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Sample records for added motor imagery

  1. Comparison of embedded and added motor imagery training in patients after stroke: study protocol of a randomised controlled pilot trial using a mixed methods approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two different approaches have been adopted when applying motor imagery (MI to stroke patients. MI can be conducted either added to conventional physiotherapy or integrated within therapy sessions. The proposed study aims to compare the efficacy of embedded MI to an added MI intervention. Evidence from pilot studies reported in the literature suggests that both approaches can improve performance of a complex motor skill involving whole body movements, however, it remains to be demonstrated, which is the more effective one. Methods/Design A single blinded, randomised controlled trial (RCT with a pre-post intervention design will be carried out. The study design includes two experimental groups and a control group (CG. Both experimental groups (EG1, EG2 will receive physical practice of a clinical relevant motor task ('Going down, laying on the floor, and getting up again' over a two week intervention period: EG1 with embedded MI training, EG2 with MI training added after physiotherapy. The CG will receive standard physiotherapy intervention and an additional control intervention not related to MI. The primary study outcome is the time difference to perform the task from pre to post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include level of help needed, stages of motor task completion, degree of motor impairment, balance ability, fear of falling measure, motivation score, and motor imagery ability score. Four data collection points are proposed: twice during baseline phase, once following the intervention period, and once after a two week follow up. A nested qualitative part should add an important insight into patients' experience and attitudes towards MI. Semi-structured interviews of six to ten patients, who participate in the RCT, will be conducted to investigate patients' previous experience with MI and their expectations towards the MI intervention in the study. Patients will be interviewed prior and after the intervention period

  2. Motor imagery ability in stroke patients: The relationship between implicit and explicit motor imagery measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd eDe Vries

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is little consensus on how motor imagery ability should be measured in stroke patients. In particular it is unclear how two methods tapping different aspects of the motor imagery process relate to each other. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between implicit and explicit motor imagery ability by comparing performance of stroke patients and controls on a motor imagery questionnaire and a hand laterality judgment task (HLJT. Sixteen ischemic stroke patients (36±13 weeks post-stroke and 16 controls, matched by age (51±10 years, gender (7 females and handedness (3 left-handed, performed a HLJT and completed a motor imagery questionnaire. Our study shows that neither in the healthy controls nor in patients, a correlation is found between the HLJT and the motor imagery questionnaire. Although the patient group scored significantly lower than the control group on the visual motor imagery component (U= 60; p = 0.010 and the kinesthetic motor imagery component (U = 63.5; p = 0.015 of the questionnaire, there were no significant differences between patients and controls on accuracy scores of the HLJT. Analyses of the reaction time profiles of patients and controls showed that patient were still able to use an implicit motor imagery strategy in the HLJT task. Our results show that after stroke performance on tests that measure two different aspects of motor imagery ability, e.g. implicit and explicit motor imagery, can be differently affected. These results articulate the complex relation phenomenological experience and the different components of motor imagery have and caution the use of one tool as an instrument for use in screening, selecting and monitoring stroke patients in rehabilitation settings.

  3. Motor imagery development in primary school children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caeyenberghs, K.; Tsoupas, J.; Wilson, P.H.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Motor imagery provides a unique window on the integrity of movement representation. How this ability unfolds during development remains unknown, however. It was the aim of this cross-sectional study to chart the development of movement imagery over childhood using validated measures, and to examine

  4. Posture influences motor imagery: An fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, F.P. de; Helmich, R.; Toni, I.

    2006-01-01

    Motor imagery is widely used to study cognitive aspects of the neural control of action. However, what is exactly simulated during motor imagery is still a matter of debate. On the one hand, it is conceivable that motor imagery is an embodied cognitive process, involving a simulation of movements of

  5. Sport expert's motor imagery: functional imaging of professional motor skills and simple motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gaoxia; Luo, Jing

    2010-06-23

    Numerous studies provide evidence that motor skill acquisition is associated with dynamic changes in cortical and subcortical regions. Athletes are a professional population who are engaged in extensive motor training for long periods. However, the neural substrates of extreme level motor performance have not been clarified. We used kinesthetic imagery task to induce the mental representation of sport expert's extraordinary performance in view of the shared substrates of executing movement and motor imagery. For the first time, we compared, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the pattern of cerebral activations in 12 professional divers and 12 normal people without extensive training, during imagery of professional skills and imagery of simple motor skills. The sport experts showed significant activation in the parahippocampus during imagery of professional skills relative to the novices, which might reflect the representation adapted to experience-related motor tasks. No significant difference was found between experts and novices when they imagined simple motor skills. These results indicated the experts might utilize their kinesthetic imagery more efficiently than novices, but only for the activity in which they had expertise. The sport experts also demonstrated more focused activation patterns in prefrontal areas in both of imagery tasks, which may be relevant to higher order of motor control during motor imagery. Moreover, this study suggested that the brains of sport experts could be regarded as the ideal subjects to explore the relationship between cerebral plasticity and learning of complex motor skills.

  6. Motor imagery in unipolar major depression

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    Djamila eBennabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor imagery is a potential tool to investigate action representation, as it can provide insights into the processes of action planning and preparation. Recent studies suggest that depressed patients present specific impairment in mental rotation. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of unipolar depression on motor imagery ability.Methods: Fourteen right-handed patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for unipolar depression were compared to fourteen matched healthy controls. Imagery ability was accessed by the timing correspondence between executed and imagined movements during a pointing task, involving strong spatiotemporal constraints (speed/accuracy trade off paradigm.Results: Compared to controls, depressed patients showed marked motor slowing on both actual and imagined movements. Furthermore, we observed greater temporal discrepancies between actual and mental movements in depressed patients than in healthy controls. Lastly, depressed patients modulated, to some extent, mental movement durations according to the difficulty of the task, but this modulation was not as strong as that of healthy subjects.Conclusion: These results suggest that unipolar depression significantly affects the higher stages of action planning and point out a selective decline of motor prediction.

  7. Daytime naps improve motor imagery learning.

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    Debarnot, Ursula; Castellani, Eleonora; Valenza, Gaetano; Sebastiani, Laura; Guillot, Aymeric

    2011-12-01

    Sleep is known to contribute to motor memory consolidation. Recent studies have provided evidence that a night of sleep plays a similar functional role following motor imagery (MI), while the simple passage of time does not result in performance gains. Here, we examined the benefits of a daytime nap on motor memory consolidation after MI practice. Participants were trained by MI on an explicitly known sequence of finger movements at 11:00. Half of the participants were then subjected (at 14:00) to either a short nap (10 min of stage 2 sleep) or a long nap (60-90 min, including slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep). We also collected data from both quiet and active rest control groups. All participants remained in the lab until being retested at 16:00. The data revealed that a daytime nap after imagery practice improved motor performance and, therefore, facilitated motor memory consolidation, as compared with spending a similar time interval in the wake state. Interestingly, the results revealed that both short and long naps resulted in similar delayed performance gains. The data might also suggest that the presence of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep does not provide additional benefits for the sleep-dependent motor skill consolidation following MI practice.

  8. The Study of Object-Oriented Motor Imagery Based on EEG Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Motor imagery is a conventional method for brain computer interface and motor learning. To avoid the great individual difference of the motor imagery ability, object-oriented motor imagery was applied, and the effects were studied. Kinesthetic motor imagery and visual observation were administered to 15 healthy volunteers. The EEG during cue-based simple imagery (SI), object-oriented motor imagery (OI), non-object-oriented motor imagery (NI) and visual observation (VO) was recorded. Study res...

  9. Selective effect of physical fatigue on motor imagery accuracy.

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    Franck Di Rienzo

    Full Text Available While the use of motor imagery (the mental representation of an action without overt execution during actual training sessions is usually recommended, experimental studies examining the effect of physical fatigue on subsequent motor imagery performance are sparse and yielded divergent findings. Here, we investigated whether physical fatigue occurring during an intense sport training session affected motor imagery ability. Twelve swimmers (nine males, mean age 15.5 years conducted a 45 min physically-fatiguing protocol where they swam from 70% to 100% of their maximal aerobic speed. We tested motor imagery ability immediately before and after fatigue state. Participants randomly imagined performing a swim turn using internal and external visual imagery. Self-reports ratings, imagery times and electrodermal responses, an index of alertness from the autonomic nervous system, were the dependent variables. Self-reports ratings indicated that participants did not encounter difficulty when performing motor imagery after fatigue. However, motor imagery times were significantly shortened during posttest compared to both pretest and actual turn times, thus indicating reduced timing accuracy. Looking at the selective effect of physical fatigue on external visual imagery did not reveal any difference before and after fatigue, whereas significantly shorter imagined times and electrodermal responses (respectively 15% and 48% decrease, p<0.001 were observed during the posttest for internal visual imagery. A significant correlation (r=0.64; p<0.05 was observed between motor imagery vividness (estimated through imagery questionnaire and autonomic responses during motor imagery after fatigue. These data support that unlike local muscle fatigue, physical fatigue occurring during intense sport training sessions is likely to affect motor imagery accuracy. These results might be explained by the updating of the internal representation of the motor sequence, due to

  10. Mental Representation and Motor Imagery Training

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    Thomas eSchack

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in sports, dance and rehabilitation has shown that Basic Action Concepts (BACs are fundamental building blocks of mental action representations. BACs are based on chunked body postures related to common functions for realizing action goals. In this paper, we outline issues in research methodology and an experimental method, SDA-M (structural dimensional analysis of mental representation, to assess action-relevant representational structures that reflect the organization of BACs. The SDA-M reveals a strong relationship between cognitive representation and performance if complex actions are performed. We show how the SDA-M can improve motor imagery training and how it contributes to our understanding of coaching processes. The SDA-M capitalizes on the objective measurement of individual mental movement representations before training and the integration of these results into the motor imagery training. Such motor imagery training based on mental representations has been applied successfully in professional sports such as golf, volleyball, gymnastics, windsurfing, and recently in the rehabilitation of patients who have suffered a stroke.

  11. 2012 Oconee County, Georgia ADS80 Imagery

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    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All imagery was collected during the 2012 Spring flying season during leaf-off conditions for deciduous vegetation in the State of Georgia. The sun angle was at...

  12. Corticospinal excitability during observation and imagery of simple and complex hand tasks : Implications for motor rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, Meyke; Zijdewind, Inge

    2010-01-01

    Movement observation and imagery are increasingly propagandized for motor rehabilitation. Both observation and imagery are thought to improve motor function through repeated activation of mental motor representations. However, it is unknown what stimulation parameters or imagery conditions are optim

  13. Current insights in the development of children's motor imagery ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, S.; Kamp, J. van der; Steenbergen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the number of studies on motor imagery in children has witnessed a large expansion. Most studies used the hand laterality judgment paradigm or the mental chronometry paradigm to examine motor imagery ability. The main objective of the current review is to collate these stu

  14. Current insights in the development of children's motor imagery ability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, S.; Kamp, J. van der; Steenbergen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the number of studies on motor imagery in children has witnessed a large expansion. Most studies used the hand laterality judgment paradigm or the mental chronometry paradigm to examine motor imagery ability. The main objective of the current review is to collate these stu

  15. Facilitation of motor imagery through movement-related cueing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heremans, Elke; Helsen, Werner F.; De Poel, Harjo J.; Alaerts, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter; Feys, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the past few years, the use of motor imagery as an adjunct to other forms of training has been studied extensively. However, very little attention has been paid to how imagery could be used to greatest effect. it is well known that the provision of external cues has a beneficial effect on motor s

  16. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance

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    Rachel M. Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians’ encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies, and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies. Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning or performing without sound (motor learning; following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall. During either Learning (Experiment 1 or Recall (Experiment 2, pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists’ pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2. Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1: Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2: Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the

  17. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the...

  18. Bridging the gap between motor imagery and motor execution with a brain-robot interface.

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    Bauer, Robert; Fels, Meike; Vukelić, Mathias; Ziemann, Ulf; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    According to electrophysiological studies motor imagery and motor execution are associated with perturbations of brain oscillations over spatially similar cortical areas. By contrast, neuroimaging and lesion studies suggest that at least partially distinct cortical networks are involved in motor imagery and execution. We sought to further disentangle this relationship by studying the role of brain-robot interfaces in the context of motor imagery and motor execution networks. Twenty right-handed subjects performed several behavioral tasks as indicators for imagery and execution of movements of the left hand, i.e. kinesthetic imagery, visual imagery, visuomotor integration and tonic contraction. In addition, subjects performed motor imagery supported by haptic/proprioceptive feedback from a brain-robot-interface. Principal component analysis was applied to assess the relationship of these indicators. The respective cortical resting state networks in the α-range were investigated by electroencephalography using the phase slope index. We detected two distinct abilities and cortical networks underlying motor control: a motor imagery network connecting the left parietal and motor areas with the right prefrontal cortex and a motor execution network characterized by transmission from the left to right motor areas. We found that a brain-robot-interface might offer a way to bridge the gap between these networks, opening thereby a backdoor to the motor execution system. This knowledge might promote patient screening and may lead to novel treatment strategies, e.g. for the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke.

  19. Motor imagery modulation of body sway is task-dependent and relies on imagery ability

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    Thiago eLemos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study we investigate to what extent the effects of motor imagery on postural sway are constrained by movement features and the subject’s imagery ability. Twenty-three subjects were asked to imagine three movements using the kinesthetic modality: rising on tiptoes, whole-body forward reaching, and whole-body lateral reaching. After each task, subjects reported the level of imagery vividness and were subsequently grouped into a HIGH group (scores ≥3, moderately intense imagery or a LOW group (scores ≤2, mildly intense imagery. An eyes closed trial was used as a control task. Center of gravity (COG coordinates were collected, along with surface EMG of the deltoid (medial and anterior portion and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. COG variability was quantified as the amount of fluctuations in position and velocity in the forward-backward and lateral directions. Changes in COG variability during motor imagery were observed only for the HIGH group. COG variability in the forward-backward direction was increased during the rising on tiptoes imagery, compared with the control task (p=0.01 and the lateral reaching imagery (p=0.02. Conversely, COG variability in the lateral direction was higher in rising on tiptoes and lateral reaching imagery than during the control task (p0.08 or task (p>0.46 for any of the tested muscles. In summary, motor imagery influences body sway dynamics in a task-dependent manner, and relies on the subject’ imagery ability.

  20. What Do Eye Gaze Metrics Tell Us about Motor Imagery?

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    Elodie Poiroux

    Full Text Available Many of the brain structures involved in performing real movements also have increased activity during imagined movements or during motor observation, and this could be the neural substrate underlying the effects of motor imagery in motor learning or motor rehabilitation. In the absence of any objective physiological method of measurement, it is currently impossible to be sure that the patient is indeed performing the task as instructed. Eye gaze recording during a motor imagery task could be a possible way to "spy" on the activity an individual is really engaged in. The aim of the present study was to compare the pattern of eye movement metrics during motor observation, visual and kinesthetic motor imagery (VI, KI, target fixation, and mental calculation. Twenty-two healthy subjects (16 females and 6 males, were required to perform tests in five conditions using imagery in the Box and Block Test tasks following the procedure described by Liepert et al. Eye movements were analysed by a non-invasive oculometric measure (SMI RED250 system. Two parameters describing gaze pattern were calculated: the index of ocular mobility (saccade duration over saccade + fixation duration and the number of midline crossings (i.e. the number of times the subjects gaze crossed the midline of the screen when performing the different tasks. Both parameters were significantly different between visual imagery and kinesthesic imagery, visual imagery and mental calculation, and visual imagery and target fixation. For the first time we were able to show that eye movement patterns are different during VI and KI tasks. Our results suggest gaze metric parameters could be used as an objective unobtrusive approach to assess engagement in a motor imagery task. Further studies should define how oculomotor parameters could be used as an indicator of the rehabilitation task a patient is engaged in.

  1. The influence of motor imagery on the learning of a fine hand motor skill.

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    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaśkowski, Wojciech; Verwey, Willem B; van der Lubbe, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Motor imagery has been argued to affect the acquisition of motor skills. The present study examined the specificity of motor imagery on the learning of a fine hand motor skill by employing a modified discrete sequence production task: the Go/NoGo DSP task. After an informative cue, a response sequence had either to be executed, imagined, or withheld. To establish learning effects, the experiment was divided into a practice phase and a test phase. In the latter phase, we compared mean response times and accuracy during the execution of unfamiliar sequences, familiar imagined sequences, and familiar executed sequences. The electroencephalogram was measured in the practice phase to compare activity between motor imagery, motor execution, and a control condition in which responses should be withheld. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and event-related lateralizations (ERLs) showed strong similarities above cortical motor areas on trials requiring motor imagery and motor execution, while a major difference was found with trials on which the response sequence should be withheld. Behavioral results from the test phase showed that response times and accuracy improved after physical and mental practice relative to unfamiliar sequences (so-called sequence-specific learning effects), although the effect of motor learning by motor imagery was smaller than the effect of physical practice. These findings confirm that motor imagery also resembles motor execution in the case of a fine hand motor skill.

  2. Adding Insult to Imagery? Art Education and Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The "Adding Insult to Imagery? Artistic Responses to Censorship and Mass-Media" exhibition opened in January 16, 2006, Kipp Gallery on the Indiana University of Pennsylvania campus. Eleven gallery-based works, 9 videos, and 10 web-based artworks comprised the show; each dealt with the relationship between censorship and mass mediated…

  3. Adding Insult to Imagery? Art Education and Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The "Adding Insult to Imagery? Artistic Responses to Censorship and Mass-Media" exhibition opened in January 16, 2006, Kipp Gallery on the Indiana University of Pennsylvania campus. Eleven gallery-based works, 9 videos, and 10 web-based artworks comprised the show; each dealt with the relationship between censorship and mass mediated images. Many…

  4. Recovery of Motor Imagery Ability in Stroke Patients

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    Sjoerd de Vries

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate whether motor imagery ability recovers in stroke patients and to see what the relationship is between different types of imagery and motor functioning after stroke. Methods. 12 unilateral stroke patients were measured at 3 and 6 weeks poststroke on 3 mental imagery tasks. Arm-hand function was evaluated using the Utrecht Arm-Hand task and the Brunnström Fugl-Meyer Scale. Age-matched healthy individuals (N=10 were included as controls. Results. Implicit motor imagery ability and visual motor imagery ability improved significantly at 6 weeks compared to 3 weeks poststroke. Conclusion. Our study shows that motor imagery can recover in the first weeks after stroke. This indicates that a group of patients who might not be initially selected for mental practice can, still later in the rehabilitation process, participate in mental practice programs. Moreover, our study shows that mental imagery modalities can be differently affected in individual patients and over time.

  5. Posture influences motor imagery: an fMRI study.

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    de Lange, Floris P; Helmich, Rick C; Toni, Ivan

    2006-11-01

    Motor imagery is widely used to study cognitive aspects of the neural control of action. However, what is exactly simulated during motor imagery is still a matter of debate. On the one hand, it is conceivable that motor imagery is an embodied cognitive process, involving a simulation of movements of one's own body. The alternative possibility is that, although motor imagery relies on knowledge of the motor processes, it does not entail an actual motor simulation that is influenced by the physical configuration of one's own body. Here we discriminate between these two hypotheses, in the context of an established motor imagery task: laterality judgments of rotated hand drawings. We found that reaction times of hand laterality judgments followed the biomechanical constraints of left or right hand movements. Crucially, the position of subjects' own left and right arm influenced laterality judgments of left and right hands. In neural terms, hand laterality judgments activated a parieto-frontal network. The activity within this network increased with increasing biomechanical complexity of the imagined hand movements, even when the amount of stimulus rotation was identical. Moreover, activity in the intraparietal sulcus was modulated by subjects' own hand position: a larger incongruence in orientation between the subjects' hand and the stimulus hand led to a selective increase in intraparietal activity. Our results indicate that motor imagery generates motor plans that depend on the current configuration of the limbs. This motor plan is calculated by a parieto-frontal network. Within this network, the posterior parietal cortex appears to incorporate proprioceptive information related to the current position of the body into the motor plan.

  6. Motor imagery : The relation between age and imagery capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Th.; Hochstenbach, J. B. H.; van Heuvelen, M. J. G.; den Otter, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    The imagination of motor actions forms not only a theoretical challenge for cognitive neuroscience but may also be seen as a novel therapeutic tool in neurological rehabilitation, in that it can be used for relearning motor control after damage to the motor system. However, since the majority of reh

  7. Current insights in the development of children’s motor imagery ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffie eSpruijt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the number of studies on motor imagery in children has witnessed a large expansion. Most studies used the hand laterality judgment paradigm or the mental chronometry paradigm to examine motor imagery ability. The main objective of the current review is to collate these studies to provide a more comprehensive insight in children’s motor imagery development and its age of onset. Motor imagery is a form of motor cognition and aligns with forward (or predictive models of motor control. Studying age-related differences in motor imagery ability in children therefore provides insight in underlying processes of motor development during childhood. Another motivation for studying age-related differences in motor imagery is that in order to effectively apply motor imagery training in children (with motor impairments, it is pertinent to first establish the age at which children are actually able to perform motor imagery.Overall, performance in the imagery tasks develops between 5 and 12 years of age. The age of motor imagery onset, however, remains equivocal, as some studies indicate that children of 5 to 7 years old can already enlist motor imagery in an implicit motor imagery task, whereas other studies using explicit instructions revealed that children do not use motor imagery before the age of 10. From the findings of the current study, we can conclude that motor imagery training is potentially a feasible method for paediatric rehabilitation in children from 5 years on. We suggest that younger children are most likely to benefit from motor imagery training that is presented in an implicit way. Action observation training might be a beneficial adjunct to implicit motor imagery training. From 10 years of age, more explicit forms of motor imagery training can be effectively used.

  8. Enhancing voluntary imitation through attention and motor imagery.

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    Bek, Judith; Poliakoff, Ellen; Marshall, Hannah; Trueman, Sophie; Gowen, Emma

    2016-07-01

    Action observation activates brain areas involved in performing the same action and has been shown to increase motor learning, with potential implications for neurorehabilitation. Recent work indicates that the effects of action observation on movement can be increased by motor imagery or by directing attention to observed actions. In voluntary imitation, activation of the motor system during action observation is already increased. We therefore explored whether imitation could be further enhanced by imagery or attention. Healthy participants observed and then immediately imitated videos of human hand movement sequences, while movement kinematics were recorded. Two blocks of trials were completed, and after the first block participants were instructed to imagine performing the observed movement (Imagery group, N = 18) or attend closely to the characteristics of the movement (Attention group, N = 15), or received no further instructions (Control group, N = 17). Kinematics of the imitated movements were modulated by instructions, with both Imagery and Attention groups being closer in duration, peak velocity and amplitude to the observed model compared with controls. These findings show that both attention and motor imagery can increase the accuracy of imitation and have implications for motor learning and rehabilitation. Future work is required to understand the mechanisms by which these two strategies influence imitation accuracy.

  9. Fractal analysis of motor imagery recognition in the BCI research

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    Chang, Chia-Tzu; Huang, Han-Pang; Huang, Tzu-Hao

    2011-12-01

    A fractal approach is employed for the brain motor imagery recognition and applied to brain computer interface (BCI). The fractal dimension is used as feature extraction and SVM (Support Vector Machine) as feature classifier for on-line BCI applications. The modified Inverse Random Midpoint Displacement (mIRMD) is adopted to calculate the fractal dimensions of EEG signals. The fractal dimensions can effectively reflect the complexity of EEG signals, and are related to the motor imagery tasks. Further, the SVM is employed as the classifier to combine with fractal dimension for motor-imagery recognition and use mutual information to show the difference between two classes. The results are compared with those in the BCI 2003 competition and it shows that our method has better classification accuracy and mutual information (MI).

  10. The correlation between motor impairments and event-related desynchronization during motor imagery in ALS patients

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    Kasahara Takashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The event-related desynchronization (ERD in EEG is known to appear during motor imagery, and is thought to reflect cortical processing for motor preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the modulation of ERD with motor impairment in ALS patients. ERD during hand motor imagery was obtained from 8 ALS patients with a variety of motor impairments. ERD was also obtained from age-matched 11 healthy control subjects with the same motor task. The magnitude and frequency of ERD were compared between groups for characterization of ALS specific changes. Results The ERD of ALS patients were significantly smaller than those of control subjects. Bulbar function and ERD were negatively correlated in ALS patients. Motor function of the upper extremities did was uncorrelated with ERD. Conclusions ALS patients with worsened bulbar scales may show smaller ERD. Motor function of the upper extremities did was uncorrelated with ERD.

  11. Optimization of a motor learning attention-directing strategy based on an individual's motor imagery ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Takeshi; Hirai, Masahiro; Watanabe, Eiju

    2016-01-01

    Motor learning performance has been shown to be affected by various cognitive factors such as the focus of attention and motor imagery ability. Most previous studies on motor learning have shown that directing the attention of participants externally, such as on the outcome of an assigned body movement, can be more effective than directing their attention internally, such as on body movement itself. However, to the best of our knowledge, no findings have been reported on the effect of the focus of attention selected according to the motor imagery ability of an individual on motor learning performance. We measured individual motor imagery ability assessed by the Movement Imagery Questionnaire and classified the participants into kinesthetic-dominant (n = 12) and visual-dominant (n = 8) groups based on the questionnaire score. Subsequently, the participants performed a motor learning task such as tracing a trajectory using visuomotor rotation. When the participants were required to direct their attention internally, the after-effects of the learning task in the kinesthetic-dominant group were significantly greater than those in the visual-dominant group. Conversely, when the participants were required to direct their attention externally, the after-effects of the visual-dominant group were significantly greater than those of the kinesthetic-dominant group. Furthermore, we found a significant positive correlation between the size of after-effects and the modality-dominance of motor imagery. These results suggest that a suitable attention strategy based on the intrinsic motor imagery ability of an individual can improve performance during motor learning tasks.

  12. Cerebral compensation during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; de Lange, Floris P; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2007-06-11

    In neurodegenerative disorders, neural damage can trigger compensatory mechanisms that minimize behavioural impairments. Here, we aimed at characterizing cerebral compensation during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease (PD), while controlling for altered motor execution and sensory feedback. We used a within-patient design to compare the most and least affected hand in 19 right-handed PD patients with markedly right-lateralized symptoms. We used a motor imagery (MI) task in which the patients were required to judge the laterality of hand images, rotated either in a lateral or in a medial orientation with respect to the body sagittal plane. This design allowed us to compare cerebral activity (using fMRI) evoked by MI of each hand separately, while objectively monitoring task performance. Reaction times and parieto-premotor activity increased in a similar manner as a function of stimulus rotation during motor imagery of left and right hands. However, patients were markedly slower when judging images of the affected hand in lateral orientations, and there was a corresponding increase in activity in the right extrastriate body area (EBA) and occipito-parietal cortex during mental rotation of the affected hand. Furthermore, these regions increased their connectivity towards the left PMd for right (affected) hands in a lateral orientation. We infer that, in strongly lateralized PD patients, motor imagery of the most-affected hand exploits additional resources in extrastriate visual areas. These findings characterize the cerebral bases of the increased dependence on visual information processing during the generation of motor plans in PD, pointing to its compensatory role.

  13. Rehearsal strategies during motor-sequence learning in old age : Execution vs motor imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoter, Arjan J. R.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Kamsma, Yvo P. T.; Mulder, Theo

    2008-01-01

    Motor imagery and action-based rehearsal were compared during motor sequence-learning by young adults (M = 25 yr., SD = 3) and aged adults (M = 63 yr., SD = 7). General accuracy of aged adults was lower than that of young adults (F-1,F-28 = 7.37, p = .01) even though working-memory capacity was equi

  14. Motor Imagery Ability in Children with Congenital Hemiplegia: Effect of Lesion Side and Functional Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline; Reid, Susan M.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Anderson, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    In addition to motor execution problems, children with hemiplegia have motor planning deficits, which may stem from poor motor imagery ability. This study aimed to provide a greater understanding of motor imagery ability in children with hemiplegia using the hand rotation task. Three groups of children, aged 8-12 years, participated: right…

  15. Task-dependent engagements of the primary visual cortex during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Maiko; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Motor imagery can be divided into kinesthetic and visual aspects. In the present study, we investigated excitability in the corticospinal tract and primary visual cortex (V1) during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery. To accomplish this, we measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and probability of phosphene occurrence during the two types of motor imageries of finger tapping. The MEPs and phosphenes were induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex and V1, respectively. The amplitudes of MEPs and probability of phosphene occurrence during motor imagery were normalized based on the values obtained at rest. Corticospinal excitability increased during both kinesthetic and visual motor imagery, while excitability in V1 was increased only during visual motor imagery. These results imply that modulation of cortical excitability during kinesthetic and visual motor imagery is task dependent. The present finding aids in the understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying motor imagery and provides useful information for the use of motor imagery in rehabilitation or motor imagery training.

  16. Best practice for motor imagery: a systematic literature review on motor imagery training elements in five different disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheidhauer Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature suggests a beneficial effect of motor imagery (MI if combined with physical practice, but detailed descriptions of MI training session (MITS elements and temporal parameters are lacking. The aim of this review was to identify the characteristics of a successful MITS and compare these for different disciplines, MI session types, task focus, age, gender and MI modification during intervention. Methods An extended systematic literature search using 24 databases was performed for five disciplines: Education, Medicine, Music, Psychology and Sports. References that described an MI intervention that focused on motor skills, performance or strength improvement were included. Information describing 17 MITS elements was extracted based on the PETTLEP (physical, environment, timing, task, learning, emotion, perspective approach. Seven elements describing the MITS temporal parameters were calculated: study duration, intervention duration, MITS duration, total MITS count, MITS per week, MI trials per MITS and total MI training time. Results Both independent reviewers found 96% congruity, which was tested on a random sample of 20% of all references. After selection, 133 studies reporting 141 MI interventions were included. The locations of the MITS and position of the participants during MI were task-specific. Participants received acoustic detailed MI instructions, which were mostly standardised and live. During MI practice, participants kept their eyes closed. MI training was performed from an internal perspective with a kinaesthetic mode. Changes in MI content, duration and dosage were reported in 31 MI interventions. Familiarisation sessions before the start of the MI intervention were mentioned in 17 reports. MI interventions focused with decreasing relevance on motor-, cognitive- and strength-focused tasks. Average study intervention lasted 34 days, with participants practicing MI on average three times per week for 17

  17. The effect of motor imagery with specific implement in expert badminton player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Wang, S; Shi, F-Y; Guan, Y; Wu, Y; Zhang, L-L; Shen, C; Zeng, Y-W; Wang, D-H; Zhang, J

    2014-09-01

    Motor skill can be improved with mental simulation. Implements are widely used in daily life and in various sports. However, it is unclear whether the utilization of implements enhances the effect of mental simulation. The present study was designed to investigate the different effects of motor imagery in athletes and novices when they handled a specific implement. We hypothesize that athletes have better motor imagery ability than novices when they hold a specific implement for the sport. This is manifested as higher motor cortical excitability in athletes than novices during motor imagery with the specific implement. Sixteen expert badminton players and 16 novices were compared when they held a specific implement such as a badminton racket and a non-specific implement such as a a plastic bar. Motor imagery ability was measured with a self-evaluation questionnaire. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to test the motor cortical excitability during motor imagery. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor carpi radialis muscles were recorded. Athletes reported better motor imagery than novices when they held a specific implement. Athletes exhibited more MEP facilitation than novices in the FDI muscle with the specific implement applied during motor imagery. The MEP facilitation is correlated with motor imagery ability in athletes. We conclude that the effects of motor imagery with a specific implement are enhanced in athletes compared to novices and the difference between two groups is caused by long-term physical training of athletes with the specific implement.

  18. Body-specific motor imagery of hand actions: neural evidence from right- and left-handers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel M Willems

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available If motor imagery uses neural structures involved in action execution, then the neural correlates of imagining an action should differ between individuals who tend to execute the action differently. Here we report fMRI data showing that motor imagery is influenced by the way people habitually perform motor actions with their particular bodies; that is, motor imagery is ‘body-specific’ (Casasanto, 2009. During mental imagery for complex hand actions, activation of cortical areas involved in motor planning and execution was left-lateralized in right-handers but right-lateralized in left-handers. We conclude that motor imagery involves the generation of an action plan that is grounded in the participant’s motor habits, not just an abstract representation at the level of the action’s goal. People with different patterns of motor experience form correspondingly different neurocognitive representations of imagined actions.

  19. Children with unilateral cerebral palsy show diminished implicit motor imagery with the affected hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.L.A.; Baas, C.M.; Sangen, A.F.M.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM Motor imagery refers to the mental simulation of a motor action without producing an overt movement. Implicit motor imagery can be regarded as a first-person kinesthetic perceptual judgement, and addresses the capacity to engage into the manipulation of one's body schema. In this study, we exami

  20. Children with unilateral cerebral palsy show diminished implicit motor imagery with the affected hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.L.A.; Baas, C.M.; Sangen, A.F.M.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Motor imagery refers to the mental simulation of a motor action without producing an overt movement. Implicit motor imagery can be regarded as a first-person kinesthetic perceptual judgement, and addresses the capacity to engage into the manipulation of one's body schema. In this study, we exam

  1. Children with unilateral cerebral palsy show diminished implicit motor imagery with the affected hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Marijtje L.A.; Baas, C. Marjolein; Sangen, Anouk F.M.; Aarts, Pauline B.M.; Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Meulenbroek, Ruud G.J.; Steenbergen, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Aim Motor imagery refers to the mental simulation of a motor action without producing an overt movement. Implicit motor imagery can be regarded as a first-person kinesthetic perceptual judgement, and addresses the capacity to engage into the manipulation of one's body schema. In this study, we exami

  2. The Motor-Cognitive Model of Motor Imagery: Evidence From Timing Errors in Simulated Reaching and Grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Scott; Baran, Marek

    2017-04-03

    Motor imagery represents an important but theoretically underdeveloped area of research in psychology. The motor-cognitive model of motor imagery was presented, and contrasted with the currently prevalent view, the functional equivalence model. In 3 experiments, the predictions of the two models were pitted against each other through manipulations of task precision and the introduction of an interference task, while comparing their effects on overt actions and motor imagery. In Experiments 1a and 1b, the motor-cognitive model predicted an effect of precision whereby motor imagery would overestimate simulated movement times when a grasping action involved a high level of precision; this prediction was upheld. In Experiment 2, the motor-cognitive model predicted that an interference task would slow motor imagery to a much greater extent than it would overt actions; this prediction was also upheld. Experiment 3 showed that the effects observed in the previous experiments could not be due to failures to match the motor imagery and overt action tasks. None of the above results were explainable by either a strong version of the functional equivalence model, or any reasonable adaptations thereof. It was concluded that the motor-cognitive model may represent a theoretically viable advance in the understanding of motor imagery. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Comparison of Sensory-motor Rhythm and Movement Related Cortical Potential during Ballistic and Repetitive Motor Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ren; JIANG Ning; MRACHACZ-KERSTING Natalie; DREMSTRUP Kim; FARINA Dario

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared two types of EEG modalities, sensory-motor rhythms (SMR) and movement related cortical potentials (MRCP), on four healthy subjects performing ballistic or repetitive movement imagination. The EEG waveform morphology across subjects was similar for MRCPs, whereas there was not a clear pattern for SMRs. The rank-sum test showed a significant difference between the amplitude of baseline and that of the MRCP as early as 2 s prior to imagery onset, for both types of motor imageries, indicating strong discriminative power of MRCPs for predicting movement onset. For SMR, this type of discriminative power was relatively weak and highly subject-specific. On the other hand, the SMR landscape under the two movement imagery types was distinctive, holding a potential for discriminating the two movement imagery types. These preliminary results presented different characteristics of SMR and MRCP under different motor imageries, providing valuable information regarding the design and implementation of motor imagery based on BCI system.

  4. How Kinesthetic Motor Imagery works: A predictive-processing theory of visualization in sports and motor expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Brass, M.

    2015-01-01

    Kinesthetic Motor Imagery (KMI) is an important technique to acquire and refine motor skills. KMI is widely used by professional athletes as an effective way to improve motor performance without overt motor output. Despite this obvious relevance, the functional mechanisms and neural circuits involve

  5. Simultaneous high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex and motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Bryan S; Edelman, Bradley; Zhang, Xiaotong; Roy, Abhrajeet; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been used to affect the excitability of neurons within the cerebral cortex. Improvements in motor learning have been found in multiple studies when tDCS was applied to the motor cortex during or before task learning is performed. The application of tDCS to motor imagery, a cognitive task showing activation in similar areas to motor execution, has resulted in differing effects based on the amplitude and duration of stimulation. We utilize high definition tDCS, a more spatially localized version of tDCS, to investigate the effect of anodal stimulation on human motor imagery performance. In parallel, we model this stimulation using a finite element model to calculate stimulation area and electrical field amplitude within the brain in the motor cortex and non-stimulated frontal and parietal regions. Overall, we found a delayed increase in resting baseline power 30 minutes post stimulation in both the right and left sensorimotor cortices which resulted in an increase in event-related desynchronization.

  6. Motor imagery training in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a potentially useful therapeutic tool for rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Craje, Céline; Nilsen, D.M.; Gordon, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates that motor deficits in cerebral palsy (CP) are related not only to problems with execution, but also to impaired motor planning. Current rehabilitation mainly focuses on alleviating compromised motor execution. Motor imagery is a promising method of training the more 'c

  7. Detection of motor imagery of brisk walking from electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huijuan; Guan, Cuntai; Wang, Chuan Chu; Ang, Kai Keng

    2015-04-15

    Rehabilitation of lower limbs is equally as important as that of upper limbs. This paper presented a study to detect motor imagery of walking (MI-Walking) from background idle state. Broad overlapping neuronal networks involved in reorganization following motor imagery introduce redundancy. We hypothesized that MI-Walking could be robustly detected by constraining dependency among selected features and class separations. Hence, we proposed to jointly select channels and frequency bands involved in MI-Walking by optimizing/regularizing the objective function formulated on the dependency between features and class labels, redundancy between to-be-selected with selected features, and separations between classes, namely, "regularized maximum dependency with minimum redundancy-based joint channel and frequency band selection (RMDR-JCFS)". Evaluated on electroencephalography (EEG) data of 11 healthy subjects, the results showed that the selected channels were mainly located at premotor cortex, mid-central area overlaying supplementary motor area (SMA), prefrontal cortex, foot area sensory cortex and leg and arm sensorimotor representation area. Broad frequencies of alpha, mu and beta rhythms were involved. Our proposed method yielded an averaged accuracy of 76.67%, which was 9.08%, 5.03%, 7.03%, 14.15% and 3.88% higher than that obtained by common spatial pattern (CSP), filter-bank CSP, sliding window discriminate CSP, filter-bank power and maximum dependency and minimum redundancy methods, respectively. Further, our method yielded significantly superior performance compared with other channel selection methods, and it yielded an averaged session-to-session accuracy of 70.14%. These results demonstrated the potentials of detecting MI-Walking using proposed method for stroke rehabilitation.

  8. Does Motor Simulation Theory Explain the Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Motor Imagery? A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Helen; Moran, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Motor simulation theory (MST; Jeannerod, 2001) purports to explain how various action-related cognitive states relate to actual motor execution. Specifically, it proposes that motor imagery (MI; imagining an action without executing the movements involved) shares certain mental representations and mechanisms with action execution, and hence, activates similar neural pathways to those elicited during the latter process. Furthermore, MST postulates that MI works by rehearsing neural motor systems off-line via a hypothetical simulation process. In this paper, we review evidence cited in support of MST and evaluate its efficacy in understanding the cognitive mechanisms underlying MI. In doing so, we delineate the precise postulates of simulation theory and clarify relevant terminology. Based on our cognitive-level analysis, we argue firstly that the psychological mechanisms underlying MI are poorly understood and require additional conceptual and empirical analysis. In addition, we identify a number of potentially fruitful lines of inquiry for future investigators of MST and MI.

  9. Motor imagery training for children with developmental coordination disorder: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the predictive control of movements is impaired in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), most likely due to a deficit in the internal modeling of movements. Motor imagery paradigms have been used to test this internal modeling deficit. The aim of the present study is to examine whether a training focused on the mental imagery of motor skills, can help to improve the motor abilities of children with DCD. Methods/Design A pre-post d...

  10. Re-imagining motor imagery: building bridges between cognitive neuroscience and sport psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Aidan; Guillot, Aymeric; Macintyre, Tadhg; Collet, Christian

    2012-05-01

    One of the most remarkable capacities of the mind is its ability to simulate sensations, actions, and other types of experience. A mental simulation process that has attracted recent attention from cognitive neuroscientists and sport psychologists is motor imagery or the mental rehearsal of actions without engaging in the actual physical movements involved. Research on motor imagery is important in psychology because it provides an empirical window on consciousness and movement planning, rectifies a relative neglect of non-visual types of mental imagery, and has practical implications for skill learning and skilled performance in special populations (e.g., athletes, surgeons). Unfortunately, contemporary research on motor imagery is hampered by a variety of semantic, conceptual, and methodological issues that prevent cross-fertilization of ideas between cognitive neuroscience and sport psychology. In this paper, we review these issues, suggest how they can be resolved, and sketch some potentially fruitful new directions for inter-disciplinary research in motor imagery.

  11. Oscillatory entrainment of the motor cortical network during motor imagery is modulated by the feedback modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukelić, Mathias; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-05-01

    Neurofeedback of self-regulated brain activity in circumscribed cortical regions is used as a novel strategy to facilitate functional restoration following stroke. Basic knowledge about its impact on motor system oscillations and functional connectivity is however scarce. Specifically, a direct comparison between different feedback modalities and their neural signatures is missing. We assessed a neurofeedback training intervention of modulating β-activity in circumscribed sensorimotor regions by kinesthetic motor imagery (MI). Right-handed healthy participants received two different feedback modalities contingent to their MI-associated brain activity in a cross-over design: (I) visual feedback with a brain-computer interface (BCI) and (II) proprioceptive feedback with a brain-robot interface (BRI) orthosis attached to the right hand. High-density electroencephalography was used to examine the reactivity of the cortical motor system during the training session of each task by studying both local oscillatory power entrainment and distributed functional connectivity. Both feedback modalities activated a distributed functional connectivity network of coherent oscillations. A significantly higher skill and lower variability of self-controlled sensorimotor β-band modulation could, however, be achieved in the BRI condition. This gain in controlling regional motor oscillations was accompanied by functional coupling of remote β-band and θ-band activity in bilateral fronto-central regions and left parieto-occipital regions, respectively. The functional coupling of coherent θ-band oscillations correlated moreover with the skill of regional β-modulation thus revealing a motor learning related network. Our findings indicate that proprioceptive feedback is more suitable than visual feedback to entrain the motor network architecture during the interplay between motor imagery and feedback processing thus resulting in better volitional control of regional brain activity.

  12. Brain effective connectivity during motor-imagery and execution following stroke and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Sahil; Butler, Andrew J; Drake, Daniel; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Brain areas within the motor system interact directly or indirectly during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks. These interactions and their functionality can change following stroke and recovery. How brain network interactions reorganize and recover their functionality during recovery and treatment following stroke are not well understood. To contribute to answering these questions, we recorded blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals from 10 stroke survivors and evaluated dynamical causal modeling (DCM)-based effective connectivity among three motor areas: primary motor cortex (M1), pre-motor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA), during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks. We compared the connectivity between affected and unaffected hemispheres before and after mental practice and combined mental practice and physical therapy as treatments. The treatment (intervention) period varied in length between 14 to 51 days but all patients received the same dose of 60 h of treatment. Using Bayesian model selection (BMS) approach in the DCM approach, we found that, after intervention, the same network dominated during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks but modulatory parameters suggested a suppressive influence of SM A on M1 during the motor-imagery task whereas the influence of SM A on M1 was unrestricted during the motor-execution task. We found that the intervention caused a reorganization of the network during both tasks for unaffected as well as for the affected hemisphere. Using Bayesian model averaging (BMA) approach, we found that the intervention improved the regional connectivity among the motor areas during both the tasks. The connectivity between PMC and M1 was stronger in motor-imagery tasks whereas the connectivity from PMC to M1, SM A to M1 dominated in motor-execution tasks. There was significant behavioral improvement (p = 0.001) in sensation and motor movements because of the

  13. Brain effective connectivity during motor-imagery and execution following stroke and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Bajaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain areas within the motor system interact directly or indirectly during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks. These interactions and their functionality can change following stroke and recovery. How brain network interactions reorganize and recover their functionality during recovery and treatment following stroke are not well understood. To contribute to answering these questions, we recorded blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals from 10 stroke survivors and evaluated dynamical causal modeling (DCM-based effective connectivity among three motor areas: primary motor cortex (M1, pre-motor cortex (PMC and supplementary motor area (SMA, during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks. We compared the connectivity between affected and unaffected hemispheres before and after mental practice and combined mental practice and physical therapy as treatments. The treatment (intervention period varied in length between 14 to 51 days but all patients received the same dose of 60 h of treatment. Using Bayesian model selection (BMS approach in the DCM approach, we found that, after intervention, the same network dominated during motor-imagery and motor-execution tasks but modulatory parameters suggested a suppressive influence of SM A on M1 during the motor-imagery task whereas the influence of SM A on M1 was unrestricted during the motor-execution task. We found that the intervention caused a reorganization of the network during both tasks for unaffected as well as for the affected hemisphere. Using Bayesian model averaging (BMA approach, we found that the intervention improved the regional connectivity among the motor areas during both the tasks. The connectivity between PMC and M1 was stronger in motor-imagery tasks whereas the connectivity from PMC to M1, SM A to M1 dominated in motor-execution tasks. There was significant behavioral improvement (p = 0.001 in sensation and motor movements

  14. Multiple roles of motor imagery during action observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eVogt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years, the topics of action observation (AO and motor imagery (MI have been largely studied in isolation from each other, despite the early integrative account by Jeannerod (1994, 2001. Recent neuroimaging studies demonstrate enhanced cortical activity when AO and MI are performed concurrently ('AO+MI', compared to either AO or MI performed in isolation. These results indicate the potentially beneficial effects of AO+MI, and they also demonstrate that the underlying neurocognitive processes are partly shared. We separately review the evidence for MI and AO as forms of motor simulation, and present two quantitative literature analyses that indeed indicate rather little overlap between the two bodies of research. We then propose a spectrum of concurrent AO+MI states, from congruent AO+MI where the contents of AO and MI widely overlap, over coordinative AO+MI, where observed and imagined action are different but can be coordinated with each other, to cases of conflicting AO+MI. We believe that an integrative account of AO and MI is theoretically attractive, that it should generate novel experimental approaches, and that it can also stimulate a wide range of applications in sport, occupational therapy, and neurorehabilitation.

  15. MOTOR IMAGERY AND TENNIS SERVE PERFORMANCE: THE EXTERNAL FOCUS EFFICACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Guillot

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is now ample evidence that motor imagery (MI contributes to enhance motor performance. Previous research also demonstrated that directing athletes' attention to the effects of their movements on the environment is more effective than focusing on the action per se. The present study aimed therefore at evaluating whether adopting an external focus during MI contributes to enhance tennis serve performance. Twelve high-level young tennis players were included in a test-retest procedure. The effects of regular training were first evaluated. Then, players were subjected to a MI intervention during which they mentally focused on ball trajectory and specifically visualized the space above the net where the serve can be successfully hit. Serve performance was evaluated during both a validated serve test and a real match. The main results showed a significant increase in accuracy and velocity during the ecological serve test after MI practice, as well as a significant improvement in successful first serves and won points during the match. Present data therefore confirmed the efficacy of MI in combination of physical practice to improve tennis serve performance, and further provided evidence that it is feasible to adopt external attentional focus during MI. Practical applications are discussed

  16. Modulation of EMG power spectrum frequency during motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, F; Rouffet, D; Collet, C; Guillot, A

    2008-04-25

    To provide evidence that motor imagery (MI) is accompanied by improvement of intramuscular conduction velocity (CV), we investigated surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of 3 muscles during the elbow flexion/extension. Thirty right-handed participants were asked to lift or to imagine lifting a weighted dumbbell under 3 types of muscular contractions, i.e. concentric, isometric and eccentric, taken as independent variables. The EMG activity of the agonist (long and short heads of biceps brachii) and the antagonist (long portion of triceps brachii) muscles was recorded and processed to determine the median frequency (MF) of EMG power spectrum as dependant variable. The MF was significantly higher during the MI sessions than during the resting condition while the participants remained strictly motionless. Moreover, the MF during imagined concentric contraction was significantly higher than during the eccentric. Thus, the MF variation was correlated to the type of contraction the muscle produced. During MI, the EMG patterns corresponding to each type of muscle contraction remained comparable to those observed during actual movement. In conclusion, specific motor programming is hypothesized to be performed as a function of muscle contraction type during MI.

  17. Combining motor imagery with selective sensation toward a hybrid-modality BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lin; Meng, Jianjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid modality brain-computer interface (BCI) is proposed in this paper, which combines motor imagery with selective sensation to enhance the discrimination between left and right mental tasks, e.g., the classification between left/ right stimulation sensation and right/ left motor imagery. In this paradigm, wearable vibrotactile rings are used to stimulate both the skin on both wrists. Subjects are required to perform the mental tasks according to the randomly presented cues (i.e., left hand motor imagery, right hand motor imagery, left stimulation sensation or right stimulation sensation). Two-way ANOVA statistical analysis showed a significant group effect (F (2,20) = 7.17, p = 0.0045), and the Benferroni-corrected multiple comparison test (with α = 0.05) showed that the hybrid modality group is 11.13% higher on average than the motor imagery group, and 10.45% higher than the selective sensation group. The hybrid modality experiment exhibits potentially wider spread usage within ten subjects crossed 70% accuracy, followed by four subjects in motor imagery and five subjects in selective sensation. Six subjects showed statistically significant improvement ( Benferroni-corrected) in hybrid modality in comparison with both motor imagery and selective sensation. Furthermore, among subjects having difficulties in both motor imagery and selective sensation, the hybrid modality improves their performance to 90% accuracy. The proposed hybrid modality BCI has demonstrated clear benefits for those poorly performing BCI users. Not only does the requirement of motor and sensory anticipation in this hybrid modality provide basic function of BCI for communication and control, it also has the potential for enhancing the rehabilitation during motor recovery.

  18. Assessing motor imagery using the hand rotation task: Does performance change across childhood?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butson, M.L.; Hyde, C.; Steenbergen, B.; Williams, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined at what age children can engage in the hand rotation task (as a measure of motor imagery); whether engagement changes across development and; the influence of age and motor skill on performance. Children were aged 5-12years (N=101; 52 girls), with no IQ or motor skill impairment.

