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Sample records for addison disease

  1. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts of some or all of its hormones ( hypopituitarism ) Autoimmune disorder that affects the nerves and the ... disease) Dermatitis herpetiformis Diabetes Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypoparathyroidism Hypopituitarism Immune response Myasthenia gravis Ovarian hypofunction Pernicious anemia ...

  2. Addison's disease presenting with muscle spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rana; Sharma, A; Rays, A; Thakur, I; Sarkar, D; Mandal, B; Mookerjee, S K; Chatterjee, S K; Chowdhury, Pradip Roy

    2013-09-01

    Primary hypoadrenalism has various causes and protean manifestation. We report a young female patient who presented with severe muscle spasm as her primary complaint. On evaluation she was found to be a case of Addison's disease secondary to adrenal tuberculosis. Her muscle spasm disappeared rapidly with replacement dose of glucocorticoid.

  3. Jane Austen and Addison's disease: an unconvincing diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K G

    2009-12-01

    Jane Austen's letters describe a two-year deterioration into bed-ridden exhaustion, with unusual colouring, bilious attacks and rheumatic pains. In 1964, Zachary Cope postulated tubercular Addison's to explain her symptoms and her relatively pain-free illness. Literary scholars later countered this posthumous diagnosis on grounds that are not well substantiated, while medical authors supported his conclusion. Important symptoms reported by contemporary Addison's patients-mental confusion, generalised pain and suffering, weight loss and anorexia-are absent from Jane Austen's letters. Thus, by listening to the patient's perspective, we can conclude it is unlikely that Addison's disease caused Jane Austen's demise. Disseminated bovine tuberculosis would offer a coherent explanation for her symptoms, so that Cope's original suggestion of infective tuberculosis as the cause of her illness may have been correct.

  4. Addison's Disease Revisited in Poland: Year 2008 versus Year 1990

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    Anna A. Kasperlik-Zaluska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at comparing two groups of patients with Addison's disease: A, including 180 patients described in 1991 and B, consisting of 138 patients registered since 1991. The incidence of coexisting autoimmune disorders was evaluated and etiological factors were analyzed. Immunological and imaging studies (computed tomography in group B were performed. Adrenal autoantibodies were examined by an indirect immunofluorescence technique in group A, and by the assay measuring autoantibodies against steroid 21-hydroxylase in group B. Adrenal autoantibodies were revealed in 37% of patients examined by the immunofluorescence method and in 63% investigated by the modern technique. Tuberculosis was found in 52 patients in the group A and in two patients in the group B; metastatic infiltrations of the adrenals in CT were detected in 16 patients. Probable autoimmune Addison's disease was diagnosed in 125/180 patients (69% in the group A and in 116/138 patients (84% in the group B.

  5. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  6. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms...... or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel...... polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions...

  7. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects. T

  8. The role of patients' illness representations in coping and functioning with Addison's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between illness representations, coping behaviour and adaptive outcome in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Design: Cross-sectional. Following Leventhal's self-regulation model (Leventhal, Meyer & Nerenz, 1980), it was hypothesized that illness representati

  9. Addison's disease presenting with idiopathic intracranial hypertension in 24-year-old woman: a case report

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    Moore Peter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension can rarely be associated with an underlying endocrine disorder such as Cushing's syndrome, hyperthyroidism, or with administration of thyroxine or growth hormone. Though cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension associated with Addison's disease in children have been reported, there is only one documented case report of this association in adults. We describe a case of an acute adrenal insufficiency precipitated by idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a Caucasian female. Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian woman was acutely unwell with a background of several months of generalised fatigue and intermittent headaches. She had unremarkable neurological and systemic examination with a normal computerised tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Normal cerebrospinal fluid but increased opening pressure at lumbar puncture suggested intracranial hypertension. A flat short synacthen test and raised level of adrenocorticotrophic hormone were consistent with primary adrenal failure. Conclusion Addison's disease can remain unrecognised until precipitated by acute stress. This case suggests that idiopathic intracranial hypertension can rarely be associated with Addison's disease and present as an acute illness. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is possibly related to an increase in the levels of arginine vasopressin peptide in serum and cerebrospinal fluid secondary to a glucocorticoid deficient state.

  10. Salivary cortisol day curves in Addison's disease in patients on hydrocortisone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, I L; Levitt, N S; Van der Walt, J S; Schatz, D A; Johannsson, G; Haarburger, D H; Pillay, T S

    2013-01-01

    Using salivary cortisol (SC) measurements, cortisol exposure in Addison's disease patients on hydrocortisone replacement was determined and compared with healthy controls. Cortisol pharmacokinetics was assessed in 31 patients with Addison's disease on replacement hydrocortisone doses (median daily dose 20 mg; range 5-50 mg) and 30 healthy control subjects. Saliva samples (n=16) were collected between 08:00 and 00:00 h in 1 day, using a passive drool technique. Cortisol exposure was evaluated by noncompartmental approach. In the patients, cortisol exposure was significantly higher than in controls: median inter-quartile range (IQR) peak cortisol (C(max)) 174.5 (59.3-837.0) vs. 6.50 (4.7-19.3) nmol/l, p=0.0001; area under the curve (AUC) 390.1 (177.1-928.9) vs. 21.4 (14.6-28.4) minutes*nmol/l, p=0.0001, trough cortisol level (C(min)) 0.49 (0.49-0.96) vs. 0.49 (0.49-0.49) nmol/l, p=0.02, occurring at 480.0 (0.1-660.0) vs. 405.0 (180.0-570.0) min, p=0.56. First peak cortisol was 174.5 (53.0-754.7) vs. 6.27 (3.90-8.47) nmol/l, p=0.0001 and second peak cortisol 18.90 (5.22-76.9) vs. 3.12 (1.76-4.79) nmol/l, p=0.0001. The time to first peak cortisol differed between the 2 groups, 30 (30-75) vs. 0.1 (0.1-30) minutes; p=0.0001. At doses studied, hydrocortisone replacement therapy results in cortisol pharmacokinetics being markedly different from endogenous cortisol profiles in healthy control subjects. Addison's disease patients had significantly higher SC levels compared to healthy control subjects.

  11. Addison's Disease and Possible Cannabis Withdrawal Syndrome Presenting as an Eating Disorder in a Thirty-Year-Old Female

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A 30-year-old female with a history of anxiety, cannabis use, and Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder presented for residential treatment of a Cannabis Use Disorder. Upon arrival, she had not eaten for two days and was found to be hypotensive with electrolyte disturbances. She was admitted to a nearby hospital, where the Internist diagnosed her with Addison's disease. She was treated with corticosteroid therapy, with rapid normalization of her electrolytes, eating, and anxiety. This is the first published case of undiagnosed Addison's disease presenting as an eating disorder, with cannabis use likely contributing to symptoms. This case elucidates the importance of ruling out other biologic and psychologic causes of clinical presentations before an eating disorder diagnosis can be made.

  12. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

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    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  13. The rs1990760 polymorphism within the IFIH1 locus is not associated with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Addison's disease

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    Seidl Christian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three genes have been confirmed as major joint susceptibility genes for endocrine autoimmune disease:human leukocyte antigen class II, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22. Recent studies showed that a genetic variation within the interferon induced helicase domain 1 (IFIH1 locus (rs1990760 polymorphism is an additional risk factor in type 1 diabetes and Graves' disease (GD. Methods The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the rs1990760 polymorphism within the IFIH1 gene in German patients with GD (n = 258, Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 106, Addison's disease (AD, n = 195 and healthy controls (HC, n = 227 as well as in 55 GD families (165 individuals, German and 100 HT families (300 individuals, Italian. Furthermore, the interaction between rs1990760 polymorphism with human leukocyte antigen (HLA risk haplotype DQ2(DQA*0501-DQB*0201, the risk haplotypes DQ2/DQ8 (DQA*0301-DQB*0302 and the status of thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb and TSH receptor antibody (TRAb in patients and families were analysed. Results No significant differences were found between the allele and genotype frequencies for rs1990760 IFIH1 polymorphism in patients with GD, HT, AD and HC. Also no differences were observed when stratifying the IFIH1 rs1990760 polymorphism for gender, presence or absence of thyroid antibodies (GD:TRAb and HT:TPOAb/TgAb and HLA risk haplotypes (DQ2:for GD and HT, DQ2/DQ8:for AD. Furthermore the transmission analysis in GD and HT families revealed no differences in alleles transmission for rs1990760 IFIH1 from parents with or without HLA risk haplotype DQ2 to the affected offspring. In contrast, by dividing the HT parents according to the presence or absence of thyroid Ab titers, mothers and fathers both positive for TPOAb/TgAb overtransmitted the allele A of IFIH1 rs1990760 to their HT affected offspring (61.8% vs 38.2%;p = 0

  14. Absence of autoantibodies connected to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and II and Addison's disease in girls and women with Turner syndrome

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    Kämpe Olle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A disturbance in the immune system has been described in Turner syndrome (45,X, with an association to low levels of IgG and IgM and decreased levels of T- and B-lymphocytes. Also different autoimmune diseases have been connected to Turner syndrome (45,X, thyroiditis being the most common. Other autoimmune diseases seen are inflammatory bowel disease, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, Addison's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo, alopecia, pernicious anaemia and hypoparathyroidism, but the association to Turner syndrome is not definite. Besides the typical features of Turner syndrome (short stature, failure to enter puberty spontaneously and infertility due to ovarian insufficiency ear problems are common. Otitis media and a progressive sensorineural hearing disorder are commonly seen. In the normal population there are known inner ear disorders related to autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate patients with Turner syndrome regarding autoantibodies connected to the autoimmune disorders; autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and II and Addison's disease, to screen for overlapping profile of autoantibodies. Blood samples from 110 Turner patients (7–65 years were investigated using in vitro transcription, translation and immunoprecipitation techniques regarding autoantibodies connected to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and II and Addison's disease (21-hydroxylase, 17α-hydroxylase, side-chain cleavage enzyme, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase. Results The autoantibodies investigated were not overrepresented among the Turner patients. Conclusion The autoimmune disorders associated with Turner syndrome do not seem to be of the same origin as Addison's disease, the type I or II autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome.

  15. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report

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    De Nardo Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. Case presentation A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Conclusions Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected

  16. Salivary Cortisol and Cortisone do not Appear to be Useful Biomarkers for Monitoring Hydrocortisone Replacement in Addison's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, I L; Lacerda, M; Pillay, T S; Blom, D J; Johannsson, G; Dave, J A; Levitt, N S; Haarburger, D; van der Walt, J-S

    2016-12-01

    Salivary cortisol has been used to monitor hydrocortisone replacement in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Since salivary cortisol is metabolised to salivary cortisone, it may be an adjunctive analyte to assess adequacy of hydrocortisone replacement in patients with AD. We aimed to characterise the exposure of salivary cortisol and cortisone in patients and healthy controls. We measured salivary cortisol and cortisone by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and constructed a day curve (08:00 until 24:00 h) with 16 time points in 25 AD patients taking their usual hydrocortisone dose and in 26 healthy controls. The median (interquartile range) area under the curve (AUC) for cortisol was not different for patients, compared with controls [55.63 (32.91-151.07) nmol*min*l(-1) vs. 37.49 (27.41-52.00) nmol*min*l(-1); p=0.098, respectively], whereas the peak cortisol Cmax was higher in patients [32.61 (5.75-146.19) nmol/l vs. 8.96 (6.96-12.23) nmol/l; p=0.013], compared with controls. The AUC for cortisone [23.65 (6.10-54.76) nmol*min*l(-1) vs. 227.73 (200.10-280.52) nmol*min*l(-1); p≤ 0.001, respectively], and peak cortisone Cmax was lower in patients than in controls [11.11 (2.91-35.85) nmol/l vs. 33.12 (25.97-39.95) nmol/l; p=0.002]. The AUC for salivary cortisol and salivary cortisone were not correlated with any measures of hydrocortisone dose. The time-course and AUC of salivary cortisol were similar between Addison's patients and healthy controls. Patients had substantially lower salivary cortisone AUC, compared to healthy controls. Salivary cortisol AUC and pharmacokinetics were not related to hydrocortisone dose and thus are not likely useful markers for the adequacy of hydrocortisone replacement.

  17. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's Disease.

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    Alisdair M Boag

    Full Text Available Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS, circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH, CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH, CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation. Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016. Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037. Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015 and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017 were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism.

  18. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's Disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boag, Alisdair M; Christie, Michael R; McLaughlin, Kerry A; Syme, Harriet M; Graham, Peter; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH), CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH), CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc) and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD) were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation). Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016). Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037). Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015) and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017) were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism.

  19. Jane Austen's lifelong health problems and final illness: New evidence points to a fatal Hodgkin's disease and excludes the widely accepted Addison's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upfal, A

    2005-06-01

    Jane Austen is typically described as having excellent health until the age of 40 and the onset of a mysterious and fatal illness, initially identified by Sir Zachary Cope in 1964 as Addison's disease. Her biographers, deceived both by Cassandra Austen's destruction of letters containing medical detail, and the cheerful high spirits of the existing letters, have seriously underestimated the extent to which illness affected Austen's life. A medical history reveals that she was particularly susceptible to infection, and suffered unusually severe infective illnesses, as well as a chronic conjunctivitis that impeded her ability to write. There is evidence that Austen was already suffering from an immune deficiency and fatal lymphoma in January 1813, when her second and most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice, was published. Four more novels would follow, written or revised in the shadow of her increasing illness and debility. Whilst it is impossible now to conclusively establish the cause of her death, the existing medical evidence tends to exclude Addison's disease, and suggests there is a high possibility that Jane Austen's fatal illness was Hodgkin's disease, a form of lymphoma.

  20. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity. 2010;(3):217–223. Clinical Trials The National Institute of Diabetes and ... la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Clinical Trials For Health Care Professionals Community ...

  1. Addison's Disease: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Nausea, diarrhea or vomiting Abdominal pain Muscle or joint pains Irritability Depression Body hair loss ... in both men and women. They cause sexual development in men, and influence muscle mass, libido and ...

  2. VT Lidar Hillshade (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related "HILLSHADE" raster data. HILLSHADE data is for...

  3. VT Lidar DSM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and related Digital Surface Model (DSM) data. This metadata...

  4. Disease: H00176 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available progressive behavioral, cognitive and neurologic deficit. Inherited metabolic disease; Neurodegenerative dis...ropathy (AMN), Addison-only, and asymptomatic. This disorder is characterized by

  5. Addison's disease. Challenges in treatment and follow up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.C.C.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis we discuss a concise stepwise approach for the diagnostic evaluation of adrenal insufficiency (AI), taking into account the possible pitfalls associated with the different tests. The second part describes the history of replacement therapy, discusses the current impe

  6. VT Lidar Hydro-flattened DEM (1.6 meter) - 2012 - Addison

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Addison County 2012 1.6m and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets of various...

  7. Disease: H00552 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00552 Glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD), including: Hyperglycerolemia; Chromosome X...p21 deletion syndrome; X-linked Addison disease (AHX); Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) Glycerol kinase def... GKD is an Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome involving the glycerol kinase locus together with X-linked Addison disease... (AHX) or Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) loci or both. Inherited metabolic disease hsa00561(2710) ...JK, Duran M, Beemer FA, Poll-The BT Isolated and contiguous glycerol kinase gene

  8. DOENÇA DE ADDISON: A DIFICULDADE DO DIAGNÓSTICO

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    Clara Preto

    2016-07-01

    Discussão: A doença de Addison é uma patologia rara em idade pediátrica e o seu diagnóstico requer um elevado grau de suspeição, dada a inespecificidade da sintomatologia inicial. Os autores pretendem alertar para a suspeição necessária perante uma clínica de hiponatrémia associada a sintomas constitucionais e gastrointestinais.

  9. Enfermedad de Addison asociado a tuberculosis pulmonar: reporte de un caso

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    Maria Ofelia Foronda Rios

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Addison resulta de la destrucción progresiva de las glándulas adrenales pudiendo llegar a destruir hasta el 90% antes de que aparezca una insuficiencia corticosuprarrenal clínicamente observable.Históricamente, la tuberculosis fue una causa frecuente de la enfermedad de Addison, aunque otras enfermedades también pueden producir la enfermedad.La enfermedad de Addison estima una prevalencia de aproximadamente 110 casos por millón de habitantes y una incidencia de 5 a 6 casos por millón al año.Presentamos el caso clínico de un paciente de sexo masculino que ingresa al servicio de infectología del hospital Clínico Viedma, con el antecedente de cambio de coloración de la piel en miembros de cinco meses de evolución, cuadro se acompaño de disnea de clase III. En el examen físico general se observó hiperpigmentación generalizada que compromete mucosas, signos vitales normales. Al examen físico regional presentó adinamia, anorexia y astenia.

  10. Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease) in a Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Sarah; Rooker, Leah; Nobrega-Lee, Michelle; Guthrie, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    A 22-yr-old, captive-born, presumed female Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni) presented in respiratory distress with severe dehydration and symptoms of hypotension. During treatment, dysphagia was noted and oral examination revealed enlarged palatine tonsils and mucosal plaques. Bloodwork showed a decreased sodium:potassium ratio, a low baseline cortisol, a decreased adrenocorticotropin response test, and a blunted aldosterone stimulation test. All values were compared to a healthy male Hoffmann's two-toed sloth at the same facility. Despite aggressive medical management and treatment for hypoadrenocorticism, the sloth was found deceased. Necropsy revealed abdominal effusion, multifocal plaques throughout the upper gastrointestinal tract, and testes. Histopathology showed marked adrenal cortical atrophy and intranuclear mucosal inclusions in the gastrointestinal tract; advanced molecular techniques did not uncover any viral etiologies. This is the first reported case of hypoadrenocorticism in a sloth.

