WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive training control

  1. Designing Training for Temporal and Adaptive Transfer: A Comparative Evaluation of Three Training Methods for Process Control Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Annette; Sauer, Juergen; Burkolter, Dina; Ritzmann, Sandrina

    2010-01-01

    Training in process control environments requires operators to be prepared for temporal and adaptive transfer of skill. Three training methods were compared with regard to their effectiveness in supporting transfer: Drill & Practice (D&P), Error Training (ET), and procedure-based and error heuristics training (PHT). Communication…

  2. Self-Directed Learning in Adaptive Training Systems: A Plea for Shared Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meeuwen, Ludo; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Kirschner, Paul A.; De Bock, Jeano; Oprins, Esther; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    In the field of aviation, air traffic controllers must be able to adapt to and act upon continuing changes in a highly advanced technological work environ- ment. This position paper claims that explicit training of self-directed learning skills (i.e. the ability to: formulate own learning needs, set

  3. Specific adaptations of neuromuscular control and knee joint stiffness following sensorimotor training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M; Bruhn, S; Gollhofer, A

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how fixations of the ankle joint during sensorimotor training (SMT) influence adaptations in mechanical stiffness and neuromuscular control of the knee joint. Sixty-three healthy subjects were randomly assigned to three training groups that differed in their degree of ankle joint fixation, which was either barefooted, with an ankle brace or with a ski boot. Mechanical knee joint stiffness and reflex control of m. vastus medialis, m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps femoris, and m. semitendinosus were tested during force controlled anterior tibial displacements. This force was applied as both a fast and a slow stimulus. After the training period the group that trained barefooted showed an increase in mechanical stiffness of the knee joint from 79 +/- 21 (Mean +/- SD) N/mm to 110 +/- 38 N/mm (p boots was able to improve knee joint stiffness from 67 +/- 26 N/mm to 96 +/- 47 N/mm (p knee joint injuries.

  4. Training adaptive teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jamie C; Cooke, Nancy J; Amazeen, Polemnia G

    2010-04-01

    We report an experiment in which three training approaches are compared with the goal of training adaptive teams. Cross-training is an established method in which team members are trained with the goal of building shared knowledge. Perturbation training is a new method in which team interactions are constrained to provide new coordination experiences during task acquisition. These two approaches, and a more traditional procedural approach, are compared. Assigned to three training conditions were 26 teams. Teams flew nine simulated uninhabited air vehicle missions; three were critical tests of the team's ability to adapt to novel situations. Team performance, response time to novel events, and shared knowledge were measured. Perturbation-trained teams significantly outperformed teams in the other conditions in two out of three critical test missions. Cross-training resulted in significant increases in shared teamwork knowledge and highest mean performance in one critical test. Procedural training led to the least adaptive teams. Perturbation training allows teams to match coordination variability during training to demands for coordination variability during posttraining performance. Although cross-training has adaptive benefits, it is suggested that process-oriented approaches, such as perturbation training, can lead to more adaptive teams. Perturbation training is amenable to simulation-based training, where perturbations provide interaction experiences that teams can transfer to novel, real-world situations.

  5. Adaptations to a New Physical Training Program in the Combat Controller Training Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Traditional bodybuilding -type resistance training (e.g., bench press, bicep curls) was replaced by functional strength training. Functional strength...as opposed to the single joint, externally stabilized motion of many bodybuilding exercises. Addition of athletic trainer visits. Prior to the

  6. Personalized Adaptive Control of Training Load in Cardio-Exergames--A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Katrin; Sportwiss, Dipl; Hardy, Sandro; Wiemeyer, Josef; Göbel, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a feasibility study of using an algorithm for an individual and adaptive control of training load in an ergometer-controlled exergame for aerobic training. An additional goal was to investigate the effects of the adaptive game on the players' motivation. A two-phase approach (calibration and exercise phase) was applied in a sample of 16 physically active adults. In the cardio-exergame "LetterBird," the flight of a pigeon was controlled by the pedaling rate of a bike ergometer as input device. During the calibration phase the individual heart rate (HR) responses of the players were measured. In the exercise phase, these data were used to adjust the resistance of the ergometer using the proposed algorithm. The purpose of this algorithm was to induce an individually defined target HR and to keep it in a steady state. In order to establish a reference for further studies, the game experience was measured using the kids-Game Experience Questionnaire. In 15 of 16 participants the actual HR reached the intended individual HR range within 10 minutes after onset of exercise. However, the induced HR initially exceeded the target HR in 13 participants, which made load adjustments necessary. The analysis of the kids-Game Experience Questionnaire confirmed the motivational effect of the exergame "LetterBird." The results confirm that the proposed algorithm for personalized HR control in the game "LetterBird" is feasible. Furthermore, the cardio-exergame "LetterBird" seems to have a substantial short-term motivating effect.

  7. Life Adaptation Skills Training (LAST) for persons with depression: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Ling; Pan, Ay-Woan; Hsiung, Ping-Chuan; Chung, Lyinn; Lai, Jin-Shei; Shur-Fen Gau, Susan; Chen, Tsyr-Jang

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy of the "Life Adaptation Skills Training (LAST)" program for persons with depression. Sixty-eight subjects with depressive disorder were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics in Taipei city and were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (N=33), or a control group (N=35). The intervention group received 24-sessions of the LAST program, as well as phone contact mainly related to support for a total of 24 times. The control group only received phone contact 24 times. The primary outcome measure utilized was the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF-Taiwan version. Secondary outcome measures included the Occupational self-assessment, the Mastery scale, the Social support questionnaire, the Beck anxiety inventory, the Beck depression inventory-II, and the Beck scale for suicide ideation. The mixed-effects linear model was applied to analyze the incremental efficacy of the LAST program, and the partial eta squared (ηp(2)) was used to examine the within- and between- group effect size. The subjects who participated in the LAST program showed significant incremental improvements with moderate to large between-group effect sizes on their level of anxiety (-5.45±2.34, psuicidal ideation (-3.09±1.11, psuicidal ideations had a maintenance effect for three months after the end of intervention (-3.44±1.09, pdepression. The within-group effect sizes achieved large effects in the intervention group (ηp(2)=0.328-0.544), and were larger than that of the control group. A small sample size in the study, a high dropout rate, lower compliance rates for the intervention group, and lacking of true control group. The occupation-based LAST program, which focuses on lifestyle rearrangement and coping skills enhancement, could significantly improve the level of anxiety and suicidal ideations for persons with depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An adaptive vibration control method to suppress the vibration of the maglev train caused by track irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Danfeng; Yu, Peichang; Wang, Lianchun; Li, Jie

    2017-11-01

    The levitation gap of the urban maglev train is around 8 mm, which puts a rather high requirement on the smoothness of the track. In practice, it is found that the track irregularity may cause stability problems when the maglev train is traveling. In this paper, the dynamic response of the levitation module, which is the basic levitation structure of the urban maglev train, is investigated in the presence of track irregularities. Analyses show that due to the structural configuration of the levitation module, the vibration of the levitation gap may be amplified and "resonances" may be observed under some specified track wavelengths and train speeds; besides, it is found that the gap vibration of the rear levitation unit in a levitation module is more significant than that of the front levitation unit, which agrees well with practice. To suppress the vibration of the rear levitation gap, an adaptive vibration control method is proposed, which utilizes the information of the front levitation unit as a reference. A pair of mirror FIR (finite impulse response) filters are designed and tuned by an adaptive mechanism, and they produce a compensation signal for the rear levitation controller to cancel the disturbance brought by the track irregularity. Simulations under some typical track conditions, including the sinusoidal track profile, random track irregularity, as well as track steps, indicate that the adaptive vibration control scheme can significantly reduce the amplitude of the rear gap vibration, which provides a method to improve the stability and ride comfort of the maglev train.

  9. Cognitive Flexibility Training: A Large-Scale Multimodal Adaptive Active-Control Intervention Study in Healthy Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessika I. V. Buitenweg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As aging is associated with cognitive decline, particularly in the executive functions, it is essential to effectively improve cognition in older adults. Online cognitive training is currently a popular, though controversial method. Although some changes seem possible in older adults through training, far transfer, and longitudinal maintenance are rarely seen. Based on previous literature we created a unique, state-of-the-art intervention study by incorporating frequent sessions and flexible, novel, adaptive training tasks, along with an active control group. We created a program called TAPASS (Training Project Amsterdam Seniors and Stroke, a randomized controlled trial. Healthy older adults (60–80 y.o. were assigned to a frequent- (FS or infrequent switching (IS experimental condition or to the active control group and performed 58 half-hour sessions over the course of 12 weeks. Effects on executive functioning, processing- and psychomotor speed, planning, verbal long term memory, verbal fluency, and reasoning were measured on four time points before, during and after the training. Additionally, we examined the explorative question which individual aspects added to training benefit. Besides improvements on the training, we found significant time effects on multiple transfer tasks in all three groups that likely reflected retest effects. No training-specific improvements were detected, and we did not find evidence of additional benefits of individual characteristics. Judging from these results, the therapeutic value of using commercially available training games to train the aging brain is modest, though any apparent effects should be ascribed more to expectancy and motivation than to the elements in our training protocol. Our results emphasize the importance of using parallel tests as outcome measures for transfer and including both active and passive control conditions. Further investigation into different training methods is advised

  10. Effects of cognitive control training on the dynamics of (mal)adaptive emotion regulation in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorelbeke, Kristof; Koster, Ernst H W; Demeyer, Ineke; Loeys, Tom; Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive control plays a key role in both adaptive emotion regulation, such as positive reappraisal, and maladaptive emotion regulation, such as rumination, with both strategies playing a major role in resilience and well-being. As a result, cognitive control training (CCT) targeting working memory functioning may have the potential to reduce maladaptive emotion regulation and increase adaptive emotion regulation. The current study explored the effects of CCT on positive reappraisal ability in a lab context, and deployment and efficacy of positive appraisal and rumination in daily life. A sample of undergraduates (n = 83) was allocated to CCT or an active control condition, performing 10 online training sessions over a period of 14 days. Effects on regulation of affective states in daily life were assessed using experience sampling over a 7-day posttraining period. Results revealed a positive association between baseline cognitive control and self-reported use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies, whereas maladaptive emotion regulation strategies showed a negative association. CCT showed transfer to working memory functioning on the dual n-back task. Overall, effects of CCT on emotion regulation were limited to reducing deployment of rumination in low positive affective states. However, we did not find beneficial effects on indicators of adaptive emotion regulation. These findings are in line with previous studies targeting maladaptive emotion regulation but suggest limited use in enhancing adaptive emotion regulation in a healthy sample. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Adaptive Hierarchical Control for the Muscle Strength Training of Stroke Survivors in Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozheng Xu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Muscle strength training for stroke patients is of vital importance for helping survivors to progressively restore muscle strength and improve the performance of their activities in daily living (ADL. An adaptive hierarchical therapy control framework which integrates the patient's real biomechanical state estimation with task-performance quantitative evaluation is proposed. Firstly, a high-level progressive resistive supervisory controller is designed to determine the resistive force base for each training session based on the patient's online task-performance evaluation. Then, a low-level adaptive resistive force triggered controller is presented to further regulate the interactive resistive force corresponding to the patient's real-time biomechanical state – characterized by the patient's bio-damping and bio-stiffness in the course of one training session, so that the patient is challenged in a moderate but engaging and motivating way. Finally, a therapeutic robot system using a Barrett WAM™ compliant manipulator is set up. We recruited eighteen inpatient and outpatient stroke participants who were randomly allocated in experimental (robot-aided and control (conventional physical therapy groups and enrolled for sixteen weeks of progressive resistance training. The preliminary results show that the proposed therapy control strategies can enhance the recovery of strength and motor control ability.

  12. Volition-adaptive control for gait training using wearable exoskeleton: preliminary tests with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Aranda, Joan; Montesano, Luis; Del-Ama, Antonio J; Pons, Jose L

    2018-01-03

    Gait training for individuals with neurological disorders is challenging in providing the suitable assistance and more adaptive behaviour towards user needs. The user specific adaptation can be defined based on the user interaction with the orthosis and by monitoring the user intentions. In this paper, an adaptive control model, commanded by the user intention, is evaluated using a lower limb exoskeleton with incomplete spinal cord injury individuals (SCI). A user intention based adaptive control model has been developed and evaluated with 4 incomplete SCI individuals across 3 sessions of training per individual. The adaptive control model modifies the joint impedance properties of the exoskeleton as a function of the human-orthosis interaction torques and the joint trajectory evolution along the gait sequence, in real time. The volitional input of the user is identified by monitoring the neural signals, pertaining to the user's motor activity. These volitional inputs are used as a trigger to initiate the gait movement, allowing the user to control the initialization of the exoskeleton movement, independently. A Finite-state machine based control model is used in this set-up which helps in combining the volitional orders with the gait adaptation. The exoskeleton demonstrated an adaptive assistance depending on the patients' performance without guiding them to follow an imposed trajectory. The exoskeleton initiated the trajectory based on the user intention command received from the brain machine interface, demonstrating it as a reliable trigger. The exoskeleton maintained the equilibrium by providing suitable assistance throughout the experiments. A progressive change in the maximum flexion of the knee joint was observed at the end of each session which shows improvement in the patient performance. Results of the adaptive impedance were evaluated by comparing with the application of a constant impedance value. Participants reported that the movement of the

  13. Molecular adaptations to concurrent training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, E O; Tricoli, V; Roschel, H; Brum, P C; Bacurau, A V N; Ferreira, J C B; Aoki, M S; Neves, M; Aihara, A Y; da Rocha Correa Fernandes, A; Ugrinowitsch, C

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the chronic effects of concurrent training (CT) on morphological and molecular adaptations. 37 men (age=23.7±5.5 year) were divided into 4 groups: interval (IT), strength (ST) and concurrent (CT) training and a control group (C) and underwent 8 weeks of training. Maximum strength (1RM) and muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) were evaluated before and after training. Muscle samples were obtained before the training program and 48 h after the last training session. VO2max improved in 5±0.95% and 15±1.3% (pre- to post-test) in groups CT and IT, respectively, when compared to C. Time to exhaustion (TE) improved from pre- to post-test when compared to C (CT=6.1±0.58%; IT=8.3±0.88%; ST=3.2±0.66%). 1RM increased from pre-to post-test only in ST and CT groups (ST=18.5±3.16%; CT=17.6±3.01%). Similarly, ST and CT groups increased quadriceps CSA from pre-to post-test (6.2±1.4%; 7.8±1.66%). The p70S6K1 total protein content increased after CT. The ST group showed increased Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (45.0±3.3%) whereas AMPK phosphorylation at Thr172 increased only in IT group, (100±17.6%). In summary, our data suggest that despite the differences in molecular adaptations between training regimens, CT did not blunt muscle strength and hypertrophy increments when compared with ST. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Preventing academic difficulties in preterm children: a randomised controlled trial of an adaptive working memory training intervention – IMPRINT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Very preterm children exhibit difficulties in working memory, a key cognitive ability vital to learning information and the development of academic skills. Previous research suggests that an adaptive working memory training intervention (Cogmed) may improve working memory and other cognitive and behavioural domains, although further randomised controlled trials employing long-term outcomes are needed, and with populations at risk for working memory deficits, such as children born preterm. In a cohort of extremely preterm (effectiveness of Cogmed in improving academic functioning 2 years’ post-intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving working memory and attention 2 weeks’, 12 months’ and 24 months’ post-intervention, and to investigate training related neuroplasticity in working memory neural networks 2 weeks’ post-intervention. Methods/Design This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 126 extremely preterm/extremely low birthweight 7-year-old children. Children attending mainstream school without major intellectual, sensory or physical impairments will be eligible. Participating children will undergo an extensive baseline cognitive assessment before being randomised to either an adaptive or placebo (non-adaptive) version of Cogmed. Cogmed is a computerised working memory training program consisting of 25 sessions completed over a 5 to 7 week period. Each training session takes approximately 35 minutes and will be completed in the child’s home. Structural, diffusion and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which is optional for participants, will be completed prior to and 2 weeks following the training period. Follow-up assessments focusing on academic skills (primary outcome), working memory and attention (secondary outcomes) will be conducted at 2 weeks’, 12 months’ and 24 months’ post-intervention. Discussion To our knowledge, this study will be

  15. Training Adaptability in Digital Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hess-Kosa, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    .... As outlined in this Phase I report, Aptima and the Group for Organizational Effectiveness (gOE) have lain the groundwork for an innovative, computer-based, digital-skills training package designed to increase the adaptability of digital skills...

  16. Climate Change Adaptation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    A list of on-line training modules to help local government officials and those interested in water management issues better understand how the changing climate affects the services and resources they care about

  17. Adaptations following an intermittent hypoxia-hyperoxia training in coronary artery disease patients: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazachev, Oleg; Kopylov, Phylipp; Susta, Davide; Dudnik, Elena; Zagaynaya, Elena

    2017-06-01

    Repeated exposure to intermittent normobaric hypoxia improves exercise tolerance in cardiac patients. Little is known on the effects of intermittent normobaric hypoxia-hyperoxia exposure in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (New York Heart Association II-III). IHHT improves exercise tolerance, cardiometabolic profile, and quality of life in CAD patients. The study design was a nonrandomized, controlled, before-and-after trial. Forty-six CAD patients volunteered to take part in the study: a group of 27 patients undertook the intermittent hypoxia (O 2 at 10%)-hyperoxia (O 2 at 30%) training (IHHT), whereas a control group (CTRL) of 19 patients, who already completed an 8-week standard cardiac rehabilitation program, was allocated to sham-IHHT treatment (breathing room air, O 2 at 21%). Exercise performance, blood and metabolic profiles, and quality of life (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ]) were measured before and after in the IHHT group (IHHG) and sham-IHHT in the CTRL group. The IHHG showed improved exercise capacity, reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressures, enhanced left ventricle ejection fraction, and reduced glycemia, but only at 1-month follow-up. Angina as a reason to stop exercising was significantly reduced after treatment and at 1-month follow-up. The IHHT SAQ profile was improved in the IHHG and not significantly different to the CTRL group after standard rehabilitation. The IHHG was also compared to the CTRL group at 1-month follow-up, and no differences were found. In CAD patients, an IHHT program is associated with improved exercise tolerance, healthier risks factors profile, and a better quality of life. Our study also suggests that IHHT is as effective as an 8-week standard rehabilitation program. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Feedback in Videogame-Based Adaptive Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Iris Daliz

    2010-01-01

    The field of training has been changing rapidly due to advances in technology such as videogame-based adaptive training. Videogame-based adaptive training has provided flexibility and adaptability for training in cost-effective ways. Although this method of training may have many benefits for the trainee, current research has not kept up to pace…

  19. User adaptation in long-term, open-loop myoelectric training: implications for EMG pattern recognition in prosthesis control

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiayuan; Zhang, Dingguo; Jiang, Ning; Sheng, Xinjun; Farina, Dario; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Recent studies have reported that the classification performance of electromyographic (EMG) signals degrades over time without proper classification retraining. This problem is relevant for the applications of EMG pattern recognition in the control of active prostheses. Approach. In this study we investigated the changes in EMG classification performance over 11 consecutive days in eight able-bodied subjects and two amputees. Main results. It was observed that, when the classifier was trained on data from one day and tested on data from the following day, the classification error decreased exponentially but plateaued after four days for able-bodied subjects and six to nine days for amputees. The between-day performance became gradually closer to the corresponding within-day performance. Significance. These results indicate that the relative changes in EMG signal features over time become progressively smaller when the number of days during which the subjects perform the pre-defined motions are increased. The performance of the motor tasks is thus more consistent over time, resulting in more repeatable EMG patterns, even if the subjects do not have any external feedback on their performance. The learning curves for both able-bodied subjects and subjects with limb deficiencies could be modeled as an exponential function. These results provide important insights into the user adaptation characteristics during practical long-term myoelectric control applications, with implications for the design of an adaptive pattern recognition system.

  20. Cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise training leads to cardiovascular changes that markedly increase aerobic power and lead to improved endurance performance. The functionally most important adaptation is the improvement in maximal cardiac output which is the result of an enlargement in cardiac dimension, improved...... arteries is reduced, a factor contributing to increased arterial compliance. Endurance training may also induce alterations in the vasodilator capacity, although such adaptations are more pronounced in individuals with reduced vascular function. The microvascular net increases in size within the muscle...... allowing for an improved capacity for oxygen extraction by the muscle through a greater area for diffusion, a shorter diffusion distance, and a longer mean transit time for the erythrocyte to pass through the smallest blood vessels. The present article addresses the effect of endurance training on systemic...

  1. Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Gøran; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Holden, Geir; Hallén, Jostein; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Sveen, Ole; Skaug, Arne; Paur, Ingvild; Bastani, Nasser E; Østgaard, Hege Nymo; Buer, Charlotte; Midttun, Magnus; Freuchen, Fredrik; Wiig, Havard; Ulseth, Elisabeth Tallaksen; Garthe, Ina; Blomhoff, Rune; Benestad, Haakon B; Raastad, Truls

    2014-04-15

    In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, we investigated the effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on endurance training adaptations in humans. Fifty-four young men and women were randomly allocated to receive either 1000 mg of vitamin C and 235 mg of vitamin E or a placebo daily for 11 weeks. During supplementation, the participants completed an endurance training programme consisting of three to four sessions per week (primarily of running), divided into high-intensity interval sessions [4-6 × 4-6 min; >90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax)] and steady state continuous sessions (30-60 min; 70-90% of HRmax). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max ), submaximal running and a 20 m shuttle run test were assessed and blood samples and muscle biopsies were collected, before and after the intervention. Participants in the vitamin C and E group increased their VO2 max (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5%) and performance in the 20 m shuttle test (10 ± 11%) to the same degree as those in the placebo group (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5% and 14 ± 17%, respectively). However, the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX4) and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) increased in the m. vastus lateralis in the placebo group by 59 ± 97% and 19 ± 51%, respectively, but not in the vitamin C and E group (COX4: -13 ± 54%; PGC-1α: -13 ± 29%; P ≤ 0.03, between groups). Furthermore, mRNA levels of CDC42 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) in the trained muscle were lower in the vitamin C and E group than in the placebo group (P ≤ 0.05). Daily vitamin C and E supplementation attenuated increases in markers of mitochondrial biogenesis following endurance training. However, no clear interactions were detected for improvements in VO2 max and running performance. Consequently, vitamin C and E supplementation hampered cellular adaptations in the exercised muscles, and although this did not translate to the performance tests

  2. Fuzzy controller adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myravyova, E. A.; Sharipov, M. I.; Radakina, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    During writing this work, the fuzzy controller with a double base of rules was studied, which was applied for the synthesis of the automated control system. A method for fuzzy controller adaptation has been developed. The adaptation allows the fuzzy controller to automatically compensate for parametric interferences that occur at the control object. Specifically, the fuzzy controller controlled the outlet steam temperature in the boiler unit BKZ-75-39 GMA. The software code was written in the programming support environment Unity Pro XL designed for fuzzy controller adaptation.

  3. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Cruise Control for a Class of High-Speed Trains with Unknown Actuator Failure and Control Input Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the position and velocity tracking control of a class of high-speed trains (HST with unknown actuator failures (AF and control input saturation (CIS. Firstly, a nonlinear dynamic model for HST at normal operating status is built. The structure of traction system in HST is analyzed and the corresponding model for HST with unknown AF is presented as well. The type of AF under consideration is that some of the plant inputs are influenced by hopping function. An adaptive model-based fault detection and diagnosis (AMFDD module is proposed based on immersion and invariance (I&I method to make decisions on whether a fault has occurred. A new framework to design a monotone mapping is proposed in I&I method, that is, P(x-monotone. Using on-line obtained fault information, an adaptive law is designed to update the controller parameters to handle unknown AF and CIS in HST simultaneously when some of plant parameters are unknown. Closed-loop stability and asymptotic position and velocity tracking are ensured. Numerical simulations of China Railways High-speed 2 (CRH2 train are provided to verify the effectiveness of the presented scheme.

  4. Long-Term Adaptations to Unexpected Surface Perturbations: Postural Control During Stance and Gait in Train Conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Christian; Hoppe, Matthias Wilhelm; Freiwald, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to evaluate the differences in postural control during stance and gait between train conductors and controls. Twenty-one train conductors and 21 office workers performed 6 unilateral and bilateral balance tests on stable and unstable surfaces as well as a gait analysis. In the balance tests, the mean velocity of the center of pressure and unstable surface was measured. In the bilateral balance tests the selected stance width was measured. During gait the length, width, frequency, and velocity of the steps were calculated from the ground reaction forces. Train conductors showed a significantly greater step width during gait (15.4 ± 4.7 vs. 13.0 ± 3.4 cm; p = .035) and stance width during the bilateral stance on the unstable surface (21.0 ± 5.1 vs. 17.8 ± 3.7 cm; p = .026) than the office workers, while no differences were revealed in balance variables. The revealed differences between train conductors and office workers may represent task-specific feedforward control strategies, which increase the base of support and may be helpful to resist unexpected perturbations in trains.

  5. Nutrition and training adaptations in aquatic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Iñigo; Stellingwerff, Trent; Tipton, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    The adaptive response to training is determined by the combination of the intensity, volume, and frequency of the training. Various periodized approaches to training are used by aquatic sports athletes to achieve performance peaks. Nutritional support to optimize training adaptations should take periodization into consideration; that is, nutrition should also be periodized to optimally support training and facilitate adaptations. Moreover, other aspects of training (e.g., overload training, tapering and detraining) should be considered when making nutrition recommendations for aquatic athletes. There is evidence, albeit not in aquatic sports, that restricting carbohydrate availability may enhance some training adaptations. More research needs to be performed, particularly in aquatic sports, to determine the optimal strategy for periodizing carbohydrate intake to optimize adaptations. Protein nutrition is an important consideration for optimal training adaptations. Factors other than the total amount of daily protein intake should be considered. For instance, the type of protein, timing and pattern of protein intake and the amount of protein ingested at any one time influence the metabolic response to protein ingestion. Body mass and composition are important for aquatic sport athletes in relation to power-to-mass and for aesthetic reasons. Protein may be particularly important for athletes desiring to maintain muscle while losing body mass. Nutritional supplements, such as b-alanine and sodium bicarbonate, may have particular usefulness for aquatic athletes' training adaptation.

  6. Adaptive sequential controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Xing, Jian (Seattle, WA); Butler, Nicholas G. (Newberg, OR); Rodriguez, Alonso (Pasadena, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  7. Adaptive sequential controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  8. Neural adaptations to electrical stimulation strength training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, Tibor; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides evidence for the hypothesis that electrostimulation strength training (EST) increases the force of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) through neural adaptations in healthy skeletal muscle. Although electrical stimulation and voluntary effort activate muscle differently, there

  9. Adaptive nonlinear flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysdyk, Rolf Theoduor

    1998-08-01

    Research under supervision of Dr. Calise and Dr. Prasad at the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Aerospace Engineering. has demonstrated the applicability of an adaptive controller architecture. The architecture successfully combines model inversion control with adaptive neural network (NN) compensation to cancel the inversion error. The tiltrotor aircraft provides a specifically interesting control design challenge. The tiltrotor aircraft is capable of converting from stable responsive fixed wing flight to unstable sluggish hover in helicopter configuration. It is desirable to provide the pilot with consistency in handling qualities through a conversion from fixed wing flight to hover. The linear model inversion architecture was adapted by providing frequency separation in the command filter and the error-dynamics, while not exiting the actuator modes. This design of the architecture provides for a model following setup with guaranteed performance. This in turn allowed for convenient implementation of guaranteed handling qualities. A rigorous proof of boundedness is presented making use of compact sets and the LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem. The analysis allows for the addition of the e-modification which guarantees boundedness of the NN weights in the absence of persistent excitation. The controller is demonstrated on the Generic Tiltrotor Simulator of Bell-Textron and NASA Ames R.C. The model inversion implementation is robustified with respect to unmodeled input dynamics, by adding dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness of signals in the system is included. The effectiveness of the robustification is also demonstrated on the XV-15 tiltrotor. The SHL Perceptron NN provides a more powerful application, based on the universal approximation property of this type of NN. The SHL NN based architecture is also robustified with the dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness extends the SHL NN augmentation with robustness to unmodeled actuator

  10. Training Adaptive Decision-Making.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James C.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive Thinking has been defined here as the capacity to recognize when a course of action that may have previously been effective is no longer effective and there is need to adjust strategy. Research was undertaken with human test subjects to identify the factors that contribute to adaptive thinking. It was discovered that those most effective in settings that call for adaptive thinking tend to possess a superior capacity to quickly and effectively generate possible courses of action, as measured using the Category Generation test. Software developed for this research has been applied to develop capabilities enabling analysts to identify crucial factors that are predictive of outcomes in fore-on-force simulation exercises.

  11. Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training (ADEPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeshek, Eric; Ong, James; Mohammed, John

    2013-01-01

    ADEPT (Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training) is designed to provide more effective, flexible, and portable training for NASA systems controllers. When creating a training scenario, an exercise author can specify a representative rationale structure using the graphical user interface, annotating the results with instructional texts where needed. The author's structure may distinguish between essential and optional parts of the rationale, and may also include "red herrings" - hypotheses that are essential to consider, until evidence and reasoning allow them to be ruled out. The system is built from pre-existing components, including Stottler Henke's SimVentive? instructional simulation authoring tool and runtime. To that, a capability was added to author and exploit explicit control decision rationale representations. ADEPT uses SimVentive's Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG)- based interactive graphic display capability as the basis of the tool for quickly noting aspects of decision rationale in graph form. The ADEPT prototype is built in Java, and will run on any computer using Windows, MacOS, or Linux. No special peripheral equipment is required. The software enables a style of student/ tutor interaction focused on the reasoning behind systems control behavior that better mimics proven Socratic human tutoring behaviors for highly cognitive skills. It supports fast, easy, and convenient authoring of such tutoring behaviors, allowing specification of detailed scenario-specific, but content-sensitive, high-quality tutor hints and feedback. The system places relatively light data-entry demands on the student to enable its rationale-centered discussions, and provides a support mechanism for fostering coherence in the student/ tutor dialog by including focusing, sequencing, and utterance tuning mechanisms intended to better fit tutor hints and feedback into the ongoing context.

