore the impacts of climate change on polar bears. Niche Mapper predicted that all but the poorest condition bears would survive a 120 day fast under current climate conditions. When the fast extended to 180 days, Niche Mapper predicted mortality of up to 18% for males. Our results illustrate how environmental conditions, variation in animal properties, and thermoregulation processes may impact survival during extended fasts because polar bears were predicted to require additional energetic expenditure for thermoregulation during a 180 day fast. A uniform 3°C temperature increase reduced male mortality during a 180 day fast from 18% to 15%. Niche Mapper explicitly links an animal's energetics to environmental conditions and thus can be a valuable tool to help inform predictions of climate-related population changes. Since Niche Mapper is a generic model, it can make energetic predictions for other species threatened by climate change.

  14. Early results on energetic particle dynamics and structure from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B.; Westlake, J. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Pollock, C. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Blake, J. B.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The cluster of four, formation-flying spacecraft, comprising the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched on 13 March 2015 into near equatorial 1.2 x 12 RE orbits, provides an important new asset for assessing the transport of energy and matter from the distant regions of Earth's magnetosphere into the inner regions. Here we report on early results from the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) instrument on each of the MMS Spacecraft. EIS provides nearly all-sky energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions for 1 MeV. It also measures energetic electrons from 25 keV to > 0.5 MeV in support and coordination with the electron-focused Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS). During the early phase of the MMS mission, while the full complement of instruments was being commissioned prior to the prime mission phase beginning 1 September 2015, EIS observed dynamic energetic particle injections at the root of the magnetotail between the post-midnight regions and dawn in association with numerous dipolarization fronts and related processes. Here we report on coordinated measurements between MMS's EIS instrument and EIS's sister instrument on the Van Allen Probes, RBSPICE, to further address the relationship between dynamic injections and depolarization fronts in the magnetotail and injections observed deep within the magnetosphere's ring current regions. We also report preliminary result on using energetic particle gradients and anistotropies to diagnose magnetopause structures near mission-identified reconnection sites.

  15. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energetics of flattened carbon nonoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A

    1998-09-01

    When examined under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, carbon soot produced alongside buckytubes in an arc-discharge is found to contain a small percentage of flattened carbon shells. These objects are shown to be small graphite flakes which eliminated their dangling bonds by terminating their edges with highly curved junctions. Ideal models for these structures are presented, and their energy estimated. The calculations show that the establishment of highly curved junctions is energetically favourable for a graphite flake in an inert atmosphere. Flattened shells also appear more stable than their `inflated` counterparts (fullerene `onions` and buckytubes) when the shell dimensions obey specific criteria.(authors) 29 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  17. Modelling rock fragmentation of Extremely Energetic Rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Dattola, Giuseppe; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extremely energetic rockfalls (EER) are phenomena for which the combination of a large volume (at least some thousands of m ) and a free fall height of hundreds of metres, results in a large released energy. We fix a threshold value of around 1/50 of kilotons to define such a type of events. Documented examples include several events with dif-ferent size in the Alps (Dru, 2005, 2011, 265,000, 59,200 m3; val Fiscalina - Cima Una, 2007, 40,000 m3; Thurwieser 2004, ca 2 Mm3; Cengalo, 2011, 1.5*105 m3 in 2016, in Switzerland; Civetta, 2013, ca 50,000 m3;), in the Apennines (Gran Sasso, 2006, 30,000 m3), Rocky Mountains (Yosemite, Happy Isles, 38,000 m3), and Himalaya. EERs may become more frequent on steep and sharp mountain peaks as a consequence of permafrost thawing at higher altitudes. In contrast to low energy rockfalls where block disintegration is limited, in EERs the impact after free fall causes an immediate and efficient release of energy much like an explosion. The severe disintegration of the rock and the corresponding air blast are capable of snapping trees many hundreds of metres ahead of the fall area. Pulverized rock at high speed can abrade tree logs, and the resulting suspension flow may travel much further the impact zone, blanketing vast surrounding areas. Using both published accounts of some of these events and collecting direct data for some of them, we present some basic models to describe the involved processes based on analogies with explosions and explosive fragmentation. Of the initial energy, one part is used up in the rock disintegration, and the rest is shared between the shock wave and air blast. The fragmentation energy is calculated based on the fitting of the dust size spectrum by using different proba-bilistic distribution laws and the definition of a surface energy and by considering the involved strain rate. We find the fragmentation is around one third of the initial boulder energy. Finally, we evaluate the velocity of the

  18. Microbial Energetics Beneath the Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J. A.; Turchyn, A. V.; Farquhar, J.; Priscu, J. C.; Schrag, D. P.; Pearson, A.

    2007-12-01

    Subglacial microbiology is controlled by glacier hydrology, bedrock lithology, and the preglacial ecosystem. These factors can all affect metabolic function by influencing electron acceptor and donor availability in the subglacial setting leaving biogeochemical signatures that can be used to determine ecosystem processes. Blood Falls, an iron-rich, episodic subglacial outflow from the Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys Antarctica provides an example of how microbial community structure and function can provide insight into subglacial hydrology. This subglacial outflow contains cryoconcentrated, Pliocene-age seawater salts that pooled in the upper Taylor Valley and was subsequently covered by the advance of the Taylor Glacier. Biogeochemical measurements, culture-based techniques, and genomic analysis were used to characterize microbes and chemistry associated with the subglacial outflow. The isotopic composition of important geochemical substrates (i.e., δ34Ssulfate, Δ33Ssulfate, δ18Osulfate, δ18Owater, Δ14SDIC) were also measured to provide more detail on subglacial microbial energetics. Typically, subglacial systems, when driven to anoxia by the hydrolysis of organic matter, will follow a continuum of redox chemistries utilizing electron acceptors with decreasing reduction potential (e.g., Fe (III), sulfate, CO2). Our data provide no evidence for sulfate reduction below the Taylor Glacier despite high dissolved organic carbon (450 μM C) and measurable metabolic activity. We contend that, in the case of the Taylor Glacier, the in situ bioenergetic reduction potential has been 'short-circuited' at Fe(III)-reduction and excludes sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Given the length of time that this marine system has been isolated from phototrophic production (~2 Mya) the ability to degrade and consume increasingly recalcitrant organic carbon is likely an important component to the observed redox chemistry. Our work indicates that glacier hydrology

  19. Salt-bridge energetics in halophilic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Nayek

    Full Text Available Halophilic proteins have greater abundance of acidic over basic and very low bulky hydrophobic residues. Classical electrostatic stabilization was suggested as the key determinant for halophilic adaptation of protein. However, contribution of specific electrostatic interactions (i.e. salt-bridges to overall stability of halophilic proteins is yet to be understood. To understand this, we use Adaptive-Poison-Boltzmann-Solver Methods along with our home-built automation to workout net as well as associated component energy terms such as desolvation energy, bridge energy and background energy for 275 salt-bridges from 20 extremely halophilic proteins. We then perform extensive statistical analysis on general and energetic attributes on these salt-bridges. On average, 8 salt-bridges per 150 residues protein were observed which is almost twice than earlier report. Overall contributions of salt-bridges are -3.0 kcal mol-1. Majority (78% of salt-bridges in our dataset are stable and conserved in nature. Although, average contributions of component energy terms are equal, their individual details vary greatly from one another indicating their sensitivity to local micro-environment. Notably, 35% of salt-bridges in our database are buried and stable. Greater desolvation penalty of these buried salt-bridges are counteracted by stable network salt-bridges apart from favorable equal contributions of bridge and background terms. Recruitment of extensive network salt-bridges (46% with a net contribution of -5.0 kcal mol-1 per salt-bridge, seems to be a halophilic design wherein favorable average contribution of background term (-10 kcal mol-1 exceeds than that of bridge term (-7 kcal mol-1. Interiors of proteins from halophiles are seen to possess relatively higher abundance of charge and polar side chains than that of mesophiles which seems to be satisfied by cooperative network salt-bridges. Overall, our theoretical analyses provide insight into halophilic

  20. Solar energetic particle propagation in 3-dimensional heliospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Qin, G.; Rassoul, H.

    2008-05-01

    We present the first model calculation of solar energetic particle propagation in realistic 3-dimensional heliopsheric magnetic field. The model includes essentially all the particle transport mechanisms: streaming along magnetic fields, convection with the solar wind, pitch-angle diffusion, focusing, perpendicular diffusion, and pitch-angle dependent adiabatic cooling. We solve the Fokker-Planck transport equation with simulation of backward stochastic processes in a fixed reference frame. Here we focus on high-energy E > ~ 10 MeV solar energetic particles that are accelerated and injected near the Sun. The source of solar energetic particles can be either solar flares or coronal mass ejections, both having limited coverage of latitude and longitude on the solar surface. We compute the particle flux and anisotropy profiles at various observation locations in interplanetary space up to 5 AU from the ecliptic to the solar poles. We found that solar energetic particles are observed no matter whether an observer is directly connected to solar source by the magnetic field. Our model calculation results can explain why we often see solar energetic particles reach an almost uniform reservoir in the inner heliosphere a few days after the onset of a solar energetic particle event and then the intensities of particles in a broad range of energies decay uniformly everywhere. This phenomenon can happen without a need of particle diffusion barrier in the outer heliosphere. We will discuss what mechanism is responsible for the formation of such a reservoir and what role the perpendicular diffusion plays in the transport of solar energetic particles.

  1. Specification of Concurrent Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten U.

    relation over two objects and an event. In the model, objects can be composed by parallel composition, encapsulation, and hiding of operations. Refinement between objects is defined as fair trace inclusion.A specification language is presented where objects can be specified operationally by abstract......Concurrent objects are named concurrent processes that interact by invoking each other's operations. We describe how such concurrent objects can be specified, how objects can be composed, and how it can be shown that one object refines another.First a model is defined, based on a transition...

  2. Effects of different strength training methods on postexercise energetic expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Rodrigo Lavinas; Brentano, Michel Arias; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2010-08-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strength training in increasing energetic expenditure (EE) both during and after training sessions, there are no studies available that analyze the influence on EE of the order in which exercises are performed. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to verify whether the order in which exercises are performed, represented by 2 different methods of strength training (circuit [CT] and pre-exhaustion [PE]), influences the magnitude of the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) as well as the EE. Eight nonstrength-trained women participated in the study. Two strength training sessions, with different orders of execution, were held with 7 exercises performed with loads of between 50% and 55% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). The oxygen uptake was measured before the training sessions, and the difference between the values found was taken as the EPOC of each training session and used in later analysis. No significant differences were found in either the EPOC (CT: 7.19 L +/- 6.17 an. PE: 7.22 +/- 5.84 L) or the postexercise EE (CT: 34.67 +/- 29.76 Kcal, PE: 34.77 +/- 28.15 Kcal) of the 2 training methodologies. Our results indicate that, in strength training, the magnitude of the EPOC is not linked to the order in which the exercises are performed. However, the absence of recovery periods between the sets and the exercises promotes an increase in the magnitude of the EPOC to the levels found in training sessions with higher percentages of 1RM.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERACTIVE SOFTWARE TO STUDY ENERGETIC METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuella da Silva Cardoso

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Technology allows the creation of dynamic interfaces and graphics, which enables the construction of different scenarios that simulate biochemical events at cellular and molecular level. Furthermore, games have the ability to amuse and stimulate students and thus keeping them interested and receptive. Therefore, digital games must be explored as teaching aids once they have features that enhance the teaching process. OBJECTIVES: This project aimed to develop an educational software that contributes to the understanding of various events taking place in energetic metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We developed a downloadable educational game in Java, divided into two levels, each of which tackle issues about the Krebs cycle, the respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Initially, the names of the components of the metabolic process appear randomly on computer screen and the user must follow clues to place them in the right sequence, until all the biochemical reactions are complete. In next phase, there is a quiz about details and clinical correlates related to the theme of the game. Finally, students have to answer a form in order to verify acceptance and relevance of the game. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: The game was applied to 40 medical students from UFF. The game’s subject matter and its difficulty were analyzed and more than 40% of students classified both respiratory chain and Krebs cycle as difficult. These findings highlight the need to establish new methods to enhance the teaching and learning processes and decrease the students’ difficulties, which is the game’s purpose. The game was very highly rated by students once they evaluated the game as an excellent educational aid and 92% of students agreed that it complements the content discussed in classroom. Finally, 97,5% of students said they would play again. CONCLUSION: Therefore, educational games could be an excellent tool to optimize learning.

  4. Non-coherent energetic interfaces accounting for degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Ali; Steinmann, Paul; Javili, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Within the continuum mechanics framework, there are two main approaches to model interfaces: classical cohesive zone modeling (CZM) and interface elasticity theory. The classical CZM deals with geometrically non-coherent interfaces for which the constitutive relation is expressed in terms of traction-separation laws. However, CZM lacks any response related to the stretch of the mid-plane of the interface. This issue becomes problematic particularly at small scales with increasing interface area to bulk volume ratios, where interface elasticity is no longer negligible. The interface elasticity theory, in contrast to CZM, deals with coherent interfaces that are endowed with their own energetic structures, and thus is capable of capturing elastic resistance to tangential stretch. Nonetheless, the interface elasticity theory suffers from the lack of inelastic material response, regardless of the strain level. The objective of this contribution therefore is to introduce a generalized mechanical interface model that couples both the elastic response along the interface and the cohesive response across the interface whereby interface degradation is taken into account. The material degradation of the interface mid-plane is captured by a non-local damage model of integral-type. The out-of-plane decohesion is described by a classical cohesive zone model. These models are then coupled through their corresponding damage variables. The non-linear governing equations and the weak forms thereof are derived. The numerical implementation is carried out using the finite element method and consistent tangents are derived. Finally, a series of numerical examples is studied to provide further insight into the problem and to carefully elucidate key features of the proposed theory.

  5. Enhancement of hybrid rocket combustion performance using nano-sized energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risha, Grant Alexander

    Until now, the regression rate of classical hybrid rocket engines have typically been an order of magnitude lower than solid propellant motors; thus, hybrids require a relatively large fuel surface area for a given thrust level. In addition to low linear regression rates, relatively low combustion efficiency (87 to 92%), low mass burning rates, varying oxidizer-to-fuel ratio during operation, and lack of scaling laws have been reported. These disadvantages can be ameliorated by introducing nano-sized energetic powder additives into the solid fuel. The addition of nano-sized energetic particles into the solid fuel enhances performance as measured by parameters such as: density specific impulse, mass and linear burning rates, and thrust. Thermophysical properties of the solid fuel such as density, heat of combustion, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are also enhanced. The types of nano-sized energetic particles used in this study include aluminum, boron, boron carbide, and some Viton-A coated particles. Since the combustion process of solid fuels in a hybrid rocket engine is governed by the mass flux of the oxidizer entering the combustion chamber, the rate-limiting process is the mixing and reacting of the pyrolysis products of the fuel grain with the incoming oxidizer. The overall goal of this research was to determine the relative propulsive and combustion behavior for a family of newly-developed HTPB-based solid-fuel formulations containing various nano-sized energetic particles. Seventeen formulations contained 13% additive by weight, one formulation (SF4) contained 6.5% additive by weight, and one formulation (SF19) contained 5.65% boron by weight. The two hybrid rocket engines which were used in this investigation were the Long Grain Center-Perforated (LGCP) rocket engine and the X-Ray Transparent Casing (XTC) rocket engine. The smaller scale LGCP rocket engine was used to evaluate all of the formulations because conducting experiments using the

  6. Synthesis of Energetic Nitrocarbamates from Polynitro Alcohols and Their Potential as High Energetic Oxidizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axthammer, Quirin J; Krumm, Burkhard; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2015-06-19

    A new synthesis strategy for the preparation of energetic carbamates and nitrocarbamates starting from readily available polynitro alcohols is introduced. The efficient synthesis of mainly new carbamates was performed with the reactive chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) reagent. The carbamates were nitrated using mixed acid to form the corresponding primary nitrocarbamates. The thermal stability of all synthesized compounds was studied using differential scanning calorimetry, and the energies of formation were calculated on the CBS-4 M level of theory. Detonation parameters and propulsion properties were determined with the software package EXPLO5 V6.02. Furthermore, for all new substances single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies were performed and are presented and discussed as Supporting Information.

  7. Food additives and preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  8. Energetic Particles: From Sun to Heliosphere - and vice versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.; Boden, S.; Boettcher, S. I.; Cernuda, I.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Droege, W.; Elftmann, R.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Ho, G. C.; Klassen, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mann, G. J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Mason, G. M.; Panitzsch, L.; Prieto, M.; Sanchez, S.; Steinhagen, J.; Tammen, J.; Terasa, C.; Yu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Energetic particles in the heliosphere can be measured at their elevated energetic status after three processes: injection, acceleration, and transport. Suprathermal seed particles have speeds well above the fast magnetosonic speed in the solar wind frame of reference and can vary from location to location and within the solar activity cycle. Acceleration sites include reconnecting current sheets in solar flares or magnetspheric boundaries, shocks in the solar corona, heliosphere and a planetary obstacles, as well as planetary magnetospheres. Once accelerated, particles are transported from the acceleration site into and through the heliosphere. Thus, by investigating properties of energetic particles such as their composition, energy spectra, pitch-angle distribution, etc. one can attempt to distinguish their origin or injection and acceleration site. This in turn allows us to better understand transport effects whose underlying microphysics is also a key ingredient in the acceleration of particles. In this presentation we will present some clear examples which link energetic particles from their observing site to their source locations. These include Jupiter electrons, singly-charged He ions from CIRs, and 3He from solar flares. We will compare these examples with the measurement capabilities of the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on Solar Orbiter and consider implications for the key science goal of Solar Orbiter and Solar Proble Plus - How the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere.