  11. A coding polymorphism in NALP1 confers risk for autoimmune Addison's disease and type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magitta, N. F.; Wolff, A. S. Boe; Johansson, S.; Skinningsrud, B.; Lie, B. A.; Myhr, K-M; Undlien, D. E.; Joner, G.; Njolstad, P. R.; Kvien, T. K.; Forre, O.; Knappskog, P. M.; Husebye, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Variants in the gene encoding NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 1 (NALP1), an important molecule in innate immunity, have recently been shown to confer risk for vitiligo and associated autoimmunity. We hypothesized that sequence variants in this gene may be involved in susceptibility to a wider spec

  12. A Dog with Pseudo-Addison Disease Associated with Trichuris vulpis Infection

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    Luigi Venco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A female Rottweiler dog was presented with a history of intermittent vomiting and diarrhoea, dysorexia, weakness, and weight loss. Haemocytometry and biochemistry values were within normal ranges except for electrolyte analyses, that demonstrated hyponatremia and hyperkalemia with a decreased sodium/potassium ratio. A diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism was suspected. Basal and post-ACTH stimulation cortisolemia were within the normal values. Electrocardiography was normal, and thoracic radiography showed no significant modifications. On abdominal ultrasonography, adrenal glands appeared normal, while the bowel was distended, and several thin linear hyperechoic objects floating in the lumen were observed. Two adult female whipworms (Trichuris vulpis were collected following bowel irrigation. Anthelmintic treatment against the parasite was curative.

  13. Disease: H01355 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cit and cardiomyopathy accompanying long-term rGH treatment. BMC Pediatr 13:27 (2013) PMID:9727847 Boles RG,... Roe T, Senadheera D, Mahnovski V, Wong LJ Mitochondrial DNA deletion with Kearns Sayre syndrome in a child with Addison disease. Eur J Pediatr 157:643-7 (1998) ...

  14. High grade primary adrenal intravascular large B-cell lymphoma manifesting as Addison disease Linfoma intravascular de alto grado de células B grandes y origen suprarrenal que se manifiesta en forma de enfermedad de Addison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Venizelos

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a 68 aged male who presented with adrenal failure and was diagnosed of high grade large B-cell lymphoma primarily arising in the adrenal glands. The patient was administrated with additional chemotherapy but he passed away 7 months later due to infection in the lungs. Intravascular lymphoma should be suspected in patients with bilateral adrenal masses who present with rapidly progressive adrenal insufficiency.Publicamos el caso poco frecuente de un varón de 68 años de edad que debutó con insuficiencia adrenal y fue diagnosticado de linfoma de alto grado de células B grandes ubicado principalmente en las glándulas suprarrenales. Al paciente le administraron quimioterapia adicional, pero falleció 7 meses después de infección pulmonar. El linfoma intravascular debe sospecharse en los pacientes con masas suprarrenales bilaterales que presenten insuficiencia adrenal rápidamente progresiva.

  15. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to ana

  16. Effect of steroid replacement on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity in Addison′ s disease with primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prakash Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid replacement without thyroxine supplementation normalizes thyroid function test (TFT in some but not all Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to this improvement in TFT. However, the documentation of the change in thyroid autoimmunity after cortisol replacement is very limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steroid replacement on TFT and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab titer in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. Six Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism, who were only on steroid replacement, were included in the study. Low serum cortisol (22 pmol/L and/or hyperpigmentation of skin/mucous membranes was considered as the diagnostic criteria for Addison's disease. Primary hypothyroidism (both overt and subclinical was defined as high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH with/without low free thyroxine (fT4. TFT and anti-TPO-Ab were performed before and after steroid replacement in all of them. Results: Poststeroid replacement, there was a normalization of TSH in all but one subjects. In overt hypothyroidism patients, fT4 also normalized. The improvement in TFT was not associated with decreasing titer of the anti-TPO-Ab in all six patients. However, there was a significant difference in TSH after steroid replacement compared to the baseline status. Conclusions: The concept of normalization of primary hypothyroidism with cortisol replacement in patients with Addison's disease should be recognized to avoid iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis caused by thyroxine replacement. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to these alterations.

  17. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1A diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Type 1A diabetes (DM1A) is an autoimmune disease that comprises 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Its frequency is gradually increasing in countries like Mexico. Patients with DM1A commonly have hypothyroidism, Addison disease, celiac disease and less common diseases such as polyglandular syndrome. These diseases are related to susceptibility genes such as HLA, CTLA-4 and PTPN22, which induce central and peripheral immunologic tolerance. This review article emphasizes the importance of searching other autoimmune diseases in patients with DM1A, to improve their prognosis and quality of life.

  18. [Thomas Hodgkin and his disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Hodgkin (1798-1866), born into a family of Quakers, would remain faithful all his life to the principles and rules of the 'Society of Friends'. He studied pharmacy and medicine in London, Edinburgh and Paris. As curator for the museum of pathological anatomy of Guy's Hospital (1825-1837) he introduced modern, organ-based, medicine in England, together with the clinicians Richard Bright and Thomas Addison. In 1832 Hodgkin reported autopsy findings of seven patients who had shown swollen lymph glands and an enlarged spleen, without evidence of tuberculosis, purulent inflammation or cancer. Later the diagnosis 'Hodgkin's disease' would be restricted to lymphomas with giant, multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells on microscopic examination. Especially in his later years, Hodgkin devoted much time and effort to the emancipation of oppressed or destitute minorities, especially abroad. He died of dysentery on a journey to Palestine and lies buried in Jaffa.

  19. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi;

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  20. Addisons sygdom hos femårig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard, Heidi; Jensen, Rikke Beck; Holm, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    This case-report presents a 5-year-old girl with gastrointestinal symptoms, who became increasingly confused over the last day before admission. She was believed to be in septic shock or have meningitis and was treated with normal saline infusion, glucocorticoid and antibiotics intravenously. A few...

  1. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations.

  2. DOE ZERH Case Study: Addison Homes, Cobbler Lane, Simpsonville, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed humid climate that got a HERS 41 without PV, with 2x4 16” on-center walls with 1 inch rigid foam, a sealed conditioned crawl space insulated on inside with 2 inches poly iso, a vented attic with R-38 blown fiberglass, a central heat pump with fresh air intake.

  3. Risk of cancer of unknown primary after hospitalization for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-12-15

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous syndrome diagnosed at metastatic sites. The etiology is unknown but immune dysfunction may be a contributing factor. Patients with autoimmune diseases were identified from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent CUP and compared with subjects without autoimmune diseases. A total of 789,681 patients were hospitalized for any of 32 autoimmune diseases during years 1964-2012; 2,658 developed subsequent CUP, giving an overall SIR of 1.27. A total of 16 autoimmune diseases were associated with an increased risk for CUP; polymyositis/dermatomyositis showed the highest SIR of 3.51, followed by primary biliary cirrhosis (1.81) and Addison's disease (1.77). CUP risk is known to be reduced in long-time users of pain-relieving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin. For patients with ankylosing spondylitis and with some other autoimmune diseases, with assumed chronic medication by NSAIDSs, CUP risks decreased in long-term follow-up. The overall risk of CUP was increased among patients diagnosed with autoimmune diseases, which call for clinical attention and suggest a possible role of immune dysfunction in CUP. The associations with many autoimmune diseases were weak which may imply that autoimmunity may not synergize with CUP-related immune dysfunction. However, long-term NSAID medication probably helped to curtail risks in some autoimmune diseases and CUP risks were generally higher in autoimmune diseases for which NSAIDs are not used and for these CUP appears to be a serious side effect.

  4. Six year old with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome: can genetics tell us the story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanny, Steven; Wallerstein, Robert; Chartoff, Amy; Post, Janet; Aisenberg, Javier; Auyeung, Valerie

    2010-07-01

    Children who have diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1) are at increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. These associated diseases include Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves' disease, Celiac disease, and Addison's disease. Since Addison's disease is potentially fatal if undiagnosed and untreated, it would be prudent to effectively screen individuals to determine if they are at risk of developing this disease. We present a case of a 6 year old male with a history of DMT1, who presented in adrenal crisis and was subsequently diagnosed with Addison's disease. HLA-DRB1 404/DR4 is one of the genes involved in the development of Addison's disease in children with DMT1. Our patient later tested positive for this haplotype. Genetic testing is not routinely done in patients with (DMT1) to determine if they will potentially develop other associated conditions. We propose using genetic testing of associated HLA haplotypes to screen children with DMT1 for Addison's disease.

  5. [Bright's disease is mentioned in an official Hungarian medical document in the 19th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, István

    2011-10-01

    The World Kidney Day was announced for the fifth time in 2011, that calls attention to chronic renal failure as it attains the title of endemic. Richard Bright (1789-1858), a British doctor was the first to recognize and describe the uremic state and the kidney diseases leading to it. There are many aspects that the readers should remember him about especially in connection with the World Kidney Day. During his European study tour's stage in Hungary, he was not so much interested in the country's medical and health conditions, rather in its economic and cultural life, natural history and geography. He travelled to Hungary on two occasions and recorded his experiences in a personal travel documentation illustrated with his own drawings. He finally established himself in London in 1820 and together with Thomas Addison and Thomas Hodgkin they formed the Guy's Hospital's world-famous "scientist trio". Bright described the nephritis's classical image, nowadays known as Bright's disease for the first time at the age of 38 years in 1827. A presently turned up Hungarian medical certificate from 1870 contains the Bright's disease described by Richard Bright as a written diagnosis. This 140-year-old document also confirms that we can be proud of our predecessors concerning our knowledge of kidney diseases and their application in daily use in Hungary, because in the past they were the ones who used the most advanced knowledge in their practices. One of today's greatest challenges for us is to be able to inform healthy and ill people alike properly about kidney diseases and their prevention or management. Place this in order to stem the epidemic of chronic renal failure and still pay homage to this disease's greatest scientist, Richard Bright.

  6. Gaucher disease

    OpenAIRE

    POSPÍŠILOVÁ, Iva

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called Gaucher disease, or Morbus Gaucher. There is described the history of the disease, various forms of disease, effect of bones, visceral organs, hematological changes, changes in metabolism etc.; differential diagnosis, diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is Hashimoto’s disease? Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. An ... Points to Remember • Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. • Hashimoto’s ...

  8. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive problems called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or lactose intolerance . And in some cases, a kid won't ... for Kids With Celiac Disease Inflammatory Bowel Disease Lactose Intolerance Are Your Bowels Moving? Indigestion Nut and Peanut ...

  9. Gaucher's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of developing the most common variety of Gaucher's disease. Gaucher's disease may increase the risk of: Growth delays ... illness can be difficult, but having a rare disease like Gaucher's may be even harder. Few people know about ...

  10. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, symptom of Alzheimer disease.) People with Pick disease tend to behave the wrong way in different social settings. The changes in behavior ... symptoms of the disease. Some persons have more difficulty ...

  11. Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Alzheimer Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Alzheimer Disease A A A ... slow it down. When Someone You Love Has Alzheimer Disease You might feel sad or angry — or both — ...

  12. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meniere's disease can affect your social life, your productivity and the overall quality of your life. Learn ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/basics/definition/CON-20028251 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  13. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of ...

  14. Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki disease is a rare childhood disease. It makes the walls of the blood vessels in the body ... veins, and capillaries. No one knows what causes Kawasaki disease. Symptoms include High fever that lasts longer than ...

  15. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  16. Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from doing your everyday activities. You have side effects from medicines you are taking for your condition. Alternative Names Crohn's disease; Inflammatory bowel disease - Crohn's disease; Regional enteritis; Ileitis; ...

  17. Ribbing disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukkada Philson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc.

  18. Bladder Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  19. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  20. Glomerular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD ... kidney damage. Endocarditis sometimes produces chronic kidney disease (CKD). HIV, the virus that leads to AIDS, can also cause glomerular disease. Between 5 and 10 percent of ...

  1. Whipple's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common conditions with similar symptoms, including inflammatory rheumatic disease—characterized by inflammation and loss of function in ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la salud en ...

  2. Rh Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Rh disease Rh disease E-mail to a friend Please fill ... Rh-negative with a blood test. What is Rh factor? Rh factor is a protein that’s found ...

  3. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  4. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay still. Liver disease has many causes. Infection Parasites and viruses can infect the liver, causing inflammation ... beyond. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/ ...

  5. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  6. Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  7. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  8. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are ... cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria ...

  9. Canavan Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation, Inc. Canavan Research Foundation Genetic Alliance National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Foundation, Inc. Canavan Research Foundation Genetic Alliance National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  10. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inc. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Inc. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  11. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  12. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Sources Investigation Protocol Outbreak Response What is Legionella? Exposure and Transmission Disease Symptoms Incidence and Risk ... form of pneumonia. More than 43 species of Legionella have been identified and more than 20 linked ...

  13. Digestive Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease Bowel Control Problems (Fecal Incontinence) Gas Lactose Intolerance Diarrhea Diverticulosis & Diverticulitis Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) More Digestive Disease Topics Children and Teens Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Chronic ...

  14. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  15. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  16. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart valves, valve insufficiency, valve regurgitation, valve stenosis, valvular heart disease Every time your heart beats, blood flows into, ... removed from the market after being linked to heart valve disease. An infection in the lining of the heart's ...

  17. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you have ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  18. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daily aspirin to prevent heart attack? Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Does using ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Taking birth ...

  19. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You ... extra copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  20. Binswanger's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  1. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  2. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  3. Krabbe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  4. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in copper, such as –shellfish –liver –mushrooms –nuts –chocolate • A person cannot prevent Wilson disease; however, people with a family history of Wilson disease, especially those with an affected ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's disease more than stretching and resistance training. Yoga. In yoga, gentle stretching movements and poses may increase your ... Disease Association. You and your family may also benefit from talking to a mental health professional (psychologist) ...

  6. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000755.htm Parkinson disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Parkinson disease causes certain brain cells to die. These are ...

  7. Legionnaire disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Legionnaire disease is an infection of the lungs and airways. It is caused by Legionella bacteria. Causes The bacteria that cause Legionnaire disease have ...

  8. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prognosis of Crohn's disease in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 2, 2014. Smoking and ... cancer surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 9, 2014. Inflammatory bowel ...

  9. [Gaucher Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Torayuki

    2015-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by congenital deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase. Gaucher disease is classified into three types. In addition to enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, chemical chaperon therapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy are considered for the effective treatment of Gaucher disease.

  10. Menetrier's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... producing cells in the stomach, which decreases stomach acid. Ménétrier’s disease is also called Ménétrier disease or hypoproteinemic hypertrophic ... Alternate Versions PDF Version (102 KB) Additional Links Peptic Ulcer Disease Upper GI Endoscopy This content is provided as ...

  11. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  12. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  13. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Disease & NASH Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis) Hepatitis ...

  14. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hero Brokalaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually arises between the first and the third year of age, with diarrhea, flatulence and low weight. The malabsorption in small intestine causes many extaintestinal manifestations, such us anemia, bone abnormalities, hemorrhage and neuropathy. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histological examination of tissue samples taken by duodenum due gastroscopy and by the detection of certain antibodies in blood (anti-GL-IgG, anti-GL-IgA, ΕΜΑ-IgA και anti-tTg-IgA. The only therapeutic approach to celiac disease is a gluten-free diet and, if it is necessary, the administration of iron, folic acid, calcium and vitamins (K, B12. The prognosis of celiac disease is excellent, if there is an early diagnosis and the patient keeps for life a gluten free diet.

  15. Vascular Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  16. What Is Vascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  17. Is "Parkinson's disease" one disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to how and why categories of ill health are divided into diseases. Aetiology is a fundamental criterion for the delineation of individual diseases. The same clinical and pathological picture may have many different causes; for example meningococcal meningitis and pneumococcal meningitis are distinct diseases that may display the same symptoms and signs. On the other hand, a single aetiology may lead to quite separate clinical and pathological phenomena; for example, neu...

  18. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals with WD is liver disease, appearing in late childhood or early adolescence as acute hepatitis, liver failure, or progressive chronic ... individuals with WD is liver disease, appearing in late childhood or early adolescence as acute hepatitis, liver failure, or progressive chronic ...

  19. Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to note that Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging. What Is Alzheimer's Disease? Video length: 2 min 29 sec Click to watch this video The course of Alzheimer’s disease—which symptoms appear and how quickly changes occur—varies from person to person. The time ...

  20. Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  1. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children with Batten disease who were treated with vitamins C and E and with diets low in vitamin A. However, these treatments did not prevent the ... Complications of AIDS Information Page Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease ... Page Neuromyelitis Optica Information Page Neuronal Migration ...

  2. Disease Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Jim; Lewis, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Students use transparencies and dry erase markers to simulate the spread of a zombie virus among a fixed population. Students are then challenged to create their own "disease" and develop an ODE model for the resulting data. From this exercise students gain greater understanding of population and SIR models, disease dynamics, parameter estimation and compartment modeling.

  3. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970309 Myocardial injury of Keshan disease andapoptosis. ZHONG Xuekuan(钟学宽), et al. KeshanDis Instit, Harbin Med Univ, Harbin, 150086. Chin JEndemiol 1997, 16(2): 81-82. Objective: To discuss the relationship between my-ocardial injury Of Keshan disease and apoptosis. Meth-

  4. Whipple Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common conditions with similar symptoms, including • inflammatory rheumatic disease— characterized by inflammation and loss of function in ... way to prevent Whipple disease. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition A person with Whipple disease and malabsorption may need • a diet high in ...

  5. Sir Michael Francis Addison Woodruff (1911-2001) FRS DSc MD MS FRCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Winston

    2011-02-01

    Michael Woodruff performed the first successful renal transplant in the UK and described the technique of joining the ureter of the transplant to the bladder. He contributed to all aspects of transplantation biology and was responsible for the design of the first purpose-built transplant unit in the world. As a Japanese prisoner of war at Changi in Singapore, Michael Woodruff studied the effects of malnutrition and devised a machine for extracting vitamins and trace elements from grass. After the war he demonstrated that the anterior chamber of the eye was an immunologically privileged site. He was the first person to describe 'adaptation'. He showed that antilymphocytic serum was effective as an immunosuppressive agent for homografts.