  12. Efficient adaptive fuzzy control scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papp, Z.; Driessen, B.J.F.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an adaptive nonlinear (state-) feedback control structure, where the nonlinearities are implemented as smooth fuzzy mappings defined as rule sets. The fine tuning and adaption of the controller is realized by an indirect adaptive scheme, which modifies the parameters of the fuzzy

  13. Adaptive filtering prediction and control

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, Graham C

    2009-01-01

    Preface1. Introduction to Adaptive TechniquesPart 1. Deterministic Systems2. Models for Deterministic Dynamical Systems3. Parameter Estimation for Deterministic Systems4. Deterministic Adaptive Prediction5. Control of Linear Deterministic Systems6. Adaptive Control of Linear Deterministic SystemsPart 2. Stochastic Systems7. Optimal Filtering and Prediction8. Parameter Estimation for Stochastic Dynamic Systems9. Adaptive Filtering and Prediction10. Control of Stochastic Systems11. Adaptive Control of Stochastic SystemsAppendicesA. A Brief Review of Some Results from Systems TheoryB. A Summary o

  14. A robust adaptive robot controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, Harry; Berghuis, Harry; Ortega, Romeo; Nijmeijer, Henk

    1993-01-01

    A globally convergent adaptive control scheme for robot motion control with the following features is proposed. First, the adaptation law possesses enhanced robustness with respect to noisy velocity measurements. Second, the controller does not require the inclusion of high gain loops that may

  15. Adaptive skin detection based on online training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Tang, Liang; Zhou, Jie; Rong, Gang

    2007-11-01

    Skin is a widely used cue for porn image classification. Most conventional methods are off-line training schemes. They usually use a fixed boundary to segment skin regions in the images and are effective only in restricted conditions: e.g. good lightness and unique human race. This paper presents an adaptive online training scheme for skin detection which can handle these tough cases. In our approach, skin detection is considered as a classification problem on Gaussian mixture model. For each image, human face is detected and the face color is used to establish a primary estimation of skin color distribution. Then an adaptive online training algorithm is used to find the real boundary between skin color and background color in current image. Experimental results on 450 images showed that the proposed method is more robust in general situations than the conventional ones.

  16. Adaptive control for chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Changchun E-mail: cch@ysu.edu.cn; Guan Xinping

    2004-10-01

    Control problem of chaotic system is investigated via adaptive method. A fairly simple adaptive controller is constructed, which can control chaotic systems to unstable fixed points. The precise mathematical models of chaotic systems need not be known and only the fixed points and the dimensions of chaotic systems are required to be known. Simulations on controlling different chaotic systems are investigated and the results show the validity and feasibility of the proposed controller.

  17. Nonlinear adaptive neural controller for unstable aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh, S; Omkar, SN; Mani, V; Sundararajan, N

    2005-01-01

    A model reference indirect adaptive neural control scheme that uses both off-line and online learning strategies is proposed for an,unstable nonlinear aircraft controller design. The bounded-input-bounded-output stability requirement for the controller design is circumvented using an off-line, finite interval of time training scheme. The aircraft model is first identified using a neural network with linear filter (also known as time-delayed neural network) with the available input-output data...

  18. Adaptive optimal training of animal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Choi, Jung Yoon; Akrami, Athena; Witten, Ilana; Pillow, Jonathan

    Neuroscience experiments often require training animals to perform tasks designed to elicit various sensory, cognitive, and motor behaviors. Training typically involves a series of gradual adjustments of stimulus conditions and rewards in order to bring about learning. However, training protocols are usually hand-designed, and often require weeks or months to achieve a desired level of task performance. Here we combine ideas from reinforcement learning and adaptive optimal experimental design to formulate methods for efficient training of animal behavior. Our work addresses two intriguing problems at once: first, it seeks to infer the learning rules underlying an animal's behavioral changes during training; second, it seeks to exploit these rules to select stimuli that will maximize the rate of learning toward a desired objective. We develop and test these methods using data collected from rats during training on a two-interval sensory discrimination task. We show that we can accurately infer the parameters of a learning algorithm that describes how the animal's internal model of the task evolves over the course of training. We also demonstrate by simulation that our method can provide a substantial speedup over standard training methods.

  19. Automatically controlled training systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milashenko, A.; Afanasiev, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the computer system for NPP personnel training was developed for training centers in the Soviet Union. The system should be considered as the first step in training, taking into account that further steps are to be devoted to part-task and full scope simulator training. The training room consists of 8-12 IBM PC/AT personal computers combined into a network. A trainee accesses the system in a dialor manner. Software enables the instructor to determine the trainee's progress in different subjects of the program. The quality of any trainee preparedness may be evaluated by Knowledge Control operation. Simplified dynamic models are adopted for separate areas of the program. For example, the system of neutron flux monitoring has a dedicated model. Currently, training, requalification and support of professional qualifications of nuclear power plant operators is being emphasized. A significant number of emergency situations during work are occurring due to operator errors. Based on data from September-October 1989, more than half of all unplanned drops in power and stoppages of power plants were due to operator error. As a comparison, problems due to equipment malfunction accounted for no more than a third of the total. The role of personnel, especially of the operators, is significant during normal operations, since energy production costs as well as losses are influenced by the capability of the staff. These facts all point to the importance of quality training of personnel

  20. Cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training after uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohiro, Masayuki; Yuasa, Fumio; Hattori, Toshihiko; Sumimoto, Tsutomu; Takeuchi, Masaharu; Kaida, Mutsuhito; Jikuhara, Toshimitsu; Hikosaka, Makoto; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2005-09-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular adaptations of an exercise training program and evaluated the role of peripheral vasodilator capacity in contributing to these adaptations after myocardial infarction. A total of 44 consecutive patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction underwent 3 wks of exercise training. Controls (n = 12) with comparable myocardial infarction were selected from our database and were restricted to a program with minimal activity. All patients performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing with hemodynamic measurements. Forearm and calf reactive hyperemic flow were measured by venous occlusive plethysmography as indices of peripheral vasodilator capacity. Despite no change in arteriovenous oxygen difference at peak exercise after training, training resulted in significant increases in oxygen consumption, cardiac output, and stroke volume and a significant decrease in systemic vascular resistance at peak exercise (overall, P training (P training had a positive correlation with increases in peak cardiac output, stroke volume, and oxygen consumption after training and an inverse correlation with peak systemic vascular resistance. Exercise training improved exercise tolerance by improving hemodynamic responses to exercise after myocardial infarction. This improved exercise performance was linked to a training-induced increase in calf vasodilator capacity.

  1. Adaptive Augmenting Control and Launch Vehicle Adaptive Control Flight Experiments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Researchers at NASA Armstrong are working to further the development of an adaptive augmenting control algorithm (AAC). The AAC was developed to improve the...

  2. Adaptive unmanned aerial vechile control

    OpenAIRE

    Bernotaitis, Vilimantas

    2016-01-01

    This thesis analyzes unmanned aerial vehicles and its adaptivity - their structures, operational principles and components. Also analyzing algorithms of adaptive neural networks and their usage in unmanned aerial vehicles. The main objective of this thesis is to analyze structures, control systems of unmanned aerial vehicles and their abilities to adapt to changing environment. This thesis contains analysis of already used solutions and their drawbacks. As research made in this thesis shown t...

  3. Enhancing Astronaut Performance using Sensorimotor Adaptability Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J Bloomberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Astronauts experience disturbances in balance and gait function when they return to Earth. The highly plastic human brain enables individuals to modify their behavior to match the prevailing environment. Subjects participating in specially designed variable sensory challenge training programs can enhance their ability to rapidly adapt to novel sensory situations. This is useful in our application because we aim to train astronauts to rapidly formulate effective strategies to cope with the balance and locomotor challenges associated with new gravitational environments - enhancing their ability to learn to learn. We do this by coupling various combinations of sensorimotor challenges with treadmill walking. A unique training system has been developed that is comprised of a treadmill mounted on a motion base to produce movement of the support surface during walking. This system provides challenges to gait stability. Additional sensory variation and challenge are imposed with a virtual visual scene that presents subjects with various combinations of discordant visual information during treadmill walking. This experience allows them to practice resolving challenging and conflicting novel sensory information to improve their ability to adapt rapidly. Information obtained from this work will inform the design of the next generation of sensorimotor countermeasures for astronauts.

  4. Controlling smart grid adaptivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toersche, Hermen; Nykamp, Stefan; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    Methods are discussed for planning oriented smart grid control to cope with scenarios with limited predictability, supporting an increasing penetration of stochastic renewable resources. The performance of these methods is evaluated with simulations using measured wind generation and consumption

  5. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  6. Evaluation of a Neural Adaptive Flight Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totah, Joseph J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present results from the evaluation of a direct adaptive tracking controller. The control architecture employs both pre-trained and an on-line neural networks to represent the non-linear aircraft dynamics in the model inversion portion of the controller. The aircraft model used for this evaluation is representative of the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft. The controller was evaluated for three cases: (1) nominal conditions; (2) loss of control power; and (3) loss of control power in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The results were compared with the existing F-15 ACTIVE conventional mode controller in all cases. The results indicate extremely desirable airframe stabilization characteristics for case (1) that do not degrade significantly for case (2) or (3) as does the conventional mode controller. It was concluded that this controller exhibits both stable and robust adaptive characteristics when subjected to mild and extreme loss of control power conditions. Integration of this neural adaptive flight controller into the full non-linear six degree-of-freedom F-15 ACTIVE simulation is recommended for evaluation in a real-time high fidelity piloted simulation environment.

  7. Adaptive Robot Control – An Experimental Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Alonge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with experimental comparison between stable adaptive controllers of robotic manipulators based on Model Based Adaptive, Neural Network and Wavelet -Based control. The above control methods were compared with each other in terms of computational efficiency, need for accurate mathematical model of the manipulator and tracking performances. An original management algorithm of the Wavelet Network control scheme has been designed, with the aim of constructing the net automatically during the trajectory tracking, without the need to tune it to the trajectory itself. Experimental tests, carried out on a planar two link manipulator, show that the Wavelet-Based control scheme, with the new management algorithm, outperforms the conventional Model-Based schemes in the presence of structural uncertainties in the mathematical model of the robot, without pre-training and more efficiently than the Neural Network approach.

  8. Adaptive Extremum Control and Wind Turbine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xin

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is divided into two parts, i.e., adaptive extremum control and modelling and control of a wind turbine. The rst part of the thesis deals with the design of adaptive extremum controllers for some processes which have the behaviour that process should have as high e ciency as possible...... in parameters, and thus directly lends itself to parameter estimation and adaptive control. The extremum control law is derived based on static optimization of a performance function. For a process with nonlinearity at output the intermediate signal between the linear part and nonlinear part plays an important...... role. If it can be emphasis on control design. The models have beenvalidated by experimental data obtained from an existing wind turbine. The e ective wind speed experienced by the rotor of a wind turbine, which is often required by some control methods, is estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind...

  9. Positive train control shared network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Interoperable Train Control (ITC) Positive : Train Control (PTC) Shared Network (IPSN) : project investigated anticipated industry benefits : and the level of support for the development of : a hosted technological platform for PTC : messaging ac...

  10. Physiological Adaptations to Sprint Interval Training with Matched Exercise Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Lun; Hsu, Wei-Chieh; Cheng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols featuring matched times but distinct sprint durations affect cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses and performance. Thirty-eight recreationally active men (age 21 ± 2 yr) were assigned to one of three interval training groups: long-duration high-intensity (HIIT60s; 8 × 60 s at 85%-90% V˙O2max; 120-s recovery at 30% V˙O2max), short-duration high-intensity (HIIT10s; 48 × 10 s at 85%-90% V˙O2max; 20-s recovery at 30% V˙O2max), and control (regular physical activity without HIIT). Before and after a 4-wk training period (three sessions per week), participants performed graded exercise tests and repeated sprint tests, based on which their aerobic and anaerobic capacities were assessed. Skinfold thickness, blood, and metabolic responses were also measured before and after intervention. After the 4-wk training period, V˙O2max was significantly increased (P training (P 0.05), but testosterone concentration in the HIIT10s was higher after training than before (P performance and lower skinfold thickness in HIIT60s versus HIIT10s reflected similar adaptations, but the higher repeated sprint performance was observed only in responses to HIIT60s, which may elicit greater anaerobic adaptations.

  11. Flight control with adaptive critic neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongchen

    2001-10-01

    In this dissertation, the adaptive critic neural network technique is applied to solve complex nonlinear system control problems. Based on dynamic programming, the adaptive critic neural network can embed the optimal solution into a neural network. Though trained off-line, the neural network forms a real-time feedback controller. Because of its general interpolation properties, the neurocontroller has inherit robustness. The problems solved here are an agile missile control for U.S. Air Force and a midcourse guidance law for U.S. Navy. In the first three papers, the neural network was used to control an air-to-air agile missile to implement a minimum-time heading-reverse in a vertical plane corresponding to following conditions: a system without constraint, a system with control inequality constraint, and a system with state inequality constraint. While the agile missile is a one-dimensional problem, the midcourse guidance law is the first test-bed for multiple-dimensional problem. In the fourth paper, the neurocontroller is synthesized to guide a surface-to-air missile to a fixed final condition, and to a flexible final condition from a variable initial condition. In order to evaluate the adaptive critic neural network approach, the numerical solutions for these cases are also obtained by solving two-point boundary value problem with a shooting method. All of the results showed that the adaptive critic neural network could solve complex nonlinear system control problems.

  12. MOTIVATIONAL AND ADAPTATIVE ASPECT OF PROSPECTIVE MUSIC TEACHERS’ VOCAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with motivational and adaptive direction of vocal training of the Art Faculty students of the Pedagogical University. Motivational and adaptive phase consisted in identifying the real state of prospective music teachers’ readiness to work with educational vocal choirs. The criterion of formation of motivational and adaptive component is defined as personal motivation in acquiring high-quality vocal and choral training. The author developed an experimental technique that involves a number of empirical research methods: special and long-term monitoring of the content and progress of the educational process; analysis, control and objectivity of teaching methods; testing; perform creative tasks; test activities; conversations and interviews that were conducted among students, faculty and trainers professional disciplines teaching practice.The mentioned criterion implies that Chinese students have sustained professional focus on improving their own vocal and choral training, awareness of the importance and prospects of this profession in their practical activities in educational conditions in China. Motivation in learning vocal and choral activities, Chinese students made the so-called "immunity" to the difficulties related with the new learning environment in universities Ukraine increases the desire to intensify and optimize the process of conducting and choral training, there is awareness of the need for new development knowledge, skills, new experience and carry it into practice national music and teacher education.

  13. Adaptive training of feedforward neural networks by Kalman filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptive training of feedforward neural networks by Kalman filtering is described. Adaptive training is particularly important in estimation by neural network in real-time environmental where the trained network is used for system estimation while the network is further trained by means of the information provided by the experienced/exercised ongoing operation. As result of this, neural network adapts itself to a changing environment to perform its mission without recourse to re-training. The performance of the training method is demonstrated by means of actual process signals from a nuclear power plant. (orig.)

  14. Adaptations in athletic performance after ballistic power versus strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2010-08-01

    To determine whether the magnitude of improvement in athletic performance and the mechanisms driving these adaptations differ in relatively weak individuals exposed to either ballistic power training or heavy strength training. Relatively weak men (n = 24) who could perform the back squat with proficient technique were randomized into three groups: strength training (n = 8; ST), power training (n = 8; PT), or control (n = 8). Training involved three sessions per week for 10 wk in which subjects performed back squats with 75%-90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM; ST) or maximal-effort jump squats with 0%-30% 1RM (PT). Jump and sprint performances were assessed as well as measures of the force-velocity relationship, jumping mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural drive. Both experimental groups showed significant (P < or = 0.05) improvements in jump and sprint performances after training with no significant between-group differences evident in either jump (peak power: ST = 17.7% +/- 9.3%, PT = 17.6% +/- 4.5%) or sprint performance (40-m sprint: ST = 2.2% +/- 1.9%, PT = 3.6% +/- 2.3%). ST also displayed a significant increase in maximal strength that was significantly greater than the PT group (squat 1RM: ST = 31.2% +/- 11.3%, PT = 4.5% +/- 7.1%). The mechanisms driving these improvements included significant (P < or = 0.05) changes in the force-velocity relationship, jump mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural activation that showed a degree of specificity to the different training stimuli. Improvements in athletic performance were similar in relatively weak individuals exposed to either ballistic power training or heavy strength training for 10 wk. These performance improvements were mediated through neuromuscular adaptations specific to the training stimulus. The ability of strength training to render similar short-term improvements in athletic performance as ballistic power training, coupled with the potential long-term benefits of improved maximal strength

  15. Neural adaptations to submaximal isokinetic eccentric strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrué-Belou, Simon; Amarantini, David; Marque, Philippe; Duclay, Julien

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the neural adaptations following submaximal isokinetic eccentric strength training of the plantar flexors. The modulation of electromyographic (EMG) activity and spinal excitability were compared in the soleus muscle (SOL) during isometric, concentric and eccentric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) before and after submaximal isokinetic eccentric training. Eighteen healthy subjects were divided into a training group (n = 8) and a control group (n = 10). The training protocol consisted of sixteen sessions of isokinetic eccentric strength training during 8 weeks. Normalized EMG was used to assess the activity of SOL and medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG). For SOL, maximal Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) and compound motor potential were evoked during isometric, concentric and eccentric actions at rest (Hmax and Mmax, respectively) and during MVC (Hsup and Msup, respectively). The results showed that the torque and normalized EMG of SOL significantly increased after training during eccentric (+20.5 and +28.8 %, respectively) and isometric (+18.2 and +23.0 %, respectively) MVC (p  0.05), and remained significantly depressed during eccentric compared to isometric and concentric actions (p  0.05). These results suggested that the increase in voluntary torque after submaximal isokinetic eccentric training can be at least partly ascribed to enhanced neural drive for SOL that does not affect the H-reflex pathway.

  16. Training-specific functional, neural, and hypertrophic adaptations to explosive- vs. sustained-contraction strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balshaw, Thomas G; Massey, Garry J; Maden-Wilkinson, Thomas M; Tillin, Neale A; Folland, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Training specificity is considered important for strength training, although the functional and underpinning physiological adaptations to different types of training, including brief explosive contractions, are poorly understood. This study compared the effects of 12 wk of explosive-contraction (ECT, n = 13) vs. sustained-contraction (SCT, n = 16) strength training vs. control (n = 14) on the functional, neural, hypertrophic, and intrinsic contractile characteristics of healthy young men. Training involved 40 isometric knee extension repetitions (3 times/wk): contracting as fast and hard as possible for ∼1 s (ECT) or gradually increasing to 75% of maximum voluntary torque (MVT) before holding for 3 s (SCT). Torque and electromyography during maximum and explosive contractions, torque during evoked octet contractions, and total quadriceps muscle volume (QUADSVOL) were quantified pre and post training. MVT increased more after SCT than ECT [23 vs. 17%; effect size (ES) = 0.69], with similar increases in neural drive, but greater QUADSVOL changes after SCT (8.1 vs. 2.6%; ES = 0.74). ECT improved explosive torque at all time points (17-34%; 0.54 ≤ ES ≤ 0.76) because of increased neural drive (17-28%), whereas only late-phase explosive torque (150 ms, 12%; ES = 1.48) and corresponding neural drive (18%) increased after SCT. Changes in evoked torque indicated slowing of the contractile properties of the muscle-tendon unit after both training interventions. These results showed training-specific functional changes that appeared to be due to distinct neural and hypertrophic adaptations. ECT produced a wider range of functional adaptations than SCT, and given the lesser demands of ECT, this type of training provides a highly efficient means of increasing function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Direct Adaptive Control Of An Industrial Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Lee, Thomas; Delpech, Michel

    1992-01-01

    Decentralized direct adaptive control scheme for six-jointed industrial robot eliminates part of overall computational burden imposed by centralized controller and degrades performance of robot by reducing sampling rate. Control and controller-adaptation laws based on observed performance of manipulator: no need to model dynamics of robot. Adaptive controllers cope with uncertainties and variations in robot and payload.

  18. Adaptive stochastic disturbance accommodating control

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jemin; Singla, Puneet; Crassidis, John L.

    2011-02-01

    This article presents a Kalman filter based adaptive disturbance accommodating stochastic control scheme for linear uncertain systems to minimise the adverse effects of both model uncertainties and external disturbances. Instead of dealing with system uncertainties and external disturbances separately, the disturbance accommodating control scheme lumps the overall effects of these errors in a to-be-determined model-error vector and then utilises a Kalman filter in the feedback loop for simultaneously estimating the system states and the model-error vector from noisy measurements. Since the model-error dynamics is unknown, the process noise covariance associated with the model-error dynamics is used to empirically tune the Kalman filter to yield accurate estimates. A rigorous stochastic stability analysis reveals a lower bound requirement on the assumed system process noise covariance to ensure the stability of the controlled system when the nominal control action on the true plant is unstable. An adaptive law is synthesised for the selection of stabilising system process noise covariance. Simulation results are presented where the proposed control scheme is implemented on a two degree-of-freedom helicopter.

  19. Fast Linear Adaptive Skipping Training Algorithm for Training Artificial Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Manjula Devi, R.; Kuppuswami, S.; Suganthe, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural network has been extensively consumed training model for solving pattern recognition tasks. However, training a very huge training data set using complex neural network necessitates excessively high training time. In this correspondence, a new fast Linear Adaptive Skipping Training (LAST) algorithm for training artificial neural network (ANN) is instituted. The core essence of this paper is to ameliorate the training speed of ANN by exhibiting only the input samples that do ...

  20. Adaptive Controller Effects on Pilot Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.; Hempley, Lucas E.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive control provides robustness and resilience for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic. Some of the recent flight experiences of pilot-in-the-loop with an adaptive controller have exhibited unpredicted interactions. In retrospect, this is not surprising once it is realized that there are now two adaptive controllers interacting, the software adaptive control system and the pilot. An experiment was conducted to categorize these interactions on the pilot with an adaptive controller during control surface failures. One of the objectives of this experiment was to determine how the adaptation time of the controller affects pilots. The pitch and roll errors, and stick input increased for increasing adaptation time and during the segment when the adaptive controller was adapting. Not surprisingly, altitude, cross track and angle deviations, and vertical velocity also increase during the failure and then slowly return to pre-failure levels. Subjects may change their behavior even as an adaptive controller is adapting with additional stick inputs. Therefore, the adaptive controller should adapt as fast as possible to minimize flight track errors. This will minimize undesirable interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controller and maintain maneuvering precision.

  1. Hot Water Bathing Impairs Training Adaptation in Elite Teen Archers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ta-Cheng; Liao, Yi-Hung; Tsai, Yung-Shen; Ferguson-Stegall, Lisa; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Chen, Chung-Yu

    2018-03-12

    Despite heat imposes considerable physiological stress to human body, hot water immersion remains as a popular relaxation modality for athletes. Here we examined the lingering effect of hot tub relaxation after training on performance-associated measures and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) in junior archers. Ten national level archers, aged 16.6 ± 0.3 years (M = 8, F = 2), participated in a randomized counter-balanced crossover study after baseline measurements. In particular, half participants were assigned to the hot water immersion (HOT) group, whereas another halves were assigned to the untreated control (CON) group. Crossover trial was conducted following a 2-week washout period. During the HOT trial, participants immersed in hot water for 30 min at 40°C, 1 h after training, twice a week (every 3 days) for 2 weeks. Participants during control trial sat at the same environment without hot water after training. Performance-associated measures and salivary DHEA-S were determined 3 days after the last hot tub session. We found that the HOT intervention significantly decreased shooting performance (CON: -4%; HOT: -22%, P training adaptation specific to shooting performance in archers.

  2. Adaptive collaborative control of highly redundant robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, David A.

    2008-04-01

    The agility and adaptability of biological systems are worthwhile goals for next-generation unmanned ground vehicles. Management of the requisite number of degrees of freedom, however, remains a challenge, as does the ability of an operator to transfer behavioral intent from human to robot. This paper reviews American Android research funded by NASA, DARPA, and the U.S. Army that attempts to address these issues. Limb coordination technology, an iterative form of inverse kinematics, provides a fundamental ability to control balance and posture independently in highly redundant systems. Goal positions and orientations of distal points of the robot skeleton, such as the hands and feet of a humanoid robot, become variable constraints, as does center-of-gravity position. Behaviors utilize these goals to synthesize full-body motion. Biped walking, crawling and grasping are illustrated, and behavior parameterization, layering and portability are discussed. Robotic skill acquisition enables a show-and-tell approach to behavior modification. Declarative rules built verbally by an operator in the field define nominal task plans, and neural networks trained with verbal, manual and visual signals provide additional behavior shaping. Anticipated benefits of the resultant adaptive collaborative controller for unmanned ground vehicles include increased robot autonomy, reduced operator workload and reduced operator training and skill requirements.

  3. Protein Supplementation Does Not Affect Myogenic Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Paul T; Fry, Christopher S; Igbinigie, Sherry; Deer, Rachel R; Jennings, Kristofer; Cope, Mark B; Mukherjea, Ratna; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-06-01

    It has been proposed that protein supplementation during resistance exercise training enhances muscle hypertrophy. The degree of hypertrophy during training is controlled in part through the activation of satellite cells and myonuclear accretion. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of protein supplementation (and the type of protein) during traditional resistance training on myofiber cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition. Healthy young men participated in supervised whole-body progressive resistance training 3 d·wk for 12 wk. Participants were randomized to one of three groups ingesting a daily 22-g macronutrient dose of soy-dairy protein blend (PB, n = 22), whey protein isolate (WP, n = 15), or an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo (MDP, n = 17). Lean mass, vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition were assessed before and after resistance training. PB and the pooled protein treatments (PB + WP = PRO) exhibited a greater whole-body lean mass %change compared with MDP (P = 0.057 for PB) and (P = 0.050 for PRO), respectively. All treatments demonstrated similar leg muscle hypertrophy and vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area (P supplementation during resistance training has a modest effect on whole-body lean mass as compared with exercise training without protein supplementation, and there was no effect on any outcome between protein supplement types (blend vs whey). However, protein supplementation did not enhance resistance exercise-induced increases in myofiber hypertrophy, satellite cell content, or myonuclear addition in young healthy men. We propose that as long as protein intake is adequate during muscle overload, the adaptations in muscle growth and function will not be influenced by protein supplementation.

  4. Adaptive Training for Voice Conversion Based on Eigenvoices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Yamato; Toda, Tomoki; Saruwatari, Hiroshi; Shikano, Kiyohiro

    In this paper, we describe a novel model training method for one-to-many eigenvoice conversion (EVC). One-to-many EVC is a technique for converting a specific source speaker's voice into an arbitrary target speaker's voice. An eigenvoice Gaussian mixture model (EV-GMM) is trained in advance using multiple parallel data sets consisting of utterance-pairs of the source speaker and many pre-stored target speakers. The EV-GMM can be adapted to new target speakers using only a few of their arbitrary utterances by estimating a small number of adaptive parameters. In the adaptation process, several parameters of the EV-GMM to be fixed for different target speakers strongly affect the conversion performance of the adapted model. In order to improve the conversion performance in one-to-many EVC, we propose an adaptive training method of the EV-GMM. In the proposed training method, both the fixed parameters and the adaptive parameters are optimized by maximizing a total likelihood function of the EV-GMMs adapted to individual pre-stored target speakers. We conducted objective and subjective evaluations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed training method. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptive training yields significant quality improvements in the converted speech.

  5. Book Review: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China. Charlotte P. Lee . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xii + 251 pp. $99.99. ISBN 978-1-107-09063-7......Review of: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China. Charlotte P. Lee . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xii + 251 pp. $99.99. ISBN 978-1-107-09063-7...

  6. Active Recovery After High-Intensity Interval-Training Does Not Attenuate Training Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimo Wiewelhove

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: High-intensity interval training (HIIT can be extremely demanding and can consequently produce high blood lactate levels. Previous studies have shown that lactate is a potent metabolic stimulus, which is important for adaptation. Active recovery (ACT after intensive exercise, however, enhances blood lactate removal in comparison with passive recovery (PAS and, consequently, may attenuate endurance performance improvements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of regular ACT on training adaptations during a HIIT mesocycle.Methods: Twenty-six well-trained male intermittent sport athletes (age: 23.5 ± 2.5 years; O2max: 55.36 ± 3.69 ml min kg-1 participated in a randomized controlled trial consisting of 4 weeks of a running-based HIIT mesocycle with a total of 12 HIIT sessions. After each training session, participants completed 15 min of either moderate jogging (ACT or PAS. Subjects were matched to the ACT or PAS groups according to age and performance. Before the HIIT program and 1 week after the last training session, the athletes performed a progressive incremental exercise test on a motor-driven treadmill to determine O2max, maximum running velocity (vmax, the running velocity at which O2max occurs (vO2max, and anaerobic lactate threshold (AT. Furthermore, repeated sprint ability (RSA were determined.Results: In the whole group the HIIT mesocycle induced significant or small to moderate changes in vmax (p < 0.001, effect size [ES] = 0.65,, vO2max (p < 0.001, ES = 0.62, and AT (p < 0.001, ES = 0.56 compared with the values before the intervention. O2max and RSA remained unchanged throughout the study. In addition, no significant differences in the changes were noted in any of the parameters between ACT and PAS except for AT (p < 0.05, ES = 0.57.Conclusion: Regular use of individualized ACT did not attenuate training adaptations during a HIIT mesocycle compared to PAS. Interestingly, we found that the ACT

  7. Almost optimal adaptive LQ control: SISO case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, Jan W.; Daams, Jasper

    2002-01-01

    In this paper an almost optimal indirect adaptive controller for input/output dynamical systems is proposed. The control part of the adaptive control scheme is based on a modified LQ control law: by adding a time-varying gain to the certainty equivalent control law the conflict between

  8. Adaptations to speed endurance training in highly trained soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Fiorenza, Matteo; Lund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study examined whether a period of additional speed endurance training would improve intense intermittent exercise performance in highly trained soccer players during the season and whether the training changed aerobic metabolism and the level of oxidative enzymes in type I...... and II muscle fibers. METHODS: During the last nine weeks of the season, thirteen semi-professional soccer players performed additional speed endurance training sessions consisting of 2-3 sets of 8 - 10 repetitions of 30 m sprints with 10 s of passive recovery (SET). Before and after SET, subjects...... in type I and II fibers did not change. CONCLUSION: In highly trained soccer players, additional speed endurance training is associated with an improved ability to perform repeated high-intensity work. To what extent the training-induced changes in V˙O2 kinetics and mechanical efficiency in type I fibers...