  19. Assessing motor imagery using the hand rotation task: Does performance change across childhood?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butson, M.L.; Hyde, C.; Steenbergen, B.; Williams, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined at what age children can engage in the hand rotation task (as a measure of motor imagery); whether engagement changes across development and; the influence of age and motor skill on performance. Children were aged 5-12 years (N = 101; 52 girls), with no IQ or motor skill impairme

  20. Effects of motor imagery on hand function during immobilization after flexor tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Mulder, Theo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether motor imagery during the immobilization period after flexor tendon injury results in a faster recovery of central mechanisms of hand function. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Tertiary referral hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=28) after surgical flexor

  1. The Effect of Visual and Auditory Enhancements on Excitability of the Primary Motor Cortex during Motor Imagery: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kohei; Higashi, Toshio; Sugawara, Kenichi; Tomori, Kounosuke; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kasai, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    The effect of visual and auditory enhancements of finger movement on corticospinal excitability during motor imagery (MI) was investigated using the transcranial magnetic stimulation technique. Motor-evoked potentials were elicited from the abductor digit minimi muscle during MI with auditory, visual and, auditory and visual information, and no…

  2. Assessing motor imagery ability in younger and older adults by combining measures of vividness, controllability and timing of motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saimpont, Arnaud; Malouin, Francine; Tousignant, Béatrice; Jackson, Philip L

    2015-02-09

    With the population aging, a large number of patients undergoing rehabilitation are older than 60 years. Also, since the use of motor imagery (MI) training in rehabilitation is becoming more popular, it is important to gain a better knowledge about the age-related changes in MI ability. The main goal of this study was to compare MI ability in younger and older adults as well as to propose a new procedure for testing this ability. Thirty healthy young subjects (mean age: 22.9±2.7 years) and 28 healthy elderly subjects (mean age: 72.4±5.5 years) participated in the experiment. They were administered three tests aimed at assessing three dimensions of MI: (1) the kinesthetic and visual imagery questionnaire (KVIQ) to assess MI vividness; (2) a finger-thumb opposition task to assess MI controllability; and (3) a chronometric task to assess the timing of MI. On average, the younger and older groups showed similar results on the KVIQ and the chronometric task, but the younger group was more accurate at the finger-thumb opposition task. Interestingly, there was a large variability in the performance within both groups, emphasizing the importance of considering each person individually regarding MI ability, whatever his age. Finally, we propose two indexes of MI ability to identify the potential of persons to engage in MI training programs. Future studies are needed to confirm the predictive value of these MI indexes and define inclusion/exclusion thresholds for their use as a screening tool in both younger and older adults.

  3. Autonomic nervous system correlates in movement observation and motor imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eCollet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature offering a better understanding on the autonomic nervous system (ANS correlates in motor imagery (MI and movement observation. These are two high brain functions involving sensori-motor coupling, mediated by memory systems. How observing or mentally rehearsing a movement affect ANS activity has not been extensively investigated. The links between cognitive functions and ANS responses are not so obvious. We first describe the organization of the ANS whose main purposes are controlling vital functions by maintaining the homeostasis of the organism and providing adaptive responses when changes occur either in the external or internal milieu. We will then review how scientific knowledge evolved, thus integrating recent findings related to ANS functioning, and show how these are linked to mental functions. In turn, we will describe how movement observation or MI may elicit physiological responses at the peripheral level of the autonomic effectors, thus eliciting autonomic correlates to cognitive activity. Key features of this paper are to draw a step-by step progression from the understanding of ANS physiology to its relationships with high mental processes such as movement observation or MI. We will further provide evidence that mental processes are co-programmed both at the somatic and autonomic levels of the central nervous system. We will thus detail how peripheral physiological responses may be analyzed to provide objective evidence that MI is actually performed. The main perspective is thus to consider that, during movement observation and MI, ANS activity is an objective witness of mental processes.

  4. Imaging the imagination: the trouble with motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Arne

    2008-08-01

    Sports and exercise psychology finds itself in a most unfortunate situation these days. While all other branches of the psychological sciences help themselves freely to the glitzy new toys of modern neuroscience--MRI and PET, mostly--exploring the neural underpinnings of whatever cognitive function they are interested in exploring, the sport sciences are left out of the fun for the simple reason that these imaging instruments preclude motion--the very thing then that is the subject of interest to them. There are several legitimate ways around this problem but the one that seems to be most popular is, I think, not--legitimate, that is. The basic idea, unduly sharpened here, is the following. Neuroimaging studies have shown that imagined and actual motion share the same neural substrates or, alternatively, imagining an action corresponds to a subliminal activation of the same brain areas required for its execution. It follows from this, the arguments runs, that motor imagery can be used as a proxy for real motor performance, et voilà, the sports sciences can go wild with all the snazzy brain imaging tools after all--just like everyone else. This notion is, I believe, misbegotten, a house of cards that threatens to cast a long shadow over the field. The present article, then, is, to be frank, intended to put a machete to this kind of thinking. It does this by exposing this conclusion to be based on an unholy marriage of selective data reporting and gross overgeneralization. The result is a wild goose chase fueled by wishful thinking.

  5. Context-aware adaptive spelling in motor imagery BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikis, S.; Leeb, R.; Millán, J. d. R.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. This work presents a first motor imagery-based, adaptive brain-computer interface (BCI) speller, which is able to exploit application-derived context for improved, simultaneous classifier adaptation and spelling. Online spelling experiments with ten able-bodied users evaluate the ability of our scheme, first, to alleviate non-stationarity of brain signals for restoring the subject’s performances, second, to guide naive users into BCI control avoiding initial offline BCI calibration and, third, to outperform regular unsupervised adaptation. Approach. Our co-adaptive framework combines the BrainTree speller with smooth-batch linear discriminant analysis adaptation. The latter enjoys contextual assistance through BrainTree’s language model to improve online expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood estimation. Main results. Our results verify the possibility to restore single-sample classification and BCI command accuracy, as well as spelling speed for expert users. Most importantly, context-aware adaptation performs significantly better than its unsupervised equivalent and similar to the supervised one. Although no significant differences are found with respect to the state-of-the-art PMean approach, the proposed algorithm is shown to be advantageous for 30% of the users. Significance. We demonstrate the possibility to circumvent supervised BCI recalibration, saving time without compromising the adaptation quality. On the other hand, we show that this type of classifier adaptation is not as efficient for BCI training purposes.

  6. Multiclass Posterior Probability Twin SVM for Motor Imagery EEG Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Qingshan; Ma, Yuliang; Meng, Ming; Luo, Zhizeng

    2015-01-01

    Motor imagery electroencephalography is widely used in the brain-computer interface systems. Due to inherent characteristics of electroencephalography signals, accurate and real-time multiclass classification is always challenging. In order to solve this problem, a multiclass posterior probability solution for twin SVM is proposed by the ranking continuous output and pairwise coupling in this paper. First, two-class posterior probability model is constructed to approximate the posterior probability by the ranking continuous output techniques and Platt's estimating method. Secondly, a solution of multiclass probabilistic outputs for twin SVM is provided by combining every pair of class probabilities according to the method of pairwise coupling. Finally, the proposed method is compared with multiclass SVM and twin SVM via voting, and multiclass posterior probability SVM using different coupling approaches. The efficacy on the classification accuracy and time complexity of the proposed method has been demonstrated by both the UCI benchmark datasets and real world EEG data from BCI Competition IV Dataset 2a, respectively.

  7. Motor imagery modulation of postural sway is accompanied by changes in the EMG-COP association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Thiago; Rodrigues, Erika C; Vargas, Claudia D

    2014-08-08

    Motor imagery (MI) performed in an upright stance promotes increases in postural sway without changes in usual amplitude measures of calf muscle EMG. However, postural muscle activity can also be determined from the temporal association between EMG and center of pressure (COP) displacements. In this study we investigated whether the MI modulation of postural sway is accompanied by changes in EMG-COP association. Surface EMG from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle and COP coordinates were collected from 12 subjects while they imagined themselves performing a rising on tiptoes movement via kinesthetic or visual imagery. As a control condition subjects were requested to imagine singing a song. The standard deviation of the forward-backward COP sway and the coefficient of variation of the EMG were calculated and compared across tasks. The degree of association between COP sways and LG activity was evaluated through a cross-correlation function. Kinesthetic imagery promoted a larger COP displacement than both visual and control imagery (pEMG amplitude was observed across imagery tasks (p=0.08). Crucially, we found a stronger EMG-COP association during kinesthetic imagery compared to control imagery (p=0.02), whereas the EMG-COP association in visual imagery was not different from that observed during kinesthetic or control imagery (p>0.19). In conclusion, kinesthetic imagery resulted in a higher EMG-COP temporal association. Subliminal fringe mechanisms may account for the imagery effects on muscle activity and postural sway during upright stance.

  8. Patients' Views on a Combined Action Observation and Motor Imagery Intervention for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Judith; Webb, Jordan; Gowen, Emma; Vogt, Stefan; Crawford, Trevor J; Sullivan, Matthew S; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Action observation and motor imagery activate neural structures involved in action execution, thereby facilitating movement and learning. Although some benefits of action observation and motor imagery have been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD), methods have been based on stroke rehabilitation and may be less suitable for PD. Moreover, previous studies have focused on either observation or imagery, yet combining these enhances effects in healthy participants. The present study explores the feasibility of a PD-specific home-based intervention combining observation, imagery, and imitation of meaningful everyday actions. Methods. A focus group was conducted with six people with mild to moderate PD and two companions, exploring topics relating to the utility and feasibility of a home-based observation and imagery intervention. Results. Five themes were identified. Participants reported their experiences of exercise and use of action observation and motor imagery in everyday activities, and the need for strategies to improve movement was expressed. Motivational factors including feedback, challenge, and social support were identified as key issues. The importance of offering a broad range of actions and flexible training was also highlighted. Conclusions. A home-based intervention utilising action observation and motor imagery would be useful and feasible in mild to moderate PD.

  9. Patients’ Views on a Combined Action Observation and Motor Imagery Intervention for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Action observation and motor imagery activate neural structures involved in action execution, thereby facilitating movement and learning. Although some benefits of action observation and motor imagery have been reported in Parkinson’s disease (PD, methods have been based on stroke rehabilitation and may be less suitable for PD. Moreover, previous studies have focused on either observation or imagery, yet combining these enhances effects in healthy participants. The present study explores the feasibility of a PD-specific home-based intervention combining observation, imagery, and imitation of meaningful everyday actions. Methods. A focus group was conducted with six people with mild to moderate PD and two companions, exploring topics relating to the utility and feasibility of a home-based observation and imagery intervention. Results. Five themes were identified. Participants reported their experiences of exercise and use of action observation and motor imagery in everyday activities, and the need for strategies to improve movement was expressed. Motivational factors including feedback, challenge, and social support were identified as key issues. The importance of offering a broad range of actions and flexible training was also highlighted. Conclusions. A home-based intervention utilising action observation and motor imagery would be useful and feasible in mild to moderate PD.

  10. Patients' Views on a Combined Action Observation and Motor Imagery Intervention for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jordan; Gowen, Emma; Vogt, Stefan; Crawford, Trevor J.; Sullivan, Matthew S.; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Action observation and motor imagery activate neural structures involved in action execution, thereby facilitating movement and learning. Although some benefits of action observation and motor imagery have been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD), methods have been based on stroke rehabilitation and may be less suitable for PD. Moreover, previous studies have focused on either observation or imagery, yet combining these enhances effects in healthy participants. The present study explores the feasibility of a PD-specific home-based intervention combining observation, imagery, and imitation of meaningful everyday actions. Methods. A focus group was conducted with six people with mild to moderate PD and two companions, exploring topics relating to the utility and feasibility of a home-based observation and imagery intervention. Results. Five themes were identified. Participants reported their experiences of exercise and use of action observation and motor imagery in everyday activities, and the need for strategies to improve movement was expressed. Motivational factors including feedback, challenge, and social support were identified as key issues. The importance of offering a broad range of actions and flexible training was also highlighted. Conclusions. A home-based intervention utilising action observation and motor imagery would be useful and feasible in mild to moderate PD. PMID:27777809

  11. Improvement in precision grip force control with self-modulation of primary motor cortex during motor imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura eBlefari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI has shown effectiveness in enhancing motor performance. This may be due to the common neural mechanisms underlying MI and motor execution (ME. The main region of the ME network, the primary motor cortex (M1, has been consistently linked to motor performance. However, the activation of M1 during motor imagery is controversial, which may account for inconsistent rehabilitation therapy outcomes using MI. Here, we examined the relationship between contralateral M1 (cM1 activation during MI and changes in sensorimotor performance. To aid cM1 activity modulation during MI, we used real-time fMRI neurofeedback-guided MI based on cM1 hand area blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal in healthy subjects, performing kinesthetic MI of pinching. We used multiple regression analysis to examine the correlation between cM1 BOLD signal and changes in motor performance during an isometric pinching task of those subjects who were able to activate cM1 during motor imagery. Activities in premotor and parietal regions were used as covariates. We found that cM1 activity was positively correlated to improvements in accuracy as well as overall performance improvements, whereas other regions in the sensorimotor network were not. The association between cM1 activation during MI with performance changes indicates that subjects with stronger cM1 activation during MI may benefit more from MI training, with implications towards targeted neurotherapy.

  12. Stimulation through Simulation? Motor Imagery and Functional Reorganization in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Frey, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    A key factor influencing reorganization of function in damaged neural networks of the adult brain is stimulation. How to stimulate motor areas of patients with paralyses is a formidable challenge. One possibility is to use internal movement simulations, or motor imagery, as an alternative to conventional therapeutic interventions that require…

  13. Differences in Motor Imagery Time when Predicting Task Duration in Alpine Skiers and Equestrian Riders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Magali; Collet, Christian; Champely, Stephane; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' ability to use motor imagery (MI) to predict the speed at which they could perform a motor sequence has received little attention. In this study, 21 alpine skiers and 16 equestrian riders performed MI based on a prediction of actual performance time (a) after the course inspection, (b) before the start, and (c) after the actual…

  14. The facilitating effect of clinical hypnosis on motor imagery: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Katharina; Bacht, Katrin; Schramm, Stephanie; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2012-05-16

    Hypnosis is increasingly being employed in therapy of neurologically impaired patients. In fact, reports from neuropsychological practice point out that neurological patients with a loss of motor abilities achieve successful rehabilitation by means of motor imagery during hypnosis. This approach was shown to be effective even if the patients' ability to imagine movements was impaired or lost. The underlying mechanisms of "how" and "where" hypnosis affects the brain, however, are largely unknown. To identify the brain areas involved in motor imagery under hypnosis, we conducted an fMRI study in which we required healthy human subjects either to imagine or to execute repetitive finger movements during a hypnotic trance. We observed fMRI-signal increases exclusively related to hypnosis in the left superior frontal cortex, the left anterior cingulate gyrus and left thalamus. While the superior frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate were active related more to movement performance than to imagery, the thalamus was activated only during motor imagery. These areas represent central nodes of the salience network linking primary and higher motor areas. Therefore, our data substantiate the notion that hypnosis enhances motor imagery.

  15. Motor imagery cognitive network after left ischemic stroke: study of the patients during mental rotation task.

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    Jing Yan

    Full Text Available Although motor imagery could improve motor rehabilitation, the detailed neural mechanisms of motor imagery cognitive process of stroke patients, particularly from functional network perspective, remain unclear. This study investigated functional brain network properties in each cognitive sub-stage of motor imagery of stroke patients with ischemic lesion in left hemisphere to reveal the impact of stroke on the cognition of motor imagery. Both stroke patients and control subjects participated in mental rotation task, which includes three cognitive sub-stages: visual stimulus perception, mental rotation and response cognitive process. Event-related electroencephalograph was recorded and interdependence between two different cortical areas was assessed by phase synchronization. Both global and nodal properties of functional networks in three sub-stages were statistically analyzed. Phase synchronization of stroke patients significantly reduced in mental rotation sub-stage. Longer characteristic path length and smaller global clustering coefficient of functional network were observed in patients in mental rotation sub-stage which implied the impaired segregation and integration. Larger nodal clustering coefficient and betweenness in contralesional occipitoparietal and frontal area respectively were observed in patients in all sub-stages. In addition, patients also showed smaller betweenness in ipsilesional central-parietal area in response sub-stage. The compensatory effects on local connectedness and centrality indicated the neuroplasticity in contralesional hemisphere. The functional brain networks of stroke patients demonstrated significant alterations and compensatory effects during motor imagery.

  16. 3D visualization of movements can amplify motor cortex activation during subsequent motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollfrank, Teresa; Hart, Daniel; Goodsell, Rachel; Foster, Jonathan; Tan, Tele

    2015-01-01

    A repetitive movement practice by motor imagery (MI) can influence motor cortical excitability in the electroencephalogram (EEG). This study investigated if a realistic visualization in 3D of upper and lower limb movements can amplify motor related potentials during subsequent MI. We hypothesized that a richer sensory visualization might be more effective during instrumental conditioning, resulting in a more pronounced event related desynchronization (ERD) of the upper alpha band (10-12 Hz) over the sensorimotor cortices thereby potentially improving MI based brain-computer interface (BCI) protocols for motor rehabilitation. The results show a strong increase of the characteristic patterns of ERD of the upper alpha band components for left and right limb MI present over the sensorimotor areas in both visualization conditions. Overall, significant differences were observed as a function of visualization modality (VM; 2D vs. 3D). The largest upper alpha band power decrease was obtained during MI after a 3-dimensional visualization. In total in 12 out of 20 tasks the end-user of the 3D visualization group showed an enhanced upper alpha ERD relative to 2D VM group, with statistical significance in nine tasks.With a realistic visualization of the limb movements, we tried to increase motor cortex activation during subsequent MI. The feedback and the feedback environment should be inherently motivating and relevant for the learner and should have an appeal of novelty, real-world relevance or aesthetic value (Ryan and Deci, 2000; Merrill, 2007). Realistic visual feedback, consistent with the participant's MI, might be helpful for accomplishing successful MI and the use of such feedback may assist in making BCI a more natural interface for MI based BCI rehabilitation.

  17. Short time sports exercise boosts motor imagery patterns: Implications of mental practice in rehabilitation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Christin Wriessnegger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI is a commonly used paradigm for the study of motor learning or cognitive aspects of action control. The rationale for using MI training to promote the relearning of motor function arises from research on the functional correlates that MI shares with the execution of physical movements. While most of the previous studies investigating MI were based on simple movements in the present study a more attractive mental practice was used to investigate cortical activation during MI. We measured cerebral responses with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in twenty three healthy volunteers as they imagined playing soccer or tennis before and after a short physical sports exercise. Our results demonstrated that only 10 minutes of training are enough to boost motor imagery patterns in motor related brain regions including premotor cortex and supplementary motor area (SMA but also fronto-parietal and subcortical structures. This supports previous findings that motor imagery has beneficial effects especially in combination with motor execution when used in motor rehabilitation or motor learning processes. We conclude that sports MI combined with an interactive game environment could be a promising additional tool in future rehabilitation programs aiming to improve upper or lower limb functions or support neuroplasticity.

  18. Motor imagery evokes increased somatosensory activity in Parkinson's disease patients with tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is surprisingly heterogeneous: some patients have a prominent resting tremor, while others never develop this symptom. Here we investigate whether the functional organization of the voluntary motor system differs between PD patients with and without resting tremor, and whether these differences relate to the cerebral circuit producing tremor. We compared 18 PD patients with marked tremor, 20 PD patients without tremor, and 19 healthy controls. Subjects performed a controlled motor imagery task during fMRI scanning. We quantified imagery-related cerebral activity by contrasting imagery of biomechanically difficult and easy movements. Tremor-related activity was identified by relating cerebral activity to fluctuations in tremor amplitude, using electromyography during scanning. PD patients with tremor had better behavioral performance than PD patients without tremor. Furthermore, tremulous PD patients showed increased imagery-related activity in somatosensory area 3a, as compared with both healthy controls and to nontremor PD patients. This effect was independent from tremor-related activity, which was localized to the motor cortex, cerebellum, and thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM, with known projections to area 3a, was unique in showing both tremor- and imagery-related responses. We conclude that parkinsonian tremor influences motor imagery by modulating central somatosensory processing through the VIM. This mechanism may explain clinical differences between PD patients with and without tremor.

  19. Effect of biased feedback on motor imagery learning in BCI-teleoperation system

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    Maryam eAlimardani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feedback design is an important issue in motor imagery BCI systems. Regardless, to date it has not been reported how feedback presentation can optimize co-adaptation between a human brain and such systems. This paper assesses the effect of realistic visual feedback on users’ BC performance and motor imagery skills. We previously developed a tele-operation system for a pair of humanlike robotic hands and showed that BCI control of such hands along with first-person perspective visual feedback of movements can arouse a sense of embodiment in the operators. In the first stage of this study, we found that the intensity of this ownership illusion was associated with feedback presentation and subjects’ performance during BCI motion control. In the second stage, we probed the effect of positive and negative feedback bias on subjects’ BCI performance and motor imagery skills. Although the subject specific classifier, which was set up at the beginning of experiment, detected no significant change in the subjects’ online performance, evaluation of brain activity patterns revealed that subjects’ self-regulation of motor imagery features improved due to a positive bias of feedback and a possible occurrence of ownership illusion. Our findings suggest that in general training protocols for BCIs, manipulation of feedback can play an important role in the optimization of subjects’ motor imagery skills.

  20. Assessing motor imagery in brain-computer interface training: Psychological and neurophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Anatoly; Liburkina, Sofya; Yakovlev, Lev; Perepelkina, Olga; Kaplan, Alexander

    2017-02-04

    Motor imagery (MI) is considered to be a promising cognitive tool for improving motor skills as well as for rehabilitation therapy of movement disorders. It is believed that MI training efficiency could be improved by using the brain-computer interface (BCI) technology providing real-time feedback on person's mental attempts. While BCI is indeed a convenient and motivating tool for practicing MI, it is not clear whether it could be used for predicting or measuring potential positive impact of the training. In this study, we are trying to establish whether the proficiency in BCI control is associated with any of the neurophysiological or psychological correlates of motor imagery, as well as to determine possible interrelations among them. For that purpose, we studied motor imagery in a group of 19 healthy BCI-trained volunteers and performed a correlation analysis across various quantitative assessment metrics. We examined subjects' sensorimotor event-related EEG events, corticospinal excitability changes estimated with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), BCI accuracy and self-assessment reports obtained with specially designed questionnaires and interview routine. Our results showed, expectedly, that BCI performance is dependent on the subject's capability to suppress EEG sensorimotor rhythms, which in turn is correlated with the idle state amplitude of those oscillations. Neither BCI accuracy nor the EEG features associated with MI were found to correlate with the level of corticospinal excitability increase during motor imagery, and with assessed imagery vividness. Finally, a significant correlation was found between the level of corticospinal excitability increase and kinesthetic vividness of imagery (KVIQ-20 questionnaire). Our results suggest that two distinct neurophysiological mechanisms might mediate possible effects of motor imagery: the non-specific cortical sensorimotor disinhibition and the focal corticospinal excitability increase

  1. Action observation and motor imagery for rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and an integrative hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiore, Daniele; Mustile, Magda; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses recent evidence supporting the use of action observation therapy and motor imagery practice for rehabilitation of Parkinson's disease. A main question that emerges from the review regards the different effectiveness of these approaches and the possibility of integrating them into a single method to enhance motor behaviour in subjects with Parkinson's disease. In particular, the reviewed studies suggest that action observation therapy can have a positive effect on motor facilitation of patients and that a long-term rehabilitation program based on action observation therapy or motor imagery practice can bring some benefit on their motor recovery. Moreover, the paper discusses how the research on the combined use of action observation and motor imagery for motor improvements in healthy subjects may encourage the combined use of action observation therapy and motor imagery practice for therapeutic aims in Parkinson's disease. To date, this hypothesis has never been experimented.

  2. Neural evidence for compromised motor imagery in right hemiparetic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel Van Elk

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present EEG study we investigated the neural and temporal dynamics of motor imagery in participants with right-sided HCP (n = 10 and in left-handed control participants (n = 10. A mental rotation task was used in which participants were required to judge the laterality of hand pictures. At a behavioral level participants with HCP were slower in making hand laterality judgments compared to control subjects, especially when presented with pictures representing the affected hand. At a neural level, individuals with HCP were characterized by a reduced rotation-related negativity (RRN over parietal areas, that was delayed in onset with respect to control participants. Interestingly, participants that were relatively mildly impaired showed a stronger RRN for the rotation of right hand stimuli than participants that were more strongly impaired in their motor function, suggesting a direct relation between the motor imagery process and the biomechanical constraints of the participant. Together, the results provide new insights in the relation between motor imagery and motor capabilities and indicate that participants with HCP may be characterized by a compromised ability to use motor imagery.

  3. Spectral entropy analysis of different alpha band rhythms in relation to hand motor imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The event-related desynchronization/synchronization(ERD/ERS) time courses of lower and upper alpha band rhythms during hand motor imagery are investigated respectively by Fourier Sectral Entropy (FSE) in this paper. By analyzing one group of BCI competition data, it was found that FSE within upper alpha band displays a pronounced increase and decrease over contralateral and ipsilaterai brain areas respectively at the onset of hand motor imagery, which is corresponding to the antagonistic ERD/ERS patterns in previous studies. Different from the upper alpha activity pattern, FSE within lower alpha band displays a consistent increase over both two hemispheres hand representative areas. The preliminary results show that FSE could disclose the different behaviors of the upper and lower alpha band rhythms so that a new idea with the complexity measure is provided to characterize functional dissociation of lower and upper frequency alpha rhythms in relation to hand motor imagery.

  4. Mu and beta rhythm topographies during motor imagery and actual movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, D J; Miner, L A; Vaughan, T M; Wolpaw, J R

    2000-01-01

    People can learn to control the 8-12 Hz mu rhythm and/or the 18-25 Hz beta rhythm in the EEG recorded over sensorimotor cortex and use it to control a cursor on a video screen. Subjects often report using motor imagery to control cursor movement, particularly early in training. We compared in untrained subjects the EEG topographies associated with actual hand movement to those associated with imagined hand movement. Sixty-four EEG channels were recorded while each of 33 adults moved left- or right-hand or imagined doing so. Frequency-specific differences between movement or imagery and rest, and between right- and left-hand movement or imagery, were evaluated by scalp topographies of voltage and r spectra, and principal component analysis. Both movement and imagery were associated with mu and beta rhythm desynchronization. The mu topographies showed bilateral foci of desynchronization over sensorimotor cortices, while the beta topographies showed peak desynchronization over the vertex. Both mu and beta rhythm left/right differences showed bilateral central foci that were stronger on the right side. The independence of mu and beta rhythms was demonstrated by differences for movement and imagery for the subjects as a group and by principal components analysis. The results indicated that the effects of imagery were not simply an attenuated version of the effects of movement. They supply evidence that motor imagery could play an important role in EEG-based communication, and suggest that mu and beta rhythms might provide independent control signals.

  5. The Importance of Visual Feedback Design in BCIs; from Embodiment to Motor Imagery Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been developed and implemented in many areas as a new communication channel between the human brain and external devices. Despite their rapid growth and broad popularity, the inaccurate performance and cost of user-training are yet the main issues that prevent their application out of the research and clinical environment. We previously introduced a BCI system for the control of a very humanlike android that could raise a sense of embodiment and agency in the operators only by imagining a movement (motor imagery) and watching the robot perform it. Also using the same setup, we further discovered that the positive bias of subjects’ performance both increased their sensation of embodiment and improved their motor imagery skills in a short period. In this work, we studied the shared mechanism between the experience of embodiment and motor imagery. We compared the trend of motor imagery learning when two groups of subjects BCI-operated different looking robots, a very humanlike android’s hands and a pair of metallic gripper. Although our experiments did not show a significant change of learning between the two groups immediately during one session, the android group revealed better motor imagery skills in the follow up session when both groups repeated the task using the non-humanlike gripper. This result shows that motor imagery skills learnt during the BCI-operation of humanlike hands are more robust to time and visual feedback changes. We discuss the role of embodiment and mirror neuron system in such outcome and propose the application of androids for efficient BCI training. PMID:27598310

  6. The Importance of Visual Feedback Design in BCIs; from Embodiment to Motor Imagery Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been developed and implemented in many areas as a new communication channel between the human brain and external devices. Despite their rapid growth and broad popularity, the inaccurate performance and cost of user-training are yet the main issues that prevent their application out of the research and clinical environment. We previously introduced a BCI system for the control of a very humanlike android that could raise a sense of embodiment and agency in the operators only by imagining a movement (motor imagery) and watching the robot perform it. Also using the same setup, we further discovered that the positive bias of subjects' performance both increased their sensation of embodiment and improved their motor imagery skills in a short period. In this work, we studied the shared mechanism between the experience of embodiment and motor imagery. We compared the trend of motor imagery learning when two groups of subjects BCI-operated different looking robots, a very humanlike android's hands and a pair of metallic gripper. Although our experiments did not show a significant change of learning between the two groups immediately during one session, the android group revealed better motor imagery skills in the follow up session when both groups repeated the task using the non-humanlike gripper. This result shows that motor imagery skills learnt during the BCI-operation of humanlike hands are more robust to time and visual feedback changes. We discuss the role of embodiment and mirror neuron system in such outcome and propose the application of androids for efficient BCI training.

  7. Efficacy of motor imagery in post-stroke rehabilitation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of how Motor Imagery and conventional therapy (physiotherapy or occupational therapy compare to conventional therapy only in their effects on clinically relevant outcomes during rehabilitation of persons with stroke. Design Systematic review of the literature Methods We conducted an electronic database search in seven databases in August 2005 and also hand-searched the bibliographies of studies that we selected for the review. Two reviewers independently screened and selected all randomized controlled trials that compare the effects of conventional therapy plus Motor Imagery to those of only conventional therapy on stroke patients. The outcome measurements were: Fugl-Meyer Stroke Assessment upper extremity score (66 points and Action Research Arm Test upper extremity score (57 points. Due to the high variability in the outcomes, we could not pool the data statistically. Results We identified four randomized controlled trials from Asia and North America. The quality of the included studies was poor to moderate. Two different Motor imagery techniques were used (three studies used audiotapes and one study had occupational therapists apply the intervention. Two studies found significant effects of Motor Imagery in the Fugl-Meyer Stroke Assessment: Differences between groups amounted to 11.0 (1.0 to 21.0 and 3.2 (-4 to 10.3 respectively and in the Action Research Arm Test 6.1 (-6.2 to 18.4 and 15.8 (0.5 to 31.0 respectively. One study did not find a significant effect in the Fugl-Meyer Stroke Assessment and Color trail Test (p = 0.28 but in the task-related outcomes (p > 0.001. Conclusion Current evidence suggests that Motor imagery provides additional benefits to conventional physiotherapy or occupational therapy. However, larger and methodologically sounder studies should be conducted to assess the benefits of Motor imagery.

  8. Classification of Motor Imagery EEG Signals with Support Vector Machines and Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuliang; Ding, Xiaohui; She, Qingshan; Luo, Zhizeng; Potter, Thomas; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Support vector machines are powerful tools used to solve the small sample and nonlinear classification problems, but their ultimate classification performance depends heavily upon the selection of appropriate kernel and penalty parameters. In this study, we propose using a particle swarm optimization algorithm to optimize the selection of both the kernel and penalty parameters in order to improve the classification performance of support vector machines. The performance of the optimized classifier was evaluated with motor imagery EEG signals in terms of both classification and prediction. Results show that the optimized classifier can significantly improve the classification accuracy of motor imagery EEG signals. PMID:27313656

  9. Passive reading and motor imagery about hand actions and tool-use actions: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Shu, Hua

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that motor activations in action verb comprehension can be modulated by task demands (e.g., motor imagery vs. passive reading) and the specificity of action verb meaning. However, how the two factors work together to influence the involvement of the motor system during action verb comprehension is still unclear. To address the issue, the current study investigated the brain activations in motor imagery and passive reading of verbs about hand actions and tool-use actions. Three types of Chinese verbs were used, including hand-action verbs and two types of tool-use verbs emphasizing either the hand or tools information. Results indicated that all three types of verbs elicited common activations in hand motor areas during passive reading and motor imagery. Contrast analyses showed that in the hand verbs and the tool verbs where the hand information was emphasized, motor imagery elicited stronger effects than passive reading in the superior frontal gyrus, supplemental motor area and cingulate cortex that are related to motor control and regulation. For tool-use verbs emphasizing tools information, the motor imagery task elicited stronger activity than passive reading in occipital regions related to visual imagery. These results suggest that motor activations during action verb comprehension can be modulated by task demands and semantic features of action verbs. The sensorimotor simulation during language comprehension is flexible and determined by the interactions between linguistic and extralinguistic contexts.

  10. Effects of motor imagery combined with functional electrical stimulation on upper limb motor function of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-feng LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of motor imagery (MI combined with the third generation functional electrical stimulation (FES on upper limb motor function in acute ischemic stroke patients with hemiplegia.  Methods Forty acute ischemic stroke patients, within 48 h of onset, were randomly divided into FES group (N = 20 and combination group (FES combined with motor imagery, N = 20. All patients received basic routine rehabilitation training, for example, good limb positioning, accepting braces, balance training and training in the activities of daily living (ADL. FES group received the third generation FES therapy and the combination group also received motor imagery for 2 weeks. All of the patients were assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and active range of motion (AROM of wrist dorsiflexion before and after 2 weeks of treatment.  Results After 2 weeks of treatment, the 2 groups had significantly higher FMA score, ARAT score and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion than that in pre-treatment (P = 0.000, for all. Besides, the FMA score (t = - 2.528, P = 0.016, ARAT score (t = - 2.562, P = 0.014 and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion (t = - 2.469, P = 0.018 in the combination group were significantly higher than that in the FES group. There were interactions of treatment methods with observation time points (P < 0.05, for all.  Conclusions Motor imagery combined with the third generation FES can effectively promote the recovery of upper limb motor function and motion range of wrist dorsiflexion in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.008

  11. Importance of baseline in event-related desynchronization during a combination task of motor imagery and motor observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwiriyasakul, Chayanin; Verhagen, Rens; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; Rutten, Wim L. C.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) or synchronization (ERS) refers to the modulation of any EEG rhythm in response to a particular event. It is typically quantified as the ratio between a baseline and a task condition (the event). Here, we focused on the sensorimotor mu-rhythm. We explored the effects of different baselines on mu-power and ERD of the mu-rhythm during a motor imagery task. Methods. Eighteen healthy subjects performed motor imagery tasks while EEGs were recorded. Five different baseline movies were shown. For the imagery task a right-hand opening/closing movie was shown. Power and ERD of the mu-rhythm recorded over C3 and C4 for the different baselines were estimated. Main Results. 50% of the subjects showed relatively high mu-power for specific baselines only, and ERDs of these subjects were strongly dependent on the baseline used. In 17% of the subjects no preference was found. Contralateral ERD of the mu-rhythm was found in about 67% of the healthy volunteers, with a significant baseline preference in about 75% of that subgroup. Significance. The sensorimotor ERD quantifies activity of the brain during motor imagery tasks. Selection of the optimal baseline increases ERD.

  12. Demonstration of Motor Imagery- and Phantom-Movement Related Neuronal Activity in Human Thalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, William S.; Weiss, Nirit; Lawson, Herman Christopher; Ohara, Shinji; Rowland, Lance; Lenz, Frederick A.

    2011-01-01

    Functional imaging studies demonstrate that motor imagery activates multiple structures in the human forebrain. We now show that phantom movements in an amputee and imagined movements in intact subjects elicit responses from neurons in several human thalamic nuclei. These include the somatic sensory nucleus receiving input from the periphery (ventral caudal – Vc), and the motor nuclei receiving input from the cerebellum (ventral intermediate -Vim) and the basal ganglia (ventral oral posterior...

  13. Action Observation and Motor Imagery: Innovative Cognitive Tools in the Rehabilitation of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Abbruzzese; Laura Avanzino; Roberta Marchese; Elisa Pelosin

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive impairment of motor skills with deterioration of autonomy in daily living activities. Physiotherapy is regarded as an adjuvant to pharmacological and neurosurgical treatment and may provide small and short-lasting clinical benefits in PD patients. However, the development of innovative rehabilitation approaches with greater long-term efficacy is a major unmet need. Motor imagery (MI) and action observation (AO) have been recently prop...

  14. Connecticut Coastal Airborne ADS40 Digital Imagery Acquisition and Natural Color and Color Infrared Orthophoto Production collected in September 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased digital ADS40 imagery and digital elevation models of the Connecticut coastline in 2004. The Coastal Connecticut...

  15. Mutual information-based feature selection for low-cost BCIs based on motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiatti, L; Faes, L; Tessadori, J; Barresi, G; Mattos, L

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a feature selection algorithm based on mutual information (MI) was applied to electro-encephalographic (EEG) data acquired during three different motor imagery tasks from two dataset: Dataset I from BCI Competition IV including full scalp recordings from four subjects, and new data recorded from three subjects using the popular low-cost Emotiv EPOC EEG headset. The aim was to evaluate optimal channels and band-power (BP) features for motor imagery tasks discrimination, in order to assess the feasibility of a portable low-cost motor imagery based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system. The minimal sub set of features most relevant to task description and less redundant to each other was determined, and the corresponding classification accuracy was assessed offline employing linear support vector machine (SVM) in a 10-fold cross validation scheme. The analysis was performed: (a) on the original full Dataset I from BCI competition IV, (b) on a restricted channels set from Dataset I corresponding to available Emotiv EPOC electrodes locations, and (c) on data recorded with the EPOC system. Results from (a) showed that an offline classification accuracy above 80% can be reached using only 5 features. Limiting the analysis to EPOC channels caused a decrease of classification accuracy, although it still remained above chance level, both for data from (b) and (c). A top accuracy of 70% was achieved using 2 optimal features. These results encourage further research towards the development of portable low cost motor imagery-based BCI systems.

  16. Selective Influence of Circadian Modulation and Task Characteristics on Motor Imagery Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stephane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no…

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation and EEG-based motor imagery BCI for upper limb stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kai Keng; Guan, Cuntai; Phua, Kok Soon; Wang, Chuanchu; Teh, Irvin; Chen, Chang Wu; Chew, Effie

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies had shown that EEG-based motor imagery Brain-Computer Interface (MI-BCI) combined with robotic feedback is effective in upper limb stroke rehabilitation, and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) combined with other rehabilitation techniques further enhanced the facilitating effect of tDCS. This motivated the current clinical study to investigate the effects of combining tDCS with MI-BCI and robotic feedback compared to sham-tDCS for upper limb stroke rehabilitation. The stroke patients recruited were randomized to receive 20 minutes of tDCS or sham-tDCS prior to 10 sessions of 1-hour MI-BCI with robotic feedback for 2 weeks. The online accuracies of detecting motor imagery from idle condition were assessed and offline accuracies of classifying motor imagery from background rest condition were assessed from the EEG of the evaluation and therapy parts of the 10 rehabilitation sessions respectively. The results showed no evident differences between the online accuracies on the evaluation part from both groups, but the offline analysis on the therapy part yielded higher averaged accuracies for subjects who received tDCS (n=3) compared to sham-tDCS (n=2). The results suggest towards tDCS effect in modulating motor imagery in stroke, but a more conclusive result can be drawn when more data are collected in the ongoing study.

  18. Motor imagery for walking: A comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  19. Motor imagery for walking: A comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  20. Motor imagery training for children with developmental coordination disorder: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, I.L.J.; Steenbergen, B.; Lust, J.M.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that the predictive control of movements is impaired in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), most likely due to a deficit in the internal modeling of movements. Motor imagery paradigms have been used to test this internal modeling deficit.

  1. Effect of motor imagery and voluntary muscle contraction on the F wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Motohiko; Kimura, Jun; Walker, D David; Taniguchi, Shinichirou; Ichikawa, Hiroo; Fujisawa, Reiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Abe, Tatsuya; Yamada, Thoru; Kayamori, Ryoji; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2010-08-01

    We tested the validity of instructing patients to minimally contract the muscle to facilitate F-wave recording in clinical practice. In 12 healthy subjects, F waves were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle at rest, during motor imagery, and at up to 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). F-wave persistence increased significantly from 32.5 +/- 11.9% (mean +/- SD) at rest to 58.3 +/- 15.2% during motor imagery and 90.0 +/- 8.7% during 3% MVC. It then remained the same during stepwise changes to and from 30% MVC before decreasing significantly from 80.8 +/- 18.5% during 3% MVC to 48.7 +/- 23.8% during motor imagery and 27.0 +/- 16.0% at rest. The trial average of F-wave amplitude showed a similar pattern of facilitation. Motor imagery enhances F-wave persistence and amplitude, which further increase with a slight muscle contraction and show no additional change with a stronger effort.

  2. Motor imagery and action observation : cognitive tools for rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Th.

    2007-01-01

    Rehabilitation, for a large part may be seen as a learning process where old skills have to be re-acquired and new ones have to be learned on the basis of practice. Active exercising creates a flow of sensory (afferent) information. It is known that motor recovery and motor learning have many aspect

  3. Motor imagery and stroke rehabilitation : A critical discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sjoerd; Mulder, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Motor disorders are a frequent consequence of stroke and much effort is invested in the re-acquisition of motor control. Although patients often regain some of their lost function after therapy, most remain chronically disabled. Functional recovery is achieved largely through reorganization processe

  4. Translation of EEG spatial filters from resting to motor imagery using independent component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Wang

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs often use spatial filters to improve signal-to-noise ratio of task-related EEG activities. To obtain robust spatial filters, large amounts of labeled data, which are often expensive and labor-intensive to obtain, need to be collected in a training procedure before online BCI control. Several studies have recently developed zero-training methods using a session-to-session scenario in order to alleviate this problem. To our knowledge, a state-to-state translation, which applies spatial filters derived from one state to another, has never been reported. This study proposes a state-to-state, zero-training method to construct spatial filters for extracting EEG changes induced by motor imagery. Independent component analysis (ICA was separately applied to the multi-channel EEG in the resting and the motor imagery states to obtain motor-related spatial filters. The resultant spatial filters were then applied to single-trial EEG to differentiate left- and right-hand imagery movements. On a motor imagery dataset collected from nine subjects, comparable classification accuracies were obtained by using ICA-based spatial filters derived from the two states (motor imagery: 87.0%, resting: 85.9%, which were both significantly higher than the accuracy achieved by using monopolar scalp EEG data (80.4%. The proposed method considerably increases the practicality of BCI systems in real-world environments because it is less sensitive to electrode misalignment across different sessions or days and does not require annotated pilot data to derive spatial filters.

  5. Increased muscle activation following motor imagery during the rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Florent; Guillot, Aymeric; Collet, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is the mental representation of an action without any concomitant movement. MI has been used frequently after peripheral injuries to decrease pain and facilitate rehabilitation. However, little is known about the effects of MI on muscle activation underlying the motor recovery. This study aimed to assess the therapeutic effects of MI on the activation of lower limb muscles, as well as on the time course of functional recovery and pain after surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Twelve patients with a torn ACL were randomly assigned to a MI or control group, who both received a series of physiotherapy. Electromyographic activity of the quadriceps, pain, anthropometrical data, and lower limb motor ability were measured throughout a 12-session therapy. The data provided evidence that MI elicited greater muscle activation, even though imagery practice did not result in pain decrease. Muscle activation increase might originate from a redistribution of the central neuronal activity, as there was no anthropometric change in lower limb muscles after imagery practice. This study confirmed the effectiveness of integrating MI in a rehabilitation process by facilitating muscular properties recovery following motor impairment. MI may thus be considered a reliable adjunct therapy to help injured patients to recover motor functions after reconstructive surgery of ACL.

  6. Analysis of Brain Activation during Motor Imagery Based on fMRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yang; Wen Huang; Wei Liao; Hua-Fu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Brain activation during motor imagery (MI) has been studied extensively for years.Based on studies of brain activations of MI,in present study,a complex finger tapping imagery and execution experi-ment is designed to test the brain activation during MI.The experiment results show that during MI,brain activation exists mainly in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and precentral area where the dorsal premotor area (PMd) and the primary motor area (M1) mainly located;and some activation can be also observed in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex (S1),the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the superior parietal lobule (SPL).Additionally,more brain activation can be observed during left-hand MI than during right-hand MI,this difference probably is caused by asymmetry of brain.

  7. Discrimination of EEG-Based Motor Imagery Tasks by Means of a Simple Phase Information Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Loboda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose an off-line analysis method in order to discriminate between motor imagery tasks manipulated in a brain computer interface system. A measure of large-scale synchronization based on phase locking value is established. The results indicate that it can take advantage of the phase synchrony between scalp-recorded EEG activity in the supplementary motor area and in sezorimotor area, computing the differences between the active and the relaxation states. Phase locking value features are more discriminative in ß rhythm than in µ rhythm. The proposed method is simple, computationally efficient and proves good results on EEG Motor Movement/Imagery Dataset available from PhysioNet research resource for physiologic signals.

  8. The influence of task paradigm on motor imagery ability in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, G D; Wilson, P H; Smits-Engelsman, B C M

    2015-12-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have difficulty imagining movements such that they conform to the customary temporal constraints of real performance. We examined whether this ability is influenced by the choice of task used to elicit motor imagery (MI). Performance of typically developing (TD) (n=30) and children with DCD (n=30) was compared on two tasks: the Visually Guided Pointing Task (VGPT) and the Computerized Virtual Radial Fitts Task (C-VRFT). Since the VGPT places higher demands on executive functions like working memory but requires less spatial planning, we reasoned that the C-VRFT would provide a purer measure of motor imagery (or simulation). Based on our earlier work, we predicted that imagery deficits in DCD would more likely manifest on the C-VRFT. Results showed high correlations between tasks in terms of executed and imagined movement time suggest that both tasks measure MI ability. However, group differences were more pronounced in the imagined condition of the radial Fitts' task. Taken together, the more spatially complex C-VRFT appears to be a more sensitive measure of motor imagery, better discriminating between DCD and TD. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  9. Motor timing deficits in sequential movements in Parkinson disease are related to action planning: a motor imagery study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Avanzino

    Full Text Available Timing of sequential movements is altered in Parkinson disease (PD. Whether timing deficits in internally generated sequential movements in PD depends also on difficulties in motor planning, rather than merely on a defective ability to materially perform the planned movement is still undefined. To unveil this issue, we adopted a modified version of an established test for motor timing, i.e. the synchronization-continuation paradigm, by introducing a motor imagery task. Motor imagery is thought to involve mainly processes of movement preparation, with reduced involvement of end-stage movement execution-related processes. Fourteen patients with PD and twelve matched healthy volunteers were asked to tap in synchrony with a metronome cue (SYNC and then, when the tone stopped, to keep tapping, trying to maintain the same rhythm (CONT-EXE or to imagine tapping at the same rhythm, rather than actually performing it (CONT-MI. We tested both a sub-second and a supra-second inter-stimulus interval between the cues. Performance was recorded using a sensor-engineered glove and analyzed measuring the temporal error and the interval reproduction accuracy index. PD patients were less accurate than healthy subjects in the supra-second time reproduction task when performing both continuation tasks (CONT-MI and CONT-EXE, whereas no difference was detected in the synchronization task and on all tasks involving a sub-second interval. Our findings suggest that PD patients exhibit a selective deficit in motor timing for sequential movements that are separated by a supra-second interval and that this deficit may be explained by a defect of motor planning. Further, we propose that difficulties in motor planning are of a sufficient degree of severity in PD to affect also the motor performance in the supra-second time reproduction task.

  10. How Kinesthetic Motor Imagery works: a predictive-processing theory of visualization in sports and motor expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Brass, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Kinesthetic Motor Imagery (KMI) is an important technique to acquire and refine motor skills. KMI is widely used by professional athletes as an effective way to improve motor performance without overt motor output. Despite this obvious relevance, the functional mechanisms and neural circuits involved in KMI in sports are still poorly understood. In the present article, which aims at bridging the sport sciences and cognitive neurophysiology literatures, we give a brief overview of relevant research in the field of KMI. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical account that relates KMI to predictive motor control theories assuming that it is based on internal activation of anticipatory images of action effects. This mechanism allows improving motor performance solely based on internal emulation of action. In accordance with previous literature, we propose that this emulation mechanism is implemented in brain regions that partially overlap with brain areas involved in overt motor performance including the posterior parietal cortex, the cerebellum, the basal ganglia and the premotor cortex. Finally, we outline one way to test the heuristic value of our theoretical framework for KMI; we suggest that experience with motor performance improves the ability to correctly infer the goals of others, in particular in penalty blocking in soccer.

  11. Motor imagery during action observation: A brief review of evidence, theory and future research opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lloyd Eaves

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI and action observation (AO have traditionally been viewed as two separate techniques, which can both be used alongside physical practice to enhance motor learning and rehabilitation. Their independent use has been shown to be effective, and there is clear evidence that the two processes can elicit similar activity in the motor system. Building on these well-established findings, research has now turned to investigate the effects of their combined use. In this article, we first review the available neurophysiological and behavioral evidence for the effects of combined action observation and motor imagery (‘AO+MI’ on motor processes. We next describe a conceptual framework for their combined use, and then discuss several areas for future research into AO+MI processes. In this review, we advocate a more integrated approach to AO+MI techniques than has previously been adopted by movement scientists and practitioners alike. We hope this early review of an emergent body of research, along with a related set of research questions, can inspire new work in this area. We are optimistic that future research will further confirm if, how, and when this combined approach to AO+MI can be more effective in motor learning and rehabilitation settings, relative to the more traditional application of AO or MI independently.

  12. Task-dependent interaction between parietal and contralateral primary motor cortex during explicit versus implicit motor imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Lebon

    Full Text Available Both mental rotation (MR and motor imagery (MI involve an internalization of movement within motor and parietal cortex. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS techniques allow for a task-dependent investigation of the interhemispheric interaction between these areas. We used image-guided dual-coil TMS to investigate interactions between right inferior parietal lobe (rIPL and left primary motor cortex (M1 in 11 healthy participants. They performed MI (right index-thumb pinching in time with a 1 Hz metronome or hand MR tasks, while motor evoked potentials (MEPs were recorded from right first dorsal interosseous. At rest, rIPL conditioning 6 ms prior to M1 stimulation facilitated MEPs in all participants, whereas this facilitation was abolished during MR. While rIPL conditioning 12 ms prior to M1 stimulation had no effect on MEPs at rest, it suppressed corticomotor excitability during MI. These results support the idea that rIPL forms part of a distinct inhibitory network that may prevent unwanted movement during imagery tasks.