  6. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  7. Pompe's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2008-10-11

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also regarded as a muscular disorder, but the generalised storage of glycogen causes more than mobility and respiratory problems. The clinical spectrum is continuous and broad. First symptoms can present in infants, children, and adults. Cardiac hypertrophy is a key feature of classic infantile Pompe's disease. For a long time, there was no means to stop disease progression, but the approval of enzyme replacement therapy has substantially changed the prospects for patients. With this new development, the disease is now among the small but increasing number of lysosomal storage disorders, for which treatment has become a reality. This review is meant to raise general awareness, to present and discuss the latest insights in disease pathophysiology, and to draw attention to new developments about diagnosis and care. We also discuss the developments that led to the approval of enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from Chinese hamster ovary cells (alglucosidase alfa) by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency in 2006, and review clinical practice.

  8. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It c

  9. Fahr's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezcan Caliskan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fahr's disease refers to sporadic or familial idiopathic basal ganglia, cerebral and cerebellar calcification. Patients may remain symptom-free but approximately two-thirds of the patients are symptomatic. Typical presentation starts in the 4th to 5th decades of life. Patients present with pyramidal, extrapyramidal, cerebellar, psychiatric and cognitive manifestations. Various diagnostic studies can be used to detect Fahr's disease and associated abnormalities. There is no specific treatment other than symptomatic support. In this review, clinical features and different types of presentations of Fahr's disease are discussed under the light of current literature. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(2.000: 133-135

  10. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  11. Kummell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Larry T; Schucany, William G; Opatowsky, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Kummell disease, or avascular necrosis of a vertebral body, presents as vertebral osteonecrosis typically affecting a thoracic vertebra with compression deformity, intravertebral vacuum cleft, and exaggerated kyphosis weeks to months after a minor traumatic injury. This rare disease is increasing in prevalence secondary to an aging population and the associated rise in osteoporosis. Treatment with vertebroplasty or surgical decompression and fusion is often required. We present a classic case of Kummell disease to illustrate the salient features of the condition, with associated imaging findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jagdish R; Moots, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting vasculitis of unknown aetiology. It has the capacity to affect almost all organ systems because of its potential to involve both arteries and veins of all sizes, resulting in significant organ-threatening morbidity and mortality. Traditionally known as the 'silk road' disease, it has a worldwide occurrence. The aetiopathological mechanisms of disease development in BD remain poorly understood, but genome wide studies show human leukocyte antigen and non-human leukocyte antigen associations. Environmental influences and genetic factors may have a role in the aetiopathogenetic mechanisms that lead to development of the disease, indicating the autoimmune and auto-inflammatory nature of BD. The evidence base for treatment is limited but new knowledge is emerging and current treatment options range from symptomatic treatment, through to non-biological and biological immunosuppressive drugs, to cover the spectrum of clinical manifestations.

  13. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atherosclerosis is also the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. It can be caused by correctable problems, such as an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, being overweight and smoking. Causes of heart arrhythmia ...

  14. Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away from the teeth. This is known as periodontitis (pronounced: pair-ee-oh-don-TY-tus), a more advanced form of gum disease. With periodontitis, gums become weakened and form pockets around the ...

  15. Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may show signs of Huntington disease include: Psychological testing Head CT or MRI scan PET (isotope) scan ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  16. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis ...

  17. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can also spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell_s_palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of ... symptoms, joint pain or a swollen joint, or facial paralysis. Can I Prevent Lyme Disease? There's no surefire ...

  18. Planning Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Medard

    1984-01-01

    To solve societal problems, both local and global, a global approach is needed. Serious diseases that are crippling present-day problem solving and planning are discussed, and the characteristics of a healthy, effective planning approach are described. (RM)

  19. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from water that contains the bacteria. The mist may come from hot tubs, showers, or air-conditioning units for ...

  20. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking ...

  1. [Prion diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, J J

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are one of the paradigms of modern neurological nosology founded on molecular grounds. Their incidence is low, however the public health challenges derived from their transmissibility, especially due to the appearance of a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) confers them a preferential place among health care authority concerns. The evolution of data from the European surveillance systems suggests a generalized underdiagnosis of prion diseases and casts doubts about their ability to detect a possible second wave of atypical vCJD, especially if their clinical-pathological characteristics change. Recent data also challenge the feasibility of a subclassification of prion diseases according to their genetic-molecular features

  2. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Low Vision Specialists Retinal Physicians My Retina Tracker Registry Genetic Testing Clinical Trials Join the Fight ... of lipofuscin, a fatty byproduct of normal cell activity. In Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation ...

  3. Krabbe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regarding the expected course of the disease. Newborn screening In some states, a screening test for Krabbe ... to deliver fluids and nutrients directly into the stomach (gastric tube) Interventions for older children or adults ...

  4. Vaginal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems ...

  5. [Lyme disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Santibáñez, Sonia; Oteo, José A

    2014-02-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a worldwide-distributed multisystemic process caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) and transmitted by hard ticks. In fact, it is the most common tick-borne infectious disease in the northern hemisphere. In Spain it is transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks and Borrelia garinii is the genoespecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. mostly involved in our area. LD is known as "the last great imitator" due to the broad clinical spectrum that may cause. Except in the case of erythema migrans (pathognomonic feature of the disease), the remaining clinical manifestations should be confirmed using microbiological tests. This review is intended to provide readers a current vision of the etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in our environment. Controversial aspects arising from the use of non-validated microbiological tests that are being used without scientific rigor are highlighted.

  6. [Kawasaki's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, J; Martínez, B; Montini, C; Barraza, P; Reyes, A

    1989-08-01

    We described a case of Kawasaki's disease in a chilean girl, one year and 5 months old of age, who presented the oral characteristics, cutaneous and systemic manifestation of the condition, that is not very common for the dentist but that it is necessary to know due to the heart complications and the mortality associated with the disease, and it is necessary that the dentist recognize early this condition.

  7. Bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008069 The application of Montreal classification in inflammatory bowel disease. YANG Chuanhua(杨川华), et al. Renji Hosp, Shanghai Instit, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ Med Coll, Shanghai 200001. Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(1):7-10. Objective To investigate the clinical features of Crohn′s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) according to the Montreal classification. Methods The clinical data of 110 cases of CD or UC were reviewed. The age at

  8. Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, G P; Dorsey, R.; Gusella, J F; Hayden, M. R.; Kay, C; Leavitt, B. R.; Nance, M; Ross, C A; Scahill, R. I.; Wetzel, R.; Wild, E. J.; Tabrizi, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is devastating to patients and their families — with autosomal dominant inheritance, onset typically in the prime of adult life, progressive course and combination of motor, cognitive and behavioural features. The disease is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat (of variable length) in HTT, the gene which encodes the protein huntingtin. In mutation carriers, huntingtin is produced with abnormally long polyglutamine sequences that confers toxic gains of function a...

  9. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008119 Therapeutic effect of neuropeptide PACAP27 on Parkinson′s disease in mice. WANG Gang(王刚), et al.Dept Neurol & Neurol Instit, Ruijin Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Med Sch, Shanghai 200025. Chin J Neurol 2007;40(12):837-841. Objective To investigate the effects of different doses of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on the functional and morphological outcome in a mice model of Parkinson′s disease (PD) re

  10. Muscular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930186 The diagnostic value of MRI on neuro-muscular disease.CHEN Qingtang(陈清棠),etal.Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Beijing Med Univ,100034.Chin J Neurol & Psychiat 1992;25(5):267-269.The article concentrated on the study ofskeletal muscles of four extremities in 12 casesof different kinds of neuromuscular diseases and4 volunteers with MRI.The results revealed:MRI could clearly display individual muscle,muscle groups or abnormal muscles morphologi-

  11. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008486 Neuropsychiatric problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease. ZHOU Mingzhu(周明珠), et al. Dept Neurol, Xinhua Hosp Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Sch Med, Shanghai 200092.Natl Med J China 2008;88(21):1442-1445. Objective To survey the prevalence and distribution of neuropsychiatric problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and to investigate their effects on life quality and the interactions among different neuropsychiatric problems.

  12. [Ledderhose's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelli, M; D'Arienzo, M; Veneziani, C

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical appearance of Ledderhose disease and emphasize the association with Dupuytren disease. They report on a series of patients treated at the 2nd Orthopedic Unit of University of Florence and describe the operating technique used. They believe that the procedure of removal of nodules must always be performed in association with careful exeresis of normal tissue, employing total aponeurectomy only in revision surgery.

  13. HIRAYAMA DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Sulaiman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama’s disease, also known as Monomelic Amyotrophy (MMA, juvenile non-progressive amyotrophy, Sobue disease. It is rare and benign condition. It is a focal, lower motor neuron type of disorder, which occurs mainly in young males. Age of onset, it is first seen most commonly in people in their second and third decades. Geographically, it is seen most commonly in Asian countries like India and Japan. Cause of this disease is unknown in most cases. MRI of cervical spine in flexion is the investigation of choice, which will reveal the cardinal features of Hirayama disease. CASE REPORT 20 years old male came with the complaints of tremors of both hands more of right hand and weakness and wasting of right hand, which is slowly progressive for past 6 months. Lower limbs had no abnormality with normal deep tendon reflexes. On examination, there was wasting and weakness of hypothenar and interosseous muscles of right hand. MRI showed thinning of cord from C5 to C7 level. Proximal epidural fat and tiny flow voids with anterior migration of the posterior dural layer at C5-7 level on flexion MRI. Based on these features a diagnosis of focal amyotrophy was made. A cervical collar was prescribed and patient is under regular follow-up. CONCLUSION Hirayama disease is a rare self-limiting disease. Early diagnosis is necessary as the use of a simple cervical collar which will prevent neck flexion, has been shown to stop the progression.

  14. Niemann-Pick Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease] National Niemann-Pick Disease Foundation, Inc. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Disease] National Niemann-Pick Disease Foundation, Inc. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  15. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  16. Learning about Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's disease? What are the symptoms ... disease Additional Resources for Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's disease? Crohn's disease, an idiopathic (of unknown cause), chronic ...

  17. Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki Kurokawa, M; Suzuki, N

    2004-09-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a systemic disorder of recurrent acute inflammation, characterized by major symptoms of oral aphthous ulcers, uveitis, skin lesions and genital ulcers. Involvement of intestines, vessels, and central nervous system (CNS) sometimes leads to a poor prognosis. Patients with BD are known to distribute along the ancient Silk Road. The incidence is relatively higher from eastern Asia to the Mediterranean area as roughly 1-10 patients in 10,000 people, whereas only 1-2 patients in 1,000,000 people in UK and North America. Although etiology of the disease is still unknown, high prevalence of HLA-B51, increased expression of heat shock protein 60 and Th1 dominant immune responses in the patients are considered important in its pathogenesis. Non-infectious neutrophil activation and infection with Streptococcus sanguis and herpes simplex virus would also be associated. Because BD lacks any pathognomonic symptoms and laboratory findings, the diagnosis relies largely upon the criteria proposed by the International Study Group for Behcet's disease in 1990. In Japan, the diagnosis was also made according to the Japanese criteria revised in 1987. Recently, the Behcet's Disease Research Committee of Japan again revised the Japanese criteria in 2003 to avoid overdiagnosis. The new Japanese criteria are introduced in this review. Differential diagnosis excluding Sweet's disease, pemphigus, erythema nodosum and Crohn's disease is important, and positive laboratory data for pathergy test, prick test for dead Streptococci and HLA-B51 are emphasized to make appropriate diagnosis in these criteria. Pathological findings of the disease-affected site such as erythematous nodosum is also stressed. Treatment for the disease has been chosen according to the clinical symptoms. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants, corticosteroids and colchicine are basically introduced. Recently, effects of interferon-alpha/beta, anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody

  18. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930497 Ectopic expression and the significanceof HLA—class II antigens in the myocardium ofpatients with dilated cardiomyopathy.LI Yunyou(李运友),et al.lst Affili Hosp,Nanjing MedCoil,Nanjing,210029.Chin J Cardiol 1993;21(1):15—16.Expression of HLA—class II antigens(DQ,DP)in the myocardium of patients with differentheart diseases and normal controls was studiedwith indirect immunofluorescence(IIF).Thepositive rates in different groups were observedas follows:dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM,12/13,+++),rheumatic heart disease(2/4,++),congenital heart diseases(1/14,+),left a-trial myxoma(0/1)and normal controls(1/8,

  19. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    , which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  20. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...

  1. Dent's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  2. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  3. Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid, a type of fat found in certain foods. As a result, toxic levels of phytanic acid build up in the brain, blood, and other tissues. The disease usually begins in late childhood or early adulthood with increasing night blindness due ...

  4. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    3.1 Viral disease2003162 The clinical and epidemiological analysis on 46 patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever in Huainan areas. WANG Kexia(王克霞). Sch Med, An-hui Univ Sci & Tehnol, Huainan 232001. Chin J En-demiol 2003;22(1):48-50.

  5. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seizures. More than 30,000 Americans have HD. Huntington’s disease is caused by a mutation in the gene for a protein called huntingtin. The defect causes the cytosine, adenine, and guanine (CAG) building blocks of DNA to repeat many more ...

  6. Extraphyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009250 Effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on depression in patients with parkinson’s disease. WANG Xuelian(王学廉),et al.Dept Neurosurg,Tangdu Hosp,4th Milit Med Univ,Xi’an,710038.Chin J Nerv Ment Dis,2009;35(2):88-92.

  7. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease2003263 Isolation, identification and sequence analyses of dengue virus type 2 strain GD19/2001. REN Rui-wen(任瑞文), et al. Milit Med Instit Guangzhou Milit District, Guangzhou 510507. Chin J Epidemiol 2003; 24 (4):288-290. Objective:To identify the virus isolated from patients

  8. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    3.1 Viral disease2004310 One-step simultaneous detection of G-genotype of human group a rotaviruses by multiplex RT-PCR. TANG Shaowen (唐少文) , et al. Dept Epidemiol, Tongji Med Coll Huozhong Univ Sci & Technol, Wuhan 430030. Chin J Lab Med 2004; 27 (4):234-236

  9. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...... osteoporosis, iron and vitamin deficiencies, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma....

  10. Meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Koyfman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The first cases of meningococcal meningitis were described in Geneva in 1805 and in New England in 1806, the causative agent finally being identified by Anton Weichselbaum in 1887. The first meningococcal epidemics occurred in sub-Saharan Africa in the early 1900s and periodic outbreaks continue to occur worldwide today. Neisseria meningitidis colonizes the naso-oropharyngeal mucosa in approximately 10–20% of healthy individuals. When it invades the bloodstream, meningococcus has the potential to cause devastating disease. It can affect people of any age, but primarily infects children and adolescents. Meningococcemia classically follows an upper respiratory illness consisting of myalgias, fever, headache, and nausea. It can present as an indolent infection with rapid recovery or progress within a few hours into a fulminant illness affecting multiple organ systems. As such, meningococcemia is one of the important causes of sepsis. Prior to antibiotic therapy, the disease carried a 70% mortality rate. Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment, 10–15% of affected patients die from the disease and another 10–20% are left with severe morbidities (neurologic disability, hearing loss, loss of a limb. Meningococcal disease remains a significant global health threat.

  11. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    4. 1 Viral disease2004174 Study on the seropositive prevalence of humanimmunodeficiency virus in a village residents living in rural region of central China. CHENG Hua (程华), et al. Public Health Sch, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Epidemiol 2004;25(4):317 -321.

  12. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    -derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  13. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920666 Immunocytochemical study ofCuZn superoxide dismutase in the myocardi-um of normal subjects and patients ofrheumatic heart disease.ZHENG Yi(郑毅),et al. Dept Intern Med, Navy General Hosp,PLA, Beijing. 100037. Natl Med J China 1992;72(4): 225-227. By using the methods of immunocytochemistry

  14. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stop taking the medicine suddenly, because the medicine alters the body’s production of the natural corticosteroid hormones. Long-term use of these medications can have side effects such as osteoporosis (a disease that leads to bone fragility), weight gain, delayed ...

  15. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  16. Infectious Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    3.1 Viral disease2007149 Study on platelet β3 integrin expression levels and their relationships with disease severity in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.GAO Maicang(高麦仓), et al. Dept Infect Dis, 1st Affili Hosp, Sch Med, Xi′an Jiaotong Univ , Xi′an 710061. Chin J Infect Dis 2007;25(3):152-153. Objective To investigate the relationship between the expression level of platelet membrane glycoprotein 133(GP Ⅲa, CD61) and the severity of disease in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome(HFRS). Methods One hundred and four patients with HFRS and 30 healthy individuals were recruited. The percentage of CD61 positive platelets and the mean fluorescence intensities (MFI) of platelet membrane glycoprotein β3 were determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The 104 patients studied were divided into three groups based on their expression levels of platelet membrane glycoprotein β3 at oliguric phase. Clinical data and laboratory parameters in different groups were compared and analyzed. Results The expression levels of CD61 in patients with HFRS were significantly higher than those in control group, although no significant difference in the percentage of CD61 positive platelets between patients with HFRS and controls was detected. The MFI of CD61 expression in patients with HFRS at fever phase, oliguric phase and polyuric phase was 19. 75±2.57, 17.46±1.48 and 15. 55±0.60, respectively, which was significantly higher than that in control group (3. 20±0.12). The expression level of CD61 in patients with HFRS at oliguric phase was negatively correlated with platelet count and serum albumin(r=-0.637 and -0. 695. respectively) and positively correlated with white blood cell count, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase(r= 0.945, 0. 904, 0.956 and 0. 891, respectively). When the patients were compared according to the expression levels of CD61, it was indicated that the higher the expression level of CD61, the

  17. Celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder,induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief,this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-Ⅱ antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2(tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the "gold standard" for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis,several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin,various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders.Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals,although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  18. Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-05-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms.