  9. Adaptive working-memory training benefits reading, but not mathematics in middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Julia; Strobach, Tilo; Schubert, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) capacity is highly correlated with general cognitive ability and has proven to be an excellent predictor for academic success. Given that WM can be improved by training, our aim was to test whether WM training benefited academic abilities in elementary-school children. We examined 28 participants (mean age = 8.3 years, SD = 0.4) in a pretest-training-posttest-follow-up design. Over 14 training sessions, children either performed adaptive WM training (training group, n = 14) or nonadaptive low-level training (active control group, n = 14) on the same tasks. Pretest, posttest, and follow-up at 3 months after posttest included a neurocognitive test battery (WM, task switching, inhibition) and standardized tests for math and reading abilities. Adaptive WM training resulted in larger training gains than nonadaptive low-level training. The benefits induced by the adaptive training transferred to an untrained WM task and a standardized test for reading ability, but not to task switching, inhibition, or performance on a standardized math test. Transfer to the untrained WM task was maintained over 3 months. The analysis of individual differences revealed compensatory effects with larger gains in children with lower WM and reading scores at pretest. These training and transfer effects are discussed against the background of cognitive processing resulting from WM span training and the nature of the intervention.

  10. Determining the user profile for an adaptable training platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive computer-based training systems aim to enhance the learning experience by personalising the presentation and content delivery according to the preferences of each particular user. The complexity of humans - the many factors in uencing...

  11. Effect of speed endurance and strength training on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup Petersen, Jacob; Tybirk, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Thomas Petursson

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of combined strength and speed endurance (SE) training along with a reduced training volume on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners. METHODS: Sixteen male endurance runners (VO2-max: ~60 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were...... randomly assigned to either a combined strength and SE training (CSS; n = 9) or a control (CON; n = 7) group. For 8 weeks, CSS replaced their normal moderate-intensity training (~63 km week(-1)) with SE (2 × week(-1)) and strength training (2 × week(-1)) as well as aerobic high (1 × week(-1)) and moderate...... (1 × week(-1)) intensity training with a reduction in total volume of ~58 %, whereas CON continued their training (~45 km week(-1)). RESULTS: In CSS, 400-m and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test performance was improved by 5 % (P

  12. Olympic weightlifting training causes different knee muscle-coactivation adaptations compared with traditional weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabatzi, Fotini; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an Olympic weightlifting (OL) and traditional weight (TW) training program on muscle coactivation around the knee joint during vertical jump tests. Twenty-six men were assigned randomly to 3 groups: the OL (n = 9), the TW (n = 9), and Control (C) groups (n = 8). The experimental groups trained 3 d · wk(-1) for 8 weeks. Electromyographic (EMG) activity from the rectus femoris and biceps femoris, sagittal kinematics, vertical stiffness, maximum height, and power were collected during the squat jump, countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ), before and after training. Knee muscle coactivation index (CI) was calculated for different phases of each jump by dividing the antagonist EMG activity by the agonist. Analysis of variance showed that the CI recorded during the preactivation and eccentric phases of all the jumps increased in both training groups. The OL group showed a higher stiffness and jump height adaptation than the TW group did (p training (p training caused an increased CI, probably to enhance joint stability.

  13. Real-time Adaptive Control Using Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Pam; Soloway, Don; Gold, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control algorithm by showing real-time adaptive control on a plant with relatively fast time-constants. Generalized Predictive Control has classically been used in process control where linear control laws were formulated for plants with relatively slow time-constants. The plant of interest for this paper is a magnetic levitation device that is nonlinear and open-loop unstable. In this application, the reference model of the plant is a neural network that has an embedded nominal linear model in the network weights. The control based on the linear model provides initial stability at the beginning of network training. In using a neural network the control laws are nonlinear and online adaptation of the model is possible to capture unmodeled or time-varying dynamics. Newton-Raphson is the minimization algorithm. Newton-Raphson requires the calculation of the Hessian, but even with this computational expense the low iteration rate make this a viable algorithm for real-time control.

  14. Adaptive Working Memory Training Reduces the Negative Impact of Anxiety on Competitive Motor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, Emmanuel; Wilson, Mark; Smith, Tim J; Derakshan, Nazanin

    2017-12-01

    Optimum levels of attentional control are essential to prevent athletes from experiencing performance breakdowns under pressure. The current study explored whether training attentional control using the adaptive dual n-back paradigm, designed to directly target processing efficiency of the main executive functions of working memory (WM), would result in transferrable effects on sports performance outcomes. A total of 30 tennis players were allocated to an adaptive WM training or active control group and underwent 10 days of training. Measures of WM capacity as well as performance and objective gaze indices of attentional control in a tennis volley task were assessed in low- and high-pressure posttraining conditions. Results revealed significant benefits of training on WM capacity, quiet eye offset, and tennis performance in the high-pressure condition. Our results confirm and extend previous findings supporting the transfer of cognitive training benefits to objective measures of sports performance under pressure.

  15. Monitoring the Performance of a Neuro-Adaptive Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Gupta, Pramod

    2004-01-01

    Traditional control has proven to be ineffective to deal with catastrophic changes or slow degradation of complex, highly nonlinear systems like aircraft or spacecraft, robotics, or flexible manufacturing systems. Control systems which can adapt toward changes in the plant have been proposed as they offer many advantages (e.g., better performance, controllability of aircraft despite of a damaged wing). In the last few years, use of neural networks in adaptive controllers (neuro-adaptive control) has been studied actively. Neural networks of various architectures have been used successfully for online learning adaptive controllers. In such a typical control architecture, the neural network receives as an input the current deviation between desired and actual plant behavior and, by on-line training, tries to minimize this discrepancy (e.g.; by producing a control augmentation signal). Even though neuro-adaptive controllers offer many advantages, they have not been used in mission- or safety-critical applications, because performance and safety guarantees cannot b e provided at development time-a major prerequisite for safety certification (e.g., by the FAA or NASA). Verification and Validation (V&V) of an adaptive controller requires the development of new analysis techniques which can demonstrate that the control system behaves safely under all operating conditions. Because of the requirement to adapt toward unforeseen changes during operation, i.e., in real time, design-time V&V is not sufficient.

  16. An Adaptive Speed Control Approach for DC Shunt Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Tapia-Olvera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A B-spline neural networks-based adaptive control technique for angular speed reference trajectory tracking tasks with highly efficient performance for direct current shunt motors is proposed. A methodology for adaptive control and its proper training procedure are introduced. This algorithm sets the control signal without using a detailed mathematical model nor exact values of the parameters of the nonlinear dynamic system. The proposed robust adaptive tracking control scheme only requires measurements of the velocity output signal. Thus, real-time measurements or estimations of acceleration, current and disturbance signals are avoided. Experimental results confirm the efficient and robust performance of the proposed control approach for highly demanding motor operation conditions exposed to variable-speed reference trajectories and completely unknown load torque. Hence, laboratory experimental tests on a direct current shunt motor prove the viability of the proposed adaptive output feedback trajectory tracking control approach.

  17. Cognitive adaptation training combined with assertive community treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Peter; Østergaard, Birte; Nordentoft, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) targets the adaptive behaviour of patients with schizophrenia and has shown promising results regarding the social aspects of psychosocial treatment. As yet, no reports have appeared on the use of CAT in combination with assertive community treatment (ACT). Our...

  18. Statistical Physics for Adaptive Distributed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on statistical physics for distributed adaptive control is shown. The topics include: 1) The Golden Rule; 2) Advantages; 3) Roadmap; 4) What is Distributed Control? 5) Review of Information Theory; 6) Iterative Distributed Control; 7) Minimizing L(q) Via Gradient Descent; and 8) Adaptive Distributed Control.

  19. Flight Test Approach to Adaptive Control Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen; Less, James L.; Larson, David Nils

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on a full-scale F-18 testbed. The validation of adaptive controls has the potential to enhance safety in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage or control surface failures. This paper describes the research interface architecture, risk mitigations, flight test approach and lessons learned of adaptive controls research.

  20. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescher, Kevin L.; Baum, Christopher C.; Jones, Roger D.

    1997-01-01

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data.

  1. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescher, K.L.; Baum, C.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1997-08-19

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data. 46 figs.

  2. Effect of speed endurance and strength training on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorup, Jacob; Tybirk, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Ravnholt, Tanja; Dalsgaard, Sarah; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of combined strength and speed endurance (SE) training along with a reduced training volume on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners. Sixteen male endurance runners (VO2-max: ~60 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were randomly assigned to either a combined strength and SE training (CSS; n = 9) or a control (CON; n = 7) group. For 8 weeks, CSS replaced their normal moderate-intensity training (~63 km week(-1)) with SE (2 × week(-1)) and strength training (2 × week(-1)) as well as aerobic high (1 × week(-1)) and moderate (1 × week(-1)) intensity training with a reduction in total volume of ~58 %, whereas CON continued their training (~45 km week(-1)). In CSS, 400-m and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test performance was improved by 5 % (P speed was 0.6 km h(-1) higher (P speed endurance training, along with a reduced training volume, can improve short-term exercise capacity and induce muscular adaptations related to anaerobic capacity in endurance-trained runners.

  3. Enhancing Functional Performance using Sensorimotor Adaptability Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Brady, R.; Audas, C.; Ruttley, T. M.; Cohen, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    During the acute phase of adaptation to novel gravitational environments, sensorimotor disturbances have the potential to disrupt the ability of astronauts to perform functional tasks. The goal of this project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program designed to facilitate recovery of functional capabilities when astronauts transition to different gravitational environments. The project conducted a series of studies that investigated the efficacy of treadmill training combined with a variety of sensory challenges designed to increase adaptability including alterations in visual flow, body loading, and support surface stability.

  4. Adaptations to Speed Endurance Training in Highly Trained Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Michael; Fiorenza, Matteo; Lund, Anders; Christensen, Magnus; Rømer, Tue; Piil, Peter; Hostrup, Morten; Christensen, Peter M; Holbek, Simon; Ravnholt, Thomas; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined whether a period of additional speed endurance training would improve intense intermittent exercise performance in highly trained soccer players during the season and whether the training changed aerobic metabolism and the level of oxidative enzymes in type I and type II muscle fibers. During the last 9 wk of the season, 13 semiprofessional soccer players performed additional speed endurance training sessions consisting of two to three sets of 8-10 repetitions of 30-m sprints with 10 s of passive recovery (SET). Before and after SET, subjects completed a double-step exercise protocol that included transitions from standing to moderate-intensity running (~75% HRmax), followed by transitions from moderate- to high-intensity running (~90% HRmax) in which pulmonary oxygen uptake (V˙O2) was determined. In addition, the yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 was performed, and a muscle biopsy was obtained at rest. The yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 performance was 11.6% ± 6.4% (mean ± SD) better (2803 ± 330 vs 3127 ± 383 m, P speed endurance training is associated with an improved ability to perform repeated high-intensity work. To what extent the training-induced changes in V˙O2 kinetics and mechanical efficiency in type I fibers caused the improvement in performance warrants further investigation.

  5. Effective neural network training with adaptive learning rate based on training loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Tomoumi; Oyama, Satoshi; Kurihara, Masahito

    2018-02-13

    A method that uses an adaptive learning rate is presented for training neural networks. Unlike most conventional updating methods in which the learning rate gradually decreases during training, the proposed method increases or decreases the learning rate adaptively so that the training loss (the sum of cross-entropy losses for all training samples) decreases as much as possible. It thus provides a wider search range for solutions and thus a lower test error rate. The experiments with some well-known datasets to train a multilayer perceptron show that the proposed method is effective for obtaining a better test accuracy under certain conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuromuscular adaptations to 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Meyland, Jacob; Raffalt, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes on jumping performance and underlying changes in biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations. Nine well-trained athletes at high national competition level within sprinting and jumping disciplines...

  7. Optimal model distributions in supervisory adaptive control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, D.; Baldi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Several classes of multi-model adaptive control schemes have been proposed in literature: instead of one single parameter-varying controller, in this adaptive methodology multiple fixed-parameter controllers for different operating regimes (i.e. different models) are utilised. Despite advances in

  8. A robust adaptive controller for robot manipulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, Harry; Berghuis, Harry; Ortega, Romeo; Nijmeijer, Henk

    1992-01-01

    The authors propose a globally convergent adaptive control scheme for robot motion control with the following features: first, the adaptation law processes enhanced robustness with respect to noisy velocity measurements; secondly, the controller does not require the inclusion of high-gain loops that

  9. Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Climate Change Adaptation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    This training discusses climate vulnerabilities and methods for incorporating adaptation measures into OLEM programs. This training is meant to follow completion of EPA's Introductory Climate Change Training.

  10. Adaptive Controller Adaptation Time and Available Control Authority Effects on Piloting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna; Gregory, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive control is considered for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic of adverse conditions. This experiment looked at how adaptive controller adaptation time to recover nominal aircraft dynamics affects pilots and how pilots want information about available control authority transmitted. Results indicate that an adaptive controller that takes three seconds to adapt helped pilots when looking at lateral and longitudinal errors. The controllability ratings improved with the adaptive controller, again the most for the three seconds adaptation time while workload decreased with the adaptive controller. The effects of the displays showing the percentage amount of available safe flight envelope used in the maneuver were dominated by the adaptation time. With the displays, the altitude error increased, controllability slightly decreased, and mental demand increased. Therefore, the displays did require some of the subjects resources but these negatives may be outweighed by pilots having more situation awareness of their aircraft.

  11. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  12. BACKPROPAGATION TRAINING ALGORITHM WITH ADAPTIVE PARAMETERS TO SOLVE DIGITAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Saraswathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient technique namely Backpropagation training with adaptive parameters using Lyapunov Stability Theory for training single hidden layer feed forward network is proposed. A three-layered Feedforward neural network architecture is used to solve the selected problems. Sequential Training Mode is used to train the network. Lyapunov stability theory is employed to ensure the faster and steady state error convergence and to construct and energy surface with a single global minimum point through the adaptive adjustment of the weights and the adaptive parameter ß. To avoid local minima entrapment, an adaptive backpropagation algorithm based on Lyapunov stability theory is used. Lyapunov stability theory gives the algorithm, the efficiency of attaining a single global minimum point. The learning parameters used in this algorithm is responsible for the faster error convergence. The adaptive learning parameter used in this algorithm is chosen properly for faster error convergence. The error obtained has been asymptotically converged to zero according to Lyapunov Stability theory. The performance of the adaptive Backpropagation algorithm is measured by solving parity problem, half adder and full adder problems.

  13. Physiological Adaptations following Resistance Training in Youth Athletes-A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legerlotz, Kirsten; Marzilger, Robert; Bohm, Sebastian; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2016-11-01

    To understand the mechanisms for the effects of resistance training on functional parameters, and to assess the injury risk of the involved tissues, it is necessary to examine the underlying morphological and structural changes of the respective tissues. The presented information on physiological adaptations have been deduced from cross-sectional studies comparing youth athletes with controls and children with adults as well as from longitudinal studies examining the effects of resistance training in untrained children and adolescents and in youth athletes. The evidence indicates, that training induced changes in motor performance rely partly on enhanced neuromuscular control, and partly on morphological adaptation of muscles and tendons, such as changes in muscle, muscle fiber and tendon cross-sectional area, muscle composition, and tendon material properties, with the bone also adapting by increasing bone mineral content and cortical area. Although the training induced adaptations of the investigated tissues follows similar principles in children as in adults, the magnitude of the adaptive response appears to be more subtle. As studies investigating physiological adaptation in youth athletes are sparse, more research in this area is warranted to elucidate the specific physiological stimulus-response relationship necessary for effective training programs and injury prevention.

  14. Localised cutaneous microvascular adaptation to exercise training in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Thijssen, Dick H J; Birk, Gurpreet K; Cable, N Timothy; Low, David A; Kerstens, Floortje; Meeuwis, Iris; Dawson, Ellen A; Green, Daniel J

    2018-02-07

    Exercise training induces adaptation in conduit and resistance arteries in humans, partly as a consequence of repeated elevation in blood flow and shear stress. The stimuli associated with intrinsic cutaneous microvascular adaptation to exercise training have been less comprehensively studied. We studied 14 subjects who completed 8-weeks cycle ergometer training, with partial cuff inflation on one forearm to unilaterally attenuate cutaneous blood flow responses during each exercise-training bout. Before and after training, bilateral forearm skin microvascular dilation was determined using cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: skin flux/blood pressure) responses to gradual localised heater disk stimulation performed at rest (33, 40, 42 and 44 °C). Cycle exercise induced significant increases in forearm cutaneous flux and temperature, which were attenuated in the cuffed arm (2-way ANOVA interaction-effect; P < 0.01). We found that forearm CVC at 42 and 44 °C was significantly lower in the uncuffed arm following 8-weeks of cycle training (P < 0.01), whereas no changes were apparent in the contralateral cuffed arm (P = 0.77, interaction-effect P = 0.01). Lower limb exercise training in healthy young men leads to lower CVC-responses to a local heating stimulus, an adaptation mediated, at least partly, by a mechanism related to episodic increases in skin blood flow and/or skin temperature.

  15. Algebraic and adaptive learning in neural control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Silvia

    A systematic approach is developed for designing adaptive and reconfigurable nonlinear control systems that are applicable to plants modeled by ordinary differential equations. The nonlinear controller comprising a network of neural networks is taught using a two-phase learning procedure realized through novel techniques for initialization, on-line training, and adaptive critic design. A critical observation is that the gradients of the functions defined by the neural networks must equal corresponding linear gain matrices at chosen operating points. On-line training is based on a dual heuristic adaptive critic architecture that improves control for large, coupled motions by accounting for actual plant dynamics and nonlinear effects. An action network computes the optimal control law; a critic network predicts the derivative of the cost-to-go with respect to the state. Both networks are algebraically initialized based on prior knowledge of satisfactory pointwise linear controllers and continue to adapt on line during full-scale simulations of the plant. On-line training takes place sequentially over discrete periods of time and involves several numerical procedures. A backpropagating algorithm called Resilient Backpropagation is modified and successfully implemented to meet these objectives, without excessive computational expense. This adaptive controller is as conservative as the linear designs and as effective as a global nonlinear controller. The method is successfully implemented for the full-envelope control of a six-degree-of-freedom aircraft simulation. The results show that the on-line adaptation brings about improved performance with respect to the initialization phase during aircraft maneuvers that involve large-angle and coupled dynamics, and parameter variations.

  16. Robust Adaptive Control of Multivariable Nonlinear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    On the commercial side, the implementation of L1 adaptive controller on NASA’s subscale generic transport model (GTM) aircraft demonstrated...I. Gregory, L. Valavani, Experimental Validation of 1L Adaptive Control: Rohrs ’ Counterexample in Flight, Submitted to AIAA Journal of Guidance

  17. Adaptive Method Using Controlled Grid Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin FRUNZULICA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an adaptive method using the controlled grid deformation over an elastic, isotropic and continuous domain. The adaptive process is controlled with the principal strains and principal strain directions and uses the finite elements method. Numerical results are presented for several test cases.

  18. Research in Neural Network Based Adaptive Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calise, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    .... We regard this as a major step towards flight certification of adaptive controllers. The approach is more general in that it permits a broad class of input nonlinearities, including such effects as discrete and bang/bang control...

  19. Adaptive Control Methods for Soft Robots

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — I propose to develop methods for soft and inflatable robots that will allow the control system to adapt and change control parameters based on changing conditions...

  20. Intelligent and adaptive tutoring for active learning and training environments

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Claire; Pahl, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Active learning facilitated through interactive and adaptive learning environments differs substantially from traditional instructor-oriented, classroom-based teaching. We present a Web-based e-learning environment that integrates knowledge learning and skills training. How these tools are used most effectively is still an open question. We propose knowledge-level interaction and adaptive feedback and guidance as central features. We discuss these features and evaluate the effectiveness of th...

  1. Quantum Transduction with Adaptive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengzhen; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang

    2018-01-12

    Quantum transducers play a crucial role in hybrid quantum networks. A good quantum transducer can faithfully convert quantum signals from one mode to another with minimum decoherence. Most investigations of quantum transduction are based on the protocol of direct mode conversion. However, the direct protocol requires the matching condition, which in practice is not always feasible. Here we propose an adaptive protocol for quantum transducers, which can convert quantum signals without requiring the matching condition. The adaptive protocol only consists of Gaussian operations, feasible in various physical platforms. Moreover, we show that the adaptive protocol can be robust against imperfections associated with finite squeezing, thermal noise, and homodyne detection, and it can be implemented to realize quantum state transfer between microwave and optical modes.

  2. Neuromuscular adaptations to sprint interval training and the effect of mammalian omega-3 fatty acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Evan J H; Stucky, Frédéric; Radonic, Peter W; Metherel, Adam H; Wolever, Thomas M S; Wells, Greg D

    2017-03-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) stimulates rapid metabolic adaptations within skeletal muscle but the nature of neuromuscular adaptions is unknown. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (N-3 PUFA) are suggested to enhance neuromuscular adaptations to exercise. We measured the neuromuscular adaptations to SIT (Study-1) and conducted a placebo-controlled randomized double blinded study to determine the effect of N-3 PUFA supplementation on neuromuscular adaptations to SIT (Study-2). In Study-1, seven active men (24.4 ± 2.6 years, VO 2 peak 43.8 ± 8.7 ml kg min -1 ) completed 2-weeks of SIT with pre- and post-training 10 km cycling time trials (TT). In Study-2, 30 active men (24.5 ± 4.2 years, VO 2 peak 41.0 ± 5.1 ml kg min -1 ) were randomly assigned to receive N-3 PUFA (2330 mg day -1 ) (n = 14) or olive oil (n = 16) during 2-weeks of SIT with pre- and post-training TTs. Four week post-training, a SIT session and TT were also performed. Change in neuromuscular function was assessed from resting twitches, quadriceps maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, and potentiated twitch force (Q tw ). Study-1 showed that SIT did not elicit significant neuromuscular adaptations. Study-2 showed that N-3 PUFA supplementation had no significant effect on neuromuscular adaptations. Training caused lower MVC force [mean ± SD; N-3 PUFA -9 ± 11%, placebo -9 ± 13% (p training in all groups [Study-1 -10%, Study-2 N-3 PUFA -8%, placebo -12% (p training adaptations.

  3. Training on Working Memory and Inhibitory Control in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesus Maraver

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Different types of interventions have focused on trying to improve Executive Functions (EF due to their essential role in human cognition and behavior regulation. Although EF are thought to be diverse, most training studies have targeted cognitive processes related to working memory (WM, and fewer have focused on training other control mechanisms, such as inhibitory control (IC. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the differential impact of training WM and IC as compared with control conditions performing non-executive control activities. Young adults were divided into two training (WM/IC and two (active/passive control conditions. Over six sessions, the training groups engaged in three different computer-based adaptive activities (WM or IC, whereas the active control group completed a program with low control-demanding activities that mainly involved processing speed. In addition, motivation and engagement were monitored through the training. The WM-training activities required maintenance, updating and memory search processes, while those from the IC group engaged response inhibition, and interference control. All participants were pre- and post-tested in criterion tasks (n-back and Stroop, near transfer measures of WM (Operation Span and IC (Stop-Signal. Non-trained far transfer outcome measures included an abstract reasoning test (Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices and a well-validated experimental task (AX-CPT that provides indices of cognitive flexibility considering proactive/reactive control. Training results revealed that strongly motivated participants reached higher levels of training improvements. Regarding transfer effects, results showed specific patterns of near transfer effects depending on the type of training. Interestingly, it was only the IC training group that showed far transfer to reasoning. Finally, all trained participants showed a shift towards a more proactive mode of cognitive control, highlighting a

  4. The effects of adaptive working memory training and mindfulness meditation training on processing efficiency and worry in high worriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Course-Choi, Jenna; Saville, Harry; Derakshan, Nazanin

    2017-02-01

    Worry is the principle characteristic of generalised anxiety disorder, and has been linked to deficient attentional control, a main function of working memory (WM). Adaptive WM training and mindfulness meditation practice (MMP) have both shown potential to increase attentional control. The present study hence investigates the individual and combined effects of MMP and a dual adaptive n-back task on a non-clinical, randomised sample of high worriers. 60 participants were tested before and after seven days of training. Assessment included self-report questionnaires, as well as performance tasks measuring attentional control and working memory capacity. Combined training resulted in continued reduction in worry in the week after training, highlighting the potential of utilising n-back training as an adjunct to established clinical treatment. Engagement with WM training correlated with immediate improvements in attentional control and resilience, with worry decreasing over time. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flight Approach to Adaptive Control Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen; Less, James L.; Larson, David Nils

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on a full-scale F-18 testbed. The testbed served as a full-scale vehicle to test and validate adaptive flight control research addressing technical challenges involved with reducing risk to enable safe flight in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage or control surface failures. This paper describes the research interface architecture, risk mitigations, flight test approach and lessons learned of adaptive controls research.

  6. Mechanisms of motor adaptation in reactive balance control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrence D J Welch

    Full Text Available Balance control must be rapidly modified to provide stability in the face of environmental challenges. Although changes in reactive balance over repeated perturbations have been observed previously, only anticipatory postural adjustments preceding voluntary movements have been studied in the framework of motor adaptation and learning theory. Here, we hypothesized that adaptation occurs in task-level balance control during responses to perturbations due to central changes in the control of both anticipatory and reactive components of balance. Our adaptation paradigm consisted of a Training set of forward support-surface perturbations, a Reversal set of novel countermanding perturbations that reversed direction, and a Washout set identical to the Training set. Adaptation was characterized by a change in a motor variable from the beginning to the end of each set, the presence of aftereffects at the beginning of the Washout set when the novel perturbations were removed, and a return of the variable at the end of the Washout to a level comparable to the end of the Training set. Task-level balance performance was characterized by peak center of mass (CoM excursion and velocity, which showed adaptive changes with repetitive trials. Only small changes in anticipatory postural control, characterized by body lean and background muscle activity were observed. Adaptation was found in the evoked long-latency muscular response, and also in the sensorimotor transformation mediating that response. Finally, in each set, temporal patterns of muscle activity converged towards an optimum predicted by a trade-off between maximizing motor performance and minimizing muscle activity. Our results suggest that adaptation in balance, as well as other motor tasks, is mediated by altering central sensitivity to perturbations and may be driven by energetic considerations.

  7. Chronic Adaptations to Eccentric Training: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jamie; Pearson, Simon; Ross, Angus; McGuigan, Mike

    2017-05-01

    Resistance training is an integral component of physical preparation for athletes. A growing body of evidence indicates that eccentric strength training methods induce novel stimuli for neuromuscular adaptations. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effects of eccentric training in comparison to concentric-only or traditional (i.e. constrained by concentric strength) resistance training. Searches were performed using the electronic databases MEDLINE via EBSCO, PubMed and SPORTDiscus via EBSCO. Full journal articles investigating the long-term (≥4 weeks) effects of eccentric training in healthy (absence of injury or illness during the 4 weeks preceding the training intervention), adult (17-35 years), human participants were selected for the systematic review. A total of 40 studies conformed to these criteria. Eccentric training elicits greater improvements in muscle strength, although in a largely mode-specific manner. Superior enhancements in power and stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) function have also been reported. Eccentric training is at least as effective as other modalities in increasing muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), while the pattern of hypertrophy appears nuanced and increased CSA may occur longitudinally within muscle (i.e. the addition of sarcomeres in series). There appears to be a preferential increase in the size of type II muscle fibres and the potential to exert a unique effect upon fibre type transitions. Qualitative and quantitative changes in tendon tissue that may be related to the magnitude of strain imposed have also been reported with eccentric training. Eccentric training is a potent stimulus for enhancements in muscle mechanical function, and muscle-tendon unit (MTU) morphological and architectural adaptations. The inclusion of eccentric loads not constrained by concentric strength appears to be superior to traditional resistance training in improving variables associated with strength, power and speed

  8. Adaptations with Intermittent Exercise Training in Post- and Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelin, Kåre; Nyberg, Michael; Piil, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of the present study was to examine the effect of intermittent exercise training on musculoskeletal and metabolic health in postmenopausal (PM) and premenopausal (PRM) women and, furthermore, to evaluate whether the adaptations can be maintained with a reduced training frequency. Eighteen PM (51 ± 1 yr, mean ± SEM) and 12 PRM (48 ± 1 yr) women participated in floorball training approximately two times per week for 12 wk. In a subgroup (n = 9) of PM women (PM40), exercise training was performed for an additional 40 wk with a reduced training frequency of approximately one training session per week. In PM, the body fat percentage decreased (P < 0.05) and the total lean leg mass increased (P < 0.05) during the 12-wk training period, with no changes in PRM. In both PM and PRM, lean body mass and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) were higher, and Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test 1 (YYIET-1) performance was better (P < 0.05) after the 12-wk training period. Procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide was higher (P < 0.05) in PM, and total leg bone mineral density (BMD) was higher (P < 0.05) in both PM and PRM after the 12-wk training period. In PM40, total lean leg mass, V˙O2max, YYIET-1 performance, level of procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide, and total leg BMD were maintained, whereas whole-body BMD and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were reduced (P < 0.05) and the expression of muscle glucose transporter type 4 was higher (P < 0.05). Twelve weeks of intermittent exercise training increased BMD, intermittent exercise capacity, and V˙O2max in PM and PRM, with PM also having positive changes in body composition. Additional 40 wk of training with a reduced frequency was sufficient to preserve these physiological adaptations and also improve blood glucose regulation in PM.