  9. Evaluation of Energetic Plasticisers for Solid Gun Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the evaluation of four different energetic plasticisers, viz., glycidyl azidepolymer (GAP, MW = 390, 1,5-diazido-3-nitrazapentane (DANPE, ethylene-glycol-bis-azido-acetate (EGBAA and N-n-butyl-N-(2 nitroxyethyl nitramine (n-Bu-NENA separately into highenergy gun propellant containing 28 per cent NC (13.1 N %, 65 per cent RDX, 6 per cent di-octyl-phthahate (DOP and 1 per cent carbamite.  Four different propellant compositions based on theenergetic plasticiser have been formulated separately with the replacement of non-energeticplasticiser, DOP. The propellants were processed by standard solvent method and evaluatedexperimentally along with the control composition to determine the ballistic parameters, cal-val,sensitivity, thermal characterisation, thermal stability and mechanical properties. The performanceof the propellants containing the energetic plasticiser has  been compared with that of thecontrol composition containing the non-energetic plasticiser, DOP so as to assess the suitabilityof the energetic plasticiser for the futuristic gun propellant formulations. It has been found outthat n-Bu-NENA is the superior plasticiser among the four energetic plasticisers evaluated inthis study.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(1, pp.86-93, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1627

  10. Automatic object recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganath, H. S.; Mcingvale, Pat; Sage, Heinz

    1988-01-01

    Geometric and intensity features are very useful in object recognition. An intensity feature is a measure of contrast between object pixels and background pixels. Geometric features provide shape and size information. A model based approach is presented for computing geometric features. Knowledge about objects and imaging system is used to estimate orientation of objects with respect to the line of sight.

  11. Objects in Films: analyzing signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAMBARATO, Renira Rampazzo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this essay is the analysis of daily objects as signs in films. Objects from everyday life acquire several functions in films: they can be solely used as scene objects or to support a particular film style. Other objects are specially chosen to translate a character’s interior state of mind or the filmmaker’s aesthetical or ethical commitment to narrative concepts. In order to understand such functions and commitments, we developed a methodology for film analysis which focuses on the objects. Object interpretation, as the starting point of film analysis, is not a new approach. For instance, French film critic André Bazin proposed that use of object interpretation in the 1950s. Similarly, German film theorist Siegfried Kracauer stated it in the 1960s. However, there is currently no existing analytical model to use when engaging in object interpretation in film. This methodology searches for the most representative objects in films which involves both quantitative and qualitative analysis; we consider the number of times each object appears in a film (quantitative analysis as well as the context of their appearance, i.e. the type of shot used and how that creates either a larger or smaller relevance and/or expressiveness (qualitative analysis. In addition to the criteria of relevance and expressiveness, we also analyze the functionality of an object by exploring details and specifying the role various objects play in films. This research was developed at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada and was supported by the Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Canada (DFAIT.

  12. Energetic methods to study bifunctional biotin operon repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    1998-01-01

    Application of a broad range of approaches and techniques to analysis of the functional energetics of the biotin regulatory system has enabled dissection of each of the steps in the assembly of this transcriptional repression complex. Although the molecular details of the interactions are not yet completely understood, the studies described in this article have laid a solid foundation for future studies of the system. The application of kinetic and equilibrium methods to studies of binding of the allosteric effector has allow determination of the kinetic parameters governing the interaction of the protein and ligand. The kinetic parameters have, furthermore, been utilized to calculate the equilibrium parameters associated with the binding. The great advantage of using kinetic methods to study the binding process is the additional information provide about the mechanism of allosteric activation of the protein. Based on the initial observation of a kinetic time course that is consistent with the occurrence of a structural change concomitant with effector binding, additional measurements have been performed that have allowed formulation of a testable hypothesis concerning the nature and location of one locus: the structural change in the three-dimensional structure of BirA. Studies of assembly of the protein indicate the bio-5-AMP is an allosteric activator of dimerization of the protein. The dimerization is, however, weak. These results have been critical in analyzing site-specific DNA binding measurements. Application of the DNase I footprinting technique has allowed formulation of a model for association of holoBirA with bioO. Results of studies of binding of the protein to mutant operator templates, although not yielding the anticipated results, provide further insight into the mechanism of association of the protein and DNA. Two models for binding, the validity of which can be tested via the application of kinetic techniques, have been derived from these

  13. Object oriented methods

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Ian

    1994-01-01

    This book is a revision of Ian Graham's successful survey of the whole area of object technology. It covers object- oriented programming, object-oriented design, object- oriented analysis, object-oriented databases and treats several related technologies. New to this edition are more applications of object-oriented methods and more coverage of object-oriented database products available. Graham has also doubled the design and analysis material that examines over 60 different approaches - making this the most comprehensive book on the market. Also new is the foreword by Grady Booch.

  14. Investigation of Fuel Additive Effects on Sooting Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-28

    material to be analyzed i, illuminated with a beam of soft x-rays. These cause both photo- and Auger-electrons to be emitted from surface layer atoms. 5...by controlled sputtering away of surface material with energetic argon cations done in sequence with the ESCA procedure described above. The ESCA...may not always be estimated accurately. This difficulty’ rn-y be overcome, how., vver , by making anI additional Rayleigh measurement of’ scattered

  15. Predicting Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events: The FORSPEF Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadis, A.; Papaioannou, A.; Sandberg, I.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Kouloumvakos, A.; Jiggens, P.

    2017-09-01

    A novel integrated prediction system for solar flares (SFs) and solar energetic particle (SEP) events is presented here. The tool called forecasting solar particle events and flares (FORSPEF) provides forecasts of solar eruptive events, such as SFs with a projection to occurrence and velocity of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and the likelihood of occurrence of an SEP event. In addition, the tool provides nowcasting of SEP events based on actual SF and CME near real-time data, as well as the SEP characteristics ( e.g. peak flux, fluence, rise time, and duration) per parent solar event. The prediction of SFs relies on the effective connected magnetic field strength (B_{eff}) metric, which is based on an assessment of potentially flaring active-region (AR) magnetic configurations, and it uses a sophisticated statistical analysis of a large number of AR magnetograms. For the prediction of SEP events, new statistical methods have been developed for the likelihood of the SEP occurrence and the expected SEP characteristics. The prediction window in the forecasting scheme is 24 hours with a refresh rate of 3 hours, while the respective prediction time for the nowcasting scheme depends on the availability of the near real-time data and ranges between 15 - 20 minutes for solar flares and 6 hours for CMEs. We present the modules of the FORSPEF system, their interconnection, and the operational setup. Finally, we demonstrate the validation of the modules of the FORSPEF tool using categorical scores constructed on archived data, and we also discuss independent case studies.

  16. Can the mantle control the core?: Energetics and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    The sustainability of magnetic field generation is discussed from a coupled model of numerical mantle convection simulation and core energetics theory. The pattern of geomagnetic field could be also controlled as a consequence of mantle convection [e.g. Amit and Choblet, 2009]. Our previous studies have suggested that the best-fit scenario for explaining both sustainability of magnetic field generation caused by dynamo actions and the size of inner core would be strongly controlled by the heat transfer of mantle convection with strongly compositional heterogeneities [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004; Nakagawa and Tackley, 2010]. Here we investigate effects of initial mantle temperature and radioactive heat source in a convecting mantle with extremely high initial temperature at the core-mantle boundary that has been suggested from the hypothesis of early Earth [Labrosse et al., 2007] for checking how the mantle can control the thermal evolution of the core. Main consequence is that the amount of heat production rate and initial mantle temperature are not very sensitive to the thermal evolution of Earth's core but the convective vigor seems to be sensitive to the results. For the mantle side, the Urey ratio is not very good constraint for understanding thermal evolution of the whole Earth. In addition, we also show an example of numerical dynamo simulations with both a stably stratified layer and lateral variation of heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which expands a paper by Nakagawa [2011], evaluated from numerical mantle convection simulations for checking how the mantle can control the dynamics of the core, which checks dead or alive for the magnetic field generated by dynamo actions with strongly lateral variation of CMB heat flux.

  17. Forecasting the Solar Drivers of Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Large flares and fast CMEs are the drivers of the most severe space weather including Solar Energetic Particle Events (SEP Events). Large flares and their co-produced CMEs are powered by the explosive release of free magnetic energy stored in non-potential magnetic fields of sunspot active regions. The free energy is stored in and released from the low-beta regime of the active region's magnetic field above the photosphere, in the chromosphere and low corona. From our work over the past decade and from similar work of several other groups, it is now well established that (1) a proxy of the free magnetic energy stored above the photosphere can be measured from photospheric magnetograms, maps of the measured field in the photosphere, and (2) an active region's rate of production of major CME/flare eruptions in the coming day or so is strongly correlated with its present measured value of the free-energy proxy. These results have led us to use the large database of SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning Solar Cycle 23 to obtain empirical forecasting curves that from an active region's present measured value of the free-energy proxy give the active region's expected rates of production of major flares, CMEs, fast CMEs, and SEP Events in the coming day or so (Falconer et al 2011, Space Weather, 9, S04003). We will present these forecasting curves and demonstrate the accuracy of their forecasts. In addition, we will show that the forecasts for major flares and fast CMEs can be made significantly more accurate by taking into account not only the value of the free energy proxy but also the active region's recent productivity of major flares; specifically, whether the active region has produced a major flare (GOES class M or X) during the past 24 hours before the time of the measured magnetogram.

  18. Microwave observations for forecasting energetic particles from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Pietro; Nuñez, Marlon; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Malandraki, Olga; Pavlos, Evgenios; Miteva, Rositsa

    2017-04-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs), especially protons and heavy ions, are a major space weather hazard when they impact spacecraft and the terrestrial atmosphere. Forecasting schemes have been developed, which use earlier signatures of particle acceleration to predict the arrival of solar protons and ions in the space environment of the Earth. In this study, we investigate the advantages of microwave observations for forecasting the SEP occurrence and SEP energy spectrum. The UMASEP scheme forecasts the occurrence and the importance of a SEP event based on combined observations of soft X-rays, their time derivative, and protons above 10 MeV at geosynchronous orbit. We explore the possibility to replace the derivative of the soft X-ray time history by the microwave time history in the UMASEP scheme. For the forecast of the SEP energy spectrum, we investigate if the hardness or softness of the proton spectrum in interplanetary space can be predicted from the shape of the microwave spectrum. The technique developed by Chertok et al (2009) is to use the ratio of peak microwave flux densities near 9 and 15 GHz as a predictor. Here, we tested this scheme over solar cycle 23 and 24. A detailed analysis of the results including limitations the methods are presented. We conclude that microwave patrol observations improve SEP forecasting schemes that employ soft X-rays. High-quality microwave data available in real time appear as a significant addition to our ability to predict SEP occurrence and their energy spectrum. Acknowledgements: This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 637324

  19. Adsorption of nitrogen on thermally treated peat soils: the role of energetic and geometric heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowaka, Z.; Hajnos, M.; Borowko, M.; Sokolowski, S.

    1999-11-01

    The authors investigate adsorption isotherms of nitrogen at 80 K on several peat soils. In addition to natural soil samples they also study samples thermally treated at 50, 100, and 150 C. The experimental adsorption isotherms are used to evaluate the surface fractal dimension and the energy distribution functions. Moreover, for some samples they have also determined the pore size distributions from mercury intrusion data. The authors compare the surface fractal dimensions evaluated from the mercury intrusion data and from adsorption isotherms and discuss how the thermal treatment changes the energetic heterogeneity of the samples.

  20. Emissions from energetic material waste during the Molten Salt Destruction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, B.E.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-07-05

    The Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) process is an alternative to open burn/open detonation for destroying energetic materials; MSD has inherently low gaseous emissions, and the salt bath can scrub both acidic gases and particulates. It was demonstrated that high explosives and a liquid propellant can be safely and completely destroyed using MSD. Gaseous emissions of NOx and CO are very low. Nitrate builds up in the salt bath when nitrate-rich materials are destroyed, but addition fuel reduces the nitrate to NO. A program has been begun to add catalytic materials to the bed to further reduce emissions; a small molten salt bath has been constructed for chemical kinetic studies.

  1. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  2. Coordinate Transformations in Object Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Markus

    2006-01-01

    A basic problem of visual perception is how human beings recognize objects after spatial transformations. Three central classes of findings have to be accounted for: (a) Recognition performance varies systematically with orientation, size, and position; (b) recognition latencies are sequentially additive, suggesting analogue transformation…

  3. Effect of energetic oxygen atoms on neutral density models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The dissociative recombination of O2(+) and NO(+) in the F region results in the production of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen with substantially greater kinetic energy than the ambient atoms. In the exosphere these energetic atoms have long free paths. They can ascend to altitudes of several thousand kilometers and can travel horizontally to distances of the order of the earth's radius. The distribution of energetic oxygen atoms is derived by means of models of the ion and neutral densities for quiet and disturbed solar conditions. A distribution technique is used to study the motion of the atoms in the collision-dominated region. Ballistic trajectories are calculated in the spherical gravitational field of the earth. The present calculations show that the number densities of energetic oxygen atoms predominate over the ambient atomic oxygen densities above 1000 km under quiet solar conditions and above 1600 km under disturbed solar conditions.

  4. Effect of Energetic Electrons on Quiet Auroral Arc Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroki; Ohno, Nobuaki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The theory of feedback instability between the magnetosphere and ionosphere is believed as one of the candidate to explain the formation of quiet auroral arc. Then, some magneto-hydro- dynamics simulations showed the arc formation by this macroscopic instability, while the effect of auroral energetic electrons on the arc formation was neglected or given as a macroscopic parameter in these simulations. On the other hand, because of the recent development of particle simulations, auroral energetic electrons are thought to be produced by the super ion-acoustic double layer that should be created by microscopic instability. To make close investigation of auroral arc formation, it is necessary to consider the interaction with microscopic instability. In this paper, we numerically study the effect of energetic electrons on quiet auroral arc formation by means of the Macro-Micro Interlocked simulation.

  5. Chemical rocket propulsion a comprehensive survey of energetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shimada, Toru; Sinditskii, Valery; Calabro, Max

    2017-01-01

    Developed and expanded from the work presented at the New Energetic Materials and Propulsion Techniques for Space Exploration workshop in June 2014, this book contains new scientific results, up-to-date reviews, and inspiring perspectives in a number of areas related to the energetic aspects of chemical rocket propulsion. This collection covers the entire life of energetic materials from their conceptual formulation to practical manufacturing; it includes coverage of theoretical and experimental ballistics, performance properties, as well as laboratory-scale and full system-scale, handling, hazards, environment, ageing, and disposal. Chemical Rocket Propulsion is a unique work, where a selection of accomplished experts from the pioneering era of space propulsion and current technologists from the most advanced international laboratories discuss the future of chemical rocket propulsion for access to, and exploration of, space. It will be of interest to both postgraduate and final-year undergraduate students in...

  6. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Intitute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung, Indonesia 40132 dhani@as.itb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  7. Energetics of atomic scale structure changes in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Bichoutskaia, Elena

    2015-05-21

    The presence of defects in graphene has an essential influence on its physical and chemical properties. The formation, behaviour and healing of defects are determined by energetic characteristics of atomic scale structure changes. In this article, we review recent studies devoted to atomic scale reactions during thermally activated and irradiation-induced processes in graphene. The formation energies of vacancies, adatoms and topological defects are discussed. Defect formation, healing and migration are quantified in terms of activation energies (barriers) for thermally activated processes and by threshold energies for processes occurring under electron irradiation. The energetics of defects in the graphene interior and at the edge is analysed. The effects of applied strain and a close proximity of the edge on the energetics of atomic scale reactions are overviewed. Particular attention is given to problems where further studies are required.

  8. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  9. Energetic salts with π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions lead the way to future energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Vo, Thao T; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-02-04

    Among energetic materials, there are two significant challenges facing researchers: 1) to develop ionic CHNO explosives with higher densities than their parent nonionic molecules and (2) to achieve a fine balance between high detonation performance and low sensitivity. We report a surprising energetic salt, hydroxylammonium 3-dinitromethanide-1,2,4-triazolone, that exhibits exceptional properties, viz., higher density, superior detonation performance, and improved thermal, impact, and friction stabilities, then those of its precursor, 3-dinitromethyl-1,2,4-triazolone. The solid-state structure features of the new energetic salt were investigated with X-ray diffraction which showed π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions that contribute to closer packing and higher density. According to the experimental results and theoretical analysis, the newly designed energetic salt also gives rise to a workable compromise in high detonation properties and desirable stabilities. These findings will enhance the future prospects for rational energetic materials design and commence a new chapter in this field.

  10. Energetic-assisted scanning thermal lithography for patterning silver nanoparticles in polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Min; Yeh, Chung-Hsien; Chen, Lung; Huang, De-An; Kuo, Changshu

    2013-01-01

    Energetic-assisted scanning thermal lithography (SThL) was demonstrated with the addition of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) for patterning silver nanoparticles. SThL samples were prepared by spin-coating poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films preloaded with BPO and silver nitrate precursors. Localized thermal analysis via probe heating demonstrated that the BPO decomposition in the polymer film took place at the temperature of 80 °C. Above this temperature, the thermal probe initiated the decomposition of the peroxide, which resulted in the in situ discharge of exothermal energy to compensate the joule shortage and the rapid cooling in the SThL thin film samples. The additional joule energy thermally enhanced the synthesis of silver nanoparticles, which were patterned and embedded in the PMMA thin film. Surface plasmon resonance scattering of these silver nanoparticles was observed by dark-field optical microscopy, whereas the nanoparticle distribution was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Variations in the scanning probe temperatures and peroxide concentrations were carefully investigated to optimize the thermal lithography efficiency upon the addition of energetics.