  19. Bacterial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930445 A report on investigation of an outbreakof legionnaires’disease in a hotel in Beijing.DENG Changying(邓长英),et al.Beijing ArmedForce General Hosp,Beijing,100027.Chin J Epi-demiol 1993;14(2):78—79.During the period from February to March,1992,an outbreak of upper respiratory infection(influenza—like syndrome)took place in a hotelin Beijing.An epidemiological investigation andbacteriological examination were carried out inthis hotel.The results showed that it was anoutbreak of Legionnaires’disease caused by Le-gionella pneumophila serogroup 10(Lpl0).Theincidence was 13.51%(5/37).This is the firstreport on Lp10 infection in China.

  20. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...... relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). RESULTS: We found two studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. CONCLUSIONS...

  1. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment in ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's disease ...

  3. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Linden T

    2016-05-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Lyme disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  4. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    4.1 Viral disease2003021 Analysis on the epidemiologic features of Dengue fever in Guangdong province, 1990 - 2000. LUO Huiming(罗会明), et al. Dis Contr & Prev Center Guangdong Prov, Guangzhou 510300. Chin J Epi-demiol 2002;23(6):427-430.Objective: To determine the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of Dengue fever in Guangdong province in 1990 - 2000, and to develop the strategy for

  5. Fungal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930031 Experimental studies on lung lesionsof rabbits caused by streptomyces thermohy-groscopicus.LIU Fang(刘仿),et al.Dept Mi-crobiol,Hubei Med Coll,Xianning Branch,437100.Chin J Tuberc & Respir Dis 1992;15(4):207—208.Imitating the natural way of infection ofFarmer’s lung disease,we succeeded in inducingChina Medical Abstracts(Internal Medicine)

  6. Ledderhose Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausto de Souza, Dominique; Micaelo, Lilian; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2010-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. A 28-year-old Brazilian woman with a six-year history of painless bilateral plantar nodules is described in this article. PMID:20877526

  7. Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudianos, G; Gitlin, J D

    2000-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism resulting from the absence or dysfunction of a copper transporting P-type ATPase encoded on chromosome 13. This ATPase is expressed in hepatocytes where it is localized to the trans-Golgi network and transports copper into the secretory pathway for incorporation into ceruloplasmin and excretion into the bile. Under physiologic circumstances, biliary excretion represents the sole mechanism for copper excretion, and thus affected individuals have progressive copper accumulation in the liver. When the capacity for hepatic storage is exceeded, cell death ensues with copper release into the plasma, hemolysis, and tissue deposition. Presentation in childhood may include chronic hepatitis, asymptomatic cirrhosis, or acute liver failure. In young adults, neuropsychiatric symptoms predominate and include dystonia, tremor, personality changes, and cognitive impairments secondary to copper accumulation in the central nervous system. The laboratory diagnosis of Wilson's disease is confirmed by decreased serum ceruloplasmin, increased urinary copper content, and elevated hepatic copper concentration. Molecular genetic analysis is complex as more than 100 unique mutations have been identified and most individuals are compound heterozygotes. Copper chelation with penicillamine is an effective therapy in most patients and hepatic transplantation is curative in individuals presenting with irreversible liver failure. Elucidation of the molecular genetic basis of Wilson's disease has permitted new insights into the mechanisms of cellular copper homeostasis.

  8. [Multicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease. A POEMS type variant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María del Pilar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la enfermedad de Castleman es un trastorno linfoproliferativo atípico en el que pueden existir manifestaciones compatibles con síndrome POEMS. Caso clínico: hombre de 53 años de edad con antecedente de diabetes mellitus tipo 2, hipotiroidismo y enfermedad de Addison. Se iniciaron parestesias y debilidad en las extremidades y, posteriormente, disnea, endurecimiento cutáneo, fenómeno de Raynaud y pérdida de peso. Se identificó taquipnea, hiperpigmentación cutánea generalizada y extremidades con endurecimiento cutáneo, debilidad muscular, hipoestesia e hiporreflexia; así como hiperprolactinemia, testosterona baja, hipotiroidismo y enfermedad de Addison; los anticuerpos antinucleares y antiScl-70 fueron negativos. Los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales indicaron neuropatía periférica y la electromiografía, olineuropatía axonal severa. Radiografía torácica: infiltrado reticular bilateral y ensanchamiento mediastinal. Electrocardiograma: hipertensión arterial pulmonar moderada. Tomografía toracoabdominal: ganglios axilares, mediastinales y retroperitoneales. Con la biopsia se identificó enfermedad de Castleman multicéntrica hialina vascular. El paciente recibió rituximab. Conclusiones: si bien la experiencia con el rituximab aún es limitada, en el caso descrito se observó buena respuesta.

  9. Infectious Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease 2006009 Correlation analysis of type A influenza virus genetic variation characteristic with survival selective pressure ZHOU xiao -ming(周晓明 ) ,et al. Sch Pub Health,Fudan Univ. Shanghai 200032. China J Infect Dis 2005;23(4) :221 -224 Objective:To study the relationship betweer. type A influenza virus genetic variation with survival selective pressure to find possible vaccine conserved antigen target. Methods:Seven strains of same HA (Hemagglutinin) serotype, regional and isolation time closely related type A influenza virus were selected with full HA gene coding sequence , Blast2 program was used to calculate the param-

  10. Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Isabel

    2008-08-01

    Celiac disease is an immunologically mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, characterized by lifelong intolerance to the gliadin and related prolamines from wheat and other cereals, that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. Symptoms result from structural damage to the mucosa of the small intestine, which may cause malabsorption with positive autoantibodies in the sera. Normal mucosal architecture is restored after the use of a gluten-free diet and the normalization of the autoantibodies. Villous atrophy and high levels of autoantibodies reappear when gluten is reintroduced into the diet (gluten challenge).

  11. Menkes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export......Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...

  12. Menkes disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2009-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar ‘kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane...

  13. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  14. Occupational Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Occupational Respiratory Disease Occupational Respiratory Disease Condition Occupational HealthPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share ...

  15. Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  16. [Bone disease in Gaucher's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca Espiau, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    The exposition aims, is to review the pathophysiological mechanisms of bone marrow involvement and the patterns of marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. We have reviewed the different methods of assessment of bone marrow infiltration and its temporal development. Qualitative methods include simple radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and radioisotope. The simple radiography is the basic element, but its sensitivity is limited and only allows for assessing changes and trabecular bone remodeling MRI allows us to appreciate the bone marrow infiltration, detection of complications and response to therapy. Radioisotopes can contribute to the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and bone crises. Among the quantitative methods are the QCSI (quantitative chemical shift imaging) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as well as new quantitative techniques of CT, MRI and ultrasound densitometry. The QCSI performed an assessment of fat content of bone marrow in the spine. DEXA quantifies bone density by measuring the attenuation coefficient. The semiquantitative methods have various "scores" to establish criteria for generalized bone disease endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.

  17. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  18. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  19. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  20. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  1. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are ... Transplantation End-stage Lung Disease Adult Lung Transplantation Pediatric Lung ... Aortic Aneurysm Mitral Valve Disease Overview The mitral valve is ...

  2. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  3. Lipid Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age 2, usually from lung disease. Children with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases often die at an ... age 2, usually from lung disease. Children with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases often die at an ...

  4. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sickle cell disease?Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... disease, hemoglobin SS disease, hemoglobin synthesis, hemoglobinopathies, ... cell anemia, sickle cell crisis, vaso-occlusive crisis Family Health, ...

  5. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease A A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  6. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease A A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  7. Lipid Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weeks. What are the types of lipid storage disease? Gaucher disease is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme ... infection. The disease affects males and females equally. Gaucher disease has three common clinical subtypes. Type 1 (or ...

  8. Gaucher Disease in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your health care provider. What is Gaucher disease? Gaucher disease is a genetic disorder. People with Gaucher ... severe and depend on the type of Gaucher disease. Gaucher disease occurs in approximately 1 in 60,000 ...

  9. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  10. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Beryllium Disease Chronic Beryllium Disease Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... MD, MSPH, FCCP (February 01, 2016) What is chronic beryllium disease (CBD)? Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is ...

  11. Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses therapeutic challenges. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in noninvasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, although whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of noninvasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), targeting the motor cortex. Current studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential for rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible with regard to functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS include increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters that derive their rationale from studies on brain physiology. These novel parameters are intended to simulate normal firing patterns or to act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia with regard to motor control and its contribution to the pathogenesis of motor disorders. Noninvasive brain stimulation studies will enhance our understanding of PD pathophysiology and might provide further evidence for potential therapeutic applications.

  12. [Castleman disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, Gerardo A; Savio, Verónica; Minoldo, Daniel; Caminos, Susana; Yorio, Marcelo A

    2004-01-01

    A 66 years female, who was since last year under astenia, arthralgias, pimply lesions in spread plates and tests showing eritrosedimentation over 100 mm, anemi, leucocitosis with neutrofilia, policlonal hypergammaglobulinemia, slight proteinuria and IgE on 900. This patient was sporadically treated with corticoids. When made the medical consult had lost 34lb., was under anorexy, as well as dyspepsia. Hemoglobyn 6.9 gr/dl, leucocytes 20000/mm3, neutrofils at 90%, proteinogram the same as former, with hypoalbuminemia. She was taking prednisona, 16 mg/day. When examined showed depress of conscience, astenia, and dermic lesions already quoted. 4 cm nonpainful right axillary adenopaty adhered to deep planes. Medulogram with increased iron, hyperegenerative. Ganglionar biopsia: linfoid hyperplasic process linked to inmune response. Toracoabdominal tomography with adenomegalia in torax and retroperitoneo. Skin biopsia: neutrofilic vasculitis. The patient suspends the 16 mg of prednisona and fever as well as generalized adenopatias come up. After laying aside other ethiologies, and understanding as Castleman Multicentric disease, it is started to supply prednisona 1 mg/kg of weight with a clinical and biochemical fast and outstanding response. After 7 months it was progressively suspended the esteroids and 60 days later, the process fall back; for that, corticoids are restarted, with a good evolution. The illness of Castleman although it is not very frequent, it should be considered as differential diagnosis in those clinical cases that are accompanied with important general commitment, linphadenopaties and respons to steroid therapy.

  13. Muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15)

  14. Alzheimer disease: An interactome of many diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji S Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is an outcome as well as source of many diseases. Alzheimer is linked with many other diseases like Diabetes type 2, cholesterolemia, hypertension and many more. But how each of these diseases affecting other is still unknown to scientific community. Signaling Pathways of one disease is interlinked with other disease. But to what extent healthy brain is affected when any signaling in human body is disturbed is the question that matters. There is a need of Pathway analysis, Protein-Protein interaction (PPI and the conserved interactome study in AD and linked diseases. It will be helpful in finding the potent drug or vaccine target in conscious manner. In the present research the Protein-Protein interaction of all the proteins involved in Alzheimer Disease is analyzed using ViSANT and osprey tools and pathway analysis further reveals the significant genes/proteins linking AD with other diseases.

  15. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Rare Disorders; Undiagnosed Disorders; Disorders of Unknown Prevalence; Cornelia De Lange Syndrome; Prenatal Benign Hypophosphatasia; Perinatal Lethal Hypophosphatasia; Odontohypophosphatasia; Adult Hypophosphatasia; Childhood-onset Hypophosphatasia; Infantile Hypophosphatasia; Hypophosphatasia; Kabuki Syndrome; Bohring-Opitz Syndrome; Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy; Narcolepsy-cataplexy; Hypersomnolence Disorder; Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia With Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia; Kleine-Levin Syndrome; Kawasaki Disease; Leiomyosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma of the Corpus Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of the Cervix Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of Small Intestine; Acquired Myasthenia Gravis; Addison Disease; Hyperacusis (Hyperacousis); Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis; Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis; Williams Syndrome; Lyme Disease; Myasthenia Gravis; Marinesco Sjogren Syndrome(Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome); Isolated Klippel-Feil Syndrome; Frasier Syndrome; Denys-Drash Syndrome; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Emanuel Syndrome; Isolated Aniridia; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Paternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Translocation/Inversion; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microdeletion; Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome; Aniridia-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Aniridia - Renal Agenesis - Psychomotor Retardation; Aniridia - Ptosis - Intellectual Disability - Familial Obesity; Aniridia - Cerebellar Ataxia - Intellectual Disability; Aniridia - Absent Patella; Aniridia; Peters Anomaly - Cataract; Peters Anomaly; Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Syndromic Aniridia; WAGR Syndrome; Wolf

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  17. Virus diseases of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stanley W.

    1954-01-01

    Viruses are probably the cause of a wide spectrum of fish diseases. Although relatively few virus diseases of fish are known today, some of the diseases of unknown etiology, as well as some diseases presently accepted as due to bacteria, protozoa, fungi or nutritional deficiencies, possibly will be recognized eventually as virus diseases.

  18. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD ... as polycystic kidney disease (PKD), another disease that causes the kidneys to ... chronic kidney disease (CKD)—a condition that develops over many years ...

  19. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  20. KEGG DISEASE / Acute encephalitis [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H01417 Entry H01417Disease Name Acute encephalitis Description Acute encep...ns Infections caused by dsDNA viruses H01417Acute encephalitis Human diseases in ICD-10 classification [BR:b...of the central nervous system G04Encephalitis, myelitis and encephalomyelitis H01417Acute encephalitis Patho...elines for management. Journal Eur J Neurol 12:331-43 (2005) KEGG DISEASE / Acute encephalitis ...

  1. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result of coronary artery disease, or CAD, said Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., M.P. ... Problems and Disease • High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Metabolic Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • ...

  2. KEGG DISEASE / Acute alcohol sensitivity [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H01071 Entry H01071Disease Name Acute alcohol sensitivity Description Alde...bolism Congenital disorders of carbohydrate metabolism H01071Acute alcohol sensit...eases. Journal Cardiovasc Res 88:51-7 (2010) KEGG DISEASE / Acute alcohol sensitivity ...

  3. Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type 2: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah Karamifar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "nAutoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS type 2 is characterized by the presence of Addison's disease, in association with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. APS type 2 occurs most often in middle aged females and is rare in children. Here an 11 year old boy is reported with Addison's disease who developed symptom's of diabetes mellitus, goiter, malabsorption, macrocytic anemia and keratitis. APS type 2 occurs most often in middle aged females and is quite rare in children but one should think to autoimmune poly glandular syndrome type II in patient at any age especially in patients with Addison's disease.

  4. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the ...

  5. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 4,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  6. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  7. Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Kidneys are remarkable organs. Inside them ... resulting in kidney disease. How Does Diabetes Cause Kidney Disease? When our bodies digest the protein we ...

  8. Liver Disease and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Liver Disease and IBD Go Back Liver Disease and IBD Email Print + Share Several complications ... be necessary to make the definitive diagnosis. FATTY LIVER DISEASE (HEPATCI STEATOSIS) This is the most common ...

  9. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  10. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  11. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  12. Adult Still's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  13. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  14. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today What is Parkinson’s Disease? Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, ... million people in the US are living with Parkinson's disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is ...

  15. Learn About Neuromuscular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inherited and Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Spinal-Bulbar Muscular ... Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathy Miyoshi Distal Myopathy Motor Neurone Disease Muscle-Eye- ...

  16. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , hepatitis B or hepatitis ... disease Crohn disease Erythropoietin test Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Osteomyelitis Rheumatic fever Ulcerative colitis Review Date 2/1/ ...

  17. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  18. Cholestatic liver disease masquerading as Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Vikrant; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Alam, Seema

    2015-03-01

    Wilson disease and cholestatic liver diseases may present as a diagnostic dilemma if standard guidelines incorporating markers of copper overload are followed. We hereby present a series of four cases of sclerosing cholangitis masquerading as Wilson disease. True Wilson disease cases had significantly lower ceruloplasmin (6 vs. 16 mg/dL) and higher 24-hour urinary copper (322.3 vs. 74.5 μg/day) as compared to mimickers. Initial low serum ceruloplasmin levels normalized in mimickers on follow up, and this may used as a diagnostic indicator. Standard Wilson disease diagnostic criteria thus need further modification especially in developing countries to help avoid mismanagement.

  19. Liver in systemic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Potential causes of abnormal liver function tests include viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, hereditary diseases, hepatobiliary malignancies or infection, gallstones and drug-induced liver injury. Moreover, the liver may be involved in systemic diseases that mainly affect other organs. Therefore, in patients without etiology of liver injury by screening serology and diagnostic imaging, but who have systemic diseases, the abnormal liver function test results might be caused by the systemic disease. In most of these patients, the systemic disease should be treated primarily. However, some patients with systemic disease and severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure require intensive treatments of the liver.

  20. Disease cycle approach to plant disease prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wolf, Erick D; Isard, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    Plant disease cycles represent pathogen biology as a series of interconnected stages of development including dormancy, reproduction, dispersal, and pathogenesis. The progression through these stages is determined by a continuous sequence of interactions among host, pathogen, and environment. The stages of the disease cycle form the basis of many plant disease prediction models. The relationship of temperature and moisture to disease development and pathogen reproduction serve as the basis for most contemporary plant disease prediction systems. Pathogen dormancy and inoculum dispersal are considered less frequently. We found extensive research efforts evaluating the performance of prediction models as part of operation disease management systems. These efforts appear to be greater than just a few decades ago, and include novel applications of Bayesian decision theory. Advances in information technology have stimulated innovations in model application. This trend must accelerate to provide the disease management strategies needed to maintain global food supplies.

  1. A Reversible Cause of Skin Hyperpigmentation and Postural Hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Cherqaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency results in neuropsychiatric, hematologic, gynecologic, cardiovascular, and cutaneous manifestations. It is seen most commonly in the elderly, malabsorption diseases  (>60% of all cases, vegans, and vegetarians. Manifestations of pernicious anemia may be similar to Addison disease and may lead to a misdiagnosis. Herein, we report two cases of vitamin B12 deficiency in which clinical features shared many similarities with Addison disease. Both patients presented with progressive darkening of hands and postural hypotension that reversed with replenishment of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in patients presenting with skin lesions especially with other coexisting autoimmune diseases.