  9. Training Cognitive Control to Reduce Emotional Vulnerability in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainston, Jessica; Derakshan, Nazanin

    2018-04-06

    Breast cancer enhances anxiety and depressive vulnerability, profoundly impairing the quality of life in survivors. Hinging on recent research that training attentional control can reduce emotional vulnerability, we assess how improving cognitive function could reduce emotional vulnerability in female survivors of breast cancer. Participants took part in a course of adaptive dual n-back cognitive training (Training Group) or a non-adaptive active control group (Active Control) for 12 days across a two-week period. Transfer-related training gains were assessed immediately after the intervention, at a shorter one-month follow-up and at a longer follow-up time of approximately 15 months post intervention, to assess sustainability of training effects. Adaptive cognitive training reduced anxiety and rumination with effects evident at shorter and longer term follow-up assessments. Our results are amongst the first to suggest that adaptive cognitive training can reduce emotional vulnerability in breast cancer, with the potential to enhance quality of life in survivorship. Our findings have profound implications for designing interventions targeting cognitive function in populations who've suffered from cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptive Control of Chaos in Chua's Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Guo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A feedback control method and an adaptive feedback control method are proposed for Chua's circuit chaos system, which is a simple 3D autonomous system. The asymptotical stability is proven with Lyapunov theory for both of the proposed methods, and the system can be dragged to one of its three unstable equilibrium points respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed methods are valid, and control performance is improved through introducing adaptive technology.

  11. Quiz commercial game adaptation to help in the radioprotection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2002-01-01

    An employee will be qualified to operate a gamma irradiation facility at EMBRARAD after doing a radiation protection training of at least 18 months. After that, the main radiation protection subjects are revised every six months. In that half-yearly training the operators become teachers and so they explain the radiation protection subjects, under the supervision of an instructor. After some years attending the same training, operators do not have motivation to participate in this kind of periodic event due to the same issues covered. Therefore something should be made to revival their interest and motivation to take part in this periodic training. The way chose was adapted a quiz commercial game to revised radiation protection subjects and included it in the periodic training. The game was well accepted by the operators, it caused a competition among them because everybody wanted to win the game and consequently stimulated them to study. (author)

  12. Adaptive Flight Control Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    A broad overview of current adaptive flight control research efforts at NASA is presented, as well as some more detailed discussion of selected specific approaches. The stated objective of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project, one of NASA s Aviation Safety programs, is to advance the state-of-the-art of adaptive controls as a design option to provide enhanced stability and maneuverability margins for safe landing in the presence of adverse conditions such as actuator or sensor failures. Under this project, a number of adaptive control approaches are being pursued, including neural networks and multiple models. Validation of all the adaptive control approaches will use not only traditional methods such as simulation, wind tunnel testing and manned flight tests, but will be augmented with recently developed capabilities in unmanned flight testing.

  13. Adaptations of prefrontal brain activity, executive functions, and gait in healthy elderly following exergame and balance training: A randomized-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schättin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During aging, the prefrontal cortex (PFC undergoes age-dependent neuronal changes influencing cognitive and motor functions. Motor-learning interventions are hypothesized to ameliorate motor and cognitive deficits in older adults. Especially, video game-based physical exercise might have the potential to train motor in combination with cognitive abilities in older adults. The aim of this study was to compare conventional balance training with video game-based physical exercise, a so-called exergame, on the relative power (RP of electroencephalographic (EEG frequencies over the PFC, executive function (EF, and gait performance. Twenty-seven participants (mean age 79.2 ± 7.3 years were randomly assigned to one of two groups. All participants completed 24 trainings including three times a 30min session/week. The EEG measurements showed that theta RP significantly decreased in favor of the exergame group (L(14 = 6.23, p = 0.007. Comparing pre- vs. post-test, EFs improved both within the exergame (working memory: z = -2.28, p = 0.021; divided attention auditory: z = -2.51, p = 0.009; divided attention visual: z = -2.06, p = 0.040; go/no-go: z = -2.55, p = 0.008; set-shifting: z = -2.90, p = 0.002 and within the balance group (set-shifting: z = -2.04, p = 0.042. Moreover, spatio-temporal gait parameters primarily improved within the exergame group under dual-task conditions (speed normal walking: z = -2.90, p = 0.002; speed fast walking: z = -2.97, p = 0.001; cadence normal walking: z = -2.97, p = 0.001; stride length fast walking: z = -2.69, p = 0.005 and within the balance group under single-task conditions (speed normal walking: z = -2.54, p = 0.009; speed fast walking: z = -1.98, p = 0.049; cadence normal walking: z = -2.79, p = 0.003. These results indicate that exergame training as well as balance training positively influence prefrontal cortex activity and/or function in varying proportion.

  14. Neural and morphological adaptations of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles to isokinetic eccentric training

    OpenAIRE

    Franke,Rodrigo de Azevedo; Baroni,Bruno Manfredini; Rodrigues,Rodrigo; Geremia,Jeam Marcel; Lanferdini,Fábio Juner; Vaz,Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) are frequently targeted in conditioning/rehabilitation programs due to their role in patellar stabilization during knee extension. This study assessed neural and muscular adaptations in these two muscles after an isokinetic eccentric training program. Twenty healthy men underwent a four-week control period followed by a 12-week period of isokinetic eccentric training. Ultrasound evaluations of VL and VM muscle thickness at rest and electromyograp...

  15. Adaptive Feedfoward Feedback Control Framework Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An Adaptive Feedforward and Feedback Control (AFFC) Framework is proposed to suppress the aircraft's structural vibrations and to increase the resilience of the...

  16. Multiple model adaptive control with mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Matthew

    Despite the remarkable theoretical accomplishments and successful applications of adaptive control, the field is not sufficiently mature to solve challenging control problems requiring strict performance and safety guarantees. Towards addressing these issues, a novel deterministic multiple-model adaptive control approach called adaptive mixing control is proposed. In this approach, adaptation comes from a high-level system called the supervisor that mixes into feedback a number of candidate controllers, each finely-tuned to a subset of the parameter space. The mixing signal, the supervisor's output, is generated by estimating the unknown parameters and, at every instant of time, calculating the contribution level of each candidate controller based on certainty equivalence. The proposed architecture provides two characteristics relevant to solving stringent, performance-driven applications. First, the full-suite of linear time invariant control tools is available. A disadvantage of conventional adaptive control is its restriction to utilizing only those control laws whose solutions can be feasibly computed in real-time, such as model reference and pole-placement type controllers. Because its candidate controllers are computed off line, the proposed approach suffers no such restriction. Second, the supervisor's output is smooth and does not necessarily depend on explicit a priori knowledge of the disturbance model. These characteristics can lead to improved performance by avoiding the unnecessary switching and chattering behaviors associated with some other multiple adaptive control approaches. The stability and robustness properties of the adaptive scheme are analyzed. It is shown that the mean-square regulation error is of the order of the modeling error. And when the parameter estimate converges to its true value, which is guaranteed if a persistence of excitation condition is satisfied, the adaptive closed-loop system converges exponentially fast to a closed

  17. Functional and muscular adaptations in an experimental model for isometric strength training in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Krüger

    Full Text Available Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionally, either a sedentary control group (CT or a regular endurance training group (ET groups were used as controls. Performance capacity was determined by maximum holding time (MHT and treadmill spirometry, respectively. Furthermore, muscle fiber types and diameter, muscular concentration of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK, succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa, and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 were determined. In a further approach, the effect of ST on glucose intolerance was tested in diabetic mice. In mice of the ST group we observed an increase of MHT in isometric strength tests, a type II fiber hypertrophy, and an increased GLUT4 protein content in the membrane fraction. In contrast, in mice of the ET group an increase of VO(2max, a shift to oxidative muscle fiber type and an increase of oxidative enzyme content was measured. Furthermore strength training was effective in reducing glucose intolerance in mice fed a high fat diet. An effective murine strength training model was developed and evaluated, which revealed marked differences in adaptations known from endurance training. This approach seems also suitable to test for therapeutical effects of strength training.

  18. An adaptable Boolean net trainable to control a computing robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, F. E.; Prevete, R.; Milo, M.; Visco, S.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a method to implement in a Boolean neural network a Hebbian rule so to obtain an adaptable universal control system. We start by presenting both the Boolean neural net and the Hebbian rule we have considered. Then we discuss, first, the problems arising when the latter is naively implemented in a Boolean neural net, second, the method consenting us to overcome them and the ensuing adaptable Boolean neural net paradigm. Next, we present the adaptable Boolean neural net as an intelligent control system, actually controlling a writing robot, and discuss how to train it in the execution of the elementary arithmetic operations on operands represented by numerals with an arbitrary number of digits

  19. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood Mike; Rasmussen Chris; Cooke Matthew; Harvey Travis; Wilborn Colin D; Campbell Bill; Taylor Lem W; Kerksick Chad M; Iosia Mike; Roberts Michael D; Wilson Ronald; Jitomir Jean; Willoughby Darryn; Kreider Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-...

  20. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive adaptation training as a nursing intervention in long-term residential patients with severe mental illness : Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiekema, Annemarie P. M.; Quee, Piotr J.; Dethmers, Marian; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Redmeijer, Jeroen E.; Rietberg, Kees; Stant, A. Dennis; Swart, Marte; van Weeghel, Jaap; Aleman, Andre; Velligan, Dawn I.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Bruggeman, Richard; van der Meer, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the well-known importance of cognitive deficits for everyday functioning in patients with severe mental illness (SMI), evidence-based interventions directed at these problems are especially scarce for SMI patients in long-term clinical facilities. Cognitive adaptation Training

  1. 75 FR 2597 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... al. Positive Train Control Systems; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 10 / Friday... Positive Train Control Systems AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation... passenger and freight rail lines requiring the implementation of positive train control (PTC) systems. This...

  2. 76 FR 63899 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ...-0028, Notice No. 2] RIN 2130-AC27 Positive Train Control Systems AGENCY: Federal Railroad...-based criteria in order to avoid positive train control (PTC) system implementation on track segments... and Compliance, Staff Director, Signal & Train Control Division, Federal Railroad Administration, Mail...

  3. Maritime Adaptive Optics Beam Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Griot Helium Neon Class II laser with output power of 0.5 mW, operating at a wavelength of 633 nm. The science camera is an IDS uEye-2210SE CCD camera...produced by Edmund Optics, Newport/New Focus, Thor Labs, and CVI Melles Griot . Two computer controllers are used for the full experimental system. The

  4. Adaptive Control Strategies for Flexible Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1996-01-01

    The control problem of a flexible robotic arm has been investigated. The control strategies that have been developed have a wide application in approaching the general control problem of flexible space structures. The following control strategies have been developed and evaluated: neural self-tuning control algorithm, neural-network-based fuzzy logic control algorithm, and adaptive pole assignment algorithm. All of the above algorithms have been tested through computer simulation. In addition, the hardware implementation of a computer control system that controls the tip position of a flexible arm clamped on a rigid hub mounted directly on the vertical shaft of a dc motor, has been developed. An adaptive pole assignment algorithm has been applied to suppress vibrations of the described physical model of flexible robotic arm and has been successfully tested using this testbed.

  5. Training-specific muscle architecture adaptation after 5-wk training in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazevich, Anthony J; Gill, Nicholas D; Bronks, Roger; Newton, Robert U

    2003-12-01

    This study examined changes in the muscle size, muscle architecture, strength, and sprint/jump performances of concurrently training athletes during 5 wk of "altered" resistance training (RT). Eight female and 15 male athletes performed 4 wk of sprint, jump, and resistance training in addition to their sports training (standardization) before adopting one of three different programs for 5 wk: 1) squat lift training (SQ, N = 8) with sprint/jump training; 2) forward hack squat training (FHS, N = 7) with sprint/jump training; or 3) sprint/jump training only (SJ, N = 8). Muscle size, fascicle angle, and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles (using ultrasound procedures) as well as 20-m sprint run, vertical jump, and strength performance changes were examined. A small increase in VL fascicle angle in SQ and FHS was statistically different to the decrease in SJ subjects (P < 0.05 at distal, P < 0.1 at proximal). VL fascicle length increased for SJ only (P < 0.05 at distal, P < 0.1 at proximal) and increased in RF in SQ subjects (P < 0.05). Muscle thickness of VL and RF increased in all training groups (P < 0.05) but only at proximal sites. There were no between-group differences in squat, forward hack squat, or isokinetic strength performances, or in sprint or jump performances, despite improvements in some of the tests across the groups. Significant muscle size and architectural adaptations can occur in concurrently training athletes in response to a 5-wk training program. These adaptations were possibly associated with the force and velocity characteristics of the training exercises but not the movement patterns. Factors other than, or in addition to, muscle architecture must mediate changes in strength, sprint, and jump performance.

  6. OUTPUT CONTROL WITH ADAPTIVE-PROPORTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL CONTROLLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Opeiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this articl is to improve acсuracy and stability margine for system with proportional differential (PD-controllers and parameters unsertaity by means of adaptation. The adaptive controller must produce the accuraсy improving by encreasing the proportional gain of controller, when the error is non zero. Consequently, the error decrease, adaptation become less intensive, and the system maintain the stability. The is provided by the correctly constructed Lapunov function. The method of parametric synthesis for adaptive PD-controller is developed based on roots location on complex plane. The numerical example of synthesis is presented with simulation results, which demonstrate the correctness of developed method. The adaptive PD-controller allow accuracy improuving with stability retaining, i. e. the adaptivity is able to replace the integrator by proportional gain tuning. The adaptive PD-controller is especially helpful for systems, working with inputs variability, and when the exponential dynamic is of importance. In cases, when diturbances are restricted, the adaptive PD-controller provides the stability and accuracy, but slowly operation.

  7. A phoneme-based student model for adaptive spelling training

    OpenAIRE

    Baschera, Gian-Marco; Gross, Markus H.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel phoneme-based student model for spelling training. Our model is data driven, adapts to the user and provides information for, e.g., optimal word selection. We describe spelling errors using a set of features accounting for phonemic, capitalization, typo, and other error categories. We compute the influence of individual features on the error expectation values based on previous input data using Poisson regression. This enables us to predict error expectation values and to c...

  8. Adaptations of mouse skeletal muscle to low intensity vibration training

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeehen, James N.; Novotny, Susan A.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Call, Jarrod A.; Nuckley, David J.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that low intensity vibration training in mice improves contractile function of hindlimb skeletal muscles and promotes exercise-related cellular adaptations. Methods We subjected C57BL/6J mice to 6 wk, 5 d·wk−1, 15 min·d−1 of sham or low intensity vibration (45 Hz, 1.0 g) while housed in traditional cages (Sham-Active, n=8; Vibrated-Active, n=10) or in small cages to restrict physical activity (Sham-Restricted, n=8; Vibrated-Restricted, n=8). Contractile function and resistance to fatigue were tested in vivo (anterior and posterior crural muscles) and ex vivo on the soleus muscle. Tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were evaluated histologically for alterations in oxidative metabolism, capillarity, and fiber types. Epididymal fat pad and hindlimb muscle masses were measured. Two-way ANOVAs were used to determine effects of vibration and physical inactivity. Results Vibration training resulted in a 10% increase in maximal isometric torque (P=0.038) and 16% faster maximal rate of relaxation (P=0.030) of the anterior crural muscles. Posterior crural muscles were unaffected by vibration, with the exception of greater rates of contraction in Vibrated-Restricted mice compared to Vibrated-Active and Sham-Restricted mice (P=0.022). Soleus muscle maximal isometric tetanic force tended to be greater (P=0.057) and maximal relaxation was 20% faster (P=0.005) in Vibrated compared to Sham mice. Restriction of physical activity induced muscle weakness but was not required for vibration to be effective in improving strength or relaxation. Vibration training did not impact muscle fatigability or any indicator of cellular adaptation investigated (P≥0.431). Fat pad but not hindlimb muscle masses were affected by vibration training. Conclusion Vibration training in mice improved muscle contractility, specifically strength and relaxation rates, with no indication of adverse effects to muscle function or cellular adaptations. PMID:23274599

  9. Neuronal control of adaptive thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong eYang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The obesity epidemic continues rising as a global health challenge, despite the increasing public awareness and the use of lifestyle and medical interventions. The biomedical community is urged to develop new treatments to obesity. Excess energy is stored as fat in white adipose tissue (WAT, dysfunction of which lie at the core of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. In contrast, brown adipose tissue (BAT burns fat and dissipates chemical energy as heat. The development and activation of brown-like adipocytes, also known as beige cells, result in WAT browning and thermogenesis. The recent discovery of brown and beige adipocytes in adult humans has sparked the exploration of the development, regulation, and function of these thermogenic adipocytes. The central nervous system (CNS drives the sympathetic nerve activity in BAT and WAT to control heat production and energy homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the integration of thermal, hormonal, and nutritional information on hypothalamic circuits in thermoregulation.

  10. Autonomic adaptation after traditional and reverse swimming training periodizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier; Fernandes, R J; Arroyo-Toledo, J J; Figueiredo, P; González-Ravé, J M; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the autonomic response of trained swimmers to traditional and reverse training periodization models. Seventeen swimmers were divided in two groups, performing a traditional periodization (TPG) or a reverse periodization (RPG) during a period of 10 weeks. Heart rate variability and 50 m swimming performance were analyzed before and after the training programs. After training, the TPG decreased the values of the high frequency band (HF), the number of differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals longer than 50 ms (NN50) and the percentage of differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals more than 50 ms (pNN50), and the RPG increased the values of HF and square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals (RMSSD). None of the groups improved significantly their performance in the 50-m test. The autonomic response of swimmers was different depending on the periodization performed, with the reverse periodization model leading to higher autonomic adaption. Complementary, the data suggests that autonomic adaptations were not critical for the 50-m swimming performance.

  11. Adaptive Control Algorithm of the Synchronous Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the the problem of controlling a synchronous generator, namely, maintaining the stability of the control object in the conditions of occurrence of noise and disturbances in the regulatory process. The model of a synchronous generator is represented by a system of differential equations of Park-Gorev, where state variables are computed relative to synchronously rotating d, q-axis. Management of synchronous generator is proposed to organize on the basis of the position-path control using algorithms to adapt with the reference model. Basic control law directed on the stabilizing indicators the frequency generated by the current and the required power level, which is achieved by controlling the mechanical torque on the shaft of the turbine and the value of the excitation voltage of the synchronous generator. Modification of the classic adaptation algorithm using the reference model, allowing to minimize the error of the reference regulation and the model under investigation within the prescribed limits, produced by means of the introduction of additional variables controller adaptation in the model. Сarried out the mathematical modeling of control provided influence on the studied model of continuous nonlinear and unmeasured the disturbance. Simulation results confirm the high level accuracy of tracking and adaptation investigated model with respect to the reference, and the present value of the loop error depends on parameters performance of regulator.

  12. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  13. LFC based adaptive PID controller using ANN and ANFIS techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. Mosaad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive PID Load Frequency Control (LFC for power systems using Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN oriented by Genetic Algorithm (GA. PID controller parameters are tuned off-line by using GA to minimize integral error square over a wide-range of load variations. The values of PID controller parameters obtained from GA are used to train both ANFIS and ANN. Therefore, the two proposed techniques could, online, tune the PID controller parameters for optimal response at any other load point within the operating range. Testing of the developed techniques shows that the adaptive PID-LFC could preserve optimal performance over the whole loading range. Results signify superiority of ANFIS over ANN in terms of performance measures.

  14. 75 FR 59108 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ...-0132, Notice No. 4] RIN 2130-AC03 Positive Train Control Systems AGENCY: Federal Railroad... amendments to the final rule regarding the development, testing, implementation, and use of Positive Train... Compliance, Staff Director, Signal & Train Control Division, Federal Railroad Administration, Mail Stop 25...

  15. Adapted marching distances and physical training decrease recruits' injuries and attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Lilian; Boesch, Maria; Sefidan, Sandra; Frey, Franz; Mäder, Urs; Annen, Hubert; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence that progressive loading of physical demands at the beginning of basic military service and specific physical training can reduce injury incidences. Therefore, aim of this study was to measure the effects of a progressive increase in marching distances and an adapted physical training program on injury incidence and attrition rate in a Swiss Army infantry training school. One company reduced the distances covered on foot during the first 4 weeks of basic military training. A second company performed an adapted physical training program for 10 weeks. A third company participated in both interventions combined, and a fourth company served as a control group without any intervention. The injury incidences and attrition rates of 651 male recruits were registered during 21 weeks of military service. Several predictor variables for injury and attrition, such as physical fitness, previous injuries, level of previous physical activity, smoking, motivation, and socioeconomic factors, were assessed as well. The data were analyzed using binary logistic backward regressions. Each intervention separately had a favorable effect on injury prevention. However, combining the 2 interventions resulted in the greatest reduction in injury incidence rate (-33%). Furthermore, the adapted physical training successfully reduced the military service attrition rates (-53%). Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Muscle adaptations and performance enhancements of soccer training for untrained men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Christensen, Jesper F.; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard

    2010-01-01

    We examined the physical demands of small-sided soccer games in untrained middle-age males and muscle adaptations and performance effects over 12 weeks of recreational soccer training in comparison with continuous running. Thirty-eight healthy subjects (20-43 years) were randomized into a soccer ...... energy turnover and is an effective type of training leading to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations as well as performance enhancements throughout a 12-week training period.......We examined the physical demands of small-sided soccer games in untrained middle-age males and muscle adaptations and performance effects over 12 weeks of recreational soccer training in comparison with continuous running. Thirty-eight healthy subjects (20-43 years) were randomized into a soccer...... (SO), running (RU) and control (CO) group. Two-three weekly 1-h training sessions were performed. Muscle lactate (30.1 +/- 4.1 vs. 15.6 +/- 3.3 mmol/kg d.w.), blood lactate, blood glucose and time above 90% HR(max) (20 +/- 4% vs. 1 +/- 1%) were higher (p training in SO than in RU. After...

  17. Cognitive training: How can it be adapted for surgical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lauren; Raison, Nicholas; Ghumman, Faisal; Moran, Aidan; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-08-01

    There is a need for new approaches to surgical training in order to cope with the increasing time pressures, ethical constraints, and legal limitations being placed on trainees. One of the most interesting of these new approaches is "cognitive training" or the use of psychological processes to enhance performance of skilled behaviour. Its ability to effectively improve motor skills in sport has raised the question as to whether it could also be used to improve surgical performance. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current evidence on the use of cognitive training within surgery, and evaluate the potential role it can play in surgical education. Scientific database searches were conducted to identify studies that investigated the use of cognitive training in surgery. The key studies were selected and grouped according to the type of cognitive training they examined. Available research demonstrated that cognitive training interventions resulted in greater performance benefits when compared to control training. In particular, cognitive training was found to improve surgical motor skills, as well as a number of non-technical outcomes. Unfortunately, key limitations restricting the generalizability of these findings include small sample size and conceptual issues arising from differing definitions of the term 'cognitive training'. When used appropriately, cognitive training can be a highly effective supplementary training tool in the development of technical skills in surgery. Although further studies are needed to refine our understanding, cognitive training should certainly play an important role in future surgical education. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive Training Considerations for Use in Simulation-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    partial and non-AT ( Tennyson & Rothen, 1977). Trainees also showed an increase in motor skills with AT (Cote, Williges, & Williges, 1981; Johnson...Aptitudes, learner control and adaptive instruction. Educational Psychologist, 15, 151-158. * Tennyson , R. D., & Rothen, W. (1977). Pretask and on-task...also adapting the instruction to the student by changing such conditions as display time, sequence, format of examples, etc. ( Tennyson et al, 1998

  19. Stress inoculation training supported by physiology-driven adaptive virtual reality stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Sinisa; Horvat, Marko; Kukolja, Davor; Dropuljić, Branimir; Cosić, Kresimir

    2009-01-01

    Significant proportion of psychological problems related to combat stress in recent large peacekeeping operations underscores importance of effective methods for strengthening the stress resistance of military personnel. Adaptive control of virtual reality (VR) stimulation, based on estimation of the subject's emotional state from physiological signals, may enhance existing stress inoculation training (SIT). Physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation can tailor the progress of stressful stimuli delivery to the physiological characteristics of each individual, which is indicated for improvement in stress resistance. Therefore, following an overview of SIT and its applications in the military setting, generic concept of physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation is presented in the paper. Toward the end of the paper, closed-loop adaptive control strategy applicable to SIT is outlined.

  20. Brain structural changes following adaptive cognitive training assessed by Tensor-Based Morphometry (TBM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Roberto; Hua, Xue; Martínez, Kenia; Burgaleta, Miguel; Román, Francisco J; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Carmona, Susanna; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    Tensor-Based Morphometry (TBM) allows the automatic mapping of brain changes across time building 3D deformation maps. This technique has been applied for tracking brain degeneration in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases with high sensitivity and reliability. Here we applied TBM to quantify changes in brain structure after completing a challenging adaptive cognitive training program based on the n-back task. Twenty-six young women completed twenty-four training sessions across twelve weeks and they showed, on average, large cognitive improvements. High-resolution MRI scans were obtained before and after training. The computed longitudinal deformation maps were analyzed for answering three questions: (a) Are there differential brain structural changes in the training group as compared with a matched control group? (b) Are these changes related to performance differences in the training program? (c) Are standardized changes in a set of psychological factors (fluid and crystallized intelligence, working memory, and attention control) measured before and after training, related to structural changes in the brain? Results showed (a) greater structural changes for the training group in the temporal lobe, (b) a negative correlation between these changes and performance across training sessions (the greater the structural change, the lower the cognitive performance improvements), and (c) negligible effects regarding the psychological factors measured before and after training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adaptive control of solar energy collector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, João M; Igreja, José M

    2014-01-01

    This book describes methods for adaptive control of distributed-collector solar fields: plants that collect solar energy and deliver it in thermal form. Controller design methods are presented that can overcome difficulties found in these type of plants:they are distributed-parameter systems, i.e., systems with dynamics that depend on space as well as time;their dynamics is nonlinear, with a bilinear structure;there is a significant level of uncertainty in plant knowledge.Adaptive methods form the focus of the text because of the degree of uncertainty in the knowledge of plant dynamics. Parts

  2. Enhanced response inhibition during intensive meditation training predicts improvements in self-reported adaptive socioemotional functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahdra, Baljinder K; MacLean, Katherine A; Ferrer, Emilio; Shaver, Phillip R; Rosenberg, Erika L; Jacobs, Tonya L; Zanesco, Anthony P; King, Brandon G; Aichele, Stephen R; Bridwell, David A; Mangun, George R; Lavy, Shiri; Wallace, B Alan; Saron, Clifford D

    2011-04-01

    We examined the impact of training-induced improvements in self-regulation, operationalized in terms of response inhibition, on longitudinal changes in self-reported adaptive socioemotional functioning. Data were collected from participants undergoing 3 months of intensive meditation training in an isolated retreat setting (Retreat 1) and a wait-list control group that later underwent identical training (Retreat 2). A 32-min response inhibition task (RIT) was designed to assess sustained self-regulatory control. Adaptive functioning (AF) was operationalized as a single latent factor underlying self-report measures of anxious and avoidant attachment, mindfulness, ego resilience, empathy, the five major personality traits (extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience), difficulties in emotion regulation, depression, anxiety, and psychological well-being. Participants in Retreat 1 improved in RIT performance and AF over time whereas the controls did not. The control participants later also improved on both dimensions during their own retreat (Retreat 2). These improved levels of RIT performance and AF were sustained in follow-up assessments conducted approximately 5 months after the training. Longitudinal dynamic models with combined data from both retreats showed that improvement in RIT performance during training influenced the change in AF over time, which is consistent with a key claim in the Buddhist literature that enhanced capacity for self-regulation is an important precursor of changes in emotional well-being. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. No evidence for true training and transfer effects after inhibitory control training in young healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Sören; Behnke, Alexander; Fleischhauer, Monika; Küttler, Lena; Kliegel, Matthias; Strobel, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies reported that training of working memory may improve performance in the trained function and beyond. Other executive functions, however, have been rarely or not yet systematically examined. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of inhibitory control (IC) training to produce true training-related function improvements in a sample of 122 healthy adults using a randomized, double-blind pretest/posttest/follow-up design. Two groups performed either adaptive (training group) or nonadaptive (active control) versions of go/no-go and stop-signal tasks for 3 weeks. Training gains as well as near-transfer to an untrained Stroop task and far-transfer to psychometric fluid intelligence were explored. Although the adaptive group could substantially improve overall IC task performance after training, no differences to the active control group occurred, neither at posttest nor at follow-up testing. A large decrease in response latency from pre- to posttest (and from pretest to 4 months' follow-up testing) was found when the training group was compared to the passive control group, which, however, does not sufficiently control for possible confounds. Thus, no conclusive evidence was found that this performance increase mirrors a true increase in IC function. The fact that training improvement was mainly related to response latency may indicate that individuals were more focused on performance gains in the prepotent go trials but less on the stop trials to meet the requirements of the tasks as well as possible. The challenges for response inhibition training studies are extensively discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Adaptive control of nonlinear underwater robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor I. Fossen

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of controlling underwater mobile robots in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF is addressed. Uncertainties in the input matrix due to partly known nonlinear thruster characteristics are modeled as multiplicative input uncertainty. This paper proposes two methods to compensate for the model uncertainties: (1 an adaptive passivity-based control scheme and (2 deriving a hybrid (adaptive and sliding controller. The hybrid controller consists of a switching term which compensates for uncertainties in the input matrix and an on-line parameter estimation algorithm. Global stability is ensured by applying Barbalat's Lyapunovlike lemma. The hybrid controller is simulated for the horizontal motion of the Norwegian Experimental Remotely Operated Vehicle (NEROV.