  11. Object reading: text recognition for object recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaoglu, S.; van Gemert, J.C.; Gevers, T.

    2012-01-01

    We propose to use text recognition to aid in visual object class recognition. To this end we first propose a new algorithm for text detection in natural images. The proposed text detection is based on saliency cues and a context fusion step. The algorithm does not need any parameter tuning and can d

  12. Data quality objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberer, F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) spends about $500 million annually in collecting environmental data for scientific research and regulatory decision making. In addition, the regulated community may spend as much as ten times more each year in responding to EPA compliance requirements. Among the EPA and the regulated community there are several important common concerns: both want to make informed decisions using the right type, quality, and quantity of data. Collecting new data is very resource intensive to all parties. Neither EPA nor the regulated community can afford to collect more or {open_quotes}better{close_quotes} data than are really needed; the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process is a systematic planning tool for ensuring that the right data will be collected for arriving at a decision within the desired confidence constraints. Using the DQO process to plan environmental data collections can help improve their effectiveness and efficiency, and enhance the defensibility of the decisions for which the data are used.

  13. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  14. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This final report describes activities under NASA contract NAS5-31213 to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. The report covers the entire contract period from 8 May 1991 to 7 Jun. 1994. This is a contract under the NASA Guest Investigator Program for the analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. These combined data sets have been used to survey the energetic ion environment in the earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there.

  15. ENERGETIC EXTREMES IN REEF FISH OCCUPYING HARSH HABITATS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2009-01-01

    document how relatively small changes in fin morphology has afforded some coral reef fish taxa with exceptional locomotor performance and energetic efficiency, and how this key attribute may have played a key role in the evolution and ecology of several diverse Indo-Pacific reef fish families. Using......-finned counterparts. We discuss how such differences in locomotor efficiency are pivotal to the habitat-use of these fishes, and how eco-energetic models may be used to provide new insights into spatial variations in fish demography and ecology among coral reef habitat zones....

  16. MOISTURE HUMIDITY EQUILIBRIUM OF WOOD CHIPS FROM ENERGETIC CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Barwicki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Processes occurring during storage of wood chips for energetic or furniture industry purposes were presented. As a result of carried out investigations, dependences of temperature and relative humidity changes of surrounding air were shown. Modified Henderson equation can be utilized for computer simulation of storing and drying processes concerning wood chips for energetic and furniture industry purposes. It reflects also obtained results from experiments carried out with above mentioned material. Using computer simulation program we can examine different wood chips storing conditions to avoid overheating and loss problems.

  17. Electronic Density Approaches to the Energetics of Noncovalent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Politzer

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present an overview of procedures that have been developed to compute several energetic quantities associated with noncovalent interactions. These formulations involve numerical integration over appropriate electronic densities. Our focus is upon the electrostatic interaction between two unperturbed molecules, the effect of the polarization of each charge distribution by the other, and the total energy of interaction. The expression for the latter is based upon the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Applications to a number of systems are discussed; among them are dimers of uracil and interacting pairs of molecules in the crystal lattice of the energetic compound RDX.

  18. Higher-order-mode fiber optimized for energetic soliton propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Martin E V; Cheng, Ji; Charan, Kriti; Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Jakobsen, Dan

    2012-08-15

    We describe the design optimization of a higher-order-mode (HOM) fiber for energetic soliton propagation at wavelengths below 1300 nm. A new HOM fiber is fabricated according to our design criteria. The HOM fiber is pumped at 1045 nm by an energetic femtosecond fiber laser. The soliton self-frequency shift process shifts the center wavelength of the soliton to 1085 nm. The soliton has a temporal duration of 216 fs and a pulse energy of 6.3 nJ. The demonstrated pulse energy is approximately six times higher than the previous record in a solid core fiber at wavelengths below 1300 nm.

  19. [Food additives and healthiness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  20. Defining Learning Objectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍鑫红

    2014-01-01

    <正>This article attempts to introduce the teacher to developments in the area of specifying learning objectives.When you have studied this article carefully,you should be able to(a)distinguish between statements of aims and statements of objectives,(b)discuss the merits of writing objectives from the point of view of the learner,and(c)write both complete and abbreviated statements of learning objectives for different language skills,functions,and notions.

  1. [Historiography of medical objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Felip

    2008-01-01

    It has become acceptable among historians of medicine to profess a predilection for the historiography of medical ideas. But it is justified all the same to ask whether the logical connection really caused the origin, the change, or the disappearance of the medical objects. The interaction of ideas and medical objects assure as much objectivity as possible. In consequence, the contents of the museums, medical objects, is an aspect rather that a branch of the history of medicine.

  2. Learning Objects and Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Donna M.; Tompkins, Catherine J.

    2006-01-01

    Virtual AGE (vAGE) is an asynchronous educational environment that utilizes learning objects focused on gerontology and a learning anytime/anywhere philosophy. This paper discusses the benefits of asynchronous instruction and the process of creating learning objects. Learning objects are "small, reusable chunks of instructional media" Wiley…

  3. Presentation on Instructional Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Bibi Asia

    2009-01-01

    "Learning can be defined as change in a student's capacity for performance as a result of experience" (Kenneth D. Moore). The intended changes should be specified in instructional objectives. Viewed in this context, an objective can be defined as a clear and unambiguous description of your instructional intent. An objective is not a…

  4. On the Crime Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutaev, Rasul M.; Magomedov, Guseyn B.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research of this problem is caused by the theoretical and practical needs of a specific concept of the crime object as one of the corpus delicti signs essentially the determining and defining its object and objective side, thereby--the nature of socially dangerous act. Besides, being a facultative sign of corpus delicti, the…

  5. Birth of the Object: Detection of Objectness and Extraction of Object Shape through Object Action Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Pugeault, Nicolas; Baseski, Emre

    2008-01-01

    interact. First, by making use of an object independent grasping mechanism, physical control over potential objects can be gained. Having evaluated the initial grasping mechanism as being successful, a second behavior extracts the object shape by making use of prediction based on the motion induced...

  6. Objects in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  7. Ownership and Object History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Ori; Neary, Karen R.; Defeyter, Margaret A.; Malcolm, Sarah L.

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate behavior in relation to an object often requires judging whether it is owned and, if so, by whom. The authors propose accounts of how people make these judgments. Our central claim is that both judgments often involve making inferences about object history. In judging whether objects are owned, people may assume that artifacts (e.g.,…

  8. Recent advances in the molten salt destruction of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruneda, C. O., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for destroying explosives, liquid gun propellant, and explosives-contaminated materials on a 1.5 kg of explosive/hr bench- scale unit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). In our recently constructed 5 kg/hr pilot- scale unit we have also demonstrated the destruction of a liquid gun propellant and simulated wastes containing HMX (octogen). MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic materials waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a vessel containing molten salt (a eutectic mixture of sodium, potassium, and lithium carbonates). The following pure explosives have been destroyed in our bench-scale experimental unit located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K- 6 (keto-RDX), NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following compositions were also destroyed: Comp B, LX- IO, LX- 1 6, LX- 17, PBX-9404, and XM46 (liquid gun propellant). In this 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NO{sub x} were found to be well below 1%. In addition to destroying explosive powders and compositions we have also destroyed materials that are typical of residues which result from explosives operations. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic-bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the process data obtained on the bench-scale unit we designed and constructed a next-generation 5 kg/hr pilot-scale unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. The pilot unit has completed process implementation operations and explosives safety reviews. To date, in this

  9. Laser-driven electron acceleration in a plasma channel with an additional electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    We examine the electron acceleration in a two-dimensional plasma channel under the action of a laser field and an additional static electric field. We propose to design an appropriate additional electric field (its direction and location), in order to launch the electron onto an energetic trajectory. We find that the electron acceleration strongly depends on the coupled effects of the laser polarization, the direction, and location of the additional electric field. The additional electric field affects the electron dynamics by changing the dephasing rate. Particularly, a suitably designed additional electric field leads to a considerable energy gain from the laser pulse after the interaction with the additional electric field. The electron energy gain from the laser with the additional electric field can be much higher than that without the additional electric field. This engineering provides a possible means for producing high energetic electrons.

  10. Energetics of lateral eddy diffusion/advection:Part I. Thermodynamics and energetics of vertical eddy diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Rui Xin

    2014-01-01

    Two important nonlinear properties of seawater thermodynamics linked to changes of water density, cab-beling and elasticity (compressibility), are discussed. Eddy diffusion and advection lead to changes in den-sity;as a result, gravitational potential energy of the system is changed. Therefore, cabbeling and elasticity play key roles in the energetics of lateral eddy diffusion and advection. Vertical eddy diffusion is one of the key elements in the mechanical energy balance of the global oceans. Vertical eddy diffusion can be con-ceptually separated into two steps:stirring and subscale diffusion. Vertical eddy stirring pushes cold/dense water upward and warm/light water downward;thus, gravitational potential energy is increased. During the second steps, water masses from different places mix through subscale diffusion, and water density is increased due to cabbeling. Using WOA01 climatology and assuming the vertical eddy diffusivity is equal to a constant value of 2×103 Pa2/s, the total amount of gravitational potential energy increase due to vertical stirring in the world oceans is estimated at 263 GW. Cabbeling associated with vertical subscale diffusion is a sink of gravitational potential energy, and the total value of energy lost is estimated at 73 GW. Therefore, the net source of gravitational potential energy due to vertical eddy diffusion for the world oceans is estimated at 189 GW.

  11. Additives in yoghurt production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milna Tudor

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In yoghurt production, mainly because of sensory characteristics, different types of additives are used. Each group, and also each substance from the same group has different characteristics and properties. For that reason, for improvement of yoghurt sensory characteristics apart from addition selection, the quantity of the additive is very important. The same substance added in optimal amount improves yoghurt sensory attributes, but too small or too big addition can reduce yoghurt sensory attributes. In this paper, characteristics and properties of mostly used additives in yoghurt production are described; skimmed milk powder, whey powder, concentrated whey powder, sugars and artificial sweeteners, fruits, stabilizers, casein powder, inulin and vitamins. Also the impact of each additive on sensory and physical properties of yoghurt, syneresis and viscosity, are described, depending on used amount added in yoghurt production.

  12. Per Object statistical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Variable. This procedure was developed in order to be able to export objects as ESRI shape data with the 90-percentile of the Hue of each object's pixels as an item in the shape attribute table. This procedure uses a sub-level single pixel chessboard segmentation, loops for each of the objects......This RS code is to do Object-by-Object analysis of each Object's sub-objects, e.g. statistical analysis of an object's individual image data pixels. Statistics, such as percentiles (so-called "quartiles") are derived by the process, but the return of that can only be a Scene Variable, not an Object...... of a specific class in turn, and uses as pair of PPO stages to derive the statistics and then assign them to the objects' Object Variables. It may be that this could all be done in some other, simply way, but several other ways that were tried did not succeed. The procedure ouptut has been tested against...

  13. Words without Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Laycock

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of the problem of mass nouns depends on an expansion of our semantic/ontological taxonomy. Semantically, mass nouns are neither singular nor plural; they apply to neither just one object, nor to many objects, at a time. But their deepest kinship links them to the plural. A plural phrase — 'the cats in Kingston' — does not denote a single plural thing, but merely many distinct things. Just so, 'the water in the lake' does not denote a single aggregate — it is not ONE, but rather MUCH. The world is not the totality of singular objects, plural objects, and mass objects; for there are no plural or mass objects. It is the totality of single objects and (just stuff.

  14. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  15. Determination of foraging thresholds and effects of application on energetic carrying capacity for waterfowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagy, Heath M; Kaminski, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Energetic carrying capacity of habitats for wildlife is a fundamental concept used to better understand population ecology and prioritize conservation efforts. However, carrying capacity can be difficult to estimate accurately and simplified models often depend on many assumptions and few estimated parameters. We demonstrate the complex nature of parameterizing energetic carrying capacity models and use an experimental approach to describe a necessary parameter, a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which animals no longer can efficiently forage and acquire energy), for a guild of migratory birds. We created foraging patches with different fixed prey densities and monitored the numerical and behavioral responses of waterfowl (Anatidae) and depletion of foods during winter. Dabbling ducks (Anatini) fed extensively in plots and all initial densities of supplemented seed were rapidly reduced to 10 kg/ha and other natural seeds and tubers combined to 170 kg/ha, despite different starting densities. However, ducks did not abandon or stop foraging in wetlands when seed reduction ceased approximately two weeks into the winter-long experiment nor did they consistently distribute according to ideal-free predictions during this period. Dabbling duck use of experimental plots was not related to initial seed density, and residual seed and tuber densities varied among plant taxa and wetlands but not plots. Herein, we reached several conclusions: 1) foraging effort and numerical responses of dabbling ducks in winter were likely influenced by factors other than total food densities (e.g., predation risk, opportunity costs, forager condition), 2) foraging thresholds may vary among foraging locations, and 3) the numerical response of dabbling ducks may be an inconsistent predictor of habitat quality relative to seed and tuber density. We describe implications on habitat conservation objectives of using different foraging thresholds in energetic carrying capacity models and

  16. New fluidized bed reactor for coating of energetic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Huijser, T.; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2009-01-01

    The process of altering and changing the properties of the energetic materials by coating has been studied extensively by several scientific groups. According to the desired application different coating techniques have been developed and applied to achieve satisfactory results. Among the already de

  17. Solar Source Regions of Energetic 3He Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, G. M.; Nitta, N. V.; Cohen, C. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the surprising observations from the ACE mission has been the detection of energetic 3He emission occurring over multi-day periods. Previously observations of solar energetic 3He had detected short-lived "impulsive" energetic particle events which were associated with type III bursts and energetic electrons. The ACE observations were able to detect 3He at very low levels (<1% of 4He compared to ~10% in most earlier work) and this showed that the impulsive events often occurred during seemingly continuous multi-day periods of 3He emission. During solar active periods, 3He was present at 1 AU the majority of the time, giving evidence for either semi-continuous processes or else unresolved multiple small injections. The obvious injections during such periods were strongly associated with jet activity By adding STEREO and SDO observations we are seeking to extend the observational picture for these events. First, by following single 3He emitting regions from STEREO-B to ACE to STEREO-A we seek to examine for how long the 3He emission can continue, since any single spacecraft can be magnetically connected to a single region for only a few days and ACE often sees emission periods of that length. Second, by using SDO-AIA we seek to probe further the properties of the emitting regions to see if the previously reported association with jets is seen in events which we can now observe with greater resolution, sensitivity, and cadence than previously possible.

  18. Evolution of clusters in energetic heavy ion bombarded amorphous graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, M N; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Carbon clusters have been generated by a novel technique of energetic heavy ion bombardment of amorphous graphite. The evolution of clusters and their subsequent fragmentation under continuing ion bombardment is revealed by detecting various clusters in the energy spectra of the direct recoils emitted as a result of collision between ions and the surface constituents.

  19. New fluidized bed reactor for coating of energetic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Huijser, T.; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2009-01-01

    The process of altering and changing the properties of the energetic materials by coating has been studied extensively by several scientific groups. According to the desired application different coating techniques have been developed and applied to achieve satisfactory results. Among the already

  20. Propulsion and energetic materials research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zevenbergen, J.F.; Pekalski, A.A.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Keizers, H.L.J.; Berg, R.P. van den; Maree, A.G.M.; Vliet, L.D. van; Welland, W.H.M.; Wierckx, F.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental research on new and existing propellant formulations and energetic materials in the Netherlands is essentially carried out by the Delft University of Technology, Utrecht University, the Dutch Defense Laboratory ‘TNO Defense Security and Safety’ and the SME Aerospace Propulsion Products.

  1. Decay Rate of Energy Eigenfunctions in Classically Energetically Inaccessible Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Ge

    2004-01-01

    Classically energetically inaccessible parts of energy eigenfunctions in configuration space are studied by making use of a generalization of Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory. Approximate formulas are proposed for describing local decaying rate of this part of energy eigenfunctions, which are useful in the study of quantum phenomena,such as tunnelling effect, and are tested in an anharmonic oscillator.

  2. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lario, D; Roelof, E C; Vinas, A -F

    2015-01-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic ($\\geq$83 keV) protons ($P_{EP}$) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field ($P_{B}$). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when $P_{EP}$ exceeds $P_{B}$ by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of the energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, $P_{EP}$ also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population ($P_{TH}$). Prolonged periods ($>$12 h) with both $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{B}$ and $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{TH}$ may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well-upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential incre...

  3. The energetics of organic synthesis inside and outside the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic modelling of organic synthesis has largely been focused on deep-sea hydrothermal systems. When seawater mixes with hydrothermal fluids, redox gradients are established that serve as potential energy sources for the formation of organic compounds and biomolecules from inorganic starting materials. This energetic drive, which varies substantially depending on the type of host rock, is present and available both for abiotic (outside the cell) and biotic (inside the cell) processes. Here, we review and interpret a library of theoretical studies that target organic synthesis energetics. The biogeochemical scenarios evaluated include those in present-day hydrothermal systems and in putative early Earth environments. It is consistently and repeatedly shown in these studies that the formation of relatively simple organic compounds and biomolecules can be energy-yielding (exergonic) at conditions that occur in hydrothermal systems. Expanding on our ability to calculate biomass synthesis energetics, we also present here a new approach for estimating the energetics of polymerization reactions, specifically those associated with polypeptide formation from the requisite amino acids. PMID:23754809

  4. The Prudent Parent : Energetic Adjustments in Avian Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, R.H.; Daan, S.