  2. A reversible cause of skin hyperpigmentation and postural hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherqaoui, Rabia; Husain, Mehreen; Madduri, Sujay; Okolie, Pamela; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Williams, James

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency results in neuropsychiatric, hematologic, gynecologic, cardiovascular, and cutaneous manifestations. It is seen most commonly in the elderly, malabsorption diseases  (>60% of all cases), vegans, and vegetarians. Manifestations of pernicious anemia may be similar to Addison disease and may lead to a misdiagnosis. Herein, we report two cases of vitamin B12 deficiency in which clinical features shared many similarities with Addison disease. Both patients presented with progressive darkening of hands and postural hypotension that reversed with replenishment of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in patients presenting with skin lesions especially with other coexisting autoimmune diseases.

  3. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  4. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD What If My Kidneys Fail? Clinical Trials Anemia High Blood Pressure Heart ... Nephropathy Kidney Disease in Children Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Hemolytic ...

  5. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD What If My Kidneys Fail? Clinical Trials Anemia High Blood Pressure Heart ... Nephropathy Kidney Disease in Children Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Hemolytic ...

  6. PERIANAL CROHNS-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEDEMAKER, HOT

    1994-01-01

    Perianal disease in Crohn's disease is a difficult matter to deal with. The indication for therapy is not always clear in this disease with a relatively mild natural course. More confusion is caused by the fact that not all disease in the perianal region in a patient with Crohn's has to be Crohn-rel

  7. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  8. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  9. Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    New advances in disease testing and diagnosis, such as genetic testing , now provide increased means for disease diagnosis but also possible therapeutic...treatments. Indeed, according to some experts, genetic testing and therapy may be key to future disease detection, therapy, and even prevention. In...associated with its long-term management. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Neurological disease , genetic testing , aeromedical concerns, Huntington’s disease 16

  10. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    SAĞLAM, Ebru; SARUHAN, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  11. Genetic diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolettis, Peter N

    2003-02-01

    Genetic diseases that do not primarily affect the genitourinary tract may have urologic manifestations. These urologic manifestations range from benign and malignant renal disease to infertility. Thus, the practicing urologist may be involved in the care of these patients and should have knowledge of these diseases. Continued improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of these genetic diseases will likely result in improved survival and will increase the number of patients who may develop urologic manifestations of these diseases.

  12. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place, and Contractor. Part 1 (Addison, Alabama-Yell Arkansas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    C4 0)0 () N I a(0-aN(0a 00 () 44 វ 0 < <U C/.() W) U0 < I (0-’N4 am toalU mOO aULA 0 toI I a I IALnLAIn oo MC0)0)0) tow (00 oo 00 m a 4 c0-N4 aa...CLCLz JC 0 00. 20 0 wA of E I m-4 tic 0 -.1 L0 (0 03 Co U 0 2 0.I.I() II 0 0. 2 92 0 0 14 1-1 I :11 I- (0.O-_4 OC .0(.0(. (w 0(0 .(DC (0 w Q 0 ,0 (o CD...00 (𔄁 >- Uf U I M(00 10 TIC 101 0.0.4( U(0 0 00 V .-4 Ŕ m’ NI V 11L. :CO 0 ifC moo. C N 04 ) r- (74 c r- c mI c oe moo0 0 017 z 0 0 -4 InC) I I mo 11

  13. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  14. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  15. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  16. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  17. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001104.htm Cyanotic heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cyanotic heart disease refers to a group of many different heart ...

  18. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Caffeine and Heart Disease Updated:Aug 17,2015 Caffeine has many metabolic ... high caffeine intake increases the risk of coronary heart disease is still under study. Many studies have been ...

  19. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  20. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  1. Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. The causes of STDs ... often help with the symptoms and keep the disease under control. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly ...

  2. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lyme disease FAQ Health care providers Educational materials Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... in the northeast and upper Midwest. Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  3. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Websites About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... 1. True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  4. Feline corneal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Phillip Anthony

    2005-05-01

    The cornea is naturally transparent. Anything that interferes with the cornea's stromal architecture, contributes to blood vessel migration, increases corneal pigmentation, or predisposes to corneal edema, disrupts the corneas transparency and indicates corneal disease. The color, location, and shape and pattern of a corneal lesion can help in determining the underlying cause for the disease. Corneal disease is typically divided into congenital or acquired disorders. Congenital disorders, such as corneal dermoids are rare in cats, whereas acquired corneal disease associated with nonulcerative or ulcerative keratitis is common. Primary ocular disease, such as tear film instability, adenexal disease (medial canthal entropion, lagophthalmus, eyelid agenesis), and herpes keratitis are associated with the majority of acquired corneal disease in cats. Proliferative/eosinophilic keratitis, acute bullous keratopathy, and Florida keratopathy are common feline nonulcerative disorders. Nonprogressive ulcerative disease in cats, such as chronic corneal epithelial defects and corneal sequestration are more common than progressive corneal ulcerations.

  5. American Behcet's Disease Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about Behcet's: www.rareconnect.org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI ...

  6. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  7. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  8. Polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  9. Kidney Disease Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys ...

  10. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease. These changes may include limiting fluids, eating a ...

  11. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose , also called ... I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? The best way to slow or prevent diabetes- ...

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of a funeral ritual) Scrapie (found in sheep) Other very rare inherited human diseases, such as ... markers that sometimes occur with the disease CT scan of the brain Electroencephalogram (EEG) MRI of the ...

  13. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  14. Lewy Body Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss ... enough to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, ...

  15. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Celiac Disease Antibody Tests Share this page: Was this ... else I should know? How is it used? Celiac disease antibody tests are primarily used to help ...

  16. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown. The lining of the intestines have small areas called villi which project outward into the opening of ...

  17. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  18. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources How to Find A Physician Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Statistics More Information Get Email Updates To receive ... often need special consideration when being treated for parasitic diseases in order to avoid harm to the fetus, ...

  19. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... the United States cannot diagnose parasites? How are parasitic diseases diagnosed? Many kinds of lab tests are available ...

  20. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  1. Learning about Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouse Models Of Huntington's Disease 1998 News Release Learning About Huntington's Disease What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Huntington's Outreach ...

  2. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  3. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases associated with PLP1, which also includes Spastic Paraplegia Type 2 (SPG2). The PLP1-related disorders span ... diseases associated with PLP1, which also includes Spastic Paraplegia Type 2 (SPG2). The PLP1-related disorders span ...

  4. Learning about Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glucocerebrosidase providing a molecular link between Parkinson and Gaucher diseases Journal of Biological Chemistry , June 9, 2011 Learning ... Glucocerebrosidase providing a molecular link between Parkinson and Gaucher diseases Journal of Biological Chemistry , June 9, 2011 Get ...

  5. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  6. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called phagocytes are unable to kill some types of bacteria and ...

  7. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  8. Infantile Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and how the disorder damages the brain. Using rodent models of the disease and brain tissue from ... and how the disorder damages the brain. Using rodent models of the disease and brain tissue from ...

  10. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  11. Fibrocystic breast disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... made in the ovaries may make a woman's breasts feel swollen, lumpy, or painful before or during ...

  12. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Overview of CDC’s work. Advancements in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement ...

  13. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen A Diefenbach; Christopher K Breuer

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents.The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies,and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed,the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population.Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy.Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented.The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  15. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  18. What Is Kawasaki Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Cardiovascular Conditions What Is Kawasaki Disease? Kawasaki disease is a children’s illness. It’s also known as Kawasaki syndrome or mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome. About 80 percent of people with ...

  19. Heart Diseases--Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have a close family member who had heart disease at an early age. Fortunately, there are many things you can do reduce your chances of getting heart disease. You should Know your blood pressure and keep ...

  20. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... of choice to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) . However, there is a wide variability in ...

  1. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  2. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patience in a long duration.

  3. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... with functional bowel disease. The findings may have direct influence on the dietary guidance given to a major group of patients with functional bowel disease and may make it possible to define separate entities in this disease complex....

  4. Genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  5. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  6. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  7. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  8. Venereal Disease Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Jerry

    This speech on venereal disease education uses as its focus this quotation from George Santayana, "Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it." The author presents a brief history of venereal disease education and statistics on the present rate of venereal disease. He concludes that past research and experience indicate that…

  9. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and C, or by genetic mutations. Other liver diseases can be triggered by autoimmune reactions or drug toxicity. The rise in obesity in the United States has led to a rise in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Many liver diseases place individuals at higher risk ...

  10. Epilepsy is a disease!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition of disease, epilepsy shall not be considered neither a symptom nor a syndrome. Epilepsy is a generic term for a group of diseases characterized by seizures. It implies a state quite distinct from health. Therefore it seems worthy to keep epilepsy as such in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD.

  11. Pompe disease: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello JF

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan Francisco Cabello,1 Deborah Marsden21Genetics and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, Nutrition and Food Technology Institute (INTA, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pompe disease (acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency, OMIM 232300 is a rare lysosomal storage disorder due to autosomal recessive mutations in the GAA gene. It has also been called acid maltase deficiency and glycogen storage disease type II. There is a broad clinical presentation: the most severe form that presents in the first few months of life with cardiomyopathy and generalized muscle weakness that rapidly progresses to death from cardio-respiratory failure in the first year of life (infant-onset Pompe disease. A more slowly progressive disease, with little or no cardiac involvement, presents with proximal myopathy and/or pulmonary insufficiency, from the second year of life to late adulthood (late-onset Pompe disease. The recent development and introduction of enzyme replacement therapy with intravenous infusion of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase have made a major improvement in the morbidity and mortality of this disease. New therapies are also in development. With the availability of treatment, diagnostic methods have also improved, allowing for earlier recognition and potential early therapeutic intervention. The advent of newborn screening for Pompe disease may identify patients who can be treated before significant irreversible disease has occurred. Keywords: Pompe disease, glycogen storage disease, lysosomal storage disease, enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, chaperone therapy, genotype/phenotype, newborn screening

  12. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are Crohn's & Colitis? > What is Crohn’s Disease? Crohn’s Disease is a Chronic Condition By understanding your body ... live a full and rewarding life What is Crohn’s Disease? Email Print + Share Named after Dr. Burrill B. ...

  13. Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Miranda, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-06-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, W.

    1982-10-11

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent pseudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. syringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine.

  15. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...

  16. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  17. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases pose a significant problem for the healthcare system, doctors, and patients. With an aging population, more and more individuals are developing neurodegenerative diseases and there are few treatment options at the present time. Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform. There is increasing research evidence to support the application of meditation techniques to help improve cognition and memory in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the current data on meditation, memory, and attention, and the potential applications of meditation techniques in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Parkinson's disease and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaserman, Nathalie

    2005-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with an increased risk of falls. The risk is greatest in patients with advanced disease. Because Parkinson's disease usually occurs late in life, the risk factors related to the neurological impairments add to those associated with aging. The incidence of fractures is high in patients with Parkinson's disease, with femoral neck fractures in older women being particularly common. Risk factors for fractures include a low body mass index, limited exposure to sunlight, an inadequate vitamin D intake with low 25-OH vitamin D levels, and bone loss. Several studies found decreased bone mineral density values at the femoral neck and lumbar spine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Although this decrease is ascribable in part to factors unrelated with Parkinson's disease, such as older age and female gender, Parkinson's disease itself also plays a role, most notably in patients with severe neurological impairments (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV).

  19. [The Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A metabolic disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, I; Boirie, Y; Morio, B; Derost, P; Ulla, M; Marques, A; Debilly, B; Bannier, S; Durif, F

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by motor impairments (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability) associated or not with non-motor complications (cognitive disorders, dysautonomia). Most of patients loose weight during evolution of their disease. Dysregulations of hypothalamus, which is considered as the regulatory center of satiety and energy metabolism, could play a major role in this phenomenon. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (NST) is an effective method to treat patients with advanced Parkinson's disease providing marked improvement of motor impairments. This chirurgical procedure also induces a rapid and strong body weight gain and sometimes obesity. This post-operative weight gain, which exceeds largely weight lost recorded in non-operated patient, could be responsible of metabolic disorders (such as diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes body weight variations generated by Parkinson' disease and deep brain stimulation of the NST, and focuses on metabolic disorders capable to explain them. Finally, this review emphasizes on the importance of an adequate nutritional follow up care for parkinsonian patient.

  20. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit.

  1. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  2. Multiple cystic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt–Hogg–Dubé; other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management.

  3. Celiac disease and gluten-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Celiac disease develops from an autoimmune response to specific dietary grains that contain gluten. Diagnosis can be made based on the classical presentation of diarrhea, fatty stools, and abdominal bloating and cramping, as well as the presence of specific serum antibodies. In addition, gluten ingestion has increasingly been found to be associated with other conditions not usually correlated with gluten intolerance. The subsequent diversity of the clinical presentation in these cases can complicate decision-making and delay treatment initiation in conditions such as ataxia, headaches, arthritis, neuropathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and others. This review explores the etiology and pathology of celiac disease, presents support for the relationship between gluten and other diseases, and provides effective screening and treatment protocols.

  4. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  5. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Sickle Cell Disease Print ... healthy, and productive lives. A Closer Look at Sickle Cell Disease The different types of sickle cell disease ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  7. Bladder Control and Nerve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedure at regular intervals, a practice called clean intermittent catheterization. Some patients cannot place their own catheters ... Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de ...

  8. Diagnosis of Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Lukacs, Zoltan; Straub, Volker

    2013-01-01

    of the methods used in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of late-onset Pompe disease. Muscle biopsy is commonly used as an early diagnostic tool in the evaluation of muscle disease. However, experience has shown that relying solely on visualizing a periodic acid-Schiff-positive vacuolar myopathy...... will improve patient outcomes as care standards including enzyme replacement therapy can be applied and complications can be anticipated. Increased awareness of the clinical phenotype of Pompe disease is therefore warranted to expedite diagnostic screening for this condition with blood-based enzymatic assays.......The diagnosis of Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) in children and adults can be challenging because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and considerable overlap of signs and symptoms found in other neuromuscular diseases. This review evaluates some...

  9. [Physical diseases in alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kojiro

    2015-09-01

    Rapid excessive alcohol drinking frequently causes disturbance of consciousness due to head trauma, brain edema, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hepatic coma and so on, provoked by acute alcohol intoxication. Rapid differential diagnosis and management are extremely important to save a life. On the other hands, the chronic users of alcohol so called alcoholism has many kinds of physical diseases such as liver diseases (i.e., fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver disease), diabetes mellitus, injury to happen in drunkenness, pancreas disease (i.e., acute and chronic pancreatitis and deterioration of chronic pancreatitis), gastrontestinal diseases (i.e., gastroduodenal ulcer), and so on. Enough attention should be paid to above mentioned diseases, otherwise they would turn worse more with continuation and increase in quantity of the alcohol. It should be born in its mind that the excessive drinking becomes the weapon threatening life.

  10. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  11. Castleman disease (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melikyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes – a rare benign lymphoproliferative disease with prolonged asymptomatic course, associated with a wide variety of autoimmune and oncological diseases and the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The rare occurrence of this disease and a variety of clinical course did not allow for a complete and consistent research on the etiology and pathogenesis and the standard therapies development. In recent years, the number of patients with Castleman disease in the Russian Federation has increased, which requires its recognition among non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphadenopathy. The article provides an overview about clinical and histological variants of Castleman’s disease, its pathogenesis concepts, classification and treatment.

  12. Spectrum of cardiorenal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter A. McCullough

    2005-01-01

    @@ Cardiorenal disease The modern day,worldwide epidemics of obesity and hypertension (HTN) are central drivers of a secondary epidemic of type 2 diabetes with combined chronic kidney disease (CKD)and cardiovascular disease (CVD).1 Approximately half of those with diabetes will develop CKD.2 Conversely,half of all cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are due to diabetic nephropathy.With the aging of the general population and cardiovascular care shifting towards the elderly,an understanding of why decreasing levels of renal function act as a major adverse prognostic factor after a variety of cardiac events is imperative.The heart and kidney are inextricably linked via hemodynamic and neurohumoral function (Fig.1).Considerable evidence shows that CKD accelerates atherosclerosis,myocardial disease,valvular disease,and promotes an array of cardiac arrhythmias.3

  13. Dynamics of interacting diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, Joaquín; Meloni, Sandro; Moreno, Yamir

    2014-01-01

    Current modeling of infectious diseases allows for the study of complex and realistic scenarios that go from the population to the individual level of description. Most epidemic models however assume that the spreading process takes place on a single level (be it a single population, a meta-population system or a network of contacts). The latter is in part a consequence of our still limited knowledge about the interdependency of the many mechanisms and factors involved in disease spreading. In particular, interdependent contagion phenomena can only be addressed if we go beyond the scheme one pathogen-one network. In this paper, we study a model that allows describing the spreading dynamics of two concurrent diseases and apply it to a paradigmatic case of disease-disease interaction: the interaction between AIDS and Tuberculosis. Specifically, we characterize analytically the epidemic thresholds of the two diseases for different scenarios and also compute the temporal evolution characterizing the unfolding dyn...

  14. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H. Zimmerman

    2001-01-01

    There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health intera...

  15. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  16. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up to date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting servicePharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News. The following reports are selected from the very latest ...

  17. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up to date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News. The following reports are selected from the very latest...

  18. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up to date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News. The following reports are selected from the very latest...

  19. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News . The following reports are selected from the very lates...

  20. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News Weekly. The following reports are selected from the very...

  1. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News Weekly . The following reports are selected from the ver...

  2. NAFLD: A multisystem disease

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Christopher D.; Targher, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries that is predicted to become also the most frequent indication for liver transplantation by 2030. Over the last decade, it has been shown that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but there is now growing evidence that NAFLD is a multisystem disease, affecting extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. For example, NAFLD incr...