  13. Classification of four-class motor imagery employing single-channel electroencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Ge

    Full Text Available With advances in brain-computer interface (BCI research, a portable few- or single-channel BCI system has become necessary. Most recent BCI studies have demonstrated that the common spatial pattern (CSP algorithm is a powerful tool in extracting features for multiple-class motor imagery. However, since the CSP algorithm requires multi-channel information, it is not suitable for a few- or single-channel system. In this study, we applied a short-time Fourier transform to decompose a single-channel electroencephalography signal into the time-frequency domain and construct multi-channel information. Using the reconstructed data, the CSP was combined with a support vector machine to obtain high classification accuracies from channels of both the sensorimotor and forehead areas. These results suggest that motor imagery can be detected with a single channel not only from the traditional sensorimotor area but also from the forehead area.

  14. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  15. A neural network-based optimal spatial filter design method for motor imagery classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Yuksel

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel spatial filter design method is introduced. Spatial filtering is an important processing step for feature extraction in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces. This paper introduces a new motor imagery signal classification method combined with spatial filter optimization. We simultaneously train the spatial filter and the classifier using a neural network approach. The proposed spatial filter network (SFN is composed of two layers: a spatial filtering layer and a classifier layer. These two layers are linked to each other with non-linear mapping functions. The proposed method addresses two shortcomings of the common spatial patterns (CSP algorithm. First, CSP aims to maximize the between-classes variance while ignoring the minimization of within-classes variances. Consequently, the features obtained using the CSP method may have large within-classes variances. Second, the maximizing optimization function of CSP increases the classification accuracy indirectly because an independent classifier is used after the CSP method. With SFN, we aimed to maximize the between-classes variance while minimizing within-classes variances and simultaneously optimizing the spatial filter and the classifier. To classify motor imagery EEG signals, we modified the well-known feed-forward structure and derived forward and backward equations that correspond to the proposed structure. We tested our algorithm on simple toy data. Then, we compared the SFN with conventional CSP and its multi-class version, called one-versus-rest CSP, on two data sets from BCI competition III. The evaluation results demonstrate that SFN is a good alternative for classifying motor imagery EEG signals with increased classification accuracy.

  16. Cognitive alterations in motor imagery process after left hemispheric ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motor imagery training is a promising rehabilitation strategy for stroke patients. However, few studies had focused on the neural mechanisms in time course of its cognitive process. This study investigated the cognitive alterations after left hemispheric ischemic stroke during motor imagery task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eleven patients with ischemic stroke in left hemisphere and eleven age-matched control subjects participated in mental rotation task (MRT of hand pictures. Behavior performance, event-related potential (ERP and event-related (desynchronization (ERD/ERS in beta band were analyzed to investigate the cortical activation. We found that: (1 The response time increased with orientation angles in both groups, called "angle effect", however, stoke patients' responses were impaired with significantly longer response time and lower accuracy rate; (2 In early visual perceptual cognitive process, stroke patients showed hypo-activations in frontal and central brain areas in aspects of both P200 and ERD; (3 During mental rotation process, P300 amplitude in control subjects decreased while angle increased, called "amplitude modulation effect", which was not observed in stroke patients. Spatially, patients showed significant lateralization of P300 with activation only in contralesional (right parietal cortex while control subjects showed P300 in both parietal lobes. Stroke patients also showed an overall cortical hypo-activation of ERD during this sub-stage; (4 In the response sub-stage, control subjects showed higher ERD values with more activated cortical areas particularly in the right hemisphere while angle increased, named "angle effect", which was not observed in stroke patients. In addition, stroke patients showed significant lower ERD for affected hand (right response than that for unaffected hand. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cortical activation was altered differently in each cognitive sub-stage of motor imagery after

  17. Real-Time Brain-Computer Interface System Based on Motor Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie-Jun Liu; Ping Yang; Xu-Yong Peng; Yu Huang; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) real-time system based on motor imagery translates the user's motor intention into a real-time control signal for peripheral equipments.A key problem to be solved for practical applications is real-time data collection and processing.In this paper,a real-time BCI system is implemented on computer with electroencephalogram amplifier.In our implementation,the on-line voting method is adopted for feedback control strategy,and the voting results are used to control the cursor horizontal movement.Three subjects take part in the experiment.The results indicate that the best accuracy is 90%.

  18. A Wearable Channel Selection-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Imagery Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chun Lo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI is a communication interface between an external machine and the brain. Many kinds of spatial filters are used in BCIs to enhance the electroencephalography (EEG features related to motor imagery. The approach of channel selection, developed to reserve meaningful EEG channels, is also an important technique for the development of BCIs. However, current BCI systems require a conventional EEG machine and EEG electrodes with conductive gel to acquire multi-channel EEG signals and then transmit these EEG signals to the back-end computer to perform the approach of channel selection. This reduces the convenience of use in daily life and increases the limitations of BCI applications. In order to improve the above issues, a novel wearable channel selection-based brain-computer interface is proposed. Here, retractable comb-shaped active dry electrodes are designed to measure the EEG signals on a hairy site, without conductive gel. By the design of analog CAR spatial filters and the firmware of EEG acquisition module, the function of spatial filters could be performed without any calculation, and channel selection could be performed in the front-end device to improve the practicability of detecting motor imagery in the wearable EEG device directly or in commercial mobile phones or tablets, which may have relatively low system specifications. Finally, the performance of the proposed BCI is investigated, and the experimental results show that the proposed system is a good wearable BCI system prototype.

  19. A Wearable Channel Selection-Based Brain-Computer Interface for Motor Imagery Detection.

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    Lo, Chi-Chun; Chien, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Ho; Fang, Wai-Chi; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2016-02-06

    Motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication interface between an external machine and the brain. Many kinds of spatial filters are used in BCIs to enhance the electroencephalography (EEG) features related to motor imagery. The approach of channel selection, developed to reserve meaningful EEG channels, is also an important technique for the development of BCIs. However, current BCI systems require a conventional EEG machine and EEG electrodes with conductive gel to acquire multi-channel EEG signals and then transmit these EEG signals to the back-end computer to perform the approach of channel selection. This reduces the convenience of use in daily life and increases the limitations of BCI applications. In order to improve the above issues, a novel wearable channel selection-based brain-computer interface is proposed. Here, retractable comb-shaped active dry electrodes are designed to measure the EEG signals on a hairy site, without conductive gel. By the design of analog CAR spatial filters and the firmware of EEG acquisition module, the function of spatial filters could be performed without any calculation, and channel selection could be performed in the front-end device to improve the practicability of detecting motor imagery in the wearable EEG device directly or in commercial mobile phones or tablets, which may have relatively low system specifications. Finally, the performance of the proposed BCI is investigated, and the experimental results show that the proposed system is a good wearable BCI system prototype.

  20. Evaluation of Methods for Estimating Fractal Dimension in Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interface

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    Chu Kiong Loo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction, and classification operations. Feature extraction is crucial, as it has a substantial effect on the classification accuracy and speed. While fractal dimension has been successfully used in various domains to characterize data exhibiting fractal properties, its usage in motor imagery-based BCI has been more recent. In this study, commonly used fractal dimension estimation methods to characterize time series Katz's method, Higuchi's method, rescaled range method, and Renyi's entropy were evaluated for feature extraction in motor imagery-based BCI by conducting offline analyses of a two class motor imagery dataset. Different classifiers fuzzy k-nearest neighbours FKNN, support vector machine, and linear discriminant analysis were tested in combination with these methods to determine the methodology with the best performance. This methodology was then modified by implementing the time-dependent fractal dimension TDFD, differential fractal dimension, and differential signals methods to determine if the results could be further improved. Katz's method with FKNN resulted in the highest classification accuracy of 85%, and further improvements by 3% were achieved by implementing the TDFD method.

  1. Classification of motor imagery by means of cortical current density estimation and Von Neumann entropy.

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    Kamousi, Baharan; Amini, Ali Nasiri; He, Bin

    2007-06-01

    The goal of the present study is to employ the source imaging methods such as cortical current density estimation for the classification of left- and right-hand motor imagery tasks, which may be used for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. The scalp recorded EEG was first preprocessed by surface Laplacian filtering, time-frequency filtering, noise normalization and independent component analysis. Then the cortical imaging technique was used to solve the EEG inverse problem. Cortical current density distributions of left and right trials were classified from each other by exploiting the concept of Von Neumann entropy. The proposed method was tested on three human subjects (180 trials each) and a maximum accuracy of 91.5% and an average accuracy of 88% were obtained. The present results confirm the hypothesis that source analysis methods may improve accuracy for classification of motor imagery tasks. The present promising results using source analysis for classification of motor imagery enhances our ability of performing source analysis from single trial EEG data recorded on the scalp, and may have applications to improved BCI systems.

  2. A timely review of a key aspect of motor imagery: a commentary on Guillot et al. (2012.

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    Dave eSmith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The timing of motor imagery has recently received attention from a number of researchers, culminating in a comprehensive review by Guillot and colleagues. This paper aims to further explore this issue, building upon the said review to suggest a number of other important timing-related issues. Specifically, we consider the possible role of bio-informational theory (Lang, 1979, 1985 and the recent proposal of ‘behavioural matching’ in conjunction with the PETTLEP model (Holmes & Collins, 2001 of motor imagery. Furthermore, we explore the possibility that timing has important implications for motivational aspects of imagery and the potential role of rhythm, an important but important but often overlooked aspect of skilled motor performance, and its links to the timing issue. We conclude by offering suggestions for future research to examine this relatively under-researched area of imagery.

  3. Modulation of mu rhythm desynchronization during motor imagery by transcranial direct current stimulation

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    Kimura Akio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mu event-related desynchronization (ERD is supposed to reflect motor preparation and appear during motor imagery. The aim of this study is to examine the modulation of ERD with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. Methods Six healthy subjects were asked to imagine their right hand grasping something after receiving a visual cue. Electroencephalograms (EEGs were recorded near the left M1. ERD of the mu rhythm (mu ERD by right hand motor imagery was measured. tDCS (10 min, 1 mA was used to modulate the cortical excitability of M1. Anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS were tested in each subject with a randomized sequence on different days. Each condition was separated from the preceding one by more than 1 week in the same subject. Before and after tDCS, mu ERD was assessed. The motor thresholds (MT of the left M1 were also measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Results Mu ERD significantly increased after anodal stimulation, whereas it significantly decreased after cathodal stimulation. There was a significant correlation between mu ERD and MT. Conclusions Opposing effects on mu ERD based on the orientation of the stimulation suggest that mu ERD is affected by cortical excitability.

  4. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

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    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot‐assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three‐dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot‐assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patientʹs EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patientʹs motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post‐stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot‐assisted training with motor imagery‐ based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  5. Brisk heart rate and EEG changes during execution and withholding of cue-paced foot motor imagery

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    Gert ePfurtscheller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cue-paced motor imagery is a frequently used mental strategy to realize a Brain-Computer Interace (BCI. Recently it has been reported that 2 motor imagery tasks can be separated with a high accuracy within the first second after cue presentation onset. To investigate this phenomenon in detail we studied the dynamics of motor cortex beta oscillations in EEG and the changes in heart rate (HR during visual cue-paced foot imagery using a go (execution of imagery versus nogo (withholding of imagery paradigm in 16 healthy subjects. Both execution and withholding of motor imagery resulted in a brisk centrally localized beta ERD with a maximum at ~ 400 ms and a concomitant HR deceleration. We found that response patterns within the first second after stimulation differed between conditions. The ERD was significantly larger in go as compared to nogo. In contrast the HR deceleration was somewhat smaller and followed by an acceleration in go as compared to nogo. These findings suggest that the early beta ERD reflects visually induced preparatory activity in motor cortex networks. Both the early beta ERD and HR deceleration are the result of automatic operating processes that are likely part of the orienting reflex. Of interest, however, is that the preparatory cortical activity is strengthened and the HR modulated already within the first second after stimulation during the execution of motor imagery. The subtraction of the HR time course of the nogo from the go condition revealed a slight HR acceleration in the first seconds most likely due to the increased mental effort associated with the imagery process.

  6. Double dissociation between motor and visual imagery in the posterior parietal cortex.

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    Pelgrims, Barbara; Andres, Michael; Olivier, Etienne

    2009-10-01

    Because motor imagery (MI) and visual imagery (VI) are influenced differently by factors such as biomechanical constraints or stimulus size, it is conceivable that they rely on separate processes, possibly involving distinct cortical networks, a view corroborated by neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies. In the posterior parietal cortex, it has been suggested that the superior parietal lobule (SPL) underlies VI, whereas MI relies on the supramarginalis gyrus (SMG). However, because several brain imaging studies have also shown an overlap of activations in SPL and SMG during VI or MI, the question arises as to which extent these 2 subregions really contribute to distinct imagery processes. To address this issue, we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to induce virtual lesions of either SMG or SPL in subjects performing a MI (hand drawing rotation) or a VI (letter rotation) task. Whatever hemisphere was stimulated, SMG lesions selectively altered MI, whereas SPL lesions only affected VI, demonstrating a double dissociation between MI and VI. Because these deficits were not influenced by the angular distance of the stimuli, we suggest that SMG and SPL are involved in the reenactment of the motor and visual representations, respectively, and not in mental rotation processes per se.

  7. Action Observation and Motor Imagery: Innovative Cognitive Tools in the Rehabilitation of Parkinson’s Disease

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    Giovanni Abbruzzese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is characterized by a progressive impairment of motor skills with deterioration of autonomy in daily living activities. Physiotherapy is regarded as an adjuvant to pharmacological and neurosurgical treatment and may provide small and short-lasting clinical benefits in PD patients. However, the development of innovative rehabilitation approaches with greater long-term efficacy is a major unmet need. Motor imagery (MI and action observation (AO have been recently proposed as a promising rehabilitation tool. MI is the ability to imagine a movement without actual performance (or muscle activation. The same cortical-subcortical network active during motor execution is engaged in MI. The physiological basis of AO is represented by the activation of the “mirror neuron system.” Both MI and AO are involved in motor learning and can induce improvements of motor performance, possibly mediated by the development of plastic changes in the motor cortex. The review of available evidences indicated that MI ability and AO feasibility are substantially preserved in PD subjects. A few preliminary studies suggested the possibility of using MI and AO as parts of rehabilitation protocols for PD patients.

  8. Action Observation and Motor Imagery: Innovative Cognitive Tools in the Rehabilitation of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Avanzino, Laura; Marchese, Roberta; Pelosin, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive impairment of motor skills with deterioration of autonomy in daily living activities. Physiotherapy is regarded as an adjuvant to pharmacological and neurosurgical treatment and may provide small and short-lasting clinical benefits in PD patients. However, the development of innovative rehabilitation approaches with greater long-term efficacy is a major unmet need. Motor imagery (MI) and action observation (AO) have been recently proposed as a promising rehabilitation tool. MI is the ability to imagine a movement without actual performance (or muscle activation). The same cortical-subcortical network active during motor execution is engaged in MI. The physiological basis of AO is represented by the activation of the "mirror neuron system." Both MI and AO are involved in motor learning and can induce improvements of motor performance, possibly mediated by the development of plastic changes in the motor cortex. The review of available evidences indicated that MI ability and AO feasibility are substantially preserved in PD subjects. A few preliminary studies suggested the possibility of using MI and AO as parts of rehabilitation protocols for PD patients.

  9. Using a hybrid brain computer interface and virtual reality system to monitor and promote cortical reorganization through motor activity and motor imagery training.

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    Bermúdez i Badia, S; García Morgade, A; Samaha, H; Verschure, P F M J

    2013-03-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of adult disability with high economical and societal costs. In recent years, novel rehabilitation paradigms have been proposed to address the life-long plasticity of the brain to regain motor function. We propose a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI)-virtual reality (VR) system that combines a personalized motor training in a VR environment, exploiting brain mechanisms for action execution and observation, and a neuro-feedback paradigm using mental imagery as a way to engage secondary or indirect pathways to access undamaged cortico-spinal tracts. Furthermore, we present the development and validation experiments of the proposed system. More specifically, EEG data on nine naïve healthy subjects show that a simultaneous motor activity and motor imagery paradigm is more effective at engaging cortical motor areas and related networks to a larger extent. Additionally, we propose a motor imagery driven BCI-VR version of our system that was evaluated with nine different healthy subjects. Data show that users are capable of controlling a virtual avatar in a motor imagery training task that dynamically adjusts its difficulty to the capabilities of the user. User self-report questionnaires indicate enjoyment and acceptance of the proposed system.

  10. Adaptive Stacked Generalization for Multiclass Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interfaces.

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    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis F; Corralejo, Rebeca; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Álvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Practical motor imagery-based brain computer interface (MI-BCI) applications are limited by the difficult to decode brain signals in a reliable way. In this paper, we propose a processing framework to address non-stationarity, as well as handle spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics associated with execution of motor tasks. Stacked generalization is used to exploit the power of classifier ensembles for combining information coming from multiple sources and reducing the existing uncertainty in EEG signals. The outputs of several regularized linear discriminant analysis (RLDA) models are combined to account for temporal, spatial, and spectral information. The resultant algorithm is called stacked RLDA (SRLDA). Additionally, an adaptive processing stage is introduced before classification to reduce the harmful effect of intersession non-stationarity. The benefits of the proposed method are evaluated on the BCI Competition IV dataset 2a. We demonstrate its effectiveness in binary and multiclass settings with four different motor imagery tasks: left-hand, right-hand, both feet, and tongue movements. The results show that adaptive SRLDA outperforms the winner of the competition and other approaches tested on this multiclass dataset.

  11. Motor imagery reinforces brain compensation of reach-to-grasp movement after cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Sébastien eMateo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI that causes tetraplegia are challenged with dramatic sensorimotor deficits. However, certain rehabilitation techniques may significantly enhance their autonomy by restoring reach-to-grasp movements. Among others, evidence of motor imagery (MI benefits for neurological rehabilitation of upper limb movements is growing. This literature review addresses motor imagery (MI effectiveness during reach-to-grasp rehabilitation after tetraplegia. Among articles from MEDLINE published between 1966 and 2015, we selected ten studies including 34 participants with C4 to C7 tetraplegia and 22 healthy controls published during the last fifteen years. We found that MI of possible non-paralyzed movements improved reach-to-grasp performance by i increasing both tenodesis grasp capabilities and muscle strength, ii decreasing movement time, and trajectory variability, and, iii reducing the abnormally increased brain activity. MI can also strengthen motor commands by potentiating recruitment and synchronization of motoneurons, which leads to improved recovery. These improvements reflect brain adaptations induced by MI. Furthermore, MI can be used to control brain computer interfaces (BCI that successfully restore grasp capabilities. These results highlight the growing interest for MI and its potential to recover functional grasping in individuals with tetraplegia, and motivate the need for further studies to substantiate it.

  12. [German test of the controllability of motor imagery in older adults].

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    Schott, N

    2013-10-01

    After a person is instructed to imagine a certain movement, no possibility exists to control whether the person is doing what they are asked for. The purpose of this study was to validate the German Test of the Controllability of Motor Imagery ("Tests zur Kontrollierbarkeit von Bewegungsvorstellungen" TKBV). A total sample of 102 men [mean 55.6, standard deviation (SD) 25.1] and 93 women (mean 59.2, SD 24.0) ranging in age from 18-88 years completed the TKBV. Two conditions were performed: a recognition (REC) and a regeneration (REG) test. In both conditions the participants had to perform the six consecutive instructions. They were asked to imagine the posture of their own body. Subjects had to move only one body part (head, arms, legs, trunk) per instruction. On the regeneration test the participants had to actually produce the final position. On the recognition test, they were required to select the one picture among five pictures, which fit the imagery they have. Explorative factor analysis showed the proposed two-dimensional solution: (1) the ability to control their body scheme, and (2) the ability to transform a visual imagery. Cronbach's α of the two dimensions of the TKBV were 0.89 and 0.73, respectively. The scales correlate low with convergent measures assessing mental chronometry (Timed-Up-and-Go test, rREG = - 0.33, rREC = - 0.31), and the vividness of motor imagery (MIQvis, rREG = 0.14, rREC = 0.14; MIQkin, rREG = 0.11, rREC = 0.13). Criterion validity of the TKBV was established by statistically significant correlations between the subscales, the Corsi block tapping test (BTT, rREG = 0.45, rREC = 0.38) and with physical activity (rREG = 0.50, rREC = 0.36). The TKBV is a valid instrument to assess motor imagery. Thus, it is an important and helpful tool in the neurologic and orthopedic rehabilitation.

  13. Improving the performance of an EEG-based motor imagery brain computer interface using task evoked changes in pupil diameter.

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    Rozado, David; Duenser, Andreas; Howell, Ben

    2015-01-01

    For individuals with high degrees of motor disability or locked-in syndrome, it is impractical or impossible to use mechanical switches to interact with electronic devices. Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) can use motor imagery to detect interaction intention from users but lack the accuracy of mechanical switches. Hence, there exists a strong need to improve the accuracy of EEG-based motor imagery BCIs attempting to implement an on/off switch. Here, we investigate how monitoring the pupil diameter of a person as a psycho-physiological parameter in addition to traditional EEG channels can improve the classification accuracy of a switch-like BCI. We have recently noticed in our lab (work not yet published) how motor imagery is associated with increases in pupil diameter when compared to a control rest condition. The pupil diameter parameter is easily accessible through video oculography since most gaze tracking systems report pupil diameter invariant to head position. We performed a user study with 30 participants using a typical EEG based motor imagery BCI. We used common spatial patterns to separate motor imagery, signaling movement intention, from a rest control condition. By monitoring the pupil diameter of the user and using this parameter as an additional feature, we show that the performance of the classifier trying to discriminate motor imagery from a control condition improves over the traditional approach using just EEG derived features. Given the limitations of EEG to construct highly robust and reliable BCIs, we postulate that multi-modal approaches, such as the one presented here that monitor several psycho-physiological parameters, can be a successful strategy in making BCIs more accurate and less vulnerable to constraints such as requirements for long training sessions or high signal to noise ratio of electrode channels.

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Neurofeedback-guided Motor Imagery Training and Motor Training for Parkinson’s Disease: Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Leena; Morris, Monica Busse; Brosnan, Meadhbh; Turner, Duncan L.; Morris, Huw R.; Linden, David E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback (NF) uses feedback of the patient’s own brain activity to self-regulate brain networks which in turn could lead to a change in behavior and clinical symptoms. The objective was to determine the effect of NF and motor training (MOT) alone on motor and non-motor functions in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in a 10-week small Phase I randomized controlled trial. Methods: Thirty patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD; Hoehn and Yahr I-III) and no significant comorbidity took part in the trial with random allocation to two groups. Group 1 (NF: 15 patients) received rt-fMRI-NF with MOT. Group 2 (MOT: 15 patients) received MOT alone. The primary outcome measure was the Movement Disorder Society—Unified PD Rating Scale-Motor scale (MDS-UPDRS-MS), administered pre- and post-intervention “off-medication”. The secondary outcome measures were the “on-medication” MDS-UPDRS, the PD Questionnaire-39, and quantitative motor assessments after 4 and 10 weeks. Results: Patients in the NF group were able to upregulate activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA) by using motor imagery. They improved by an average of 4.5 points on the MDS-UPDRS-MS in the “off-medication” state (95% confidence interval: −2.5 to −6.6), whereas the MOT group improved only by 1.9 points (95% confidence interval +3.2 to −6.8). The improvement in the intervention group meets the minimal clinically important difference which is also on par with other non-invasive therapies such as repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). However, the improvement did not differ significantly between the groups. No adverse events were reported in either group. Interpretation: This Phase I study suggests that NF combined with MOT is safe and improves motor symptoms immediately after treatment, but larger trials are needed to explore its superiority over active control conditions. PMID:27375451

  15. Motor imagery and its effect on complex regional pain syndrome: an integrative review

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    Nélio Silva de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The motor imagery (MI has been proposed as a treatment in the complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1, since it seems to promote a brain reorganization effect on sensory- motor areas of pain perception. The aim of this paper is to investigate, through an integrative critical review, the influence of MI on the CRPS-1, correlating their evidence to clinical practice. Research in PEDro, Medline, Bireme and Google Scholar databases was conducted. Nine randomized controlled trials (level 2, 1 non-controlled clinical study (level 3, 1 case study (level 4, 1 systematic review (level 1, 2 review articles and 1 comment (level 5 were found. We can conclude that MI has shown effect in reducing pain and functionality that remains after 6 months of treatment. However, the difference between the MI strategies for CRPS-1 is unknown as well as the intensity of mental stress influences the painful response or effect of MI or other peripheral neuropathies.

  16. Testing the Self-Similarity Exponent to Feature Extraction in Motor Imagery Based Brain Computer Interface Systems

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    Rodríguez-Bermúdez, Germán; Sánchez-Granero, Miguel Ángel; García-Laencina, Pedro J.; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Serna, José; Roca-Dorda, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system is a tool not requiring any muscle action to transmit information. Acquisition, preprocessing, feature extraction (FE), and classification of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals constitute the main steps of a motor imagery BCI. Among them, FE becomes crucial for BCI, since the underlying EEG knowledge must be properly extracted into a feature vector. Linear approaches have been widely applied to FE in BCI, whereas nonlinear tools are not so common in literature. Thus, the main goal of this paper is to check whether some Hurst exponent and fractal dimension based estimators become valid indicators to FE in motor imagery BCI. The final results obtained were not optimal as expected, which may be due to the fact that the nature of the analyzed EEG signals in these motor imagery tasks were not self-similar enough.

  17. A novel deep learning approach for classification of EEG motor imagery signals

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    Rezaei Tabar, Yousef; Halici, Ugur

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Signal classification is an important issue in brain computer interface (BCI) systems. Deep learning approaches have been used successfully in many recent studies to learn features and classify different types of data. However, the number of studies that employ these approaches on BCI applications is very limited. In this study we aim to use deep learning methods to improve classification performance of EEG motor imagery signals. Approach. In this study we investigate convolutional neural networks (CNN) and stacked autoencoders (SAE) to classify EEG Motor Imagery signals. A new form of input is introduced to combine time, frequency and location information extracted from EEG signal and it is used in CNN having one 1D convolutional and one max-pooling layers. We also proposed a new deep network by combining CNN and SAE. In this network, the features that are extracted in CNN are classified through the deep network SAE. Main results. The classification performance obtained by the proposed method on BCI competition IV dataset 2b in terms of kappa value is 0.547. Our approach yields 9% improvement over the winner algorithm of the competition. Significance. Our results show that deep learning methods provide better classification performance compared to other state of art approaches. These methods can be applied successfully to BCI systems where the amount of data is large due to daily recording.

  18. Motor imagery in Asperger syndrome: testing action simulation by the hand laterality task.

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    Massimiliano Conson

    Full Text Available Asperger syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental condition within the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD characterized by specific difficulties in social interaction, communication and behavioural control. In recent years, it has been suggested that ASD is related to a dysfunction of action simulation processes, but studies employing imitation or action observation tasks provided mixed results. Here, we addressed action simulation processes in adolescents with AS by means of a motor imagery task, the classical hand laterality task (to decide whether a rotated hand image is left or right; mental rotation of letters was also evaluated. As a specific marker of action simulation in hand rotation, we assessed the so-called biomechanical effect, that is the advantage for judging hand pictures showing physically comfortable versus physically awkward positions. We found the biomechanical effect in typically-developing participants but not in participants with AS. Overall performance on both hand laterality and letter rotation tasks, instead, did not differ in the two groups. These findings demonstrated a specific alteration of motor imagery skills in AS. We suggest that impaired mental simulation and imitation of goal-less movements in ASD could be related to shared cognitive mechanisms.

  19. Motor Imagery Classification based on Bilinear Sub-Manifold Learning of Symmetric Positive-Definite Matrices.

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    Xie, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhu Liang; Lu, Haiping; Gu, Zhenghui; Li, Yuanqing

    2016-07-07

    In motor imagery brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), the symmetric positive-definite (SPD) covariance matrices of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals carry important discriminative information. In this paper, we intend to classify motor imagery EEG signals by exploiting the fact that the space of SPD matrices endowed with Riemannian distance is a highdimensional Riemannian manifold. To alleviate the overfitting and heavy computation problems associated with conventional classification methods on high-dimensional manifold, we propose a framework for intrinsic sub-manifold learning from a high-dimensional Riemannian manifold. Considering a special case of SPD space, a simple yet efficient bilinear sub-manifold learning (BSML) algorithm is derived to learn the intrinsic submanifold by identifying a bilinear mapping that maximizes the preservation of the local geometry and global structure of the original manifold. Two BSML-based classification algorithms are further proposed to classify the data on a learned intrinsic sub-manifold. Experimental evaluation of the classification of EEG revealed that the BSML method extracts the intrinsic submanifold approximately 5 faster and with higher classification accuracy compared with competing algorithms. The BSML also exhibited strong robustness against a small training dataset, which often occurs in BCI studies.

  20. Discrimination of Motor Imagery-Induced EEG Patterns in Patients with Complete Spinal Cord Injury

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    G. Pfurtscheller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EEG-based discrimination between different motor imagery states has been subject of a number of studies in healthy subjects. We investigated the EEG of 15 patients with complete spinal cord injury during imagined right hand, left hand, and feet movements. In detail we studied pair-wise discrimination functions between the 3 types of motor imagery. The following classification accuracies (mean ± SD were obtained: left versus right hand 65.03% ± 8.52, left hand versus feet 68.19% ± 11.08, and right hand versus feet 65.05% ± 9.25. In 5 out of 8 paralegic patients, the discrimination accuracy was greater than 70% but in only 1 out of 7 tetraplagic patients. The present findings provide evidence that in the majority of paraplegic patients an EEG-based BCI could achieve satisfied results. In tetraplegic patients, however, it is expected that extensive training-sessions are necessary to achieve a good BCI performance at least in some subjects.

  1. When music tempo affects the temporal congruence between physical practice and motor imagery.

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    Debarnot, Ursula; Guillot, Aymeric

    2014-06-01

    When people listen to music, they hear beat and a metrical structure in the rhythm; these perceived patterns enable coordination with the music. A clear correspondence between the tempo of actual movement (e.g., walking) and that of music has been demonstrated, but whether similar coordination occurs during motor imagery is unknown. Twenty participants walked naturally for 8m, either physically or mentally, while listening to slow and fast music, or not listening to anything at all (control condition). Executed and imagined walking times were recorded to assess the temporal congruence between physical practice (PP) and motor imagery (MI). Results showed a difference when comparing slow and fast time conditions, but each of these durations did not differ from soundless condition times, hence showing that body movement may not necessarily change in order to synchronize with music. However, the main finding revealed that the ability to achieve temporal congruence between PP and MI times was altered when listening to either slow or fast music. These data suggest that when physical movement is modulated with respect to the musical tempo, the MI efficacy of the corresponding movement may be affected by the rhythm of the music. Practical applications in sport are discussed as athletes frequently listen to music before competing while they mentally practice their movements to be performed.

  2. A standardized motor imagery introduction program (MIIP for neuro-rehabilitation: development and evaluation

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    Christine eWondrusch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: For patients with central nervous system lesions and sensorimotor impairments a solid motor imagery (MI introduction is crucial to understand and use MI to improve motor performance. The study’s aim was to develop and evaluate a standardized MI group introduction program (MIIP for patients after stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and traumatic brain injury. Methods:Phase 1: Based on literature a MIIP was developed comprising MI theory (definition, type, mode, perspective, planning and MI practice (performance, control. Phase 2: Development of a 27-item self-administered MIIP evaluation questionnaire, assessing MI knowledge self-evaluation of the ability to perform MI and patient satisfaction with the MIIP. Phase 3: Evaluation of MIIP and MI questionnaire by 2 independent MI experts based on predefined criteria and 2 patients using semi-structured interviews.Phase 4: Case series with a pre-post design to evaluate MIIP (3x30minutes using the MI questionnaire, Imaprax, Kinaesthetic and Visual Imagery Questionnaire, and Mental Chronometry. The paired t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to determine significant changes.Results: Data of eleven patients were analysed (5 females; age 62.3±14.1 years. Declarative MI knowledge improved significantly from 5.4±2.2 to 8.8±2.9 (p=0.010. Patients demonstrated good satisfaction with MIIP (mean satisfaction score: 83.2±11.4 %. MI ability remained on a high level but showed no significant change, except a significant decrease in the Kinaesthetic and Visual Imagery Questionnaire score.Conclusion: The presented MIIP seems to be valid and feasible for patients with central nervous system lesions and sensorimotor impairments resulting in improved MI knowledge. MIIP sessions can be held in groups of four or less. MI ability and Mental Chronometry remained unchanged after 3 training sessions.

  3. Active vision during action execution, observation and imagery: evidence for shared motor representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheree A McCormick

    Full Text Available The concept of shared motor representations between action execution and various covert conditions has been demonstrated through a number of psychophysiological modalities over the past two decades. Rarely, however, have researchers considered the congruence of physical, imaginary and observed movement markers in a single paradigm and never in a design where eye movement metrics are the markers. In this study, participants were required to perform a forward reach and point Fitts' Task on a digitizing tablet whilst wearing an eye movement system. Gaze metrics were used to compare behaviour congruence between action execution, action observation, and guided and unguided movement imagery conditions. The data showed that participants attended the same task-related visual cues between conditions but the strategy was different. Specifically, the number of fixations was significantly different between action execution and all covert conditions. In addition, fixation duration was congruent between action execution and action observation only, and both conditions displayed an indirect Fitts' Law effect. We therefore extend the understanding of the common motor representation by demonstrating, for the first time, common spatial eye movement metrics across simulation conditions and some specific temporal congruence for action execution and action observation. Our findings suggest that action observation may be an effective technique in supporting motor processes. The use of video as an adjunct to physical techniques may be beneficial in supporting motor planning in both performance and clinical rehabilitation environments.

  4. 2014 Horry County, SC ADS80 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All imagery was collected during the 2014 Spring flying season during leaf-off conditions for deciduous vegetation in the State of South Carolina. The sun angle was...

  5. Assessing the feasibility of time-resolved fNIRS to detect brain activity during motor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalmalak, Androu; Milej, Daniel; Diop, Mamadou; Naci, Lorina; Owen, Adrian M.; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive optical technique for detecting brain activity, which has been previously used during motor and motor executive tasks. There is an increasing interest in using fNIRS as a brain computer interface (BCI) for patients who lack the physical, but not the mental, ability to respond to commands. The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of time-resolved fNIRS to detect brain activity during motor imagery. Stability tests were conducted to ensure the temporal stability of the signal, and motor imagery data were acquired on healthy subjects. The NIRS probes were placed on the scalp over the premotor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA), as these areas are responsible for motion planning. To confirm the fNIRS results, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the same task. Seven subjects have participated to date, and significant activation in the SMA and/or the PMC during motor imagery was detected by both fMRI and fNIRS in 4 of the 7 subjects. No activation was detected by either technique in the remaining three participants, which was not unexpected due to the nature of the task. The agreement between the two imaging modalities highlights the potential of fNIRS as a BCI, which could be adapted for bedside studies of patients with disorders of consciousness.

  6. Single-trial connectivity estimation for classification of motor imagery data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinger, Martin; Brunner, Clemens; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Many brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) use band power (BP) changes in the electroencephalogram to distinguish between different motor imagery (MI) patterns. Most current approaches do not take connectivity of separated brain areas into account. Our objective is to introduce single-trial connectivity features and apply these features to BCI data. Approach. We introduce a procedure for extracting single-trial connectivity estimates from vector autoregressive (VAR) models of independent components in a BCI setting. Main results. In a simulated BCI, we demonstrate that the directed transfer function (DTF) with full-frequency normalization and the direct DTF give classification results similar to BP, while other measures such as the partial directed coherence perform significantly worse. Significance. We show that single-trial MI classification is possible with connectivity measures extracted from VAR models, and that a BCI could potentially utilize such measures.

  7. Feature combination for classifying single-trial ECoG during motor imagery of different sessions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Qingguo; Meng Fei; Wang Yijun; Gao Xiaorong; Gao Shangkai

    2007-01-01

    The input signals of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) may be either scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) or electrocorticogram (ECoG) recorded from subdural electrodes. To make BCIs practical, the classifiers for discriminating different brain states must have the ability of session-to-session transfer. This paper proposes an algorithm for classifying single-trial ECoG during motor imagery of different sessions. Three features, derived from two physiological phenomena, movement-related potentials (MRP) and event-related desynchronization (ERD), and extracted by common spatial subspace decomposition (CSSD) and waveform mean, are combined to perform classification tasks. The specific signal processing methods utilized are described in detail. The algorithm was successfully applied to Data Set I of BCI Competition Ⅲ, and achieved a classification accuracy of 91% on test set.

  8. Quaternion-Based Signal Analysis for Motor Imagery Classification from Electroencephalographic Signals

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    Patricia Batres-Mendoza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quaternions can be used as an alternative to model the fundamental patterns of electroencephalographic (EEG signals in the time domain. Thus, this article presents a new quaternion-based technique known as quaternion-based signal analysis (QSA to represent EEG signals obtained using a brain-computer interface (BCI device to detect and interpret cognitive activity. This quaternion-based signal analysis technique can extract features to represent brain activity related to motor imagery accurately in various mental states. Experimental tests in which users where shown visual graphical cues related to left and right movements were used to collect BCI-recorded signals. These signals were then classified using decision trees (DT, support vector machine (SVM and k-nearest neighbor (KNN techniques. The quantitative analysis of the classifiers demonstrates that this technique can be used as an alternative in the EEG-signal modeling phase to identify mental states.

  9. Time sparsification of EEG signals in motor-imagery based brain computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method of sparsifying EEG signals in the time domain for common spatial patterns (CSP) which are often used for feature extraction in brain computer interfaces (BCI). For accurate classification, it is important to analyze the period of time when a BCI user performs a mental task. We address this problem by optimizing the CSP cost with a time sparsification that removes unnecessary samples from the classification. We design a cost function that has CSP spatial weights and time window as optimization parameters. To find these parameters, we use alternating optimization. In an experiment on classification of motor-imagery EEG signals, the proposed method increased classification accuracy by 6% averaged over five subjects.

  10. Multisubject Learning for Common Spatial Patterns in Motor-Imagery BCI

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    Dieter Devlaminck

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor-imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs commonly use the common spatial pattern filter (CSP as preprocessing step before feature extraction and classification. The CSP method is a supervised algorithm and therefore needs subject-specific training data for calibration, which is very time consuming to collect. In order to reduce the amount of calibration data that is needed for a new subject, one can apply multitask (from now on called multisubject machine learning techniques to the preprocessing phase. Here, the goal of multisubject learning is to learn a spatial filter for a new subject based on its own data and that of other subjects. This paper outlines the details of the multitask CSP algorithm and shows results on two data sets. In certain subjects a clear improvement can be seen, especially when the number of training trials is relatively low.

  11. Programming an offline-analyzer of motor imagery signals via python language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz María; Sepulveda, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems control the user's environment via his/her brain signals. Brain signals related to motor imagery (MI) have become a widespread method employed by the BCI community. Despite the large number of references describing the MI signal treatment, there is not enough information related to the available programming languages that could be suitable to develop a specific-purpose MI-based BCI. The present paper describes the development of an offline-analysis system based on MI-EEG signals via open-source programming languages, and the assessment of the system using electrical activity recorded from three subjects. The analyzer recognized at least 63% of the MI signals corresponding to three classes. The results of the offline analysis showed a promising performance considering that the subjects have never undergone MI trainings.

  12. Fractals properties of EEG during event-related desynchronization of motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Quang; Truong, Quang Dang Khoa; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Chaos and fractal dimension are emerging modalities for the research of electroencephalogram (EEG) signal processing. The capability of measuring non-linear characteristics of the fractal dimension enables new methodologies to identify distinct brain activities. Recent studies on the topic focus on utilizing various types of fractals as features in order to design better brain state classification system. However, we have little insight about the EEG signals projected in fractal dimension. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the non-linear characteristics of ongoing EEG signals and event-related desynchronization (ERD) during motor imagery. We observed a considerable synchronization between ERD and fractal dimension. This finding suggests further usage of chaos and fractal theory in investigating brain activities.

  13. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time.

  14. Common Spatio-Time-Frequency Patterns for Motor Imagery-Based Brain Machine Interfaces

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    Hiroshi Higashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For efficient decoding of brain activities in analyzing brain function with an application to brain machine interfacing (BMI, we address a problem of how to determine spatial weights (spatial patterns, bandpass filters (frequency patterns, and time windows (time patterns by utilizing electroencephalogram (EEG recordings. To find these parameters, we develop a data-driven criterion that is a natural extension of the so-called common spatial patterns (CSP that are known to be effective features in BMI. We show that the proposed criterion can be optimized by an alternating procedure to achieve fast convergence. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively extract discriminative features for a motor imagery-based BMI.

  15. Three-Class EEG-Based Motor Imagery Classification Using Phase-Space Reconstruction Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Ridha; Bazyed, Ayad G.; Belwafi, Kais; Gannouni, Sofien; Kaaniche, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few decades, brain signals have been significantly exploited for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. In this paper, we study the extraction of features using event-related desynchronization/synchronization techniques to improve the classification accuracy for three-class motor imagery (MI) BCI. The classification approach is based on combining the features of the phase and amplitude of the brain signals using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and autoregressive (AR) modeling of the reconstructed phase space as well as the modification of the BCI parameters (trial length, trial frequency band, classification method). We report interesting results compared with those present in the literature by utilizing sequential forward floating selection (SFFS) and a multi-class linear discriminant analysis (LDA), our findings showed superior classification results, a classification accuracy of 86.06% and 93% for two BCI competition datasets, with respect to results from previous studies. PMID:27563927

  16. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Aymeric; Di Rienzo, Franck; Pialoux, Vincent; Simon, Germain; Skinner, Sarah; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI) during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time. PMID:26580804

  17. Application of quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to motor imagery EEG classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we propose a recognition system for single-trial analysis of motor imagery (MI) electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Applying event-related brain potential (ERP) data acquired from the sensorimotor cortices, the system chiefly consists of automatic artifact elimination, feature extraction, feature selection and classification. In addition to the use of independent component analysis, a similarity measure is proposed to further remove the electrooculographic (EOG) artifacts automatically. Several potential features, such as wavelet-fractal features, are then extracted for subsequent classification. Next, quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO) is used to select features from the feature combination. Finally, selected sub-features are classified by support vector machine (SVM). Compared with without artifact elimination, feature selection using a genetic algorithm (GA) and feature classification with Fisher's linear discriminant (FLD) on MI data from two data sets for eight subjects, the results indicate that the proposed method is promising in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications.

  18. Implementation of Motor Imagery during Specific Aerobic Training Session in Young Tennis Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Guillot

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of implementing motor imagery (MI during specific tennis high intensity intermittent training (HIIT sessions on groundstroke performance in young elite tennis players. Stroke accuracy and ball velocity of forehand and backhand drives were evaluated in ten young tennis players, immediately before and after having randomly performed two HIIT sessions. One session included MI exercises during the recovery phases, while the other included verbal encouragements for physical efforts and served as control condition. Results revealed that similar cardiac demand was observed during both sessions, while implementing MI maintained groundstroke accuracy. Embedding MI during HIIT enabled the development of physical fitness and the preservation of stroke performance. These findings bring new insight to tennis and conditioning coaches in order to fulfil the benefits of specific playing HIIT sessions, and therefore to optimise the training time.

  19. Quantifying the role of motor imagery in brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesotti, Silvia; Bassolino, Michela; Serino, Andrea; Bleuler, Hannes; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    Despite technical advances in brain machine interfaces (BMI), for as-yet unknown reasons the ability to control a BMI remains limited to a subset of users. We investigate whether individual differences in BMI control based on motor imagery (MI) are related to differences in MI ability. We assessed whether differences in kinesthetic and visual MI, in the behavioral accuracy of MI, and in electroencephalographic variables, were able to differentiate between high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. High-aptitude BMI users showed higher MI accuracy as captured by subjective and behavioral measurements, pointing to a prominent role of kinesthetic rather than visual imagery. Additionally, for the first time, we applied mental chronometry, a measure quantifying the degree to which imagined and executed movements share a similar temporal profile. We also identified enhanced lateralized μ-band oscillations over sensorimotor cortices during MI in high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. These findings reveal that subjective, behavioral, and EEG measurements of MI are intimately linked to BMI control. We propose that poor BMI control cannot be ascribed only to intrinsic limitations of EEG recordings and that specific questionnaires and mental chronometry can be used as predictors of BMI performance (without the need to record EEG activity).

  20. Non-invasive detection of high gamma band activity during motor imagery

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    Melissa M Smith

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available High gamma oscillations (70-150 Hz; HG are rapidly evolving, spatially localized neurophysiological signals that are believed to be the best representative signature of engaged neural populations. The HG band has been best characterized from invasive electrophysiological approaches such as electrocorticography (ECoG because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio that results when by-passing the scalp and skull. Despite the recent observation that HG activity can be detected non-invasively by electroencephalography (EEG, it is unclear to what extent EEG can accurately resolve the spatial distribution of HG signals during active task engagement. We have overcome some of the limitations inherent to acquiring HG signals across the scalp by utilizing individual head anatomy in combination with an inverse modeling method. We applied a linearly constrained minimum variance beamformer (LCMV method on EEG data during a motor imagery paradigm to extract a time-frequency spectrogram at every voxel location on the cortex. To confirm spatially distributed patterns of HG responses, we contrasted overlapping maps of the EEG HG signal with BOLD fMRI data acquired from the same set of neurologically normal subjects during a separate session. We show that scalp-based HG band activity detected by EEG during motor imagery spatially co-localizes with BOLD fMRI data. Taken together, these results suggest that EEG can accurately resolve spatially specific estimates of local cortical high frequency signals, potentially opening an avenue for non-invasive measurement of HG potentials from diverse sets of neurologically impaired populations for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes

  1. Extension of mental preparation positively affects motor imagery as compared to motor execution: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holper, Lisa; Scholkmann, Felix; Shalóm, Diego E; Wolf, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is widely used to study cognitive action control. Although, the neural simulation theory assumes that MI and motor execution (ME) share many common features, the extent of similarity and whether it spreads into the preparation phase is still under investigation. Here we asked, whether an extension of physiological mental preparation has a comparable effect on MI and ME. Data were recorded using wireless functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a two-stage task design where subjects were cued with or without preparatory stimuli to either execute or imagine complex sequential thumb-finger tasks. The main finding is that the extended mental preparation has a significant positive effect on oxy-hemoglobin (∆[O(2)Hb]) in response to MI, which is proportionally larger as that found in response to ME. Furthermore, fNIRS was capable to discriminate within each task whether it was preceded by preparatory stimuli or not. Transition from mental preparation to actual performance (ME or MI) was reflected by a dip of the fNIRS signal presumably related to underlying cortical processes changing between preparation and task performance. Statistically significant main effects of 'Preparation' and 'Task' showed that ∆[O(2)Hb] during preparation was preparation-specific, i.e., positively affected by the presence of preparatory stimuli, whereas during task performance ∆[O(2)Hb] was both preparation- and task-specific, i.e., additionally affected by the task mode. These results are particularly appealing from a practical point of view for making use of MI in neuroscientific applications. Especially neurorehabilitation and neural interfaces may benefit from utilizing positive interactions between mental preparation and MI performance.

  2. Motor imagery for walking: a comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Michèle; Kudlinski, Cyril; Guilbert, Jessica; Spruijt, Steffie; Steenbergen, Bert; Jouen, François

    2015-02-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for walking was investigated in CP adolescents diagnosed with hemiplegia (n=10) or diplegia (n=10) and in adolescents with typical motor development (n=10). Participants were explicitly asked to imagine walking before and after actually walking toward a target located at 4 m and 8 m. Movement durations for executed and imagined trials were recorded. ANOVA and Pearson's correlation analyses revealed the existence of time invariance between executed and imagined movement durations for the control group and both groups of CP participants. However, results revealed that MI capacity in CP participants was observed for the short distance (4 m) but not for the long distance (8 m). Moreover, even for short distance, CP participants performed worse than typical adolescents. These results are discussed inline of recent researches suggesting that MI in CP participants may not depend on the side of the lesion.

  3. Virtual reality and motor imagery: promising tools for assessment and therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Anat; Maidan, Inbal; Deutsch, Judith E

    2013-09-15

    Motor imagery (MI) and virtual reality (VR) are two evolving therapeutic approaches that make use of cognitive function to study and enhance movement, in particular, balance and mobility of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). This review examines the literature on the use of VR and MI in the assessment of mobility and as a therapeutic intervention to improve balance and gait in patients with PD. A study was eligible for inclusion if MI or VR were used to assess motor or cognitive function to improve gait, balance, or mobility in patients with PD. Data were extracted on the following categories: participants; study design; intervention (type, duration, and frequency); and outcomes. Intervention studies were evaluated for quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. Sixteen studies were identified; 4 articles used MI and 12 used VR for assessment and treatment of gait impairments in PD. The studies included small samples and were diverse in terms of methodology. Quality of the intervention trials varied from fair for VR to good for MI. The benefits of using MI and VR for assessment and treatment were noted. Encouraging findings on the potential benefits of using MI and VR in PD were found, although further good-quality research is still needed. Questions remain on the optimal use, content of interventions, and generalizability of findings across the different stages of the disease. The possible mechanisms underlying MI and VR and recommendations for future research and therapy are also presented.