  5. Shear stress mediates endothelial adaptations to exercise training in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinken, Toni M; Thijssen, Dick H J; Hopkins, Nicola; Dawson, Ellen A; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Although episodic changes in shear stress have been proposed as the mechanism responsible for the effects of exercise training on the vasculature, this hypothesis has not been directly addressed in humans. We examined brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, an index of NO-mediated endothelial function, in healthy men in response to an acute bout of handgrip exercise and across an 8-week period of bilateral handgrip training. Shear stress responses were attenuated in one arm by cuff inflation to 60 mm Hg. Similar increases were observed in grip strength and forearm volume and girth in both limbs. Acute bouts of handgrip exercise increased shear rate (P<0.005) and flow-mediated dilation percentage (P<0.05) in the uncuffed limb, whereas no changes were evident in the cuffed arm. Handgrip training increased flow-mediated dilation percentage in the noncuffed limb at weeks 2, 4, and 6 (P<0.001), whereas no changes were observed in the cuffed arm. Brachial artery peak reactive hyperemia, an index of resistance artery remodeling, progressively increased with training in the noncuffed limb (P<0.001 and 0.004); no changes were evident in the cuffed arm. Neither acute nor chronic shear manipulation during exercise influenced endothelium-independent glyceryl trinitrate responses. These results demonstrate that exercise-induced changes in shear provide the principal physiological stimulus to adaptation in flow-mediated endothelial function and vascular remodeling in response to exercise training in healthy humans.

  6. Cultural Adaptation of the Skills Training Model: Assertion Training with American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Rowe, Wayne

    A skills training approach provides a conceptual framework from which human services can be provided for the personal and emotional needs of Indian people without the subtle, culturally erosive effect of traditional psychotherapy. Some 30 tribal groups and agencies participated in a cultural adaptation of an assertive coping-skills training…

  7. Adaptive Critic Nonlinear Robust Control: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; He, Haibo; Liu, Derong

    2017-10-01

    Adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) and reinforcement learning are quite relevant to each other when performing intelligent optimization. They are both regarded as promising methods involving important components of evaluation and improvement, at the background of information technology, such as artificial intelligence, big data, and deep learning. Although great progresses have been achieved and surveyed when addressing nonlinear optimal control problems, the research on robustness of ADP-based control strategies under uncertain environment has not been fully summarized. Hence, this survey reviews the recent main results of adaptive-critic-based robust control design of continuous-time nonlinear systems. The ADP-based nonlinear optimal regulation is reviewed, followed by robust stabilization of nonlinear systems with matched uncertainties, guaranteed cost control design of unmatched plants, and decentralized stabilization of interconnected systems. Additionally, further comprehensive discussions are presented, including event-based robust control design, improvement of the critic learning rule, nonlinear H ∞ control design, and several notes on future perspectives. By applying the ADP-based optimal and robust control methods to a practical power system and an overhead crane plant, two typical examples are provided to verify the effectiveness of theoretical results. Overall, this survey is beneficial to promote the development of adaptive critic control methods with robustness guarantee and the construction of higher level intelligent systems.

  8. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  9. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  10. Two scale high gain adaptive control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, Jan W.; Mareels, I.M.Y.; Mareels, Iven

    2004-01-01

    Simple adaptive controllers based on high gain output feedback suffer a lack of robustness with respect to bounded disturbances. Existing modifications achieve boundedness of all solutions but introduce solutions that, even in the absence of disturbances, do not achieve regulation. In this paper a

  11. Simple adaptive control system design trades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the design of a Model Reference Adaptive Control system, a reference model serves as the (well-known) basis through which system and user requirements can find their way into the design. By tuning the design parameters, the response of the actual vehicle should track the response of the

  12. Graceful degradation of cooperative adaptive cruise control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, J.; Semsar-Kazerooni, E.; Lijster, G.; Wouw, N. van de; Nijmeijer, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) employs wireless intervehicle communication, in addition to onboard sensors, to obtain string-stable vehicle-following behavior at small intervehicle distances. As a consequence, however, CACC is vulnerable to communication impairments such as latency and

  13. Geometry control in adaptive truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. V.; Utku, S.

    1990-01-01

    Forward and inverse kinematics equations are derived for the large geometry maneuver of adaptive trusses. A new algorithm based on higher-order multistep methods is proposed as a means of computing the length control for a described large geometry maneuver. The algorithm is shown to improve in computational speed at least five times over the algorithm presented in an earlier paper. The acceleration in control computation and other features such as varying velocity profiles and curved trajectories are illustrated by simulation results.

  14. Multivariable adaptive control of bio process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, M.; Bahhou, B.; Roux, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Maher, M. [Faculte des Sciences, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Physique

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a multivariable adaptive control of a continuous-flow fermentation process for the alcohol production. The linear quadratic control strategy is used for the regulation of substrate and ethanol concentrations in the bioreactor. The control inputs are the dilution rate and the influent substrate concentration. A robust identification algorithm is used for the on-line estimation of linear MIMO model`s parameters. Experimental results of a pilot-plant fermenter application are reported and show the control performances. (authors) 8 refs.

  15. Robust and Adaptive Control With Aerospace Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lavretsky, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Robust and Adaptive Control shows the reader how to produce consistent and accurate controllers that operate in the presence of uncertainties and unforeseen events. Driven by aerospace applications the focus of the book is primarily on continuous-dynamical systems.  The text is a three-part treatment, beginning with robust and optimal linear control methods and moving on to a self-contained presentation of the design and analysis of model reference adaptive control (MRAC) for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. Recent extensions and modifications to MRAC design are included, as are guidelines for combining robust optimal and MRAC controllers. Features of the text include: ·         case studies that demonstrate the benefits of robust and adaptive control for piloted, autonomous and experimental aerial platforms; ·         detailed background material for each chapter to motivate theoretical developments; ·         realistic examples and simulation data illustrating key features ...

  16. Executive control training from middle childhood to adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eKarbach

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Executive functions include a number of higher-level cognitive control abilities, such as cognitive flexibility, inhibition, and working memory serving action control and the flexible adaptation to changes in the environment. These control functions are supported by the prefrontal cortex and therefore develop rapidly across childhood and mature well into late adolescence. Given that executive control is a strong predictor for various life outcomes, such as academic attainment, socioeconomic status, and physical health, numerous training interventions have been designed to improve executive functioning across the lifespan, many of them targeting children and adolescents. Despite the increasing popularity of these trainings, their results are neither robust nor consistent, and the transferability of training-induced performance improvements to untrained tasks seems to be limited. In this review, we provide a selective overview of the developmental literature on process-based cognitive interventions by discussing (1 the concept and the development of executive functions and their neural underpinnings, (2 the effects of different types of executive control training in normally developing children and adolescents, (3 individual differences in training-related performance gains as well as (4 the potential of cognitive training interventions for the application in clinical and educational contexts. Based on recent findings, we consider how transfer of process-based executive control trainings may be supported and how interventions may be tailored to the needs of specific age groups or populations.

  17. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  18. Adaptive control method for functional simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.М. Синєглазов

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  The structural scheme of operators studying process control and management in the training complex is proposed for observation. Structural scheme includes the division of operators upon the subgroups according to the level of demonstrated knowledge. Also in the article the example of such divisions criteria is presented.

  19. Balancing Training Techniques for Flight Controller Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Training of ground control teams has been a difficult task in space operations. There are several intangible skills that must be learned to become the steely eyed men and women of mission control who respond to spacecraft failures that can lead to loss of vehicle or crew if handled improperly. And as difficult as training is, it can also be costly. Every day, month or year an operator is in training, is a day that not only they are being trained without direct benefit to the organization, but potentially an instructor or mentor is also being paid for hours spent assisting them. Therefore, optimization of the training flow is highly desired. Recently the Expedition Division (DI) at Johnson Space Flight Center has recreated their training flows for the purpose of both moving to an operator/specialist/instructor hierarchy and to address past inefficiencies in the training flow. This paper will discuss the types of training DI is utilizing in their new flows, and the balance that has been struck between the ideal learning environments and realistic constraints. Specifically, the past training flow for the ISS Attitude Determination and Control Officer will be presented, including drawbacks that were encountered. Then the new training flow will be discussed and how a new approach utilizes more training methods and teaching techniques. We will look at how DI has integrated classes, workshops, checkouts, module reviews, scenarios, OJT, paper sims, Mini Sims, and finally Integrated Sims to balance the cost and timing of training a new flight controller.

  20. The effects of short-lasting anti-saccade training in homonymous hemianopia with and without saccadic adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine eLévy-Bencheton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Homonymous Visual Field Defects (HVFD are common following stroke and can be highly debilitating for visual perception and higher level cognitive functions such as exploring visual scene or reading a text. Rehabilitation using oculomotor compensatory methods with automatic training over a short duration (~15 days have been shown as efficient as longer voluntary training methods (>1 month. Here, we propose to evaluate and compare the effect of an original HVFD rehabilitation method based on a single 15 min voluntary anti-saccades task (AS toward the blind hemifield, with automatic sensorimotor adaptation to increase AS amplitude. In order to distinguish between adaptation and training effect, fourteen left- or right-HVFD patients were exposed, one month apart, to three training, two isolated AS task (Delayed-shift & No-shift paradigm and one combined with AS adaptation (Adaptation paradigm. A quality of life questionnaire (NEI-VFQ 25 and functional measurements (reading speed, visual exploration time in pop-out and serial tasks as well as oculomotor measurements were assessed before and after each training. We could not demonstrate significant adaptation at the group level, but we identified a group of 9 adapted patients. While AS training itself proved to demonstrate significant functional improvements in the overall patient group , we could also demonstrate in the sub-group of adapted patients and specifically following the adaptation training, an increase of saccade amplitude during the reading task (left-HVFD patients and the Serial exploration task, and improvement of the visual quality of life. We conclude that short-lasting AS training combined with adaptation could be implemented in rehabilitation methods of cognitive dysfunctions following HVFD. Indeed, both voluntary and automatic processes have shown interesting effects on the control of visually guided saccades in different cognitive tasks.

  1. Self-guided strategy-adaption training for older adults: Transfer effects to everyday tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiroli, Sara; Cavallini, Elena; Dunlosky, John; Vecchi, Tomaso; Hertzog, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the present research was to examine the potential of a learner-oriented approach to improving older adults' performance in tasks that are similar to real-life situations that require strategic deployment of cognitive resources. A crucial element of this approach involves encouraging older adults to explicitly analyze tasks to consider how to adapt trained skills to a new task context. In an earlier study, a specialist-directed intervention produced training gains and transfer to some untrained memory tasks. In the present study, older adults received a manual instructing them about principles of task analysis, two memory strategies, and strategy adaptation. Self-guided strategy-adaption training involved practicing some memory tasks as well as instructions on how the trained skills could be applied to new tasks that were not practiced. The criterion tasks involved practice tasks, non-practiced tasks that were discussed in the manual, and transfer tasks that were never mentioned in the manual. Two of the tests were from the Everyday Cognition Battery (inductive reasoning and working memory). As compared to a waiting-list control group, older adults assigned to self-guided strategy-adaption training showed memory improvements on tasks that were practiced or discussed during training. Most important, the learner-oriented approach produced transfer to the everyday tasks. Our findings show the potential of instructing task appraisal processes as a basis for fostering transfer, including improving older adults' performance in simulated everyday tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Adaptive working memory training improved brain function in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Linda; Løhaugen, Gro C; Andres, Tamara; Jiang, Caroline S; Douet, Vanessa; Tanizaki, Naomi; Walker, Christina; Castillo, Deborrah; Lim, Ahnate; Skranes, Jon; Otoshi, Chad; Miller, Eric N; Ernst, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an adaptive working memory (WM) training (WMT) program, the corresponding neural correlates, and LMX1A-rs4657412 polymorphism on the adaptive WMT, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) participants compared to seronegative (SN) controls. A total of 201 of 206 qualified participants completed baseline assessments before randomization to 25 sessions of adaptive WMT or nonadaptive WMT. A total of 74 of 76 (34 HIV, 42 SN) completed adaptive WMT and all 40 completed nonadaptive WMT (20 HIV, 20 SN) and were assessed after 1 month, and 55 adaptive WMT participants were also assessed after 6 months. Nontrained near-transfer WM tests (Digit-Span, Spatial-Span), self-reported executive functioning, and functional magnetic resonance images during 1-back and 2-back tasks were performed at baseline and each follow-up visit, and LMX1A-rs4657412 was genotyped in all participants. Although HIV participants had slightly lower cognitive performance and start index than SN at baseline, both groups improved on improvement index (>30%; false discovery rate [FDR] corrected p < 0.0008) and nontrained WM tests after adaptive WMT (FDR corrected, p ≤ 0.001), but not after nonadaptive WMT (training by training type corrected, p = 0.01 to p = 0.05) 1 month later. HIV participants (especially LMX1A-G carriers) also had poorer self-reported executive functioning than SN, but both groups reported improvements after adaptive WMT (Global: training FDR corrected, p = 0.004), and only HIV participants improved after nonadaptive WMT. HIV participants also had greater frontal activation than SN at baseline, but brain activation decreased in both groups at 1 and 6 months after adaptive WMT (FDR corrected, p < 0.0001), with normalization of brain activation in HIV participants, especially the LMX1A-AA carriers (LMX1A genotype by HIV status, cluster-corrected-p < 0.0001). Adaptive WMT, but not nonadaptive WMT, improved WM performance

  3. Adaptive working memory training improved brain function in human immunodeficiency virus–seropositive patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løhaugen, Gro C.; Andres, Tamara; Jiang, Caroline S.; Douet, Vanessa; Tanizaki, Naomi; Walker, Christina; Castillo, Deborrah; Lim, Ahnate; Skranes, Jon; Otoshi, Chad; Miller, Eric N.; Ernst, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an adaptive working memory (WM) training (WMT) program, the corresponding neural correlates, and LMX1A‐rs4657412 polymorphism on the adaptive WMT, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) participants compared to seronegative (SN) controls. Methods A total of 201 of 206 qualified participants completed baseline assessments before randomization to 25 sessions of adaptive WMT or nonadaptive WMT. A total of 74 of 76 (34 HIV, 42 SN) completed adaptive WMT and all 40 completed nonadaptive WMT (20 HIV, 20 SN) and were assessed after 1 month, and 55 adaptive WMT participants were also assessed after 6 months. Nontrained near‐transfer WM tests (Digit‐Span, Spatial‐Span), self‐reported executive functioning, and functional magnetic resonance images during 1‐back and 2‐back tasks were performed at baseline and each follow‐up visit, and LMX1A‐rs4657412 was genotyped in all participants. Results Although HIV participants had slightly lower cognitive performance and start index than SN at baseline, both groups improved on improvement index (>30%; false discovery rate [FDR] corrected p < 0.0008) and nontrained WM tests after adaptive WMT (FDR corrected, p ≤ 0.001), but not after nonadaptive WMT (training by training type corrected, p = 0.01 to p = 0.05) 1 month later. HIV participants (especially LMX1A‐G carriers) also had poorer self‐reported executive functioning than SN, but both groups reported improvements after adaptive WMT (Global: training FDR corrected, p = 0.004), and only HIV participants improved after nonadaptive WMT. HIV participants also had greater frontal activation than SN at baseline, but brain activation decreased in both groups at 1 and 6 months after adaptive WMT (FDR corrected, p < 0.0001), with normalization of brain activation in HIV participants, especially the LMX1A‐AA carriers (LMX1A genotype by HIV status, cluster‐corrected‐p < 0

  4. Neuro- PI controller based model reference adaptive control for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The control input to the plant is given by the sum of the output of conventional MRAC and the output of NN. The proposed Neural Network -based Model Reference Adaptive Controller (NN-MRAC) can significantly improve the system behavior and force the system to follow the reference model and minimize the error ...

  5. Effect of Lower-Body Resistance Training on Upper-Body Strength Adaptation in Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Sandro; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Merni, Franco

    2018-01-01

    Bartolomei, S, Hoffman, JR, Stout, JR, and Merni, F. Effect of lower-body resistance training on upper-body strength adaptation in trained men. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 13-18, 2018-The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 2 different lower-body strength training schemes on upper-body adaptations to resistance training. Twenty resistance-trained men (4.25 ± 1.6 years of experience) were randomly assigned to either a high intensity (HI; n = 9; age = 24.9 ± 2.9 years; body mass = 88.7 ± 17.2 kg; height = 177.0 ± 5.6 cm) or a mixed high volume and HI resistance training program (MP; n = 11; age = 26.0 ± 4.7 years; body mass = 82.8 ± 9.1 kg; height = 177.54 ± 5.9 cm). High-intensity group followed a HI training for both upper and lower body (4-5 reps at 88%-90% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM)), whereas the MP group performed high-volume training sessions focused on muscle hypertrophy for lower body (10-12 reps at 65%-70% of 1-RM) and a HI protocol for the upper body. Maximal strength and power testing occurred before and after the 6-week training program. Analysis of covariance was used to compare performance measures between the groups. Greater increases in MP groups compared with HI groups were observed for bench press 1RM (p = 0.007), bench press power at 50% of 1RM (p = 0.011), and for arm muscle area (p = 0.046). Significant difference between the 2 groups at posttest were also observed for fat mass (p = 0.009). Results indicated that training programs focused on lower-body muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength for upper body can stimulate greater strength and power gains in the upper body compared with HI resistance training programs for both the upper and lower body.

  6. Adaptive traffic control systems for urban networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivojević Danilo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive traffic control systems represent complex, but powerful tool for improvement of traffic flow conditions in locations or zones where applied. Many traffic agencies, especially those that have a large number of signalized intersections with high variability of the traffic demand, choose to apply some of the adaptive traffic control systems. However, those systems are manufactured and offered by multiple vendors (companies that are competing for the market share. Due to that fact, besides the information available from the vendors themselves, or the information from different studies conducted on different continents, very limited amount of information is available about the details how those systems are operating. The reason for that is the protecting of the intellectual property from plagiarism. The primary goal of this paper is to make a brief analysis of the functionalities, characteristics, abilities and results of the most recognized, but also less known adaptive traffic control systems to the professional public and other persons with interest in this subject.

  7. Rail Vehicle Vibrations Control Using Parameters Adaptive PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Metin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, vertical rail vehicle vibrations are controlled by the use of conventional PID and parameters which are adaptive to PID controllers. A parameters adaptive PID controller is designed to improve the passenger comfort by intuitional usage of this method that renews the parameters online and sensitively under variable track inputs. Sinusoidal vertical rail misalignment and measured real rail irregularity are considered as two different disruptive effects of the system. Active vibration control is applied to the system through the secondary suspension. The active suspension application of rail vehicle is examined by using 5-DOF quarter-rail vehicle model by using Manchester benchmark dynamic parameters. The new parameters of adaptive controller are optimized by means of genetic algorithm toolbox of MATLAB. Simulations are performed at maximum urban transportation speed (90 km/h of the rail vehicle with ±5% load changes of rail vehicle body to test the robustness of controllers. As a result, superior performance of parameters of adaptive controller is determined in time and frequency domain.

  8. ADAPTIVE SUBOPTIMAL CONTROL OF INPUT CONSTRAINED PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Azarskov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper deals with adaptive regulation of a discrete-time linear time-invariant plant witharbitrary bounded disturbances whose control input is constrained to lie within certain limits. The adaptivecontrol algorithm exploits the one-step-ahead control strategy and the gradient projection type estimationprocedure using the modified dead zone. The convergence property of the estimation algorithm is shown tobe ensured. The sufficient conditions guaranteeing the global asymptotical stability and simultaneously thesuboptimality of the closed-loop systems are derived. Numerical examples and simulations are presented tosupport the theoretical results.

  9. Noninvasive optical imaging of resistance training adaptations in human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert V.; Cotter, Joshua; Ganesan, Goutham; Le, Lisa; Agustin, Janelle P.; Duarte, Bridgette; Cutler, Kyle; O'Sullivan, Thomas; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    A quantitative and dynamic analysis of skeletal muscle structure and function can guide training protocols and optimize interventions for rehabilitation and disease. While technologies exist to measure body composition, techniques are still needed for quantitative, long-term functional imaging of muscle at the bedside. We evaluate whether diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) can be used for long-term assessment of resistance training (RT). DOSI measures of tissue composition were obtained from 12 adults before and after 5 weeks of training and compared to lean mass fraction (LMF) from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Significant correlations were detected between DXA LMF and DOSI-measured oxy-hemo/myoglobin, deoxy-hemo/myoglobin, total-hemo/myoglobin, water, and lipid. RT-induced increases of ˜6% in oxy-hemo/myoglobin (3.4±1.0 μM, p=0.00314) and total-hemo/myoglobin (4.9±1.1 μM, p=0.00024) from the medial gastrocnemius were detected with DOSI and accompanied by ˜2% increases in lean soft tissue mass (36.4±12.4 g, p=0.01641) and ˜60% increases in 1 rep-max strength (41.5±6.2 kg, p = 1.9E-05). DOSI measures of vascular and/or muscle changes combined with correlations between DOSI and DXA suggest that quantitative diffuse optical methods can be used to evaluate body composition, provide feedback on long-term interventions, and generate new insight into training-induced muscle adaptations.

  10. Do antioxidant supplements interfere with skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A popular belief is that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced during exercise by the mitochondria and other subcellular compartments ubiquitously cause skeletal muscle damage, fatigue and impair recovery. However, the importance of ROS and RNS as signals in the cellular adaptation process to stress is now evident. In an effort to combat the perceived deleterious effects of ROS and RNS it has become common practice for active individuals to ingest supplements with antioxidant properties, but interfering with ROS/RNS signalling in skeletal muscle during acute exercise may blunt favourable adaptation. There is building evidence that antioxidant supplementation can attenuate endurance training‐induced and ROS/RNS‐mediated enhancements in antioxidant capacity, mitochondrial biogenesis, cellular defence mechanisms and insulin sensitivity. However, this is not a universal finding, potentially indicating that there is redundancy in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise, meaning that in some circumstances the negative impact of antioxidants on acute exercise response can be overcome by training. Antioxidant supplementation has been more consistently reported to have deleterious effects on the response to overload stress and high‐intensity training, suggesting that remodelling of skeletal muscle following resistance and high‐intensity exercise is more dependent on ROS/RNS signalling. Importantly there is no convincing evidence to suggest that antioxidant supplementation enhances exercise‐training adaptions. Overall, ROS/RNS are likely to exhibit a non‐linear (hormetic) pattern on exercise adaptations, where physiological doses are beneficial and high exposure (which would seldom be achieved during normal exercise training) may be detrimental. PMID:26638792

  11. Cost effective material control and accountability training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaux, J.J.; Shull, L.M.; Salizzoni, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    DOE Order 5630.15, ''Safeguards and Security Training Program'' is being implemented at the Savannah River Site within the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's material control and accountability program. This paper reviews the development of a material control and accountability task analysis, the development of specific material control and accountability courses, and the cost effective and innovative strategies employed to implement the training program. The paper also discusses how the site material control and accountability policies and procedures are incorporated into the Westinghouse Savannah River Company training program to ensure that personnel receive the most current information

  12. Training change control process at Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, Cornelia Mariana

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the process of 'Training Change Control' at Cernavoda NPP. This process is a systematic approach that allows determination of the most effective training and/or non-training solutions for challenges that may influence the content and conditions for a training program or course. Changes may be the result of: - response to station systems or equipment modifications; - new or revised procedures; - regulatory requirements; - external organizations requirements; - internal evaluations meaning feedback from trainees, trainers, management or post-training evaluations; - self-assessments; - station condition reports; - operating experience (OPEX); - modifications of job scope; - management input. The Training Change Control Process at Cernavoda NPP includes the following aspects. The first step is the identification of all the initiating factors for a potential training change. Then, retain only those, which could have an impact on training and classify them in two categories: as deficiencies or as enhancement suggestions. The process is different for the two categories. The deficiency category supposes the application of the Training Needs Analysis (TNA) process. This is a performance-oriented process, resulting in more competent employees, solving existing and potential performance problems. By using needs analysis to systematically determine what people or courses and programs are expected to do and gathering data to reveal what they are really doing, we can receive a clear picture of the problem and then we can establish corrective action plans to fix it. The process is supported by plant subjects matter and by training specialists. On the other hand, enhancements suggestions are assessed by designated experienced persons and then are implemented in the training process. Regarding these two types of initiating factors for the training change control process, the final result consists of a training improvement, raising the effectiveness, efficiency or

  13. Evidence of muscular adaptations within four weeks of barbell training in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Olinghouse, Kendra D; Drusch, Alexander S; Mota, Jacob A; Hernandez, Jennah M; Akalonu, Chibuzo C; Thompson, Brennan J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the time course of neuromuscular and hypertrophic adaptations associated with only four weeks of barbell squat and deadlift training. Forty-seven previously untrained women (mean±SD, age=21±3years) were randomly assigned to low volume training (n=15), moderate volume training (n=16), and control (n=16) groups. The low and moderate volume training groups performed two and four sets, respectively, of five repetitions per exercise, twice a week. Testing was performed weekly, and included dual X-ray absorptiometry and vastus lateralis and rectus femoris B-mode ultrasonography. Bipolar surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris during isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg extensors. Significant increases in lean mass for the combined gynoid and leg regions for the low (+0.68kg) and moderate volume (+0.47kg) groups were demonstrated within three weeks. Small-to-moderate effect sizes were shown for leg lean mass, vastus lateralis thickness and pennation angle, and peak torque, but EMG amplitude was unaffected. These findings demonstrated rapid muscular adaptations in response to only eight sessions of back squat and deadlift training in women despite the absence of changes in agonist-antagonist EMG amplitude. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptive PID and Model Reference Adaptive Control Switch Controller for Nonlinear Hydraulic Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear systems are modeled as piecewise linear systems at multiple operating points, where the operating points are modeled as switches between constituent linearized systems. In this paper, adaptive piecewise linear switch controller is proposed for improving the response time and tracking performance of the hydraulic actuator control system, which is essentially piecewise linear. The controller composed of PID and Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC adaptively chooses the proportion of these two components and makes the designed system have faster response time at the transient phase and better tracking performance, simultaneously. Then, their stability and tracking performance are analyzed and evaluated by the hydraulic actuator control system, the hydraulic actuator is controlled by the electrohydraulic system, and its model is built, which has piecewise linear characteristic. Then the controller results are compared between PID and MRAC and the switch controller designed in this paper is applied to the hydraulic actuator; it is obvious that adaptive switch controller has better effects both on response time and on tracking performance.

  15. Monitoring the Performance of a neuro-adaptive Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Gupta, Pramod

    2004-11-01

    We present a tool to estimate the performance of the neural network in a neural network based adaptive controller. Using a Bayesian approach, this tool supports verification and validation of the adaptive controller as well as on-line monitoring. In this paper, we discuss our approach and present simulation results using the adaptive controller developed for NASA's IFCS (Intelligent Flight Control System) project.

  16. Robust adaptive control for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Nazli E.

    The objective of meeting higher endurance requirements remains a challenging task for any type and size of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). According to recent research studies significant energy savings can be realized through utilization of thermal currents. The navigation strategies followed across thermal regions, however, are based on rather intuitive assessments of remote pilots and lack any systematic path planning approaches. Various methods to enhance the autonomy of UAVs in soaring applications are investigated while seeking guarantees for flight performance improvements. The dynamics of the aircraft, small UAVs in particular, are affected by the environmental conditions, whereas unmodeled dynamics possibly become significant during aggressive flight maneuvers. Besides, the demanded control inputs might have a magnitude range beyond the limits dictated by the control surface actuators. The consequences of ignoring these issues can be catastrophic. Supporting this claim NASA Dryden Flight Research Center reports considerable performance degradation and even loss of stability in autonomous soaring flight tests with the subsequent risk of an aircraft crash. The existing control schemes are concluded to suffer from limited performance. Considering the aircraft dynamics and the thermal characteristics we define a vehicle-specific trajectory optimization problem to achieve increased cross-country speed and extended range of flight. In an environment with geographically dispersed set of thermals of possibly limited lifespan, we identify the similarities to the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) and provide both exact and approximate guidance algorithms for the navigation of automated UAVs. An additional stochastic approach is used to quantify the performance losses due to incorrect thermal data while dealing with random gust disturbances and onboard sensor measurement inaccuracies. One of the main contributions of this research is a novel adaptive control design with

  17. Moderate exercise training promotes adaptations in coronary blood flow and adenosine production in normotensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Fernanda R.; Soci, Ursula Paula Renó; De Angelis, Katia; Coelho, Marcele A.; Furstenau, Cristina R.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Oliveira, Edilamar M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Aerobic exercise training prevents cardiovascular risks. Regular exercise promotes functional and structural adaptations that are associated with several cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of swimming training on coronary blood flow, adenosine production and cardiac capillaries in normotensive rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C) and trained (T). An exercise protocol was performed for 10 weeks and 60 min/day with a tail overload of 5% bodyweight. Coronary blood flow was quantified with a color microsphere technique, and cardiac capillaries were quantified using light microscopy. Adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was evaluated by enzymatic activity, and protein expression was evaluated by western blot. The results are presented as the means ± SEMs (p<0.05). RESULTS: Exercise training increased the coronary blood flow and the myocardial capillary-to-fiber ratio. Moreover, the circulating and cardiac extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was higher in the trained rats than in the sedentary rats due to the increased activity and protein expression of enzymes, such as E-NTPDase and 5′-nucleotidase. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training increases coronary blood flow, number of cardiac capillaries, and adenine nucleotide hydrolysis. Increased adenosine production may be an important contributor to the enhanced coronary blood flow and angiogenesis that were observed in the exercise-trained rats; collectively, these results suggest improved myocardial perfusion. PMID:22189737

  18. Moderate exercise training promotes adaptations in coronary blood flow and adenosine production in normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda R. Roque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Aerobic exercise training prevents cardiovascular risks. Regular exercise promotes functional and structural adaptations that are associated with several cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of swimming training on coronary blood flow, adenosine production and cardiac capillaries in normotensive rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C and trained (T. An exercise protocol was performed for 10 weeks and 60 min/day with a tail overload of 5% bodyweight. Coronary blood flow was quantified with a color microsphere technique, and cardiac capillaries were quantified using light microscopy. Adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was evaluated by enzymatic activity, and protein expression was evaluated by western blot. The results are presented as the means ± SEMs (p<0.05. RESULTS: Exercise training increased the coronary blood flow and the myocardial capillary-to-fiber ratio. Moreover, the circulating and cardiac extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was higher in the trained rats than in the sedentary rats due to the increased activity and protein expression of enzymes, such as E-NTPDase and 59- nucleotidase. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training increases coronary blood flow, number of cardiac capillaries, and adenine nucleotide hydrolysis. Increased adenosine production may be an important contributor to the enhanced coronary blood flow and angiogenesis that were observed in the exercise-trained rats; collectively, these results suggest improved myocardial perfusion.