  3. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia......, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  4. Ageing and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Chih; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2010-11-01

    Ageing, which all creatures must encounter, is a challenge to every living organism. In the human body, it is estimated that cell division and metabolism occurs exuberantly until about 25 years of age. Beyond this age, subsidiary products of metabolism and cell damage accumulate, and the phenotypes of ageing appear, causing disease formation. Among these age-related diseases, neurodegenerative diseases have drawn a lot of attention due to their irreversibility, lack of effective treatment, and accompanied social and economical burdens. In seeking to ameliorate ageing and age-related diseases, the search for anti-ageing drugs has been of much interest. Numerous studies have shown that the plant polyphenol, resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), extends the lifespan of several species, prevents age-related diseases, and possesses anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. The beneficial effects of resveratrol are believed to be associated with the activation of a longevity gene, SirT1. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cerebrovascular disease. The therapeutic potential of resveratrol, diet and the roles of stem cell therapy are discussed to provide a better understanding of the ageing mystery.

  5. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (PDF) What Is Dementia? Alzheimer's and Dementia Caregiver Center Alzheimer's Association Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher ...

  6. [Pregnancy in Gaucher disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufettal, H; Quessar, A; Jeddaoui, Z; Mahdoui, S; Noun, M; Hermas, S; Samouh, N

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. The association with pregnancy exposes the worsening of the disease and complications of pregnancy and puerperium. We report a case of pregnancy in a woman of 35 years, suffering from Gaucher disease type 1. Pregnancy had a favorable outcome. Complications occurred. They were kept under control. The outcome was favorable. The authors discuss the evolution of the disease during pregnancy and management of complications. They can occur during pregnancy, post-partum and breastfeeding. Support begins with preconception consultation. It involves finding and correcting the biological problems and deficiencies, and management of complications. Genetic counseling is important, it helps prevent inbreeding.

  7. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  8. Epigenetics in neonatal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xue-feng; DU Li-zhong

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of epigenetic regulation in neonatal diseases and better understand Barker's "fetal origins of adult disease hypothesis".Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles published in Medline/PubMed between January 1953 and December 2009.Study selection Articles associated with epigenetics and neonatal diseases were selected.Results There is a wealth of epidemiological evidence that lower birth weight is strongly correlated with an increased risk of adult diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This phenomenon of fetal origins of adult disease is strongly associated with fetal insults to epigenetic modifications of genes. A potential role of epigenetic modifications in congenital disorders, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM), intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) have been studied.Conclusions Acknowledgment of the role of these epigenetic modifications in neonatal diseases would be conducive to better understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, and provide new insight for improved treatment and prevention of later adult diseases.

  9. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  10. History of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Naoe, Shiro

    2014-04-01

    We describe a short history of Kawasaki disease. In 1967, we published a paper entitled 'Infantile acute febrile mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes. Clinical observation of 50 cases'; this was the first report on what is now called Kawasaki disease. Since then, many reports on cardiology, treatment, epidemiology, pathology and etiology of Kawasaki disease have been published. Furthermore, a recent Chapel Hill Consensus Statement on Kawasaki disease in the classification of vasculitis is given, along with a figure on the relationship and classification of childhood vasculitis by autopsy material.

  11. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  12. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Houlberg; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  13. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the number one killer in the United States - heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/3/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  14. Management of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammermeier, Jochen; Morris, Mary-Anne; Garrick, Vikki; Furman, Mark; Rodrigues, Astor; Russell, Richard K

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is rapidly increasing in children so an up to date knowledge of diagnosis, investigation and management is essential. Exclusive enteral nutrition is the first line treatment for active disease. The vast majority of children will need immunosuppressant treatment and around 20% will need treatment with biologics. Recent guidelines have helped make best use of available therapies.

  15. Women and Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹国如

    2005-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading killer of Americans. But it kills more women than men. The American Heart Association says heart disease and other cardiovascular (心血管的) disorders kill about five hundred thousand women a year. That is more than the next seven causes of death combined.

  16. Management of diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützer, Roland H; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Diverticular disease is a common condition in Western countries and the incidence and prevalence of the disease is increasing. The pathogenetic factors involved include structural changes in the gut that increase with age, a diet low in fibre and rich in meat, changes in intestinal motility, the concept of enteric neuropathy and an underlying genetic background. Current treatment strategies are hampered by insufficient options to stratify patients according to individual risk. One of the main reasons is the lack of an all-encompassing classification system of diverticular disease. In response, the German Society for Gastroenterology and Digestive Diseases (DGVS) has proposed a classification system as part of its new guideline for the diagnosis and management of diverticular disease. The classification system includes five main types of disease: asymptomatic diverticulosis, acute uncomplicated and complicated diverticulitis, as well as chronic diverticular disease and diverticular bleeding. Here, we review prevention and treatment strategies stratified by these five main types of disease, from prevention of the first attack of diverticulitis to the management of chronic complications and diverticular bleeding.

  17. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  18. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  19. A rare tonsillar disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safavi Naiyni SA

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A 16 year old woman with Tangier disease in palatine tonsils is reported. She has recurrent sore throat. In physical examination the palatine tonsils are hypertrophied and has very yellowish points. The facial skin is yellowish but the skin of another areas of body is normal. After tonsillectomy the pathologist report Tangier disease in palatine tonsils

  20. Paget’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bertoldi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paget’s disease of bone is the most common metabolic bone disease after osteoporosis and affects 2-4% of adults over 55 years of age. Its etiology is only partly understood and includes both genetic and environmental factors. The disease may be asymptomatic and can be uncovered incidentally on x-ray or in biochemical tests performed for another condition. It can also manifest itself with bone pain, deformity, fracture or other complications. Paget’s disease is diagnosed by x-rays and in general has very typical radiological features, but occasionally the clinical picture may be unusual and a differential diagnosis of sclerotic or lytic metastases needs to be considered. Plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity is the most clinically useful indicator of disease activity. It is elevated in most untreated patients, but may be within the normal range in patients with monostotic or limited disease. Bisphosphonate therapy is indicated for patients with symptoms and should also be considered in patients with disease sites that suggest a risk of complications, such as long bones, vertebrae or base of the skull. Orthopedic surgery in Paget’s disease patients includes almost exclusively the correction of fractures and arthroplasty.

  1. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee...

  2. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  3. Psoriasis, a Systemic Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Atakan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease which is characterized by plaques with shiny white desquamation on the skin. It affects 1 to 3% of different ethnic populations. The disease significantly lowers the quality of life for the patients as the lesions appear on visible regions such as the scalp, face and extremities causing pruritus and extensive use of topical agents with a poor rate of recovery and the disease has a recurrent course with frequent attacks. Psoriasis was previously assumed to be a cutaneous disease resulting from epidermal cell hyperproliferation for a long time. However, studies conducted on the etiopathogenesis of the disease revealed that psoriasis is a chronic autoinflammatory disease which is caused by immune system dysregulation. Recently, the frequent association of psoriasis with other autoinflammatory diseases, comorbidities and complications which indeed shorten life expectancy concluded that psoriasis is a systemic disease and created a major difference in its treatment and follow-up modalities. In this review, the comorbidities, which are shown to be related to systemic inflammation and which also share a common pathogenesis with psoriasis, will be discussed. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 119-22

  4. Dysphagia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk-van den Berg, Willemien Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance. Patients with HD suffer from dysphagia which can have serious consequences, such as weight loss, dehydration, and pneumonia leading to death. Many patients with HD die of aspiration

  5. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  6. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication.

  7. Tick-Borne Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Tick-Borne Disease Hazards to Outdoor Workers Physical Hazards Heat Stress Cold Stress Sun Exposure Noise Biological Hazards Insects ... No Longer Available Lyme Disease Hazards to Outdoor Workers Physical Hazards Heat Stress Cold Stress Sun Exposure Noise Biological Hazards Insects ...

  8. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  9. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the feet and ankles Causes & Risk FactorsWhat causes CKD?The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. ... caused by CKD.How else is CKD treated?Chronic kidney disease can cause other problems. Talk with your doctor about how ...

  11. Plant Diseases & Chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Sherm

    2008-01-01

    This course discusses the use of chemicals for plant disease control. Specifically, pesticides that can be used both in commercial or home/yard sitautions. This course also teaches how to determine plant diseases that may have caused a plant to die.

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... our Helpline: 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) Staffed by nurses, social workers and therapists, our Helpline is here to ...

  13. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone populations

  14. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  15. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  16. Hyperosmia in Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Puri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurological involvement in Lyme disease has been reported to include meningitis, cranial neuropathy and radiculoneuritis. While it is known that in some cases of asceptic meningitis patients may develop hyperosmia, the association between hyperosmia and Lyme disease has not previously been studied. Objective To carry out the first systematic study to ascertain whether hyperosmia is also a feature of Lyme disease. Method A questionnaire regarding abnormal sensory sensitivity in respect of the sense of smell was administered to 16 serologically positive Lyme disease patients and to 18 control subjects. Results The two groups were matched in respect of age, sex and body mass. None of the 34 subjects was suffering from migraine. Eight (50% of the Lyme patients and none (0% of the controls suffered from hyperosmia (p=0.0007. Conclusion This first systematic controlled study showed that Lyme disease is associated with hyperosmia.

  17. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  18. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  19. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  20. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  1. Disease: H00424 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00424 Defects in the degradation of sphingomyelin, including: Niemann-Pick disease...elin is a group of autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases including Niemann-Pick disease (NPD), type...brane turnover. Inherited metabolic disease; Lysosomal storage disease; Nervous system disease hsa00600(6609...ressive visceral organ abnormalities, including hepatosplenomegaly and cardiovascular disease. The different...mith EL, Schuchman EH The unexpected role of acid sphingomyelinase in cell death and the pathophysiology of common disea

  2. Achalasia and thyroid disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hassan Emami; Mostafa Raisi; Jaleh Amini; Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate some possible etiologies of achalasia by screening patients with achalasia for some autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disease.METHODS: We examined 30 known cases of achalasia (20 females, 10 males). Their age ranged 15-70 years.All of them were referred to our institute for treatment.Their sera were evaluated to detect some possible associations with rheumatoid disease, thyroid disease,inflammatory process, anemia, etc.RESULTS: Seven out of 30 patients (23%) had thyroid disease including four patients with hypothyroidism (13.3%), two patients with hyperthyroidism (6.6%),and one had only thyroid nodule but was in euthyroid state (3.3%). Two of these hypothyroid patients had no related clinical symptoms (subclinical) and two had clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism. There were no correlations between the intensity of thyroid diseases and the severity of achalasia symptoms.CONCLUSION: The etiology of achalasia is unknown although autoimmunity has been implicated and is supported by several studies. Thyroid disease presents concomitantly with achalasia in about one fourth of our patients who may have a common etiology.

  3. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  4. Osteoporosis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Marco; Carda, Stefano; Viscontini, Giovanni Sguazzini; Cisari, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease are at a high risk for fractures, mainly of the hip. These fractures are caused by falls due to postural imbalance, neurological impairment and reduced bone mass. The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the correlations and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone loss in Parkinson's disease and appraise bone loss or fracture risk reduction interventions; (2) to develop a research agenda that informs the design and development of risk reduction strategies. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are very common findings in patients with Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 91% of women and 61% of men. Reduced bone mass in Parkinsonian patients seems to be caused mainly by reduced mobility through a mechanism similar to that observed in other neurological diseases. Endocrine (such as vitamin D deficiency), nutritional and iatrogenic factors also play an important role in bone mass depletion. Female gender, disease duration and severity (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV), old age and low body mass index are related to more severe osteoporosis. Vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates seem to be effective in reducing the risk of nonvertebral fractures in patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Prevention and evaluation of osteoporosis through bone mass density assessment should be considered in all patients with Parkinson's disease.

  5. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2011-11-01

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jian-rong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a degenerative central nervous system (CNS disease caused by infection of prion protein (PrP, with clinical features including short course, rapid development and 100% mortality. This article aims to discuss the pathogenesis, histopathological features, clinical manifestations, electroencephalogram (EEG findings, imaging data and treatment progress of this disease based on literature review. Cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein detection, EEG and MRI are three important methods to make an early diagnosis on patients with suspected CJD, such as elderly patients with rapidly progressive dementia (RPD and young patients with mental symptoms involving multiple systems (MS.

  7. Gaucher′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Bohra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher′s disease (GD is the most common amongst the various disorders classified under the lysosomal storage disorders. GD is a model for applications of molecular medicine to clinical delineation, diagnosis, and treatment. The multiorgan and varied presentation of the disease makes it a challenge to diagnose GD early. The advent of enzyme replacement therapy in the early 1990s changed the management, and survival, of patients with GD. In addition to this, development of substrate reduction, pharmacological chaperone, and gene therapies has broadened the horizon for this rare disease. However, in resource-poor countries like ours, optimal management is still a distant dream.

  8. Kirsner's inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Balfour Sarto; William J Sandborn

    2005-01-01

    @@ Very few medical textbooks have so thoroughly dominated,and even defined a field, as has Inflammatory Bowel Diseases by Joe Kirsner. Originally co-edited with Roy Shorter of Mayo Clinic, this book, beginning with its first edition in 1975, encapsulated the science and art of caring for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Thus it is with considerable respect, and indeed some awe and trepidation,that we eagerly embraced the opportunity to assume the editorship of this preeminent textbook and the obligation to transition it to reflect the changing, increasingly complex pathophysiology and treatment of these diseases.

  9. SMOKING AND PERIODONTAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover Harpreet Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is the result of complex interrelationships between infectious agents and host factors. Environmental, acquired, and genetic risk factors modify the expression of disease and may, therefore, affect the onset or progression of periodontitis. Numerous studies of the potential mechanisms whereby smoking tobacco may predispose to periodontal disease have been conducted, and it appears that smoking may affect the vasculature, the humoral immune system, and the cellular immune and inflammatory systems, and have effects throughout the cytokine and adhesion molecule network. The aim of present review is to consider the association between smoking and periodontal diseases.

  10. Imaging in Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama disease, also known as Sobue disease is a rare nonprogressive spinal muscular atrophy. Here, we report a case series of three young males presenting with atrophy of distal upper limb and Hirayama disease as their clinico-radiological diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed loss of cervical lordosis with focal areas of lower cervical cord atrophy in a neutral position. MRI in flexion position revealed, anterior displacement of the detached posterior dura from the underlying lamina compressing the thecal sac and widened posterior epidural space with flow voids seen better on 3D-CISS images. All the three patients were managed conservatively.

  11. Pharmacology of Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    k 7RD-A157 116 PHARMRCOLOGY’ OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE(U) UNIVERSITY OF i/ I HEALTH SCIENCES/CHICAGO MEDICAL SCHOOL DEPT OF I PHARMACOLOGY S F HOFF 24...Region Bethesda, MD 20814-5044 • .RE: Annual Letter Report , ONR Contract #N00014-84-K-0562 "Pharmacology of Periodontal Disease" Dear Capt. Hancock...Annual Letter Report ONR Contract #N00014-84-K-0562 1,! t "Pharmacology of Periodontal Disease" f Steven F. Hoff, Ph.D. (Principal Investigator) A

  12. Fabry disease in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Rasmussen, AK

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, multiorgan disease. The most serious complications involve the kidney, brain and heart. This study aims to assess the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using agalsidase-beta in children with Fabry disease. We carried out a nationwide, descriptive and observational...... increased. Treatment with agalsidase-beta was associated with a reduction of neuropathic and abdominal pain and headache. Although all aspects of the Fabry pain phenotype cannot be treated with ERT, the observed effects were clinically significant in the lives of the majority of Fabry children and together...

  13. Feline dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  14. [Upper extremity arterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F

    2007-02-01

    Compared to lower limb arterial diseases, upper limb arterial diseases look rare, heterogeneous with various etiologies and a rather vague clinical picture, but with a negligible risk of amputation. Almost all types of arterial diseases can be present in the upper limb, but the anatomical and hemodynamic conditions particular to the upper limb often confuse the issue. Thus, atherosclerosis affects mainly the subclavian artery in its proximal segment where the potential of collateral pathway is high making the symptomatic forms not very frequent whereas the prevalence of subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is relatively high. The clinical examination and the etiologies are discussed according to the clinical, anatomical and hemodynamic context.

  15. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Mahaprani Danastri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC is an chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Colecctively, they are called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and about 1,5 millions people in America suffering from UC and CD. The cause of UC and CD is unknown, but the expert believe that UC and CD are caused by a disturbed immune response in someone who has a genetic predisposition. UC and CD have a significant recurrency  and remission rate. Surgery in UC is a curative treatment for colon’s disease and a potentially colon’s malignancy, but it is not a curative treatment for CD.

  16. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  17. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t live without, including sex hormones and cortisol. Cortisol helps you respond to stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough hormones. In Cushing's ... too much cortisol, while with Addison's disease, there is too little. ...

  18. Dissimilary in patients' and spouses' representations of chronic illness: exploration of relations to patient adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the illness representations of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (n=49) and Addison's Disease (n=52) and those of their spouses were compared. Couples generally held similar views with regard to the dimensions of illness identity and cause but disagreed

  19. Physical, social and societal functioning of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and their parents, in a Dutch population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, S.A.; Wiegers, T.A.; Otten, B.J.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most research concerning congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and related conditions caused by primary adrenal insufficiency, such as Addison's or Cushing's disease, has focused on medical aspects rather than on patients' quality of life. Therefore, our objective was to investigate the p

  20. Some Important Diseases of Tree Fruits - Diseases of Vegetable Crops - Diseases of Grapes - Diseases of Tree Nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Donald H.; And Others

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University consists of four sections on plant disease recognition and control. The titles of these four sections are: (1) Some Important Diseases of Tree Fruits; (2) Diseases of Vegetable Crops; (3) Diseases of Crops; and (4) Diseases of Tree Nuts. The first section discusses…

  1. Systemic manifestations of oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    N Chaitanya Babu; Andrea Joan Gomes

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity is the site of much infectious and inflammatory disease which has been associated with systemic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and pre-term low births. This article emphasizes on the oral-systemic disease connection which is now a rapidly advancing area of research. The possible systemic diseases which arise from oral microorganisms are hereby focused.

  2. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  3. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: ... with heart disease and those who have suffered stroke are at higher risk for serious problems from ...