    1980-01-01

    1. Energetics of reproduction in birds is reviewed with the question in mind how the parent adjusts its effort in relation to prevailing environmental conditions in order to maximize the output of young in its lifetime. Emphasis is on proximate controls, rather than ultimate factors measurable in te

  5. Energetic Argument for Bimodal Black Hole Accretion discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林一清; 卢炬甫; 顾为民

    2002-01-01

    Based on simple energetic considerations, we show that two crucial ingredients of bimodal black hole accretiondiscs, namely the sonic point and the transition radius, can be determined from the disc constant parameters.Thus, we can further justify the model of bimodal discs containing thermal instability triggered transition.

  6. Preparation and characterization of GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUANFEI LAN; XUEBAO WANG; YUNJUN LUO

    2016-12-01

    Graphene aerogel (GA) with nano-porous structure was assembled through the formation of physical cross-links between graphene sheets by a facile sol–gel method and supercritical CO$_2$ drying process. Thenhexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was added and trapped in the nano-porous three-dimensional networks of GA to obtain a novel GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite. The composition, morphology andstructure of the obtained GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite were characterized by elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption tests and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the thermal decompositioncharacteristic was investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that GA could be a perfect aerogel matrix for the fabrication of GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite due to itsunique nano-porous structure and attributes. It was also demonstrated that RDX homogeneously disperses in the asprepared GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite at nanometric scale. GA showed promising catalytic effects for the thermal decomposition of RDX. After incorporating with GA, the decomposition of RDX was obviously accelerated.

  7. Kinetic effects of energetic particles on resistive MHD stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R; Brennan, D P; Kim, C C

    2009-04-03

    We show that the kinetic effects of energetic particles can play a crucial role in the stability of the m/n=2/1 tearing mode in tokamaks (e.g., JET, JT-60U, and DIII-D), where the fraction of energetic particle beta(frac) is high. Using model equilibria based on DIII-D experimental reconstructions, the nonideal MHD linear stability of cases unstable to the 2/1 mode is investigated including a deltaf particle-in-cell model for the energetic particles coupled to the nonlinear 3D resistive MHD code NIMROD [C. C. Kim et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072507 (2008)10.1063/1.2949704]. It is observed that energetic particles have significant damping and stabilizing effects at experimentally relevant beta, beta(frac), and S, and excite a real frequency of the 2/1 mode. Extrapolation of the results is discussed for implications to JET and ITER, where the effects are projected to be significant.

  8. Self-Remediating Energetic Fills Based on Cyclic Dinitroureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    50 Appendix B –SERDP SEED Project WP1624 Report .................................................................. 51...hexanitrohexaazatricyclododecanedione (HHTDD). During a recently completed SERDP SEED effort (WP-1624), we quantified these ingredients’ susceptibility to...PBX binders. Spherical particles, with mono- disperse size distributions, are preferred for energetic formulations. Therefore, efforts to

  9. Energetic assessment of soybean biodiesel obtainment in West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-16

    Jul 16, 2014 ... In the oil extraction stage, energetic inputs corresponded to a total of 16.80 MJ and .... used for soybean farming with features, life cycle and hours of .... consumption was obtained by the product between the quantities of.

  10. Energetic bottlenecks and other design constraints in avian annual cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, T

    2002-01-01

    The flexible phenotypes of birds and mammals often appear to represent adjustments to alleviate some energetic bottleneck or another. By increasing the size of the organs involved in digestion and assimilation of nutrients (gut and liver), an individual bird can increase its ability to process nutri

  11. The energetics of organic synthesis inside and outside the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Jan P; LaRowe, Douglas E; McCollom, Thomas M; Shock, Everett L

    2013-07-19

    Thermodynamic modelling of organic synthesis has largely been focused on deep-sea hydrothermal systems. When seawater mixes with hydrothermal fluids, redox gradients are established that serve as potential energy sources for the formation of organic compounds and biomolecules from inorganic starting materials. This energetic drive, which varies substantially depending on the type of host rock, is present and available both for abiotic (outside the cell) and biotic (inside the cell) processes. Here, we review and interpret a library of theoretical studies that target organic synthesis energetics. The biogeochemical scenarios evaluated include those in present-day hydrothermal systems and in putative early Earth environments. It is consistently and repeatedly shown in these studies that the formation of relatively simple organic compounds and biomolecules can be energy-yielding (exergonic) at conditions that occur in hydrothermal systems. Expanding on our ability to calculate biomass synthesis energetics, we also present here a new approach for estimating the energetics of polymerization reactions, specifically those associated with polypeptide formation from the requisite amino acids.

  12. Energetic lanthanide complexes: coordination chemistry and explosives applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manner, V. W.; Barker, B. J.; Sanders, V. E.; Laintz, K. E.; Scott, B. L.; Preston, D. N.; Sandstrom, M.; Reardon, B. L.

    2014-05-01

    Metals are generally added to organic molecular explosives in a heterogeneous composite to improve overall heat and energy release. In order to avoid creating a mixture that can vary in homogeneity, energetic organic molecules can be directly bonded to high molecular weight metals, forming a single metal complex with Angstrom-scale separation between the metal and the explosive. To probe the relationship between the structural properties of metal complexes and explosive performance, a new series of energetic lanthanide complexes has been prepared using energetic ligands such as NTO (5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazole-3-one). These are the first examples of lanthanide NTO complexes where no water is coordinated to the metal, demonstrating novel control of the coordination environment. The complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography, NMR and IR spectroscopies, photoluminescence, and sensitivity testing. The structural and energetic properties are discussed in the context of enhanced blast effects and detection. Cheetah calculations have been performed to fine-tune physical properties, creating a systematic method for producing explosives with 'tailor made' characteristics. These new complexes will be benchmarks for further study in the field of metalized high explosives.

  13. Kinetics and energetics of producing animal-manure-based biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of animal manure produce biochar with multiple beneficial use potentials for improving soil quality and the environment. The kinetics and energetics of pyrolysis in producing manure-based biochar char were reviewed and analyzed. Kinetic analysis of pyrolysis showed that the higher the temp...

  14. Solar Energetic Particle Precipitation Effects on the ionosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Robert; Larson, Davin; Luhmann, Janet; Lee, Christina; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are an important, if irregular, source of ionization and energy input to the Martian atmosphere. As is the case for much-studied Polar Cap precipitation events on the earth, when SEPs precipitate into the Mars atmosphere, they cause heating, ionization, excitation and dissociation, leading to altitude-dependent changes in chemistry. We present a study of the effects of SEP ionization in the Martian atmosphere using data from the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission. Specifically, we will correlate altitude profiles of thermal planetary ions (O+, CO2+ and O2+) and electrons measured by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) and Langmuir Probe on the MAVEN spacecraft with fluxes of energetic protons and electrons measured by the Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) detector. First, we will present case studies of this correlation, before and during SEP events to examine short-term effects of SEP ionization. We will also examine SEP ionization under different heliospheric conditions, leading to different SEP shadowing geometries and ionization rates. Second, we will present a statistical study showing the degree to which ionospheric densities are affected by the presence of energetic particles, as a function of altitude, SEP spectrum flux and solar zenith angle. This work will provide a better understanding of this important source of ionization in the Martian upper atmosphere and hence, how more frequent and more intense SEP events in Mars' past may have affected the structure of the Martian upper atmosphere and hence atmospheric escape.

  15. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2016-04-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  16. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farshchiansadegh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum. In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  17. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2016-01-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths. PMID:27035587

  18. Early object relations into new objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, T W

    2001-01-01

    Two strands of change are suggested by this review, one maturational, the other therapeutic or developmental (Hartmann and Kris, 1945). By "maturational" I mean to suggest energies that infuse the individual from earliest life in a manner that includes object relations, but for the healthy exercise of which object relations per se need not be of central and crucial importance. Within wide limits such energies may be delayed until growth conditions prevail without significant distortion of certain of the organism's ego functions. Therapeutic change is analogous to developmental change in that both involve the crucial presence of another to release energies. In therapeutic change these are energies that have been repressed beyond the reach of developmental dynamics. In everyday development crisis and synthesis alternate in conjunction with new and emerging objects to add to the psychological structures brought to the fore by maturation. In many instances, as we see with John, over time and in a less focussed manner, developmental changes can approximate therapeutic change and visa versa. Freud-Dann in their "experiment" pursued one line, in which the equipmental delay brought on by extremely adverse living circumstances was redressed by providing an interpersonally enriching, loving, developmentally facilitating milieu. The sketches of individual children and John's subsequent story provide a perspective into what becomes the stuff of growth and what remains the stuff of neurosis. The developmental reserves and ego resilience of these children were impressive but probably not extraordinary. Usual growth ensued as soon as they were provided with the rich soil of Bulldogs Bank instead of the desert sand of the Tereszin concentration camp. However, no one can escape such adverse circumstances without having taken in the stuff of neurosis. Affects and percepts that were not assimilatable or even available to consciousness at the time remain buried in the unconscious

  19. Energetics, Biomechanics, and Performance in Masters' Swimmers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Neiva, Henrique P; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Ferreira, MI, Barbosa, TM, Costa, MJ, Neiva, HP, and Marinho, DA. Energetics, biomechanics, and performance in masters' swimmers: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2069-2081, 2016-This study aimed to summarize evidence on masters' swimmers energetics, biomechanics, and performance gathered in selected studies. An expanded search was conducted on 6 databases, conference proceedings, and department files. Fifteen studies were selected for further analysis. A qualitative evaluation of the studies based on the Quality Index (QI) was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The studies were thereafter classified into 3 domains according to the reported data: performance (10 studies), energetics (4 studies), and biomechanics (6 studies). The selected 15 articles included in this review presented low QI scores (mean score, 10.47 points). The biomechanics domain obtained higher QI (11.5 points), followed by energetics and performance (10.6 and 9.9 points, respectively). Stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) were both influenced by aging, although SF is more affected than SL. Propelling efficiency (ηp) decreased with age. Swimming performance declined with age. The performance declines with age having male swimmers deliver better performances than female counterparts, although this difference tends to be narrow in long-distance events. One single longitudinal study is found in the literature reporting the changes in performance over time. The remaining studies are cross-sectional designs focusing on the energetics and biomechanics. Overall, biomechanics parameters, such as SF, SL, and ηp, tend to decrease with age. This review shows the lack of a solid body of knowledge (reflected in the amount and quality of the articles published) on the changes in biomechanics, energetics, and performance of master swimmers over time. The training programs for this age-group should aim to preserve the energetics as much as possible and, concurrently, improve the

  20. LEEM investigations of clean surfaces driven by energetic ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbamonte, Peter M. [University of Illinois

    2013-04-24

    The original purpose of this award was to use low‐energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to explore the dynamics of surfaces of clean single crystal surfaces when driven by a beam of energetic ions. The goal was to understand the nanoscience of hyperthermal growth, surface erosion by sublimation and irradiation, operation of surface sinks in irradiated materials, diffusion on driven surfaces, and the creation of structural patterns. This project was based on a novel LEEM system constructed by C. P. Flynn, which provided real‐time imaging of surface dynamics by scattering low energy electrons. With the passing of Prof. Flynn in late 2011, this project was completed under a slightly different scope by constructing a low‐energy, inelastic electron scattering (EELS) instrument. Consistent with Flynn's original objectives for his LEEM system, this device probes the dynamics of crystal surfaces. However the measurements are not carried out in real time, but instead are done in the frequency domain, through the energy lost from the probe electrons. The purpose of this device is to study the collective bosonic excitations in a variety of materials, including high temperature superconductors, topological insulators, carbon allotropes including (but not limited to) graphene, etc. The ultimate goal here is to identify the bosons that mediate interactions in these and other materials, with hopes of shedding light on the origin of many exotic phenomena including high temperature superconductivity. We completed the construction of a low‐energy EELS system that operates with an electron kinetic energy of 7 - 10 eV. With this instrument now running, we hope to identify, among other things, the bosons that mediate pairing in high temperature superconductors. Using this instrument, we have already made our first discovery. Studying freshly cleaved single crystals of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is a topological insulator, we have observed a surface excitation at an energy loss

  1. Objects, materiality and meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    The present research work investigates the relation between physical objects, their materiality, understood as the physical substances they are made from, and the communication from the objects. In product design of physical objects the communicative aspects are just as important as the function ...... be written into the object. The materials are therefore carriers of communication, even though this is dependent of the cultural context and the environment which the object will be part of. However the designer has only minor influence on those.......The present research work investigates the relation between physical objects, their materiality, understood as the physical substances they are made from, and the communication from the objects. In product design of physical objects the communicative aspects are just as important as the function...... of the object, and the designers aim is therefore to tune both in order to achieve a desired goal. To do so the designer basically has 2 options: Alteration of the physical shape of the object and the selection of materials. Through the manipulation of shape and materials can symbolic and sensory information...

  2. Pruning removal from orchards for energetic use: impacts on SOC and CO2-emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Sonja; Lanza, Giacomo; Schleicher, Sarah; Bischoff, Wolf-Anno; Gomez Palermo, Maider; Nogues, Fernando Sebastian; Kern, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Prunings of orchards are usually burnt or left on the soil for nutrient and organic carbon recycling. Recently the interest rose to remove prunings for energetic use. Effects of pruning removal on soil physical and chemical characteristics are expected rather in the long term. Under certain circumstances, however, soil characteristics as organic carbon content and greenhouse gas emissions might change on the short term as our literature review revealed. The main objective of this research was to determine if pruning removal from orchards changes soil organic carbon content and CO2-emission from soils in the short-term. We compared six different study sites in Spain, France and Germany in terms of impacts on soil chemistry (total and organic carbon) and four sites for impacts on CO2-emissions during 2 years. A block design was set up over two rows each with two parcels where we removed prunings and two parcels where prunings were chipped and left on the soil (n=4). As soil characteristics may vary between tree rows and interrows of orchards, we sampled both positions separately. To assess the relative contribution of CO2 emissions from carbonate and organic material, the isotopic signature of CO2 (δ 13CO_2) was analyzed for one orchard. Our results show that pruning removal could significantly decrease soil organic carbon in the tree row after 2 years of pruning removal, as found for one German orchard. No treatment effects were detected on CO2-emissions. We found, however, differences in CO2 emissions according to the sampling position in tree rows and interrows. More CO2 emission was found for that row position per orchard with higher soil organic carbon. Isotopic CO2 signature indicated that elevated CO2 emissions were rather linked to higher microbial decomposition or root respiration than to the release from carbonates. As no pruning wood decomposition effect on CO2 emissions were apparent, but soil with higher organic carbon released more CO2, it is expected

  3. Perspectives of the non-energetic use of lignite in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D.; Sailer, B. [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    RWE Power AG as integral part of RWE Generation SE has been active in the development and commercialization of coal gasification routes for many years. RWE Generation SE is one of Europe's leading electricity producers and combines the expertise of the power plant specialists Essent (NL), RWE npower (UK) and RWE Power (D). A globally increasing freight traffic and accompanying fuel demand is anticipated in the future. This higher demand will probably result in an increase in crude oil price in the course of the next years. There will also be a disproportionately high increase in fuel prices additionally to the increase in the crude oil price due to an increasing treatment effort within refineries. Therefore the substitution of crude oil becomes more and more attractive in view of economical perspectives and security of supply. Crude oil is not only to be substituted as feedstock for fuels but also for the chemical industry. Coal has been and will be the most important feedstock for this. Especially its gasification enables various routes. In Germany there is also an interesting perspective for Coal-to-Liquids and Coal-to-Gas or CtL/CtG as the non-energetic use of coal is abbreviated. Lignite is available regardless of any market impacts and currently faces a change in its use for power generation due to the increasing use of renewable energies. Hence lignite is an attractive feedstock for CtL/CtG in Germany. The construction of a commercial size CtL/CtG plant means a billion Euro investment. So a reliable economic evaluation is inevitable. Today all CtL/CtG routes miss commercial competitiveness to the conventional production by some ten percents. In case the current upward price trend of crude oil continues CtL/CtG might become viable in the near future. The production of synthetic fuels appears most attractive in view of a substantial market potential. The further commercialization of gasification routes in Germany requires R and D activities especially

  4. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  5. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Energetic cost of insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, A; Magaud, A; Nicot, A; Vézilier, J

    2011-05-01

    The extensive use of insecticides to control vector populations has lead to the widespread development of different mechanisms of insecticide resistance. Mutations that confer insecticide resistance are often associated to fitness costs that prevent them from spreading to fixation. In vectors, such fitness costs include reductions in preimaginal survival, adult size, longevity, and fecundity. The most commonly invoked explanation for the nature of such pleiotropic effects of insecticide resistance is the existence of resource-based trade-offs. According to this hypothesis, insecticide resistance would deplete the energetic stores of vectors, reducing the energy available for other biological functions and generating trade-offs between insecticide resistance and key life history traits. Here we test this hypothesis by quantifying the energetic resources (lipids, glycogen, and glucose) of larvae and adult females of the mosquito Culex pipiens L. resistant to insecticides through two different mechanisms: esterase overproduction and acetylcholinesterase modification. We find that, as expected from trade-off theory, insecticide resistant mosquitoes through the overproduction of esterases contain on average 30% less energetic reserves than their susceptible counterparts. Acetylcholinesterase-modified mosquitoes, however, also showed a significant reduction in energetic resources (20% less). We suggest that, in acetylcholinesterase-modified mosquitoes, resource depletion may not be the result of resource-based trade-offs but a consequence of the hyperactivation of the nervous system. We argue that these results not only provide a mechanistic explanation for the negative pleiotropic effects of insecticide resistance on mosquito life history traits but also can have a direct effect on the development of parasites that depend on the vector's energetic reserves to fulfil their own metabolic needs.