  4. Motor imagery during action observation modulates automatic imitation effects in rhythmical actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lloyd Eaves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that passively observing a task-irrelevant rhythmical action can bias the cycle time of a subsequently executed rhythmical action. Here we use the same paradigm to investigate the impact of different forms of motor imagery (MI during action observation (AO on this automatic imitation (AI effect. Participants saw a picture of the instructed action followed by a rhythmical distractor movie, wherein cycle time was subtly manipulated across trials. They then executed the instructed rhythmical action. When participants imagined performing the instructed action in synchrony with the distractor action (AO + MI, a strong imitation bias was found that was significantly greater than in our previous study. The bias was pronounced equally for compatible and incompatible trials, wherein observed and imagined actions were different in type (e.g., face washing vs. painting or plane of movement, or both. In contrast, no imitation bias was observed when MI conflicted with AO. In Experiment 2, motor execution synchronised with AO produced a stronger imitation bias compared to AO + MI, showing an advantage in synchronisation for overt execution over MI. Furthermore, the bias was stronger when participants synchronised the instructed action with the distractor movie, compared to when they synchronised the distractor action with the distractor movie. Although we still observed a significant bias in the latter condition, this finding indicates a degree of specificity in AI effects for the identity of the synchronised action. Overall, our data show that MI can substantially modulate the effects of AO on subsequent execution, wherein: (1 combined AO + MI can enhance AI effects relative to passive AO; (2 observed and imagined actions can be flexibly coordinated across different action types and planes; and (3 conflicting AO + MI can abolish AI effects. Therefore, combined AO + MI instructions should be considered in motor training and

  5. Differential Neural Processing during Motor Imagery of Daily Activities in Chronic Low Back Pain Patients.

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    Andrea Vrana

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (chronic LBP is both debilitating for patients but also a major burden on the health care system. Previous studies reported various maladaptive structural and functional changes among chronic LBP patients on spine- and supraspinal levels including behavioral alterations. However, evidence for cortical reorganization in the sensorimotor system of chronic LBP patients is scarce. Motor Imagery (MI is suitable for investigating the cortical sensorimotor network as it serves as a proxy for motor execution. Our aim was to investigate differential MI-driven cortical processing in chronic LBP compared to healthy controls (HC by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Twenty-nine subjects (15 chronic LBP patients, 14 HC were included in the current study. MI stimuli consisted of randomly presented video clips showing every-day activities involving different whole-body movements as well as walking on even ground and walking downstairs and upstairs. Guided by the video clips, subjects had to perform MI of these activities, subsequently rating the vividness of their MI performance. Brain activity analysis revealed that chronic LBP patients exhibited significantly reduced activity compared to HC subjects in MI-related brain regions, namely the left supplementary motor area and right superior temporal sulcus. Furthermore, psycho-physiological-interaction analysis yielded significantly enhanced functional connectivity (FC between various MI-associated brain regions in chronic LBP patients indicating diffuse and non-specific changes in FC. Current results demonstrate initial findings about differences in MI-driven cortical processing in chronic LBP pointing towards reorganization processes in the sensorimotor network.

  6. EEG classification for motor imagery and resting state in BCI applications using multi-class Adaboost extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Jue

    2016-08-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems provide an alternative communication and control approach for people with limited motor function. Therefore, the feature extraction and classification approach should differentiate the relative unusual state of motion intention from a common resting state. In this paper, we sought a novel approach for multi-class classification in BCI applications. We collected electroencephalographic (EEG) signals registered by electrodes placed over the scalp during left hand motor imagery, right hand motor imagery, and resting state for ten healthy human subjects. We proposed using the Kolmogorov complexity (Kc) for feature extraction and a multi-class Adaboost classifier with extreme learning machine as base classifier for classification, in order to classify the three-class EEG samples. An average classification accuracy of 79.5% was obtained for ten subjects, which greatly outperformed commonly used approaches. Thus, it is concluded that the proposed method could improve the performance for classification of motor imagery tasks for multi-class samples. It could be applied in further studies to generate the control commands to initiate the movement of a robotic exoskeleton or orthosis, which finally facilitates the rehabilitation of disabled people.

  7. Long-lasting cortical reorganization as the result of motor imagery of throwing a ball in a virtual tennis court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria eCebolla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the neural signature of a motor imagery (MI task, the present study investigates for the first time the oscillation characteristics including both of the time-frequency measurements, event related spectral perturbation (ERSP and intertrial coherence (ITC underlying the variations in the temporal measurements (ERP directly related to a motor imagery task. We hypothesize that significant variations in both of the time-frequency measurements underlie the specific changes in the ERP directly related to motor imagery. For the motor imagery task, we chose a simple everyday task (throwing a tennis ball, that does not require any particular motor expertise, set within the controlled virtual reality scenario of a tennis court. When compared to the rest condition a consistent, long-lasting negative fronto-central ERP wave was accompanied by significant changes in both time frequency measurements suggesting long-lasting cortical activity reorganization. The ERP wave was characterised by two peaks at about 300 ms (N300 and 1000 ms (N1000. The N300 component was centrally localized on the scalp and was accompanied by significant phase consistency in the delta brain rhythms in the contralateral central scalp areas. The N1000 component spread wider centrally and was accompanied by a significant power decrease (or ERD in low beta brain rhythms localized in fronto-precentral and parieto-occipital scalp areas and also by a significant power increase (or ERS in theta brain rhythms spreading fronto-centrally. During the transition from N300 to N1000, a contralateral alpha (mu as well as post-central and parieto- theta rhythms occurred. The visual representation of movement formed in the minds of participants might underlie a top-down process from the fronto-central areas which is reflected by the amplitude changes observed in the fronto-central ERPs and by the significant phase synchrony in contralateral fronto-central delta and

  8. The effect of leisure activity golf practice on motor imagery: an fMRI study in middle adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladina eBezzola

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about practice-induced plasticity of the motor system. But it is not clear whether the activity in the motor network induced by mental motor imagery is influenced by actually practicing the imagined motor tasks.In a longitudinal study design with two measurement time-points, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to explore dynamic changes in the brain in response to training of highly complex movements by participants of 40 to 60 years of age. The investigated motor learning task entailed golf training practiced by novices as leisure activity. Additionally, data from an age and sex-matched control group without golf training was collected.Results show increased hemodynamic responses during mental rehearsal of a golf swing in non-primary cortical motor areas, sub-cortical motor areas, and parietal regions of the novice golfers and the control subjects. This result complements previous mental imagery research that shows involvement of motor areas during mental rehearsal of a complex movement, especially in subjects with low skill level. More importantly, changes were only found between the two measurement time-points in the golf novice group with a decrease in hemodynamic responses in non-primary motor areas after the 40 hours of golf practice. Thus, the results indicate that a complex physical leisure activity induces functional neuroplasticity in the seldom studied population of middle-aged adults, and that this effect is evident during mental rehearsal of the practiced task. This finding supports the idea that (a a skill improvement is associated with a modified activation pattern in the associated neuronal network that can be identified during mental rehearsal of the practiced task, and that (b a strict training protocol is not necessary to induce functional neuroplasticity.

  9. Motor imagery, P300 and error-related EEG-based robot arm movement control for rehabilitation purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Saugat; Konar, Amit; Tibarewala, D N

    2014-12-01

    The paper proposes a novel approach toward EEG-driven position control of a robot arm by utilizing motor imagery, P300 and error-related potentials (ErRP) to align the robot arm with desired target position. In the proposed scheme, the users generate motor imagery signals to control the motion of the robot arm. The P300 waveforms are detected when the user intends to stop the motion of the robot on reaching the goal position. The error potentials are employed as feedback response by the user. On detection of error the control system performs the necessary corrections on the robot arm. Here, an AdaBoost-Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier is used to decode the 4-class motor imagery and an SVM is used to decode the presence of P300 and ErRP waveforms. The average steady-state error, peak overshoot and settling time obtained for our proposed approach is 0.045, 2.8% and 44 s, respectively, and the average rate of reaching the target is 95%. The results obtained for the proposed control scheme make it suitable for designs of prosthetics in rehabilitative applications.

  10. Adaptation of motor imagery EEG classification model based on tensor decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyang; Guan, Cuntai; Zhang, Haihong; Keng Ang, Kai; Ong, Sim Heng

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Session-to-session nonstationarity is inherent in brain-computer interfaces based on electroencephalography. The objective of this paper is to quantify the mismatch between the training model and test data caused by nonstationarity and to adapt the model towards minimizing the mismatch. Approach. We employ a tensor model to estimate the mismatch in a semi-supervised manner, and the estimate is regularized in the discriminative objective function. Main results. The performance of the proposed adaptation method was evaluated on a dataset recorded from 16 subjects performing motor imagery tasks on different days. The classification results validated the advantage of the proposed method in comparison with other regularization-based or spatial filter adaptation approaches. Experimental results also showed that there is a significant correlation between the quantified mismatch and the classification accuracy. Significance. The proposed method approached the nonstationarity issue from the perspective of data-model mismatch, which is more direct than data variation measurement. The results also demonstrated that the proposed method is effective in enhancing the performance of the feature extraction model.

  11. Multiscale topological properties of functional brain networks during motor imagery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Pichiorri, Floriana; Morone, Giovanni; Molinari, Marco; Babiloni, Fabio; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, network analyses have been used to evaluate brain reorganization following stroke. However, many studies have often focused on single topological scales, leading to an incomplete model of how focal brain lesions affect multiple network properties simultaneously and how changes on smaller scales influence those on larger scales. In an EEG-based experiment on the performance of hand motor imagery (MI) in 20 patients with unilateral stroke, we observed that the anatomic lesion affects the functional brain network on multiple levels. In the beta (13-30 Hz) frequency band, the MI of the affected hand (Ahand) elicited a significantly lower smallworldness and local efficiency (Eloc) versus the unaffected hand (Uhand). Notably, the abnormal reduction in Eloc significantly depended on the increase in interhemispheric connectivity, which was in turn determined primarily by the rise of regional connectivity in the parieto-occipital sites of the affected hemisphere. Further, in contrast to the Uhand MI, in which significantly high connectivity was observed for the contralateral sensorimotor regions of the unaffected hemisphere, the regions with increased connectivity during the Ahand MI lay in the frontal and parietal regions of the contralaterally affected hemisphere. Finally, the overall sensorimotor function of our patients, as measured by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) index, was significantly predicted by the connectivity of their affected hemisphere. These results improve on our understanding of stroke-induced alterations in functional brain networks.

  12. Haptic, Virtual Interaction and Motor Imagery: Entertainment Tools and Psychophysiological Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Invitto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the perception of affordances was analysed in terms of cognitive neuroscience during an interactive experience in a virtual reality environment. In particular, we chose a virtual reality scenario based on the Leap Motion controller: this sensor device captures the movements of the user’s hand and fingers, which are reproduced on a computer screen by the proper software applications. For our experiment, we employed a sample of 10 subjects matched by age and sex and chosen among university students. The subjects took part in motor imagery training and immersive affordance condition (a virtual training with Leap Motion and a haptic training with real objects. After each training sessions the subject performed a recognition task, in order to investigate event-related potential (ERP components. The results revealed significant differences in the attentional components during the Leap Motion training. During Leap Motion session, latencies increased in the occipital lobes, which are entrusted to visual sensory; in contrast, latencies decreased in the frontal lobe, where the brain is mainly activated for attention and action planning.

  13. Application of ensemble classifier in EEG-based motor imagery tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bianhong; Hao, Hongwei

    2007-12-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded during motor imagery tasks can be used to move a cursor to a target on a computer screen. Such an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) can provide a new communication channel for the subjects with neuromuscular disorders. To achieve higher speed and more accuracy to enhance the practical applications of BCI in computer aid medical systems, the ensemble classifier is used for the single classification. The ERDs at the electrodes C3 and C4 are calculated and then stacked together into the feature vector for the ensemble classifier. The ensemble classifier is based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Nearest Neighbor (NN). Furthermore, it considers the feedback. This method is successfully used in the 2003 international data analysis competition on BCI-tasks (data set III). The results show that the ensemble classifier succeed with a recognition as 90%, on average, which is 5% and 3% higher than that of using the LDA and NN separately. Moreover, the ensemble classifier outperforms LDA and NN in the whole time course. With adequate recognition, ease of use and clearly understood, the ensemble classifier can meet the need of time-requires for single classification.

  14. The comparison between motor imagery and verbal rehearsal on the learning of sequential movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eSaimpont

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mental practice refers to the cognitive rehearsal of a physical activity. It is widely used by athletes to enhance their performance and its efficiency to help train motor function in people with physical disabilities is now recognized. Mental practice is generally based on motor imagery (MI i.e. the conscious simulation of a movement without its actual execution. It may also be based on verbal rehearsal (VR i.e. the silent rehearsal of the labels associated with an action. In this study, the effect of MI training or VR on the learning and retention of a foot-sequence task was investigated. Thirty right-footed subjects, aged between 22 and 37 years old (mean: 27.4±4.1 years and randomly assigned to one of three groups, practiced a serial reaction time task involving a sequence of three dorsiflexions and three plantar flexions with the left foot. One group (n=10 mentally practiced the sequence with MI for five weeks, another group (n=10 mentally practiced the sequence with VR of the foot positions for the same duration, and a control group (n=10 did not practice the sequence mentally. The time to perform the practiced sequence as well as an unpracticed sequence was recorded before training, immediately after training and six months after training (retention. The main results showed that the speed improvement after training was significantly greater in the MI group compared to the control group and tended to be greater in the VR group compared to the control group. The improvement in performance did not differ in the MI and VR groups. At retention, however, no difference in response times was found among the three groups, indicating that the effect of mental practice did not last over a long period without training. Interestingly, this pattern of results was similar for the practiced and non-practiced sequence. Overall, these results suggest that both MI training and VR help to improve motor performance and that mental practice may induce non

  15. Je pense donc je fais: transcranial direct current stimulation modulates brain oscillations associated with motor imagery and movement observation

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    Olivia Morgan Lapenta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Motor system neural networks are activated during movement imagery, observation and execution, with a neural signature characterized by suppression of the Mu rhythm. In order to investigate the origin of this neurophysiological marker, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS modifies Mu rhythm oscillations during tasks involving observation and imagery of biological and non-biological movements. We applied tDCS (anodal, cathodal and sham in 21 male participants (mean age 23.8+3.06, over the left M1 with a current of 2mA for 20 minutes. Following this, we recorded the EEG at C3, C4 and Cz and surrounding C3 and C4 electrodes. Analyses of C3 and C4 showed significant effects for biological vs. non-biological movement (p=0.005, and differential hemisphere effects according to the type of stimulation (p=0.04 and type of movement (p=0.02. Analyses of surrounding electrodes revealed significant interaction effects considering type of stimulation and imagery or observation of biological or non-biological movement (p=0.03. The main findings of this study were (i Mu desynchronization during biological movement of the hand region in the contralateral hemisphere after sham tDCS; (ii polarity-dependent modulation effects of tDCS on the Mu rhythm, i.e. anodal tDCS led to Mu synchronization while cathodal tDCS led to Mu desynchronization during movement observation and imagery (iii specific focal and opposite inter-hemispheric effects, i.e. contrary effects for the surrounding electrodes during imagery condition and also for inter-hemispheric electrodes (C3 vs. C4. These findings provide insights into the cortical oscillations during movement observation and imagery. Furthermore it shows that tDCS can be highly focal when guided by a behavioral task.

  16. The investigation of brain-computer interface for motor imagery and execution using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Xuejun; Xu, Fengang; Jiang, Jin; Yang, Hanjun; Cao, Yong; Fu, Jiahao

    2017-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which can measure cortex hemoglobin activity, has been widely adopted in brain-computer interface (BCI). To explore the feasibility of recognizing motor imagery (MI) and motor execution (ME) in the same motion. We measured changes of oxygenated hemoglobin (HBO) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HBR) on PFC and Motor Cortex (MC) when 15 subjects performing hand extension and finger tapping tasks. The mean, slope, quadratic coefficient and approximate entropy features were extracted from HBO as the input of support vector machine (SVM). For the four-class fNIRS-BCI classifiers, we realized 87.65% and 87.58% classification accuracy corresponding to hand extension and finger tapping tasks. In conclusion, it is effective for fNIRS-BCI to recognize MI and ME in the same motion.

  17. Multi-class motor imagery EEG decoding for brain-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that scalp electroencephalography (EEG as a non-invasive interface has great potential for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs. However, one factor that has limited practical applications for EEG-based BCI so far is the difficulty to decode brain signals in a reliable and efficient way. This paper proposes a new robust processing framework for decoding of multi-class motor imagery (MI that is based on five main processing steps. (i Raw EEG segmentation without the need of visual artifact inspection. (ii Considering that EEG recordings are often contaminated not just by electrooculography (EOG but also other types of artifacts, we propose to first implement an automatic artifact correction method that combines regression analysis with independent component analysis (ICA for recovering the original source signals. (iii The significant difference between frequency components based on event-related (de- synchronization and sample entropy is then used to find non-continuous discriminating rhythms. After spectral filtering using the discriminating rhythms, a channel selection algorithm is used to select only relevant channels. (iv Feature vectors are extracted based on the inter-class diversity and time-varying dynamic characteristics of the signals. (v Finally, a support vector machine (SVM is employed for four-class classification. We tested our proposed algorithm on experimental data that was obtained from dataset 2a of BCI competition IV (2008. The overall four-class kappa values (between 0.41 and 0.80 were comparable to other models but without requiring any artifact-contaminated trial removal. The performance showed that multi-class MI tasks can be reliably discriminated using artifact-contaminated EEG recordings from a few channels. This may be a promising avenue for online robust EEG-based BCI applications.

  18. Proprioceptive Feedback Facilitates Motor Imagery-Related Operant Learning of Sensorimotor β-Band Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Sam; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Boulay, Chadwick B.; Ridding, Michael C.; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) activates the sensorimotor system independent of actual movements and might be facilitated by neurofeedback. Knowledge on the interaction between feedback modality and the involved frequency bands during MI-related brain self-regulation is still scarce. Previous studies compared the cortical activity during the MI task with concurrent feedback (MI with feedback condition) to cortical activity during the relaxation task where no feedback was provided (relaxation without feedback condition). The observed differences might, therefore, be related to either the task or the feedback. A proper comparison would necessitate studying a relaxation condition with feedback and a MI task condition without feedback as well. Right-handed healthy subjects performed two tasks, i.e., MI and relaxation, in alternating order. Each of the tasks (MI vs. relaxation) was studied with and without feedback. The respective event-driven oscillatory activity, i.e., sensorimotor desynchronization (during MI) or synchronization (during relaxation), was rewarded with contingent feedback. Importantly, feedback onset was delayed to study the task-related cortical activity in the absence of feedback provision during the delay period. The reward modality was alternated every 15 trials between proprioceptive and visual feedback. Proprioceptive input was superior to visual input to increase the range of task-related spectral perturbations in the α- and β-band, and was necessary to consistently achieve MI-related sensorimotor desynchronization (ERD) significantly below baseline. These effects occurred in task periods without feedback as well. The increased accuracy and duration of learned brain self-regulation achieved in the proprioceptive condition was specific to the β-band. MI-related operant learning of brain self-regulation is facilitated by proprioceptive feedback and mediated in the sensorimotor β-band. PMID:28232788

  19. High theta and low alpha powers may be indicative of BCI-illiteracy in motor imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyu Ahn

    Full Text Available In most brain computer interface (BCI systems, some target users have significant difficulty in using BCI systems. Such target users are called 'BCI-illiterate'. This phenomenon has been poorly investigated, and a clear understanding of the BCI-illiteracy mechanism or a solution to this problem has not been reported to date. In this study, we sought to demonstrate the neurophysiological differences between two groups (literate, illiterate with a total of 52 subjects. We investigated recordings under non-task related state (NTS which is collected during subject is relaxed with eyes open. We found that high theta and low alpha waves were noticeable in the BCI-illiterate relative to the BCI-literate people. Furthermore, these high theta and low alpha wave patterns were preserved across different mental states, such as NTS, resting before motor imagery (MI, and MI states, even though the spatial distribution of both BCI-illiterate and BCI-literate groups did not differ. From these findings, an effective strategy for pre-screening subjects for BCI illiteracy has been determined, and a performance factor that reflects potential user performance has been proposed using a simple combination of band powers. Our proposed performance factor gave an r = 0.59 (r(2 = 0.34 in a correlation analysis with BCI performance and yielded as much as r = 0.70 (r(2 = 0.50 when seven outliers were rejected during the evaluation of whole data (N = 61, including BCI competition datasets (N = 9. These findings may be directly applicable to online BCI systems.

  20. Effects of imagery motor training on torque production of ankle plantar flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Toering, ST; Bessem, B; van der Laan, O; Diercks, RL

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in control subjects the effect of imagery training on the torque of plantar-flexor muscles of the ankle. Twenty-nine subjects were allocated to one of three groups that performed either imagery training, low-intensity strength training, or no training (only m

  1. Dizzy people perform no worse at a motor imagery task requiring whole body mental rotation; a case-control comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Wallwork

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We wanted to find out whether people who suffer from dizziness take longer than people who do not, to perform a motor imagery task that involves implicit whole body rotation. Our prediction was that people in the ‘dizzy’ group would take longer at a left/right neck rotation judgment task but not a left/right hand judgment task, because actually performing the former, but not the latter, would exacerbate their dizziness. Secondly, we predicted that when dizzy participants responded to neck rotation images, responses would be greatest when images were in the upside-down orientation; an orientation with greatest dizzy-provoking potential. To test this idea, we used a case-control comparison design. One hundred and eighteen participants who suffered from dizziness and 118 age, gender, arm pain and neck pain matched controls took part in the study. Participants undertook two motor imagery tasks; a left/right neck rotation judgment task and a left/right hand judgment task. The tasks were completed using the Recognise program; an on-line reaction time task program. Images of neck rotation were shown in four different orientations; 0°, 90°, 180° and 270°. Participants were asked to respond to each ‘neck’ image identifying it as either ‘right neck rotation’ or a ‘left neck rotation’, or for hands, a right or a left hand. Results showed that participants in the ‘dizzy’ group were slower than controls at both tasks (p= 0.015, but this was not related to task (p= 0.498. Similarly, ‘dizzy’ participants were not proportionally worse at images of different orientations (p= 0.878. Our findings suggest impaired performance in dizzy people, an impairment that may be confined to motor imagery or may extend more generally.

  2. Equal prefrontal cortex activation between males and females in a motor tasks and different visual imagery perspectives: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago F. Dias Kanthack

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the prefrontal cortex (PFC blood flow variation and time on in males and females while performing a motor task and imagery perspectives. Eighteen right handed subjects (11 males and 7 females were volunteers to this study. All subjects went through three randomly conditions, a motor task condition (MT in which they had to do a simple finger tap. The other conditions included practicing imagery in first and third views. During all the conditions, the fNIRS device was attached to the subject forehead to obtain the blood flow; the total time in each task which was measured with a chronometer. No difference had been found in any condition for both sexes in the PFC and time, nor for all subjects integrated in the PFC. Therefore, we conclu-de that both imageries can be used to mentally train a motor task, and probably both sexes can be benefited.

  3. Impaired motor planning and motor imagery in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: challenges for the future of pediatric rehabilitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Jongbloed-Pereboom, M.; Spruijt, S.; Gordon, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Compromised action performance is one of the most characteristic features of children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP). Current rehabilitation efforts predominantly aim to improve the capacity and performance of the affected arm. Recent evidence, however, suggests that compromised motor

  4. The Efficacy of Imagery Building in Film Ads%影视广告中意象营造之效用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王飞

    2012-01-01

    意象的组合营造在影视广告中十分重要,以至于有观点认为,广告的创意本质就是意象的使用、连接、组合、跳跃的过程。影视广告中的创意实际是通过对声画元素有机组合来构造的,因此选用合适的表现元素和合理的表达方式能构筑出广告传播需要的情境意象,从而促进购买。%The combination of imagery plays an important role in producing film ads. In consequence, the essence of ads creation is acknowledged to be using, combining, associating and switching over the imagery. As a matter of fact, ads creation is produced by composing phonic and visual elements in order. Thus only by properly selecting and applying expression elements and modes can we build the very imagery needed in ads dissemination, witch facilitates the purchasing.

  5. Non-physical practice improves task performance in an unstable, perturbed environment: motor imagery and observational balance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Lorch, Michael; Zeiter, Sibylle; Keller, Martin

    2014-01-01

    For consciously performed motor tasks executed in a defined and constant way, both motor imagery (MI) and action observation (AO) have been shown to promote motor learning. It is not known whether these forms of non-physical training also improve motor actions when these actions have to be variably applied in an unstable and unpredictable environment. The present study therefore investigated the influence of MI balance training (MI_BT) and a balance training combining AO and MI (AO+MI_BT) on postural control of undisturbed and disturbed upright stance on unstable ground. As spinal reflex excitability after classical (i.e., physical) balance training (BT) is generally decreased, we tested whether non-physical BT also has an impact on spinal reflex circuits. Thirty-six participants were randomly allocated into an MI_BT group, in which participants imagined postural exercises, an AO+MI_BT group, in which participants observed videos of other people performing balance exercises and imagined being the person in the video, and a non-active control group (CON). Before and after 4 weeks of non-physical training, balance performance was assessed on a free-moving platform during stance without perturbation and during perturbed stance. Soleus H-reflexes were recorded during stable and unstable stance. The post-measurement revealed significantly decreased postural sway during undisturbed and disturbed stance after both MI_BT and AO+MI_BT. Spinal reflex excitability remained unchanged. This is the first study showing that non-physical training (MI_BT and AO+MI_BT) not only promotes motor learning of "rigid" postural tasks but also improves performance of highly variable and unpredictable balance actions. These findings may be relevant to improve postural control and thus reduce the risk of falls in temporarily immobilized patients.

  6. Action Verbs and the Primary Motor Cortex: A Comparative TMS Study of Silent Reading, Frequency Judgments, and Motor Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Barbara; Fink, Gereon R.; Sparing, Roland; Dafotakis, Manuel; Weiss, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex or, as a control, to the vertex (STIMULATION: TMS[subscript M1] vs. TMS[subscript vertex]) while right-handed volunteers silently read verbs related to hand actions. We examined three different tasks and time points for stimulation…

  7. Sparse Bayesian Learning for Obtaining Sparsity of EEG Frequency Bands Based Feature Vectors in Motor Imagery Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Xingyu

    2017-03-01

    Effective common spatial pattern (CSP) feature extraction for motor imagery (MI) electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings usually depends on the filter band selection to a large extent. Subband optimization has been suggested to enhance classification accuracy of MI. Accordingly, this study introduces a new method that implements sparse Bayesian learning of frequency bands (named SBLFB) from EEG for MI classification. CSP features are extracted on a set of signals that are generated by a filter bank with multiple overlapping subbands from raw EEG data. Sparse Bayesian learning is then exploited to implement selection of significant features with a linear discriminant criterion for classification. The effectiveness of SBLFB is demonstrated on the BCI Competition IV IIb dataset, in comparison with several other competing methods. Experimental results indicate that the SBLFB method is promising for development of an effective classifier to improve MI classification.

  8. Mobile EEG and its potential to promote the theory and application of imagery-based motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranczioch, Cornelia; Zich, Catharina; Schierholz, Irina; Sterr, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Studying the brain in its natural state remains a major challenge for neuroscience. Solving this challenge would not only enable the refinement of cognitive theory, but also provide a better understanding of cognitive function in the type of complex and unpredictable situations that constitute daily life, and which are often disturbed in clinical populations. With mobile EEG, researchers now have access to a tool that can help address these issues. In this paper we present an overview of technical advancements in mobile EEG systems and associated analysis tools, and explore the benefits of this new technology. Using the example of motor imagery (MI) we will examine the translational potential of MI-based neurofeedback training for neurological rehabilitation and applied research.

  9. An Efficient Framework for EEG Analysis with Application to Hybrid Brain Computer Interfaces Based on Motor Imagery and P300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Yu, Tianyou

    2017-01-01

    The hybrid brain computer interface (BCI) based on motor imagery (MI) and P300 has been a preferred strategy aiming to improve the detection performance through combining the features of each. However, current methods used for combining these two modalities optimize them separately, which does not result in optimal performance. Here, we present an efficient framework to optimize them together by concatenating the features of MI and P300 in a block diagonal form. Then a linear classifier under a dual spectral norm regularizer is applied to the combined features. Under this framework, the hybrid features of MI and P300 can be learned, selected, and combined together directly. Experimental results on the data set of hybrid BCI based on MI and P300 are provided to illustrate competitive performance of the proposed method against other conventional methods. This provides an evidence that the method used here contributes to the discrimination performance of the brain state in hybrid BCI. PMID:28316617

  10. An Efficient Framework for EEG Analysis with Application to Hybrid Brain Computer Interfaces Based on Motor Imagery and P300

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyi Long

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid brain computer interface (BCI based on motor imagery (MI and P300 has been a preferred strategy aiming to improve the detection performance through combining the features of each. However, current methods used for combining these two modalities optimize them separately, which does not result in optimal performance. Here, we present an efficient framework to optimize them together by concatenating the features of MI and P300 in a block diagonal form. Then a linear classifier under a dual spectral norm regularizer is applied to the combined features. Under this framework, the hybrid features of MI and P300 can be learned, selected, and combined together directly. Experimental results on the data set of hybrid BCI based on MI and P300 are provided to illustrate competitive performance of the proposed method against other conventional methods. This provides an evidence that the method used here contributes to the discrimination performance of the brain state in hybrid BCI.

  11. Neurocognitive Rehabilitation in Parkinson’s Disease with Motor Imagery: A Rehabilitative Experience in a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Zangrando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old female with Parkinson’s disease underwent a neurocognitive rehabilitation program consisting of one-hour-lasting sessions attended twice a week for three months. The balance and the risk of falls were determined using the Tinetti Balance and Gait Evaluation Scale. The pain was determined using the Visual Analog Scale and the course of the disease was examined using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS. Endpoints were before the treatment, at the end of the treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neurocognitive rehabilitation in PD with motor imagery. Primary outcome is the improvement in balance and the falls risk reduction; secondary outcome is lower limb pain reduction.

  12. Use of video observation and motor imagery on jumping performance in national rhythmic gymnastics athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Claudia; D'Artibale, Emanuele; Fiorilli, Giovanni; Piazza, Marina; Tsopani, Despina; Giombini, Arrigo; Calcagno, Giuseppe; di Cagno, Alessandra

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a mental training protocol could improve gymnastic jumping performance. Seventy-two rhythmic gymnasts were randomly divided into an experimental and control group. At baseline, experimental group completed the Movement Imagery Questionnaire Revised (MIQ-R) to assess the gymnast ability to generate movement imagery. A repeated measures design was used to compare two different types of training aimed at improving jumping performance: (a) video observation and PETTLEP mental training associated with physical practice, for the experimental group, and (b) physical practice alone for the control group. Before and after six weeks of training, their jumping performance was measured using the Hopping Test (HT), Drop Jump (DJ), and Counter Movement Jump (CMJ). Results revealed differences between jumping parameters F(1,71)=11.957; p<.01, and between groups F(1,71)=10.620; p<.01. In the experimental group there were significant correlations between imagery ability and the post-training Flight Time of the HT, r(34)=-.295, p<.05 and the DJ, r(34)=-.297, p<.05. The application of the protocol described herein was shown to improve jumping performance, thereby preserving the elite athlete's energy for other tasks.

  13. Motor Imagery signal Classification for BCI System Using Empirical Mode Décomposition and Bandpower Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Trad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea that brain activity could be used as a communication channel has rapidly developed. Indeed, Electroencephalography (EEG is the most common technique to measure the brain activity on the scalp and in real-time. In this study we examine the use of EEG signals in Brain Computer Interface (BCI. This approach consists of combining the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD and band power (BP for the extraction of EEG signals in order to classify motor imagery (MI. This new feature extraction approach is intended for non-stationary and non-linear characteristics MI EEG. The EMD method is proposed to decompose the EEG signal into a set of stationary time series called Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF. These IMFs are analyzed with the bandpower (BP to detect the characteristics of sensorimotor rhythms (mu and beta when a subject imagines a left or right hand movement. Finally, the data were just reconstructed with the specific IMFs and the bandpower is applied on the new database. Once the new feature vector is rebuilt, the classification of MI is performed using two types of classifiers: generative and discriminant. The results obtained show that the EMD allows the most reliable features to be extracted from EEG and that the classification rate obtained is higher and better than using the direct BP approach only. Such a system is a promising communication channel for people suffering from severe paralysis, for instance, people with myopathic diseases or muscular dystrophy (MD in order to help them move a joystick to a desired direction corresponding to the specific motor imagery.

  14. EEG Event-Related Desynchronization of patients with stroke during motor imagery of hand movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernig, Carolina B.; Carrere, Lucía C.; Lopez, Camila A.; Ballario, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) can be used for therapeutic purposes to improve voluntary motor control that has been affected post stroke. For this purpose, desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) can be used. But it is necessary to study what happens in the affected motor cortex of this people. In this article, we analyse EEG recordings of hemiplegic stroke patients to determine if it is possible to detect desynchronization in the affected motor cortex during the imagination of movements of the affected hand. Six patients were included in the study; four evidenced desynchronization in the affected hemisphere, one of them showed no results and the EEG recordings of the last patient presented high noise level. These results suggest that we could use the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms of the EEG signal as a BCI paradigm in a rehabilitation programme.

  15. Feature Selection Strategy for Classification of Single-Trial EEG Elicited by Motor Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Swati; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Prasad, Ramjee

    2011-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) provides new means of communication for people with motor disabilities by utilizing electroencephalographic activity. Selection of features from Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for classification plays a key part in the development of BCI systems. In this paper, we...

  16. Motor imagery evokes increased somatosensory activity in parkinson's disease patients with tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is surprisingly heterogeneous: some patients have a prominent resting tremor, while others never develop this symptom. Here we investigate whether the functional organization of the voluntary motor system differs between PD patients with and without resting tremor, and wheth

  17. Motor imagery evokes increased somatosensory activity in parkinson's disease patients with tremor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is surprisingly heterogeneous: some patients have a prominent resting tremor, while others never develop this symptom. Here we investigate whether the functional organization of the voluntary motor system differs between PD patients with and without resting tremor, and wheth

  18. Age-specific activation of cerebral areas in motor imagery - a fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing (China); Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Image, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Qiu, Mingguo; Zhang, Jingna; Zhang, Ye; Sang, Linqiong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Image, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Chen; Yang, Jun [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zheng, Xiaolin [Chongqing University, Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing (China)

    2014-04-15

    The objectives of this study were to study the age-specific activation patterns of cerebral areas during motor execution (ME) and motor imaging (MI) of the upper extremities and to discuss the age-related neural mechanisms associated with ME or MI. The functional magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to monitor the pattern and intensity of brain activation during the ME and MI of the upper extremities in 20 elderly (>50 years) and 19 young healthy subjects (<25 years). No major differences were identified regarding the activated brain areas during ME or MI between the two groups; however, a minor difference was noted. The intensity of the activated brain area during ME was stronger in the older group than in the younger group, while the results with MI were the opposite. The posterior central gyrus and supplementary motor area during MI were more active in the younger group than in the older group. The putamen, lingual, and so on demonstrated stronger activation during dominant hand MI in the older group. The results of this study revealed that the brain structure was altered and that neuronal activity was attenuated with age, and the cerebral cortex and subcortical tissues were found to be over-activated to achieve the same level of ME and MI, indicating that the activating effects of the left hemisphere enhanced with age, whereas the inhibitory effects declined during ME, and activation of the right hemisphere became more difficult during MI. (orig.)

  19. A novel Morse code-inspired method for multiclass motor imagery brain-computer interface (BCI) design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow disabled individuals to control external devices voluntarily, helping us to restore lost motor functions. However, the number of control commands available in MI-based BCIs remains limited, limiting the usability of BCI systems in control applications involving multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), such as control of a robot arm. To address this problem, we developed a novel Morse code-inspired method for MI-based BCI design to increase the number of output commands. Using this method, brain activities are modulated by sequences of MI (sMI) tasks, which are constructed by alternately imagining movements of the left or right hand or no motion. The codes of the sMI task was detected from EEG signals and mapped to special commands. According to permutation theory, an sMI task with N-length allows 2 × (2(N)-1) possible commands with the left and right MI tasks under self-paced conditions. To verify its feasibility, the new method was used to construct a six-class BCI system to control the arm of a humanoid robot. Four subjects participated in our experiment and the averaged accuracy of the six-class sMI tasks was 89.4%. The Cohen's kappa coefficient and the throughput of our BCI paradigm are 0.88 ± 0.060 and 23.5bits per minute (bpm), respectively. Furthermore, all of the subjects could operate an actual three-joint robot arm to grasp an object in around 49.1s using our approach. These promising results suggest that the Morse code-inspired method could be used in the design of BCIs for multi-DOF control.

  20. Effect of motor imagery on excitability of spinal neural function and its impact on the accuracy of movement-considering the point at which subjects subjectively determine the 50%MVC point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Yuki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effect of motor imagery on the accuracy of motion and the excitability of spinal neural function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy volunteers (males, 15; females, 15; mean age, 20.3 ± 1.0 years) were recruited. F-waves was recorded at rest, while holding a sensor, and while using motor imagery. Next, subjects learned 50% maximum voluntary contraction. The pinch force was measured without visual feedback before and after motor imagery. F-waves were analyzed with respect to persistence and the F/M amplitude ratio. Correction time and coefficient of variation were calculated from the pinch force. [Results] Persistence and F/M amplitude ratio ware significantly higher in the holding sensor and motor imagery conditions than in the resting condition. In addition, persistence under motor imagery was significantly higher than that in the holding sensor condition. No significant differences were observed in relative values of correction time and coefficient of variation between the two pinch action conditions. The pinch force in task 2 approximated a more authentic 50%MVC than that in task 1. [Conclusion] Motor imagery increases the excitability of spinal neural function, suggesting that it also affects accurate control of muscle force.

  1. A semi-supervised support vector machine approach for parameter setting in motor imagery-based brain computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jinyi; Yu, Zhuliang

    2010-01-01

    Parameter setting plays an important role for improving the performance of a brain computer interface (BCI). Currently, parameters (e.g. channels and frequency band) are often manually selected. It is time-consuming and not easy to obtain an optimal combination of parameters for a BCI. In this paper, motor imagery-based BCIs are considered, in which channels and frequency band are key parameters. First, a semi-supervised support vector machine algorithm is proposed for automatically selecting a set of channels with given frequency band. Next, this algorithm is extended for joint channel-frequency selection. In this approach, both training data with labels and test data without labels are used for training a classifier. Hence it can be used in small training data case. Finally, our algorithms are applied to a BCI competition data set. Our data analysis results show that these algorithms are effective for selection of frequency band and channels when the training data set is small. PMID:21886673

  2. Motor imagery is less efficient in adults with probable developmental coordination disorder: evidence from the hand rotation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Christian; Fuelscher, Ian; Buckthought, Karen; Enticott, Peter G; Gitay, Maria A; Williams, Jacqueline

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed to provide preliminary insight into the integrity of motor imagery (MI) in adults with probable developmental coordination disorder (pDCD). Based on a strong body of evidence indicating that paediatric samples of DCD often experience difficulties engaging MI, we hypothesised that young adults with pDCD would demonstrate similar difficulties. The performance of 12 young adults (19-35 years) with pDCD was compared to 47 age-matched controls on a traditional mental hand rotation task. Mean inverse efficiency scores were generated for each participant by dividing each participant's mean RT by their proportion of correct responses at each of the stimuli presentation conditions. Preliminary analysis revealed that the performance profiles of individuals with pDCD and age-matched controls showed evidence of being constrained by the biomechanical and postural constraints of real movement, suggesting that both groups engaged in an embodied (MI) strategy to complete the task. Despite engaging in a MI strategy, however, young adults with pDCD were nonetheless significantly less efficient when doing so, shown by significant main effects for group on all group efficiency comparisons. Based on the assumption that MI provides insight into the internal 'neural' action representation that precedes action, we argue that the less efficient MI performance demonstrated by young adults with pDCD may indicate inefficiencies engaging or implementing internal action representations. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  3. Classification of Two Class Motor Imagery Tasks Using Hybrid GA-PSO Based K-Means Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transferring the brain computer interface (BCI from laboratory condition to meet the real world application needs BCI to be applied asynchronously without any time constraint. High level of dynamism in the electroencephalogram (EEG signal reasons us to look toward evolutionary algorithm (EA. Motivated by these two facts, in this work a hybrid GA-PSO based K-means clustering technique has been used to distinguish two class motor imagery (MI tasks. The proposed hybrid GA-PSO based K-means clustering is found to outperform genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO based K-means clustering techniques in terms of both accuracy and execution time. The lesser execution time of hybrid GA-PSO technique makes it suitable for real time BCI application. Time frequency representation (TFR techniques have been used to extract the feature of the signal under investigation. TFRs based features are extracted and relying on the concept of event related synchronization (ERD and desynchronization (ERD feature vector is formed.

  4. The hybrid BCI system for movement control by combining motor imagery and moving onset visual evoked potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Li, Hui; Deng, Lili; Yang, Hao; Lv, Xulin; Li, Peiyang; Li, Fali; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Tiejun; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Movement control is an important application for EEG-BCI (EEG-based brain–computer interface) systems. A single-modality BCI cannot provide an efficient and natural control strategy, but a hybrid BCI system that combines two or more different tasks can effectively overcome the drawbacks encountered in single-modality BCI control. Approach. In the current paper, we developed a new hybrid BCI system by combining MI (motor imagery) and mVEP (motion-onset visual evoked potential), aiming to realize the more efficient 2D movement control of a cursor. Main result. The offline analysis demonstrates that the hybrid BCI system proposed in this paper could evoke the desired MI and mVEP signal features simultaneously, and both are very close to those evoked in the single-modality BCI task. Furthermore, the online 2D movement control experiment reveals that the proposed hybrid BCI system could provide more efficient and natural control commands. Significance. The proposed hybrid BCI system is compensative to realize efficient 2D movement control for a practical online system, especially for those situations in which P300 stimuli are not suitable to be applied.

  5. Enhancing performance of a motor imagery based brain–computer interface by incorporating electrical stimulation-induced SSSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Weibo; Qiu, Shuang; Wang, Kun; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhao, Xin; He, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Jiajia; Ming, Dong

    2017-04-01

    Objective. We proposed a novel simultaneous hybrid brain–computer interface (BCI) by incorporating electrical stimulation into a motor imagery (MI) based BCI system. The goal of this study was to enhance the overall performance of an MI-based BCI. In addition, the brain oscillatory pattern in the hybrid task was also investigated. Approach. 64-channel electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded during MI, selective attention (SA) and hybrid tasks in fourteen healthy subjects. In the hybrid task, subjects performed MI with electrical stimulation which was applied to bilateral median nerve on wrists simultaneously. Main results. The hybrid task clearly presented additional steady-state somatosensory evoked potential (SSSEP) induced by electrical stimulation with MI-induced event-related desynchronization (ERD). By combining ERD and SSSEP features, the performance in the hybrid task was significantly better than in both MI and SA tasks, achieving a ~14% improvement in total relative to the MI task alone and reaching ~89% in mean classification accuracy. On the contrary, there was no significant enhancement obtained in performance while separate ERD feature was utilized in the hybrid task. In terms of the hybrid task, the performance using combined feature was significantly better than using separate ERD or SSSEP feature. Significance. The results in this work validate the feasibility of our proposed approach to form a novel MI-SSSEP hybrid BCI outperforming a conventional MI-based BCI through combing MI with electrical stimulation.

  6. Single-trial classification of motor imagery differing in task complexity: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For brain computer interfaces (BCIs, which may be valuable in neurorehabilitation, brain signals derived from mental activation can be monitored by non-invasive methods, such as functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS. Single-trial classification is important for this purpose and this was the aim of the presented study. In particular, we aimed to investigate a combined approach: 1 offline single-trial classification of brain signals derived from a novel wireless fNIRS instrument; 2 to use motor imagery (MI as mental task thereby discriminating between MI signals in response to different tasks complexities, i.e. simple and complex MI tasks. Methods 12 subjects were asked to imagine either a simple finger-tapping task using their right thumb or a complex sequential finger-tapping task using all fingers of their right hand. fNIRS was recorded over secondary motor areas of the contralateral hemisphere. Using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA and cross validation, we selected for each subject a best-performing feature combination consisting of 1 one out of three channel, 2 an analysis time interval ranging from 5-15 s after stimulation onset and 3 up to four Δ[O2Hb] signal features (Δ[O2Hb] mean signal amplitudes, variance, skewness and kurtosis. Results The results of our single-trial classification showed that using the simple combination set of channels, time intervals and up to four Δ[O2Hb] signal features comprising Δ[O2Hb] mean signal amplitudes, variance, skewness and kurtosis, it was possible to discriminate single-trials of MI tasks differing in complexity, i.e. simple versus complex tasks (inter-task paired t-test p ≤ 0.001, over secondary motor areas with an average classification accuracy of 81%. Conclusions Although the classification accuracies look promising they are nevertheless subject of considerable subject-to-subject variability. In the discussion we address each of these aspects, their

  7. Discriminating hand gesture motor imagery tasks using cortical current density estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Bradley; Baxter, Bryan; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Current EEG based brain computer interface (BCI) systems have achieved successful control in up to 3 dimensions; however the current paradigm may be unnatural for many rehabilitative and recreational applications. Therefore there is a great need to find motor imagination (MI) tasks that are realistic for output device control. In this paper we present our results on classifying hand gesture MI tasks, including right hand flexion, extension, supination and pronation using a novel EEG inverse imaging approach. By using both temporal and spatial specificity in the source domain we were able to separate MI tasks with up to 95% accuracy for binary classification of any two tasks compared to a maximum of only 79% in the sensor domain.

  8. Adding effect of current displacement and magnetic circuit saturation in an asynchronous motor mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Tsodik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A methodology of an asynchronous motor mathematical model synthesis is described. Experiments are suggested to be conducted in the following sequence. Geometrical models are first built in AutoCAD, then imported to Comsol Multiphysics, and further processed in Matlab with computation of coefficients and dependences applied in the asynchronous motor mathematical model.

  9. A Motor Imagery During Blind Action is Guided by the Same Foci of Attention as Actual Performance in a Sample Comprising Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem Khalaf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence that focussing on the goal of an action improves performance relative to focussing on the concrete motor behaviours. The current study tests whether blind action guided by imagery relies on the same foci of attention. Thirty female participants took part in an experiment. In each condition there were 20 trials, they were asked to close their eyes and draw a straight line between two landmarks on a graphics tablet. We instructed them, in three conditions, to focus on (1 mental imagery of the goal landmark (external focus of attention, (2 drawing a straight line with the fingers (internal focus, or (3 without a specific focus of attention (control. We tested to what extent these attention instructions affected drawing performance, in terms of both deviations of the participants’ lines from an ideal straight line, and the time it took to complete the line. The study revealed that the manipulation specifically affected the deviation measure and that an external focus of attention was better than an internal focus and the control condition. These findings reveal that that mental imagery during blind action relies on same processes as actual performance. These data give perceptual representations of a direct role in motor control. They will be related to current theories of action control (constrained action hypothesis, ideomotor theories, and dual task accounts.

  10. Reduced motor imagery efficiency is associated with online control difficulties in children with probable developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Enticott, Peter G; Hyde, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the ability to correct reaching movements in response to unexpected target changes (i.e., online control) is reduced in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Recent computational modeling of human reaching suggests that these inefficiencies may result from difficulties generating and/or monitoring internal representations of movement. This study was the first to test this putative relationship empirically. We did so by investigating the degree to which the capacity to correct reaching mid-flight could be predicted by motor imagery (MI) proficiency in a sample of children with probable DCD (pDCD). Thirty-four children aged 8 to 12 years (17 children with pDCD and 17 age-matched controls) completed the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI, and a double-step reaching task (DSRT), a protocol commonly adopted to infer one's capacity for correcting reaching online. As per previous research, children with pDCD demonstrated inefficiencies in their ability to generate internal action representations and correct their reaching online, demonstrated by inefficient hand rotation performance and slower correction to the reach trajectory following unexpected target perturbation during the DSRT compared to age-matched controls. Critically, hierarchical moderating regression demonstrated that even after general reaching ability was controlled for, MI efficiency was a significant predictor of reaching correction efficiency, a relationship that was constant across groups. Ours is the first study to provide direct pilot evidence in support of the view that a decreased capacity for online control of reaching typical of DCD may be associated with inefficiencies generating and/or using internal representations of action.

  11. A novel calibration and task guidance framework for motor imagery BCI via a tendon vibration induced sensation with kinesthesia illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lin; Meng, Jianjun; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Lack of efficient calibration and task guidance in motor imagery (MI) based brain-computer interface (BCI) would result in the failure of communication or control, especially in patients, such as a stroke with motor impairment and intact sensation, locked-in state amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in which the sources of data for calibration may worsen the subsequent decoding. In addition, enhancing the proprioceptive experience in MI might improve the BCI performance. Approach. In this work, we propose a new calibrating and task guidance methodology to further improve the MI BCI, exploiting the afferent nerve system through tendon vibration stimulation to induce a sensation with kinesthesia illusion. A total of 30 subjects’ experiments were carried out, and randomly divided into a control group (control-group) and calibration and task guidance group (CTG-group). Main results. Online experiments have shown that MI could be decoded by classifier calibrated solely using sensation data, with 8 of the 15 subjects in the CTG-Group above 80%, 3 above 95% and all above 65%. Offline chronological cross-validation analysis shows that it has reached a comparable performance with the traditional calibration method (F(1,14)=0.14,P=0.7176). In addition, the discrimination accuracy of MI in the CTG-Group is significantly 12.17% higher on average than that in the control-group (unpaired-T test, P = 0.0086), and illusory sensation indicates no significant difference (unpaired-T test, p = 0.3412). The finding of the existed similarity of the discriminative brain patterns and grand averaged ERD/ERS between imagined movement (actively induced) and illusory movement (passively evoked) also validates the proposed calibration and task guidance framework. Significance. The cognitive complexity of the illusory sensation task is much lower and more objective than that of MI. In addition, subjects’ kinesthetic experience mentally simulated during the MI task might be enhanced by

  12. Motor Imagery Experiences and Use: Asking Patients after Stroke Where, When, What, Why, and How They Use Imagery: A Qualitative Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Schuster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A framework on where, when, what, why, and how to use imagery from sports psychology was explored whether it can be applied in patients after stroke in their chronic stage. Methods. Eleven patients (ages 31–85, 3 females, 1.3–6.4 years after stroke were interviewed. Semistructured interviews were conducted before and after a two-week MI intervention period with six MI sessions. Information was obtained regarding experiences and knowledge of MI, and the evaluation of an MI practical example. The coding scheme was based on the framework and a hierarchical categorisation. Results. Information regarding domains where, when, what, why, and how to use imagery was addressed. Patients imagined themselves as healthy individuals, did not focus on surroundings during MI practice,and reported to use positive imagery only. After MI training, patients became more flexible regarding their location and position during MI practice. Conclusions. MI became an automatic process, and patients did not need specific concentration and quietness as mentioned in the first interview. Patients recommended daily MI training and began to transfer MI to practice movements that were affected by the stroke. In contrast to sports, patients did not talk about how MI was triggered rather than how MI was designed.