  4. Assembling of ({beta}LPH) beta-lypothrophine radioimmunoassay. Plasma levels standardization in normal individuals and patients with hypophysis and adrenals diseases; Montagem do radioimunoensaio da beta-lipotrofina ({beta}LPH). Padronizacao dos niveis plasmaticos em individuos normais e em pacientes com doencas hipofisarias e adrenais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Margaret de

    1988-12-31

    The present study investigates the extraction and radioimmunoassay (RIA) conditions of plasma {beta}LPH. It was extracted by the activated silicic acid method, with a mean extraction efficiency of 31.6% and a mean intra-extraction variation coefficient of 8.1%. Radioiodination was performed by the chloramine-T method and {beta}LPH {sup 125} I was purified by gel chromatography on Sephadex G100. Estimated specific activity ranged from 100 to 192.8 {mu}Ci/{mu}g, with a mean incorporation percentage of 66.6%. The titer of the first antibody was 1:50.000/100 {mu}l. The assay was performed under non-equilibrium conditions, with a pre-incubation period of 24 hours and incubation of 4 hours. Mean immunoreactivity (Bo/Total) was 21.1%, with a mean Blank/Total ratio of 2.3%. Sensitivity, expressed as the mean minimum detectable dose, was 40 pg/tube, equivalent to 56 pg/ml plasma. Intra-assay variation coefficients were 6.5%, 3.8% and 6.8%, respectively, at B/Bo levels of 0.8, 0.6 and 0.4 of the standard curve. At B/Bo equal to 0.5, the intra-assay variation coefficient was 20.9%. Replicates of 14 plasma samples showed a correlation coefficient of r 0.99, (p< 0.05). Parallelism between the curve obtained with different volumes of an extract with a high {beta}LPH value and the standard curve was found. The method was controlled biologically by the presence of correlation between the plasma {beta}LPH levels and determined pathological states and with clinical functional studies. Twenty seven normal individuals, 10 patients with Cushing`s disease to a tumor of the hypophysis, 4 patients with Cushing syndrome due to an adrenal tumor, 10 patients Addison disease, and 8 patients with hypopituitarism were studied. (author). 119 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. GM2-Gangliosidosis (Sandhoff and Tay Sachs disease: Diagnosis and Neuroimaging Findings (An Iranian Pediatric Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2014-07-01

    for assessment of GM2-Gangliosidosis disease. ReferencesYun YM, Lee SN. A case refort of Sandhoff disease. Korean journal of ophthalmology: KJO. 2005;19(1:68-72. Epub 2005/06/03.O’Dowd BF, Klavins MH, Willard HF, Gravel R, Lowden JA, Mahuran DJ. Molecular heterogeneity in the infantile and juvenile forms of Sandhoff disease (O-variant GM2 gangliosidosis. The Journal of biological chemistry. 1986;261(27:12680-5. Epub 1986/09/25.Der Kaloustian VM, Khoury MJ, Hallal R, Idriss ZH, Deeb ME, Wakid NW, et al. Sandhoff disease: a prevalent form of infantile GM2 gangliosidosis in Lebanon. American journal of human genetics. 1981;33(1:85-9. Epub 1981/01/01.Cashman NR, Antel JP, Hancock LW, Dawson G, Horwitz AL, Johnson WG, et al. N-acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase beta locus defect and juvenile motor neuron disease: a case study. Annals of neurology. 1986;19(6:568-72. Epub 1986/06/01.Oonk JGW, Van der Helm HJ, Martin JJ. Spinocerebellar degeneration: hexosaminidase A and B deficiency in two adult sisters. Neurology 1979;29:380–384.Federico A, Ciacci G, D’Amore I, Pallini R, Palmeri S, Rossi A, et al. GM2 Gangliosidosis with Hexosaminidase A and B Defect: Report of a Family with Motor Neuron Disease-like Phenotype. In: Addison GM, Harkness RA, Isherwood DM, Pollitt RJ, editors. Practical Developments in Inherited Metabolic Disease: DNA Analysis, Phenylketonuria and Screening for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Springer Netherlands; 1986. p. 307-10.Gomez-Lira M, Sangalli A, Mottes M, Perusi C, Pignatti PF, Rizzuto N, et al. A common beta hexosaminidase gene mutation in adult Sandhoff disease patients. Human genetics. 1995;96(4:417-22. Epub 1995/10/01.Barbeau A, Plasse L, Cloutier T, Paris S, Roy M. Lysosomal enzymes in ataxia: discovery of two new cases of late onset hexosaminidase A and B deficiency (adult Sandhoff disease in French Canadians. The Canadian journal of neurological sciences Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques. 1984;11(4 Suppl:601-6. Epub 1984

  6. [Pregnancy and kidney diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekierka-Harreis, M; Rump, L C

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease in women of childbearing age reaches approximately 0.2%. Under physiological conditions pregnancy results in important hemodynamic changes on the maternal organism. In the case of chronic kidney disease these adaptations often are only partial. Physiological changes of immune response during pregnancy may contribute to the progress of renal disease. Regardless of the underlying kidney disease, one can assume that the better the glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure are the more favorable the course of pregnancy will be with the chance for a healthy child and stable renal function. To achieve this goal, a close interaction is required between gynecologist, nephrologist, and other specialists in a center with appropriate experience.

  7. Osteopetrosis (marble bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Nikolayevich Kalyagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the data of the history of describing osteopetrosis (marble bone disease, its clinical features, diagnosis, and possible therapy approaches. Our own clinical case is presented.

  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Centers of Excellence Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grants Telemedicine & Virtual Care Professional Training Expert Care & Research Our ... Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? How ...

  9. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Murmurs High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Infective Endocarditis Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  10. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain. previous continue Surgeries If a patient has cardiovascular disease, the doctor will talk about how stopping smoking, losing weight, eating a healthy diet, and getting exercise can help. The person also may need to ...

  11. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Departments Laboratory Science Related Links Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Neglected Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites ... A Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating red ...

  12. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are capable of transmitting other tick-borne diseases. Dog Tick In some regions, dog ticks are common vectors for Rocky Mountain Spotted ... these materials for a modest fee. A Spanish language brochure is also available. It should be noted ...

  13. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigg

  14. Hemoglobin C disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is ... Americans. You are more likely to have hemoglobin C disease if someone in your family has had ...

  15. Vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.

  16. Biomarkers of Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Leila; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) encompasses an array of disorders unified by the reflux of gastric contents. Because there are many potential disease manifestations, esophageal and extraesophageal, there is no single biomarker of the entire disease spectrum; a set of GERD biomarkers that each quantifies specific aspects of GERD-related pathology might be needed. We review recent reports of biomarkers of GERD, specifically in relation to endoscopically negative esophageal disease and excluding conventional pH-impedance monitoring. We consider histopathologic biomarkers, baseline impedance, and serologic assays to determine that most markers are based on manifestations of impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which is based on increased ionic and molecular permeability, and/or destruction of tight junctions. Impaired mucosal integrity quantified by baseline mucosal impedance, proteolytic fragments of junctional proteins, or histopathologic features has emerged as a promising GERD biomarker.

  17. Kawasaki Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... soles of the feet with a purple-red color swollen lymph nodes During the second phase, which ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We fight for people with Parkinson's and their families every day. We are in this together. Learn ... Sexual Functioning? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect ...

  19. Waterfowl disease contingency plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this contingency plan is reduce waterfowl losses from disease, primarily avian botulism, along the eastern shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. This...

  20. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How ... Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? Is Depression Under-Diagnosed in Patients with Parkinson's Disease? Is ...

  2. [Nail diseases in cosmetology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleszka, Romuald; Ratajczak-Stefańska, Violetta; Boer, Magdalena; Kiedrowicz, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    Clinical symptoms attributed to the nail apparatus and observed in cosmetology include atrophic or hypertrophic lesions, pathologic nail coloration, abnormalities of the nail surface, and disorders of the nail plate and bed junction. These symptoms may reflect pathologic processes limited to the nail apparatus or may be the consequence of a dermal or systemic disease. Even though the etiology of nail lesions is variegated, diseases of the nails are simply classified as infectious or non-infectious. The aim of this work was to present the most common diseases of the nail apparatus encountered in cosmetology. Often, nail diseases worsen the quality of life of the patient. In addition, the variegated symptomatology demonstrates that nail lesions should be viewed in a wider perspective because they often are important signs of pathologic processes taking place in the organism of the patient.

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  4. [Wilson disease: liver form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Álvarez, Félix; Sumire Umeres, Julia; Cok García, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a disorder of copper metabolism that is inherited as an autosomal recessive, which produces toxic copper accumulation mainly in the liver and brain, in general has two ways presentation, liver at early ages and neurological in later ages. We present the case of a female patient of 21 years diagnosed of WD in liver cirrhosis that started with an edematous ascites without any neurological symptoms despite the age. Their laboratory studies showed decrease in serum ceruloplasmin and high cupruria within 24 hours of the disease , characteristic data of WD. Although WD is not a common disease should be suspected in all chronic liver disease of unknown etiology with negative viral markers and autoimmunity with or without neurological manifestations as soon as posible and starting treatment with copper chelating mainly leads to a substantial improvement the prognosis of these patients.

  5. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis About Haemophilus influenzae Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir H. ... severe, such as a bloodstream infection. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections Infections caused by these bacteria... Causes, How ...

  6. Machado-Joseph Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... long repeats of a normal repetition of three letters of the DNA genetic code. In the case ... Page Parkinson's Disease: Challenges, Progress, and Promise Septo-Optic Dysplasia Information Page Transient Ischemic Attack Information Page ...

  7. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2010;362(1):56-65. PMID: 20054047 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20054047 . Fogarty DG, Tall ... 5 Suppl 1):S1-S290. PMID: 15114537 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15114537 . Kidney Disease: Improving ...

  8. Progression of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's is the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). It is more comprehensive than the Hoehn and ... on movement symptoms. In addition to these, the UPDRS takes into account cognitive difficulties, ability to carry ...

  9. Pregnancy and Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... half of pregnancy. Testing for Parvovirus B19 during Pregnancy A blood test for parvovirus B19 can show ...

  10. Metastatic Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begin in bone are much less common in adults older than 45 years. Other diseases, such as Paget’s sarcoma, post-radiation sarcoma, hyperparathyroidism, and fractures due to osteoporosis, are also possibilities. Additional tests will likely be ...

  11. Diabetes and kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... 26696680 . Tong LL, Adler S. Prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. ...

  12. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... without one of those important enzymes, hexosaminidase A (HEXA). So, as those fatty proteins build up in ... can have their unborn babies tested for the HEXA deficit that causes Tay-Sachs disease: If the ...

  13. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...... are robust to the inclusion of an extensive set of climate and geography controls. Moreover, using a global data set on economic activity for all terrestrial grid cells we show that the link between UVB-R and economic development survives the inclusion of country fixed effect....

  14. Alzheimer disease update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting more than 37 million people worldwide and increasing in incidence based on its primary risk factor, advancing age. A growing body of knowledge regarding amyloid and tau neuropathology, genetic and environmental risk modifiers, early and atypical clinical presentations, and the use of symptom-modifying medical and psychosocial therapies is available to aid in the diagnosis and management of patients with AD. Exciting recent advances in neurobiology render the areas of genetic susceptibility, biomarkers for early disease detection and assessment of disease progression, and novel therapeutic strategies to modify the natural history of the disease compelling, but in need of further study before implementation into routine clinical practice is feasible.

  15. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid antibodies – to help differentiate different types of thyroiditis and identify autoimmune thyroid conditions Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) ... can be detected in Graves disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis . It may be especially helpful in early Hashimoto ...

  16. Wilsons Disease: Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Gelincik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wilson disease (WD is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper transport caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene that encodes a P-type copper ATPase, ATP7B. In WD, a mutated dysfunctional ATP7B leads to a progressive accumulation of Cu in the liver and brain. Clinically, WND shows considerable phenotypic variability including fulminant hepatic failure, hemolysis, chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis and cirrhosis, and neuro-psychiatric disease with or without hepatic involvement. An 18 -year-old female patient who has the diagnosis of Wilson s disease was referred from outside center for genetic counseling. The mutations p.M1169T was identified in the homozygous form. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 345-352

  17. Ulcer disease of trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, F.F.

    1934-01-01

    During the summer of 1933, lesions of a disease were noted among some fingerling brook, rainbow, blackspotted, and lake trout at the Cortland (New York) trout hatchery. Although these lesions bore a marked superficial resemblance to those of furunculosis, they were sufficiently atypical to warrant further investigation. A more detailed examination of the lesions proved them to be of a distinct disease, which for lack of a better name is herein called "ulcer disease," for the lesions closely resemble those described by Calkins (1899) under this name. Because of the marked resemblance to furunculosis, ulcer disease has not been generally recognized by trout culturists, and any ulcer appearing on fish has been ascribed by them to furunculosis without further question.

  18. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Mitochondrial Disease FAQ's MitoFirst Handbook More Information Mito 101 Symposium Archives Get Connected Find an Event Adult Advisory Council Team Ask The Mito Doc Grand Rounds Kids & Teens Medical Child Abuse ...

  19. What's Mad Cow Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? ( ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Mad Cow Disease? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Mad ...

  20. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scoliosis that led to chronic changes in the biomechanics of the joints and spine. Symptoms are more ... to rule out diseases that affect the head, neck, and spinal cord. MRI images can help diagnose ...

  1. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis and Periodontitis In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and ... gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to periodontitis. In periodontitis, gums pull away from the teeth ...

  2. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccine for Lyme disease is currently on the market in the United States. previous continue Treatment Lyme ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid: Tick Bites ...

  3. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J White

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the epidemiology of Lyme disease depends upon information generated from several sources. Human disease surveillance can be conducted by both passive and active means involving physicians, public health agencies and laboratories. Passive and active tick surveillance programs can document the extent of tick-borne activity, identify the geographic range of potential vector species, and determine the relative risk of exposure to Lyme disease in specific areas. Standardized laboratory services can play an important role in providing data. Epidemiologists can gain a better understanding of Lyme disease through the collection of data from such programs. The interpretation of data and provision of information to the medical and general communities are important functions of public health agencies.

  4. Photodynamic treatment of diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, James M.

    1980-09-01

    Certain dyes can be absorbed by biological tissue. If the dye absorbs light there, it can damage the tissue beyond repair. This effect is currently widely used to treat certain skin diseases and will undoubtedly be extended to internal diseases. A limited number of experiments have also shown its effectiveness against cancer in humans. Other dyes in tissue do no damage but merely fluoresce. The characteristics of this fluorescence may, in the future, be used to indicate the site and nature of disease in the body. Current optical technology seems particularly well adapted for use in these emerging areas of medicine. This paper suggests how optical technology, chemistry and clinical medicine may be combined in the photodynamic treatment of disease and forecasts the technological growth rates of the relevant biomedical specialties.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottler, R.E.; Freson, M. (Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Radiology)

    1985-06-01

    Radiology is of considerable value in all forms of inflammatory bowel disease to establish its presence and extent, and to differentiate lesions. The most common inflammatory bowel diseases are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease may occur anywhere in the disgestive tract, but is most common in the terminal ileum. Since there is no practical endoscopic method of examining the small bowel, barium studies of the latter are most important. Modern radiological techniques, especially the double contrast barium enema, show excellent correlation between the macroscopic changes and the radiological features. Radiology alone does not provide the answers and the radiological features must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical investigation.

  6. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...... of acute pancreatitis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Although randomised trials showing cardiovascular benefit of triglyceride reduction are scarce, new triglyceride-lowering drugs are being developed, and large-scale trials have been initiated that will hopefully provide conclusive evidence...

  7. Periodontal disease and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Freitas Toregeani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic disease (AD is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. It expresses inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP and can provoke arterial wall thickening, which can be evaluated using Doppler ultrasound. Risk factors associated with AD include diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking. More recently, periodontal disease (PD has been identified as a factor related to AD. Periodontal disease has a high prevalence in the global population and the inflammatory process and bacterial activity at the periodontium appear to increase the risk of AD. Encouraging good oral hygiene can reduce expression of inflammatory markers of AD. A review of literature on PD, AD and inflammatory markers and the interrelationships between the two diseases was conducted using data published in articles indexed on the PUBMED, SCIELO and BIREME databases.

  8. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  9. Graves disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves disease is an autoimmune disorder that involves overactivity of the thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism). Hallmarks of the condition are bulging eyes (exophthalmos), heat intolerance, increased energy, difficulty sleeping, diarrhea, and anxiety.

  10. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newly Diagnosed Patients There are over 6,000 genetic disorders that can be passed down through the ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You ...

  11. Evolution of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, Daniel; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-09-11

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental trade-off between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple trade-offs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases.

  12. Fifth Disease (Erythema Infectiosum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parvovirus B19 is not the same parvovirus that veterinarians may be concerned about in pets, especially dogs, ... become infected during pregnancy. Prevention There is no vaccine for fifth disease, and no real way to ...

  13. Ebola Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marburg virus outbreaks: Ebola and Marburg virus disease epidemics: preparedness, alert, control, and evaluation When an outbreak ... Offices WHO African Region WHO Region of the Americas WHO South-East Asia Region WHO European Region ...

  14. Diabetes and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host response, systemic background, and genetic makeup of the host. Amongst them, diabetes mellitus tops the list. Diabetes and periodontitis influence the clinical outcome of each other and control of both influences the clinical improvement of each.

  15. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry ... infection does not make cats sick. However, the scratch or bite of an infected cat can cause ...

  16. Protagonists with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex disorder with many fascinating features. Its onset is creeping, the progression is slow but inevitable. There are motor symptoms, such as a tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, mask-like facial expression, and postural abnormalities, but also hallucinations, cognitive deterioration, and depression. In many novels, fictive patients with Parkinson's disease play a role. It seems that authors have used many aspects of the disease to emphasize their messages. Their narratives include themes such as rigidity, petrifaction, confusion, dementia, and hallucinations. In this chapter, as examples, several protagonists with Parkinson's disease will be described from works of John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Sue Miller, J.M. Coetzee, and John Harding, among others.