  19. Radiological contamination control training for laboratory research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. The guide is to assist those individuals, both within the Department of Energy (DOE) and Managing and Operating (M and O) contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual. The management guide is divided into the following sections: introduction; instructional materials development; training program standards and policies; and course-specific information. The goal of the core training program is to provide a standardized, baseline knowledge for those individuals completing the core training. Standardization of the knowledge provides personnel with the information necessary to perform their assigned duties at a predetermined level of expertise. Implementing a core training program ensures consistent and appropriate training of personnel

  20. Direct adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Tomohisa

    In light of the complex and highly uncertain nature of dynamical systems requiring controls, it is not surprising that reliable system models for many high performance engineering and life science applications are unavailable. In the face of such high levels of system uncertainty, robust controllers may unnecessarily sacrifice system performance whereas adaptive controllers are clearly appropriate since they can tolerate far greater system uncertainty levels to improve system performance. In this dissertation, we develop a Lyapunov-based direct adaptive and neural adaptive control framework that addresses parametric uncertainty, unstructured uncertainty, disturbance rejection, amplitude and rate saturation constraints, and digital implementation issues. Specifically, we consider the following research topics; direct adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain systems with exogenous disturbances; robust adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain systems; adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain systems with actuator amplitude and rate saturation constraints; adaptive reduced-order dynamic compensation for nonlinear uncertain systems; direct adaptive control for nonlinear matrix second-order dynamical systems with state-dependent uncertainty; adaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems with applications to general anesthesia; direct adaptive control of nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems with time delay; adaptive control for nonlinear nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems with applications to clinical pharmacology; neural network adaptive control for nonlinear nonnegative dynamical systems; passivity-based neural network adaptive output feedback control for nonlinear nonnegative dynamical systems; neural network adaptive dynamic output feedback control for nonlinear nonnegative systems using tapped delay memory units; Lyapunov-based adaptive control framework for discrete-time nonlinear systems with exogenous disturbances

  1. Temperature uniformity control in RTP using multivariable adaptive control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, S.; Dahhou, B.; Dilhac, J.M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Morales, S.

    1995-12-31

    In Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) control of the wafer temperature during all processing to get good trajectory following, together with spatial temperature uniformity, is essential. It is well know as RTP process is nonlinear, classical control laws are not very efficient. In this work, the authors aim at studying the applicability of MIMO (Multiple Inputs Multiple Outputs) adaptive techniques to solve the temperature control problems in RTP. A multivariable linear discrete time CARIMA (Controlled Auto Regressive Integrating Moving Average) model of the highly non-linear process is identified on-line using a robust identification technique. The identified model is used to compute an infinite time LQ (Linear Quadratic) based control law, with a partial state reference model. This reference model smooths the original setpoint sequence, and at the same time gives a tracking capability to the LQ control law. After an experimental open-loop investigation, the results of the application of the adaptive control law are presented. Finally, some comments on the future difficulties and developments of the application of adaptive control in RTP are given. (author) 13 refs.

  2. Neuromuscular adaptations to training, injury and passive interventions: implications for running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Jason; Chapman, Andrew; Blanch, Peter; Vicenzino, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Performance in endurance sports such as running, cycling and triathlon has long been investigated from a physiological perspective. A strong relationship between running economy and distance running performance is well established in the literature. From this established base, improvements in running economy have traditionally been achieved through endurance training. More recently, research has demonstrated short-term resistance and plyometric training has resulted in enhanced running economy. This improvement in running economy has been hypothesized to be a result of enhanced neuromuscular characteristics such as improved muscle power development and more efficient use of stored elastic energy during running. Changes in indirect measures of neuromuscular control (i.e. stance phase contact times, maximal forward jumps) have been used to support this hypothesis. These results suggest that neuromuscular adaptations in response to training (i.e. neuromuscular learning effects) are an important contributor to enhancements in running economy. However, there is no direct evidence to suggest that these adaptations translate into more efficient muscle recruitment patterns during running. Optimization of training and run performance may be facilitated through direct investigation of muscle recruitment patterns before and after training interventions. There is emerging evidence that demonstrates neuromuscular adaptations during running and cycling vary with training status. Highly trained runners and cyclists display more refined patterns of muscle recruitment than their novice counterparts. In contrast, interference with motor learning and neuromuscular adaptation may occur as a result of ongoing multidiscipline training (e.g. triathlon). In the sport of triathlon, impairments in running economy are frequently observed after cycling. This impairment is related mainly to physiological stress, but an alteration in lower limb muscle coordination during running after cycling

  3. Altitude training improves glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Man; Lin, Hsueh-Yi; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-08-31

    Under altitude hypoxia condition, energy reliance on anaerobic glycolysis increases to compensate the shortfall caused by reduced fatty acid oxidation. Short-term moderate altitude exposure plus endurance physical activity has been found to improve glucose tolerance (not fasting glucose) in humans, which is associated with the improvement in the whole-body insulin sensitivity. However, most of people cannot accommodate high altitude exposure above 4500 M due to acute mountain sickness and insulin resistance. There is a wide variation among individuals in response to the altitude challenge. In particular, the improvement in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by prolonged altitude hiking activity was not apparent in those individuals with low baseline dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) concentration. In rats, exercise training recovery under prolonged hypoxia exposure (14-15% oxygen, 8 h per day for 6 weeks) can also improve insulin sensitivity, secondary to an effective suppression of adiposity. After prolonged hypoxia training, obese abnormality in upregulated baseline levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and AS160 phosphorylation in skeletal muscle can be reversed. In humans, moderate hypoxia increases postprandial blood distribution towards skeletal muscle during a training recovery. This physiological response plays a role in the redistribution of fuel storage among important energy storage sites and may explain its potent effect on the favorable change in body composition. Altitude training can exert strong impact on our metabolic system, and has the potential to be designed as a non-pharmacological or recreational intervention regimen for correcting metabolic syndromes.

  4. A Methodology for Investigating Adaptive Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, P. V.; Riccio, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    Our research on postural control and human-environment interactions provides an appropriate scientific foundation for understanding the skill of mass handling by astronauts in weightless conditions (e.g., extravehicular activity or EVA). We conducted an investigation of such skills in NASA's principal mass-handling simulator, the Precision Air-Bearing Floor, at the Johnson Space Center. We have studied skilled movement-body within a multidisciplinary context that draws on concepts and methods from biological and behavioral sciences (e.g., psychology, kinesiology and neurophysiology) as well as bioengineering. Our multidisciplinary research has led to the development of measures, for manual interactions between individuals and the substantial environment, that plausibly are observable by human sensory systems. We consider these methods to be the most important general contribution of our EVA investigation. We describe our perspective as control theoretic because it draws more on fundamental concepts about control systems in engineering than it does on working constructs from the subdisciplines of biomechanics and motor control in the bio-behavioral sciences. At the same time, we have attempted to identify the theoretical underpinnings of control-systems engineering that are most relevant to control by human beings. We believe that these underpinnings are implicit in the assumptions that cut across diverse methods in control-systems engineering, especially the various methods associated with "nonlinear control", "fuzzy control," and "adaptive control" in engineering. Our methods are based on these theoretical foundations rather than on the mathematical formalisms that are associated with particular methods in control-systems engineering. The most important aspects of the human-environment interaction in our investigation of mass handling are the functional consequences that body configuration and stability have for the pick up of information or the achievement of

  5. Concurrent strength and endurance training exercise sequence does not affect neuromuscular adaptations in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Rech, Anderson; Minozzo, Felipe; Botton, Cintia Ehlers; Radaelli, Regis; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro; Pinto, Ronei Silveira

    2014-12-01

    Concurrent training is an effective method for increasing skeletal muscle performance in aging individuals, but controversy exists as to whether chronic neuromuscular and functional adaptations are affected by the intra-session exercise sequence. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concurrent endurance and power-like strength training exercise sequence on muscular and functional adaptations of older participants. Thirty-six healthy older men not engaged in systematic exercise training programs for at least 6 months were divided into a control group (CON; 65.8±5.3 years), or in the training groups: endurance-strength (ES; 63.2±3.3 years), or strength-endurance (SE; 67.1±6.1 years). Training groups underwent 12 weeks of concurrent endurance and power-like strength training, starting every exercise session with either endurance (in ES) or strength (in SE) exercises. Measurements included knee extension one repetition maximum (1RM), knee extension power, 30 second sit-to-stand test (30SS), maximum vastus lateralis surface electromyographic activity, and rectus femoris echo intensity (RFEI). Significant increases in maximal strength (ES +18±11.3%; SE +14.2±6.0%; p≤0.05), peak power (ES +22.2±19.4%; SE +26.3±31.3%; p≤0.05), and 30SS performance (ES +15.2±7.2%; SE +13.2±11.8%; p≤0.05) were observed only in the training groups, with no differences between ES and SE. Maximum muscular activity was greater after 12weeks at training groups (p≤0.05), and reductions in RFEI were found only in ES and SE (p≤0.05). These results demonstrate that concurrent strength and endurance training performed twice a week effectively increases muscular performance and functional capacity in older men, independent of the intra-session exercise sequence. Additionally, the RFEI decreases indicate an additional adaptation to concurrent training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adaptive control of a Stewart platform-based manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Antrazi, Sami S.; Zhou, Zhen-Lei; Campbell, Charles E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A joint-space adaptive control scheme for controlling noncompliant motion of a Stewart platform-based manipulator (SPBM) was implemented in the Hardware Real-Time Emulator at Goddard Space Flight Center. The six-degrees of freedom SPBM uses two platforms and six linear actuators driven by dc motors. The adaptive control scheme is based on proportional-derivative controllers whose gains are adjusted by an adaptation law based on model reference adaptive control and Liapunov direct method. It is concluded that the adaptive control scheme provides superior tracking capability as compared to fixed-gain controllers.

  7. Weekly Time Course of Neuro-Muscular Adaptation to Intensive Strength Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Niklas; Bubeck, Dieter; Haeufle, Daniel F B; Weickenmeier, Johannes; Kuhl, Ellen; Alt, Wilfried; Schmitt, Syn

    2017-01-01

    Detailed description of the time course of muscular adaptation is rarely found in literature. Thus, models of muscular adaptation are difficult to validate since no detailed data of adaptation are available. In this article, as an initial step toward a detailed description and analysis of muscular adaptation, we provide a case report of 8 weeks of intense strength training with two active, male participants. Muscular adaptations were analyzed on a morphological level with MRI scans of the right quadriceps muscle and the calculation of muscle volume, on a voluntary strength level by isometric voluntary contractions with doublet stimulation (interpolated twitch technique) and on a non-voluntary level by resting twitch torques. Further, training volume and isokinetic power were closely monitored during the training phase. Data were analyzed weekly for 1 week prior to training, pre-training, 8 weeks of training and 2 weeks of detraining (no strength training). Results show a very individual adaptation to the intense strength training protocol. While training volume and isokinetic power increased linearly during the training phase, resting twitch parameters decreased for both participants after the first week of training and stayed below baseline until de-training. Voluntary activation level showed an increase in the first 4 weeks of training, while maximum voluntary contraction showed only little increase compared to baseline. Muscle volume increased for both subjects. Especially training status seemed to influence the acute reaction to intense strength training. Fatigue had a major influence on performance and could only be overcome by one participant. The results give a first detailed insight into muscular adaptation to intense strength training on various levels, providing a basis of data for a validation of muscle fatigue and adaptation models.

  8. Determination Of Adaptive Control Parameter Using Fuzzy Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omur Can Ozguney

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The robot industry has developed along with the increasing the use of robots in industry. This has led to increase the studies on robots. The most important part of these studies is that the robots must be work with minimum tracking trajectory error. But it is not easy for robots to track the desired trajectory because of the external disturbances and parametric uncertainty. Therefore adaptive and robust controllers are used to decrease tracking error. The aim of this study is to increase the tracking performance of the robot and minimize the trajectory tracking error. For this purpose adaptive control law for robot manipulator is identified and fuzzy logic controller is applied to find the accurate values for adaptive control parameter. Based on the Lyapunov theory stability of the uncertain system is guaranteed. In this study robot parameters are assumed to be unknown. This controller is applied to a robot model and the results of simulations are given. Controller with fuzzy logic and without fuzzy logic are compared with each other. Simulation results show that the fuzzy logic controller has improved the results.

  9. Performance and neuromuscular adaptations following differing ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Thomas W.; Howatson, Glyn; Russell, Mark; French, Duncan N.

    2013-01-01

    The interference effect attenuates strength and hypertrophic responses when strength and endurance training are conducted concurrently; however, the influence of training frequency on these responses remain unclear when varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training are performed. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the strength, limb girth, and neuromuscular adaptations to varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training. Tw...

  10. Training Visual Control in Wheelchair Basketball Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudejans, Raoul R. D.; Heubers, Sjoerd; Ruitenbeek, Jean-Rene J. A. C.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual control training on expert wheelchair basketball shooting, a skill more difficult than in regular basketball, as players shoot from a seated position to the same rim height. The training consisted of shooting with a visual constraint that forced participants to use target information as late as possible.…

  11. Training visual control in wheelchair basketball shooting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans, R.R.D.; Heubers, S.; Ruitenbeek, J-R.J.A.C.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual control training on expert wheelchair basketball shooting, a skill more difficult than in regular basketball, as players shoot from a seated position to the same rim height. The training consisted of shooting with a visual constraint that forced participants to use

  12. Early and late rate of force development: differential adaptive responses to resistance training?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L L; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Zebis, M K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potentially opposing influence of qualitative and quantitative muscular adaptations in response to high-intensity resistance training on contractile rate of force development (RFD) in the early (200 ms) of rising muscle force. Fifteen healthy young...... males participated in a 14-week resistance training intervention for the lower body and 10 matched subjects participated as controls. Maximal muscle strength (MVC) and RFD were measured during maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Muscle biopsies were obtained from...... the vastus lateralis. The main findings were that RFD in the late phase of rising muscle force increased in response to resistance training whereas early RFD remained unchanged and early relative RFD (i.e., RFD/MVC) decreased. Quantitatively, muscle fiber cross-sectional area and MVC increased whereas...

  13. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Mike

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16 or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15 while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM, leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Results Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression. Conclusion AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  14. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Iosia, Mike; Kerksick, Chad M; Taylor, Lem W; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Cooke, Matthew; Rasmussen, Chris; Greenwood, Mike; Wilson, Ronald; Jitomir, Jean; Willoughby, Darryn; Kreider, Richard B

    2007-11-28

    To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 +/- 5.0 years, 180 +/- 0.1 cm, 86.1 +/- 13.0 kg, 18.1 +/- 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g.day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g.day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day.week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM), leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content) and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression). AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  15. Effects of reduced-volume of sprint interval training and the time course of physiological and performance adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, T; Babraj, J

    2017-12-01

    This study sought to determine the time course of training adaptations to two different sprint interval training programmes with the same sprint: rest ratio (1:8) but different sprint duration. Nine participants (M: 7; F: 2) were assigned to 15-second training group (15TG) consisting of 4-6 × 15-second sprints interspersed with 2-minute recovery, whereas eight participants (M: 5; F: 3) were assigned to 30-second training group (30TG) consisting of 4-6 × 30 second sprints interspersed with 4-minute recovery. Both groups performed their respective training twice per week over 9 weeks and changes in peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) and time to exhaustion (TTE) were assessed every 3 weeks. Additional eight healthy active adults (M: 6; F: 2) completed the performance assessments 9 weeks apart without performing training (control group, CON). Following 9 weeks of training, both groups improved V˙O2peak (15TG: 12.1%; 30TG: 12.8%, Pinterval training, endurance capacity (TTE) is more sensitive to such training over a longer time frame in moderately-trained individuals. Furthermore, a 50% reduction in sprint duration does not diminish overall training adaptations over 9 weeks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Error-controlled adaptive finite elements in solid mechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Erwin; Ramm, E

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error-controlled Adaptive Finite-element-methods . . . . . . . . . . . . Missing Features and Properties of Today's General Purpose FE Programs for Structural...

  17. Neural adaptations after short-term wingate-based high-intensity interval training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Ibañez, Antonio; Colomer-Poveda, David; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Viñuela-García, Manuel; Márquez, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the neural adaptations associated with a low-volume Wingate-based High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). Methods: Fourteen recreationally trained males were divided into an experimental (HIIT) and a control group to determine whether a short-term (4 weeks) Wingate-based HIIT program could alter the Hoffmann (H-) reflex, volitional (V-) wave and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar-flexor muscles, and the peak power achieved during a Wingate test. Results: Absolute and relative peak power increased in the HIIT group (ABS_Ppeak: +14.7%, P=0.001; and REL_Ppeak: +15.0%, P=0.001), but not in the control group (ABS_Ppeak: P=0.466; and REL_Ppeak: P=0.493). However, no significant changes were found in the MVC (P>0.05 for both groups). There was a significant increase in H-reflex size after HIIT (+24.5%, P=0.004), while it remained unchanged in the control group (P=0.134). No significant changes were observed either in the V-wave or in the Vwave/Mwave ratio (P>0.05 for both groups). Conclusion: The Wingate-based training led to an increased peak power together with a higher spinal excitability. However, no changes were found either in the volitional wave or in the MVC, indicating a lack of adaptation in the central motor drive. PMID:29199186

  18. TRAINING SYSTEM OF FUTURE SPECIALISTS: QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Romanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is development of innovative strategy of quality control training of engineers and skilled workers (hereinafter – future specialists in educational professional organizations on the principles of social partnership.Methods. Theoretic: theoretic and methodological analysis, polytheoretic synthesis, modeling. Empirical: research and generalization of the system, process and competence – based approaches experience, experiment, observation, surveys, expert evaluation, SWOT-analysis as a method of strategic planning which is to identify the internal and external factors (socio-cultural of the organization surrounding.Results. The strategy of the development of the process of quality control training in educational professional organizations and a predictive model of the system of quality control training for future engineers and workers have been created on the analysis and synthesis of a quantitative specification of the quality, the obtained experience and success in control training of future specialists in educational professional organizations in recent economic and educational conditions.Scientific novelty. There has been built a predicative model of quality control training of future specialists to meet modern standards and the principles of social partnership; the control algorithm of the learning process, developed in accordance with the standards (international of quality ISO in the implementation of the quality control systems of the process approach (matrix-based responsibility, competence and remit of those responsible for the education process in the educational organization, the «problem» terms and diagnostic tools for assessing the quality of professional training of future specialists. The perspective directions of innovation in the control of the quality of future professionals training have been determined; the parameters of a comprehensive analysis of the state of the system to ensure the

  19. Effect of speed endurance training and reduced training volume on running economy and single muscle fiber adaptations in trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christiansen, Danny; Christensen, Peter Møller

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improved running economy with a period of speed endurance training and reduced training volume could be related to adaptations in specific muscle fibers. Twenty trained male (n = 14) and female (n = 6) runners (maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 -max...... was performed. In addition, running at 60% vVO2 -max, and a 10-km run was performed in a normal and a muscle slow twitch (ST) glycogen-depleted condition. After compared to before the intervention, expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) was lower (P ....05) in ST muscle fibers, and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 1 (SERCA1) was lower (P VO2 -max (11.6 ± 0.2 km/h) and at v10-km (13.7 ± 0.3 km/h) was ~2% better (P

  20. Adaptive Control Using Residual Mode Filters Applied to Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Many dynamic systems containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to applications that have unknown parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a model reference direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend this adaptive control theory to accommodate problematic modal subsystems of a plant that inhibit the adaptive controller by causing the open-loop plant to be non-minimum phase. We will augment the adaptive controller using a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for problematic modal subsystems, thereby allowing the system to satisfy the requirements for the adaptive controller to have guaranteed convergence and bounded gains. We apply these theoretical results to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed wind turbine that has minimum phase zeros.

  1. Positive train control test bed interoperability upgrades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. (TTCI) upgraded the Positive Train Control (PTC) Test Bed to support additional PTC testing configurations under Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Task Order 270. The scope of work provided additional PTC Co...

  2. Morphological, molecular and hormonal adaptations to early morning versus afternoon resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedliak, Milan; Zeman, Michal; Buzgó, Gabriel; Cvecka, Jan; Hamar, Dusan; Laczo, Eugen; Okuliarova, Monika; Vanderka, Marian; Kampmiller, Tomas; Häkkinen, Keijo; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Hulmi, Juha J; Nilsen, Tormod S; Wiig, Håvard; Raastad, Truls

    2017-12-28

    It has been clearly established that maximal force and power is lower in the morning compared to noon or afternoon hours. This morning neuromuscular deficit can be diminished by regularly training in the morning hours. However, there is limited and contradictory information upon hypertrophic adaptations to time-of-day-specific resistance training. Moreover, no cellular or molecular mechanisms related to muscle hypertrophy adaptation have been studied with this respect. Therefore, the present study examined effects of the time-of-day-specific resistance training on muscle hypertrophy, phosphorylation of selected proteins, hormonal concentrations and neuromuscular performance. Twenty five previously untrained males were randomly divided into a morning group (n = 11, age 23 ± 2 yrs), afternoon group (n = 7, 24 ± 4 yrs) and control group (n = 7, 24 ± 3 yrs). Both the morning and afternoon group underwent hypertrophy-type of resistance training with 22 training sessions over an 11-week period performed between 07:30-08:30 h and 16:00-17:00 h, respectively. Isometric MVC was tested before and immediately after an acute loading exclusively during their training times before and after the training period. Before acute loadings, resting blood samples were drawn and analysed for plasma testosterone and cortisol. At each testing occasion, muscle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis were obtained before and 60 min after the acute loading. Muscle specimens were analysed for muscle fibre cross-sectional areas (CSA) and for phosphorylated p70S6K, rpS6, p38MAPK, Erk1/2, and eEF2. In addition, the right quadriceps femoris was scanned with MRI before and after the training period. The control group underwent the same testing, except for MRI, between 11:00 h and 13:00 h but did not train. Voluntary muscle strength increased significantly in both the morning and afternoon training group by 16.9% and 15.2 %, respectively. Also muscle hypertrophy occurred by 8.8% and

  3. Adaptive quality control for multimedia communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santichai Chuaywong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia communications are communications with several types of media, such as audio, video and data. The current Internet has some levels of capability to support multimedia communications, unfortunately, the QoS (Quality of Service is still challenging. A large number of QoS mechanisms has been proposed; however, the main concern is for low levels, e.g. layer 2 (Data Link or 3 (Transport. In this paper, mechanisms for control the quality of audio and video are proposed. G.723.1 and MPEG-4 are used as the audio and video codec respectively. The proposed algorithm for adaptive quality control of audio communication is based on forward error correction (FEC. In the case of video communication, the proposed algorithm adapts the value of key frame interval, which is an encoding parameter of MPEG-4. We evaluated our proposed algorithms by computer simulation. We have shown that, in most cases, the proposed scheme gained a higher throughput compared to other schemes.

  4. Does hydrotherapy help or hinder adaptation to training in competitive cyclists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halson, Shona L; Bartram, Jason; West, Nicholas; Stephens, Jessica; Argus, Christos K; Driller, Matthew W; Sargent, Charli; Lastella, Michele; Hopkins, Will G; Martin, David T

    2014-08-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) may be beneficial for acute recovery from exercise, but it may impair long-term performance by attenuating the stimuli responsible for adaptation to training. We compared effects of CWI and passive rest on cycling performance during a simulated cycling grand tour. Thirty-four male endurance-trained competitive cyclists were randomized to CWI for four times per week for 15 min at 15°C or control (passive recovery) groups for 7 d of baseline training, 21 d of intensified training, and an 11-d taper. Criteria for completion of training and testing were satisfied by 10 cyclists in the CWI group (maximal aerobic power, 5.13 ± 0.21 W·kg; mean ± SD) and 11 in the control group (5.01 ± 0.41 W·kg). Each week, cyclists completed a high-intensity interval cycling test and two 4-min bouts separated by 30 min. CWI was performed four times per week for 15 min at 15°C. Between baseline and taper, cyclists in the CWI group had an unclear change in overall 4-min power relative to control (2.7% ± 5.7%), although mean power in the second effort relative to the first was likely higher for the CWI group relative to control (3.0% ± 3.8%). The change in 1-s maximum mean sprint power in the CWI group was likely beneficial compared with control (4.4% ± 4.2%). Differences between groups for the 10-min time trial were unclear (-0.4% ± 4.3%). Although some effects of CWI on performance were unclear, data from this study do not support recent speculation that CWI is detrimental to performance after increased training load in competitive cyclists.

  5. Functional Mobility Performance and Balance Confidence in Older Adults after Sensorimotor Adaptation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Weaver, G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates a main contributor of injury in older adults is from falling. The decline in sensory systems limits information needed to successfully maneuver through the environment. The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged exposure to the realignment of perceptual-motor systems increases adaptability of balance, and if balance confidence improves after training. A total of 16 older adults between ages 65-85 were randomized to a control group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a static visual scene) and an experimental group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a rotating visual scene). Prior to visual exposure, participants completed six trials of walking through a soft foamed obstacle course. Participants came in twice a week for 4 weeks to complete training of walking on a treadmill and viewing the visual scene for 20 minutes each session. Participants completed the obstacle course after training and four weeks later. Average time, penalty, and Activity Balance Confidence Scale scores were computed for both groups across testing times. The older adults who trained, significantly improved their time through the obstacle course F (2, 28) = 9.41, p train. There was no difference in balance confidence scores between groups across testing times F (2, 28) = 0.503, p > 0.05. Although the training group improved mobility through the obstacle course, there were no differences between the groups in balance confidence.

  6. Exercise Training-Induced Adaptations Associated with Increases in Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yasuko; Gollisch, Katja S.C.; Holton, Laura; Kim, Young–Bum; Brandauer, Josef; Fujii, Nobuharu L.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exercise training results in numerous skeletal muscle adaptations, including increases in insulin sensitivity and glycogen content. To understand the mechanism for increased muscle glycogen, we studied the effects of exercise training on glycogen regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle. Female Sprague Dawley rats performed voluntary wheel running for 1, 4, or 7 weeks. After 7 weeks of training, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in epitrochlearis muscle. Compared to sedentary control rats, muscle glycogen did not change after 1 week of training, but increased significantly after 4 and 7 weeks. The increases in muscle glycogen were accompanied by elevated glycogen synthase activity and protein expression. To assess the regulation of glycogen synthase, we examined its major activator, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), and its major deactivator, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Consistent with glycogen synthase activity, PP1 activity was unchanged after 1 week of training but significantly increased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Protein expression of RGL(GM), another regulatory PP1 subunit, significantly decreased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Unlike PP1, GSK3 phosphorylation did not follow the pattern of glycogen synthase activity. The ~40% decrease in GSK-3α phosphorylation after 1 week of exercise training persisted until 7 weeks and may function as a negative feedback to elevated glycogen. Our findings suggest that exercise training-induced increases in muscle glycogen content could be regulated by multiple mechanisms including enhanced insulin sensitivity, glycogen synthase expression, allosteric activation of glycogen synthase and PP1activity. PMID:23206309

  7. Preliminary Test of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Controller for Spacecraft Attitude Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Woo Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of spacecraft attitude control is solved using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS. An ANFIS produces a control signal for one of the three axes of a spacecraft’s body frame, so in total three ANFISs are constructed for 3-axis attitude control. The fuzzy inference system of the ANFIS is initialized using a subtractive clustering method. The ANFIS is trained by a hybrid learning algorithm using the data obtained from attitude control simulations using state-dependent Riccati equation controller. The training data set for each axis is composed of state errors for 3 axes (roll, pitch, and yaw and a control signal for one of the 3 axes. The stability region of the ANFIS controller is estimated numerically based on Lyapunov stability theory using a numerical method to calculate Jacobian matrix. To measure the performance of the ANFIS controller, root mean square error and correlation factor are used as performance indicators. The performance is tested on two ANFIS controllers trained in different conditions. The test results show that the performance indicators are proper in the sense that the ANFIS controller with the larger stability region provides better performance according to the performance indicators.

  8. A new adaptive videogame for training attention and executive functions: design principles and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montani, Veronica; De Filippo De Grazia, Michele; Zorzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that action videogames could enhance a variety of cognitive skills and more specifically attention skills. The aim of this study was to develop a novel adaptive videogame to support the rehabilitation of the most common consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI), that is the impairment of attention and executive functions. TBI patients can be affected by psychomotor slowness and by difficulties in dealing with distraction, maintain a cognitive set for a long time, processing different simultaneously presented stimuli, and planning purposeful behavior. Accordingly, we designed a videogame that was specifically conceived to activate those functions. Playing involves visuospatial planning and selective attention, active maintenance of the cognitive set representing the goal, and error monitoring. Moreover, different game trials require to alternate between two tasks (i.e., task switching) or to perform the two tasks simultaneously (i.e., divided attention/dual-tasking). The videogame is controlled by a multidimensional adaptive algorithm that calibrates task difficulty on-line based on a model of user performance that is updated on a trial-by-trial basis. We report simulations of user performance designed to test the adaptive game as well as a validation study with healthy participants engaged in a training protocol. The results confirmed the involvement of the cognitive abilities that the game is supposed to enhance and suggested that training improved attentional control during play.