  13. 普拉提运动想象的脑电功率谱分析%Power spectral analysis of EEG during Pilates motor imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙红敏; 边志杰; 崔冬; 李小俚

    2012-01-01

    Neural plasticity and movement therapy techniques have been widely used in brain rehabilitation of functional disorders, but still lack of scientific basis. Aiming at this problem, the EEG power spectral of Pilates trained college students in resting and motor imagery states ias analysed. Compared with the resting state, the Alpha peak frequency was significantly increased among the whole brain, and the Beta peak frequency is increased among the forehead and fronto-central area in the Pilates motor imagery. The statistical results show that the connection among the brain neural network can be improved, thus the function of specific brain areas can be affected by Pilates motor imagery. A guide has been provided for the promotion of Pilates exercise and the use of the Pilates motor imagery in the disease rehabilitation field in the future.%神经可塑性技术和运动疗法已经在大脑功能障碍疾病的康复中得到了广泛应用,但仍然缺乏科学依据.针对此问题,本文对受过普拉提训练的大学生在静息和运动想象过程中脑电功率谱进行分析.结果发现与静息状态相比,普拉提运动想象会引起整个脑区的Alpha主峰频率显著增加,前额和额中央区的Beta主峰频率显著增加.该研究统计结果表明普拉提运动确实能够改善大脑神经网络之间的连接,进而影响特定脑区的功能,这可能为将来普拉提运动的推广和将普拉提运动想象应用于脑功能疾病康复领域提供了参考依据.

  14. Block aerial triangulation based on two flight levels ADS40 imagery data%利用双高度层ADS40影像进行区域网空中三角测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁启伟; 戴晨光; 刘亚璠; 万欢

    2012-01-01

    Aerial triangulation, which is the crucial part in the photogrammetry process, is a method to calculate the plane coordinates and elevation of the tie points and the exterior orientation parameters of the photo based on some amount control points. With the development of navigating and positioning technique, highly accurate POS system is equipped on the aerial aircraft to record the position and attitude of the camera at the shooting moment, which is used to support the aerial triangulation. In this paper, it used the two flight levels ADS40 imagery data, POS data and some ground control data to perform aerial triangulation based on ORIMA software. And finally the accuracy of the aerial triangulation with two flight levels imagery data was compared with that of the solo flight level imagery data.%空中三角测量是利用航摄像片与被摄目标之间的空间几何位置关系,根据少量的野外控制点,计算节点的平面坐标与高程以及航摄像片的外方位元素的方法,是摄影测量过程中的重要环节.随着导航定位技术的发展,高精度POS装置被广泛安装到航拍飞机上,用于记录航拍时刻相机的位置与姿态,从而进行辅助空中三角测量.本文研究利用双高度层的ADS40航线影像,结合POS数据,利用一定数量的控制点,基于ORIMA软件进行空中三角测量,并对其解算精度与同一区域单高度层航线影像的空三精度进行比较.

  15. Robot-Assisted Proprioceptive Training with Added Vibro-Tactile Feedback Enhances Somatosensory and Motor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppone, Anna Vera; Squeri, Valentina; Semprini, Marianna; Masia, Lorenzo; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the trainability of the proprioceptive sense and explored the relationship between proprioception and motor learning. With vision blocked, human learners had to perform goal-directed wrist movements relying solely on proprioceptive/haptic cues to reach several haptically specified targets. One group received additional somatosensory movement error feedback in form of vibro-tactile cues applied to the skin of the forearm. We used a haptic robotic device for the wrist and implemented a 3-day training regimen that required learners to make spatially precise goal-directed wrist reaching movements without vision. We assessed whether training improved the acuity of the wrist joint position sense. In addition, we checked if sensory learning generalized to the motor domain and improved spatial precision of wrist tracking movements that were not trained. The main findings of the study are: First, proprioceptive acuity of the wrist joint position sense improved after training for the group that received the combined proprioceptive/haptic and vibro-tactile feedback (VTF). Second, training had no impact on the spatial accuracy of the untrained tracking task. However, learners who had received VTF significantly reduced their reliance on haptic guidance feedback when performing the untrained motor task. That is, concurrent VTF was highly salient movement feedback and obviated the need for haptic feedback. Third, VTF can be also provided by the limb not involved in the task. Learners who received VTF to the contralateral limb equally benefitted. In conclusion, somatosensory training can significantly enhance proprioceptive acuity within days when learning is coupled with vibro-tactile sensory cues that provide feedback about movement errors. The observable sensory improvements in proprioception facilitates motor learning and such learning may generalize to the sensorimotor control of the untrained motor tasks. The implications of these findings for

  16. Motor Imagery EEG Classification Based on CI-HMM%基于CI-HMM的运动想象脑电信号分类

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟明; 满海涛; 佘青山

    2013-01-01

    针对隐马尔科夫模型在运动想象脑电信号分类应用中,其独立性假设与脑电信号间相关性的不一致问题,提出一种基于Choquet模糊积分隐马尔科夫模型的脑电信号分类方法。该模型应用模糊积分的单调性取代了概率测度的可加性,放宽了隐马尔科夫模型的独立性假设。利用重叠滑动窗对脑电信号分段,然后对每段数据提取绝对均值、波长和小波包相对能量特征,构成特征序列用于CI-HMM的训练和分类。选取2008年BCI竞赛Datasets 1的两类运动想象数据进行分类实验,结果表明,该方法有效提高了隐马尔科夫模型方法对运动想象脑电信号分类的性能。%In the applications of hidden Markov model( HMM) in motor imagery electroencephalogram( EEG) classi-fication,the independence assumption of HMM is inconsistent with the inherent correlation of EEG signals. In order to resolve the problem,an EEG classification method based on Choquet fuzzy integral HMM( CI-HMM) is proposed. The independence assumption of HMM is relaxed by substituting the monotonicity of fuzzy integrals for the additivity of probability measures. Each signal was segmented using overlapping sliding window. Then from each segment,the absolute mean,wavelength and wavelet packet based relative energy features were extracted to constitute observation sequence for the CI-HMM training and classification. The BCI Competition 2008 Datasets 1 with two classes of motor imagery were selected for classification experiments. The experimental results show that this method can effectively improve the performance of the HMM method used in motor imagery EEG classification.

  17. Modulation of event-related desynchronization during motor imagery with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima, Yuko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Matsushika, Yayoi; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Hase, Kimitaka; Ushiyama, Junichi; Ushiba, Junichi; Liu, Meigen

    2012-09-01

    Electroencephalogram-based brain-computer interface (BCI) has been developed as a new neurorehabilitative tool for patients with severe hemiparesis. However, its application has been limited because of difficulty detecting stable brain signals from the affected hemisphere. It has been reported that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate event-related desynchronization (ERD) in healthy persons. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that anodal tDCS could modulate ERD in patients with severe hemiparetic stroke. The participants were six patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke (mean age, 56.8 ± 9.5 years; mean time from the onset, 70.0 ± 19.6 months; Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor score, 30.8 ± 16.5). We applied anodal tDCS (10 min, 1 mA) and sham stimulation over the affected primary motor cortex in a random order. ERD of the mu rhythm (mu ERD) with motor imagery of extension of the affected finger was assessed before and after anodal tDCS and sham stimulation. Mu ERD of the affected hemisphere increased significantly after anodal tDCS, whereas it did not change after sham stimulation. Our results show that anodal tDCS can increase mu ERD in patients with hemiparetic stroke, indicating that anodal tDCS could be used as a conditioning tool for BCI in stroke patients.

  18. On the Added Value of Quad-Pol Data in a Multi-Temporal Crop Classification Framework Based on RADARSAT-2 Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantzazu Larrañaga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Polarimetric SAR images are a rich data source for crop mapping. However, quad-pol sensors have some limitations due to their complexity, increased data rate, and reduced coverage and revisit time. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the added value of quad-pol data in a multi-temporal crop classification framework based on SAR imagery. With this aim, three RADARSAT-2 scenes were acquired between May and June 2010. Once we analyzed the separability and the descriptive analysis of the features, an object-based supervised classification was performed using the Random Forests classification algorithm. Classification results obtained with dual-pol (VV-VH data as input were compared to those using quad-pol data in different polarization bases (linear H-V, circular, and linear 45°, and also to configurations where several polarimetric features (Pauli and Cloude–Pottier decomposition features and co-pol coherence and phase difference were added. Dual-pol data obtained satisfactory results, equal to those obtained with quad-pol data (in H-V basis in terms of overall accuracy (0.79 and Kappa values (0.69. Quad-pol data in circular and linear 45° bases resulted in lower accuracies. The inclusion of polarimetric features, particularly co-pol coherence and phase difference, resulted in enhanced classification accuracies with an overall accuracy of 0.86 and Kappa of 0.79 in the best case, when all the polarimetric features were added. Improvements were also observed in the identification of some particular crops, but major crops like cereals, rapeseed, and sunflower already achieved a satisfactory accuracy with the VV-VH dual-pol configuration and obtained only minor improvements. Therefore, it can be concluded that C-band VV-VH dual-pol data is almost ready to be used operationally for crop mapping as long as at least three acquisitions in dates reflecting key growth stages representing typical phenology differences of the present crops are

  19. Performance evaluation of a motor-imagery-based EEG-Brain computer interface using a combined cue with heterogeneous training data in BCI-Naive subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Youngbum

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subjects in EEG-Brain computer interface (BCI system experience difficulties when attempting to obtain the consistent performance of the actual movement by motor imagery alone. It is necessary to find the optimal conditions and stimuli combinations that affect the performance factors of the EEG-BCI system to guarantee equipment safety and trust through the performance evaluation of using motor imagery characteristics that can be utilized in the EEG-BCI testing environment. Methods The experiment was carried out with 10 experienced subjects and 32 naive subjects on an EEG-BCI system. There were 3 experiments: The experienced homogeneous experiment, the naive homogeneous experiment and the naive heterogeneous experiment. Each experiment was compared in terms of the six audio-visual cue combinations and consisted of 50 trials. The EEG data was classified using the least square linear classifier in case of the naive subjects through the common spatial pattern filter. The accuracy was calculated using the training and test data set. The p-value of the accuracy was obtained through the statistical significance test. Results In the case in which a naive subject was trained by a heterogeneous combined cue and tested by a visual cue, the result was not only the highest accuracy (p Conclusions We propose the use of this measuring methodology of a heterogeneous combined cue for training data and a visual cue for test data by the typical EEG-BCI algorithm on the EEG-BCI system to achieve effectiveness in terms of consistence, stability, cost, time, and resources management without the need for a trial and error process.

  20. Evaluation and Comparison of QuickBird and ADS40-SH52 Multispectral Imagery for Mapping Iberian Wild Pear Trees (Pyrus bourgaeana, Decne in a Mediterranean Mixed Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Arenas-Castro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of images with very high spatial and spectral resolution from airborne sensors or those aboard satellites is opening new possibilities for the analysis of fine-scale vegetation, such as the identification and classification of individual tree species. To evaluate the potential of these images, a study was carried out to compare the spatial, spectral and temporal resolution between QuickBird and ADS40-SH52 imagery, in order to discriminate and identify, within the mixed Mediterranean forest, individuals of the Iberian wild pear (Pyrus bourgaeana. This is a typical species of the Mediterranean forest, but its biology and ecology are still poorly known. The images were subjected to different correction processes and data were homogenized. Vegetation classes and individual trees were identified on the images, which were classified from two types of supervised classification (Maximum Likelihood and Support Vector Machines on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The classification values were satisfactory. The classifiers were compared, and Support Vector Machines was the algorithm that provided the best results in terms of overall accuracy. The QuickBird image showed higher overall accuracy (86.16% when the Support Vector Machines algorithm was applied. In addition, individuals of Iberian wild pear were discriminated with probability of over 55%, when the Maximum Likelihood algorithm was applied. From the perspective of improving the sampling effort, these results are a starting point for facilitating research on the abundance, distribution and spatial structure of P. bourgaeana at different scales, in order to quantify the conservation status of this species.

  1. Non motor tasks improve adaptive brain-computer interface performance in users with severe motor impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef eFaller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with severe motor impairment can use event-related desynchronization (ERD based BCIs as assistive technology. Auto-calibrating and adaptive ERD-based BCIs that users control with motor imagery tasks (SMR-AdBCI have proven effective for healthy users. We aim to find an improved configuration of such an adaptive ERD-based BCI for individuals with severe motor impairment as a result of spinal cord injury (SCI or stroke. We hypothesized that an adaptive ERD-based BCI, that automatically selects a user specific class-combination from motor-related and non motor-related mental tasks during initial auto-calibration (Auto-AdBCI could allow for higher control performance than a conventional SMR-AdBCI. To answer this question we performed offline analyses on two sessions (21 data sets total of cue-guided, five-class electroencephalography (EEG data recorded from individuals with SCI or stroke. On data from the twelve individuals in Session 1, we first identified three bipolar derivations for the SMR-AdBCI. In a similar way, we determined three bipolar derivations and four mental tasks for the Auto-AdBCI. We then simulated both, the SMR-AdBCI and the Auto-AdBCI configuration on the unseen data from the nine participants in Session 2 and compared the results. On the unseen data of Session 2 from individuals with SCI or stroke, we found that automatically selecting a user specific class-combination from motor-related and non motor-related mental tasks during initial auto-calibration (Auto-AdBCI significantly (p<0.01 improved classification performance compared to an adaptive ERD-based BCI that only used motor imagery tasks (SMR-AdBCI; average accuracy of 75.7 versus 66.3%.

  2. 运动想象的脑机制及其在卒中患者运动功能康复中的应用%Brain mechanisms of motor imagery and its application in motor rehabilitation in patients with stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹湾(综述); 陈启波(审校)

    2014-01-01

    Motor imagery ( MI) combined with physiotherapy can offer functional benefits after stroke .Due to the simple, MI can fully mobilize the patients to actively participate in rehabilitation training , and is gradually applied to clinical practice .This paper briefly reviewed the brain mechanisms of motor imagery and its application in motor rehabilitation in patients with stroke .%运动想象(motor imagery,MI)与物理治疗相结合可以改善脑卒中后患者肢体功能。 MI简便易行,能充分调动患者积极主动参与康复训练,现已逐步应用到临床实践中。该文就MI的脑机制及其在脑卒中患者运动功能康复中的应用进行综述。

  3. Differences in Motor Imagery between Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder with and without the Combined Type of ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew; Vance, Alasdair; Maruff, Paul; Wilson, Peter; Cairney, Sheree

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed, and questioned, whether motor impairments in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder, combined type (ADHD-C) alone, developmental coordination disorder (DCD) alone, and ADHD-C and comorbid DCD (ADHD-C/DCD) may arise from disruption to a common set of cognitive functions and their related neural substrate. This study examined…

  4. Different performances in static and dynamic imagery and real locomotion. An exploratory trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto eFusco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery is a mental representation of an action without its physical execution. Recently, the simultaneous movement of the body has been added to the mental simulation. This refers to dynamic motor imagery (dMI. This study was aimed at analyzing the temporal features for static and dMI in different locomotor conditions (natural walking, NW, light running, LR, lateral walking, LW, backward walking, BW, and whether these performances were more related to all the given conditions or present only in walking. We have been also evaluated the steps performed in the dMI in comparison with the ones performed by real locomotion. Twenty healthy participants (29.3 ± 5.1 y. old were asked to move towards a visualized target located at 10mt. In dMI, no significant temporal differences respect the actual locomotion were found for all the given tasks (NW: p=0.058, LR: p=0.636, BW: p=0.096; LW: p=0,487. Significant temporal differences between static imagery and actual movements were found for LR (p<0.001 and LW (p<0.001, due to an underestimation of time needed to achieve the target in imagined locomotion. Significant differences in terms of number of steps among tasks were found for LW (p<0.001 and BW (p=0.036, whereas neither in NW (p=0.124 nor LR (p=0.391 between dMI and real locomotion.Our results confirmed that motor imagery is a task-dependent process, with walking being temporally closer than other locomotor conditions. Moreover, the time records of dynamic motor imagery are nearer to the ones of actual locomotion respect than the ones of static motor imagery. Keywords: Walking, dynamic motor imagery, human locomotion, chronometry.

  5. Motor imagery-induced EEG patterns in individuals with spinal cord injury and their impact on brain-computer interface accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Putz, G. R.; Daly, I.; Kaiser, V.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Assimilating the diagnosis complete spinal cord injury (SCI) takes time and is not easy, as patients know that there is no ‘cure' at the present time. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can facilitate daily living. However, inter-subject variability demands measurements with potential user groups and an understanding of how they differ to healthy users BCIs are more commonly tested with. Thus, a three-class motor imagery (MI) screening (left hand, right hand, feet) was performed with a group of 10 able-bodied and 16 complete spinal-cord-injured people (paraplegics, tetraplegics) with the objective of determining what differences were present between the user groups and how they would impact upon the ability of these user groups to interact with a BCI. Approach. Electrophysiological differences between patient groups and healthy users are measured in terms of sensorimotor rhythm deflections from baseline during MI, electroencephalogram microstate scalp maps and strengths of inter-channel phase synchronization. Additionally, using a common spatial pattern algorithm and a linear discriminant analysis classifier, the classification accuracy was calculated and compared between groups. Main results. It is seen that both patient groups (tetraplegic and paraplegic) have some significant differences in event-related desynchronization strengths, exhibit significant increases in synchronization and reach significantly lower accuracies (mean (M) = 66.1%) than the group of healthy subjects (M = 85.1%). Significance. The results demonstrate significant differences in electrophysiological correlates of motor control between healthy individuals and those individuals who stand to benefit most from BCI technology (individuals with SCI). They highlight the difficulty in directly translating results from healthy subjects to participants with SCI and the challenges that, therefore, arise in providing BCIs to such individuals.

  6. A Genetic-Based Feature Selection Approach in the Identification of Left/Right Hand Motor Imagery for a Brain-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacoub, Charles; Mhanna, Georges; Rihana, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography is a non-invasive measure of the brain electrical activity generated by millions of neurons. Feature extraction in electroencephalography analysis is a core issue that may lead to accurate brain mental state classification. This paper presents a new feature selection method that improves left/right hand movement identification of a motor imagery brain-computer interface, based on genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks used as classifiers. Raw electroencephalography signals are first preprocessed using appropriate filtering. Feature extraction is carried out afterwards, based on spectral and temporal signal components, and thus a feature vector is constructed. As various features might be inaccurate and mislead the classifier, thus degrading the overall system performance, the proposed approach identifies a subset of features from a large feature space, such that the classifier error rate is reduced. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to reduce the number of features to as low as 0.5% (i.e., the number of ignored features can reach 99.5%) while improving the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision of the classifier. PMID:28124985

  7. Improving the separability of motor imagery EEG signals using a cross correlation-based least square support vector machine for brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuly, Siuly; Li, Yan

    2012-07-01

    Although brain-computer interface (BCI) techniques have been developing quickly in recent decades, there still exist a number of unsolved problems, such as improvement of motor imagery (MI) signal classification. In this paper, we propose a hybrid algorithm to improve the classification success rate of MI-based electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in BCIs. The proposed scheme develops a novel cross-correlation based feature extractor, which is aided with a least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) for two-class MI signals recognition. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed classifier, we replace the LS-SVM classifier by a logistic regression classifier and a kernel logistic regression classifier, separately, with the same features extracted from the cross-correlation technique for the classification. The proposed approach is tested on datasets, IVa and IVb of BCI Competition III. The performances of those methods are evaluated with classification accuracy through a 10-fold cross-validation procedure. We also assess the performance of the proposed method by comparing it with eight recently reported algorithms. Experimental results on the two datasets show that the proposed LS-SVM classifier provides an improvement compared to the logistic regression and kernel logistic regression classifiers. The results also indicate that the proposed approach outperforms the most recently reported eight methods and achieves a 7.40% improvement over the best results of the other eight studies.

  8. Differences in motor imagery between children with developmental coordination disorder with and without the combined type of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew; Vance, Alasdair; Maruff, Paul; Wilson, Peter; Cairney, Sheree

    2008-08-01

    It has been proposed, and questioned, whether motor impairments in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder, combined type (ADHD-C) alone, developmental coordination disorder (DCD) alone, and ADHD-C and comorbid DCD (ADHD-C/DCD) may arise from disruption to a common set of cognitive functions and their related neural substrate. This study examined movement durations for real and imagined movements in a visually guided pointing task in 58 prepubertal children aged 8 to 12 years old with ADHD-C alone (n=14), ADHD-C/DCD (n=14), DCD alone (n=15), and an age-, sex-, and Full-scale IQ-matched healthy comparison group (n=15). There were 10 males and 4 or 5 females in each group. The DCD alone group demonstrated an inability to generate imagined movements that was not present in the ADHD-C group, with or without comorbid DCD, or healthy comparison participants. These findings add to the emerging literature characterizing intended and actual motor impairments associated with DCD alone.

  9. Single trial predictors for gating motor-imagery brain-computer interfaces based on sensorimotor rhythm and visual evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eGeronimo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For brain-computer interfaces (BCIs that utilize visual cues to direct the user, the neural signals extracted by the computer are representative of ongoing processes, visual evoked responses, and voluntary modulation. We proposed to use three brain signatures for predicting success on a single trial of a BCI task. The first two features, the amplitude and phase of the pre-trial mu amplitude, were chosen as a correlate for cortical excitability. The remaining feature, related to the visually evoked response to the cue, served as a possible measure of fixation and attention to the task. Of these three features, mu rhythm amplitude over the central electrodes at the time of cue presentation and to a lesser extent the single trial visual evoked response were correlated with the success on the subsequent imagery task. Despite the potential for gating trials using these features, an offline gating simulation was limited in its ability to produce an increase in device throughput. This discrepancy highlights a distinction between the identification of predictive features, and the use of this knowledge in an online BCI. Using such a system, we cannot assume that the user will respond similarly when faced with a scenario where feedback is altered by trials that are gated on a regular basis. The results of this study suggest the possibility of using individualized, pre-task neural signatures for personalized and asynchronous (self-paced BCI applications, although these effects need to be quantified in a real-time adaptive scenario in a future study.

  10. LMD算法与运动想象脑电信号的时频分析%LMD algorithm and time-frequency analysis of motor imagery signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓楠; 刘建平

    2013-01-01

    脑电信号是极其复杂的非平稳信号,为了精确处理运动想象脑电信号,采用LMD(局域均值分解)方法对其进行时频分析。首先给出仿真信号的LMD分解及时频分布,而后对左右手运动想象脑电信号进行LMD时频分析。研究结果表明,LMD具有较强的时频刻画能力,能够精确描述脑电信号的非线性时变特性,是对脑电信号进行时频分析的有效方法。%The electroencephalogram (EEG) signal is a very complex non-stationary signal. Local mean decomposition (LMD) method is adopted to perform the time-frequency analysis in EEG signal processing. LMD and time-frequency distribu-tion of a simulation signal is given. The LMD time-frequency analysis for the motor imagery EEG signal of right and left hands is carried out. The results show that LMD has a strong ability to clearly describe the time-frequency distribution,and can accurately describe the nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics of EEG signal. LMD is an effective method of time-frequency analysis in EEG signal processing.

  11. The backtracking search optimization algorithm for frequency band and time segment selection in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhonghai; Wei, Qingguo

    2016-09-01

    Common spatial pattern (CSP) is a powerful algorithm for extracting discriminative brain patterns in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, its performance depends largely on the subject-specific frequency band and time segment. Accurate selection of most responsive frequency band and time segment remains a crucial problem. A novel evolutionary algorithm, the backtracking search optimization algorithm is used to find the optimal frequency band and the optimal combination of frequency band and time segment. The former is searched by a frequency window with changing width of which starting and ending points are selected by the backtracking optimization algorithm; the latter is searched by the same frequency window and an additional time window with fixed width. The three parameters, the starting and ending points of frequency window and the starting point of time window, are jointly optimized by the backtracking search optimization algorithm. Based on the chosen frequency band and fixed or chosen time segment, the same feature extraction is conducted by CSP and subsequent classification is carried out by Fisher discriminant analysis. The classification error rate is used as the objective function of the backtracking search optimization algorithm. The two methods, named BSA-F CSP and BSA-FT CSP, were evaluated on data set of BCI competition and compared with traditional wideband (8-30[Formula: see text]Hz) CSP. The classification results showed that backtracking search optimization algorithm can find much effective frequency band for EEG preprocessing compared to traditional broadband, substantially enhancing CSP performance in terms of classification accuracy. On the other hand, the backtracking search optimization algorithm for joint selection of frequency band and time segment can find their optimal combination, and thus can further improve classification rates.

  12. 基于HHT和改进CSP算法的运动想象BCI系统%Brain-Computer Interface System of Motor Imagery Base on HHT and Improved CSP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶竞; 石锐; 何庆华

    2012-01-01

    Human motor imagery tasks evoke kinds of electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. A brain computer interface is a system that can translate the signal of brain for using in communication and control. By comparing mainstream methods of time-frequency analysis, this paper has adopted Hil- bert- Huang Transform (HHT) to obtain the marginal spectrum and time domain amplitude spectrum to make the time-frequency analysis of EEG. To further enhance' noise ratio of the EEG signal, an im- proved CSP algorithm has been applied. Combined with time-domain energy analysis, reduced dimen- sion feature by sliding window is extracted to make a further improvement in feature selection. The re- suits of experiment indicate that the method can extract feature and classify effectively.%为进一步提高脑电信号的信噪比,通过希尔伯特一黄变换对脑电信号进行时频分析,得到对应的边际谱与瞬时幅值谱。采用改进公共空间模式算法处理信号,结合时域二阶矩能量分析方法,提取经滑动窗截取降维后的能量特征,基于提取的特征对脑电信号进行识别。实验结果表明,该方法能够有效地实现特征提取和模式识别。

  13. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system.

  14. The Adjustment of AD Speed Command Range of Motor Controller%电机控制器的AD速度指令范围调整

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松松; 卢刚; 李声晋; 周勇

    2012-01-01

    The data communication between host computer and brushless DC motor controller base on TMS320F28335 were researched and achieved, and the adjustment of AD speed command range was realized. The PC monitoring platform was programmed by the CVI8.5 language. The adjustment procedures of AD speed command rang was written by the C language , which was correspond to the PC monitoring platform. The experimental results validated the data communication between host computer and motor controller, and the adjustment of AD speed command range.%研究实现了基于TMS320F28335控制的无刷直流电动机控制器与上位机之间的数据通讯,并在此基础上实现了AD速度指令范围调整功能.用CV18.5编写了上位机监控平台,C语言编写了与之对应的AD速度指令范围调整程序,实验结果验证了上位机与电机控制器之间的数据通讯和AD速度指令范围调整功能.

  15. Effect of motor imagery therapy on quality of life in patients with cervical cancer%运动想象疗法对宫颈癌患者生活质量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟瑞媚; 曾雪婷; 李凯

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨运动想象疗法对宫颈癌患者生活质量的影响。方法:选取50例宫颈癌患者采用随机数字表法分为研究组和对照组各25例,对照组实施常规护理,研究组在对照组的基础上开展运动想象疗法。两组在干预前和干预后第4周末均接受生活质量核心问卷(QLQ-C30)调查。结果:干预后,研究组生活质量评分均高于对照组(P﹤0.05)。结论:运动想象疗法是一项科学、合理、有效的护理方案,它不仅能改善患者的负性情感,还能提高患者的生活质量,值得临床推广。%Objective:To investigate the effect of motor imagery therapy on quality of life in patients with cervical cancer. Methods:50 cervical cancer patients were randomly divided into the study group and the control group(25 cases in each group). The routine nursing care was implemented in the control group and the extra motor imagery therapy was provided for the patients in the study group. The pa-tients in both groups received the assessment of life quality by using QLQ-C30 before the intervention and at the end of the fourth week after the intervention. Results:The scores of quality of life of the patients were higher in the study group than the control group after motor imagery therapy(P﹤0. 05). Conclusion:The motor imagery therapy is one of scientific,reasonable and effective nursing methods;it can not only relieve the negative emotions,but also improve the quality of life of the patients.

  16. 运动意识任务的模式识别方法研究%Pattern recognition method of motor imagery tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宝国; 宋爱国; 费树岷

    2011-01-01

    针对脑机接口研究中运动想象脑电信号的模式识别问题,提出了一种基于离散小波变换和AR双谱的特征提取方法.该方法首先利用Daubechies类小波函数对二路脑电信号进行3层分解,抽取小波系数的均值、能量均值、均方差三个特征;然后,采用5阶AR模型进行双谱估计,抽取双谱切片特征;最后,将这两类特征进行组合后使用马氏距离线性判别进行分类.利用BCI2003竞赛的标准数据,该方法使得EEG的识别正确率达到92.86%,与竞赛的最好结果(89.29%)相比提高了3.57%,为BCI研究中脑电信号的模式识别提供了有效的手段.%Aiming at the issue of motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG) pattern recognition in the research of brain-computer interface (BCI) , a novel feature extraction method based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and autoregressive (AR) bispectrum is proposed. Firstly, two-channel EEG signals are decomposed to three levels using Daubechies wavelet function. Secondly, the mean, average power and standard deviation of the wavelet coefficients are computed. Thirdly, bispectrum is estimated using fifth-order AR model and diagonal slice characteristic of the bispectrum is extracted. Finally, the above two kinds of features are combined, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on Mahalanobis distance is utilized to classify the combined feature. This method is applied to the standard dataset of BCI Competition 2003 , and experimental results show that the recognition rate reaches 92.86%,which is 3.57% higher than the best result ( 89.29% ) of the competition. This technology provides an effective approach to EEG pattern recognition in BCI research.

  17. Applying a brain-computer interface to support motor imagery practice in people with stroke for upper limb recovery: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonough Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is now sufficient evidence that using a rehabilitation protocol involving motor imagery (MI practice in conjunction with physical practice (PP of goal-directed rehabilitation tasks leads to enhanced functional recovery of paralyzed limbs among stroke sufferers. It is however difficult to confirm patient engagement during an MI in the absence of any on-line measure. Fortunately an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI can provide an on-line measure of MI activity as a neurofeedback for the BCI user to help him/her focus better on the MI task. However initial performance of novice BCI users may be quite moderate and may cause frustration. This paper reports a pilot study in which a BCI system is used to provide a computer game-based neurofeedback to stroke participants during the MI part of a protocol. Methods The participants included five chronic hemiplegic stroke sufferers. Participants received up to twelve 30-minute MI practice sessions (in conjunction with PP sessions of the same duration on 2 days a week for 6 weeks. The BCI neurofeedback performance was evaluated based on the MI task classification accuracy (CA rate. A set of outcome measures including action research arm test (ARAT and grip strength (GS, was made use of in assessing the upper limb functional recovery. In addition, since stroke sufferers often experience physical tiredness, which may influence the protocol effectiveness, their fatigue and mood levels were assessed regularly. Results Positive improvement in at least one of the outcome measures was observed in all the participants, while improvements approached a minimal clinically important difference (MCID for the ARAT. The on-line CA of MI induced sensorimotor rhythm (SMR modulation patterns in the form of lateralized event-related desynchronization (ERD and event-related synchronization (ERS effects, for novice participants was in a moderate range of 60-75% within the limited 12 training

  18. Imaginería motora graduada en el síndrome de miembro fantasma con dolor Graded motor imagery in the phantom limb syndrome with pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Morales-Osorio

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuevas investigaciones sobre los cambios corticales en pacientes con dolor crónico han llevado a una reevaluación de las patologías que cursan con dolor crónico y sus tratamientos. Este es el caso del síndrome de miembro fantasma con dolor (SMFD, el cual se centraba en los estímulos nociceptivos periféricos, y ahora se replantean como una disfunción a nivel central. Una de las herramientas altamente evidencia y muchas veces desconocida para los terapeutas es la imaginería motora graduada (IMG. Esta técnica intenta normalizar la secuencia de procesamientos centrales para remediar el dolor crónico amparado en la neurociencias y en dos regalos de esta, como son las neuronas espejos y la neuromatriz. Este artículo resume brevemente los componentes básicos de la IMG, su aplicación y sus beneficios, la cual es la base de trabajo de nuestra línea de investigación, diseñado para los pacientes con SMFD, perteneciente a un centro clínico de la ciudad de Cartagena de Indias en Colombia.New investigations on cortical changes in patients with chronic pain have led to a reassessment of the pathologies that occur with chronic pain and its treatment. This is the case of Phantom limb syndrome with pain (PLP, which focused on peripheral nociceptive stimulus, and are now rethinking as a dysfunction at central level. One of the tools often highly evidence and therapists is unknown to the Graded motor imagery (IMG. This technique attempts to normalize the central processing sequence to remedy chronic pain, supported in the neurosciences and the two gifts, such as mirror neurons and the neuromatrix. This article briefly summarizes the basic components of IMG, your application and its benefits, which is the working basis of our research, designed for patients with SMFD belonging to a clinical center in Cartagena de Indias in Colombia.

  19. Effect of Motor Imagery on Unilateral Spatial Neglect in Stroke Patients%运动想象疗法在脑卒中偏侧忽略训练中的应用①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛晴霞; 郭根平; 章慧霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of motor imagery on unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in stroke patients. Methods 40 stroke patients with USN were divided into treatment group (n=20) and control group (n=20). Both groups received routine physical therapy train-ing, while the treatment group received motor imagery in addition. All the patients were assessed with Chinese Behavioral Inattention Test (CBIT), Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) and modified Barthel index (MBI) before and 8 weeks af-ter treatment. Results The scores of CBIT, MMSE, FMA and MBI were better in the treatment group than in the control group (P0.05),治疗8周后治疗组各项指标优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论运动想象疗法结合常规康复可改善脑卒中偏侧忽略问题,提高日常生活活动能力。

  20. 专家与新手运动表象过程中的脑电变化特点研究%Research on EEG Characteristics of Expert and Novice in Motor Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安燕; 郑樊慧

    2012-01-01

    Motor imagery is a mental training methods widely used in training and competition,and it's an indispensable field in sport psychology as well.From the perspective of psychophysiology,electroencephalography(EEG) was adopted as the main method of this study in order to explore the characteristics of EEG change in motor imagery process of the difference between expert athletes and novice.The results suggested: During the experiment,it was found that there was no difference between the brain neurology activeness of experts and novice under relaxed condition.No advantage was seen in either left or right hemisphere.During the motor imagery,the different position between expert and novice appeared with movement-related areas,significant differences of δ wave frequency were found left frontal pole、left central and left parietal,α wave frequency were shown left central lobe 、parietal lobes and left occipital lobe,In β wave frequency,significant differences appeared in right parietal,the cortical activation was distributed in the left.Compared with relaxed condition,α wave power percentage in visual motor imagery decreased and increased in kinesthesia motor imagery%运动表象是运动员在训练和比赛中广泛使用的一种非常有效的心理训练方法,也是研究者十分关注的重要研究主题。研究采用EEG来对运动表象进行测量,从心理生理学的角度探索专家与新手之间的差别,研究得出:专家与新手之间安静状态下大脑的神经活跃程度相似,并未因训练不同而产生差异。在运动表象过程中大脑左右半球并没有出现大脑侧性优势。运动表象时专家与新手的差异性出现与运动相关的区域,δ波在左额极区(FP1)、左中央区(C3)、左顶区(P3);α波在左中央区(C3)和左顶区(P3)、右顶区(P4)和左枕区(O1);β波在右顶区(P4)存在显著性差异,其皮层激活在左侧区域分布广泛。运动表象过

  1. 运动想象疗法在40例脑卒中康复中临床观察%The effect of motor imagery therapy in stroke rehabilitation training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆; 林英; 刘淑玉; 罗秀珍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of motor imagery therapy in stroke rehabilitation training.Methods 80 cases of stroke patients,were randomly divided into observation group and control group,40 cases in each group,the control group by Depart-ment of internal medicine drugscombined with conventional rehabilitation treatment,the observation group in the control group treatment increased based on motor imagery therapy,the treatment effect was compared between the two groups.Results the two groups of pa-tients after treatment by different methods,the observation group the FMA score increased significantly than that of control group,the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05 ).Conclusion in the Department of internal medicine drug treatment andrehabilitation training base,combined with motor imagery therapy on stroke has the advantages of obvious curative effect,economy,safety,is the treatment is worthy of clinical application.%目的:探讨运动想象疗法在脑卒中康复训练中的应用效果。方法:80例脑卒中患者,按随机数字表分成观察组和对照组,每组40例,对照组采用内科药物联合常规康复训练治疗;观察组在对照组治疗方法基础上增加运动想象疗法,比较两组患者治疗效果。结果:两组患者经不同方法治疗后,观察组FMA评分升高明显大于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:在内科药物治疗和康复训练基础上,结合运动想象疗法治疗脑卒中具有疗效显著、经济、安全等优点,是临床值得推广应用的治疗方法。

  2. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  3. 基于共空间模式的四类运动想象脑电信号分类方法%Classiifcation Method of Four-Class Motor Imagery EEG Data Based on Common Spatial Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立亭

    2016-01-01

    针对多通道四类运动想象脑电信号分类问题,使用共空间模式的特征提取方法,设计了“一对一”和“一对多”两种特征提取策略,最后结合不同的策略设计了基于支持向量机的不同分类方法。应用提出的方法对四类运动想象脑电信号进行了特征提取和分类,两种策略下分类正确率分别为64%、59%,可见,基于“一对一”的分类结果高于“一对多”的分类结果,说明了该特征提取及分类方法对该数据集的有效性。%Aiming at the classification problem of multi-channel four-class motor imagery EEG signals, the method common spatial pattern is presented for feature extraction. In the method, two feature extraction strategies, called‘one vs one’ and‘one vs rest’ are designed, finally, different classification methods based on support vector machine classifiers are designed according to the different input features. Four-class motor imagery EEG signals are extracted and classified using the proposed method. The classification accuracy of the two methods is 64% and 59%, which show the classification results based on the‘one vs one’ are higher than the classification results of the‘one vs rest’. Respectively, which showthat the proposed method is suitable for the classification of the data.

  4. 基于张量分解的运动想象脑电分类算法%A Algorithm Based on Tensor decomposition for Motor Imagery EEG Classifying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华生; 唐艳; 汤井田

    2012-01-01

    论文结合短时傅里叶变(short time Fourier transform,STFT)和平行因子分解(parallel factor,PARAFAC)模型,对运动想象脑电(EEG)进行分类。首先,通过短时傅里叶变换获得左、右手运动想象脑电的时频分布,然后平行因子分解方法从构建的张量数据中提取时域特征,最后采用贝叶斯分类器对特征进行分类。在短时傅里叶变换中,选择合理的窗函数长度和相邻片段重叠程度很重要,对分类结果有较大的影响,通过调整这两个参数,论文提出的方法获得了较好的分类结果。%this article combines STFT and PARAFAC model to classify motor imagery EEG. Firstly, we get time-frequency distribution of left/right hand motor imagery EEG through STFT algorithm; secondly, temporal features are extracted from the resulted tensors using PARAFAC model; finally, a Bayes classifier is used to classify the features. During STFT analysis, the choice of window length and percent of overlap of adjacent segments is important, which has great influences on the classifying result, through adjusting these two parameters, the algorithm introduced here can perform well.

  5. Alterações na banda alfa do eletrencefalograma durante imagética motora visual e cinestésica Changes in the electroencephalogram alpha band during visual and kinesthetic motor imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Stecklow

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi investigada a contribuição em potência na vizinhança do pico da banda alfa (BPA do EEG durante imagética motora (IM. Sinais EEG (derivações occipitais e parietais foram adquiridos em sujeitos destros (18-40 anos, durante repouso (ESP e IM nas modalidades cinestésica (IMC e visual (IMV, sendo 15 atletas de voleibol e 15 não-atletas. O Revised Movement Imagery Questionnaire não indicou diferenças entre grupos ou modalidades de IM; todavia os atletas imaginaram-se melhor que os não-atletas. Para ambos os grupos, a potência em BPA resultou menor em IM do que em ESP, sendo mais reduzida em IMC. Ativação cortical similar ocorreu em ambos os hemisférios de não-atletas e mais pronunciada no hemisfério esquerdo de atletas, principalmente durante IMC. Tais resultados sugerem que IM reduz a atividade de alfa de acordo com o conhecimento real da tarefa e a modalidade de IM.This study aims at statistically assessing the differences in alpha band power, particularly in the vicinity of the alpha peak (BPA, during motor imagery (MI. Multi-channel EEG (occipital and parietal regions was acquired at rest condition (ESP and MI kinesthetic (MIC and visual (MIV modalities from right-handed male subjects (18-40 years, 15 ‘athletes’ (experienced volleyball players and 15 ‘non-athletes’. The Revised Movement Imagery Questionnaire indicated no differences between groups or MI modalities, but athletes imagine themselves more clearly than non-athletes during MI. The power within BPA reduces in both groups, but greater in MIC than in MIV. The cortical activation was similar in both hemispheres of non-athletes but more pronounced in left hemisphere of athletes, mainly in MIC. The findings suggest that MI reduces alpha activity according to individual knowledge of real execution of motor task and MI modalities.

  6. Mental imagery in music performance: underlying mechanisms and potential benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the role of mental imagery in music performance. Self-reports by musicians, and various other sources of anecdotal evidence, suggest that covert auditory, motor, and/or visual imagery facilitate multiple aspects of music performance. The cognitive and motor mechanisms that underlie such imagery include working memory, action simulation, and internal models. Together these mechanisms support the generation of anticipatory images that enable thorough action planning and movement execution that is characterized by efficiency, temporal precision, and biomechanical economy. In ensemble performance, anticipatory imagery may facilitate interpersonal coordination by enhancing online predictions about others' action timing. Overlap in brain regions subserving auditory imagery and temporal prediction is consistent with this view. It is concluded that individual differences in anticipatory imagery may be a source of variation in expressive performance excellence and the quality of ensemble cohesion. Engaging in effortful musical imagery is therefore justified when artistic perfection is the goal.

  7. The effect of chronic deafferentation on mental imagery: a case study.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Visual- and motor imagery rely primarily on perceptual and motor processes, respectively. In healthy controls, the type of imagery used to solve a task depends on personal preference, task instruction, and task properties. But how does the chronic loss of proprioceptive and tactile sensory inputs from the body periphery influence mental imagery? In a unique case study, we investigated the imagery capabilities of the chronically deafferented patient IW when he was performing a mental rotation ...

  8. 基于信号投影能量特征的脑电意识动态分类%Dynamic Motor Imagery Classification with Signal Power Projection based Feature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永轩; 邱天爽; 刘蓉; 李春月; 马征

    2012-01-01

    The brain-computer Interface (BCI) gives interactive communications between people and the machine, and has fascinated the researchers over the last couple of years. However, the BCI system suffers from a low information transmission rate, low accuracy and poor interactive performance, which is the bottleneck for the promotion of BCI-actuated system. Therefore, to classify different motor commands fast with minimal error is an important problem in the BCI system. For the dynamic classification of motor imagery mind states in the brain-computer interface (BCI) , we proposed a power projection based feature extraction method to classify the EEGs by combining information accumulative posterior Bayesian approach. This method improves the classification accuracy by maximizing the average projection energy difference of the two types of signals. The experimental results on two motor imagery datasets show that the maximum classification accuracy is a-bout 90%. With three indexes, i.e. maximum classification accuracy, kappa coefficient and mutual information, the effectiveness of this method is demonstrated.%针对脑电意识任务动态分类问题,本文提出了一种基于投影能量的特征提取方法来提取反映不同思维状态的脑电特征,并结合信息累积后验贝叶斯方法进行分类以提高脑-机接口系统的分类正确率.该方法通过使两类信号在投影基上的平均投影能量比达到极值,从而达到提高脑电信号分类准确度的作用.实验结果表明两个运动想象数据集上的最大正确率都达到90%左右,最大分类准确率、kappa系数和最大互信息等评价指标的比较也表明该方法能够有效提高BCI系统的性能,具有较好的实用性.

  9. Auditory imagery and the poor-pitch singer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Halpern, Andrea R

    2013-08-01

    The vocal imitation of pitch by singing requires one to plan laryngeal movements on the basis of anticipated target pitch events. This process may rely on auditory imagery, which has been shown to activate motor planning areas. As such, we hypothesized that poor-pitch singing, although not typically associated with deficient pitch perception, may be associated with deficient auditory imagery. Participants vocally imitated simple pitch sequences by singing, discriminated pitch pairs on the basis of pitch height, and completed an auditory imagery self-report questionnaire (the Bucknell Auditory Imagery Scale). The percentage of trials participants sung in tune correlated significantly with self-reports of vividness for auditory imagery, although not with the ability to control auditory imagery. Pitch discrimination was not predicted by auditory imagery scores. The results thus support a link between auditory imagery and vocal imitation.

  10. SPRT-based classification method for motor imagery electroencephalogram%基于序贯似然比检验的运动想象脑电信号分类方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘蓉; 李春月; 王永轩; 王媛媛; 李响

    2013-01-01

    快速准确地对脑电信号进行特征分类是脑-机接口研究的关键问题之一。从人脑决策模型出发,结合自适应小波基特征提取方法,提出了一种基于序贯似然比检验的运动想象脑电信号动态分类方法。该方法在分类中无须预先固定样本量,而是逐次取样,累积分类信息,有利于解决脑-机接口的实时控制问题。为了更好地衡量该方法的有效性,进行了10次10折交叉验证,实验结果表明3个运动想象数据集共8位受试者的平均正确率达到87%以上,互信息和分类时间等指标也表明该方法能够有效提高脑-机接口系统的性能,具有较好的实用性。%To extract and classify the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal features fast and accurately is a key issue for the brain-computer interface (BCI) systems .Based on the human decision-making model ,a motor imagery EEG dynamic classification method is proposed based on the sequential probability ratio testing (SPRT ) combined with an adaptive wavelet feature extraction method . Without pre-fixed sample size , this classification method samples and accumulates classification information successively .It is helpful to solve the real-time control problems in the BCI .In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm , a 10 times 10-fold cross-validation is used . T he experimental results show that the average classification accuracy of three motor imagery datasets of eight subjects is above 87% .The results of mutual information and classification time also show that the method can effectively improve the performance of BCI system and has good practicability .

  11. 多类运动想象任务脑电信号的KNN分类研究%Study on multi-class motor imagery EEG classification based on KNN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冲; 颜世玉; 赵海滨; 王宏

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the features of multi-class motor imagery EEG (electroencephalogram) signals, CSP (common spatial pattern) is used as the feature extraction method of 4 motor imagery tasks (left & right hands, feet and tongue) , and the features are extracted under two conditions of "One versus One" and "One versus Rest". Then, a kind of k- nearest neighbor classifier based on multi-class task mode is designed. Aiming at the problem that different classes of samples have the same number of sample points in multi-class task classification, distance decision method is used to improve the classifier. The CSP feature is classified with the "One versus Rest" and "One versus One" classification methods, and the maximum mean Kappa coefficients are 0. 55 and 0. 59, respectively, which shows that the proposed method is suitable for the classification of the data.%针对基于多类任务的运动想象脑电信号的特点,使用共空间模式特征提取方法分别在“一对一”和“一对多”2种特征提取方法下提取了4类任务(想象左右手、双足以及舌头)运动想象脑电信号的特征.设计了基于多类任务模式的k最近邻分类器,针对多类任务分类过程中会出现不同类别的样本点数相等的情况,通过判断距离的方法改进了分类器,对2种特征提取方法下的共空间模式特征进行分类,分类结果的平均最大Kappa系数分别达到了0 55和0 59,说明了该特征提取及分类方法对该数据集的有效性.

  12. EEG changes during sequences of visual and kinesthetic motor imagery Alterações no EEG durante sequencias de imagética motora visual e cinestésica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Stecklow

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The evoked cerebral electric response when sequences of complex motor imagery (MI task are executed several times is still unclear. This work aims at investigating the existence of habituation in the cortical response, more specifically in the alpha band peak of parietal and occipital areas (10-20 international system electroencephalogram, EEG, protocol. The EEG signals were acquired during sequences of MI of volleyball spike movement in kinesthetic and visual modalities and also at control condition. Thirty right-handed male subjects (18 to 40 years were assigned to either an 'athlete' or a 'non-athlete' group, both containing 15 volunteers. Paired Wilcoxon tests (with α=0.05 indicates that sequential MI of complex tasks promotes cortical changes, mainly in the power vicinity of the alpha peak. This finding is more pronounced along the initial trials and also for the athletes during the modality of kinesthetic motor imagery.A resposta elétrica cerebral evocada quando sequencias de imagética motora (MI de tarefas complexas são executadas seguidamente no tempo permanecem desconhecidas. Este trabalho objetivou investigar a existência de habituação da resposta cortical, mais especificamente na banda do pico de alfa de áreas parietais e occipitais (sistema internacional 10-20, eletroencefalograma, protocolo de EEG. Os sinais de EEG foram adquiridos durante sequências de MI do movimento de ataque do voleibol nas modalidades cinestésica e visual, e também em condição de controle. Trinta voluntários adultos (entre 18 e 40 anos, destros, do gênero masculino foram agrupados como 'atletas' ou 'não-atletas', sendo cada grupo composto de 15 voluntários. Testes pareados de Wilcoxon (com α=0.05 indicaram que a MI sequencial de tarefas complexas promoveram alterações nas respostas corticais, mais especificamente na região ao redor do pico de alfa. Este achado foi mais pronunciado ao longo dos trechos iniciais e também nos atletas durante

  13. Motor cortical plasticity induced by motor learning through mental practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAvanzino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations suggest that actual and mental actions trigger similar neural substrates. Motor learning via physical practice results in long-term potentiation (LTP-like plasticity processes, namely potentiation of M1 and a temporary occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, whether this neuroplasticity process contributes to improve motor performance through mental practice remains to be determined. Here, we tested skill learning-dependent changes in primary motor cortex (M1 excitability and plasticity by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation in subjects trained to physically execute or mentally perform a sequence of finger opposition movements. Before and after physical practice and motor-imagery practice, M1 excitability was evaluated by measuring the input-output (IO curve of motor evoked potentials. M1 long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD-like plasticity was assessed with paired-associative stimulation (PAS of the median nerve and motor cortex using an interstimulus interval of 25 ms (PAS25 or 10 ms (PAS10, respectively. We found that even if after both practice sessions subjects significantly improved their movement speed, M1 excitability and plasticity were differentially influenced by the two practice sessions. First, we observed an increase in the slope of IO curve after physical but not after motor-imagery practice. Second, there was a reversal of the PAS25 effect from LTP-like plasticity to LTD-like plasticity following physical and motor-imagery practice. Third, LTD-like plasticity (PAS10 protocol increased after physical practice, whilst it was occluded after motor-imagery practice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that motor-imagery practice lead to the development of neuroplasticity, as it affected the PAS25- and PAS10- induced plasticity in M1. These results, expanding the current knowledge on how motor-imagery training shapes M1 plasticity, might have a potential impact in

  14. Combined action observation and imagery facilitates corticospinal excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David James Wright

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Observation and imagery of movement both activate similar brain regions to those involved in movement execution. As such, both are recommended as techniques for aiding the recovery of motor function following stroke. Traditionally, action observation and movement imagery have been considered as independent intervention techniques. Researchers have however begun to consider the possibility of combining the two techniques into a single intervention strategy. This study investigated the effect of combined action observation and movement imagery on corticospinal excitability in comparison to either observation or imagery alone. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to the hand representation of the left motor cortex during combined action observation and movement imagery, passive observation, or movement imagery of right index finger abduction-adduction movements or control conditions. Motor evoked potential (MEPs were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM muscles of the right hand. The combined action observation and movement imagery condition produced MEPs of larger amplitude than were obtained during passive observation and control conditions. This effect was only present in the FDI muscle, indicating the facilitation of corticospinal excitability during the combined condition was specific to the muscles involved in the observed/imagined task. These findings have implications for stroke rehabilitation, where combined action observation and movement imagery interventions may prove to be more effective than observation or imagery alone.