  7. Energetic particle emission: preequilibrium emission and cooperative effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Colonna, M.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Zoppo, A. Del; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D. [INFN Lab. Nazionale del Sud, Via A. Doria 44, Catania (Italy); Colonna, N. [INFN, Bari (Italy); Bruno, M.; D Agostino, M.; Mastinu, P.F. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (Italy); Gramegna, F. [INFN Laboratorio Nazionale di Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Iori, I.; Fabbietti, L.; Moroni, A. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Margagliotti, G.V.; Milazzo, P.M.; Rui, R.; Vannini, G. [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Blumenfeld, Y.; Scarpaci, J.A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3CNRS, F91406 Orsay (France)

    2001-09-01

    Full text: The {sup 58} Ni +{sup 58} Ni reaction at 30 A MeV was investigated at Laboratori Nazionale del Sud with the MEDEA and MULTICS apparatus. Energetic protons were detected in coincidence with photons, light charged particles (Z = 1, 2) (LCP) and intermediate and heavy fragments on an event by event basis. Protons with energy extending up to almost 20% of the total available energy, namely much larger than expected by coupling the relative motion with a sharp nucleon Fermi momentum distribution (kinematical limit), were measured in our experiment. We have also investigated the average proton multiplicity as a function of the number of participating nucleons A{sub part} (b) and a striking behavior with increasing energy is found. Indeed, the experimental proton multiplicity (full squares) displays the expected linear dependence on A{sub part} (b) for energy close to the kinematical limit (60 {<=} Ep {<=} 80 MeV), while the multiplicity of extremely energetic protons (130 {<=} Ep {<=} 150 MeV) exhibits an almost quadratic increase with A{sub part}. The comparison with BNV calculations which include the momentum dependence in the effective potential shows that the features of the energetic proton emission are well reproduced up to {approx_equal} 110 MeV while this approach fails to explain the almost quadratic dependence on the number of participant nucleons of the yield of very energetic protons (E{sub p}{sup NN} {>=} 130 MeV). So, the observed behavior calls for the introduction of mechanisms beyond the mean field and two body nucleon-nucleon collisions such as cooperative effects. In conclusions, these results shed some light on the emission of extremely energetic protons and can improve the understanding of the mechanism responsible for deep subthreshold particle production. Moreover, the detailed comparison with dynamical calculations allows to get a deeper insight on the first non equilibrated stage of the reaction where the highest temperatures and

  8. Sensitivity and performance of azole-based energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zijun; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2013-10-24

    Imidazole, pyrazole, 1,2,3-triazole-, 1,2,4-triazole-, and tetrazole-based energetic materials are theoretically investigated by employing density functional theory (DFT). Heats of formation (ΔfH(0)'s) for the studied compounds (298 K) in the gas phase are determined at the B3P86/6-311G (d, p) theory level through isodesmic reactions. The bond dissociation energies (BDEs) corresponding to NO2, NH2, CH3, and Cl removal from carbon or nitrogen positions of the azole ring are also calculated at the B3P86/6-311G (d, p) theory level. The substituent effect of electron-withdrawing (NO2, Cl) and electron-donating (NH2, CH3) groups on the ΔfH(0)s and BDEs is discussed. Both electron-withdrawing groups and electron-donating groups (except the CH3 group) dramatically increase the ΔfH(0)s of these energetic materials when the substituent is at an N position on the azole ring. For substitution at a C atom on the azole ring, electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups have different effects on the ΔfH(0)s for different azole compounds. A correlation is developed for this series of energetics between impact sensitivity h50% and the defined sensitivity index (SI): based on this empirical relationship and its extrapolation, the impact sensitivities of compounds for which experiments are not available are provided. The promising energetic compounds in each groups, which have potentially good energetic performance and low sensitivity, are 1-amino-2,4,5-trinitroimidazole, 1-amino-3,4,5-trinitropyrazole, 1,4-dinitro-1,2,3-triazole, 1,3-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole, and 1-nitrotetrazole.

  9. Additive Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Duvenaud, David; Rasmussen, Carl Edward

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a Gaussian process model of functions which are additive. An additive function is one which decomposes into a sum of low-dimensional functions, each depending on only a subset of the input variables. Additive GPs generalize both Generalized Additive Models, and the standard GP models which use squared-exponential kernels. Hyperparameter learning in this model can be seen as Bayesian Hierarchical Kernel Learning (HKL). We introduce an expressive but tractable parameterization of the kernel function, which allows efficient evaluation of all input interaction terms, whose number is exponential in the input dimension. The additional structure discoverable by this model results in increased interpretability, as well as state-of-the-art predictive power in regression tasks.

  10. Development of Nanomaterials for Nuclear Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunin, V. F.

    Structure and properties peculiarities of the nanocrystalline powders give the opportunity to design new and to develop a modernization of nuclear energy industry materials. It was shown experimentally, that addition of 5-10% uranium dioxide nanocrystalline powder to traditional coarse powder allows to decrease the sintering temperature or to increase the fuel tablets size of grain. Similar perspectives for the technology of neutron absorbing tablets of control-rod modernization are shown by nanopowder of dysprosium hafnate changing instead now using boron carbide. It is powders in nanocrystalline state get an opportunity to sinter them and to receive compact tablet with 8,2-8,4 g/cm2 density for automatic defence system of nuclear reactor. Resource of dysprosium hafnate ceramics can be 18-20 years instead 4-5 years for boron carbide. To step up the radiation-damage stability of fuel element jacket material was suggested to strengthen a heat-resistant ferrite-martensite steel by Y2O3 nanocrystalline powder addition. Nanopowder with size of particles 560 nm and crystallite size 9 nm was prepeared by chemical coprecipitation method. To make lighter the container for transport and provisional disposal of exposed fuel from nuclear reactor a new boron-aluminium alloy called as boral was developed. This composite armed with nanopowders of boron-containing materials and heavy metals oxides can replace succesburnt-up corrosion-resistant steels.

  11. Scaled-Free Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Grilliette, Will

    2010-01-01

    Several functional analysts and C*-algebraists have been moving toward a categorical means of understanding normed objects. In this work, I address a primary issue with adapting these abstract concepts to functional analytic settings, the lack of free objects. Using a new object, called a "crutched set", and associated categories, I devise generalized construction of normed objects as a left adjoint functor to a natural forgetful functor. Further, the universal property in each case yields a "scaled-free" mapping property, which extends previous notions of `"free" normed objects. In particular, I construct the following types of scaled-free objects: Banach spaces, Banach algebras, C*-algebras, operator spaces, and operator algebras. In subsequent papers, this scaled-free property, coupled with the associated functorial results, will give rise to a new view of presentation theory for C*-algebras, which inherits many properties and constructions from its algebraic counterpart.

  12. Conceivability Theses and Objections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the thesis is more fashionable in the current debate than defending conceivability as anything but one psychological heuristic device among others with which we form beliefs about modality. In this paper, I shall offer a way of demarcating conceivability theses in a way that offers a concise overview, and I...... will try to provide an overview also of the different objections that have been and are leveled at the conceivability theses. A number of these are problems for an epistemology of modality generally. I will focus on the objections that are peculiar to conceivability theses: the Standard Objection...... and the Uselessness Objection. The Standard Objection targets the second premise in an argument for possibility from conceivability, that what is conceived is possible, typically by offering counterexamples in the form of conceivable impossibilities. The Uselessness Objection targets the first premise in an argument...

  13. Reasoning about Function Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordio, Martin; Calcagno, Cristiano; Meyer, Bertrand; Müller, Peter; Tschannen, Julian

    Modern object-oriented languages support higher-order implementations through function objects such as delegates in C#, agents in Eiffel, or closures in Scala. Function objects bring a new level of abstraction to the object-oriented programming model, and require a comparable extension to specification and verification techniques. We introduce a verification methodology that extends function objects with auxiliary side-effect free (pure) methods to model logical artifacts: preconditions, postconditions and modifies clauses. These pure methods can be used to specify client code abstractly, that is, independently from specific instantiations of the function objects. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we have implemented an automatic prover, which verifies several non-trivial examples.

  14. On Coordinating Collaborative Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Imine, Abdessamad

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative object represents a data type (such as a text document) designed to be shared by a group of dispersed users. The Operational Transformation (OT) is a coordination approach used for supporting optimistic replication for these objects. It allows the users to concurrently update the shared data and exchange their updates in any order since the convergence of all replicas, i.e. the fact that all users view the same data, is ensured in all cases. However, designing algorithms for achieving convergence with the OT approach is a critical and challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a formal compositional method for specifying complex collaborative objects. The most important feature of our method is that designing an OT algorithm for the composed collaborative object can be done by reusing the OT algorithms of component collaborative objects. By using our method, we can start from correct small collaborative objects which are relatively easy to handle and incrementally combine them to build more ...

  15. Kuiper Binary Object Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nazzario, R. C.; Orr, K.; Covington, C.; Kagan, D.; Hyde, T. W.

    2005-01-01

    It has been observed that binary Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) exist contrary to theoretical expectations. Their creation presents problems to most current models. However, the inclusion of a third body (for example, one of the outer planets) may provide the conditions necessary for the formation of these objects. The presence of a third massive body not only helps to clear the primordial Kuiper Belt but can also result in long lived binary Kuiper belt objects. The gravitational interaction betw...

  16. Propelling Extended Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A force acting on just part of an extended object (either a solid or a volume of a liquid) can cause all of it to move. That motion is due to the transmission of the force through the object by its material. This paper discusses how the force is distributed to all of the object by a gradient of stress or pressure in it, which creates the local…

  17. Synthesis of New Energetic Materials and Ionic Liquids Derived from Metronidazole

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and efficient synthetic procedures were established for the preparation of new energetic covalent compounds, salts, and protonated ionic liquids based on the readily available antimicrobial agent metronidazole. Some of these materials exhibit the desirable properties of energetic materials and energetic ionic liquids, such as low vapor pressure, low melting point, good chemical and thermal stability, and high energetic content. For each of the relevant compounds prepared, thermal stabi...

  18. Objective-C

    CERN Document Server

    DeVoe, Jiva

    2011-01-01

    A soup-to-nuts guide on the Objective-C programming language. Objective-C is the language behind Cocoa and Cocoa Touch, which is the Framework of applications written for the Macintosh, iPod touch, iPhone, and iPad platforms. Part of the Developer Reference series covering the hottest Apple topics, this book covers everything from the basics of the C language to advanced aspects of Apple development. You'll examine Objective-C and high-level subjects of frameworks, threading, networking, and much more.: Covers the basics of the C language and then quickly moves onto Objective-C and more advanc

  19. The Relative Deep Penetrations of Energetic Electrons and Ions into the Slot Region and Inner Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere are distributed into two regions: the inner radiation belt and the outer radiation belt, with the slot region in between separating the two belts. Though many studies have focused on the outer belt dynamics, the energetic electrons in the slot region and especially inner belt did not receive much attention until recently. A number of new features regarding electrons in the low L region have been reported lately, including the abundance of 10s-100s of keV electrons in the inner belt, the frequent deep injections of 100s of keV electrons, and 90°-minimum pitch angle distributions of 100s of keV electrons in the inner belt and slot region. In this presentation, we focus on the relative deep injections into the slot region and inner belt of energetic electrons and ions using observations from HOPE and MagEIS instruments on the Van Allen Probes. It is shown that while 10s - 100s of keV electrons penetrate commonly deep into the low L region and are persistent in the inner belt, the deep injections of ions with similar energies occur rarely, possibly due to the fast loss of ions in the low L region. The energy spectra and pitch angle distributions of electrons and ions during injections are also very different, indicating the existence of different physical mechanisms acting on them. In addition, some intriguing similarities between lower energy ions and higher energy electrons will also be discussed.

  20. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T Ayoub

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to the overall lateral and longitudinal structural stability was performed. The obtained results identified the key residues and tubulin domains according to their energetic contributions. They also identified the molecular forces that drive microtubule disassembly. At the tip of the plus end of the microtubule, the uneven distribution of longitudinal interaction energies within a protofilament generates a torque that bends tubulin outwardly with respect to the cylinder's axis causing disassembly. In the presence of GTP, this torque is opposed by lateral interactions that prevent outward curling, thus stabilizing the whole microtubule. Once GTP hydrolysis reaches the tip of the microtubule (lateral cap, lateral interactions become much weaker, allowing tubulin dimers to bend outwards, causing disassembly. The role of magnesium in the process of outward curling has also been demonstrated. This study also showed that the microtubule seam is the most energetically labile inter-dimer interface and could serve as a trigger point for disassembly. Based on a detailed balance of the energetic contributions per amino acid residue in the microtubule, numerous other analyses could be performed to give additional insights into the properties of microtubule dynamic instability.

  1. Capillary instabilities in thin films. I. Energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srolovitz, D.J.; Safran, S.A.

    1986-07-01

    A stability theory is presented which describes the conditions under which thin films rupture. It is found that holes in the film will either grow or shrink, depending on whether their initial radius is larger or smaller than a critical value. If the holes grow large enough, they impinge to form islands; the size of which are determined by the surface energies. The formation of grooves where the grain boundary meets the free surface is a potential source of holes which can lead to film rupture. Equilibrium grain boundary groove depths are calculated for finite grain sizes. Comparison of groove depth and film thickness yields microstructural conditions for film rupture. In addition, pits which form at grain boundary vertices, where three grains meet, are another source of film instability.

  2. Energetic and economic limitations of biogas utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimm, A.; Fleischhauer, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Economic efficiency of biogas conversion plants can only be achieved from approximately 60% gas exploitation on. That presupposes use of gas in the farm itself beyond household needs, for instance to dry grain, or for supply to third parties. To secure the desired high exploitation level, it is important to remember, the animals must stay in their shelters also in summer, because this is the only way of safeguarding an appropriate supply of biomaterial. To use biogas in the household alone means also to be contented with a gas yield of little more than 40%. Biogas conversion plants for a stock of 50 to 100 large cattle must largely be erected by self-construction from, partly, used plant components. This is the only way of securing that the plant pays, for the purchase of a new plant requires some 40,000 marks additional capital.

  3. Additive and polynomial representations

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, David H; Suppes, Patrick

    1971-01-01

    Additive and Polynomial Representations deals with major representation theorems in which the qualitative structure is reflected as some polynomial function of one or more numerical functions defined on the basic entities. Examples are additive expressions of a single measure (such as the probability of disjoint events being the sum of their probabilities), and additive expressions of two measures (such as the logarithm of momentum being the sum of log mass and log velocity terms). The book describes the three basic procedures of fundamental measurement as the mathematical pivot, as the utiliz

  4. Aerial Thermography for Energetic Modelling of Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Bitelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The rising attention to energy consumption problems is renewing interest in the applications of thermal remote sensing in urban areas. The research presented here aims to test a methodology to retrieve information about roof surface temperature by means of a high resolution orthomosaic of airborne thermal infrared images, based on a case study acquired over Bologna (Italy. The ultimate aim of such work is obtaining datasets useful to support, in a GIS environment, the decision makers in developing adequate strategies to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emission. In the processing proposed, the computing of radiometric quantities related to the atmosphere was performed by the Modtran 5 radiative transfer code, while an object-oriented supervised classification was applied on a WorldView-2 multispectral image, together with a high-resolution digital surface model (DSM, to distinguish among the major roofing material types and to model the effects of the emissivity. The emissivity values were derived from literature data, except for some roofing materials, which were measured during ad hoc surveys, by means of a thermal camera and a contact probe. These preliminary results demonstrate the high sensitivity of the model to the variability of the surface emissivity and of the atmospheric parameters, especially transmittance and upwelling radiance.