  9. A new adaptive videogame for training attention and executive functions: Design principles and initial validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eMontani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that action videogames could enhance a variety of cognitive skills and more specifically attention skills. The aim of this study was to develop a novel adaptive videogame to support the rehabilitation of the most common consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI, that is the impairment of attention and executive functions. TBI patients can be affected by psychomotor slowness and by difficulties in dealing with distraction, maintain a cognitive set for a long time, processing different simultaneously presented stimuli, and planning purposeful behaviour. Accordingly, we designed a videogame that was specifically conceived to activate those functions. Playing involves visuospatial planning and selective attention, active maintenance of the cognitive set representing the goal, and error monitoring. Moreover, different game trials require to alternate between two tasks (i.e., task switching or to perform the two tasks simultaneously (i.e., divided attention / dual-tasking. The videogame is controlled by a multidimensional adaptive algorithm that calibrates task difficulty on-line based on a model of user performance that is updated on a trial-by-trial basis. We report simulations of user performance designed to test the adaptive game as well as a validation study with healthy participants engaged in a training protocol. The results confirmed the involvement of the cognitive abilities that the game is supposed to enhance and suggested that training improved attentional control during play.

  10. A new adaptive videogame for training attention and executive functions: design principles and initial validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montani, Veronica; De Filippo De Grazia, Michele; Zorzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that action videogames could enhance a variety of cognitive skills and more specifically attention skills. The aim of this study was to develop a novel adaptive videogame to support the rehabilitation of the most common consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI), that is the impairment of attention and executive functions. TBI patients can be affected by psychomotor slowness and by difficulties in dealing with distraction, maintain a cognitive set for a long time, processing different simultaneously presented stimuli, and planning purposeful behavior. Accordingly, we designed a videogame that was specifically conceived to activate those functions. Playing involves visuospatial planning and selective attention, active maintenance of the cognitive set representing the goal, and error monitoring. Moreover, different game trials require to alternate between two tasks (i.e., task switching) or to perform the two tasks simultaneously (i.e., divided attention/dual-tasking). The videogame is controlled by a multidimensional adaptive algorithm that calibrates task difficulty on-line based on a model of user performance that is updated on a trial-by-trial basis. We report simulations of user performance designed to test the adaptive game as well as a validation study with healthy participants engaged in a training protocol. The results confirmed the involvement of the cognitive abilities that the game is supposed to enhance and suggested that training improved attentional control during play. PMID:24860529

  11. Learning to control actions: transfer effects following a procedural cognitive control computerized training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitzan Shahar

    Full Text Available Few studies have addressed action control training. In the current study, participants were trained over 19 days in an adaptive training task that demanded constant switching, maintenance and updating of novel action rules. Participants completed an executive functions battery before and after training that estimated processing speed, working memory updating, set-shifting, response inhibition and fluid intelligence. Participants in the training group showed greater improvement than a no-contact control group in processing speed, indicated by reduced reaction times in speeded classification tasks. No other systematic group differences were found across the different pre-post measurements. Ex-Gaussian fitting of the reaction-time distribution revealed that the reaction time reduction observed among trained participants was restricted to the right tail of the distribution, previously shown to be related to working memory. Furthermore, training effects were only found in classification tasks that required participants to maintain novel stimulus-response rules in mind, supporting the notion that the training improved working memory abilities. Training benefits were maintained in a 10-month follow-up, indicating relatively long-lasting effects. The authors conclude that training improved action-related working memory abilities.

  12. Model reference adaptive control and adaptive stability augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Arne; Ravn, Ole

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of the standard concepts in MRAC design suggests that a combination of the implicit and the explicit design techniques may lead to an improvement of the overall system performance in the presence of unmodelled dynamics. Using the ideas of adaptive stability augmentation a combined...

  13. Adaptive Torque Control of Variable Speed Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. E.

    2004-08-01

    The primary focus of this work is a new adaptive controller that is designed to resemble the standard non-adaptive controller used by the wind industry for variable speed wind turbines below rated power. This adaptive controller uses a simple, highly intuitive gain adaptation law designed to seek out the optimal gain for maximizing the turbine's energy capture. It is designed to work even in real, time-varying winds.

  14. Models and Methods for Adaptive Management of Individual and Team-Based Training Using a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsyna, L. S.; Smetyuh, N. P.; Golikov, S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Research of adaptive individual and team-based training has been analyzed and helped find out that both in Russia and abroad, individual and team-based training and retraining of AASTM operators usually includes: production training, training of general computer and office equipment skills, simulator training including virtual simulators which use computers to simulate real-world manufacturing situation, and, as a rule, the evaluation of AASTM operators’ knowledge determined by completeness and adequacy of their actions under the simulated conditions. Such approach to training and re-training of AASTM operators stipulates only technical training of operators and testing their knowledge based on assessing their actions in a simulated environment.

  15. A Context-Adaptive Teacher Training Model in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chiang, Feng Kuang; Jiang, Ya Na; Yu, Sheng Quan

    2017-01-01

    In view of the discrepancies in teacher training and teaching practice, this paper put forward a context-adaptive teacher training model in a ubiquitous learning (u-learning) environment. The innovative model provides teachers of different subjects with adaptive and personalized learning content in a u-learning environment, implements intra- and…

  16. Adaptive neural network motion control for aircraft under uncertainty conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, A. V.; Tiaglik, M. S.; Tiumentsev, Yu V.

    2018-02-01

    We need to provide motion control of modern and advanced aircraft under diverse uncertainty conditions. This problem can be solved by using adaptive control laws. We carry out an analysis of the capabilities of these laws for such adaptive systems as MRAC (Model Reference Adaptive Control) and MPC (Model Predictive Control). In the case of a nonlinear control object, the most efficient solution to the adaptive control problem is the use of neural network technologies. These technologies are suitable for the development of both a control object model and a control law for the object. The approximate nature of the ANN model was taken into account by introducing additional compensating feedback into the control system. The capabilities of adaptive control laws under uncertainty in the source data are considered. We also conduct simulations to assess the contribution of adaptivity to the behavior of the system.

  17. Interpreting Adaptation to Concurrent Compared with Single-Mode Exercise Training: Some Methodological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Jackson J; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2018-02-01

    Incorporating both endurance and resistance training into an exercise regime is termed concurrent training. While there is evidence that concurrent training can attenuate resistance training-induced improvements in maximal strength and muscle hypertrophy, research findings are often equivocal, with some suggesting short-term concurrent training may instead further enhance muscle hypertrophy versus resistance training alone. These observations have questioned the validity of the purported 'interference effect' on muscle hypertrophy with concurrent versus single-mode resistance training. This article aims to highlight some methodological considerations when interpreting the concurrent training literature, and, in particular, the degree of changes in strength and muscle hypertrophy observed with concurrent versus single-mode resistance training. Individual training status clearly influences the relative magnitude and specificity of both training adaptation and post-exercise molecular responses in skeletal muscle. The training status of participants is therefore likely a key modulator of the degree of adaptation and interference seen with concurrent training interventions. The divergent magnitudes of strength gain versus muscle hypertrophy induced by resistance training also suggests most concurrent training studies are likely to observe more substantial changes in (and in turn, any potential interference to) strength compared with muscle hypertrophy. Both the specificity and sensitivity of measures used to assess training-induced changes in strength and muscle hypertrophy also likely influence the interpretation of concurrent training outcomes. Finally, the relative importance of any modulation of hypertrophic versus strength adaptation with concurrent training should be considered in context with the relevance of training-induced changes in these variables for enhancing athletic performance and/or functional capacity. Taken together, these observations suggest that

  18. Adaptive nonlinear control for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez R, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Linearization by feedback of states is based on the idea of transform the nonlinear dynamic equation of a system in a linear form. This linear behavior can be achieve well in a complete way (input state) or in partial way (input output). This can be applied to systems of single or multiple inputs, and can be used to solve problems of stabilization and tracking of references trajectories. Comparing this method with conventional ones, linearization by feedback of states is exact in certain region of the space of state, instead of linear approximations of the equations in a certain point of the operation. In the presence of parametric uncertainties in the model of the system, the introduction of adaptive schemes provide a type toughness to the control system by nonlinear feedback, which gives as result the eventual cancellation of the nonlinear terms in the dynamic relationship between the output and the input of the auxiliary control. In the same way, it has been presented the design of a nonlinearizing control for the non lineal model of a TRIGA Mark III type reactor, with the aim of tracking a predetermined power profile. The asymptotic tracking of such profile is, at the present moment, in the stage of verification by computerized simulation the relative easiness in the design of auxiliary variable of control, as well as the decoupling action of the output variable, make very attractive the utilization of the method herein presented. (Author)

  19. Training for Adaptibility and Transfer on Digital Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaab, Brooke

    2001-01-01

    .... This research compared training digital skills to entry-level, enlisted soldiers by the conventional method to training by a constructivist method The constructivist method actively engages soldiers...

  20. On-line, adaptive state estimator for active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic characteristics of airframe structures are expected to vary as aircraft flight conditions change. Accurate knowledge of the changing dynamic characteristics is crucial to enhancing the performance of the active noise control system using feedback control. This research investigates the development of an adaptive, on-line state estimator using a neural network concept to conduct active noise control. In this research, an algorithm has been developed that can be used to estimate displacement and velocity responses at any locations on the structure from a limited number of acceleration measurements and input force information. The algorithm employs band-pass filters to extract from the measurement signal the frequency contents corresponding to a desired mode. The filtered signal is then used to train a neural network which consists of a linear neuron with three weights. The structure of the neural network is designed as simple as possible to increase the sampling frequency as much as possible. The weights obtained through neural network training are then used to construct the transfer function of a mode in z-domain and to identify modal properties of each mode. By using the identified transfer function and interpolating the mode shape obtained at sensor locations, the displacement and velocity responses are estimated with reasonable accuracy at any locations on the structure. The accuracy of the response estimates depends on the number of modes incorporated in the estimates and the number of sensors employed to conduct mode shape interpolation. Computer simulation demonstrates that the algorithm is capable of adapting to the varying dynamic characteristics of structural properties. Experimental implementation of the algorithm on a DSP (digital signal processing) board for a plate structure is underway. The algorithm is expected to reach the sampling frequency range of about 10 kHz to 20 kHz which needs to be maintained for a typical active noise control

  1. Adaptive powertrain control for plugin hybrid electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar-Dongarkar, Gurunath; Weslati, Feisel

    2013-10-15

    A powertrain control system for a plugin hybrid electric vehicle. The system comprises an adaptive charge sustaining controller; at least one internal data source connected to the adaptive charge sustaining controller; and a memory connected to the adaptive charge sustaining controller for storing data generated by the at least one internal data source. The adaptive charge sustaining controller is operable to select an operating mode of the vehicle's powertrain along a given route based on programming generated from data stored in the memory associated with that route. Further described is a method of adaptively controlling operation of a plugin hybrid electric vehicle powertrain comprising identifying a route being traveled, activating stored adaptive charge sustaining mode programming for the identified route and controlling operation of the powertrain along the identified route by selecting from a plurality of operational modes based on the stored adaptive charge sustaining mode programming.

  2. [Controlled dynamic weight training in patients with neuromuscular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, J; Ahlhelm, F; Regitz, T; Pape, D; Schmitt, E

    2001-08-01

    The question posed was whether individually adapted, controlled dynamic weight training, in accordance with training principles and methods from sports science, applied for a limited time, can lead to an improvement in the stimulation and release of muscular strength in patients with neuromuscular disorders. The muscles of the pelvic girdle and the lower extremity of 10 patients (5 with dystrophic muscle disease and 5 with neurogenic muscular atrophy) were exercised provisionally for a period of 6 weeks on various weight training machines. The training routine was 3 sessions (TS) per week at an intensity range of 40-60% of the respective best performance for the exercise (One Repetition Maximum; ORM), at 8-12 repetitions/set and 2-4 sets/exercise. Body weight and ORM were determined before, during and after the training period (TP), the different load criteria/TS were documented. It was possible to train the patients in accordance with principles of training known from sports science. Over the entire TP it was possible to increase the load criteria significantly (p rehabilitation, it represents a supplementary form of therapy in the symptomatic treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  3. The effects of training group exercise class instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, N; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Quested, E; Hancox, J

    2017-09-01

    Drawing from self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2002), we developed and tested an intervention to train fitness instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style when interacting with exercisers. This was a parallel group, two-arm quasi-experimental design. Participants in the intervention arm were 29 indoor cycling instructors (n = 10 for the control arm) and 246 class members (n = 75 for the control arm). The intervention consisted of face-to-face workshops, education/information video clips, group discussions and activities, brainstorming, individual planning, and practical tasks in the cycling studio. Instructors and exercisers responded to validated questionnaires about instructors' use of motivational strategies and other motivation-related variables before the first workshop and at the end of the third and final workshop (4 months later). Time × arm interactions revealed no significant effects, possibly due to the large attrition of instructors and exercisers in the control arm. Within-group analyses in the intervention arm showed that exercisers' perceptions of instructor motivationally adaptive strategies, psychological need satisfaction, and intentions to remain in the class increased over time. Similarly, instructors in the intervention arm reported being less controlling and experiencing more need satisfaction over time. These results offer initial promising evidence for the positive impact of the training. © 2016 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged......While many studies have documented the beneficial effect of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations in trained subjects (reviewed in Iaia & Bangsbo 2010; J Bangsbo 2015; Hostrup & Bangsbo 2016), knowledge in certain areas are lacking. Examples on such areas......-term performance than the initial intervention, while the initial gain in 10-km performance is of the same magnitude. Changes in short-term performance were found together with muscular adaptations of importance for the development of fatigue with specific changes in the expression of Na+/K+ pump isoforms...

  5. Biofeedback systems and adaptive control hemodialysis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line monitoring devices to control functions such as volume, body temperature, and ultrafiltration, were considered more toys than real tools for routine clinical application. However, bio-feedback blood volume controlled hemodialysis (HD is now possible in routine dialysis, allowing the delivery of a more physiologically acceptable treatment. This system has proved to reduce the incidence of intra-HD hypotension episodes significantly. Ionic dialysance and the patient′s plasma conductivity can be calculated easily from on-line measurements at two different steps of dialysate conductivity. A bio-feedback system has been devised to calculate the patient′s plasma conductivity and modulate the conductivity of the dialysate continuously in order to achieve a desired end-dialysis patient plasma conductivity corresponding to a desired end-dialysis plasma sodium concentration. Another bio-feedback system can control the body tempe-rature by measuring it at the arterial and venous lines of the extra-corporeal circuit, and then modulating the dialysate temperature in order to stabilize the patients′ temperature at constant values that result in improved intra-HD cardiovascular stability. The module can also be used to quantify vascular access recirculation. Finally, the simultaneous computer control of ultrafiltration has proven the most effective means for automatic blood pressure stabilization during hemo-dialysis treatment. The application of fuzzy logic in the blood-pressure-guided biofeedback con-trol of ultrafiltration during hemodialysis is able to minimize HD-induced hypotension. In con-clusion, online monitoring and adaptive control of the patient during the dialysis session using the bio-feedback systems is expected to render the process of renal replacement therapy more physiological and less eventful.

  6. Neurofeedback Training for BCI Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuper, Christa; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems detect changes in brain signals that reflect human intention, then translate these signals to control monitors or external devices (for a comprehensive review, see [1]). BCIs typically measure electrical signals resulting from neural firing (i.e. neuronal action potentials, Electroencephalogram (ECoG), or Electroencephalogram (EEG)). Sophisticated pattern recognition and classification algorithms convert neural activity into the required control signals. BCI research has focused heavily on developing powerful signal processing and machine learning techniques to accurately classify neural activity [2-4].

  7. Adaptive Dynamic Surface Control for Generator Excitation Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiu-yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the generator excitation control system which is equipped with static var compensator (SVC and unknown parameters, a novel adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed based on neural network and tracking error transformed function with the following features: (1 the transformation of the excitation generator model to the linear systems is omitted; (2 the prespecified performance of the tracking error can be guaranteed by combining with the tracking error transformed function; (3 the computational burden is greatly reduced by estimating the norm of the weighted vector of neural network instead of the weighted vector itself; therefore, it is more suitable for the real time control; and (4 the explosion of complicity problem inherent in the backstepping control can be eliminated. It is proved that the new scheme can make the system semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results show the effectiveness of this control scheme.

  8. The identification of genetic pathways involved in vascular adaptations after physical deconditioning versus exercise training in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Gerwen; van Duijnhoven, Noortje T L; Hoenderop, Joost G; Horstman, Astrid M; de Haan, Arnold; Janssen, Thomas W J; de Graaf, Mark J J; Pardoel, Elisabeth M; Verwiel, Eugène T P; Thijssen, Dick H J; Hopman, Maria T E

    2013-03-01

    Physical inactivity and exercise training result in opposite adaptations of vascular structure. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these adaptations are not completely understood. We used a unique study design to examine both vascular characteristics of the superficial femoral artery (using ultrasound) and gene expression levels (from a muscle biopsy) in human models for physical deconditioning and exercise training. Initially, we compared able-bodied control subjects (n = 6) with spinal cord-injured individuals (n = 8) to assess the effects of long-term deconditioning. Subsequently, able-bodied control subjects underwent short-term lower limb deconditioning using 3 weeks of unilateral limb suspension. Spinal cord-injured individuals were examined before and after 6 weeks of functional electrical stimulation exercise training. Baseline femoral artery diameter and hyperaemic flow were lower after short- and long-term deconditioning and higher after exercise training, whilst intima-media thickness/lumen ratio was increased with short- and long-term deconditioning and decreased with exercise training. Regarding gene expression levels of vasculature-related genes, we found that groups of genes including the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, transforming growth factor β1 and extracellular matrix proteins were strongly associated with vascular adaptations in humans. This approach resulted in the identification of important genes that may be involved in vascular adaptations after physical deconditioning and exercise.

  9. Pilot-Induced Oscillation Suppression by Using 1 Adaptive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    research activities that aim to alleviate this problem. In this paper, the L1 adaptive controller has been introduced to suppress the PIO, which is caused by rate limiting and pure time delay. Due to its architecture, the L1 adaptive controller will achieve a desired response with fast adaptation. The analysis of PIO and its suppression by L1 adaptive controller are presented in detail in the paper. The simulation results indicate that the L1 adaptive control is efficient in solving this kind of problem.

  10. Training for Certification: Demonstration & Research Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing on agricultural pest control, this publication includes a full range of topics from uses of pesticides for agricultural animal pest control to the toxicity of common pesticides to fish and bees.…

  11. Functional Mobility Performance and Balance Confidence in Older Adults after Sensorimotor Adaptation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Weaver, G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates a main contributor of injury in older adults is from falling. The decline in sensory systems limits information needed to successfully maneuver through the environment. The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged exposure to the realignment of perceptual-motor systems increases adaptability of balance, and if balance confidence improves after training. A total of 16 older adults between ages 65-85 were randomized to a control group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a static visual scene) and an experimental group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a rotating visual scene). Prior to visual exposure, participants completed six trials of walking through a soft foamed obstacle course. Participants came in twice a week for 4 weeks to complete training of walking on a treadmill and viewing the visual scene for 20 minutes each session. Participants completed the obstacle course after training and four weeks later. Average time, penalty, and Activity Balance Confidence Scale scores were computed for both groups across testing times. The older adults who trained, significantly improved their time through the obstacle course F (2, 28) = 9.41, p confidence scores between groups across testing times F (2, 28) = 0.503, p > 0.05. Although the training group improved mobility through the obstacle course, there were no differences between the groups in balance confidence.

  12. Contamination control training for biomedical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    In 1991, a contamination control course was developed for the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program (BBRP) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This course was based on the developer's experience in Radiation Safety at the University of Utah and University of Kansas Medical Center. This course has been well received at LLNL because it addresses issues that are important to individuals handling small quantities of radioactive materials. This group of users is often overlooked. They are typically very well educated and are expected to ''know'' what they should do. Many of these individuals are not initially comfortable working with radioactive materials. They appreciate the opportunity to be introduced to contamination control techniques and to discuss issues they may have. In addition, the authors benefit by experience that researchers bring from other facilities. The training course will address the specific radiological training requirements for chemists, biologists, and medical researchers who are using small amounts of dispersible radionuclides in tabletop experiments, and will not be exposed to other radiation sources. The training will include: the potential hazards of typical radionuclides, contamination control procedures, and guidance for developing and including site-specific information. The training course will eliminate the need for Radiological Worker II training for bio-medical researchers. The target audience for this training course is bio-medical researchers

  13. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    While many studies have documented the beneficial effect of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations in trained subjects (reviewed in Iaia & Bangsbo 2010; J Bangsbo 2015; Hostrup & Bangsbo 2016), knowledge in certain areas are lacking. Examples on such areas...... compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged...... and proteins related to Ca2+ re-uptake. The changes in 10-km performance were associated with improved running economy and anaerobic capacity, thereby blueprinting the relevance of intense training for long-term performance. Collectively, these findings indicate that short-term performance does continuously...

  14. Adaptation in the fuzzy self-organising controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2003-01-01

    This simulation study provides an analysis of the adaptation mechanism in the self-organising fuzzy controller, SOC. The approach is to apply a traditional adaptive control viewpoint. A simplified performance measure in the SOC controller is used in a loss function, and thus the MIT rule implies...... an update mechanism similar to the SOC update mechanism. Two simulations of proportionally controlled systems show the behaviour of the proportional gain as it adapts to a specified behaviour....

  15. Adaptive output feedback control of aircraft flexible modes

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnusamy, Sangeeth Saagar; Bordeneuve-Guibé, Joël

    2012-01-01

    The application of adaptive output feedback augmentative control to the flexible aircraft problem is presented. Experimental validation of control scheme was carried out using a three disk torsional pendulum. In the reference model adaptive control scheme, the rigid aircraft reference model and neural network adaptation is used to control structural flexible modes and compensate for the effects unmodeled dynamics and parametric variations of a classical high order large passenger aircraft. Th...

  16. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  17. Adaptive Personalized Training Games for Individual and Collaborative Rehabilitation of People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Renny Octavia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Any rehabilitation involves people who are unique individuals with their own characteristics and rehabilitation needs, including patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS. The prominent variation of MS symptoms and the disease severity elevate a need to accommodate the patient diversity and support adaptive personalized training to meet every patient’s rehabilitation needs. In this paper, we focus on integrating adaptivity and personalization in rehabilitation training for MS patients. We introduced the automatic adjustment of difficulty levels as an adaptation that can be provided in individual and collaborative rehabilitation training exercises for MS patients. Two user studies have been carried out with nine MS patients to investigate the outcome of this adaptation. The findings showed that adaptive personalized training trajectories have been successfully provided to MS patients according to their individual training progress, which was appreciated by the patients and the therapist. They considered the automatic adjustment of difficulty levels to provide more variety in the training and to minimize the therapists involvement in setting up the training. With regard to social interaction in the collaborative training exercise, we have observed some social behaviors between the patients and their training partner which indicated the development of social interaction during the training.

  18. Glucose ingestion during endurance training does not alter adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Fischer, Christian P; Plomgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    , 2) lower citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (beta-HAD) activity and glycogen content in skeletal muscle, and 3) attenuated endurance performance enhancement in the trained state. To investigate this we studied nine male subjects who performed 10 wk of one-legged knee...... extensor training. They trained one leg while ingesting a 6% glucose solution (Glc) and ingested a sweetened placebo while training the other leg (Plc). The subjects trained their respective legs 2 h at a time on alternate days 5 days a week. Endurance training increased peak power (P(max)) and time...

  19. Composition and adaptation of human myotendinous junction and neighboring muscle fibers to heavy resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johannes; Mackey, A L; Knudsen, A B

    2017-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a common site of strain injury and yet understanding of its composition and ability to adapt to loading is poor. The main aims of this study were to determine the profile of selected collagens and macrophage density in human MTJ and adjoining muscle fibers......, and to investigate whether heavy exercise loading would alter this profile. Fifteen individuals scheduled for anterior cruciate ligament repair surgery were randomized into three groups: control, acute or 4 weeks heavy resistance training. MTJ samples were collected from the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles...... collagens were abundant at the MTJ and in muscle perimysium or endomysium. The endomysial content of collagen XIV, macrophages and Tenascin-C increased following 4 weeks of training. These findings illustrate the heterogeneity of collagen type composition of human MTJ. The increase in collagen XIV following...

  20. Adaptive Controller Design for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    K. Prabhu; V. Murali Bhaskaran

    2014-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important issue in chemical process and a wide range of research in the area of chemical engineering. Temperature Control of CSTR has been an issue in the chemical control engineering since it has highly non-linear complex equations. This study presents problem of temperature control of CSTR with the adaptive Controller. The Simulation is done in MATLAB and result shows that adaptive controller is an efficient controller for temperature control of C...

  1. Adaptive Filtering, Identification, and Control with Applications to Adaptive Optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, Steve

    2003-01-01

    .... Additional application areas included optical communication systems, blind identification and deconvolution, active control of noise and vibration, and detection of damage in elastic structures...

  2. Executive control and felt concentrative engagement following intensive meditation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Paul Zanesco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of mental training have been shown to improve performance on cognitively demanding tasks. Individuals trained in meditative practices, for example, show generalized improvements on a variety of tasks assessing attentional performance. A central claim of this training, derived from contemplative traditions, posits that improved attentional performance is accompanied by subjective increases in the stability and clarity of concentrative engagement with one’s object of focus, as well as reductions in felt cognitive effort as expertise develops. However, despite frequent claims of mental stability following training, the phenomenological correlates of meditation-related attentional improvements have yet to be characterized. In a longitudinal study, we assessed changes in executive control (performance on a 32-minute response inhibition task and retrospective reports of task engagement (concentration, motivation, and effort following one month of intensive, daily Vipassana meditation training. Compared to matched controls, training participants exhibited improvements in response inhibition accuracy and reductions in reaction time variability. The training group also reported increases in concentration, but not effort or motivation, during task performance. Critically, increases in concentration predicted improvements in reaction time variability, suggesting a link between the experience of concentrative engagement and ongoing fluctuations in attentional stability. By incorporating experiential measures of task performance, the present study corroborates phenomenological accounts of stable, clear attentional engagement with the object of meditative focus following extensive training. These results provide initial evidence that meditation-related changes in felt experience accompany improvements in adaptive, goal-directed behavior, and that such shifts may reflect accurate awareness of measurable changes in performance.

  3. Executive control and felt concentrative engagement following intensive meditation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanesco, Anthony P; King, Brandon G; Maclean, Katherine A; Saron, Clifford D

    2013-01-01

    Various forms of mental training have been shown to improve performance on cognitively demanding tasks. Individuals trained in meditative practices, for example, show generalized improvements on a variety of tasks assessing attentional performance. A central claim of this training, derived from contemplative traditions, posits that improved attentional performance is accompanied by subjective increases in the stability and clarity of concentrative engagement with one's object of focus, as well as reductions in felt cognitive effort as expertise develops. However, despite frequent claims of mental stability following training, the phenomenological correlates of meditation-related attentional improvements have yet to be characterized. In a longitudinal study, we assessed changes in executive control (performance on a 32-min response inhibition task) and retrospective reports of task engagement (concentration, motivation, and effort) following one month of intensive, daily Vipassana meditation training. Compared to matched controls, training participants exhibited improvements in response inhibition accuracy and reductions in reaction time variability. The training group also reported increases in concentration, but not effort or motivation, during task performance. Critically, increases in concentration predicted improvements in reaction time variability, suggesting a link between the experience of concentrative engagement and ongoing fluctuations in attentional stability. By incorporating experiential measures of task performance, the present study corroborates phenomenological accounts of stable, clear attentional engagement with the object of meditative focus following extensive training. These results provide initial evidence that meditation-related changes in felt experience accompany improvements in adaptive, goal-directed behavior, and that such shifts may reflect accurate awareness of measurable changes in performance.

  4. Neuromuscular and Cardiovascular Adaptations in Response to High-Intensity Interval Power Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Ruiz, Rubén; Vera-Ibáñez, Antonio; Colomer-Poveda, David; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Márquez, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Romero-Arenas, S, Ruiz, R, Vera-Ibáñez, A, Colomer-Poveda, D, Guadalupe-Grau, A, and Márquez, G. Neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptations in response to high-intensity interval power training. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 130-138, 2018-The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a high-intensity power training (HIPT) program, and to compare the effects of HIPT to traditional power training (TPT) on the aerobic and power performance. For this purpose, 29 healthy men (23.1 ± 2.7 years) were recruited and randomly distributed into 3 different groups. One group performed TPT (n = 10), the second group performed power training organized as a circuit (HIPT; n = 10), and the third group served as control group (CG; n = 9). Training consisted of weightlifting thrice per week for 6 weeks. The TPT subjects performed 3 to 5 sets of each exercises with interset rest of 90 seconds, and HIPT subjects executed the training in a short circuit (15 seconds of rest between exercises). To know the effects in aerobic performance, maximal aerobic speed (MAS) was measured. To identify the effects on power performance, subjects performed a Wingate test, a countermovement jump (CMJ) test, and a power-load curve in bench press. The main results showed that after both power training protocols, subjects increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the power production during the Wingate Test, the height and power reached during the CMJ test, and the peak power produced during the power-load curve. However, only the HIPT group improved significantly MAS (p ≤ 0.05). There were no changes in any variables in CG. Hence, our results suggest that HIPT may be as effective as TPT for improving power performance in young adults. In addition, only HIPT elicited improvements in MAS.