  15. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  16. Application of motor imagery therapy on the patients with unilateral spatial neglect%运动想象疗法在单侧空间忽略患者中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小冬; 赵燕娇; 刘杨

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨运动想象疗法对单侧空间忽略患者跌倒效能的影响。方法抽取50例单侧空间忽略患者,按照入院的先后顺序随机分为试验25例和对照组25例;两组患者均接受常规康复治疗,试验组在此基础上进行运动想象疗法,采用中国行为性忽略测试—香港版( CBIT-HK)、修订版跌倒效能量表( MFES)、Berg平衡功能量表( BBS)及步态评估量表( TGA),比较两组的干预效果。结果治疗前两组患者的CBIT-HK、BBS、TGA、MFES评分差异无统计学意义( P>0.05);治疗8周后,两组患者的CBIT-HK、BBS、TGA、MFES评分均明显优于治疗前,差异有统计学意义( P0.05) . After 8 weeks of treatment, scores of patients in the two groups were all higher than before the treatment ( P<0.05) , and scores of patients in the experimental group were significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05).Conclusions Combination of motor imagery therapy with routine rehabilitation can improve patients′ unilateral spatial neglect, improve their function of balance and gait, improve their fall efficacy and reduce incidence of falling.

  17. Motor Imagery Recognition Based on Support Vector Feature Selection Method%基于支持向量特征筛选方法的想象动作识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    綦宏志; 明东; 万柏坤; 任超世; 刘志朋; 殷涛

    2012-01-01

    引入了支持向量特征筛选方法,以克服基于想象动作诱发脑电特征的脑-机接口识别中,由于特征维度较高而训练数据有限、不易获得理想识别效果的问题.支持向量特征筛选方法采用扰动支持向量机代价函数的方法测量特征的分类贡献度,进而建立特征序贯指数,以递归方法进行特征排序和优化筛选.对14例受试者的左右上肢想象动作诱发脑电信号进行分析,提取6类246维特征,采用支持向量递归筛选方法进行特征优选,利用支持向量机对优选特征进行识别,结果显示,支持向量递归筛选得到的优选特征可显著提高识别正确率.研究表明,支持向量特征筛选可以降低无效特征干扰,提高分类器效率,适用于特征维度较高的脑-机接口任务识别.%This paper introduces a support vector feature selection method to improve the recognition of the motor imagery in brain-computer interface, in which it is usually hard to achieve a satisfactory result due to the massive feature dimension and the limited training data. Support vector feature selection measures the contribution of each feature to classification by disturbing the objective function of SVM. Then it constructs a feature ranking criteria and recursively ranks all features, and finally it selects the optimal feature group. Evoked potential induced by left versus right upper limb imaginary motor from 14 subjects is analyzed in this paper. Overall 246 features from 6 species are extracted and then optimized by support vector recursive feature selection. The classification result obtained by employing support vector machine shows that the optimized feature group improves accuracy significantly. This study indicates that the support vector feature selection method is capable of reducing the influence from redundant features and improving recognition efficiency, especially in the high feature dimension situation of brain-computer interface.

  18. Postura da mão e imagética motora: um estudo sobre reconhecimento de partes do corpo Hand posture and motor imagery: a body-part recognition study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AP Lameira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Assim como a imagética motora, o reconhecimento de partes do corpo aciona representações somatosensoriais específicas. Essas representações são ativadas implicitamente para comparar o corpo com o estímulo. No presente estudo, investigou-se a influência da informação proprioceptiva da postura no reconhecimento de partes do corpo (mãos e propõe-se a utilização dessa tarefa na reabilitação de pacientes neurológicos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Dez voluntários destros participaram do experimento. A tarefa era reconhecer a lateralidade de figuras da mão apresentada, em várias perspectivas e em vários ângulos de orientação. Para a figura da mão direita, o voluntário pressionava a tecla direita e para a figura da mão esquerda, a tecla esquerda. Os voluntários realizavam duas sessões: uma com as mãos na postura prona e outra com as mãos na postura supina. RESULTADOS: Os tempos de reação manual (TRM eram maiores para as vistas e orientações, nas quais é difícil realizar o movimento real, mostrando que durante a tarefa, existe um acionamento de representações motoras para comparar o corpo com o estímulo. Além disso, existe uma influência da postura do sujeito em vistas e ângulos específicos. CONCLUSÕES: Estes resultados mostram que representações motoras são ativadas para comparar o corpo com o estímulo e que a postura da mão influencia esta ressonância entre estímulo e parte do corpo.OBJECTIVE: Recognition of body parts activates specific somatosensory representations in a way that is similar to motor imagery. These representations are implicitly activated to compare the body with the stimulus. In the present study, we investigate the influence of proprioceptive information relating to body posture on the recognition of body parts (hands. It proposes that this task could be used for rehabilitation of neurological patients. METHODS: Ten right-handed volunteers participated in this experiment. The

  19. 想象足背屈训练对脑梗死偏瘫患者下肢功能恢复的影响%Efficacy of foot dorsiflexion-centered motor imagery training on lower limb function of poststroke hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷艳; 李平; 陈少玲; 王芳; 陈尚杰; 赖伏虎

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨想象足背屈训练对脑梗死偏瘫患者下肢运动功能恢复的促进作用.方法 将58例脑梗死下肢偏瘫患者随机分为干预组(30例)和对照组(28例),两组患者均接受常规康复治疗,干预组在此基础上进行连续5周的想象足背屈训练.结果 治疗后干预组患者Brunnstrom分期、FMA和MBI评分显著优于对照组(均P<0.01).结论 想象足背屈训练有效促进患者下肢运动功能的恢复及日常生活活动能力的改善.%Objective To observe the effects of foot dorsiflexion-centered motor imagery training on lower limb function of poststroke hemiplegic patients. Methods Fifty-eight poststroke hemiplegic patients were randomly divided into an intervention group of 30 and a control group of 28. All patients were given routine rehabilitation treatment, while the intervention group additionally received foot dorsiflexion-centered motor imagery training for 5 weeks. Results The Brunnstrom staging, the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score, and the modified Barthel index (MBI) score in the intervention group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0. 01 for all). Conclusion Foot dorsiflexion-centered motor imagery training can boost recovery of lower limb function and improve daily life activity of poststroke hemiplegic patients.

  20. Efficacy Observation on NJF Technique Combined with Motor Imagery on Upper Limbs Dysfunction of Stroke Patients%NJF技术结合运动想象对脑卒中患者上肢功能障碍的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈镇城; 张新斐; 冯重睿

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨NJF(神经肌肉关节促进法)结合运动想象对脑卒中患者上肢功能的影响。方法:将89例卒中患者随机分为A组和B组,A组给予常规的物理治疗及运动想象治疗,B组则在A组治疗基础上给予NJF训练,比较两组患者上肢功能及日常生活活动能力的改善情况。结果:治疗后,B组的FMA评分、MBI评分均高于A组(P<0.05)。结论:神经肌肉关节促进法(NJF)结合运动想象能较好地改善脑卒中患者的上肢功能,值得临床推广应用。%Objective:To investigate the effects of NJF (neuromuscular joint facilitation) combined with motor imagery on upper limbs function of stroke patients. Methods:89 patients with stroke were randomly divided into group A and group B, group A with routine physical therapy and motor imagery, group B received NJF training based on group A, to compare the improvement of upper extremity function and activities of daily living be-tween two groups. Results:After the treatment, FMA and MBI scores of group B were both higher than those of group A (P<0.05). Conclusion:Neu-romuscular joint facilitation (NJF) combined with motor imagery can improve the upper extremity function of stroke patients better, being worthy of clinical application.

  1. Motor imagery training can improve motor function and gait after stroke%基于镜像神经元理论的运动想象训练对脑卒中患者运动功能及步态的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 顾旭东; 时美芳; 李辉; 傅建明; 吴华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of motor imagery therapy based on mirror neuron theory on the motor function and gait in stroke survivors.Methods Forty-nine stroke survivors were randomly divided into a treatment group (n =24) and a control group (n =25) using a random number table.All the patients in both groups were given similar conventional rehabilitation treatment.In addition,the patients in the treatment group were given motor imagery training based on mirror neuron theory once a day for 20 min each time,5 days a week,lasting 8 weeks.The Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA),Functional Ambulation Categories (FACs),average step length,the percentage of time spent on the intact foot and the paralyzed foot,and 6 minute walking distance were used to evaluate the subjects' motor function and gait before and after 8 weeks of treatment.Results Before the intervention there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of any of the measurements.At the end of the 8 weeks of treatment all measurements in both groups had significantly improved compared with before training.The averages of all the measures were significantly better in the treatment group than in the control group.Conclusions Motor imagery training based on mirror neuron theory can improve the motor function and gait of stroke survivors.%目的 观察基于镜像神经元理论的运动想象训练对脑卒中患者运动功能及步态的影响.方法 将脑卒中偏瘫患者49例按随机数字表法分为治疗组24例和对照组25例,2组患者均接受常规神经内科药物治疗和常规康复治疗,治疗组在此基础上增加基于镜像神经元理论的运动想象训练,每日1次,每次20 min,每周训练5d,连续训练8周.治疗前和治疗8周后(治疗后)对2组患者的下肢运动功能(FMA)、步行能力(FAC)、双侧平均步长、健侧和患侧负重时间百分比以及6 min步行距离进行评定.结果 2组患者的FMA、FAC、双侧平均步长、健侧和患

  2. NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  3. National Agriculture Imagery Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) acquires aerial imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in the continental U.S. A primary goal of the NAIP...

  4. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  5. Current Resource Imagery Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Map showing coverage of current Resource imagery projects. High resolution/large scale Resource imagery is typically acquired for the U.S. Forest Service and other...

  6. Adaptive Feature Extraction Based on Best Basis of Wavelet Packet for Motor Imagery EEG%基于小波包最优基的运动想象EEG自适应特征提取方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明爱; 林琳; 杨金福

    2011-01-01

    In brain-computer interfaces of imagery movement, a new method which can adaptively extract features on the basis of the best wavelet package basis is proposed to solve the problems such as the low classification accuracy and weak self-adaptation, etc. First, wavelet packet is exploited to decompose the motor imagery EEG signal ; second, the traditional distance criterion is optimized by introducing a weight parameter which reflects the importance of including both the interclass and the intraclass inertias, and this evaluation criterion for classification is not only under the condition that the criteria is additive for the choice of the best wavelet packet basis, but also can effectively improve the separability of the feature information in frequency subbandst Third, the best wavelet packet basis is attained by using a fast search strategy of "from the bottom to the top, from the left to the right", and the classification feature is extracted by choosing the part wavelet package coefficient which can attain higher value by calculating the classification evaluation criterion according to the best basis; The experimental results which are compared with another common method of time and frequency analysis, show that the algorithm could produce high classification accuracy and less time consumption.%针对运动想象脑机接口系统存在分类正确率低、自适应能力差等不足,提出一种基于小波包最优基的自适应特征提取方法;该方法首先对运动想象EEG进行小波包分解;其次,对传统的距离准则进行改进,通过引入权重因子表征对类内距离和类间距离的关注程度,获得一种既可满足小波包最优基评价准则的可加性条件,又有效地增强了频带特征信息的可分离性的评价准则;进而,采用“自底向顶、自左至右”的快速搜索策略获取小波包最优基,并选取最优基对应的分类性能评价值较高的部分频带小波包系数构成分类特征;

  7. Classification of Left-Right Hand Motor Imagery Electroencephalogram Signals Based on a Feature Extraction Common Spatial Pattern Algorithm%基于共空间模式的运动想象脑电信号识别研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘赛虎; 李文杰; 张义

    2014-01-01

    Classification of electroencephalogram(EEG)signal is an important issue in brain-computer interface(BCI). Based on the classification of the EEG signals,in this paper,we collect the left-right hand motor imagery EEG data of 7 subjects which are recorded by EGI-64 scalp electrodes placed according to the international 10/20 system. Firstly,the EEG data are denoised with extend Infomax-Independent Component Analysis ( ICA );Secondly, C3 and C4 electrodes features are extracted by using Common Spatial Pattern( CSP);Finally,the average classification rates of Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis(FLDA),Bayesian,Radial Basis Function(RBF)neural network and BP neural network methods are compared. The classification results show that the average classification rate of neural network is higher than the other two methods,and that the average classification rate of BP neural network can be up to 95. 36%,but the other three methods of running velocity is obviously faster than the BP neural network. The results provide a basis for real-time BCI system implementation.%脑-机接口技术领域的关键问题是脑电信号的分类识别研究.本文针对脑电信号的分类问题,基于EGI-64导脑电采集系统得到7名被试者的左右手运动想象脑电数据,首先采用扩展Infomax-ICA方法对脑电数据进行去噪处理;然后利用共空间模式方法对C3/C42个电极的脑电信号进行特征提取;最后比较了Fisher线性判别分析法、贝叶斯方法、径向神经网络和BP神经网络几种算法的平均分类率.结果表明:神经网络分类方法得到的平均分类率要高于其他2种方法,而BP神经网络方法的平均分类率最高,可以达到95.36%,但另外3种方法的运行速度明显高于BP神经网络.该结果为实时BCI系统实施提供了一定依据.

  8. 基于AD8302的牵引电动机主极裂纹检测仪的研制%Development of Main Electrode Crack Detector for Traction Motor Based on AD8302

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余为清; 刘举平

    2006-01-01

    为实现电力机车牵引电动机主极裂纹的无损检测,利用IF/RF芯片AD8302作为涡流检测中的幅相检测核心器件,配合SPCE061A单片机研发了一种便携式涡流裂纹检测仪.仪器具有体积小,灵敏度高,操作智能化等诸多优点.试验表明:该测试系统能够对电力机车主极裂纹进行准确有效的检测.

  9. Application of digital signal processor in brain-computer interface based on motor imagery potential%DSP在基于想象动作电位的脑-机接口中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽; 高新

    2012-01-01

    应用数字信号处理器设计了一个基于想象动作电位的脑-机接口系统,通过模拟滤波与数字信号器处理相结合的方法,实现了对想象动作电位信息的有效采集和处理.系统在硬件上设计了脑电信号放大器,DSP开发板;对脑电信号放大、AD转换后,通过分类特征提取处理后,完成动作识别与控制命令的输出.将数字信号处理器应用在脑-机接口中,利用数字信号处理器优异的处理能力和丰富的外设资源,实现了一个嵌入式、微型化的脑-机接口构建,实现了脑-机接口实时处理与微型化.%This paper presents motor-imaginary-potential-based brain-computer interface (BCI) interface by using digital signal processor (DSP). Combining analog filtering and digital processing; realize the motor imaginary potential information acquisition effectively and processing. A EEG amplifier and DSP development board were designed in system for hardware. Motor imaginary potential information through EEG-amplifier and AD converted, after classification and feature extraction,gesture recognition will be completed and control command will be output to control peripherals. In this paper, digital signal processor (DSP) is used in brain-computer interface (BCI), using the DSP achieved a brain-computer interface real-time processing and miniaturization with its excellent processing power and rich resources of the peripheral. A on embedded technology Based, Miniaturization of brain-computer interface was built.

  10. Normalization of satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.; Elman, Gregory C.

    1990-01-01

    Sets of Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery taken over the Washington, DC metropolitan area during the months of November, March and May were converted into a form of ground reflectance imagery. This conversion was accomplished by adjusting the incident sunlight and view angles and by applying a pixel-by-pixel correction for atmospheric effects. Seasonal color changes of the area can be better observed when such normalization is applied to space imagery taken in time series. In normalized imagery, the grey scale depicts variations in surface reflectance and tonal signature of multi-band color imagery can be directly interpreted for quantitative information of the target.

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - VOLUSIA 2006 Orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — 2006, 6 inch Pixel Color Orthophotography - - Panchromatic, red, green, blue and near infrared imagery was acquired using the Leica ADS40 multi-spectral scanner (see...

  12. On-line brain-computer interface system design based on alpha wave and motor imagery%基于脑电alpha波及运动想象的在线脑机接口系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 王江; 刘丽芳; 杨硕; 徐桂芝; 颜威利

    2011-01-01

    背景:目前在线脑机接口系统绝大多数采用同步式设计,无法区分"工作"状态与"空闲"状态.目的:设计一种能够自由在"工作"与"空闲"状态间切换,方便灵活的脑机接口系统.方法:设计了综合睁眼产生的alpha波阻断现象,以及进行运动想象时产生事件相关同步及去同步现象这些生理特征的在线脑机接口系统.通过检测使用者枕部脑电信号alpha波状况,来切换"空闲"与"工作"状态;在"工作"状态下,通过想象不同的肢体运动,分析运动皮质脑电信号的频率特征,来实现对外界的信息传输.结果与结论:实验证明,经过训练的使用者在该在线脑机接口平台上可以自如的在不同状态间进行切换,并且能以很高的分类正确率发出控制命令.采用此方法进行设计,脑机接口系统的实用性得到了增强.%BACKGROUND: At present, most of on-line brain-computer interface (BCI) systems adopt synchronous design, which cannot tell the switch between "active" state and "idle" state.OBJECTIVE: To design an effective BCI system design, which is free to switch between "active" state and "idle" state.METHODS: In this paper, an on-line BCI system was designed based on a series of physiological phenomenon, such as alpha wave-block, event related synchronization (ERS) and event related desynchronization (ERD). Through detecting the EEG recorded from occipital area, the two states being "active" and "idle" could be switched. Under the statement of "active", EEG captured from motor cortex was processed, and the frequency feature was extracted during different motor imagery tasks, in the end, the mind that user wanted to express was estimated.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The results show that the subject can switch freely between the two states by using this on-line BCI system after training. Using this method, the practicability of on-line BCI system is getting improved greatly.

  13. 脑机接口中一种多类运动想象任务识别新方法%A novel recognition method of multi-class motor imagery tasks in brain computer interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩志军; 杨帮华; 何美燕; 刘丽

    2015-01-01

    Objective For multi-class motor imagery tasks in brain computer interface ( BCI ) , this paper presents a novel recognition method of electroencephalography ( EEG) by combining RLS-ICA-SampEn [ RLS ( recursive least-squares ) , ICA ( independent component analysis ) , SampEn ( sample entropy ) ] , multi-class CSP (common spatial patterns) and ISVM (incremental support vector machine ).Methods In the RLS-ICA-SampEn, Firstly, the ICA is used to decompose the contaminated EEG signals into independent components (IC).Then, the sample entropy is used to automatically identify the noise signal in the IC .Next, the RLS adaptive filters are applied to the identified noise in IC to remove noise further .Finally, the processed ICs are then projected back to reconstruct the noise-free EEG signals.The RLS-ICA-SampEn is used to preprocess EEG signals to get pure EEG signals , in which some noise signals can be removed .The multi-class CSP combines the CSP and the multi-band filtering technology , in which the CSP uses the ‘one versus one ’ strategy.The multi-class CSP is used to extract featuresfor pure EEG signals.The obtained features are input tothe ISVM for classification.The ‘one versus rest’ strategyis applied to classify three-class EEG signals.In order toverify the effectiveness of the proposed novel method , it iscompared with other two methods including multi CSP +ISVM(method 1), RLS-ICA +multi CSP +ISVM(method 2).Results The result shows that the recognitionaccuracy obtained by the proposed method is higher about 8% than other two methods.Conclusions Comparedwith method 1 and 2, the proposed method is better suited for the recognition of multi -class motor imagery tasksin BCI.%目的:针对脑机接口中三类运动想象任务,提出一种最小二乘法自适应滤波结合独立成分分析以及样本熵( RLS-ICA-SampEn )、多类共同空间模式( CSP )、增量式支持向量机( ISVM )相结合的脑电识别新方法,以解决

  14. Planning, preparation, execution, and imagery of volitional action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deecke, L

    1996-03-01

    There are different motor sets, which a human subject can be in or act from: he or she can be in a self-initiated voluntary movement set (action) or in a response set (re-action). Also, imagery sets are available that are necessary for the acquisition and practice of skill. Most important are such imagery sets for rehearsal in theatre, dance, music, sports, combat, etc.

  15. Effect Observation of Placement of Good Posture and Position in Combination with Motor Imagery Training on ;Stroke Patients in Bed%良姿位摆放结合运动表象训练在脑卒中卧床患者中的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌英; 周楠; 杨微

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of good posture and position in combined with motor imagery training on the functional recovery of stroke patients in bed. Methods 88 cases of stroke patients with hemiplegia were randomly divided into ex-perimental group and control group,44 cases each group. The control group was treated with posture nursing of good posture and position,while the experimental group was given motor imagery training on the basis of the control group. We analyzed the marked effective rate of limb function recovery 3 weeks and 6 weeks after intervention and adopted the modified Barthel Index( MBI) and simplified Fugl Meyer motor function scale( FMA) to evaluate,respectively. Results The difference of MBI,FMA and FIM statis-tics of patients before enrollment between two groups showed no statistical significance(P>0. 05). 3 and 6 weeks after interven-tion,marked effective rate of experimental group was obviously higher than that of control group and MBI,FMA as well as FIM scores of experimental group were all significantly higher than those of control group,with a statistically significant difference( P0.05);干预3周和6周后,试验组显效率明显高于对照组,MBI、FMA及FIM评分提高分均显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论良姿位摆放结合运动表象训练有助于脑卒中偏瘫卧床患者运动功能的恢复,同时缩短康复时间。

  16. Influence of motor imagery therapy combined with passive foot dorsiflexion training on lower limb motor function rehabilitation in stroke patients%运动想象疗法联合被动足背屈训练对脑卒中病人下肢运动功能康复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷艳; 方梅; 李平; 陈尚杰; 许琼瑜; 郑粤湘; 杜美芳; 赖伏虎

    2013-01-01

    groups before and after treatment (P<0. 01); there was statistically significant difference in improved degree of Brunnstrom staging score,FMA score and MBI score after six weeks between both groups (P<0. 01 or P<0. 05). Conclusion: On the basis of conventional rehabilitation, motor imagery therapy combined with passive foot dorsiflexion training can promote lower limb standing balance and walking ability of stroke patients with hemiplegia, and improve the quality of life of them.

  17. A meta-analytic review of multisensory imagery identifies the neural correlates of modality-specific and modality-general imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eMcnorgan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between imagery and mental representations induced through perception has been the subject of philosophical discussion since antiquity and of vigorous scientific debate in the last century. The relatively recent advent of functional neuroimaging has allowed neuroscientists to look for brain-based evidence for or against the argument that perceptual processes underlie mental imagery. Recent investigations of imagery in many new domains and the parallel development of new meta-analytic techniques now afford us a clearer picture of the relationship between the neural processes underlying imagery and perception, and indeed between imagery and other cognitive processes. This meta-analysis surveyed 65 studies investigating modality-specific imagery in auditory, tactile, motor, gustatory, olfactory, and three visual sub-domains: form, color and motion. Activation Likelihood Estimate (ALE analyses of activation foci reported within- and across sensorimotor modalities were conducted. The results indicate that modality-specific imagery activations generally overlap with but are not confined to corresponding somatosensory processing and motor execution areas, and suggest that there is a core network of brain regions recruited during imagery, regardless of task. These findings have important implications for investigations of imagery and theories of cognitive processes, such as perceptually-based representational systems.

  18. Imagery Integration Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Tracy; Melendrez, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The Human Exploration Science Office (KX) provides leadership for NASA's Imagery Integration (Integration 2) Team, an affiliation of experts in the use of engineering-class imagery intended to monitor the performance of launch vehicles and crewed spacecraft in flight. Typical engineering imagery assessments include studying and characterizing the liftoff and ascent debris environments; launch vehicle and propulsion element performance; in-flight activities; and entry, landing, and recovery operations. Integration 2 support has been provided not only for U.S. Government spaceflight (e.g., Space Shuttle, Ares I-X) but also for commercial launch providers, such as Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corporation, servicing the International Space Station. The NASA Integration 2 Team is composed of imagery integration specialists from JSC, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), who have access to a vast pool of experience and capabilities related to program integration, deployment and management of imagery assets, imagery data management, and photogrammetric analysis. The Integration 2 team is currently providing integration services to commercial demonstration flights, Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), and the Space Launch System (SLS)-based Exploration Missions (EM)-1 and EM-2. EM-2 will be the first attempt to fly a piloted mission with the Orion spacecraft. The Integration 2 Team provides the customer (both commercial and Government) with access to a wide array of imagery options - ground-based, airborne, seaborne, or vehicle-based - that are available through the Government and commercial vendors. The team guides the customer in assembling the appropriate complement of imagery acquisition assets at the customer's facilities, minimizing costs associated with market research and the risk of purchasing inadequate assets. The NASA Integration 2 capability simplifies the process of securing one

  19. The addition of functional task-oriented mental practice to conventional physical therapy improves motor skills in daily functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa C. Santos-Couto-Paz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mental practice (MP is a cognitive strategy which may improve the acquisition of motor skills and functional performance of athletes and individuals with neurological injuries. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether an individualized, specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional physical therapy (PT, promoted better learning of motor skills in daily functions in individuals with chronic stroke (13±6.5 months post-stroke. METHOD: Nine individuals with stable mild and moderate upper limb impairments participated, by employing an A1-B-A2 single-case design. Phases A1 and A2 included one month of conventional PT, and phase B the addition of MP training to PT. The motor activity log (MAL-Brazil was used to assess the amount of use (AOU and quality of movement (QOM of the paretic upper limb; the revised motor imagery questionnaire (MIQ-RS to assess the abilities in kinesthetic and visual motor imagery; the Minnesota manual dexterity test to assess manual dexterity; and gait speed to assess mobility. RESULTS: After phase A1, no significant changes were observed for any of the outcome measures. However, after phase B, significant improvements were observed for the MAL, AOU and QOM scores (p<0.0001, and MIQ-RS kinesthetic and visual scores (p=0.003; p=0.007, respectively. The significant gains in manual dexterity (p=0.002 and gait speed (p=0.019 were maintained after phase A2. CONCLUSIONS: Specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional PT, led to improvements in motor imagery abilities combined with increases in the AOU and QOM in daily functions, manual dexterity, and gait speed.

  20. L'imagerie ultrasonore

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, M.

    1983-01-01

    Parallèlement au développement des nouvelles techniques d'imagerie (scanner à rayons X, résonance magnétique nucléaire, radar à ouverture synthétique...), les applications de l'imagerie ultrasonore connaissent des progrès spectaculaires. Après un rappel des principes de l'imagerie ultrasonore, on propose une revue synthétique de la recherche dans ce domaine. Une comparaison des succès obtenus en diagnostic médical, en contrôle non destructif et en imagerie sous-marine est présentée. On met en...

  1. SHEBA Reconnaissance Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of optical band reconnaissance imagery of the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) site acquired between August 1997 and September 1998....

  2. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  3. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  4. Adding Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    Ajax can bring many advantages to an existing web application without forcing you to redo the whole thing. This book explains how you can add Ajax to enhance, rather than replace, the way your application works. For instance, if you have a traditional web application based on submitting a form to update a table, you can enhance it by adding the capability to update the table with changes to the form fields, without actually having to submit the form. That's just one example.Adding Ajax is for those of you more interested in extending existing applications than in creating Rich Internet Applica

  5. Clinical Observation on 20 cases Stroke Hand Dysfunction by Selected Acupoint Stimulation Combined with Motor Imagery Therapy%特选穴电刺激配合运动想象疗法治疗脑卒中手功能障碍20例临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋再轶; 韩国栋; 周权; 陈慕远; 刘申易; 赵洁

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of selected acupoint stimulation combined with motor imagery therapy on stroke hand dysfunction. Methods: The 40 patients with stroke hand dysfunction were randomly divided into group A with 20 cases, group B with 11 cases and group C with 11 cases. Patients were given hemiplegia rehabilitation training in 3 groups;besides hemiplegia rehabilitation training, patients were treated by selected acupoint stimulation combined with motor imagery therapy in group A and acupunture therapy in group B; patients were only given hemiplegia rehabilitation training in group C. Patients were treated for two weeks as 1 course in 3 groups, and the therapeutic effect was evaluated after 1 courses. Results:Limb function and hand function of patients were improved in 3 groups; The motor function of upper limb and finger motion function of group A were better than that of the group B and group C, with statistically significant difference (P<0.05). Con-clusion: selected acupoint stimulation combined with motor imagery therapy and hemiplegia rehabilitation training can provide good efficacy on on stroke hand dysfunction.%目的:探讨特选穴电刺激配合运动想象疗法治疗脑卒中后手功能障碍的疗效。方法:将42例脑卒中后手功能障碍患者随机分为A组20例、B组11例和C组11例。3组患者均进行偏瘫肢体康复训练,A组患者在康复训练基础上,加用特选穴电刺激及运动想象疗法,B组患者加用针灸治疗,C组只进行偏瘫肢体康复训练。3组均治疗两周为1个疗程,1个疗程后进行疗效评价。结果:治疗后3组患者肢体功能与手功能均有改善,但A组与其他两组上肢运动功能、手指运动功能比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),优于B组C组。结论:特选穴电刺激、运动想象疗法与偏瘫肢体康复训练相结合治疗对脑卒中手功能障碍有较好的疗效。

  6. Mental imagery for musical changes in loudness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Freya; Bishop, Laura; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T

    2012-01-01

    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e., pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 s (nil distractor control), or the presentation of a series of four sine tones, or four visual letters or three conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter, or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise.

  7. Mental imagery for musical changes in loudness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya eBailes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e. pitch and rhythm show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 seconds (nil distractor control, or the presentation of a series of 4 sine tones, or 4 visual letters or 3 conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise.

  8. Measuring Creative Imagery Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M. Jankowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA, developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail, originality (the ability to produce unique imagery, and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery. TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of eight studies on a total sample of more than 1,700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument’s validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science.

  9. An emerging paradigm: A strength-based approach to exploring mental imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg Eoghan Macintyre

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mental imagery, or the ability to simulate in the mind information that is not currently perceived by the senses, has attracted considerable research interest in psychology since the early 1970s. Within the past two decades, research in this field – as in cognitive psychology more generally - has been dominated by neuroscientific methods that typically involve comparisons between the imagery performance of participants from clinical populations with those who exhibit apparently normal cognitive functioning. Although this approach has been valuable in identifying key neural substrates of visual imagery, it has been less successful in understanding the possible mechanisms underlying another simulation process, namely, motor imagery or the mental rehearsal of actions without engaging in the actual movements involved. In order to address this oversight, a strength-based approach has been postulated which is concerned with understanding those on the high ability end of the imagery performance spectrum. Guided by the expert performance approach and principles of ecological validity, converging methods have to potential to enable imagery researchers to investigate the neural ‘signature’ of elite performers, for example. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explain the origin, nature and implications of the strength-based approach to mental imagery. Following a brief explanation of the background to this latter approach, we highlight some important theoretical advances yielded by recent research on mental practice, mental travel and meta-imagery processes in expert athletes and dancers. Next, we consider the methodological implications of using a strength-based approach to investigate imagery processes. The implications for the field of motor cognition are outlined and specific research questions, in dynamic imagery, imagery perspective, measurement, multi-sensory imagery and metacognition, that may benefit from this approach in the future

  10. Stabilizing posture through imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Eleonora; Manzoni, Diego; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the general population, suppression of vision modulates body sway by increasing the center of pressure (CoP) velocity, while a light fingertip touch reduces the area of the CoP displacement in blindfolded subjects. This study assessed whether imagined fixation and fingertip touch differentially stabilize posture in subjects with high (highs) and low (lows) hypnotizability. Visual and tactile imageries were ineffective in lows. In highs, the effects of visual imagery could not be evaluated because the real information was ineffective; real tactile stimulation was effective only on velocity, but the imagery effects could not be definitely assessed owing to low effect size. The highs' larger variability could account for this and represents the most important finding.

  11. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  12. Efeito das terapias associadas de imagem motora e de movimento induzido por restrição na hemiparesia crônica: estudo de caso Effects of associated therapies of motor imagery and constraint-induced movement in chronic hemiparesis: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Morais Trevisan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa os efeitos da associação das terapias de imagem motora e de movimento induzido por restrição na reeducação funcional do membro superior (MS de um paciente com deficit sensorial e motor determinado por acidente vascular encefálico (AVE. A terapia de imagem motora (IM consistiu em: 1o, estimulo visual do espelho, em 3 sessões semanais de 30 a 60 minutos por 4 semanas; e 2o, IM com prática mental, em 3 sessões semanais de 15 minutos por 3 semanas. Por último foi aplicada a terapia de indução ao movimento por restrição do membro superior não-afetado por 14 dias, em 10 dos quais foi feita atividade funcional do membro parético por 6 horas diárias. Além da avaliação clinica da sensibilidade e medida da força de preensão palmar, antes do tratamento e após cada modalidade de terapia foi medida a amplitude de movimentos de ombro, cotovelo e punho e aplicada a escala de avaliação motora (EAM. Os escores dos quatro momentos da coleta foram comparados estatisticamente. Após o tratamento os resultados mostraram diferença significativa (pThis study assessed the efficacy of the association of motor imagery and constraint-induced movement therapies in functional rehabilitation of the upper limb in a patient with somatosensory and motor deficits following stroke. Motor imagery (MI therapy, i.e., mental simulation of body image, consisted in: 1st, mirror visual stimulus, at three 30-60-minute weekly sessions for four weeks; and 2nd, MI with mental practice, at three 15-minute sessions per week for three weeks. Lastly, constraint-induced movement therapy was applied for 14 days, in 10 of which the patient underwent 6 hours daily of paretic limb functional training. The patient was assessed at baseline and at the end of each therapy modality as to clinical examination of sensation; hand grip strength; shoulder, elbow and wrist range of motion; and the motor assessment scale (MAS was applied. Scores obtained at the

  13. 强制性使用运动疗法结合运动想象疗法治疗脑卒中单侧空间忽略患者的疗效观察%The effect of constraint-induced movement therapy combined with motor imagery on unilateral spatial neglect in stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐睿华; 胡翔; 刘琦; 彭金良; 谢作文

    2010-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of constraint-induced movement therapy combined with motor imagery on unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in stroke patients. Methods Fifty stroke patients with USN were randomly divided into a treatment group ( n = 27 ) and a control group ( n = 23 ). Both groups received routine physical therapy training, including with the Bobath technique and low frequency electrotherapy, while the treatment group received constraint-induced movement therapy and motor imagery in addition. All the patients were assessed with 4 scales of the regular USN assessment ( cancellation tests, line bisection tests, clock drawing tests,copying drawing tests) and with the Barthel index (BI) before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results After 8 weeks of treatment, both groups' average USN assessments and Barthel indices improved significantly. Furthermore, both the USN results and the Barthel index scores in the treatment group were, on average, significantly better than those in the control group. Conclusion For USN stroke patients, constraint-induced movement therapy combined with motor imagery improves the symptoms of USN and ADL ability significantly better than routine physical therapy treatment alone.%目的 观察强制性运动疗法结合运动想象疗法治疗脑卒中单侧空间忽略患者的疗效.方法 将符合本研究入选标准的50例脑卒中单侧空间忽略患者分为治疗组27例和对照组23例.2组患者均于入院后接受常规康复治疗,治疗组在常规康复治疗的基础上加用强制性运动疗法及运动想象疗法.在治疗前和治疗8周后分别采用删除试验、平分直线法、画钟试验和临摹画图这4种常规单侧忽略检测方法和Barthel指数(BI)对患者进行评定.结果 治疗8周后,对照组患者的单侧忽略检测评分和BI评分较治疗前 改善,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),治疗组较治疗前改善更为显著(P<0.01);2组间治疗后比较差

  14. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  15. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Reprocessed DOQQ Aerial Imagery (NODC Accession 0086051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to reprocess existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic habitat...

  16. Selective Efficacy of Static and Dynamic Imagery in Different States of Physical Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Dias Kanthack, Thiago; Guillot, Aymeric; Ricardo Altimari, Leandro; Nunez Nagy, Susana; Collet, Christian; Di Rienzo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that motor imagery contributes to improved motor performance, and recent work showed that dynamic motor imagery (dMI) might provide additional benefits by comparison with traditional MI practice. However, the efficacy of motor imagery in different states of physical fatigue remains largely unknown, especially as imagery accuracy may be hampered by the physical fatigue states elicited by training. We investigated the effect of static motor imagery (sMI) and dMI on free-throw accuracy in 10 high-level basketball athletes, both in a non-fatigued state (Experiment 1) and immediately after an incremental running test completed until exhaustion (20m shuttle run-test–Experiment 2). We collected perceived exhaustion and heart rate to quantify the subjective experience of fatigue and energy expenditure. We found that dMI brought better shooting performance than sMI, except when athletes were physically exhausted. These findings shed light on the conditions eliciting optimal use of sMI and dMI. In particular, considering that the current physical state affects body representation, performing dMI under fatigue may result in mismatches between actual and predicted body states. PMID:26930279

  17. Selective Efficacy of Static and Dynamic Imagery in Different States of Physical Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthack, Thiago Ferreira Dias; Guillot, Aymeric; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Nunez Nagy, Susana; Collet, Christian; Di Rienzo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that motor imagery contributes to improved motor performance, and recent work showed that dynamic motor imagery (dMI) might provide additional benefits by comparison with traditional MI practice. However, the efficacy of motor imagery in different states of physical fatigue remains largely unknown, especially as imagery accuracy may be hampered by the physical fatigue states elicited by training. We investigated the effect of static motor imagery (sMI) and dMI on free-throw accuracy in 10 high-level basketball athletes, both in a non-fatigued state (Experiment 1) and immediately after an incremental running test completed until exhaustion (20 m shuttle run-test-Experiment 2). We collected perceived exhaustion and heart rate to quantify the subjective experience of fatigue and energy expenditure. We found that dMI brought better shooting performance than sMI, except when athletes were physically exhausted. These findings shed light on the conditions eliciting optimal use of sMI and dMI. In particular, considering that the current physical state affects body representation, performing dMI under fatigue may result in mismatches between actual and predicted body states.

  18. Selective Efficacy of Static and Dynamic Imagery in Different States of Physical Fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Ferreira Dias Kanthack

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that motor imagery contributes to improved motor performance, and recent work showed that dynamic motor imagery (dMI might provide additional benefits by comparison with traditional MI practice. However, the efficacy of motor imagery in different states of physical fatigue remains largely unknown, especially as imagery accuracy may be hampered by the physical fatigue states elicited by training. We investigated the effect of static motor imagery (sMI and dMI on free-throw accuracy in 10 high-level basketball athletes, both in a non-fatigued state (Experiment 1 and immediately after an incremental running test completed until exhaustion (20 m shuttle run-test-Experiment 2. We collected perceived exhaustion and heart rate to quantify the subjective experience of fatigue and energy expenditure. We found that dMI brought better shooting performance than sMI, except when athletes were physically exhausted. These findings shed light on the conditions eliciting optimal use of sMI and dMI. In particular, considering that the current physical state affects body representation, performing dMI under fatigue may result in mismatches between actual and predicted body states.

  19. The Resting Motor Threshold - Restless or Resting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke Ninija; Raffin, Estelle Emeline; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Background The resting motor threshold (RMT) is used to individually adjust the intensity of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) intensity and is assumed to be stable. Here we challenge this notion by showing that RMT expresses acute context-dependent fluctuations. Method In twelve participants......, the RMT of the right first dorsal interosseus muscle was repeatedly determined using a threshold-hunting procedure while participants performed motor imagery and visual attention tasks with the right or left hand. Data were analyzed using repeated-measure ANOVA. Results RMT differed depending on which...... hand performed the task (P = 0.003). RMT of right FDI was lower during motor imagery than during visual attention of the right hand (P = 0.002), but did not differ between left-hand tasks (P = 0.988). Conclusions State-dependent changes of RMT occur in absence of overt motor activity and can...

  20. Motor learning without doing: trial-by-trial improvement in motor performance during mental training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Rodolphe; Han, Cheol E; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2010-08-01

    Although there is converging experimental and clinical evidences suggesting that mental training with motor imagery can improve motor performance, it is unclear how humans can learn movements through mental training despite the lack of sensory feedback from the body and the environment. In a first experiment, we measured the trial-by-trial decrease in durations of executed movements (physical training group) and mentally simulated movements (motor-imagery training group), by means of training on a multiple-target arm-pointing task requiring high accuracy and speed. Movement durations were significantly lower in posttest compared with pretest after both physical and motor-imagery training. Although both the posttraining performance and the rate of learning were smaller in motor-imagery training group than in physical training group, the change in movement duration and the asymptotic movement duration after a hypothetical large number of trials were identical. The two control groups (eye-movement training and rest groups) did not show change in movement duration. In the second experiment, additional kinematic analyses revealed that arm movements were straighter and faster both immediately and 24 h after physical and motor-imagery training. No such improvements were observed in the eye-movement training group. Our results suggest that the brain uses state estimation, provided by internal forward model predictions, to improve motor performance during mental training. Furthermore, our results suggest that mental practice can, at least in young healthy subjects and if given after a short bout of physical practice, be successfully substituted to physical practice to improve motor performance.

  1. 76 FR 37682 - Airworthiness Directives; Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM) Series Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal... information identified in this AD, contact Teledyne Continental Motors, Inc., PO Box 90, Mobile, AL 36601... Continental Motors (TCM) and Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. (R-RM) Series Reciprocating Engines: Docket No....

  2. Imagery - Lake Ashtabula, ND - 2009 4-Band Orthophoto

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — 4-band aerial imagery was collected by Fugro Horizons using the Leica ADS40(SH52) camera with 30 percent side overlap on 8/26/09. The flight height was 9,600 feet...

  3. Actual and mental motor preparation and execution: a spatiotemporal ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Roberto; Deiber, Marie-Pierre; Andrey, Carine; Michel, Christoph M; Thut, Gregor; Hauert, Claude-Alain

    2004-12-01

    Studies evaluating the role of the executive motor system in motor imagery came to a general agreement in favour of the activation of the primary motor area (M1) during imagery, although in reduced proportion as compared to motor execution. It is still unclear whether this difference occurs within the preparation period or the execution period of the movement, or both. In the present study, EEG was used to investigate separately the preparation and the execution periods of overt and covert movements in adults. We designed a paradigm that randomly mixed actual and kinaesthetic imagined trials of an externally paced sequence of finger key presses. Sixty channel event-related potentials were recorded to capture the cerebral activations underlying the preparation for motor execution and motor imagery, as well as cerebral activations implied in motor execution and motor imagery. Classical waveform analysis was combined with data-driven spatiotemporal segmentation analysis. In addition, a LAURA source localization algorithm was applied to functionally define brain related motor areas. Our results showed first that the difference between actual and mental motor acts takes place at the late stage of the preparation period and consists of a quantitative modulation of the activity of common structures in M1. Second, they showed that primary motor structures are involved to the same extent in the actual or imagined execution of a motor act. These findings reinforce and refine the functional equivalence hypothesis between actual and imagined motor acts.

  4. Teaching about operation of brushless DC motors

    OpenAIRE

    Čufar, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Brush DC motor is being replaced by brushless DC motors on every area of application. My diploma thesis is a presentation of brushless DC motor, how it works and its application. Within first part we describe various electric motors and their application. There are several types of electric motors division. Last to be added is a brushless motor. Within second part of thesis we look into a brushless DC motor, how it works, its application and control. In the third part of thesis we construct a...

  5. Cerebral activations related to audition-driven performance imagery in professional musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Harris

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI was used to study the activation of cerebral motor networks during auditory perception of music in professional keyboard musicians (n = 12. The activation paradigm implied that subjects listened to two-part polyphonic music, while either critically appraising the performance or imagining they were performing themselves. Two-part polyphonic audition and bimanual motor imagery circumvented a hemisphere bias associated with the convention of playing the melody with the right hand. Both tasks activated ventral premotor and auditory cortices, bilaterally, and the right anterior parietal cortex, when contrasted to 12 musically unskilled controls. Although left ventral premotor activation was increased during imagery (compared to judgment, bilateral dorsal premotor and right posterior-superior parietal activations were quite unique to motor imagery. The latter suggests that musicians not only recruited their manual motor repertoire but also performed a spatial transformation from the vertically perceived pitch axis (high and low sound to the horizontal axis of the keyboard. Imagery-specific activations in controls were seen in left dorsal parietal-premotor and supplementary motor cortices. Although these activations were less strong compared to musicians, this overlapping distribution indicated the recruitment of a general 'mirror-neuron' circuitry. These two levels of sensori-motor transformations point towards common principles by which the brain organizes audition-driven music performance and visually guided task performance.

  6. Non-Drug Pain Relief: Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    PATIENT EDUCATION patienteducation.osumc.edu Non-Drug Pain Relief: Imagery Relaxation helps lessen tension. One way to help decrease pain is to use imagery. Imagery is using your imagination to create a ...

  7. A multimodal electroencephalogram visualization system can promote stroke patients′ motor imagery%在线多模态脑电数据可视化系统在脑卒中患者运动想象训练中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斯尧; 李明芬; 刘烨; 张丽清; 吴毅; 唐朝正; 贾杰

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of a multimodal electroencephalogram ( EEG) data visualiza-tion system on the motor imagery ability of stroke survivors. Methods Twenty stroke patients were randomly di-vided into an experimental group and a control group, each of 10. Both groups were provided with brain-computer interface-based motor imagery ( MI) training. At the same time, the experimental group was monitored and guided using an online, multimodal EEG data visualization system developed in our department. The classification accuracy ( CA) and event-related desynchronization ( ERD) of the 2 groups′ motor imagery were compared before and after the treatment. Results Before the treatment, no significant differences in the average CA of MI were found be-tween the experiment group (50.92±2.08) and the control group (49.35±4.20)(P>0.05). After the treatment, however, the experimental group′s average CA had increased to (64.52±5.27), significantly higher than that of the control group (51.18±5.02). When the stroke patients imaged affected upper extremity movements, obvious ERD was observed in the α frequency around the bilateral central motor regions of both groups, especially in the experi-mental group, but without significant differences between the two groups. However, no significant changes were found in the ERD of theβwaves of the two groups( P>0.05) . Conclusion The proposed online multimodal elec-troencephalogram data visualization system can help stroke patients imagine movements actively. It is worth sprea-ding in clinical practice.%目的:观察本研究开发的新型在线多模态脑电数据可视化系统对脑卒中患者运动想象的影响。方法采用随机数字表法将20例脑卒中患者分为实验组与对照组。2组患者均给予基于脑-机接口( BCI)的运动想象训练,实验组同时通过在线多模态脑电数据可视化系统进行监测、指导,以实时调整其运动想象模式。比较2组患者治疗前

  8. Imagery associated with menstruation in advertising targeted to adolescent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, B; Swenson, I

    1988-01-01

    Education about menstruation is not restricted to school instruction or information provided by adults and peers; exposure to advertisements in teen media provides imagery depicting menstruation and feminine role expectations. This paper analyzes the imagery in advertisements for sanitary products and products for the relief of menstrual symptoms. A 25% random sample of Seventeen magazine issues from 1976 to 1986 stratified by year were reviewed. A total of 135 ads for sanitary products and 32 ads for products for the relief of menstrual discomfort were analyzed. Each ad was examined for recurrent themes in text, context and tone. Data collected were examined for similarities in themes across both product type and time. The ads depict menstruation as a "hygienic crisis" that is best managed by an effective "security system" affording protection and "peace of mind." The failure of adequate protection places the woman at risk for soiling, staining, embarrassment and odor. Menstruating women are depicted as dynamic, energetic and always functioning at their optimal level. Such imagery may encourage guilt and diminished self-esteem in the adolescent who experiences discomfort. A lack of maternal, teacher or male figures in the ads is evident; the importance of peer support is reinforced.

  9. Imagery Rescripting for Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, Arnoud

    2011-01-01

    Imagery rescripting is a powerful technique that can be successfully applied in the treatment of personality disorders. For personality disorders, imagery rescripting is not used to address intrusive images but to change the implicational meaning of schemas and childhood experiences that underlie the patient's problems. Various mechanisms that may…

  10. String Theory on AdS Spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.

    2000-01-01

    In these notes we discuss various aspects of string theory in AdS spaces. We briefly review the formulation in terms of Green-Schwarz, NSR, and Berkovits variables, as well as the construction of exact conformal field theories with AdS backgrounds. Based on lectures given at the Kyoto YITP Workshop

  11. Online Ad Assignment with an Ad Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořák, Wolfgang; Henzinger, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Ad exchanges are becoming an increasingly popular way to sell advertisement slots on the internet. An ad exchange is basically a spot market for ad impressions. A publisher who has already signed contracts reserving advertisement impressions on his pages can choose between assigning a new ad impression for a new page view to a contracted advertiser or to sell it at an ad exchange. This leads to an online revenue maximization problem for the publisher. Given a new impression to sell decide whe...

  12. Segmented motor drive - with multi-phase induction motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Flemming Buus

    This PhD project commences in modulation of motor drives, i.e. having the advantage of reducing the number of variants and improves the system reliability at error situations. Four different motor drive topologies with modular construction as common denominator are compared on a general level....... The multi-phase motor is selected for further analysis. The project is limited to examine if increasing the number of phases can improve the characteristics for induction motor drives. In the literature it is demonstrated that torque production in a six-phase motor can be increased, if a 3rd harmonic...... current with 1/6 amplitude is added to the 1st harmonic current. This claim is verified and the optimization of the motor design is extended to, beyond the stator tooth width, also to include the inner diameter of the stator. This means that the lamination sheet is optimized according to two geometrical...