  5. Experimental characterization of energetic material dynamics for multiphase blast simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Wright, Elton K.; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of data for interactions of shock waves with particle fields having volume fractions residing between the dilute and granular regimes, which creates one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the simulation of energetic material detonation. To close this gap, a novel Multiphase Shock Tube has been constructed to drive a planar shock wave into a dense gas-solid field of particles. A nearly spatially isotropic field of particles is generated in the test section by a gravity-fed method that results in a spanwise curtain of spherical 100-micron particles having a volume fraction of about 19%. Interactions with incident shock Mach numbers of 1.66, 1.92, and 2.02 were achieved. High-speed schlieren imaging simultaneous with high-frequency wall pressure measurements are used to reveal the complex wave structure associated with the interaction. Following incident shock impingement, transmitted and reflected shocks are observed, which lead to differences in particle drag across the streamwise dimension of the curtain. Shortly thereafter, the particle field begins to propagate downstream and spread. For all three Mach numbers tested, the energy and momentum fluxes in the induced flow far downstream are reduced about 30-40% by the presence of the particle field. X-Ray diagnostics have been developed to penetrate the opacity of the flow, revealing the concentrations throughout the particle field as it expands and spreads downstream with time. Furthermore, an X-Ray particle tracking velocimetry diagnostic has been demonstrated to be feasible for this flow, which can be used to follow the trajectory of tracer particles seeded into the curtain. Additional experiments on single spherical particles accelerated behind an incident shock wave have shown that elevated particle drag coefficients can be attributed to increased compressibility rather than flow unsteadiness, clarifying confusing results from the historical database of shock tube

  6. SEA domain autoproteolysis accelerated by conformational strain: energetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Anders; Johansson, Denny G A; Macao, Bertil; Härd, Torleif

    2008-04-04

    A subclass of proteins with the SEA (sea urchin sperm protein, enterokinase, and agrin) domain fold exists as heterodimers generated by autoproteolytic cleavage within a characteristic G(-1)S+1VVV sequence. Autoproteolysis occurs by a nucleophilic attack of the serine hydroxyl on the vicinal glycine carbonyl followed by an N-->O acyl shift and hydrolysis of the resulting ester. The reaction has been suggested to be accelerated by the straining of the scissile peptide bond upon protein folding. In an accompanying article, we report the mechanism; in this article, we provide further key evidence and account for the energetics of coupled protein folding and autoproteolysis. Cleavage of the GPR116 domain and that of the MUC1 SEA domain occur with half-life (t((1/2))) values of 12 and 18 min, respectively, with lowering of the free energy of the activation barrier by approximately 10 kcal mol(-1) compared with uncatalyzed hydrolysis. The free energies of unfolding of the GPR116 and MUC1 SEA domains were measured to approximately 11 and approximately 15 kcal mol(-1), respectively, but approximately 7 kcal mol(-1) of conformational energy is partitioned as strain over the scissile peptide bond in the precursor to catalyze autoproteolysis by substrate destabilization. A straining energy of approximately 7 kcal mol(-1) was measured by using both a pre-equilibrium model to analyze stability and cleavage kinetics data obtained with the GPR116 SEA domain destabilized by core mutations or urea addition, as well as the difference in thermodynamic stabilities of the MUC1 SEA precursor mutant S1098A (with a G(-1)A+1VVV motif) and the wild-type protein. The results imply that cleavage by N-->O acyl shift alone would proceed with a t((1/2)) of approximately 2.3 years, which is too slow to be biochemically effective. A subsequent review of structural data on other self-cleaving proteins suggests that conformational strain of the scissile peptide bond may be a common mechanism of

  7. Experimental characterization of energetic material dynamics for multiphase blast simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Wright, Elton K.; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of data for interactions of shock waves with particle fields having volume fractions residing between the dilute and granular regimes, which creates one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the simulation of energetic material detonation. To close this gap, a novel Multiphase Shock Tube has been constructed to drive a planar shock wave into a dense gas-solid field of particles. A nearly spatially isotropic field of particles is generated in the test section by a gravity-fed method that results in a spanwise curtain of spherical 100-micron particles having a volume fraction of about 19%. Interactions with incident shock Mach numbers of 1.66, 1.92, and 2.02 were achieved. High-speed schlieren imaging simultaneous with high-frequency wall pressure measurements are used to reveal the complex wave structure associated with the interaction. Following incident shock impingement, transmitted and reflected shocks are observed, which lead to differences in particle drag across the streamwise dimension of the curtain. Shortly thereafter, the particle field begins to propagate downstream and spread. For all three Mach numbers tested, the energy and momentum fluxes in the induced flow far downstream are reduced about 30-40% by the presence of the particle field. X-Ray diagnostics have been developed to penetrate the opacity of the flow, revealing the concentrations throughout the particle field as it expands and spreads downstream with time. Furthermore, an X-Ray particle tracking velocimetry diagnostic has been demonstrated to be feasible for this flow, which can be used to follow the trajectory of tracer particles seeded into the curtain. Additional experiments on single spherical particles accelerated behind an incident shock wave have shown that elevated particle drag coefficients can be attributed to increased compressibility rather than flow unsteadiness, clarifying confusing results from the historical database of shock tube

  8. Diagnostics for the Analysis of Surface Chemistry Effects on Composite Energetic Material Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Diagnostics for the Analysis of Surface Chemistry Effects on Composite Energetic Material Reactions The views...peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Diagnostics for the Analysis of Surface Chemistry Effects on Composite Energetic Material Reactions Report...2.00 4.00 Evan Vargas, Michelle L. Pantoya, Mohammed A Saed, Brandon L Weeks. Advanced Susceptors for Microwave Heating of Energetic Materials

  9. 77 FR 25932 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Energetic Materials and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... Regulations (EAR): Control of Energetic Materials and Related Articles That the President Determines No Longer... this proposed rule describing how energetic materials and related articles that the President determines no longer warrant control under Category V (Explosives and Energetic Materials, Propellants...

  10. Managed Objects for Infrastructure Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Erik; Bodum, Lars; Kolar, Jan

    2009-01-01

    of 3D Geoinformation research, this realism is often related to the way the spatial world is represented. By contrast, the 2D GIS community focuses on attribute data that describes additional states or characteristics of a feature. The main focus in 3D Geoinformation has always been...... attributive data but also will contain behavioural information. Our goal is to communicate the design and handling of these enhanced objects by means of the concept introduced in Java whereby objects are created in bytecode and subsequently executed within a Java virtual machine. This concept has already been......Using data objects to describe features in the real world is a new idea and several approaches have already been shown to match scientific paradigms exceedingly well. Depending on the required level of abstraction, it is possible to represent the world more or less close to reality. In the realm...

  11. Objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a definition of the electromagnetic chirality of an object and show that it has an upper bound. The upper bound is attained if and only if the object is transparent for fields of one handedness (helicity). Additionally, electromagnetic duality symmetry, i.e. helicity preservation upon scattering, turns out to be a necessary condition for reciprocal scatterers to attain the upper bound. We use these results to provide requirements for the design of such extremal scatterers. The requirements can be formulated as constraints on the polarizability tensors for dipolar scatterers or as material constitutive relations. We also outline two applications for objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality: A twofold resonantly enhanced and background free circular dichroism measurement setup, and angle independent helicity filtering glasses.

  12. Food additives data book

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Jim; Hong-Shum, Lily

    2011-01-01

    .... Compiled by food industry experts with a proven track record of producing high quality reference work, this volume is the definitive resource for technologists using food additives"-- "The use...

  13. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  14. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  15. Additively Manufactured Propulsion System

    OpenAIRE

    Dushku, Matthew; Mueller, Paul

    2012-01-01

    New high-performance, carbon-fiber reinforced polymer material allows additive manufacturing to produce pressure vessels capable of high pressures (thousands of pounds per square inch). This advancement in turn allows integral hybrid propulsion which is revolutionary for both CubeSats and additively-manufactured spacecraft. Hybrid propulsion offers simplicity as compared to bipropellant liquid propulsion, significantly better safety compared to solid or monopropellant hydrazine propulsion, an...

  16. Conscience and Conscientious Objections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Anders

    2007-01-01

    In Western countries conscientious objection is usually accommodated in various ways, at least in certain areas (military conscription, medicine) and to some extent. It appears to be regarded as fundamentally different from other kinds of objection. But why? This study argues that conscientious obje

  17. The objective image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galison, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In his work, Galison approaches the historical development of objectivity as an important factor that affects the way we experience and imagine ourselves in communities of knowledge and in democratic societies. Prof. Peter Galison has demonstrated that scientific objectivity has a history and he

  18. Choosing for learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Emans, Bruno; Meijer, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Choosing for learning objects discusses eight educational ambitions and the possible roles of learning objects in realising these ambitions. The eight educational ambitions are: (1) Creating independent learning pathways, for example for lifelong learners; (2) Making education more flexible; (3) Res

  19. On Objects and Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugster, Patrick Thomas; Guerraoui, Rachid; Damm, Christian Heide

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents linguistic primitives for publish/subscribe programming using events and objects. We integrate our primitives into a strongly typed object-oriented language through four mechanisms: (1) serialization, (2) multiple sub typing, (3) closures, and (4) deferred code evaluation. We...

  20. Choosing for learning objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Emans, Bruno; Meijer, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Choosing for learning objects discusses eight educational ambitions and the possible roles of learning objects in realising these ambitions. The eight educational ambitions are: (1) Creating independent learning pathways, for example for lifelong learners; (2) Making education more flexible; (3) Res

  1. Composing Concurrent Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, Lodewijk

    1994-01-01

    Adopting the object-oriented paradigm for the development of large and complex software systems offers several advantages, of which increased extensibility and reusability are the most prominent ones. The object-oriented model is also quite suitable for modelling concurrent systems. However, it

  2. Programs as Data Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second Symposium on Programs as Data Objects, PADO 2001, held in Aarhus, Denmark, in May 2001. The 14 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 30 submissions. Various aspects of looking at programs as data objects...

  3. Superlensing Microscope Objective Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Bing; Parker, Alan; Lai, Yukun; Thomas, John; Yue, Liyang; Monks, James

    2016-01-01

    Conventional microscope objective lenses are diffraction limited, which means that they cannot resolve features smaller than half the illumination wavelength. Under white light illumination, such resolution limit is about 250-300 nm for an ordinary microscope. In this paper, we demonstrate a new superlensing objective lens which has a resolution of about 100 nm, offering at least two times resolution improvement over conventional objectives in resolution. This is achieved by integrating a conventional microscope objective lens with a superlensing microsphere lens using a 3D printed lens adaptor. The new objective lens was used for label-free super-resolution imaging of 100 nm-sized engineering and biological samples, including a Blu-ray disc sample, semiconductor chip and adenoviruses. Our work creates a solid base for developing a commercially-viable superlens prototype, which has potential to transform the field of optical microscopy and imaging.

  4. Beginning Objective-C

    CERN Document Server

    Dovey, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective-C is today's fastest growing programming language, at least in part due to the popularity of Apple's Mac, iPhone and iPad. Beginning Objective-C is for you if you have some programming experience, but you're new to the Objective-C programming language and you want a modern-and fast-way forwards to your own coding projects. Beginning Objective-C offers you a modern programmer's perspective on Objective-C courtesy of two of the best iOS and Mac developers in the field today, and gets you programming to the best of your ability in this important language.  It gets you rolling fast into

  5. Hardware Objects for Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Thalinger, Christian; Korsholm, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Java, as a safe and platform independent language, avoids access to low-level I/O devices or direct memory access. In standard Java, low-level I/O it not a concern; it is handled by the operating system. However, in the embedded domain resources are scarce and a Java virtual machine (JVM) without...... an underlying middleware is an attractive architecture. When running the JVM on bare metal, we need access to I/O devices from Java; therefore we investigate a safe and efficient mechanism to represent I/O devices as first class Java objects, where device registers are represented by object fields. Access...... to those registers is safe as Java’s type system regulates it. The access is also fast as it is directly performed by the bytecodes getfield and putfield. Hardware objects thus provide an object-oriented abstraction of low-level hardware devices. As a proof of concept, we have implemented hardware objects...

  6. Cultivating objects in interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    is chapter explores patterns of repeated orientations to physical objects in interactants’ visuo-spatial and haptic surround. A number of examples are presented from advice-giving activities in various institutional settings, where participants-in-interaction initially draw on material objects...... at hand while pursuing a particular line of explanation, and then return to these objects at later intervals. e analysis suggests that the objects are afforded representational properties through their being anchored to some referent in the talk, and that participants subsequently draw...... on these associations for describing, disambiguating or clarifying aspects of the relatively complex procedural frameworks discussed in the settings. is suggests that the temporal stability of material objects available to participants makes them an ideal resource to be developed as visual motifs....

  7. Hardware Objects for Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Thalinger, Christian; Korsholm, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Java, as a safe and platform independent language, avoids access to low-level I/O devices or direct memory access. In standard Java, low-level I/O it not a concern; it is handled by the operating system. However, in the embedded domain resources are scarce and a Java virtual machine (JVM) without...... an underlying middleware is an attractive architecture. When running the JVM on bare metal, we need access to I/O devices from Java; therefore we investigate a safe and efficient mechanism to represent I/O devices as first class Java objects, where device registers are represented by object fields. Access...... to those registers is safe as Java’s type system regulates it. The access is also fast as it is directly performed by the bytecodes getfield and putfield. Hardware objects thus provide an object-oriented abstraction of low-level hardware devices. As a proof of concept, we have implemented hardware objects...

  8. The Energetic Universe: a Nobel Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    he history of cosmic expansion can be accurately traced using Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) as standard candles. Over the past 40 years, this effort has improved its precision and extended its reach in redshift. Recently, the distances to SN Ia have been measured to a precision of ~5% using luminosity information that is encoded in the shape of the supernova's rest frame optical light curve. By combining observations of supernova distances as measured from their light curves and redshifts measured from spectra, we can detect changes in the cosmic expansion rate. This empirical approach was successfully exploited by the High-Z Supernova Team and by the Supernova Cosmology Project to detect cosmic expansion and to infer the presence of dark energy. The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess for this discovery. The world's sample of well-observed SN Ia light curves at high redshift and low, approaching 1000 objects, is now large enough to make statistical errors due to sample size a thing of the past. Systematic errors are now the challenge. To learn the properties of dark energy and determine, for example, whether it has an equation-of-state that is different from the cosmological constant demands higher precision and better accuracy. The largest systematic uncertainties come from light curve fitters, photometric calibration errors, and from uncertain knowledge of the scattering properties of dust along the line of sight. Efforts to use SN Ia spectra as luminosity indicators have had some success, but have not yet produced a big step forward. Fortunately, observations of SN Ia in the near infrared (NIR), from 1 to 2 microns, offer a very promising path to better knowledge of the Hubble constant and to improved constraints on dark energy. In the NIR, SN Ia are better standard candles and the effects of dust absorption are smaller. We have begun an HST program dubbed RAISIN (SN IA in the IR) to tighten our grip on dark energy properties

  9. Tracking of deformable objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Parimal; Wong, K. K.; Chong, Man N.

    2000-12-01

    Tracking of moving-objects in image sequences is needed for several video processing applications such as content-based coding, object oriented compression, object recognition and more recently for video object plane extraction in MPEG-4 coding. Tracking is a natural follow-up of motion-based segmentation. It is a fast and efficient method to achieve coherent motion segments along the temporal axis. Segmenting out moving objects for each and every frame in a video sequence is a computationally expensive approach. Thus, for better performance, semi-automatic segmentation is an acceptable compromise as automatic segmentation approaches rely heavily on prior assumptions. In semi-automatic segmentation approaches, motion-segmentation is performed only on the initial frame and the moving object is tracked in subsequent frames using tracking algorithms. In this paper, a new model for object tracking is proposed, where the image features -- edges, intensity pattern, object motion and initial keyed-in contour (by the user) form the prior and likelihood model of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model. Iterated Conditional Mode (ICM) is used for the minimization of the global energy for the MRF model. The motion segment for each frame is initialized using the segment information from the previous frame. For the initial frame, the motion segment is obtained by manually keying in the object contour. The motion-segments obtained using the proposed model are coherent and accurate. Experimental results on tracking using the proposed algorithm for different sequences -- Bream, Alexis and Claire are presented in this paper. The results obtained are accurate and can be used for a variety of applications including MPEG-4 Video Object Plane (VOP) extraction.

  10. The thermochemistry and reaction mechanisms in the decomposition of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melius, C.F.

    1994-05-01

    The chemical processes involved in the decomposition of energetic materials have been investigated theoretically using quantum chemical methods to determine the thermochemistry and reaction pathways. The Bond-Additivity-Corrected Moller-Plesset 4th order perturbation theory method (BAC-MP4) has been used to determine heats of formation and free energies of reaction intermediates of decomposition. In addition, the BAC-MP4 method has been used to determine action pathways involving these intermediates. A theoretical method for calculating solvation energies has been developed to treat the non-idealities of high pressure and the condensed phase. The resulting chemical processes involving decomposition and ignition are presented for nitrate compounds, nitramines, and nitromethane.

  11. Dancing with Energetic Nitrogen Atoms: Versatile N-Functionalization Strategies for N-Heterocyclic Frameworks in High Energy Density Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Qinghua; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-01-19

    Nitrogen-rich heterocycles represent a unique class of energetic frameworks featuring high heats of formation and high nitrogen content, which have generated considerable research interest in the field of high energy density materials (HEDMs). Although traditional C-functionalization methodology of aromatic hydrocarbons has been fully established, studies on N-functionalization strategies of nitrogen-containing heterocycles still have great potential to be exploited by virtue of forming diverse N-X bonds (X = C, N, O, B, halogen, etc.), which are capable of regulating energy performance and the stability of the resulting energetic compounds. In this sense, versatile N-functionalization of N-heterocyclic frameworks offers a flexible strategy to meet the requirements of developing new-generation HEDMs. In this Account, the role of strategic N-functionalization in designing new energetic frameworks, including the formation of N-C, N-N, N-O, N-B and N-halogen bonds, is emphasized. In the family of N-functionalized HEDMs, energetic derivatives, by virtue of forming N-C bonds, are the most widely used type due to the good nucleophilic capacity of most heterocyclic backbones. Although introduction of carbon tends to decrease energetic performance, significant improvement in material sensitivity makes this strategy attractive for safety concerns. More importantly, most "explosophores" can be readily introduced into the N-C linkage, thus providing a promising route to various HEDMs. Formation of additional N-N bonds typically gives rise to higher heats of formation, implying the potential enhancement in detonation performance. In many cases, the increased hydrogen bonding interactions within N-N functionalized heterocycles also improve thermal stability accordingly. Introduction of a single N,N'-azo bridge into several azole moieties leads to an extended nitrogen chain, demonstrating a new strategy for designing high-nitrogen compounds. The strategy of N-O functionalization

  12. From N-Nitro to N-Nitroamino: Preparation of High-Performance Energetic Materials by Introducing Nitrogen-Containing Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-11-23

    In the design of energetic materials, high energetic performance and good molecular stability are two main goals. Energetic functionalization which strives for maximum energy often results in unstable chemical bonds and causes safety problems in practical production and storage operations. In this work, N-nitro- and N-nitroamino-functionalized mono- and bis(1,2,4-triazoles) were synthesized and characterized by infrared, and multinuclear NMR spectra, and elemental analyses. The N-nitroamino-functionalization strategy was employed for bis(imidazole), leading to high density compound 14 (2.007 g cm(-3) at 100 K; 1.94 g cm(-3) at room temperature) and energetic salt 15. While N-nitro-functionalized products are thermally unstable and highly moisture sensitive, N-nitroamino-functionalized energetic salts, which are comprised of additional nitrogen-containing ions, exhibit good density, moderate to excellent structural stabilities, and high performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Atomic mobility in energetic cluster deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zheng-Ying; WANG Yue-Xia; WEI Qi; LI Zhi-Jie; ZHOU Liang; ZHANG Liang-Kun

    2004-01-01

    This paper tries to outline the influence of atomic mobility on the initial fabrication of thin films formed by LECBD. Based on our recent studies on low-energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) by molecular dynamics simulation, two examples, the deposition of small carbon clusters on Si and diamond surfaces and Al clusters on Ni substrate, were mainly discussed. The impact energy of the cluster ranges from 0.1 eV to 100 eV. In the former case,the mobility and the lateral migration of surface atoms, especially the recoil atoms, are enhanced with increasing the impact energy, which promote the film to be smoother and denser. For the latter case, the transverse kinetic energy of cluster atoms, caused mainly by the collision between moving cluster atoms, dominates the lateral spread of cluster atoms on the surface, which is contributive to layer-by-layer growth of thin films. Our result is consistent with the experimental observations that the film structure is strongly dependent on the impact energy. In addition, it elucidates that the atomic mobility takes a leading role in the structure characteristic of films formed by LECBD.