  17. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in an Area with Zika? Find a Clinic Yellow Fever Vaccinations Clinics FAQ Disease Directory Resources Resources for ... CE Courses and Training Presentations for Health Professionals Yellow Fever Vaccine Course About the Yellow Fever Vaccine Course ...

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and oxygen therapy Right-sided heart failure or cor pulmonale (heart swelling and heart failure due to chronic ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 44. Read More Cor pulmonale Dilated cardiomyopathy Heart failure - overview Lung disease Patient ...

  19. Heart disease. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunwald, E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 62 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiological and Angiographic Examination of the Heart; Newer Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Digital Subtraction Angiography, Computerized Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Nuclear Cardiology; and Genetics and Cardiovascular Disease.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CKD treated? Kidney-friendly diet for CKD What causes chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Anyone can get CKD. Some people are ... and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, ...

  1. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep ... Sheets Data & Statistics Projects and Partners Resources Events Sleep and Chronic Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  2. Minimal change disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get worse You develop new symptoms, including side effects from the medicines used to treat the disorder Alternative Names Minimal change nephrotic syndrome; Nil disease; Lipoid nephrosis; Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome of childhood Images ...

  3. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... preeclampsia—a dangerous rise in blood pressure in late pregnancy thyroid storm—a sudden, severe worsening of symptoms miscarriage premature birth low birth weight If a woman has Graves’ disease ...

  4. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors.

  5. Moyamoya disease : a review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosalakkal J

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya is probably an inherited vasocclusive disease first described in Japan and now reported from all over the world. Genetic linkage studies and study of the factors possibly involved in its pathogenesis have shed new light on this disease. There is some suggestion that the pathogenesis may vary between races. A number of revascularization procedures have been devised. There is still controversy regarding the timing and the type of surgery. Functional MRI and PET scanning may provide more objective criterion on the outcome of these procedures. Neuropsychological studies may also be of use in judging the benefits of surgery. In this review, some of the recent advances in the study of the genetics and pathogenesis of the disease are reviewed and the clinical manifestation and the role of surgery are discussed. Relative lack of literature from outside Japan and the Korean peninsula has hampered the understanding of the disease in other countries.

  6. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heneka, MT; Carson, MJ; Khoury, JE; Landreth, GE; Brosseron, F.; Feinstein, Dl; Jacobs, AH; Wyss-Coray, T; Vitorica, J; Ransohoff, RM; Herrup, K; Frautschy, SA; Finsen, B.; Brown, GC; Verkhratsky, A.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that severa...

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008430 Effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. WANG Haoyan(王浩彦), et al. Dept Respir Dis, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med Sci Univ, Beijing 100050. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(6):414-416. Objective To investigate the effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  8. Soybean diseases in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marcinkowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field observations on the occurrence of soybean diseases were undertaken in the southern and central regions of Poland in the period 1976-1980. Most prevalent were foliage diseases caused by Peronospora manshurica, Pseudomonas syrinqae pv. glycinea and soybean mosaic virus (SMV. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Ascochyta sojaecola were reported as pathogens of local importance. The following pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium culmorum, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani were also isolated from soybean.

  9. Other cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005198 Study on the relationship of plasma fib-rinogen, platelet aggregation rate ad peripheral arterial occlusive disease. WANG Jie(王洁), et al. Dept Emerg, Gene Hosp Chin People’s Armed Police Forces, Beijing 100039. Chin J Epidemiol, 2005; 26 (1):1-4. Objective: To detect the relationship of plasma fibrinogen, platelet aggregation rate and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) in the elderly.

  10. [Dowling-Degos disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Redondo, V; Losada, A; Zulaica, A; Cebreiro, C; Cervantes, R; Toribio, J

    1990-01-01

    We report two cases of Dowling-Degos' disease, one affecting the vulvovaginal semimucose, and one associated to a terminal malignant neoplasia. We remark the importance of this knowledge in order to distinguish it from malignant acanthosis nigricans or other patterns of melanosis or lentiginosis when located within mucose or semimucose, specially at the genitals. All cases associated to malignant neoplasia described are emphasized. However Dowling-Degos' disease is considered to be a nonparaneoplasic genodermatoses, this association should be taken into account.

  11. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-08

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.  Created: 8/8/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/8/2014.

  12. Respiratory diseases in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases are one of the major indirect causes of maternal deaths. Pregnancy is a unique physiological state during which changes occur in all systems of the body to meet metabolic needs of both the mother and growing foetus. Enlarging uterus and increasing hormonal levels cause changes in volumes and mechanics of lungs. Understanding the basic physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory changes during pregnancy along with the pathology of disease processes are vital in makin...

  13. Depression in cerebrovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Voskresenskaya, Tatyana

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke...

  14. DISEASE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Bens Pardamean; Anindito; Anjela Djoeang; Nana Tobing

    2013-01-01

    The study designed an information system model for Disease Management (DisMan) that met the specifications and needs of a consumer electronics manufacturer. The diseases monitored by this study were diabetes, hypertension and tuberculosis. Data were collected through interviews with the companyâs human resources department and occupational health provider. As for the model, literature and online research were conducted to collect health standards and information system standards on existing D...

  15. Motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  16. Dengue disease outbreak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayama, Pankaj; Sampath, Kameshwaran

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of outbreak of a disease may help in timely and effective public health interventions. Our motivation for this work is to assist EHD planning officer to analyze the incidence data and based on it declare whether there is an outbreak or not. In this paper, we develop ensemble of multiple techniques for detecting dengue disease outbreak. These techniques are applied to dengue incidence data from Singapore and results are summarized.

  17. Biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Todd B

    2011-04-20

    Biomarkers for detecting the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) could accelerate development of new treatments. Such biomarkers could be used to identify individuals at risk for developing PD, to improve early diagnosis, to track disease progression with precision, and to test the efficacy of new treatments. Although some progress has been made, there are many challenges associated with developing biomarkers for detecting PD in its earliest stages.

  18. Retroviruses and human disease.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 25 years animal retroviruses have been favoured subjects of research by virologists, oncologists, and molecular biologists. Retroviruses have given us reverse transcriptase, oncogenes, and cloning vectors that may one day be exploited for human gene therapy. They have also given us leukaemia and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Kawasaki disease and tropical spastic paraparesis are thought to be associated with retrovirus infection, and other diseases such as de Qu...

  19. Interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008429 The predictive factors and unfavourable prognostic factors of interstitial lung disease in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis. WANG Peizhen(王培珍), et al. Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, Changhai Hosp, Milit Med Univ, Shanghai 200433. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(6):417-420. Objective To analyze the predictive factors and the unfavourable prognostic factors of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with polymyositis

  20. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jie; Huang, Sha; Huang, Gui-Qian; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Ma, Rui-Min; Liu, Wen-yue; Shi, Ke-Qing; Guo, Gui-Long; Chen, Yong-Ping; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is known to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the relationship between NAFLD and the prognosis of CRC remains unclear. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in patients with CRC and the secondary objective was to compare clinicopathologic variables which were stratified by NAFLD. We performed a large cohort study of 1314 patien...

  1. Culture and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, A

    1986-01-01

    Both art and the kinds of life styles which predispose one to disease reflect the culture of an era. Might the history of art give some insight into the origins of behaviors which are conducive to particular diseases? An attempt is made to answer this question by looking at the perception of time and space in modern and contemporary art and in the behaviors which lead to coronary proneneses and anorexia nervosa.

  2. Dupuytren’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Trèves

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren’s disease is a contracture of the hand derived from the retractile fibrosis of the palmar aponeurosis, that leads to a progressive deformity in flexion of fingers. It has been named from the French surgeon Guillaume Dupuytren (1777-1835, that described it in 1831. In this note it is sketched a short biography of Dupuytren and the main clinical features of the disease are described, underlining some particular aspects of therapy.

  3. Diseases of Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulália Maria Martins da SILVA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With the population aging, the number of chronic and degenerative illnesses, own of the old age, it will appear more frequently. Objective: The objective of this study was to do a literature revision in order to approach the illnesses that more they attack the patients of the third age (from the chronic diseases even the degenerative chronic diseases. Para that, a description will be accomplished as the concept and the signs and symptoms of the illnesses observed more frequently in the senior patients that will be depression, stress, loss of the memory, aterosclerose, osteoporosis, arthritis reumatóide and disorder temporomandibular, arterial hypertension, vascular diseases, heart diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, urinary incontinence, hearing and visual disturbances, disease of Parkinson and still the disease of Alzheimer. Conclusion: Based on the literature revision, we ended that, not only the professionals of the health, as well as all those that work with the seniors in general, they should have the concern of treating him with larger attention, patience and perseverance, to the point of to minimize the limitations that each one presents.

  4. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Coronary Heart Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause serious complications. However, if you ... changes and medicines, go to "How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?" Work closely with your doctor to control ...

  5. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  6. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  7. Disease: H01094 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctivity and decreased volume of the granule matrix. Eosinophils are a hallmark of allergic diseases and helm...inth infection. Inherited metabolic disease; Immune system disease hsa05310(8288)

  8. Disease: H00669 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00669 Naxos disease and Carvajal syndrome Naxos disease and Carvajal syndrome are disorders... Tsatsopoulou A Naxos disease and Carvajal syndrome: cardiocutaneous disorders that highlight the pathogenes

  9. Animal Diseases and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal diseases that people can catch are called zoonoses. Many diseases affecting humans can be traced to animals or animal products. You can get a disease directly from an animal, or indirectly, through the ...

  10. What is Sickle Cell Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Español The term sickle cell disease (SCD) ... other common forms of SCD. Some Forms of Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin SS Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin Sβ 0 thalassemia ...

  11. Learning about Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Sickle Cell Disease What do we know about heredity and ... Information What do we know about heredity and sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease is the most common ...

  12. Genetic epidemiology of Scheuermann's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Frank; Engell, Vilhelm; Nielsen, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    The genetic/environmental etiology of Scheuermann's disease is unclear. We estimated the heritability of the disease using an etiological model adjusted for sex and time of diagnosis, and examined whether the prevalence of Scheuermann's disease was constant over time....

  13. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  14. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog . Alternate Language URL National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) Page Content Improving the ... kidney disease. Minorities Are at Higher Risk for Kidney Disease. If you are African American, Hispanic, or ...

  15. Disease: H01118 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fibers and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. PEO is transmitted as dominant or recessive traits. Nervous system disease; Musculos...keletal disease; Eye disease; Inherited metabolic diseas

  16. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, C.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Borm, G.F.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Leenders, K.L.; Eshuis, S.; Booij, J.; Dluzen, D.E.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate gender differences in basic disease characteristics, motor deterioration and nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We studied 253 consecutive PD patients who were not receiving levodopa or dopamine agonists (disease duration < or = 10 years). W

  17. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions celiac disease celiac disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Celiac disease is a condition in which the immune ...

  19. Disease: H00911 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ecessive disorder characterized by a striking excretion of urinary glutamate and aspartate, resulting from the incomplete reabsorptio...em disease; Kidney disease; Inherited metabolic disease hsa04974(6505) Protein digestion and absorption hsa0

  20. Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Disease Treating Cushing's Disease Your 9-year old dog has been drinking a lot more lately and ...

  1. Disease: H00694 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00694 Dent disease, including: Dent disease 1; Dent disease 2; X-linked recessive nephrolithiasis...ction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis

  2. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Medications for Parkinson's disease can help many patients live productive lives and ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Parkinson disease Parkinson disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Parkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. ...

  4. Disease: H01054 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Head louse infestation is one of the most frequently occurring parasitic diseases... They are major vectors of diseases such as typhus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. Infectious disease Pe

  5. Disease: H00088 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00088 Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), including the following four diseases...SS, Gershwin ME. Current perspectives on primary immunodeficiency diseases. Clin ..., Wedgwood J. Primary immunodeficiency diseases: an update from the International Union of Immunological Soc

  6. Disease: H00326 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available animal scratches and bites. Human bartonellosis is a group of diseases with a rap...idly increasing clinical spectrum. At least six Bartonella species are responsible for human diseases as well as zoonotic diseases

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Kawasaki disease Kawasaki disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Kawasaki disease is a sudden and time-limited (acute) illness ...

  8. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed? Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on your child's signs and ... are the first to suspect a child has Kawasaki disease. Pediatricians are doctors who specialize in treating children. ...

  9. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Monitoring of People Being Evaluated for Ebola Virus Disease Prevention Cleaning and Decontamination Guidance for the U.S. Residence ... updated: July 22, 2015 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases ( ...

  10. Disease: H01142 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -borne infection. Ehrlichia ewingii has been identified as a cause of human disease in addition to formerly ...known pathogenic Ehrlichia species. Infectious disease Ehrlichia ewingii 16S rRNA [KO:K01977] Other diseases cause

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Crohn disease Crohn disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Crohn disease is a complex, chronic disorder that primarily affects ...

  12. Disease: H00384 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and Central and South America. Immunization is the most important method of prevention of yellow fever but vaccine...eactions, neurotropic disease, and viscerotropic disease. Infectious disease Yellow fever virus [VGNM:NC_002031] Yellow fever vaccine

  13. Disease: H00745 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e attacks include ingestion of potassium-rich food, rest after strenuous exercise, and cold exposure. Musculoskeletal disea...se; Nervous system disease; Inherited metabolic disease SCN4A [HSA:6329] [KO:K04837] Hydrochl

  14. Disease: H01146 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01146 Aminoacylase 1 deficiency Aminoacylase 1 deficiency is an autosomal recessive disea...ave been reported. Inherited metabolic disease; Neurodegenerative disease hsa0033... deficiency causes spongy degeneration of the brain known as Canavan disease [DS:

  15. Disease: H00156 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein due to mutation of apolipoprotein E. Inherited metabolic disease; Cardiovascular disease APOE; apoli...ioka Y, Yoshihara K, Yamada A, Matsunaga A, Saito T Lipoprotein glomerulopathy-like disease in a patient wit

  16. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  17. Celiac disease - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojković Gradimir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Celiac disease (nontropical sprue, gluten-sensitive enteropathy, chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder is caused by gluten intolerance. This hereditary disorder is caused by sensitivity to gliadin. Because the body's own immune system causes the damage, celiac disease is considered to be an autoimmune disorder. However, it is also classified as a disease of malabsorption because nutrients are not absorbed. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. Specifically, tiny finger-like protrusions, called villi, on the lining of the small intestine are lost. The diagnosis is suspected on the basis of symptoms and signs, enhanced by laboratory and x-ray studies, and confirmed by biopsy revealing flat mucosa and subsequent clinical and histologic improvement on a gluten-free diet. Gluten must be excluded from diet. Supplementary vitamins, minerals and hematinics may be given depending on deficiency. Case report This is a case report of a 23-year old female patient with a mineralization defect (osteomalacia and secondary osteoporosis caused by long-time unrecognized celiac disease. The patient had many symptoms: short stature, steatorrhea, anemia, weight loss and chronic bone pain. Laboratory and x-ray studies and jejunal biopsy revealed a chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder caused by gluten intolerance. Gluten-free diet and supplementary vitamins, minerals and hematinics were included with apparent clinical remission. Discussion and Conclusion Some people with celiac disease may not have symptoms. The undamaged part of their small intestine is able to absorb enough nutrients to prevent symptoms. However, people without symptoms are still at risk for complications of celiac disease. Biopsy of the small intestine is the best way to diagnose celiac disease. Decreased bone density (osteoporosis and osteomalacia is a serious problem for celiacs. If calcium

  18. Uncovering disease-disease relationships through the incomplete human interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menche, Jörg; Sharma, Amitabh; Kitsak, Maksim; Ghiassian, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    According to the disease module hypothesis the cellular components associated with a disease segregate in the same neighborhood of the human interactome, the map of biologically relevant molecular interactions. Yet, given the incompleteness of the interactome and the limited knowledge of disease-associated genes, it is not obvious if the available data has sufficient coverage to map out modules associated with each disease. Here we derive mathematical conditions for the identifiability of disease modules and show that the network-based location of each disease module determines its pathobiological relationship to other diseases. For example, diseases with overlapping network modules show significant co-expression patterns, symptom similarity, and comorbidity, while diseases residing in separated network neighborhoods are clinically distinct. These tools represent an interactome-based platform to predict molecular commonalities between clinically related diseases, even if they do not share disease genes. PMID:25700523

  19. Metabolic disease network and its implication for disease comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-Sun; Oltvai, Zoltan; Christakis, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    Given that most diseases are the result of the breakdown of some cellular processes, a key aim of modern medicine is to establish the relationship between disease phenotypes and the various disruptions in the underlying cellular networks. Here we show that our current understanding of the structure of the human metabolic network can provide insight into potential relationships among often distinct disease phenotypes. Using the known enzyme-disease associations, we construct a human metabolic disease network in which nodes are diseases and two diseases are linked if the enzymes associated with them catalyze adjacent metabolic reactions. We find that the more connected a disease is, the higher is its prevalence and the chance that it is associated with a high mortality. The results indicate that the cellular network-level relationships between metabolic pathways and the associated disease provide insights into disease comorbidity, with potential important consequences on disease diagnosis and prevention.

  20. Is Alzheimer's disease a homogeneous disease entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2013-10-01

    The epidemic proportions of dementia in old age are a cause of great concern for the medical profession and the society at large. It is customary to consider Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, and vascular dementia (VaD) as being the second. This dichotomous view of a primary neurodegenerative disease as opposed to a disorder where extrinsic factors cause brain damage led to separate lines of research in these two entities. New biomarkers, particularly the introduction of modern neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid changes, have, in recent years, helped to identify anatomical and chemical changes of VaD and of AD. Nevertheless, there is a substantial difference between the two entities. While it is clear that VaD is a heterogeneous entity, AD is supposed to be a single disorder. Nobody attempts to use CADASIL as a template to develops treatment for sporadic VaD. On the other hand, early-onset AD is used to develop therapy for sporadic AD. This paper will discuss the problems relating to this false concept and its consequences.