  13. Playing piano in the mind--an fMRI study on music imagery and performance in pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, I G; Krings, T; Foltys, H; Boroojerdi, B; Müller, M; Töpper, R; Thron, A

    2004-05-01

    Reading of musical notes and playing piano is a very complex motor task which requires years of practice. In addition to motor skills, rapid and effective visuomotor transformation as well as processing of the different components of music like pitch, rhythm and musical texture are involved. The aim of the present study was the investigation of the cortical network which mediates music performance compared to music imagery in 12 music academy students playing the right hand part of a Bartok piece using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In both conditions, fMRI activations of a bilateral frontoparietal network comprising the premotor areas, the precuneus and the medial part of Brodmann Area 40 were found. During music performance but not during imagery the contralateral primary motor cortex and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) bilaterally was active. This reflects the role of primary motor cortex for motor execution but not imagery and the higher visuomotor integration requirements during music performance compared to simulation. The notion that the same areas are involved in visuomotor transformation/motor planning and music processing emphasizes the multimodal properties of cortical areas involved in music and motor imagery in musicians.

  14. Direct and crossed effects of somatosensory electrical stimulation on motor learning and neuronal plasticity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M. P.; Zijdewind, I.; Solnik, S.; Maffiuletti, N. A.; Berghuis, K. M. M.; Javet, M.; Negyesi, J.; Hortobagyi, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sensory input can modify voluntary motor function. We examined whether somatosensory electrical stimulation (SES) added to motor practice (MP) could augment motor learning, interlimb transfer, and whether physiological changes in neuronal excitability underlie these changes. Methods Particip

  15. Polarised black holes in AdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  16. Segmented Strings in $AdS_3$

    CERN Document Server

    Callebaut, Nele; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in $AdS_3$. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In $AdS_3$, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an $AdS_2$ subspace of $AdS_3$. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in $AdS_3$ and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in $AdS_3$ and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  17. The Imagery Exchange (TIE): Open Source Imagery Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, C.; Huang, T.; Thompson, C. K.; Roberts, J. T.; Hall, J. R.; Cechini, M.; Schmaltz, J. E.; McGann, J. M.; Boller, R. A.; Murphy, K. J.; Bingham, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA's Global Imagery Browse Service (GIBS) is the Earth Observation System (EOS) imagery solution for delivering global, full-resolution satellite imagery in a highly responsive manner. GIBS consists of two major subsystems, OnEarth and The Imagery Exchange (TIE). TIE is the GIBS horizontally scaled imagery workflow manager component, an Open Archival Information System (OAIS) responsible for orchestrating the acquisition, preparation, generation, and archiving of imagery to be served by OnEarth. TIE is an extension of the Data Management and Archive System (DMAS), a high performance data management system developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory by leveraging open source tools and frameworks, which includes Groovy/Grails, Restlet, Apache ZooKeeper, Apache Solr, and other open source solutions. This presentation focuses on the application of Open Source technologies in developing a horizontally scaled data system like DMAS and TIE. As part of our commitment in contributing back to the open source community, TIE is in the process of being open sourced. This presentation will also cover our current effort in getting TIE in to the hands of the community from which we benefited from.

  18. Health-related ad information and health motivation effects on product evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the effect of health-related ad information on perceived product healthfulness and purchase intention. Also, the study investigates whether consumers' health motivation moderates the effects, because of the way health motivation affects processing of health-related information...... evaluations, while functional claims and process claims have much smaller effects. Health motivation shows significant interaction with process claims on product evaluations....... in ads. Three types of healthrelated ad elements are distinguished: functional claims, process claims and health imagery. These elements were combined in mock ads and an online experiment was run to test the study hypotheses. Results show that health imagery has the largest impact on consumers' product...

  19. Intelligence and imagery in personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedford, W H; Penk, M L

    1977-08-01

    One hundred college undergraduates were administered the Richardson revision of the Gordon Test of Visual Imagery Control, the Betts-Sheehan Questionnaire Upon Mental Imagery, and the Shipley-Hartford Institute of Living Scale. The latter provided a conceptual quotient (CQ) score of intellectual impairment based upon a ratio between vocabulary and abstraction scores. Subjects with CQs above 100 had significantly higher control scores (p less than .02). High control subjects had significantly higher total IQ scores than did low control subjects (p less than .04). Subjects with high and medium range control had higher vocabulary scores than those with low control. This suggests possible assessment of proneness toward introverted and extraverted neuroticism based upon a combination type of imagery score and the ratio between abstract or vocabulary scores. The connection of imagery with dimensions of IQ may be a start toward a more refined measure of this aspect of personality. Problems and implications are discussed.

  20. New percepts via mental imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Walter Mast

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We are able to extract detailed information from mental images that we were not explicitly aware of during encoding. For example, we can discover a new figure when we rotate a previously seen image in our mind. However, such discoveries are not really new but just new interpretations. In two recent publications, we have shown that mental imagery can lead to perceptual learning (Tartaglia et al., 2009, 2012. Observers imagined the central line of a bisection stimulus for thousands of trials. This training enabled observers to perceive bisection offsets that were invisible before training. Hence, it seems that perceptual learning via mental imagery leads to new percepts. We will argue, however, that these new percepts can occur only within known models. In this sense, perceptual learning via mental imagery exceeds new discoveries in mental images. Still, the effects of mental imagery on perceptual learning are limited. Only perception can lead to really new perceptual experience.

  1. APFO Historical Availability of Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The APFO Historical Availability ArcGIS Online web map provides an easy to use reference of what historical imagery is available by county from the Aerial...

  2. Visualization techniques for data mining of Latur district satellite imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Kodge, B. G.; Hiremath, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new visualization tool for classification of satellite imagery. Visualization of feature space allows exploration of patterns in the image data and insight into the classification process and related uncertainty. Visual Data Mining provides added value to image classifications as the user can be involved in the classification process providing increased confidence in and understanding of the results. In this study, we present a prototype visualization tool for visual dat...

  3. Watch me if you can: Imagery ability moderates observational learning effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin eLawrence

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has revealed similarities in brain activity during observational learning and motor execution. However, whilst action develops visual, motor and afferent representations during acquisition, action-observation has been proposed to only develop visual-spatial learning via visual representation. In addition, it has been suggested that the vividness of visual representations are determined by imagery ability. Thus, the purpose of the current investigation was to explore the possible moderating role of imagery ability in the effectiveness of observational learning. Participants (n=40 were assessed on their imagery ability via the VMIQ-2 and then assigned to one of four groups; high imagery ability and observational learning (HIA-OL, low imagery ability and observational learning (LIA-OL, high imagery ability control (HIA-C and low imagery ability control (LIA-C. Following group allocation all participants performed a pre-test consisting of 5 actual practice trials of a novel gymnastics routine. The HIA-OL and LIA-OL groups then participated in a 14 day observational learning intervention whilst the HIA-C & LIA-C groups acted as controls. Following this, participants performed a post test, which was identical in nature to the pre-test, before finally completing the VMIQ-2 again. Performance on both the pre-test and post test was evaluated by two qualified gymnastics judges. Results revealed that gymnastics performance increased from pre-test to post test for both the HIA-OL and LIA-OL groups. However, this effect was greater in the HIA-OL group suggesting that the relationship between observational learning and successful imitation performance is moderated by imagery ability.

  4. Motor syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Francesco; Micheli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Motor disturbances alone or associated with other focal deficits are the most common symptoms suggesting a neurovascular event. An appropriate clinical assessment of these signs and symptoms may help physicians to better diagnose and to both better treat and predict outcome. In this paper the main clinical features of motor deficit are described together with other motor-related events such as ataxia and movement disturbances.

  5. Polarised Black Holes in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global $AdS_{4}$ with conformal boundary $S^{2}\\times\\mathbb{R}_{t}$. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic $AdS$ behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an $AdS$ soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the $AdS$ geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both $AdS$ soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawkin...

  6. High Resolution Imagery and Three-line Array Imagery Automatic Registration for China’s TH-1 Satellite Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    An automatic image registration method of high resolution (HR) imagery and three-line array imagery for China’s TH-1 mapping satellite is invented. The 2m resolution HR imagery is normalized to 5m resolution three-line array imagery firstly. Then using precise point prediction model (P3M) matching method, thousands of correspondent points can be matched. Based on these matched points, feature points collected on HR imagery can be converted onto three-line array imagery automatically. Conseque...

  7. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-chen Lu; Han-qiu Liu; Xu-yun Hua; Yun-dong Shen; Wen-dong Xu; Jian-guang Xu; Yu-dong Gu

    2016-01-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is dififcult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function.

  8. Constructing Lifshitz solutions from AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Cassani, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Under general assumptions, we show that a gravitational theory in d+1 dimensions admitting an AdS solution can be reduced to a d-dimensional theory containing a Lifshitz solution with dynamical exponent z=2. Working in a d=4, N=2 supergravity setup, we prove that if the AdS background is N=2 supersymmetric, then the Lifshitz geometry preserves 1/4 of the supercharges, and we construct the corresponding Killing spinors. We illustrate these results in examples from supersymmetric consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity, enhancing the class of known 4-dimensional Lifshitz solutions of string theory. As a byproduct, we find a new AdS4 x S1 x T(1,1) solution of type IIB.

  9. Ad Hoc网络%Ad Hoc Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海涛

    2005-01-01

    首先介绍了Ad Hoc网络的基本概念、技术特点以及关键技术等,然后较为全面地归纳了Ad Hoc网络的典型应用,最后讨论了Ad Hoc网络的发展趋势和有待解决的问题.

  10. Investigating effects of different artefact types on motor imagery BCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Laura; Winkler, Irene; Muller, Klaus-Robert

    2015-01-01

    Artefacts in recordings of the electroencephalogram (EEG) are a common problem in Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs). Artefacts make it difficult to calibrate from training sessions, resulting in low test performance, or lead to artificially high performance when unintentionally used for BCI contro...

  11. Electroencephalogram processing in Motor Imagery Based BCI: A tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Molina, G.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been emerging during the last twenty years, as plausible alternatives for offering communication and control to physically challenged people. Yet, the idea of achieving control by simply thinking is appealing to a wider range of users. Availability, lower cost,

  12. Working memory and acquisition of implicit knowledge by imagery training, without actual task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helene, A F; Xavier, G F

    2006-04-28

    This study investigated acquisition of a mirror-reading skill via imagery training, without the actual performance of a mirror-reading task. In experiment I, healthy volunteers simulated writing on an imaginary, transparent screen placed at eye level, which could be read by an experimenter facing the subject. Performance of this irrelevant motor task required the subject to imagine the letters inverted, as if seen in a mirror from their own point of view (imagery training). A second group performed the same imagery training interspersed with a complex, secondary spelling and counting task. A third, control, group simply wrote the words as they would normally appear from their own point of view. After training with 300 words, all subjects were tested in a mirror-reading task using 60 non-words, constructed according to acceptable letter combinations of the Portuguese language. Compared with control subjects, those exposed to imagery training, including those who switched between imagery and the complex task, exhibited shorter reading times in the mirror-reading task. Experiment II employed a 2 x 3 design, including two training conditions (imagery and actual mirror-reading) and three competing task conditions (a spelling and counting switching task, a visual working memory concurrent task, and no concurrent task). Training sessions were interspersed with mirror-reading testing sessions for non-words, allowing evaluation of the mirror-reading acquisition process during training. The subjects exposed to imagery training acquired the mirror-reading skill as quickly as those exposed to the actual mirror-reading task. Further, performance of concurrent tasks together with actual mirror-reading training severely disrupted mirror-reading skill acquisition; this interference effect was not seen in subjects exposed to imagery training and performance of the switching and the concurrent tasks. These results unequivocally show that acquisition of implicit skills by top

  13. AdS orbifolds and Penrose limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Sheikh-Jabbari, Mohammad M.; Tatar, Radu

    2002-12-09

    In this paper we study the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} orbifolds. The orbifold can be either in the pure spatial directions or space and time directions. For the AdS{sub 5}/{Lambda} x S{sup 5} spatial orbifold we observe that after the Penrose limit we obtain the same result as the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}/{Lambda}. We identify the corresponding BMN operators in terms of operators of the gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}/{Lambda}. The semi-classical description of rotating strings in these backgrounds have also been studied. For the spatial AdS orbifold we show that in the quadratic order the obtained action for the fluctuations is the same as that in S{sup 5} orbifold, however, the higher loop correction can distinguish between two cases.

  14. THE MOTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard Nielsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    something original and genuine that decisively challenges the limits of the field of architecture. This un- derstanding is important if students are to avoid mimicking an existing world of imagery in architecture or fragments of it. The point of departure for the MO- TOR assignment is that a car engine...... is dependent on a reading and analysis of the formal characteristics of the engine com- ponent. This is crucial if the staging process is to succeed....

  15. Supportive Music and Imagery Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Paik-Maier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Supportive Music and Imagery Method is derived from the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (BMGIM. It uses one piece of pre-recorded music that is short and simple in all musical elements and non-classical music is often used.It aims at enhancing one’s ego by supporting one’s positive resource rather than exploring problems and issues. It is containing and highly structured compared to BMGIM and it focuses on the here-and-now.

    I will introduce how the SMI method is conducted by illustrating a few case examples supervised by me and conducted by graduates and trainees of the Music and Imagery training in Korea.

  16. AgSat Imagery Collection Footprints

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The AgSat Imagery Collection Footprints map shows the imagery footprints which have been collected under the USDA satellite blanket purchase agreement. Click on a...

  17. Publicly Available IKONOS-2 Commercial Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Commercial Data Purchases (UCDP) imagery collection is an archive of commercial remote sensing imagery from several different commercial vendors. The UCDP...

  18. Detection of mental imagery and attempted movements in patients with disorders of consciousness using EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horki, Petar; Bauernfeind, Günther; Klobassa, Daniela S; Pokorny, Christoph; Pichler, Gerald; Schippinger, Walter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-01-01

    Further development of an EEG based communication device for patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC) could benefit from addressing the following gaps in knowledge-first, an evaluation of different types of motor imagery; second, an evaluation of passive feet movement as a mean of an initial classifier setup; and third, rapid delivery of biased feedback. To that end we investigated whether complex and/or familiar mental imagery, passive, and attempted feet movement can be reliably detected in patients with DoC using EEG recordings, aiming to provide them with a means of communication. Six patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) took part in this study. The patients were verbally instructed to perform different mental imagery tasks (sport, navigation), as well as attempted feet movements, to induce distinctive event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/S) patterns in the EEG. Offline classification accuracies above chance level were reached in all three tasks (i.e., attempted feet, sport, and navigation), with motor tasks yielding significant (p art in similar studies, to which we contributed by comparing different types of mental tasks, notably complex motor imagery and attempted feet movements, within patients. Furthermore, we explored new venues, such as an evaluation of passive feet movement as a mean of an initial classifier setup, and rapid delivery of biased feedback.

  19. Mental imagery of speech and movement implicates the dynamics of internal forward models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing eTian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical concept of efference copies in the context of internal forward models has stimulated productive research in cognitive science and neuroscience. There are compelling reasons to argue for such a mechanism, but finding direct evidence in the human brain remains difficult. Here we investigate the dynamics of internal forward models from an unconventional angle: mental imagery, assessed while recording high temporal resolution neuronal activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG. We compare two overt and covert tasks; our covert, mental imagery tasks are unconfounded by overt input/output demands – but in turn necessitate the development of appropriate multi-dimensional topographic analyses. Finger tapping (studies 1-2 and speech experiments (studies 3-5 provide temporally constrained results that implicate the estimation of an efference copy. We suggest that one internal forward model over parietal cortex subserves the kinesthetic feeling in motor imagery. Secondly, observed auditory neural activity ~170 ms after motor estimation in speech experiments (studies 3-5 demonstrates the anticipated auditory consequences of planned motor commands in a second internal forward model in imagery of speech production. Our results provide neurophysiological evidence from the human brain in favor of internal forward models deploying efference copies in somatosensory and auditory cortex, in finger tapping and speech production tasks, respectively, and also suggest the dynamics and sequential updating structure of internal forward models.

  20. Superradiant instability in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Ganchev, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of superradiance in the context of asymptotically global AdS spacetimes is investigated with particular accent on its effect on the stability of the systems under consideration. To this end, the concept of an asymptotically AdS spacetime is explained, together with its implications on the boundary conditions at $\\mathcal{I}$, as well as the Newman-Penrose-Teukolsky formalism, whereby the Teukolsky master equation in a most general form for Kerr-AdS is given. Furthermore, work done in the cases of RN-AdS and Kerr-AdS is laid out in a concise manner, putting emphasis on the important steps taken in determining the endpoint of the superradiant instability in the two configurations. For the former this turns out to be a black hole with reduced charge and a static charged scalar condensate around it, whereas for the latter two of the more probable outcomes are presented, both of which imply a violation of one of the cosmic censorships.

  1. Ultrasonic Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    and T. Higuchi, "Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Utilizing Bulk Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)," Japanese Journal of Applied Physics Part 1-Regular Papers Short Notes & Review Papers, vol. 38, pp. 3347-3350, 1999.

  2. Perceptual evaluation of color transformed multispectral imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Jong, M.J. de; Hogervorst, M.A.; Hooge, I.T.C.

    2014-01-01

    Color remapping can give multispectral imagery a realistic appearance. We assessed the practical value of this technique in two observer experiments using monochrome intensified (II) and long-wave infrared (IR) imagery, and color daylight (REF) and fused multispectral (CF) imagery. First, we investi

  3. Perceptual evaluation of color transformed multispectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; de Jong, Michael J.; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Hooge, Ignace T. C.

    2014-04-01

    Color remapping can give multispectral imagery a realistic appearance. We assessed the practical value of this technique in two observer experiments using monochrome intensified (II) and long-wave infrared (IR) imagery, and color daylight (REF) and fused multispectral (CF) imagery. First, we investigated the amount of detail observers perceive in a short timespan. REF and CF imagery yielded the highest precision and recall measures, while II and IR imagery yielded significantly lower values. This suggests that observers have more difficulty in extracting information from monochrome than from color imagery. Next, we measured eye fixations during free image exploration. Although the overall fixation behavior was similar across image modalities, the order in which certain details were fixated varied. Persons and vehicles were typically fixated first in REF, CF, and IR imagery, while they were fixated later in II imagery. In some cases, color remapping II imagery and fusion with IR imagery restored the fixation order of these image details. We conclude that color remapping can yield enhanced scene perception compared to conventional monochrome nighttime imagery, and may be deployed to tune multispectral image representations such that the resulting fixation behavior resembles the fixation behavior corresponding to daylight color imagery.

  4. Perceptual evaluation of colorized nighttime imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; de Jong, Michael J.; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Hooge, Ignace T. C.

    2014-02-01

    We recently presented a color transform that produces fused nighttime imagery with a realistic color appearance (Hogervorst and Toet, 2010, Information Fusion, 11-2, 69-77). To assess the practical value of this transform we performed two experiments in which we compared human scene recognition for monochrome intensified (II) and longwave infrared (IR) imagery, and color daylight (REF) and fused multispectral (CF) imagery. First we investigated the amount of detail observers can perceive in a short time span (the gist of the scene). Participants watched brief image presentations and provided a full report of what they had seen. Our results show that REF and CF imagery yielded the highest precision and recall measures, while both II and IR imagery yielded significantly lower values. This suggests that observers have more difficulty extracting information from monochrome than from color imagery. Next, we measured eye fixations of participants who freely explored the images. Although the overall fixation behavior was similar across image modalities, the order in which certain details were fixated varied. Persons and vehicles were typically fixated first in REF, CF and IR imagery, while they were fixated later in II imagery. In some cases, color remapping II imagery and fusion with IR imagery restored the fixation order of these image details. We conclude that color remapping can yield enhanced scene perception compared to conventional monochrome nighttime imagery, and may be deployed to tune multispectral image representation such that the resulting fixation behavior resembles the fixation behavior for daylight color imagery.

  5. Agency Video, Audio and Imagery Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation was to inform the ISS International Partners of the new NASA Agency Video, Audio and Imagery Library (AVAIL) website. AVAIL is a new resource for the public to search for and download NASA-related imagery, and is not intended to replace the current process by which the International Partners receive their Space Station imagery products.

  6. Boson Stars in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Lehner, Luis

    2013-01-01

    We construct boson stars in global Anti de Sitter (AdS) space and study their stability. Linear perturbation results suggest that the ground state along with the first three excited state boson stars are stable. We evolve some of these solutions and study their nonlinear stability in light of recent work \\cite{Bizon:2011gg} arguing that a weakly turbulent instability drives scalar perturbations of AdS to black hole formation. However evolutions suggest that boson stars are nonlinearly stable and immune to the instability for sufficiently small perturbation. Furthermore, these studies find other families of initial data which similarly avoid the instability for sufficiently weak parameters. Heuristically, we argue that initial data families with widely distributed mass-energy distort the spacetime sufficiently to oppose the coherent amplification favored by the instability. From the dual CFT perspective our findings suggest that there exist families of rather generic initial conditions in strongly coupled CFT ...

  7. AdS solutions through transgression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Gauntlett, J.P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.]|[Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). The Institute for Mathematical Sciences; Kim, Nakwoo [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Physics and Research Inst. of Basic Science

    2008-07-15

    We present new classes of explicit supersymmetric AdS{sub 3} solutions of type IIB supergravity with non-vanishing five-form flux and AdS{sub 2} solutions of D=11 supergravity with electric four-form flux. The former are dual to two-dimensional SCFTs with (0,2) supersymmetry and the latter to supersymmetric quantum mechanics with two supercharges. We also investigate more general classes of AdS{sub 3} solutions of type IIB supergravity and AdS{sub 2} solutions of D=11 supergravity which in addition have non-vanishing three-form flux and magnetic four-form flux, respectively. The construction of these more general solutions makes essential use of the Chern-Simons or ''transgression'' terms in the Bianchi identity or the equation of motion of the field strengths in the supergravity theories. We construct infinite new classes of explicit examples and for some of the type IIB solutions determine the central charge of the dual SCFTs. The type IIB solutions with non-vanishing three-form flux that we construct include a two-torus, and after two T-dualities and an S-duality, we obtain new AdS3 solutions with only the NS fields being non-trivial. (orig.)

  8. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    41 6.12 Geocoding ...47 7.6 Errors in Geocoding .............................................................................................................. 47...h = z - R cos6 (39a) and x = rt sin6. (39b) 6.12 Geocoding Acoustic backscatter imagery data are collected by recording the across-track signals

  9. Dialectical Imagery and Postmodern Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Kevin G.

    2006-01-01

    This article suggests utilizing dialectical imagery, as understood by German social philosopher Walter Benjamin, as an additional qualitative data analysis strategy for research into the postmodern condition. The use of images mined from research data may offer epistemological transformative possibilities that will assist in the demystification of…

  10. Stereoscopy in cinematographic synthetic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Jonathan; Parent, Rick

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present experiments and results pertaining to the perception of depth in stereoscopic viewing of synthetic imagery. In computer animation, typical synthetic imagery is highly textured and uses stylized illumination of abstracted material models by abstracted light source models. While there have been numerous studies concerning stereoscopic capabilities, conventions for staging and cinematography in stereoscopic movies have not yet been well-established. Our long-term goal is to measure the effectiveness of various cinematography techniques on the human visual system in a theatrical viewing environment. We would like to identify the elements of stereoscopic cinema that are important in terms of enhancing the viewer's understanding of a scene as well as providing guidelines for the cinematographer relating to storytelling. In these experiments we isolated stereoscopic effects by eliminating as many other visual cues as is reasonable. In particular, we aim to empirically determine what types of movement in synthetic imagery affect the perceptual depth sensing capabilities of our viewers. Using synthetic imagery, we created several viewing scenarios in which the viewer is asked to locate a target object's depth in a simple environment. The scenarios were specifically designed to compare the effectiveness of stereo viewing, camera movement, and object motion in aiding depth perception. Data were collected showing the error between the choice of the user and the actual depth value, and patterns were identified that relate the test variables to the viewer's perceptual depth accuracy in our theatrical viewing environment.

  11. Joint selection of time segment and frequency band for classifying multiclass motor imagery EEG data%基于时间段和频带联合选择的多类运动想象脑电数据分类

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏庆国; 韩仁香

    2014-01-01

    The time and frequency intervals of EEG signals have significant influence on the classification performance of brain-computer interfaces(BCIs).Based on joint selection of time segment and frequency band,a new classification algorithm was proposed to classify multiclass motor imagery BCI systems in this paper.A sliding window was firstly used to segment the EEG signals in time and frequency domain.Then the multiclass common spatial pattern(CSP)was utilized for feature extraction in each pair of time and fre-quency segment.Finally we employed the k-nearest neighbor(KNN)to classify the extracted feature sig-nals.Cross-validated classification accuracy was used for the selection criterion of optimal time and frequen-cy segment.The performance of the algorithm was tested and compared with those of three typical algo-rithms by a classification experiment on a four-class data set.The results suggested that the algorithm could achieve a highest accuracy rate,validating the effectiveness of the j oint selection of time segment and frequency band based classification algorithm.%脑电信号的时间和频率间隔选择对脑机接口的分类性能具有重要的影响。针对多类运动想象脑机接口系统,提出一个新的基于时间段和频带联合选择的分类算法。该算法首先使用滑动窗将运动想象产生的脑电信号在时域和频域进行分割,然后在每一对截取的时间段和频段,使用多类共空域模式算法提取脑电特征信号,最后使用k-最近邻算法对特征信号进行分类。交叉验证的分类识别率作为最优时间段和频带的选择标准。使用一个四类数据集对这个分类算法的性能进行了测试。与现有的3个典型算法比较,这个算法取得了最高的平均分类正确率,证实了这个基于时间段和频带联合选择的分类算法的有效性。

  12. Motor prediction in Brain-Computer Interfaces for controlling mobile robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tao; Gan, John Q

    2008-01-01

    EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) can be regarded as a new channel for motor control except that it does not involve muscles. Normal neuromuscular motor control has two fundamental components: (1) to control the body, and (2) to predict the consequences of the control command, which is called motor prediction. In this study, after training with a specially designed BCI paradigm based on motor imagery, two subjects learnt to predict the time course of some features of the EEG signals. It is shown that, with this newly-obtained motor prediction skill, subjects can use motor imagery of feet to directly control a mobile robot to avoid obstacles and reach a small target in a time-critical scenario.

  13. Refined Holographic Entanglement Entropy for the AdS Solitons and AdS black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Masafumi; Ning, Bo

    2012-01-01

    We consider the refinement of the holographic entanglement entropy on a disk region for the holographic dual theories to the AdS solitons and AdS black holes, including the corrected ones by the Gauss-Bonnet term. The AdS soliton is dual to a gapped system with an IR fixed-point. The refinement is obtained by extracting the UV-independent piece of the holographic entanglement entropy. We then study the renormalization group (RG) flow of the refinement by tuning the linear size of the chosen disk region. Our main results are (i) the RG flow of the refinement decreases monotonically for most of the cases; (ii) there is no topological entanglement entropy for AdS$_5$ soliton even with Gauss-Bonnet correction; (iii) for the AdS black holes, the refinement obeys the volume law at IR regime, and the transition between UV and IR regimes is a smooth crossover; however, the crossover will turn into phase transition by the Gauss-Bonnet correction; (iv) for the AdS solitons, there are discontinuous phase transitions bet...

  14. Predicting AD conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawu; Mattila, Jussi; Ruiz, Miguel �ngel Mu�oz

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracies of predicting AD conversion by using a decision support system (PredictAD tool) and current research criteria of prodromal AD as identified by combinations of episodic memory impairment of hippocampal type and visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) on MRI...

  15. An AdS Crunch in Supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertog, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We review some properties of N=8 gauged supergravity in four dimensions with modified, but AdS invariant boundary conditions on the m2 = -2 scalars. There is a one-parameter class of asymptotic conditions on these fields and the metric components, for which the full AdS symmetry group is preserved. The generators of the asymptotic symmetries are finite, but acquire a contribution from the scalar fields. For a large class of such boundary conditions, we find there exist black holes with scalar hair that are specified by a single conserved charge. Since Schwarschild-AdS is a solution too for all boundary conditions, this provides an example of black hole non-uniqueness. We also show there exist solutions where smooth initial data evolve to a big crunch singularity. This opens up the possibility of using the dual conformal field theory to obtain a fully quantum description of the cosmological singularity, and we report on a preliminary study of this.

  16. Movement and stretching imagery during flexibility training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergeer, Ineke; Roberts, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of movement and stretching imagery on increases in flexibility. Thirty volunteers took part in a 4 week flexibility training programme. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) movement imagery, where participants imagined moving the limb they were stretching; (2) stretching imagery, where participants imagined the physiological processes involved in stretching the muscle; and (3) control, where participants did not engage in mental imagery. Active and passive range of motion around the hip was assessed before and after the programme. Participants provided specific ratings of vividness and comfort throughout the programme. Results showed significant increases in flexibility over time, but no differences between the three groups. A significant relationship was found, however, between improved flexibility and vividness ratings in the movement imagery group. Furthermore, both imagery groups scored significantly higher than the control group on levels of comfort, with the movement imagery group also scoring significantly higher than the stretching imagery group. We conclude that the imagery had stronger psychological than physiological effects, but that there is potential for enhancing physiological effects by maximizing imagery vividness, particularly for movement imagery.

  17. Mental Imagery in Depression: Phenomenology, Potential Mechanisms, and Treatment Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Emily A; Blackwell, Simon E; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Renner, Fritz; Raes, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Mental imagery is an experience like perception in the absence of a percept. It is a ubiquitous feature of human cognition, yet it has been relatively neglected in the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of depression. Imagery abnormalities in depression include an excess of intrusive negative mental imagery; impoverished positive imagery; bias for observer perspective imagery; and overgeneral memory, in which specific imagery is lacking. We consider the contribution of imagery dysfunctions to depressive psychopathology and implications for cognitive behavioral interventions. Treatment advances capitalizing on the representational format of imagery (as opposed to its content) are reviewed, including imagery rescripting, positive imagery generation, and memory specificity training. Consideration of mental imagery can contribute to clinical assessment and imagery-focused psychological therapeutic techniques and promote investigation of underlying mechanisms for treatment innovation. Research into mental imagery in depression is at an early stage. Work that bridges clinical psychology and neuroscience in the investigation of imagery-related mechanisms is recommended.

  18. Adding more value to added-value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Livia

    regulation. The results of a qualitative concept test reveal positive attitudes towards the proposed production process. The discussions about fewer standards being sufficient or about options “in-between” conventional and organic standards indicate that the difference in production processes is noticed, yet...... it is probably valued less than expected. The added attributes need to be thoroughly considered when developing and marketing “organic plus” products, as their effect on other product characteristics (e.g. high prices) can detract from their added value....

  19. The application and efficacy of combined neurofeedback therapy and imagery training in adolescents with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Li, Li

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to examine the effectiveness of combined neurofeedback therapy and imagery training in adolescent patients with refractory Tourette syndrome. Two patients, aged respectively 14 and 16 years, had been treated with haloperidol and tiapride; however, this medication was ineffective and accompanied by intolerable side effects. In this study, the patients completed 80 sessions of neurofeedback treatment followed by imagery training. The patients were assessed with behavior rating scales both before and after the treatment as well as during follow-up examinations to evaluate the effect of the combined therapy. Patients showed significant improvement in motor tic and vocal tic symptoms, exemplified by a reduction in the frequency and intensity of tics, indicating that neurofeedback, together with imagery training, has a positive therapeutic effect on adolescent patients with medication-refractory Tourette syndrome.

  20. USE OF IMAGERY AND METAPHOR IN ARAVIND ADIGAS THE WHITE TIGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushama Kasbekar

    2011-10-01

    highlights how this imagery and metaphor has been used by the writer to bring out the thematic rich and poor divide or the servitude of the poor and overbearing opulence of the rich. The metaphors give added value to the themes and the characters and provide an immediate verbal picture.

  1. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav

    2016-02-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of {N}=8 supergravity on AdS4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã max. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy Ɛ ≲ ã max, while geodesics with Ɛ > ã max terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outward" in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green's function has a branch point determined by ã max which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  2. Laterality effects in motor learning by mental practice in right-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, R J; Papaxanthis, C

    2015-06-25

    Converging evidences suggest that mental movement simulation and actual movement production share similar neurocognitive and learning processes. Although a large body of data is available in the literature regarding mental states involving the dominant arm, examinations for the nondominant arm are sparse. Does mental training, through motor-imagery practice, with the dominant arm or the nondominant arm is equally efficient for motor learning? In the current study, we investigated laterality effects in motor learning by motor-imagery practice. Four groups of right-hander adults mentally and physically performed as fast and accurately as possible (speed/accuracy trade-off paradigm) successive reaching movements with their dominant or nondominant arm (physical-training-dominant-arm, mental-training-dominant-arm, physical-training-nondominant-arm, and mental-training-nondominant-arm groups). Movement time was recorded and analyzed before, during, and after the training sessions. We found that physical and mental practice had a positive effect on the motor performance (i.e., decrease in movement time) of both arms through similar learning process (i.e., similar exponential learning curves). However, movement time reduction in the posttest session was significantly higher after physical practice than motor-imagery practice for both arms. More importantly, motor-imagery practice with the dominant arm resulted in larger and more robust improvements in movement speed compared to motor-imagery practice with the nondominant arm. No such improvements were observed in the control group. Our results suggest a superiority of the dominant arm in motor learning by mental practice. We discussed these findings from the perspective of the internal models theory.

  3. ERTS-A satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvocoresses, Alden P.

    1970-01-01

    The first satellite designed to survey the Earth's resources is scheduled to be launched in 1972. This satellite, known as ERTS-A, will telemeter frames of imagery each covering 100-nautical-mile squares of the Earth. Except for the internal anomalies in the sensor system, the imagery, after being properly scaled, rectified, and controlled, may be considered an orthographic view of the Earth and used as a planimetric photomap. The accuracy of this photomap will be limited, principally by the geometric fidelity of the sensor system rather than by external effects, such as relief displacement, which restrict the direct cartographic use of the conventional aerial photograph. ERST-A is not designed as a topographic mapping satellite but does have real potential' for thematic mapping particularly in areas now covered by topographic maps.

  4. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbraith, Amy E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  5. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  6. THE MOTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard Nielsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    MOTOR is the first assignment that students at Unit 1a of the School of Architecture are introduced to. The purpose of the assignment is to shake up the students and their preconceptions of what architec- ture is. This is done by introducing them to a working method that al- lows them to develop...

  7. The political attack ad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma Peña-Jiménez, Ph.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During election campaigns the political spot has a clear objective: to win votes. This message is communicated to the electorate through television and Internet, and usually presents a negative approach, which includes a direct critical message against the opponent, rather than an exposition of proposals. This article is focused on the analysis of the campaign attack video ad purposely created to encourage the disapproval of the political opponent among voters. These ads focus on discrediting the opponent, many times, through the transmission of ad hominem messages, instead of disseminating the potential of the political party and the virtues and manifesto of its candidate. The article reviews the development of the attack ad since its first appearance, which in Spain dates back to 1996, when the famous Doberman ad was broadcast, and examines the most memorable campaign attack ads.

  8. Simulation and Performance of Brushless DC Motor Actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    AD-RI63 725 SIMULATION AND PERFORMANCE OF IRUSHLESS DC MOTOR ACTUATORS(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA A GERDA DEC 85 NPS69-85-628 M...California Progress Report SIMULATION AND PERFORMANCE OF BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR ACTUATORS IN SUPPORT OF THE PROGRAM "ADVANCED MISSILE CONTROL DEVICES"I of...34.’ SIMULATION AND PERFORMANCE OF BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR ACTUATORS SUMMARY The simulation model for a Brushless D.C. Motor and the associated * commutation power

  9. Physics-based Detection of Subpixel Targets in Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    IEEE Proceedings of the1999 Aerospace Conference, vol. 4, pp 177-181, March 1999. [4] E. A. Ashton and A. Schaum , “Algorithms for the detection...Malinowski, “Theory of error in factor analysis,” Analytical Chemistry , vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 606-612, 1977. [69] D. Manolakis, “Realistic matched...34Anomaly Detection from Hyperspectral Imagery," IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 58-69, January 2002. [104] A.D. Stocker and P. Schaum

  10. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S Prem

    2015-01-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of N=8 supergravity on AdS_4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor a_{max} . Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy E \\leq a_{max}, while geodesics with E > a_{max} terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outw...

  11. Twistor methods for AdS$_5$

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Tim; Williams, Jack

    2016-01-01

    We consider the application of twistor theory to five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. The twistor space of AdS$_5$ is the same as the ambitwistor space of the four-dimensional conformal boundary; the geometry of this correspondence is reviewed for both the bulk and boundary. A Penrose transform allows us to describe free bulk fields, with or without mass, in terms of data on twistor space. Explicit representatives for the bulk-to-boundary propagators of scalars and spinors are constructed, along with twistor action functionals for the free theories. Evaluating these twistor actions on bulk-to-boundary propagators is shown to produce the correct two-point functions.

  12. Holography of AdS vacuum bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbon, J.L.F. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica IFT UAM/CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Rabinovici, E. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We consider the fate of AdS vacua connected by tunneling events. A precise holographic dual of thin-walled Coleman-de Luccia bounces is proposed in terms of Fubini instantons in an unstable CFT. This proposal is backed by several qualitative and quantitative checks, including the precise calculation of the instanton action appearing in evaluating the decay rate. Big crunches manifest themselves as time dependent processes which reach the boundary of field space in a finite time. The infinite energy difference involved is identified on the boundary and highlights the ill-defined nature of the bulk setup. We propose a qualitative scenario in which the crunch is resolved by stabilizing the CFT, so that all attempts at crunching always end up shielded from the boundary by the formation of black hole horizons. In all these well defined bulk processes the configurations have the same asymptotics and are finite energy excitations.

  13. Mental imagery of positive and neutral memories: A fMRI study comparing field perspective imagery to observer perspective imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grol, Maud; Vingerhoets, Guy; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-02-01

    Imagery perspective can influence what information is recalled, processing style, and emotionality; however, the understanding of possible mechanisms mediating these observed differences is still limited. We aimed to examine differences between memory recall from a field perspective and observer perspective at the neurobiological level, in order to improve our understanding of what is underlying the observed differences at the behavioral level. We conducted a fMRI study in healthy individuals, comparing imagery perspectives during recall of neutral and positive autobiographical memories. Behavioral results revealed field perspective imagery of positive memories, as compared to observer perspective, to be associated with more positive feelings afterwards. At the neurobiological level, contrasting observer perspective to field perspective imagery was associated with greater activity, or less decrease relative to the control visual search task, in the right precuneus and in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). Greater activity in the right TPJ during an observer perspective as compared to field perspective could reflect performing a greater shift of perspective and mental state during observer perspective imagery than field perspective imagery. Differential activity in the precuneus may reflect that during observer perspective imagery individuals are more likely to engage in (self-) evaluative processing and visuospatial processing. Our findings contribute to a growing understanding of how imagery perspective can influence the type of information that is recalled and the intensity of the emotional response. Observer perspective imagery may not automatically reduce emotional intensity but this could depend on how the imagined situation is evaluated in relation to the self-concept.

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique, Pictometry Imagery, Published in 2009, North Georgia College and State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique dataset, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2009. It is described as 'Pictometry Imagery'....

  15. Predictive Models to Determine Imagery Strategies Employed by Children to Judge Hand Laterality

    OpenAIRE

    Steffie Spruijt; Marijtje L A Jongsma; John van der Kamp; Bert Steenbergen

    2015-01-01

    A commonly used paradigm to study motor imagery is the hand laterality judgment task. The present study aimed to determine which strategies young children employ to successfully perform this task. Children of 5 to 8 years old (N = 92) judged laterality of back and palm view hand pictures in different rotation angles. Response accuracy and response duration were registered. Response durations of the trials with a correct judgment were fitted to a-priori defined predictive sinusoid models, repr...

  16. Effects of mental imagery styles on shoulder and hip rotations during preparation of pirouettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomer, Eveline; Bouillette, Arnaud; Mertz, Caroline; Keller, Jean

    2008-07-01

    To analyze individual behavior in spatial navigation especially for pirouette preparations (complete whole-body rotations), the authors studied horizontal shoulder-hip interactions under 2 constraints: postural (right and left supporting legs [SL]) and spatial (clockwise [CW] and counterclockwise [CCW]). They performed kinematic analysis at the start and end of the shoulder-hip horizontal rotations (run-up) with regard to imagery of motor actions. On the basis of the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire, they classified 8 female expert ballet dancers and 7 untrained female participants according to their movement imagery style (kinesthetic and visual). At the run-up's end, the shoulders initiated the turn independently of SL but differently depending on training: CW for dancers and CCW for untrained participants (their commonly used direction). Kinesthetic and mixed imagery styles prevailed in dancers, whereas simply a mixed style appeared among untrained participants. Thus, dance training enhances the imagery of kinesthetic sensation and influences the choice of spatial direction, facilitating the body-space interaction.

  17. Skil problemerne ad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    På grundlag af evalueringer og forskning i gymnasiereformen 2005 foreslås det at skille problemerne ad i forskellige niveauer. Herved kan der arbejdes med niveaudelte løsninger.......På grundlag af evalueringer og forskning i gymnasiereformen 2005 foreslås det at skille problemerne ad i forskellige niveauer. Herved kan der arbejdes med niveaudelte løsninger....

  18. Combined synthetic aperture radar/Landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marque, R. E.; Maurer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into merging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images using optical and digital merging techniques. The unique characteristics of airborne and orbital SAR and Landsat MSS imagery are discussed. The case for merging the imagery is presented and tradeoffs between optical and digital merging techniques explored. Examples of Landsat and airborne SAR imagery are used to illustrate optical and digital merging. Analysis of the merged digital imagery illustrates the improved interpretability resulting from combining the outputs from the two sensor systems.

  19. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  20. OrthoImagery Submission for Isabella county, MI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This data set contains 1-meter resolution imagery derived from the 2005 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) statewide aerial imagery acquisition. Data have...

  1. Hereditary motor-sensory, motor, and sensory neuropathies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission, age of occurrence, and, in selected cases, pathological findings. The combination of these parameters frequently orients towards specific genetic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first pediatric concern. Primary, motor-sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating AD forms (CMT1). Others are demyelinating AR forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Pure motor HN represent40 genes with various biological functions have been found responsible for HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait: for the pediatric neurologist, phenotype/genotype correlations constitute a permanent bidirectional exercise.

  2. Mobile ad hoc networking

    CERN Document Server

    John Wiley & Sons

    2004-01-01

    "Assimilating the most up-to-date information on research and development activities in this rapidly growing area, Mobile Ad Hoc Networking covers physical, data link, network, and transport layers, as well as application, security, simulation, and power management issues in sensor, local area, personal, and mobile ad hoc networks. Each of the book's sixteen chapters has been written by a top expert and discusses in-depth the most important topics in the field. Mobile Ad Hoc Networking is an excellent reference and guide for professionals seeking an in-depth examination of topics that also provides a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art."--Jacket.

  3. National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) Digital Ortho Imagery for Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This data set contains imagery from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP). NAIP acquires digital ortho imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in...

  4. Thematic mapping from satellite imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Denègre, J

    2013-01-01

    Thematic Mapping from Satellite Imagery: A Guidebook discusses methods in producing maps using satellite images. The book is comprised of five chapters; each chapter covers one stage of the process. Chapter 1 tackles the satellite remote sensing imaging and its cartographic significance. Chapter 2 discusses the production processes for extracting information from satellite data. The next chapter covers the methods for combining satellite-derived information with that obtained from conventional sources. Chapter 4 deals with design and semiology for cartographic representation, and Chapter 5 pre

  5. Imagining is not doing but involves specific motor commands: a review of experimental data related to motor inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric eGuillot

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which are blocked at some level of the motor system by inhibitory mechanisms. We first assemble data from neuroimaging studies that demonstrate that the neural networks mediating MI and motor performance are not totally overlapping, thereby highlighting potential differences between MI and actual motor execution. We then review MI data indicating the presence of subliminal muscular activity reflecting the intrinsic characteristics of the motor command as well as increased corticomotor excitability. The third section not only considers the inhibitory mechanisms involved during MI but also examines how the brain resolves the problem of issuing the motor command for action while supervising motor inhibition when people engage in voluntary movement during MI. The last part of the paper draws on imagery research in clinical contexts to suggest that some patients move while imagining an action, although they are not aware of such movements. In particular, experimental data from amputees as well as from patients with Parkinson’s disease are discussed. We also review recent studies based on comparing brain activity in tetraplegic patients with that from healthy matched controls that provide insights into inhibitory processes during MI. We conclude by arguing that based on available evidence, a multifactorial explanation of motor inhibition during MI is warranted.

  6. Value Adding Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Katchamart, Akarapong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how Facilities Management (FM) can add value and develop a management concept that can assist facilities managers in implementing value adding strategies and practices. Theory: The study is based on the management model for FM included in the European FM standards, recent...... theories on added value of FM and real estate and the related concept of Value Management from building projects. The study is related to the EuroFM research group on The Added Value of FM. Design/methodology/approach: The study outlines a preliminary theoretical based management concept, which...... is investigated, tested and discussed based on a case study of an international corporation. Findings: The study shows that the management model for FM creates a relevant starting point but also that stakeholder and relationship management is an essential aspect of Value Adding Management. The case study confirms...

  7. Antiproton-Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    When the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was stopped in 1996, because of its costly operation, a cheaper way of continuing low-energy antiproton physics was sought. The Antiproton-Collector (AC), added in 1987 to the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) to provide a tenfold intensity increase, was converted into the Antiproton-Decelerator (AD). Antiprotons from the target at 3.5 GeV/c are decelerated to 100 MeV/c, and fast-ejected to the experiments. Major changes were necessary. Above all, the conversion from a constant-field machine to one with a magnetic cycle, modulating the field by an impressive factor 35. New systems for stochastic and electron cooling had to be added. Beam diagnostics at an intensity of only 2E7 antiprotons was a challenge. In 2000, the AD began delivery of antiprotons to the experiments.

  8. AdS_3: the NHEK generation

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, Iosif; Puhm, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    It was argued in arXiv:1203.4227 that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically-AdS_3 x S^3/Z_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  9. Measuring Mental Imagery with Visual Analogue Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilter, Shawn M.; Band, Jennie P.; Miller, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates some of the psychometric characteristics of the results from visual-analogue scales used to measure mental imagery. Reports that the scores from visual-analogue scales are positively related to scores from longer pencil-and-paper measures of mental imagery. Implications and limitations for the use of visual-analogue scales to measure…

  10. Alcohol imagery on New Zealand television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeder Anthony I

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent and nature of alcohol imagery on New Zealand (NZ television, a content analysis of 98 hours of prime-time television programs and advertising was carried out over 7 consecutive days' viewing in June/July 2004. The main outcome measures were number of scenes in programs, trailers and advertisements depicting alcohol imagery; the extent of critical versus neutral and promotional imagery; and the mean number of scenes with alcohol per hour, and characteristics of scenes in which alcohol featured. Results There were 648 separate depictions of alcohol imagery across the week, with an average of one scene every nine minutes. Scenes depicting uncritical imagery outnumbered scenes showing possible adverse health consequences of drinking by 12 to 1. Conclusion The evidence points to a large amount of alcohol imagery incidental to storylines in programming on NZ television. Alcohol is also used in many advertisements to market non-alcohol goods and services. More attention needs to be paid to the extent of alcohol imagery on television from the industry, the government and public health practitioners. Health education with young people could raise critical awareness of the way alcohol imagery is presented on television.

  11. Mental Imagery in Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polland, Mark J.

    In order to investigate the relationship between mental imagery and creative problem solving, a study of 44 separate accounts reporting mental imagery experiences associated with creative discoveries were examined. The data included 29 different scientists, among them Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, and 9 artists, musicians, and writers,…

  12. Detection of mental imagery and attempted movements in patients with disorders of consciousness using EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar eHorki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Further development of an EEG based communication device for patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC could benefit from addressing the following gaps in knowledge – first, an evaluation of different types of motor imagery; second, an evaluation of passive feet movement as a mean of an initial classifier setup; and third, rapid delivery of biased feedback. To that end we investigated whether complex and / or familiar mental imagery, passive, and attempted feet movement can be reliably detected in patients with DoC using EEG recordings, aiming to provide them with a means of communication. Six patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS took part in this study. The patients were verbally instructed to perform different mental imagery tasks (sport, navigation, as well as attempted feet movements, to induce distinctive event-related (desynchronization (ERD/S patterns in the EEG. Offline classification accuracies above chance level were reached in all three tasks (i.e. attempted feet, sport, and navigation, with motor tasks yielding significant (p<0.05 results more often than navigation (sport: 10 out of 18 sessions; attempted feet: 7 out of 14 sessions; navigation: 4 out of 12 sessions. The passive feet movements, evaluated in one patient, yielded mixed results: whereas time-frequency analysis revealed task-related EEG changes over neurophysiological plausible cortical areas, the classification results were not significant enough (p<0.05 to setup an initial classifier for the detection of attempted movements. Concluding, the results presented in this study are consistent with the current state of the art in similar studies, to which we contributed by comparing different types of mental tasks, notably complex motor imagery and attempted feet movements, within patients. Furthermore, we explored new venues, such as an evaluation of passive feet movement as a mean of an initial classifier setup, and rapid delivery of biased feedback.

  13. Eating ad Libitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillersdal, Line

    in the context of the 'ad libitum meal'. The analytical interest is thus what kind of eaters and bodies are enacted in the meal test and what ideas of prevention and treatment are embedded in their standards. Drawing from ongoing empirical work among Danish obesity researchers performing scientific meal tests I...... ask what make up food stuff and eaters in the meal tests? More specifically I explore a scientific testing of changes in taste preferences before and after weight-loss surgery using an ad libitum buffet with a selection of different foods and another testing the effect of exercise on appetite also...... using an ad libitum meal consisting of spaghetti bolognaise. I analyse the entanglement and concurrence of different knowledge practices and show how several scalings of appetite play out, one ex explaining the aim of the test, being to ”measure what your body would want the most” and hence producing...