  14. Energetic Efficiency of red palm oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Jiménez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to determine the energy efficiency in the production of red palm oil (Elaeis guineensis by using the biophysical indicator EROI, postulated by the Ecological Economics. This indicator is applied to compare the energy used in the preparation of synthetic fertilizers (to fill its nutritional demands versus the energy contained in the oil. In 2009, there were 195.550 hectares of land planted with African palm in Ecuador (INEC, 2011. In addition, between 2002 and 2009, there were 2,7 million tons of red oil (FEDEPAL, 2010. It is determined that for each unit of energy consumed, 4.82 units of energy are contained in the red oil. The energy used in making pesticides for cultivation, consumed in transportation, refining, and post harvest is excluded because this other energy would drastically reduce the absolute data of the indicator, which is already inefficient for the high energy consumption it requires to generate the energy contained in the oil. On the other hand, agroecology has proven to be more efficient in the generation of energy per unit of invested energy (Altieri et. al., 2010; Moore, 2004.

  15. Energetic selection of topology in ferredoxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Dongun Kim

    Full Text Available Models of early protein evolution posit the existence of short peptides that bound metals and ions and served as transporters, membranes or catalysts. The Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys heptapeptide located within bacterial ferredoxins, enclosing an Fe₄S₄ metal center, is an attractive candidate for such an early peptide. Ferredoxins are ancient proteins and the simple α+β fold is found alone or as a domain in larger proteins throughout all three kingdoms of life. Previous analyses of the heptapeptide conformation in experimentally determined ferredoxin structures revealed a pervasive right-handed topology, despite the fact that the Fe₄S₄ cluster is achiral. Conformational enumeration of a model CGGCGGC heptapeptide bound to a cubane iron-sulfur cluster indicates both left-handed and right-handed folds could exist and have comparable stabilities. However, only the natural ferredoxin topology provides a significant network of backbone-to-cluster hydrogen bonds that would stabilize the metal-peptide complex. The optimal peptide configuration (alternating α(L,α(R is that of an α-sheet, providing an additional mechanism where oligomerization could stabilize the peptide and facilitate iron-sulfur cluster binding.

  16. Development of a high flow source of energetic oxygen atoms for material degradation studies. [of Space Shuttles in low earth orbit environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for the generation, in the laboratory, of thermally 'cold', high flux of energetic oxygen atoms is presented. The flux of nearly mono-energetic oxygen atoms is obtained after a laser-induced breakdown of oxygen molecules followed by a rapid expansion of the recombining plasma. The experimental apparatus, the optical and spectral measurements, the O-atom source characterization, and the material degradation studies are discussed. Average oxygen atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s are measured with an estimated flux of 10 to the 18th per pulse, over pulse durations of several microseconds. The flow of the O2 gas for about 200 microseconds before applying the laser pulse is found to give best results. It is also found that the energetic O-atom irradiation of sample targets such as Al, Fe, and polyethylene, induces mass removal. In addition, spectral scans of the radiation reveals the existence of two main spectral subsets.

  17. Fractal dimension and energetic heterogeneity of gold-modified Al-Fe-Ce pilc's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriazo, J.G.; Molina, R. [Estado Solido y Catalisis Ambiental (ESCA), Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 30 No. 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Moreno, S. [Estado Solido y Catalisis Ambiental (ESCA), Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 30 No. 45-03, Bogota (Colombia)], E-mail: smorenog@unal.edu.co

    2008-12-30

    This paper studies the energetic and topographical changes that occur on the surface of a series of clays pillared with the mixed Al-Fe-Ce system and on the surface of solids synthesized by the deposition of gold nanoparticles over these pillared clays. The energetic heterogeneity of the solids was analyzed by means of the distribution of the adsorption potential, while the variations in the fractal dimension were determined from the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K, using the equation proposed by Avnir-Jaroniec. Results show the generation of microporous structures with important topographical modifications indicating an increase in the roughness (fractal geometry) of the surface of the solids as a consequence of the pillaring, revealing a positive effect of cerium addition in the synthesis process and the possible formation of nanoparticles of iron species and gold on the surface of pillared clays. The solids were also analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confirming the formation of nanoparticles on the surface.

  18. Test mass charging simulation of ASTROD I due to solar energetic particles at 0.5 AU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining the geodesic motion of the test mass is vital to ASTROD I space mission. However,the electrostatic charging of the test mass due to cosmic rays and solar energetic particles will result in Coulomb and Lorentz forces and consequently influence the test mass motions. To estimate the size of these effects,a credible simulation of test mass charging processes is critically required. Using the GEANT4 software toolkit,we have modeled the charging processes and predict how the ASTROD I test mass will charge positively at a rate of 217370 e + /s,due to solar energetic particles(SEPs) at~0.5 AU caused by the largest SEPs event on 29,September,1989. In addition to Monte Carlo uncertainty,an error of ±30% in the net charging rates was added to account for uncertainties in the spectra,physics and geometry models.

  19. Theoretical Study of the N-NO2 Bond Dissociation Energies for Energetic Materials with Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Hong; TANG Zheng-Xin; Abraham F.Jalbout; ZHANG Xian-Zhou; CHENG Xin-Lu

    2008-01-01

    The N-NO2 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for 7 energetic materials were computed by means of accurate density functional theory (B3LYP, B3PW91 and B3P86) with 6-31G** and 6-311G** basis sets. By comparing the computed energies and experimental results, we find that the B3P86/6-311G** method can give good results of BDE, which has the mean absolute deviation of 1.30 kcal/mol. In addition, substituent effects were also taken into account. It is noted that the Hammett constants of substituent groups are related to the BDEs of the N-NO2 bond and the bond dissociation energies of the energetic materials studied decrease when increasing the number of NO2 group.

  20. Unifying Subjectivity and Objectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Chandrasekaran

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of modern science to the progress of civilization is immeasurable. Even its tendency toward exclusive concentration on the objective world has had salutary effects of great value. Modern science has wiped away much that was merely superstitious or speculative. Its rejection of unfounded opinions and prejudices has helped the thinking mind question conventional beliefs, shed preferences and prejudices, and challenge established authority. But modern systems thinking inherited from natural science is the suppression of the subjective dimension of reality. Many complex systems are an attempt to define and represent all subjective experience in physical terms. The modern man has a bias towards objectivity. The powerful influence of sense impressions on his mind and thinking makes him ignore the subjective experience and consider only objective facts as a valid, legitimate and representation of reality. Observing objective factors that are physical is easier than observing subjective factors that are subtle. The mechanistic view of reality has led to the rejection of the role of the individual in social development as insignificant. The individuals determine the development of society. Their social power has its roots both in subjective factors and objective factors. Economy, politics, society, and culture are inseparable dimensions of a single integrated reality. Subject and object constitute an integrated whole. The mind sees them as separate and independent. Or it views one as completely subordinate to the other. Unbiased approach to the study of all human experiences may prove that subject and object are interdependent dimensions or elements of reality.

  1. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  2. Two Interesting Southern Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Two southern objects are studied. The first, the planetary nebula PK 349-01.1, is of interest because it has a chain of jets ejected from the central star. 12C(1-0) observations of the vicinity of this object reveal red- and blue-shifted molecular outflows. The second object is a star formation region consisting of two groups of IR stars. These groups have a trapezium-like configuration. Two stars in one of these groups are associated with a ring-shaped nebulae. This star formation region is associated with a new radial system of dark globules.

  3. Cultivating objects in interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    is chapter explores patterns of repeated orientations to physical objects in interactants’ visuo-spatial and haptic surround. A number of examples are presented from advice-giving activities in various institutional settings, where participants-in-interaction initially draw on material objects...... on these associations for describing, disambiguating or clarifying aspects of the relatively complex procedural frameworks discussed in the settings. is suggests that the temporal stability of material objects available to participants makes them an ideal resource to be developed as visual motifs....

  4. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  6. From additivity to synergism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Christian; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2014-01-01

    Interest in synergistic or antagonistic effects through mixture experiments has grown immensely over the past two decades, not the least within in pharmacology and toxicology. Several definitions of reference models exist; one commonly used reference model is concentration or dose addition, which...... assumes compounds, when administrated simultaneously, do not interfere with each other at the site of action. We focus on statistical modelling that allows evaluation of dose addition. We will describe several statistical approaches that are suitable for analysis mixture data where synergistic...... or antagonistic effects may be present. The statistical models are defined and explained and some of the approaches exemplified. Code in open-source software is provided....

  7. Additives for the Axe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On May 1,China will begin to ban the production and use of two food additives commonly used to "bleach" flour,benzoyl peroxide and calcium peroxide.The decision was made after 10 years of wrangling between the policy makers,manufacturers,scientists and consumers.The Ministry of Health said in a statement it was applying the ban in response to consumers’ concerns about chemical substances in food,and technical improvements that had made the two additives unnecessary in flour processing.Minister of Health Chen Zhu has also said

  8. Alcohols as gasoline additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawetz, P.

    1982-12-01

    This paper showed that, when using alcohol octane-boosting additives to gasoline, one attains several goals at the same time: (a) there is an increased saving in petroleum crude, since the alcohol is not merely a substitute for gasoline but rather a substitute for the octane-boosting additives used in the manufacture of unleaded gasoline; and (b) the production of fermentation ethanol for a fuel purpose can help revitalize the agricultural sector in different economics systems, thus becoming a road to economic development.

  9. Effect of energetic materials wettability on their outdoor effective elution rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Marie-Claude; Martel, Richard; Lange, Sébastien F; Coté, Sébastien

    2016-07-05

    Energetic materials (EM) contained in military ammunitions have been found in the surface soil and water of training areas and may potentially represent a threat to human health and the environment. EM wettability is an essential physical parameter to characterize because it controls EM dissolution rate. This paper was conducted to determine the wettability of conventional and new EM formulations used in military ammunition. Wettability was estimated in the laboratory via contact angle measurements of water droplets on different EM surfaces. Results show that 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), Octol and energetic thermoplastic elastomer (ETPE) 1000 are hydrophilic while Composition B, XRT, GIM, CX-85, ETPE 2000, and C4 are hydrophobic whereas HELOVA gun propellant has a mixed wettability oscillating between hydrophilic and hydrophobic. The present study demonstrates that wettability of EM formulation is generally controlled by their matrix constituents. Results indicate that hydrophobic formulations have a much slower outdoor environmental effective elution rate than hydrophilic ones, with the exception of the hydrophobic C4 formulation whose elution rate is extremely high. The addition of hydrophobic components into EM formulations is recommended to diminish the environmental impact on water, as it has already been done with XRT, GIM and CX-85 formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. From FOX-7 to H-FOX to insensitive energetic materials with hypergolic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Dharavath; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-06-08

    Nitrogen/halogen rich derivatives, , , , and of FOX-7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene), and H-FOX (1-hydrazinyl-2,2-dinitroethenamine) have been synthesized, characterized and found to exhibit good energetic properties. Compound displays hypergolic properties with commonly utilized fuels such as monomethyl hydrazine (MMH), and hydrazine hydrate (HH), as well as with ethylenediamine (EN), and 1,3-diaminopropane (DAP) showing ignition delay times between 2.5 to 10 ms. Additionally, the hypergolic properties of 4 and 8 were further studied by using ammonia borane as a fuel solubilized in a green ionic liquid, 1-allyl-3-methyl imidazolium dicyanamide, (1 : 1 molar ratio). This is a new role for a derivative of H-FOX. The energetic and physical properties of all the molecules were either measured or calculated. All of materials were characterized by NMR, and infrared spectra, elemental analyses, and differential scanning calorimetry. Single crystal X-ray structural measurements for and were helpful in their confirmation.

  11. Process of Energetic Carbon Atom Deposition on Si (001) Substrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于威; 滕晓云; 李晓苇; 傅广生

    2002-01-01

    The process of energetic C atom deposition on Si (001)-(2×1) is studied by the molecular dynamics method using the semi-empirical many-bond Tersoff potential. It is found that the incident energy of the carbon atom has an important effect on the collision process and its diffusion process on the substrate. Most of the incident energy of the carbon atom is transferred to the substrate atoms within the initial two vibration periods of substrate atoms and its value increases with the incident energy. The spreading distance and penetration depth of the incident atom increasing with the incident energy are also identified. The simulated results imply that an important effect of energy of incident carbon on the film growth at Iow substrate temperature provides activation energy for silicon carbide formation through the vibration enhancement of local substrate atoms. In addition, suppressing carbon atom inhomogeneous collection and dispensing with the silicon diffusion process may be effectively promoted by the spreading and penetration of the energetic carbon atom in the silicon substrate.

  12. Compatibility Study of DNTF with Some Insensitive Energetic Materials and Inert Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Wang, Bo-Liang; Lin, Qiu-Han; Chen, Li-Ping

    2016-10-01

    The compatibility of 3,4-dinitrofurazanfuroxan (DNTF) with insensitive energetic materials and inert materials was studied in detail using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TATB), 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105), 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyridine-1-oxide (ANPyO), and 5-amino-1H-tetrazole nitrate (5-ATEZN) are used as insensitive energetic materials, and polymer(vinyl acetate) (PVAC), hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), dinoctylsebacate (DOS), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), and wax are used as inert materials. The results show that DNTF/TNT and DNTF/5-ATEZN possess good compatibility, DNTF/NTO and DNTF/TATB have moderate compatibility, and the compatibility of DNTF/LLM-105 and DNTF/PVAC is poor; in addition, DNTF/ANPyO, DNTF/HTPB, DNTF/DNT, DNTF/DOS, and DNTF/wax have bad compatibility.

  13. A test of the Energetics-Hormone Vocalization model in the green treefrog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Christopher J; Lippincott, Johnny; Harris, Samuel; Hawkins, Doyle L

    2015-03-01

    Male courtship displays may be regulated by, and affect the production of, circulating hormones. The Energetics-Hormone Vocalization (EHV) model, for example, posits that interactions among chorusing male anuran amphibians stimulate androgen production that then mediates an increase in vocal effort. Increased vocal effort is expected to deplete energy reserves and increase glucocorticoid levels that, in turn, negatively affect androgen levels and vocalization. Androgen levels, glucocorticoid levels, and vocal effort are thus expected to increase across and within nights of chorus activity and should be positively correlated in calling males; energy reserves should decline temporally and be inversely related to glucocorticoid levels. We tested predictions of the EHV model in the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea. Consistent with the model, both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels increased across the breeding season in calling males. However, testosterone levels decreased and dihydrotestosterone levels did not change within nights of chorus activity, suggesting that chorusing behavior did not drive the seasonal elevation in androgens. Corticosterone (CORT) level remained relatively stable across the breeding season and decreased within nights of chorus activity, contrary to model predictions. Body condition, the proxy for energetic state, was inversely correlated with CORT level but discrepancies between model predictions and temporal patterns of CORT production arose because there was no evidence of a temporal decrease in body condition or increase in vocal effort. Moreover, androgen and CORT levels were not positively correlated with vocal effort. Additional ecological and physiological measures may be needed to support predictions of the EHV model.

  14. Synthesis and Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of the Energetic Compound 3,5-Dinitro-4-nitroxypyrazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Qin; Cao, Duan-Lin; Cui, Jian-Lan

    2016-07-01

    A novel energetic material, 3,5-dinitro-4-nitroxypyrazole (DNNP), was synthesized via nitration and nucleophilic substitution reaction using 4-chloropyrazole as raw material. The structure of DNNP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and elemental analysis. Its detonation properties were calculated and compared with those of other commonly used energetic compounds. The thermal decomposition mechanism of DNNP was studied by means of thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry coupled with a mass spectrometry (DSC-MS). The results show that the detonation properties of DNNP were better than those of TNT and comparable to those of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). In addition, the thermal decomposition mechanism of DNNP was supposed. Initially, the O-NO2 bond was broken, thereby producing a nitropyrazole oxygen radical. Subsequently, the nitropyrazole oxygen radical was decomposed by free radical cleavage of nitro or isomerized to nitritepyrazole and subsequently decomposed by free radical cleavage of the nitroso group. Finally, pyrazole ring fission occurred and produced N2, NO, N2O, and CO2.