  14. Dynamic ad hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rashvand, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the exciting new application paradigm of using amalgamated technologies of the Internet and wireless, the next generation communication networks (also called 'ubiquitous', 'complex' and 'unstructured' networking) are changing the way we develop and apply our future systems and services at home and on local, national and global scales. Whatever the interconnection - a WiMAX enabled networked mobile vehicle, MEMS or nanotechnology enabled distributed sensor systems, Vehicular Ad hoc Networking (VANET) or Mobile Ad hoc Networking (MANET) - all can be classified under new networking s

  15. THE ORTHOPAEDIC REHABILITATION OF BALANCE: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE ROLE OF MENTAL IMAGERY AND EMOTIONAL VARIABLES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo F. Di Nuovo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mental Imagery (i.e., processing of objects’ properties and spatial relations, including the ability of mentally rotating and manipulating objects in the space, is relevant for movement and its development, and particularly for rehabilitation of motor skills. Few studies aimed at assessing  the efficacy of imagery training used objective scores of Mental Imagery skills, preferring self-evaluations of these abilities reported by the subjects themselves. The aim of the paper was to explore the relevance of Mental Imagery, assessed by objective tests, in predicting the improvement of balance skills, after a standard rehabilitative training in orthopaedic settings; taking into account also emotional variables as anxiety and depression. A controlled study was conducted assessing the changes in balance skills after rehabilitative training. The sample was composed of 30 orthopaedic inpatients (females 66.7%, age range 47-91 years. To measure the dependent variable for pre-post assessment, B-scale from Performance-oriented mobility assessment test (POMA was used. Independent variables were measured using Mental Imagery Test, Mini-Mental State Examination, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scales. The best predictor of improvement in balance after rehabilitation is the Mental Imagery test, followed by age and mental efficiency. Anxiety predicts negatively the improvement, while education and depression appear to influence less the rehabilitation process. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that mental imagery is relevant in helping balance rehabilitation. A training of this function could be essential for clinical practice; the trainers should assess preliminarily the subject's attitude and ability to use mental imagery, with the aim of optimizing the rehabilitative process.

  16. Gross motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a leg). ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they develop ...

  17. Students' Use of Imagery in Solving Qualitative Problems in Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Hegarty, Mary; Mayer, Richard

    This report describes a study that investigated the relationship between mental imagery and problem solving in physics, specifically in kinematics. A distinction is made between visual imagery and spatial imagery used in solving physics problems. The results of this study indicate that while spatial imagery may promote problem solving success, the…

  18. The Sport Imagery Questionnaire for Children (SIQ-C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. R.; Munroe-Chandler, K. J.; Fishburne, G. J.; Hall, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    Athletes of all ages report using imagery extensively to enhance their sport performance. The Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall, Mack, Paivio, & Hausenblas, 1998) was developed to assess cognitive and motivational imagery used by adult athletes. No such instrument currently exists to measure the use of imagery by young athletes. The aim of the…

  19. The Effect of Imagery Generation on Science Rule Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated effects of teacher-induced imagery generation on rule recall and transfer using boys in ninth-grade physical science classes assigned to imagery encouragement or discouragement treatment groups. Results indicate that imagery utilization significantly facilitates rule recall and that imagery encouragement during instruction leads to…

  20. The SWOT analysis of Traditional Chinese Mind & Imagery Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Mind & Imagery Therapy breathign technique and clinical application is an important part of the inheritance and protection of traditional Chinese medicine, establish Mind & Imagery Therapy department can promote the inheritance and development. To explore the significance and urgency of the hospital building of Mind & Imagery Therapy department, using SWOT analysis method, the traditional Chinese building of Mind & Imagery Therapy department's strengths, weaknesses, opportunit...

  1. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  2. Localization on $AdS_2\\times S^1$

    CERN Document Server

    David, Justin R; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Narain, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conformal symmetry relates the metric on $AdS_2 \\times S^{1}$ to that of $S^3$. This implies that under a suitable choice of boundary conditions for fields on $AdS_2$ the partition function of conformal field theories on these spaces must agree which makes $AdS_2 \\times S^{1}$ a good testing ground to study localization on non-compact spaces. We study supersymmetry on $AdS_2\\times S^1$ and determine the localizing Lagrangian for ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory on $AdS_2\\times S^1$. We evaluate the partition function of ${\\cal N}=2$ supersymmetric Chern-Simons theory on $AdS_2 \\times S^1$ using localization, where the radius of $S^1$ is $q$ times that of $AdS_2$. With boundary conditions on $AdS_2\\times S^1$ which ensure that all the physical fields are normalizable and lie in the space of square integrable wave functions in $AdS_2$, the result for the partition function precisely agrees with that of the theory on the $q$-fold covering of $S^3$.

  3. D-branes in Lorentzian AdS(3)

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, D

    2005-01-01

    We study the exact construction of D-branes in Lorentzian AdS(3). We start by defining a family of conformal field theories that gives a natural Euclidean version of the SL(2,R) CFT and does not correspond to H(3)+, the analytic continuation of AdS(3). We argue that one can recuperate the exact CFT results of Lorentzian AdS(3), upon an analytic continuation in the moduli space of these conformal field theories. Then we construct exact boundary states for various symmetric and symmetry-breaking D-branes in AdS(3).

  4. Mental imagery boosts music compositional creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun

    2017-01-01

    We empirically investigated the effect of mental imagery on young children’s music compositional creativity. Children aged 5 to 8 years participated in two music composition sessions. In the control session, participants based their composition on a motif that they had created using a sequence of letter names. In the mental imagery session, participants were given a picture of an animal and instructed to imagine the animal’s sounds and movements, before incorporating what they had imagined into their composition. Six expert judges independently rated all music compositions on creativity based on subjective criteria (consensual assessment). Reliability analyses indicated that the expert judges demonstrated a high level of agreement in their ratings. The mental imagery compositions received significantly higher creativity ratings by the expert judges than did the control compositions. These results provide evidence for the effectiveness of mental imagery in enhancing young children’s music compositional creativity. PMID:28296965

  5. Imagery limitations in totally congenitally blind subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beni, R; Cornoldi, C

    1988-10-01

    Research on totally blind subjects performing tasks that involve visual imagery has often shown that they do not behave differently from matched sighted subjects, even when their blindness is congenital. If visual imagery is based on visual perception, such tasks may not required visual imagery. In the present article visual images are considered as representations maintaining some properties of visible objects and constructed on the basis of information from various sources. Owing to the absence of visual experience, the limitations of such representations are explored in a series of experiments requiring memorization of single nouns, pairs of nouns, or triplets of nouns associated with a cue noun. Recall by blind subjects was impaired when multiple interactive images (with noun pairs and triplets) are formed. The poorer recall of blind subjects reflected also loss of order information. Recall was better for both groups with locative noun cues and high-imagery targets.

  6. OrthoImagery Submission for Nobles, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  7. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    wave like features, the latter appearing to be of "white noise" nature. There exists a 180 degrees ambiguity in wave direction observed from radar imageries. Based on the method of Atanassov et al (1985), a computer program has been developed...

  8. 2013 Bridge Creek, OR 4-Band Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In March 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by Woolpert, Inc. (Woolpert) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and digital imagery in...

  9. Ads in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulan Roro Retno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetics industry created the beauty myth for women through advertising. A cosmetic ad in Indonesia has spread a new concept of white skin: East Asia beauty myth. The white concept of Asia white skin basically derived from colonial legacy. The purpose of the research was analyzing the beauty myth in Indonesia ads using postcolonial perspective. The principal result brought the discourse analysis and postcolonial perspective a new insight in communication research. Particularly on media and cultural studies. Major conclusions showed that the beauty myth since the Dutch colonial period never been change. The main concept is always in colonialism’s idea: “white is better”. The West is better than the East.

  10. Spontaneous ocular positioning during visual imagery in patients with hemianopia and/or hemineglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourtassi, Maryam; Rode, Gilles; Tilikete, Caroline; Pisella, Laure

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous eye movements during imagery are not random and can be used to study and reveal mental visualization processes (Fourtassi et al., 2013; Johansson et al. 2006). For example, we previously showed that during memory recall of French towns via imagery healthy individuals looks straight ahead when recalling Paris and their subsequent gaze positions are significantly correlated with the real GPS coordinates of the recalled towns. This correlation suggests that memory retrieval is done via depictive representations as it is never found when the towns are recalled using verbal fluency. In the present paper we added to this finding by showing that the mental image is spontaneously centered on the head or body midline. In order to investigate the capacities of visual imagery in patients, and by extension, the role of primary visual cortex and fronto-parietal cortex in spatial visual imagery, we recorded gaze positions during memory recall of French towns in an imagery task, a non-imagery task (verbal fluency), and a visually-guided task in five patients with left or right hemianopia and in four patients with hemineglect (two with left hemianopia and two without). The correlation between gaze position and real GPS coordinates of the recalled towns was significant in all hemianopic patients, but in patients with hemineglect this was only the case for towns located on the right half of the map of France. This suggests hemianopic patients can perform spatially consistent mental imagery despite direct or indirect unilateral lesions of the primary visual cortex. In contrast, the left-sided towns recalled by hemineglect patients, revealed that they have some spatial inconsistency or representational difficulty. Hemianopic patients positioned and maintained their gaze in their contralesional hemispace, suggesting that their mental map was not centered on their head or body midline. This contralesional gaze positioning appeared to be a general compensation strategy and

  11. Adding linear orders

    CERN Document Server

    Shelah, Saharon

    2011-01-01

    We address the following question: Can we expand an NIP theory by adding a linear order such that the expansion is still NIP? Easily, if acl(A)=A for all A, then this is true. Otherwise, we give counterexamples. More precisely, there is a totally categorical theory for which every expansion by a linear order has IP. There is also an \\omega-stable NDOP theory for which every expansion by a linear order interprets bounded arithmetic.

  12. Guided Imagery and Music - And Beyond?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    4 original research articles, one essay, a classical article and two clinical papers documenting the development of theory, research and clinical practice within the receptive music therapy model [The Bonny Method of] Guided Imagery and Music.......4 original research articles, one essay, a classical article and two clinical papers documenting the development of theory, research and clinical practice within the receptive music therapy model [The Bonny Method of] Guided Imagery and Music....

  13. Effects of Lossy Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    and Ma and Redmond [18] suggest using gia = 1/L. Ma and Redmond argue that, when Cref is generated by unsupervised classification methods, there is...Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory Effects of Lossy Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery J.K. Sit Group 103 (Jbrrnerly Group 97) M.K. Griffin S.M...Massachusetts EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors provide imagery with hundreds of spectral bands, typ- ically covering VNIR and/or SWIR

  14. Discriminative Sparse Representations in Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    classification , and unsupervised labeling (clustering) [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. Recently, a non-parametric (Bayesian) approach to sparse modeling and com...DISCRIMINATIVE SPARSE REPRESENTATIONS IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY By Alexey Castrodad, Zhengming Xing John Greer, Edward Bosch Lawrence Carin and...00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Discriminative Sparse Representations in Hyperspectral Imagery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  15. High efficiency motors; Motores de alta eficiencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga Favela, Ivan Jaime [Energia Controlada de Mexico, S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    This paper is a technical-financial study of the high efficiency and super-premium motors. As it is widely known, more than 60% of the electrical energy generated in the country is used for the operation of motors, in industry as well as in commerce. Therefore the importance that the motors have in the efficient energy use. [Espanol] El presente trabajo es un estudio tecnico-financiero de los motores de alta eficiencia y los motores super premium. Como es ampliamente conocido, mas del 60% de la energia electrica generada en el pais, es utilizada para accionar motores, dentro de la industria y el comercio. De alli la importancia que los motores tienen en el uso eficiente de la energia.

  16. At the interface of sensory and motor dysfunctions and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Mark W; Gilmore, Grover C; Kaye, Jeffrey; Murphy, Claire; Wingfield, Arthur; Bennett, David A; Boxer, Adam L; Buchman, Aron S; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Devanand, Davangere P; Duffy, Charles J; Gall, Christine M; Gates, George A; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Hensch, Takao; Holtzer, Roee; Hyman, Bradley T; Lin, Frank R; McKee, Ann C; Morris, John C; Petersen, Ronald C; Silbert, Lisa C; Struble, Robert G; Trojanowski, John Q; Verghese, Joe; Wilson, Donald A; Xu, Shunbin; Zhang, Li I

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that sensory and motor changes may precede the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by several years and may signify increased risk of developing AD. Traditionally, sensory and motor dysfunctions in aging and AD have been studied separately. To ascertain the evidence supporting the relationship between age-related changes in sensory and motor systems and the development of AD and to facilitate communication between several disciplines, the National Institute on Aging held an exploratory workshop titled "Sensory and Motor Dysfunctions in Aging and AD." The scientific sessions of the workshop focused on age-related and neuropathologic changes in the olfactory, visual, auditory, and motor systems, followed by extensive discussion and hypothesis generation related to the possible links among sensory, cognitive, and motor domains in aging and AD. Based on the data presented and discussed at this workshop, it is clear that sensory and motor regions of the central nervous system are affected by AD pathology and that interventions targeting amelioration of sensory-motor deficits in AD may enhance patient function as AD progresses.

  17. NASA's Global Imagery Management System: TIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, C.; Roberts, J. T.; Huang, T.; Thompson, C. K.; Cechini, M. F.; Hall, J. R.; Murphy, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)' Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) is a system that provides full resolution imagery from a broad set of Earth science disciplines to the public. Using well-accepted standard protocols such as the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Tile Service (WMTS), GIBS delivers global imagery efficiently and responsively. Behind this service, lies The Imagery Exchange (TIE), a workflow data management solution developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. TIE is an Open Archival Information System responsible for orchestrating the workflow for acquisition, preparation, generation, and archiving of imagery to be served by the GIBS' web mapping tile service, OnEarth. The workflow collects imagery provenance throughout a product's lifecycle by leveraging the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) and other long-term metadata repositories in order to promote reproducibility. Through this focus on metadata, TIE provides spatial and temporal searching capabilities such as an OpenSearch interface as well as facilitating the generation of metadata standards such as the OGC GetCapabilities. Designed as a scalable system, TIE's subsystems can scale-up or scale-down depending on the data volume it handles through the usage of popular open source technologies such as Apache Zookeeper and Grails. This presentation will cover the challenges and solutions to developing such a horizontally scalable data management system where science products are often varied with disparate provenance pertaining to source platforms and instruments, spatial resolutions, processing algorithms, metadata models and packaging specifications.

  18. AdS 3-manifolds and Higgs bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alessandrini, Daniele; Li, Qiongling

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the relationships between closed AdS 3-manifolds and Higgs bundles. We have a new way to construct AdS structures that allows us to see many of their properties explicitly, for example we can recover the very recent formula by Tholozan for the volumes. We also find...

  19. The Relationship Between Mental Preparation Strategies and Motor Performance: A Review and Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews research literature on mental practice and preparation for motor performance and research on the effect of specific mental preparation strategies on skilled performance. Strategies discussed include imagery, self-efficacy statements, attentional focus, preparatory arousal, and relaxation. (Author/CJ)

  20. Pathologies in Lovelock AdS Black Branes and AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    We study the pathologies in AdS black branes in Lovelock theory. More precisely, we examine the conditions that AdS black branes have the naked singularity, the ghost instability and the dynamical instability. From the point of view of the AdS/CFT correspondence, the pathologies in AdS black branes indicate the pathologies in the corresponding CFT. Hence, we need to be careful when we apply AdS/CFT in Lovelock theory to various phenomena such as the shear viscosity to entropy ratio in strongly coupled quantum filed theory.

  1. Motor Priming in Neurorehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2015-01-01

    Priming is a type of implicit learning wherein a stimulus prompts a change in behavior. Priming has been long studied in the field of psychology. More recently, rehabilitation researchers have studied motor priming as a possible way to facilitate motor learning. For example, priming of the motor cortex is associated with changes in neuroplasticity that are associated with improvements in motor performance. Of the numerous motor priming paradigms under investigation, only a few ...

  2. Processing Color in Astronomical Imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Arcand, Kimberly K; Rector, Travis; Levay, Zoltan G; DePasquale, Joseph; Smarr, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Every year, hundreds of images from telescopes on the ground and in space are released to the public, making their way into popular culture through everything from computer screens to postage stamps. These images span the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to infrared light to X-rays and gamma rays, a majority of which is undetectable to the human eye without technology. Once these data are collected, one or more specialists must process the data to create an image. Therefore, the creation of astronomical imagery involves a series of choices. How do these choices affect the comprehension of the science behind the images? What is the best way to represent data to a non-expert? Should these choices be based on aesthetics, scientific veracity, or is it possible to satisfy both? This paper reviews just one choice out of the many made by astronomical image processors: color. The choice of color is one of the most fundamental when creating an image taken with modern telescopes. We briefly explore the ...

  3. Building Detection in SAR Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koch, Mark William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moya, Mary M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goold, Jeremy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. The desire is to present a technique that is effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed technique assumes that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint. Where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. Constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results are provided showing the outcome of the technique.

  4. Cognitive aesthetics of alchemical imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Angela M

    2013-02-01

    Jung's contribution to the understanding of the relevance of psychology to alchemy has become increasingly invalidated by the ahistorical nature of his approach, just as his tendency to ignore the importance of cognitive aesthetics for an improved comprehension of the functions of alchemical images has prevented Jungians from further extending Jung's insight of the importance of alchemy for psychology. This paper explores the history of the development of alchemical illustrations in Western Europe from the 14(th) to the 16(th) century, tracing the emergent processes over time. It is only when we take into consideration the historical dimension and the aesthetics of alchemical imagery that it becomes possible to demonstrate how the increasing use of certain aesthetic techniques such as the disjunction and recombination of separate metaphorical elements of previous illustrations, the use of compressive combinations and the use of framing devices worked to gradually increase the cognitive function and the symbolical power of the images. If alchemy is still relevant to psychotherapy it is exactly because it helps us to understand the importance of cognitive aesthetics in our approach to the images, metaphors and narratives of our patients.

  5. The effect of Ad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小艳

    2010-01-01

    There is the trend that now people appreciate those who are slim and regard slim even thin people beautiful. The thinner a person is, the more beautiful. Women, born to pursuit beauty, try various means to follow the trend. We all watch TV, and find a lot of advertisements on diet. The effect of them is tremendous. We all know the fact that it is not at all the better mouse trap will catch mouse. The sales methods are more important. If an advertisement is very interesting and seemingly effective, people will be lured by the ad and then try some of the products.

  6. Management job ads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The article asks whether it is not the responsibility of corporations to address the issue of women being underrepresented in Danish management jobs. In other words, it is argued that corporations should be encouraged to engage more actively in the recruitment of both men and women for management...... that this agreement reflects a high degree of conservatism in the system where men enjoy a considerable advantage and where procedures that ensure male dominance are perpetuated even in the linguistic and discursive construction of job ads....

  7. Global Imagery in Online Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Geraldine E.; Janson, Marius

    2007-01-01

    A well-designed online advertisement is essential for effective communication with potential customers and contributes to successful e-commerce. However, creating online sales messages that appeal to a broad range of cultures can pose unique challenges. Internet ads must offer both a globally appealing and a culture-specific message that in turn…

  8. Value-Added Exchange Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolfs Bems; Robert C. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    This paper updates the conceptual foundations for measuring real effective exchange rates (REERs) to allow for vertical specialization in trade. We derive a value-added REER describing how demand for the value added that a country produces changes as the price of its value added changes relative to competitors. We then compute this index for 42 countries from 1970-2009 using trade measured in value added terms and GDP deflators. There are substantial differences between value-added and conven...

  9. 76 FR 77382 - Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... identified in this AD, contact Continental Motors, Inc., P.O. Box 90, Mobile, AL 36601; phone: (251) 438-3411... service information referenced in this AD, contact: Continental Motors, Inc., PO Box 90, Mobile, AL 36601... in Burlington, Massachusetts, on December 5, 2011. Peter A. White, Manager, Engine &...

  10. An $xp$ model on $AdS_2$ spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Molina-Vilaplana, Javier

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we formulate the $xp$ model on the AdS$_2$ spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, equal in magnitude, given by a harmonic oscillator with a zero point energy parameterized by the AdS radius, measured in units of a fundamental length of the model. We also construct the generators of the isometry group SO(2,1) of the AdS$_2$ spacetime, and discuss the relation with conformal quantum mechanics.

  11. Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chuan Yang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy-efficient configuration of multihop paths with automatic repeat request (ARQ mechanism in wireless ad hoc networks. We adopt a cross-layer design approach and take both the quality of each radio hop and the battery capacity of each transmitting node into consideration. Under certain constraints on the maximum tolerable transmission delay and the required packet delivery ratio, we solve optimization problems to jointly schedule the transmitting power of each transmitting node and the retransmission limit over each hop. Numerical results demonstrate that the path configuration methods can either significantly reduce the average energy consumption per packet delivery or considerably extend the average lifetime of the multihop route.

  12. Electric motor handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, B J

    2013-01-01

    Electric Motor Handbook aims to give practical knowledge in a wide range of capacities such as plant design, equipment specification, commissioning, operation and maintenance. The book covers topics such as the modeling of steady-state motor performance; polyphase induction, synchronous, and a.c. commutator motors; ambient conditions, enclosures, cooling and loss dissipation; and electrical supply systems and motor drives. Also covered are topics such as variable-speed drives and motor control; materials and motor components; insulation types, systems, and techniques; and the installation, sit

  13. Dressing phases of AdS3/CFT2

    CERN Document Server

    Borsato, Riccardo; Sfondrini, Alessandro; Stefanski, Bogdan; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We determine the all-loop dressing phases of the AdS3/CFT2 integrable system related to type IIB string theory on AdS3 x S3 x T4 by solving the recently found crossing relations and studying their singularity structure. The two resulting phases present a novel structure with respect to the ones appearing in AdS5/CFT4 and AdS4/CFT3. In the strongly-coupled regime, their leading order reduces to the universal Arutyunov-Frolov-Staudacher phase as expected. We also compute their sub-leading order and compare it with recent one-loop perturbative results, and co

  14. Dressing phases of AdS3/CFT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsato, Riccardo; Ohlsson Sax, Olof; Sfondrini, Alessandro; Stefański, Bogdan, Jr.; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    We determine the all-loop dressing phases of the AdS3/CFT2 integrable system related to type IIB string theory on AdS3×S3×T4 by solving the recently found crossing relations and studying their singularity structure. The two resulting phases present a novel structure with respect to the ones appearing in AdS5/CFT4 and AdS4/CFT3. In the strongly coupled regime, their leading order reduces to the universal Arutyunov-Frolov-Staudacher phase as expected. We also compute their subleading order and compare it with recent one-loop perturbative results and comment on their weak-coupling expansion.

  15. Design of BLDCM Driving and Control System for Motorized Treadmill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhang; Hui Li; Li-Bin Wang

    2007-01-01

    To satisfy the requirement of developing a new generation of motorized treadmill for a famous domestic manufacturer, a brushless DC motor (BLDCM) driving and control system for motorized treadmill is developed. High integration and reliability of this system are ensured under the condition that intelligent power module (TPM) is used and the protection module is included. Periodic current control method is applied to reduce the average current flowing through the armature winding of the motor when the treadmill is required to start with low speed while large load is added. Piecewise proportion-integration-differentiation (PID) control algorithm is applied to solve the problem of speed fluctuation when impulse load is added. The motorized treadmill of a new generation with the driving and control system has the advantages of high reliability, good speed stability, wide timing scope, low cost, and long life-span. And it is very promising for practical applications.

  16. Chaos and hydrodynamics near AdS$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kristan

    2016-01-01

    We revisit AdS$_2$ holography with the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev models in mind. Our main result is to rewrite a generic theory of gravity near an AdS$_2$ throat as a novel hydrodynamics coupled to the correlation functions of a conformal quantum mechanics. This gives a prescription for the computation of $n$-point functions in the dual quantum mechanics. We thereby find that the dual is maximally chaotic.

  17. Quantum Field Theory and Unification in AdS5

    CERN Document Server

    Randall, Lisa; Randall, Lisa; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2001-01-01

    We consider gauge bosons in the bulk of AdS5 in a two-brane theory that addresses the hierarchy problem. We show such a theory can be consistent with gauge coupling unification at a high scale. We discuss subtleties in this calculation and show how to regulate consistently in a bounded AdS5 background. Our regularization is guided by the holographic dual of the calculation.

  18. The musician's brain: functional imaging of amateurs and professionals during performance and imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, M; Scheler, G; Tan, H-R M; Braun, C; Birbaumer, N

    2003-11-01

    We compared activation maps of professional and amateur violinists during actual and imagined performance of Mozart's violin concerto in G major (KV216). Execution and imagination of (left hand) fingering movements of the first 16 bars of the concerto were performed. Electromyography (EMG) feedback was used during imagery training to avoid actual movement execution and EMG recording was employed during the scanning of both executed and imagined musical performances. We observed that professional musicians generated higher EMG amplitudes during movement execution and showed focused cerebral activations in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex, the bilateral superior parietal lobes, and the ipsilateral anterior cerebellar hemisphere. The finding that professionals exhibited higher activity of the right primary auditory cortex during execution may reflect an increased strength of audio-motor associative connectivity. It appears that during execution of musical sequences in professionals, a higher economy of motor areas frees resources for increased connectivity between the finger sequences and auditory as well as somatosensory loops, which may account for the superior musical performance. Professionals also demonstrated more focused activation patterns during imagined musical performance. However, the auditory-motor loop was not involved during imagined performances in either musician group. It seems that the motor and auditory systems are coactivated as a consequence of musical training but only if one system (motor or auditory) becomes activated by actual movement execution or live musical auditory stimuli.

  19. 2016 Newton County, Georgia ADS100 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-foot pixel resolution, natural color orthoimages covering Newton County, Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  20. 2016 Walton County, Georgia ADS100 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-foot pixel resolution, natural color orthoimages covering Walton County, Georgia. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  1. Supersymmetry of AdS and flat IIB backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2015-02-01

    We present a systematic description of all warped AdS n × w M 10- n and IIB backgrounds and identify the a priori number of supersymmetries N preserved by these solutions. In particular, we find that the AdS n backgrounds preserve for n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 6 supersymmetries and for suitably restricted. In addition under some assumptions required for the applicability of the maximum principle, we demonstrate that the Killing spinors of AdS n backgrounds can be identified with the zero modes of Dirac-like operators on M 10- n establishing a new class of Lichnerowicz type theorems. Furthermore, we adapt some of these results to backgrounds with fluxes by taking the AdS radius to infinity. We find that these backgrounds preserve for 2 < n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 7 supersymmetries. We also demonstrate that the Killing spinors of AdS n × w M 10- n do not factorize into Killing spinors on AdS n and Killing spinors on M 10- n .

  2. Visual mental imagery in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüter, Thomas; Grüter, Martina; Bell, Vaughan; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2009-04-10

    Congenital prosopagnosia (cPA) is a selective impairment in the visual learning and recognition of faces without detectable brain damage or malformation. There is evidence that it can be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. We assessed the capacity for visual mental imagery in 53 people with cPA using an adapted Marks' VVIQ (Vividness of Visual Imaging Questionnaire). The mean score of the prosopagnosic group showed the lowest mental imagery scores ever published for a non-brain damaged group. In a subsample of 12 people with cPA, we demonstrated that the cPA is a deficit of configural face processing. We suggest that the 'VVIQ-PA' (VVIQ-Prosopagnosia) questionnaire can help to confirm the diagnosis of cPA. Poor mental imagery, a configural face processing impairment and clinical prosopagnosia should be considered as symptoms of a yet poorly understood hereditary cerebral dysfunction.

  3. NAIP = USDA FSA National Agricultural Imagery Program: 2003 - Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) acquires aerial imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in the continental U.S. A primary goal of the NAIP...

  4. Application of SAR Imagery in Submarine Topography Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁川; 梁开龙; 桂力民

    2004-01-01

    An important research area in oceanographic surveying and mapping is to obtain submarine topography by remote sensing technique, especially by SAR imagery. In this article, problems related to SAR imagery are analyzed to provide references for the further research.

  5. USDA/FSA Imagery Programs - Public Map Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Imagery programs are an important part of maintaining, creating and updating geospatial data at the USDA Farm Service Agency. Imagery acquisition is provided by the...

  6. Effect of Imagery Practice Program on Imagery Ability in Thailand Adolescent Cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raweewat Rattanakoses

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the imagery program in Thai Sport School Cyclist-Students. The experiment was designed in duration of 10 weeks at Lampang Sport School, Thailand. Samples consisted of 66 cyclist-students through random purposive sampling, of male (46 and female (20. They were separated into two groups of experiment (33 and control (33. The questionnaire MIQ-R (Moment Imagery Questionnaire consists of 8 items of kinesthetic (KI and visual (VI to evaluate the imagery ability. Program imagery was adapted from Hogg (2002, Hall (2008. Before starting the study, researcher administered a test to see the reliability of the questionnaire: Reliability for imagery ability=.57. The finding showed that the experiment group consisted of male, (Mean=15.5622, SD=15.5530, female (Mean=15.1000, SD=1.10050. Control Group male (Mean=15.4783, SD=1.64785, female (15.3000, SD=1.15900. There was an increase in visual imagery (VI scores across the three different periods where Multivariate results indicated statistically significant F (2, 63 =4.212, p-value=.019 (p<.05, eta square=.118 (11.8% large effect at pre-test, post-test 1 and post-test 2 (Experiment and Control group. Kinesthetic imagery (KI scores increased across the three different periods where Multivariate results indicated statistically significant F (2, 63 =.879, p-value=.017 (p<.05, eta square=.121 (12.1% large effect at pre-test, post-test 1 and post-test 2 (Experiment and Control group. This research suggested that the imagery program does improve mental skills of Thailand adolescent cyclists in visual and kinesthetic imagery ability.

  7. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  8. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  9. Closing the Mind's Eye: Incoming Luminance Signals Disrupt Visual Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Mental imagery has been associated with many cognitive functions, both high and low-level. Despite recent scientific advances, the contextual and environmental conditions that most affect the mechanisms of visual imagery remain unclear. It has been previously shown that the greater the level of background luminance the weaker the effect of imagery on subsequent perception. However, in these experiments it was unclear whether the luminance was affecting imagery generation or storage of a memor...

  10. Athletes' use of exercise imagery during weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Michael S; Short, Sandra E; Ross-Stewart, Lindsay C

    2007-11-01

    Imagery is a cognitive process during which people use their minds to create (or recreate) experiences that are similar to real-life situations. This study examined how college athletes used imagery during weight training. Subjects were 295 Division I (n = 163) and Division II (n = 132) college student athletes (men: n = 138, women: n = 157) who participated in a weight training program as a requirement of their sport. They completed a slightly modified version of the "Weight Lifting Imagery Questionnaire." Results showed that appearance imagery (i.e., images related to the attainment of a fit-looking body) was used and considered the most effective followed by technique imagery (i.e., images related to performing the skill and techniques correctly with good form) and energy imagery (i.e., images related to getting "psyched up" or feeling energized). Other variables that effected imagery use were gender, age, time of season, and levels of motivation. In addition, gender, previous imagery training, and level of motivation had an effect on the perceptions of imagery effectiveness. Confidence in the ability to image was associated with both imagery use and effectiveness, and imagery use and effectiveness were associated with confidence in the weight room. The findings support previous research in exercise imagery that appearance imagery is most used followed by technique and energy imagery and extend them in such a way that strength coaches have practical advice on how to use imagery in a positive way with their athletes. Suggestions about how strength coaches can use imagery with their clients are provided.

  11. On RPC Model of Satellite Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo; YUAN Xiuxiao

    2006-01-01

    The RPC model has recently raised considerable interest in the photogrammetry and remote sensing community. The RPC is a generalized sensor model that is capable of achieving high approximation accuracy. Unfortunately, the computation of the parameters of RPC model is subject to the initial of the parameter in all available literature. An algorithm for computation of parameters of RPC model without initial value is presented and tested on SPOT-5, CBERS-2, ERS-1 imageries. RPC model is suitable for both push-broom and SAR imagery.

  12. Action growth for AdS black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Ruan, Shan-Ming; Wang, Shao-Jiang; Yang, Run-Qiu; Peng, Rong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Recently a Complexity-Action (CA) duality conjecture has been proposed, which relates the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state to the action of a Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch in the anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk. In this paper we further investigate the duality conjecture for stationary AdS black holes and derive some exact results for the growth rate of action within the Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch at late time approximation, which is supposed to be dual to the growth rate of quantum complexity of holographic state. Based on the results from the general D-dimensional Reissner-Nordström (RN)-AdS black hole, rotating/charged Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, Kerr-AdS black hole and charged Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole, we present a universal formula for the action growth expressed in terms of some thermodynamical quantities associated with the outer and inner horizons of the AdS black holes. And we leave the conjecture unchanged that the stationary AdS black hole in Einstein gravity is the fastest computer in nature.

  13. Piezoelectric Motors, an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Spanner; Burhanettin Koc

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric motors are used in many industrial and commercial applications. Various piezoelectric motors are available in the market. All of the piezoelectric motors use the inverse piezoelectric effect, where microscopically small oscillatory motions are converted into continuous or stepping rotary or linear motions. Methods of obtaining long moving distance have various drive and functional principles that make these motors categorized into three groups: resonance-drive (piezoelectric ult...

  14. Complexity Growth for AdS Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Wang, Shao-Jiang; Yang, Run-Qiu; Peng, Rong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We further investigate the Complexity-Action (CA) duality conjecture for stationary anti de-Sitter (AdS) black holes and derive some exact results for the growth rate of action within Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch at late time approximation, which is dual to the growth rate of quantum complexity of holographic state. Based on the results from the general $D$-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m (RN)-AdS black hole, rotating/charged Ba\\~{n}ados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, Kerr-AdS black hole and charged Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole, we present a new complexity bound but leave unchanged the conjecture that the stationary AdS black hole in Einstein gravity is the fastest computer in nature.

  15. AdS_5 Black Holes with Fermionic Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Burrington, B A; Sabra, W A; Burrington, Benjamin A.; Liu, James T.

    2004-01-01

    The study of new BPS objects in AdS_5 has led to a deeper understanding of AdS/CFT. To help complete this picture, and to fully explore the consequences of the supersymmetry algebra, it is also important to obtain new solutions with bulk fermions turned on. In this paper we construct superpartners of the 1/2 BPS black hole in AdS_5 using a natural set of fermion zero modes. We demonstrate that these superpartners, carrying fermionic hair, have conserved charges differing from the original bosonic counterpart. To do so, we find the R-charge and dipole moment of the new system, as well as the mass and angular momentum, defined through the boundary stress tensor. The complete set of superpartners fits nicely into a chiral representation of AdS_5 supersymmetry, and the spinning solutions have the expected gyromagnetic ratio, g=1.

  16. Constructing the AdS dual of a Fermi liquid: AdS Black holes with Dirac hair

    CERN Document Server

    \\vCubrović, Mihailo; Schalm, Koenraad

    2010-01-01

    We provide new evidence that the holographic dual to a strongly coupled charged Fermi Liquid has a non-zero fermion density in the bulk. We show that the pole-strength of the stable quasiparticle characterizing the Fermi surface is encoded in the spatially averaged AdS probability density of a single normalizable fermion wavefunction in AdS. Recalling Migdal's theorem which relates the pole strength to the Fermi-Dirac characteristic discontinuity in the number density at $\\ome_F$, we conclude that the AdS dual of a Fermi liquid is described by occupied on-shell fermionic modes in AdS. Encoding the occupied levels in the total probability density of the fermion field directly, we show that an AdS Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole in a theory with charged fermions has a critical temperature, at which the system undergoes a first-order transition to a black hole with a non-vanishing profile for the bulk fermion field. Thermodynamics and spectral analysis confirm that the solution with non-zero AdS fermion-profil...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, 2007 imagery over Eureka Township, Published in 2007, Eureka County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is described as '2007 imagery...

  18. 7 CFR 611.22 - Availability of satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of satellite imagery. 611.22 Section 611... § 611.22 Availability of satellite imagery. Cloud-free maps of the United States based on imagery received from a satellite are prepared and released to the pubic by NRCS. The maps offer the first image...

  19. Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) AD-6

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons.

  20. Global geometric properties of AdS space and the AdS/CFT correspondence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Poisson kernels and relations between them for a massive scalar field in a unit ball Bn with Hua's metric and conformal flat metric are obtained by describing the Bn as a submanifold of an (n+1)-dimensional embedding space. Global geometric properties of the AdS space are discussed. We show that the(n+1)-dimensional AdS space AdSn+1 is isomorphic to RP1×Bn and boundary of the AdS is isomorphic to RP1×Sn-1. Bulk-boundary propagator and the AdS/CFT like correspondence are demonstrated based on these global geometric properties of the RP1×Bn.

  1. Primary motor cortex activity reduction under the regulation of SMA by real-time fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Zhao, Xiaojie; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Chen, Kewei

    2012-03-01

    Real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) is a new technology which allows human subjects to observe and control their own BOLD signal change from one or more localized brain regions during scanning. Current rtfMRI-neurofeedback studies mainly focused on the target region itself without considering other related regions influenced by the real-time feedback. However, there always exits important directional influence between many of cooperative regions. On the other hand, rtfMRI based on motor imagery mainly aimed at somatomotor cortex or primary motor area, whereas supplement motor area (SMA) was a relatively more integrated and pivotal region. In this study, we investigated whether the activities of SMA can be controlled utilizing different motor imagery strategies, and whether there exists any possible impact on an unregulated but related region, primary motor cortex (M1). SMA was first localized using overt finger tapping task, the activities of SMA were feedback to subjects visually on line during each of two subsequent imagery motor movement sessions. All thirteen healthy participants were found to be able to successfully control their SMA activities by self-fit imagery strategies which involved no actual motor movements. The activation of right M1 was also found to be significantly reduced in both intensity and extent with the neurofeedback process targeted at SMA, suggestive that not only the part of motor cortex activities were influenced under the regulation of a key region SMA, but also the increased difference between SMA and M1 might reflect the potential learning effect.

  2. Anticipation by multi-modal association through an artificial mental imagery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, Wilmer; Escobar, Esaú; Hermosillo, Jorge; Lara, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery has become a central issue in research laboratories seeking to emulate basic cognitive abilities in artificial agents. In this work, we propose a computational model to produce an anticipatory behaviour by means of a multi-modal off-line hebbian association. Unlike the current state of the art, we propose to apply hebbian learning during an internal sensorimotor simulation, emulating a process of mental imagery. We associate visual and tactile stimuli re-enacted by a long-term predictive simulation chain motivated by covert actions. As a result, we obtain a neural network which provides a robot with a mechanism to produce a visually conditioned obstacle avoidance behaviour. We developed our system in a physical Pioneer 3-DX robot and realised two experiments. In the first experiment we test our model on one individual navigating in two different mazes. In the second experiment we assess the robustness of the model by testing in a single environment five individuals trained under different conditions. We believe that our work offers an underpinning mechanism in cognitive robotics for the study of motor control strategies based on internal simulations. These strategies can be seen analogous to the mental imagery process known in humans, opening thus interesting pathways to the construction of upper-level grounded cognitive abilities.

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Miami-Dade County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Pasco County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Uncorrected, historic aerial imagery; 1931-1990, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Uncorrected dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006. It is described as 'historic aerial...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Palm Beach County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  8. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Taylor County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Glades County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Martin County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Hernando County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  12. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - FL Bay Ortho Imagery Project Spring 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This file references a single orthogonal imagery tile produced from nadir images captured by Pictometry International during the period of December 30th, 2012 and...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Leon County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  14. Computer vision-based technologies and commercial best practices for the advancement of the motion imagery tradecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Marja; Capel, David; Srinivasan, James

    2014-06-01

    Motion imagery capabilities within the Department of Defense/Intelligence Community (DoD/IC) have advanced significantly over the last decade, attempting to meet continuously growing data collection, video processing and analytical demands in operationally challenging environments. The motion imagery tradecraft has evolved accordingly, enabling teams of analysts to effectively exploit data and generate intelligence reports across multiple phases in structured Full Motion Video (FMV) Processing Exploitation and Dissemination (PED) cells. Yet now the operational requirements are drastically changing. The exponential growth in motion imagery data continues, but to this the community adds multi-INT data, interoperability with existing and emerging systems, expanded data access, nontraditional users, collaboration, automation, and support for ad hoc configurations beyond the current FMV PED cells. To break from the legacy system lifecycle, we look towards a technology application and commercial adoption model course which will meet these future Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) challenges. In this paper, we explore the application of cutting edge computer vision technology to meet existing FMV PED shortfalls and address future capability gaps. For example, real-time georegistration services developed from computer-vision-based feature tracking, multiple-view geometry, and statistical methods allow the fusion of motion imagery with other georeferenced information sources - providing unparalleled situational awareness. We then describe how these motion imagery capabilities may be readily deployed in a dynamically integrated analytical environment; employing an extensible framework, leveraging scalable enterprise-wide infrastructure and following commercial best practices.

  15. Induction motor control design

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Riccardo; Verrelli, Cristiano M

    2010-01-01

    ""Nonlinear and Adaptive Control Design for Induction Motors"" is a unified exposition of the most important steps and concerns in the design of estimation and control algorithms for induction motors. A single notation and modern nonlinear control terminology is used to make the book accessible to readers who are not experts in electric motors at the same time as giving a more theoretical control viewpoint to those who are. In order to increase readability, the book concentrates on the induction motor, eschewing the much more complex and less-well-understood control of asynchronous motors. The

  16. Solid propellant motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  17. Motor/generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  18. A Reconfigurable Stepping Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Charles; Selvaggi, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Multiphase brushless actuators, commonly known as the stepper motors, are ubiquitous for many precision control applications. Developments in the microelectronics have lead to their use as efficient drive motors for modern electric vehicles. Understanding the physics and the control logic for interfacing these transducers continues to be important for scientists and engineers. An overview of the stepping motor principles and interfacing requirements is presented and a simple working model used to teach the concepts of stepper motors is described and demonstrated. This model was used to design a much larger stepper motor required to precisely rotate a massive optical system in the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory.

  19. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: A review of imagery measures and a guiding framework

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, David G.; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M. A.; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Holmes, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of s...

  20. Applying daytime colors to multiband nightvision imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method to give (fused) multiband night-time imagery a natural day-time color appearance. For input, the method requires a false color RGB image that is produced by mapping 3 individual bands (or the first 3 principal components) of a multiband nightvision system to the respective channe

  1. Perceptual evaluation of colorized nighttime imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Jong, M.J. de; Hogervorst, M.A.; Hooge, I.T.C.

    2014-01-01

    We recently presented a color transform that produces fused nighttime imagery with a realistic color appearance (Hogervorst & Toet, 2010, Information Fusion, 11-2, 69-77). To assess the practical value of this transform we performed two experiments in which we compared human scene recognition for mo

  2. Mapping Waterhyacinth Infestations Using Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] is an exotic aquatic weed that often invades and clogs waterways in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate airborne hyperspectral imagery and different image classification techniques for mapp...

  3. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application Project (MIRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Rodney P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA) Project. A detailed description of the MIRA camera service software architecture, encoder features, and on-board communications are presented. A description of a candidate camera under development is also shown.

  4. Lehrbuch Guided Imagery in Music (GIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Carola; Geiger, Edith Maria

    Guided Imagery in Music (GIM) ist eine musikpsychotherapeutische Methode, bei welcher der Patient eine Auswahl meist klassischer Musik in einem entspannten Zustand hört und sein Erleben (= Imaginationen) der Therapeutin mitteilt. Theoretische Hintergründe, klinische Anwendung, sowie...

  5. Image enhancement for noisy color imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.; Hollander, R.J.M. den

    2008-01-01

    Recently new techniques for night vision cameras are developed. So-called EMCCD cameras are able to record color information about the scene. However, in low-light situations this imagery becomes noisy. This is also the case for normal CCD cameras in dark situations or in shadowed areas. In this pap

  6. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    to be of "white noise" nature. There exists a 180° ambiguity in wave direction observed from radar imageries. Based on the method of Atanassov et al (1985), a computer program has been developed for the removal of the 180° ambiguity by using two images of the same...

  7. Multi-Imagery Exploitation Configuration Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    A124 88? MULTI-IMAGERY ENPLOITRTION CONFIGURATION DESIGN STUDY 1/2 (U) HARRIS CORP MEL8OURNE FL GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS DIV T E TIMOTHY ET...DESIGN STUDY 212 (U) HARRIS CORP MELBOURNE FL GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS DIV T E TIMOTHY ET AL. NOV 82 RRDC-TR-82-33 UNCLASSIFIED F31692-Si-C-8095 F

  8. Imagery as a Facilitator of Semantic Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Keri; Ryan, Ellen Bouchard

    The relationship between processing style (either auditory or visual) and sentence and imagery strategies was investigated with a sample of 80 second-grade children. Assignment to auditory- and visual-processor groups was based on subjects' recall of 16 pictograph sequences, four of which included visual interference and four of which included…

  9. Detailed ultraviolet asymptotics for AdS scalar field perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Evnin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    We present a range of methods suitable for accurate evaluation of the leading asymptotics for integrals of products of Jacobi polynomials in limits when the degrees of some or all polynomials inside the integral become large. The structures in question have recently emerged in the context of effective descriptions of small amplitude perturbations in anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The limit of high degree polynomials corresponds in this situation to effective interactions involving extreme short-wavelength modes, whose dynamics is crucial for the turbulent instabilities that determine the ultimate fate of small AdS perturbations. We explicitly apply the relevant asymptotic techniques to the case of a self-interacting probe scalar field in AdS and extract a detailed form of the leading large degree behavior, including closed form analytic expressions for the numerical coefficients appearing in the asymptotics.

  10. Asymptotically AdS spacetimes with a timelike Kasner singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Exact solutions to Einstein's equations for holographic models are presented and studied. The IR geometry has a timelike cousin of the Kasner singularity, which is the less generic case of the BKL (Belinski-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) singularity, and the UV is asymptotically AdS. This solution describes a holographic RG flow between them. The solution's appearance is an interpolation between the planar AdS black hole and the AdS soliton. The causality constraint is always satisfied. The entanglement entropy and Wilson loops are discussed. The boundary condition for the current-current correlation function and the Laplacian in the IR is examined. There is no infalling wave in the IR, but instead, there is a normalizable solution in the IR. In a special case, a hyperscaling-violating geometry is obtained after a dimensional reduction.

  11. Entanglement entropy for free scalar fields in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Sugishita, Sotaro

    2016-01-01

    We compute entanglement entropy for free massive scalar fields in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. The entangling surface is a minimal surface whose boundary is a sphere at the boundary of AdS. The entropy can be evaluated from the thermal free energy of the fields on a topological black hole by using the replica method. In odd-dimensional AdS, exact expressions of the Renyi entropy S_n are obtained for arbitrary n. We also evaluate 1-loop corrections coming from the scalar fields to holographic entanglement entropy. Applying the results, we compute the leading difference of entanglement entropy between two holographic CFTs related by a renormalization group flow triggered by a double trace deformation. The difference is proportional to the shift of a central charge under the flow.

  12. Microstates at the boundary of AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Samir D

    2011-01-01

    The bound states of the D1D5 brane system have a known gravitational description: flat asymptotics, an anti-de Sitter region, and a 'cap' ending the AdS region. We construct perturbations that correspond to the action of chiral algebra generators on Ramond ground states of D1D5 branes. Abstract arguments in the literature suggest that the perturbation should be pure gauge in the AdS region; our perturbation indeed has this structure, with the nontrivial deformation of the geometry occurring at the 'neck' between the AdS region and asymptotic infinity. This 'non-gauge' deformation is needed to provide the nonzero energy and momentum carried by the perturbation. We also suggest implications this structure may have for the majority of microstates which live at the cap.

  13. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  14. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  15. Neuroplasticity & Motor Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye

    Practice of a new motor task is usually associated with an improvement in performance. Indeed, if we stop practicing and return the next day to the same task, we find that our performance has been maintained and may even be better than it was at the start of the first day. This improvement...... is a measure of our ability to form and store a motor memory of the task. However, the initial memory of the task is labile and may be subject to interference. During and following motor learning plastic changes occur within the central nervous system. On one hand these changes are driven by motor practice......, on the other hand the changes underlie the formation of motor memory and the retention of improved motor performance. During motor learning changes may occur at many different levels within the central nervous system dependent on the type of task and training. Here, we demonstrate different studies from our...

  16. Piezoelectric Motors, an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Spanner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric motors are used in many industrial and commercial applications. Various piezoelectric motors are available in the market. All of the piezoelectric motors use the inverse piezoelectric effect, where microscopically small oscillatory motions are converted into continuous or stepping rotary or linear motions. Methods of obtaining long moving distance have various drive and functional principles that make these motors categorized into three groups: resonance-drive (piezoelectric ultrasonic motors, inertia-drive, and piezo-walk-drive. In this review, a comprehensive summary of piezoelectric motors, with their classification from initial idea to recent progress, is presented. This review also includes some of the industrial and commercial applications of piezoelectric motors that are presently available in the market as actuators.

  17. Motion/imagery secure cloud enterprise architecture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Cloud computing with storage virtualization and new service-oriented architectures brings a new perspective to the aspect of a distributed motion imagery and persistent surveillance enterprise. Our existing research is focused mainly on content management, distributed analytics, WAN distributed cloud networking performance issues of cloud based technologies. The potential of leveraging cloud based technologies for hosting motion imagery, imagery and analytics workflows for DOD and security applications is relatively unexplored. This paper will examine technologies for managing, storing, processing and disseminating motion imagery and imagery within a distributed network environment. Finally, we propose areas for future research in the area of distributed cloud content management enterprises.

  18. Diffusion and Chaos from near AdS$_2$ horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the thermal diffusivity $D = \\kappa/c_{\\rho}$ and butterfly velocity $v_B$ in holographic models that flow to AdS$_2 \\times R^{d}$ fixed points in the infra-red. We show that both these quantities are governed by the same irrelevant deformation of AdS$_2$ and hence establish a simple relationship between them. When this deformation corresponds to a universal dilaton mode of dimension $\\Delta = 2$ then this relationship is always given by $D = v_B^2/(2 \\pi T)$.

  19. An $xp$ model on $AdS_2$ spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we formulate the $xp$ model on the AdS$_2$ spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, whose absolute values are given by a harmonic oscillator spectrum, which in turn coincides with that of a massive Dirac fermion in AdS$_2$. We extend this result to generic $xp$ models which are shown to be equivalent to a massive Dirac fermion on spacetimes whose metric depend of the $xp$ Hamiltonian. Finally, we construct the generators of t...

  20. Mapping AdS to dS and back

    CERN Document Server

    Di Dato, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    We derive a map between Einstein spaces of positive and negative curvature. Starting from a space of positive curvature with some dimensions compactified on a sphere and analytically continuing the number of compact dimensions, we obtain a space of negative curvature with a compact hyperbolic subspace, and vice versa. Prime examples of such spaces are de Sitter and Anti-de Sitter space, as well as black hole spacetimes with (A)dS asymptotics and perturbed versions thereof, which play an important role in holography. This map extends work done by Caldarelli et.al., who map asymptotically AdS spaces to Ricci-flat ones. A remarkable result is that the boundary of asymptotically AdS spaces is mapped to a brane in the bulk of de Sitter, and perturbations near the AdS boundary are sourced by a stress tensor confined to this brane. We also calculate the Brown-York stress tensor for the perturbed AdS metric, which turns out to be the negative of the stress tensor on the de Sitter brane.