  15. Fe-rich solar energetic particle events during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, J. E.; Mason, G. M.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    During the first 10 months of WIND observations, we have detected several time periods with energetic particle abundances that are characteristic of impulsive flares: enrichments in the ³He isotope, and in heavy ions compared to the corona. Using the Supra-Thermal through Energetic Particle sensor on WIND, we find that at ∼100 keV/nucleon these events typically arrive in sequences of multiple events when the spacecraft is magnetically connected to an active region at western solar longitudes, preceding the arrival of a high speed solar wind stream. During recurrent high speed solar wind streams with their associated flux enhancements Fe-rich events are seldom seen: almost all of the events occur on days with solar wind speeds ISEE-3.

  16. Energetics and efficiency of a molecular motor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Fogedby, Hans; Svane, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The energetics and efficiency of a linear molecular motor model proposed by Mogilner et al. (Phys. Lett. 237, 297 (1998)) is analyzed from an analytical point of view. The model which is based on protein friction with a track is described by coupled Langevin equations for the motion in combination...... with coupled master equations for the ATP hydrolysis. Here the energetics and efficiency of the motor is addressed using a many body scheme with focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP). It is found that the EMP is reduced from about 10 pct in a heuristic description of the motor to about 1 per mille...... when incorporating the full motor dynamics, owing to the strong dissipation associated with the motor action....

  17. Feasibility and energetic evaluation of air stripping for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläfle, Sandra; Senn, Thomas; Gschwind, Peter; Kohlus, Reinhard

    2017-05-01

    Stripping of mashes with air as stripping gas and low ethanol contents between 3 and 5wt% was investigated in terms of its suitability for continuous bioethanol production. Experiments in a Blenke cascade system were carried out and the results were compared with values obtained from theoretical vapour-liquid-equilibrium calculations. The whole stripping process was energetically evaluated by a simulation in ChemCAD and compared to conventional distillation. Therefore several parameters such as temperature, air volume flow and initial ethanol load of the mash were varied. Air stripping was found to be a suitable separation method for bioethanol from mashes with low concentrations. However, energetic aspects have to be considered, when developing a new process.

  18. Energetic and Ecological Analysis of Energy Saving and Passive Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanytsky, Myroslav; Sekret, Robert; Wojcikiewicz, Mariusz

    2012-06-01

    In this paper results of influence of building-installation system parameters on value of energetic coefficients were calculated. Three types of buildings (standard, energy saving and low energy) with heating surface of 100, 150 i 200 m2 were used. The above types of buildings differ on thermal barrier and heating system efficiency. The influence of the gravity and mechanical ventilation systems on the final heat energy of different kinds of houses was shown. Parameters of the certificate for energy characteristics of building were used. Mathematics models of influence of thermal barrier parameters and heating surface on the value of energy characteristics, namely final energy EF, primary energy EP and useful energy EU were established. Influence of such parameters as heating energy factors, ventilation system and energy sources on the energy efficiency improvement of buildings was analyzed. The building environmental assessment system was proposed on the base of energetic and ecological analysis of houses.

  19. Cholesterol-induced protein sorting: an analysis of energetic feasibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, J A; Andersen, O S; Werge, T;

    2003-01-01

    transmembrane domain (TMD). M. S. Bretscher and S. Munro (SCIENCE: 261:1280-1281, 1993) therefore proposed a physical sorting mechanism based on the hydrophobic match between the proteins' TMD and the bilayer thickness, in which cholesterol would regulate protein sorting by increasing the lipid bilayer...... thickness. In this model, Golgi proteins with short TMDs would be excluded from cholesterol-enriched domains (lipid rafts) that are incorporated into transport vesicles destined for the plasma membrane. Although attractive, this model remains unproven. We therefore evaluated the energetic feasibility...... thickness per se, however, have only a modest effect on sorting; the major effect arises because cholesterol changes also the bilayer material properties, which augments the energetic penalty for incorporating short TMDs into cholesterol-enriched domains. We conclude that cholesterol-induced changes...

  20. Heliospheric Magnetic Fields, Energetic Particles, and the Solar Cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Kiraly

    2000-09-01

    The heliosphere is the region filled with magnetized plasma of mainly solar origin. It extends from the solar corona to well beyond the planets, and is separated from the interstellar medium by the heliopause. The latter is embedded in a complex and still unexplored boundary region. The characteristics of heliospheric plasma, fields, and energetic particles depend on highly variable internal boundary conditions, and also on quasi-stationary external ones. Both galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles of solar and heliospheric origin are subject to intensity variations over individual solar cycles and also from cycle to cycle. Particle propagation is controlled by spatially and temporally varying interplanetary magnetic fields, frozen into the solar wind. An overview is presented of the main heliospheric components and processes, and also of the relevant missions and data sets. Particular attention is given to flux variations over the last few solar cycles, and to extrapolated effects on the terrestrial environment.

  1. Gyroresonant interaction of energetic trapped electrons and protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Elena; Silevitch, Michael B.; Burke, William J.; Rothwell, Paul L.

    The present consideration of the theory of gyroresonant interactions of energetic trapped electrons and protons with ducted EM cyclotron waves in the earth's radiation zones derives a set of equations, based on the Fokker-Planck theory of pitch-angle diffusion, which describe the temporal evolution of the number of particles in the flux tube, and the energy density of waves, for (1) the interaction of Alfven waves with protons and (2) that of whistler waves with electrons. Attention is given to the reflection of the waves in the ionosphere. To dump the energetic particles from the radiation belts efficiently, the reflection coefficient must be close to unity to facilitate the growth of wave amplitudes; precipitating particle fluxes may then act as a positive feedback to raise the height-integrated conductivity of the ionosphere. This conductivity in turn enhances wave reflection.

  2. Mechanisms of Stochastic Diffusion of Energetic Ions in Spherical Tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; R.B. White; Yu.V. Yakovenko

    2001-01-18

    Stochastic diffusion of the energetic ions in spherical tori is considered. The following issues are addressed: (I) Goldston-White-Boozer diffusion in a rippled field; (ii) cyclotron-resonance-induced diffusion caused by the ripple; (iii) effects of non-conservation of the magnetic moment in an axisymmetric field. It is found that the stochastic diffusion in spherical tori with a weak magnetic field has a number of peculiarities in comparison with conventional tokamaks; in particular, it is characterized by an increased role of mechanisms associated with non-conservation of the particle magnetic moment. It is concluded that in current experiments on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) the stochastic diffusion does not have a considerable influence on the confinement of energetic ions.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations of the Galileo energetic particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, I; Garrett, H B; McEntire, R W

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport studies have been performed for the Galileo spacecraft energetic particle detector (EPD) in order to study its response to energetic electrons and protons. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, MCNP version 4B (for electrons) and MCNPX version 2.2.3 (for protons), were used throughout the study. The results are presented in the form of 'geometric factors' for the high-energy channels studied in this paper: B1, DC2, and DC3 for electrons and B0, DC0, and DC1 for protons. The geometric factor is the energy-dependent detector response function that relates the incident particle fluxes to instrument count rates. The trend of actual data measured by the EPD was successfully reproduced using the geometric factors obtained in this study.

  4. Post-equinox periodicities in Saturn's energetic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2011-12-01

    Since Saturn's vernal equinox in August 2009 (day 223), energetic electrons (110-365 keV) have exhibited a variety of periodic and aperiodic behavior within a spectral window of 5-15 hours. From late 2009 through the end of 2010, when the observed at dusk, a single period near 10.7 hours dominated the Lomb spectra of these particles. Near the end of 2010, however, the energetic electrons displayed multiple periods, with the strongest at 10.65 hours. The periodicity observed after equinox has a mean value of 10.69 ± 0.06 hours and agreed closely with that of Saturn kilometric radio (south) emissions. By early 2011, when the observer had moved to the dayside, the periodicities abruptly disappeared and the Lomb spectra show no periodicity. This behavior may suggest changes in Saturn's ionosphere as a result of seasonal change, or may alternately imply a local time dependence of periodicity caused by magnetodisk thickness asymmetry.

  5. Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals in energetic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrow, Darcie; Jilek, Brook Anton; Kohl, Ian Thomas; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of a two year early career LDRD project, which has focused on the development of ultrafast diagnostics to measure temperature, pressure and chemical change during the shock initiation of energetic materials. We compare two single-shot versions of femtosecond rotational CARS to measure nitrogen temperature: chirped-probe-pulse and ps/fs hybrid CARS thermometry. The applicability of measurements to the combustion of energetic materials will be discussed. We have also demonstrated laser shock and particle velocity measurements in thin film explosives using stretched femtosecond laser pulses. We will discuss preliminary results from Al and PETN thin films. Agreement between our results and previous work will be discussed.

  6. Energetic particles as probes of solar wind disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, H.V.; Richardson, I.G.; Wibberenz, G.

    1995-06-01

    The authors have investigated the response of particles, in the energy range approximately 1-5000 MeV, to interplanetary shocks and coronal ejecta. Shocks can accelerate particles or cause decreases in particle densities. Ejecta cause decreases. Thus particle observations can provide information about solar wind disturbances. Of particular interest is that the boundaries of ejecta can often be more readily identified from approximately l GeV particle decrease observations than from most other phenomena associated with ejecta. The authors will discuss the properties of less energetic shocks and ejecta and compare them with those of the more energetic events which are normally discussed in the context of Forbush decreases, large proton events, etc. They use data from both Helios spacecraft and IMP 8 which allows some spatial variations to be studied.

  7. Food environments select microorganisms based on selfish energetic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Diego; Arioli, Stefania; Compagno, Concetta

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient richness, and specifically the abundance of mono- and disaccharides that characterize several food matrixes, such as milk and grape juice, has allowed the speciation of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts with a high fermentation capacity instead of energetically favorable respiratory metabolism. In these environmental contexts, rapid sugar consumption and lactic acid or ethanol production, accumulation, and tolerance, together with the ability to propagate in the absence of oxygen, are several of the "winning" traits that have apparently evolved and become specialized to perfection in these fermenting microorganisms. Here, we summarize and discuss the evolutionary context that has driven energetic metabolism in food-associated microorganisms, using the dairy species Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus among prokaryotes and the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae among eukaryotes as model organisms.

  8. Food environments select microorganisms based on selfish energetic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eMora

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient richness, and specifically the abundance of mono- and disaccharides that characterize several food matrixes, such as milk and grape juice, has allowed the speciation of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts with a high fermentation capacity instead of energetically favorable respiratory metabolism. In these environmental contexts, rapid sugar consumption and lactic acid or ethanol production, accumulation and tolerance, together with the ability to propagate in the absence of oxygen, are several of the ‘winning’ traits that have apparently evolved and become specialized to perfection in these fermenting microorganisms. Here, we summarize and discuss the evolutionary context that has driven energetic metabolism in food-associated microorganisms, using the dairy species Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus among prokaryotes and the bakers’ yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae among eukaryotes as model organisms.

  9. Theory of ring sweeping of energetic particles. [in Neptune environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranicas, C. P.; Cheng, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    Because the effective 'area' of the Neptunian rings is larger than that of the inner moons, the sweeping of energetic particles by the rings is perhaps the dominant process for particle loss in the magnetosphere within 5 R(N). In this paper, a theory for calculating the absorption probability of energetic charged particles by the rings is described. The effects of a large tilt and an offset between the planet and dipole centers are included. It is found that the probability of absorption for protons is so high that the sweeping lifetime is only a few times the gradient-curvature drift period. For electrons, the sweeping lifetime is even less. The pitch angle dependence for sweeping manifests itself strongly only at large equatorial pitch angles. Lower-energy particles have higher absorption rates by the rings.

  10. Assessment of HCDA energetics in the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhow, S K; Switick, D M; McElroy, J L; Joe, B W; Elawar, Z J

    1981-03-27

    The results of hypothetical core disruptive event analyses for the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core are reported. The analytical results cover a large number of parametric cases including variations in design parameters and phenomenological assumptions. Reactor core configurations at the beginning of cycle one and end of cycle four are evaluated. The energetic consequences are evaluated based upon both fuel expansion thermodynamic work potential and a relative probability assignment. It is concluded that the structural loads, which result from 101 megajoules of available expansion work at sodium slug impact on the reactor closure head (equivalent to 661 megajoules of fuel expansion work to one atmosphere), is an adequate energetic consequence envelope for use in specifying the Structural Margins Beyond the Design Basis.

  11. Piles of objects

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Shu-Wei

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for directly modeling piles of objects in multi-body simulations. Piles of objects represent some of the more interesting, but also most time-consuming portion of simulation. We propose a method for reducing computation in many of these situations by explicitly modeling the piles that the objects may form into. By modeling pile behavior rather than the behavior of all individual objects, we can achieve realistic results in less time, and without directly modeling the frictional component that leads to desired pile shapes. Our method is simple to implement and can be easily integrated with existing rigid body simulations. We observe notable speedups in several rigid body examples, and generate a wider variety of piled structures than possible with strict impulse-based simulation. © 2010 ACM.

  12. This elusive objective existence

    CERN Document Server

    Mohrhoff, U

    2004-01-01

    Zurek's existential interpretation of quantum mechanics suffers from three classical prejudices, including the belief that space and time are intrinsically and infinitely differentiated. They compel him to relativize the concept of objective existence in two ways. The elimination of these prejudices makes it possible to recognize the quantum formalism's ontological implications - the relative and contingent reality of spatiotemporal distinctions and the extrinsic and finite spatiotemporal differentiation of the physical world - which in turn makes it possible to arrive at an unqualified objective existence. Contrary to a widespread misconception, viewing the quantum formalism as being fundamentally a probability algorithm does not imply that quantum mechanics is concerned with states of knowledge rather than states of Nature. On the contrary, it makes possible a complete and strongly objective description of the physical world that requires no reference to observers. What objectively exists, in a sense that r...

  13. Safety objectives for 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    This is the third year in which the CERN Management has presented annual safety objectives for the Organization, the “HSE Objectives”.   The HSE objectives for 2014, which were announced by the Director-General at his traditional New Year’s address to the staff and were presented at the first Enlarged Directorate meeting of the year, have been drawn up and agreed in close collaboration between the DSOs, the HSE Unit and the DG himself. From safety in the workplace to radiation and environmental protection, the document emphasises that “Safety is a priority for CERN” and that safety policy is a key element in how the Organization is run. And, like all policies, it generates objectives that “serve as a general framework for action”. The HSE objectives are broken down into the following fields: occupational health and safety on sites and in the workplace, radiation protection, radiation safety, environmental protection, emerge...

  14. Protected Objects in Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvengreen, Hans Henrik; Schwarzer, Jens Christian

    1998-01-01

    We present an implementation of Ada 95's notion of protected objects in Java. The implementation comprises a class library supporting entry queues and a (pre-) compiler translating slightly decorated Java classes to pure Java classes utilizing the library.......We present an implementation of Ada 95's notion of protected objects in Java. The implementation comprises a class library supporting entry queues and a (pre-) compiler translating slightly decorated Java classes to pure Java classes utilizing the library....

  15. Choosing for learning objects

    OpenAIRE

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Emans, Bruno; Meijer, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Choosing for learning objects discusses eight educational ambitions and the possible roles of learning objects in realising these ambitions. The eight educational ambitions are: (1) Creating independent learning pathways, for example for lifelong learners; (2) Making education more flexible; (3) Responding to differences between students; (4) The joint development of learning materials together with other institutions or external parties; (5) Attuning to professional practice; (6) Attuning to...

  16. Measurement of energetic single-photon production at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Alkhazov, G.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Burgos, C.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Bykov, A.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castello, R.; Cavallo, N.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Chung, S.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Commichau, V.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duhem, F.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Landi, G.; Lanzano, S.; Laurikainen, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leedom, I.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Mele, S.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monaco, V.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Redaelli, M.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Timellini, R.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Toker, O.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Trowitzsch, G.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weill, R.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.

    1995-02-01

    We describe the sample of energetic single-photon events ( Eγ > 15 GeV) collected by L3 in the 1991-1993 LEP runs. The event distributions agree with expectations from the Standard Model. The data are used to constrain the ZZ γ coupling and to set an upper limit of 4.1 × 10 -6, μB (90% C.L.) on the the magnetic moment of the τ neutrino.

  17. Elution of Energetic Compounds from Propellant and Composition B Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    respective aqueous solubilities (Table 2). In contrast, TNT and the two AmDNTs attained only about 21% and 1% of their respective aque - ous solubilities...sarily the case for TNT and the AmDNTs, the latter of which can covalently bond to organic matter (Thorne and Leggett 1997 ). The percentages relative...55: 357–367. Elution of Energetic Compounds 23 Thorne, P.G., and D.C. Leggett ( 1997 ) Hydrolyic release of bound residues from composted soil

  18. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  19. Electronic State Decomposition of Energetic Materials and Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    tetrazine1,4-dioxde ( DATO ), is investigated. Although these molecules are based on N -oxides of a tetrazine aromatic heterocyclic ring, their...nitramines, furazan, tetrazines, tetrazine-N oxides, terazoles, PETN, RDX,HMX,CL-20,DAATO,ACTO, DATO ,conical intersections Elliot R Bernstein Colorado State...Tetrazine-N-Oxide Based High Nitrogen Content Energetic Materials from Excited Electronic States," J. Chem. Phys. 131, 194304 (2009). A

  20. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.