  5. Adaptive Fuzzy and Robust H∞ Compensation Control for Uncertain Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two types of robust adaptive compensation control schemes for the trajectory tracking control of robot manipulator with uncertain dynamics are proposed. The proposed controllers incorporate the computed-torque control scheme as a nominal portion of the controller; an adaptive fuzzy control algorithm to approximate the structured uncertainties; and a nonlinear H∞ tracking control model as a feedback portion to eliminate the effects of the unstructured uncertainties and approximation errors. The validity of the robust adaptive compensation control schemes is investigated by numerical simulations of a two-link rotary robot manipulator

  6. Model reference adaptive control and adaptive stability augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Arne; Ravn, Ole

    1993-01-01

    stability augmented model reference design is proposed. By utilizing the closed-loop control error, a simple auxiliary controller is tuned, using a normalized MIT rule for the parameter adjustment. The MIT adjustment is protected against the effects of unmodelled dynamics by lowpass filtering...

  7. Modular and Adaptive Control of Sound Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nort, Douglas

    parameters. In this view, desired gestural dynamics and sonic response are achieved through modular construction of mapping layers that are themselves subject to parametric control. Complementing this view of the design process, the work concludes with an approach in which the creation of gestural control/sound dynamics are considered in the low-level of the underlying sound model. The result is an adaptive system that is specialized to noise-based transformations that are particularly relevant in an electroacoustic music context. Taken together, these different approaches to design and evaluation result in a unified framework for creation of an instrumental system. The key point is that this framework addresses the influence that mapping structure and control dynamics have on the perceived feel of the instrument. Each of the results illustrate this using either top-down or bottom-up approaches that consider musical control context, thereby pointing to the greater potential for refined sonic articulation that can be had by combining them in the design process.

  8. Radiation control through licensing and intensive training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-H.; Yang, Y.-C.; Wu, T.-Y.; Weng, P.-S.

    1982-01-01

    Various types of intensive training courses to suit radiation workers in different fields were sponsored by both the Atomic Energy Council of Executive Yuan and the National Health Administration of Executive Yuan, Republic of China during the past seven years. During the years 1974-79, the number of radiation workers attending each training course, their age, sex and educational background are presented in detail. The typical course contents for both medical and non-medical radiation workers are given. A summary of the percentage of passes and failures of the final examination given at the end of each training course is also given. The present status of licensing for radiation facilities and workers is described, and its results are indicated. The successful control of ionizing radiation through this kind of intensive training and licensing is evidenced in the film badge records given by a centralized service laboratory located at the National Tsing Hua University. (author)

  9. Concluding remarks: nutritional strategies to support the adaptive response to prolonged exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Luc J C; Tipton, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays a key role in allowing the numerous training hours to be translated into useful adaptive responses of various tissues in the individual athlete. Research over the last decade has shown many examples of the impact of dietary interventions to modulate the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Proper nutritional coaching should be applied throughout both training and competition, each with their specific requirements regarding nutrient provision. Such dietary support will improve exercise training efficiency and, as such, further increase performance capacity. Here, we provide an overview on the properties of various nutritional interventions that may be useful to support the adaptive response to exercise training and competition and, as such, to augment exercise training efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratollah Hedayatpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  11. Neural network based adaptive control for nonlinear dynamic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoonghyun

    Adaptive control designs using neural networks (NNs) based on dynamic inversion are investigated for aerospace vehicles which are operated at highly nonlinear dynamic regimes. NNs play a key role as the principal element of adaptation to approximately cancel the effect of inversion error, which subsequently improves robustness to parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics in nonlinear regimes. An adaptive control scheme previously named 'composite model reference adaptive control' is further developed so that it can be applied to multi-input multi-output output feedback dynamic inversion. It can have adaptive elements in both the dynamic compensator (linear controller) part and/or in the conventional adaptive controller part, also utilizing state estimation information for NN adaptation. This methodology has more flexibility and thus hopefully greater potential than conventional adaptive designs for adaptive flight control in highly nonlinear flight regimes. The stability of the control system is proved through Lyapunov theorems, and validated with simulations. The control designs in this thesis also include the use of 'pseudo-control hedging' techniques which are introduced to prevent the NNs from attempting to adapt to various actuation nonlinearities such as actuator position and rate saturations. Control allocation is introduced for the case of redundant control effectors including thrust vectoring nozzles. A thorough comparison study of conventional and NN-based adaptive designs for a system under a limit cycle, wing-rock, is included in this research, and the NN-based adaptive control designs demonstrate their performances for two highly maneuverable aerial vehicles, NASA F-15 ACTIVE and FQM-117B unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), operated under various nonlinearities and uncertainties.

  12. Intelligent adaptive nonlinear flight control for a high performance aircraft with neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savran, Aydogan; Tasaltin, Ramazan; Becerikli, Yasar

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a neural network (NN) based adaptive flight control system for a high performance aircraft. The main contribution of this work is that the proposed control system is able to compensate the system uncertainties, adapt to the changes in flight conditions, and accommodate the system failures. The underlying study can be considered in two phases. The objective of the first phase is to model the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear F-16 model using NNs. Therefore a NN-based adaptive identification model is developed for three angular rates of the aircraft. An on-line training procedure is developed to adapt the changes in the system dynamics and improve the identification accuracy. In this procedure, a first-in first-out stack is used to store a certain history of the input-output data. The training is performed over the whole data in the stack at every stage. To speed up the convergence rate and enhance the accuracy for achieving the on-line learning, the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method with a trust region approach is adapted to train the NNs. The objective of the second phase is to develop intelligent flight controllers. A NN-based adaptive PID control scheme that is composed of an emulator NN, an estimator NN, and a discrete time PID controller is developed. The emulator NN is used to calculate the system Jacobian required to train the estimator NN. The estimator NN, which is trained on-line by propagating the output error through the emulator, is used to adjust the PID gains. The NN-based adaptive PID control system is applied to control three angular rates of the nonlinear F-16 model. The body-axis pitch, roll, and yaw rates are fed back via the PID controllers to the elevator, aileron, and rudder actuators, respectively. The resulting control system has learning, adaptation, and fault-tolerant abilities. It avoids the storage and interpolation requirements for the too many controller parameters of a typical flight control

  13. Neural Control of Chronic Stress Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eHerman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress initiates adaptive processes that allow the organism to physiologically cope with prolonged or intermittent exposure to real or perceived threats. A major component of this response is repeated activation of glucocorticoid secretion by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis, which promotes redistribution of energy in a wide range of organ systems, including the brain. Prolonged or cumulative increases in glucocorticoid secretion can reduce benefits afforded by enhanced stress reactivity and eventually become maladaptive. The long-term impact of stress is kept in check by the process of habituation, which reduces HPA axis responses upon repeated exposure to homotypic stressors and likely limits deleterious actions of prolonged glucocorticoid secretion. Habituation is regulated by limbic stress-regulatory sites, and is at least in part glucocorticoid feedback-dependent. Chronic stress also sensitizes reactivity to new stimuli. While sensitization may be important in maintaining response flexibility in response to new threats, it may also add to the cumulative impact of glucocorticoids on the brain and body. Finally, unpredictable or severe stress exposure may cause long-term and lasting dysregulation of the HPA axis, likely due to altered limbic control of stress effector pathways. Stress-related disorders, such as depression and PTSD, are accompanied by glucocorticoid imbalances and structural/ functional alterations in limbic circuits that resemble those seen following chronic stress, suggesting that inappropriate processing of stressful information may be part of the pathological process.

  14. Least-Squares Adaptive Control Using Chebyshev Orthogonal Polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Burken, John; Ishihara, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive control approach using Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials as basis functions in a least-squares functional approximation. The use of orthogonal basis functions improves the function approximation significantly and enables better convergence of parameter estimates. Flight control simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive control approach.

  15. Adaptive Linear Parameter Varying Control for Aeroservoelastic Suppression, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Adaptive control offers an opportunity to fulfill aircraft safety objectives though automated vehicle recovery while maintaining performance and stability...

  16. 76 FR 52918 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ...-0028, may be submitted by any of the following methods: Web Site: Comments should be filed at the... nationwide proliferation and implementation of positive train control (PTC) systems, forecasting substantial.... --Non-Quantitative Risk 46 Railroads....... 23 assessments..... 3,200 hours........ 73,600 Assessments...

  17. Neuromuscular adaptations to concurrent training in the elderly: effects of intrasession exercise sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel; Pinto, Stephanie Santana; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Lanferdini, Fábio Juner; Radaelli, Régis; González-Izal, Miriam; Bottaro, Martim; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was investigate the effects of different intrasession exercise orders in the neuromuscular adaptations induced by concurrent training in elderly. Twenty-six healthy elderly men (64.7 ± 4.1 years), were placed into two concurrent training groups: strength prior to (SE, n = 13) or after (ES, n = 13) endurance training. Subjects trained strength and endurance training during 12 weeks, three times per week performing both exercise types in the same training session. Upper an...

  18. A practical model of low-volume high-intensity interval training induces performance and metabolic adaptations that resemble 'all-out' sprint interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Mahdi; Farzad, Babak; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Agha-Alinejad, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel type of high-intensity interval training known as sprint interval training has demonstrated increases in aerobic and anaerobic performance with very low time commitment. However, this type of training program is unpractical for general populations. The present study compared the impact of a low-volume high-intensity interval training to a "all-out" sprint interval training. Twenty-four active young males were recruited and randomized into three groups: (G1: 3-5 cycling bouts ˟ 30-s all-out with 4 min recovery; G2: 6- 10 cycling bouts ˟ 125% Pmax with 2 min recovery) and a non-trained control group. They all performed a VO2max test, a time to exhaustion at Pmax (Tmax) and a Wingate test before and after the intervention. Capillary blood lactate was taken at rest, 3, and 20 min after the Wingate trial. Training was performed 3 sessions per week for 4 weeks. In G1, significant improvements (p training were found in VO2max (9.6%), power at VO2max (12.8%), Tmax (48.4%), peak power output (10.3%) and mean power output (17.1%). In G2, significant improvements following training were found in VO2max (9.7%), power at VO2max (16.1%), Tmax (54.2%), peak power output (7.4%; p training program to aerobic and anaerobic adaptations. Of substantial interest is that the low volume high intensity training provides similar results but involves only half the intensity with double the repetitions. Key pointsGiven the markedly lower training volume in the training groups, our results suggest that intense interval training is indeed a time-efficient strategy to induce rapid metabolic and performance adaptations.The results demonstrate that a practical low-volume HIT program is effective for improving metabolic and performance adaptations that resemble many of the same performance gains occurred in all-out SIT protocol.

  19. Video game training enhances cognitive control in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguera, J A; Boccanfuso, J; Rintoul, J L; Al-Hashimi, O; Faraji, F; Janowich, J; Kong, E; Larraburo, Y; Rolle, C; Johnston, E; Gazzaley, A

    2013-09-05

    Cognitive control is defined by a set of neural processes that allow us to interact with our complex environment in a goal-directed manner. Humans regularly challenge these control processes when attempting to simultaneously accomplish multiple goals (multitasking), generating interference as the result of fundamental information processing limitations. It is clear that multitasking behaviour has become ubiquitous in today's technologically dense world, and substantial evidence has accrued regarding multitasking difficulties and cognitive control deficits in our ageing population. Here we show that multitasking performance, as assessed with a custom-designed three-dimensional video game (NeuroRacer), exhibits a linear age-related decline from 20 to 79 years of age. By playing an adaptive version of NeuroRacer in multitasking training mode, older adults (60 to 85 years old) reduced multitasking costs compared to both an active control group and a no-contact control group, attaining levels beyond those achieved by untrained 20-year-old participants, with gains persisting for 6 months. Furthermore, age-related deficits in neural signatures of cognitive control, as measured with electroencephalography, were remediated by multitasking training (enhanced midline frontal theta power and frontal-posterior theta coherence). Critically, this training resulted in performance benefits that extended to untrained cognitive control abilities (enhanced sustained attention and working memory), with an increase in midline frontal theta power predicting the training-induced boost in sustained attention and preservation of multitasking improvement 6 months later. These findings highlight the robust plasticity of the prefrontal cognitive control system in the ageing brain, and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of how a custom-designed video game can be used to assess cognitive abilities across the lifespan, evaluate underlying neural mechanisms, and serve as a powerful tool

  20. Short-term adaptations following Complex Training in team-sports: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Tomás T; Martinez-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Calleja-González, Julio; Alcaraz, Pedro E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to study the short-term adaptations on sprint and vertical jump (VJ) performance following Complex Training (CT) in team-sports. CT is a resistance training method aimed at developing both strength and power, which has a direct effect on sprint and VJ. It consists on alternating heavy resistance training exercises with plyometric/power ones, set for set, on the same workout. A search of electronic databases up to July 2016 (PubMed-MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, Web of Knowledge) was conducted. Inclusion criteria: 1) at least one CT intervention group; 2) training protocols ≥4-wks; 3) sample of team-sport players; 4) sprint or VJ as an outcome variable. Effect sizes (ES) of each intervention were calculated and subgroup analyses were performed. A total of 9 studies (13 CT groups) met the inclusion criteria. Medium effect sizes (ES) (ES = 0.73) were obtained for pre-post improvements in sprint, and small (ES = 0.41) in VJ, following CT. Experimental-groups presented better post-intervention sprint (ES = 1.01) and VJ (ES = 0.63) performance than control-groups. large ESs were exhibited in younger athletes (training programs >12 total sessions (ES = 0.74). Large ESs in programs with >12 total sessions (ES = 0.81). Medium ESs obtained for under-Division I individuals (ES = 0.56); protocols with intracomplex rest intervals ≥2 min (ES = 0.55); conditioning activities with intensities ≤85% 1RM (ES = 0.64); basketball/volleyball players (ES = 0.55). Small ESs were found for younger athletes (ES = 0.42); interventions ≥6 weeks (ES = 0.45). CT interventions have positive medium effects on sprint performance and small effects on VJ in team-sport athletes. This training method is a suitable option to include in the season planning.

  1. Effect of speed endurance training and reduced training volume on running economy and single muscle fiber adaptations in trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christiansen, Danny; Christensen, Peter M; Almquist, Nicki W; Thomassen, Martin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improved running economy with a period of speed endurance training and reduced training volume could be related to adaptations in specific muscle fibers. Twenty trained male (n = 14) and female (n = 6) runners (maximum oxygen consumption (VO 2 -max): 56.4 ± 4.6 mL/min/kg) completed a 40-day intervention with 10 sessions of speed endurance training (5-10 × 30-sec maximal running) and a reduced (36%) volume of training. Before and after the intervention, a muscle biopsy was obtained at rest, and an incremental running test to exhaustion was performed. In addition, running at 60% vVO 2 -max, and a 10-km run was performed in a normal and a muscle slow twitch (ST) glycogen-depleted condition. After compared to before the intervention, expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) was lower (P < 0.05) and dystrophin was higher (P < 0.05) in ST muscle fibers, and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 1 (SERCA1) was lower (P < 0.05) in fast twitch muscle fibers. Running economy at 60% vVO 2 -max (11.6 ± 0.2 km/h) and at v10-km (13.7 ± 0.3 km/h) was ~2% better (P < 0.05) after the intervention in the normal condition, but unchanged in the ST glycogen-depleted condition. Ten kilometer performance was improved (P < 0.01) by 3.2% (43.7 ± 1.0 vs. 45.2 ± 1.2 min) and 3.9% (45.8 ± 1.2 vs. 47.7 ± 1.3 min) in the normal and the ST glycogen-depleted condition, respectively. VO 2 -max was the same, but vVO 2 -max was 2.0% higher (P < 0.05; 19.3 ± 0.3 vs. 18.9 ± 0.3 km/h) after than before the intervention. Thus, improved running economy with intense training may be related to changes in expression of proteins linked to energy consuming processes in primarily ST muscle fibers. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  2. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaird, Catherine R.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to “fight” the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations. PMID:23307949

  3. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for quiet on-orbit crew quarters (CQ), Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  4. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA needs for quiet crew volumes in a space habitat, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  5. Applications of adaptive filters in active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Paul

    The active reduction of acoustic noise is achieved by the addition of a cancelling acoustic signal to the unwanted sound. Successful definition of the cancelling signal amounts to a system identification problem. Recent advances in adaptive signal processing have allowed this problem to be tackled using adaptive filters, which offer significant advantages over conventional solutions. The extension of adaptive noise cancelling techniques, which were developed in the electrical signal conditioning context, to the control of acoustic systems is studied. An analysis is presented of the behavior of the Widrow-Hoff LMS adaptive noise canceller with a linear filter in its control loop. The active control of plane waves propagating axially in a hardwalled duct is used as a motivating model problem. The model problem also motivates the study of the effects of feedback around an LMS adaptive filter. An alternative stochastic gradient algorithm for controlling adaptive filters in the presence of feedback is presented.

  6. Effect of the adapted Virtual Reality cognitive training program among Chinese older adults with chronic schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christopher L F; Ngai, Elena K Y; Leung, Paul K H; Wong, Stephen

    2010-06-01

    To examine the effect of the adapted virtual reality cognitive training program in older adults with chronic schizophrenia. Older adults with chronic schizophrenia were recruited from a long-stay care setting and were randomly assigned into intervention (n = 12) and control group (n = 15). The intervention group received 10-session of VR program that consisted of 2 VR activities using IREX. The control group attended the usual programs in the setting. After the 10-session intervention, older adults with chronic schizophrenia preformed significantly better than control in overall cognitive function (p .000), and in two cognitive subscales: repetition (p .001) and memory (p .040). These participants engaged in the VR activities volitionally. No problem of cybersickness was observed. The results of the current study indicate that engaging in the adapted virtual reality cognitive training program offers the potential for significant gains in cognitive function of the older adults with chronic schizophrenia.

  7. Adaptive Controller Design for Faulty UAVs via Quantum Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyang Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive controller is designed for a UAV flight control system against faults and parametric uncertainties based on quantum information technology and the Popov hyperstability theory. First, considering the bounded control input, the state feedback controller is designed to make the system stable. The model of adaptive control is introduced to eliminate the impact by the uncertainties of system parameters via quantum information technology. Then, according to the model reference adaptive principle, an adaptive control law based on the Popov hyperstability theory is designed. This law enable better robustness of the flight control system and tracking control performances. The closed-loop system's stability is guaranteed by the Popov hyperstability theory. The simulation results demonstrate that a better dynamic performance of the UAV flight control system with faults and parametric uncertainties can be maintained with the proposed method.

  8. Fuzzy adaptive speed control of a permanent magnet synchronous motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Han Ho; Jung, Jin-Woo; Kim, Rae-Young

    2012-05-01

    A fuzzy adaptive speed controller is proposed for a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM). The proposed fuzzy adaptive speed regulator is insensitive to model parameter and load torque variations because it does not need any accurate knowledge about the motor parameter and load torque values. The stability of the proposed control system is also proven. The proposed adaptive speed regulator system is implemented by using a TMS320F28335 floating point DSP. Simulation and experimental results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed fuzzy adaptive speed controller under uncertainties such as motor parameter and load torque variations using a prototype PMSM drive system.

  9. Incidence of injury and physical performance adaptations during military training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Skov-Jensen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity, such as military training, is known to demand a high degree of physical performance and to cause overuse injuries. However, the exact relation between injury incidence and physical fitness level and the influence of military training on measures of functional...

  10. Incidence of injury and physical performance adaptations during military training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Skov-Jensen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity, such as military training, is known to demand a high degree of physical performance and to cause overuse injuries. However, the exact relation between injury incidence and physical fitness level and the influence of military training on measures of functional...... performance, such as intermittent endurance capacity and maximal jump performance, are not fully described....

  11. Planning a sports training program using Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization with emphasis on physiological constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumyaito, Nattapon; Yupapin, Preecha; Tamee, Kreangsak

    2018-01-08

    An effective training plan is an important factor in sports training to enhance athletic performance. A poorly considered training plan may result in injury to the athlete, and overtraining. Good training plans normally require expert input, which may have a cost too great for many athletes, particularly amateur athletes. The objectives of this research were to create a practical cycling training plan that substantially improves athletic performance while satisfying essential physiological constraints. Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization using ɛ-constraint methods were used to formulate such a plan and simulate the likely performance outcomes. The physiological constraints considered in this study were monotony, chronic training load ramp rate and daily training impulse. A comparison of results from our simulations against a training plan from British Cycling, which we used as our standard, showed that our training plan outperformed the benchmark in terms of both athletic performance and satisfying all physiological constraints.

  12. Adaptive robust control of the EBR-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M.A.; Edwards, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation results are presented for an adaptive H ∞ controller, a fixed H ∞ controller, and a classical controller. The controllers are applied to a simulation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II primary system. The controllers are tested for the best robustness and performance by step-changing the demanded reactor power and by varying the combined uncertainty in initial reactor power and control rod worth. The adaptive H ∞ controller shows the fastest settling time, fastest rise time and smallest peak overshoot when compared to the fixed H ∞ and classical controllers. This makes for a superior and more robust controller

  13. Training specific adaptations of H- and stretch reflexes in human soleus muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Markus; Taube, Wolfgang; Gollhofer, Albert; Beck, Sandra; Amtage, Florian; Schubert, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of physical exercise on reflex excitability in a controlled intervention study. Healthy participants (N = 21) performed 4 weeks of either power training (ballistic strength training) or balance training (sensorimotor training [SMT]). Both training regimens enhanced balance control and rate of force development, whereas reductions in peak-to-peak amplitudes of stretch reflexes and in the ratio of the maximum Hoffman reflex to the maximum efferent motor respo...

  14. Cardiovascular Adaptation and Remodeling to Rigorous Athletic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2015-07-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling is a complex process by which the cardinal hemodynamic stresses of pressure and volume lead to a host of structural or functional adaptations. In aggregate, the constellation of changes that accompany this process serve to facilitate athletic performance by minimizing the cardiac work inherent in athletic activity. Although several key determinants of athletic cardiac adaptation have been described, observed variability across athlete cohorts remains an incompletely understood area. Ongoing and future work are required to further understand this process and ultimately to determine where the boundary lies between adaptive physiology and maladaptive disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiological control technician implementing continuing training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killand, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and is implementing a continuing training program for RCTs. This program was designed to meet the requirements of the DOE and Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual. The program is scheduled on a biennial (two year), six cycle format, where each cycle is seventeen weeks in length. This enables the technician to be in the classroom three times per year, for an average of four days each cycle. Content emphasis is placed on: academics review; lessons learned; new equipment and procedures; practical skills training; and oral board preparation. Academic reviews provide refresher training on core and site academics in both lecture and overview formats. During the first five cycles, an average of six lessons are presented. A preparatory exam is administered along with a quiz covering previous cycles. The sixth cycle is dedicated to an academic review of all previous lesson content, the final comprehensive exam, and the oral examination boards. In conjunction with continuing training, technicians receive additional company required training, providing a substantial cost savings to WHC. WHC employs approximately 300 RCTs

  16. [Testing results of telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, V V; Zakrevskaia, A A; Zakharchenko, D V; Alpaev, D V; At'kova, E O

    2015-01-01

    Expert and instrumental assessment covered efficiency of telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness in simulation of real night travel, through special simulator complex "Locomotive operator cabin". The telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness, if exploited correctly, provides wakefulness of the train operators at the level sufficient for the effective work. That is supported by distribution of falling asleep cases in experiments with activated or deactivated telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness. The study proved efficiency of telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness.

  17. Discrete Model Reference Adaptive Control System for Automatic Profiling Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic profiling machine is a movement system that has a high degree of parameter variation and high frequency of transient process, and it requires an accurate control in time. In this paper, the discrete model reference adaptive control system of automatic profiling machine is discussed. Firstly, the model of automatic profiling machine is presented according to the parameters of DC motor. Then the design of the discrete model reference adaptive control is proposed, and the control rules are proven. The results of simulation show that adaptive control system has favorable dynamic performances.

  18. Simulation and Rapid Prototyping of Adaptive Control Systems using the Adaptive Blockset for Simulink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the design considerations and implementational aspects of the Adaptive Blockset for Simulink which has been developed in a prototype implementation. The concept behind the Adaptive Blockset for Simulink is to bridge the gap between simulation and prototype controller implement...... design, controller and state variable filter.The use of the Adaptive Blockset is demonstrated using a simple laboratory setup. Both the use of the blockset for simulation and for rapid prototyping of a real-time controller are shown.......The paper describes the design considerations and implementational aspects of the Adaptive Blockset for Simulink which has been developed in a prototype implementation. The concept behind the Adaptive Blockset for Simulink is to bridge the gap between simulation and prototype controller...

  19. Concluding remarks: nutritional strategies to support the adaptive prolonged exercise training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, L.J.C.; Tipton, K.D.; Loon, L.J.C. van; Meeusen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays a key role in allowing the numerous training hours to be translated into useful adaptive responses of various tissues in the athlete. Research over the last decade has shown many examples of the dietary interventions to modulate the skeletal muscle adaptive response prolonged

  20. Effects of different volume-equated resistance training loading strategies on muscular adaptations in well-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Peterson, Mark D; Contreras, Bret; Sonmez, G T; Alvar, Brent A

    2014-10-01

    Regimented resistance training has been shown to promote marked increases in skeletal muscle mass. Although muscle hypertrophy can be attained through a wide range of resistance training programs, the principle of specificity, which states that adaptations are specific to the nature of the applied stimulus, dictates that some programs will promote greater hypertrophy than others. Research is lacking, however, as to the best combination of variables required to maximize hypertophic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular adaptations to a volume-equated bodybuilding-type training program vs. a powerlifting-type routine in well-trained subjects. Seventeen young men were randomly assigned to either a hypertrophy-type resistance training group that performed 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with 90 seconds rest or a strength-type resistance training (ST) group that performed 7 sets of 3RM with a 3-minute rest interval. After 8 weeks, no significant differences were noted in muscle thickness of the biceps brachii. Significant strength differences were found in favor of ST for the 1RM bench press, and a trend was found for greater increases in the 1RM squat. In conclusion, this study showed that both bodybuilding- and powerlifting-type training promote similar increases in muscular size, but powerlifting-type training is superior for enhancing maximal strength.

  1. Adaptive Training and Education Research at the US Army Research Laboratory: Bibliography (2013-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Industry Training, Simulation and Education, Artificial Intelligence in Education, Intelligent Tutoring Systems, Human Factors and Ergonomics , Applied...Human Factors and Ergonomics , Augmented Cognition, Defense and Homeland Security Simulation, and Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society...and Education Conference; 2015 Dec; Orlando, FL. Long R, Hyland J, Barnieu J, Development and evaluation of mobile adaptive training technologies

  2. Systems and Methods for Derivative-Free Adaptive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive control system is disclosed. The control system can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can employ one or more derivative-free adaptive control architectures. The control system can further employ one or more derivative-free weight update laws. The derivative-free weight update laws can comprise a time-varying estimate of an ideal vector of weights. The control system of the present invention can therefore quickly stabilize systems that undergo sudden changes in dynamics, caused by, for example, sudden changes in weight. Embodiments of the present invention can also provide a less complex control system than existing adaptive control systems. The control system can control aircraft and other dynamic systems, such as, for example, those with non-minimum phase dynamics.

  3. Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ADEPT project aims to improve the state-of-the-art with respect to capabilities and costs of scenario-based training in support of future space exploration...

  4. Musculoskeletal adaptations to training with the advanced resistive exercise device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, James A; Lee, Stuart M C; English, Kirk L; Sibonga, Jean; Smith, Scott M; Spiering, Barry A; Hagan, R Donald

    2011-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been used as a means to prevent the musculoskeletal losses associated with spaceflight. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration designed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to replace the initial device flown on the International Space Station. The ARED uses vacuum cylinders and inertial flywheels to simulate, in the absence of gravity, the constant mass and inertia, respectively, of free weight (FW) exercise. To compare the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise training using the ARED with the effects of training with FW. Previously untrained, ambulatory subjects exercised using one of two modalities: FW (6 men and 3 women) or ARED (8 men and 3 women). Subjects performed squat, heel raise, and dead lift exercises 3 d·wk(-1) for 16 wk. Squat, heel raise, and dead lift strength (one-repetition maximum; using FW and ARED), bone mineral density (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), and vertical jump were assessed before, during, and after training. Muscle mass (via magnetic resonance imaging) and bone morphology (via quantitative computed tomography) were measured before and after training. Bone biomarkers and circulating hormones were measured before training and after 4, 8, and 16 wk. Muscle strength, muscle volume, vertical jump height, and lumbar spine bone mineral density (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography) significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) in both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in any of the dependent variables at any time. After 16 wk of training, ARED exercise resulted in musculoskeletal effects that were not significantly different from the effects of training with FW. Because FW training mitigates bed rest-induced deconditioning, the ARED may be an effective countermeasure for spaceflight-induced deconditioning and should be validated during spaceflight.

  5. Adaptive control with variable dead-zone nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlicki, D.; Valavani, L.; Athans, M.; Stein, G.

    1984-01-01

    It has been found that fixed error dead-zones as defined in the existing literature result in serious degradation of performance, due to the conservativeness which characterizes the determination of their width. In the present paper, variable width dead-zones are derived for the adaptive control of plants with unmodeled dynamics. The derivation makes use of information available about the unmodeled dynamics both a priori as well as during the adaptation process, so as to stabilize the adaptive loop and at the same time overcome the conservativeness and performance limitations of fixed-dead zone adaptive or fixed gain controllers.

  6. Effects of Methoxyisoflavone, Ecdysterone, and Sulfo-Polysaccharide Supplementation on Training Adaptations in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Michael

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Methoxyisoflavone (M, 20-hydroxyecdysone (E, and sulfo-polysaccharide (CSP3 have been marketed to athletes as dietary supplements that can increase strength and muscle mass during resistance-training. However, little is known about their potential ergogenic value. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these supplements affect training adaptations and/or markers of muscle anabolism/catabolism in resistance-trained athletes. Methods Forty-five resistance-trained males (20.5 ± 3 yrs; 179 ± 7 cm, 84 ± 16 kg, 17.3 ± 9% body fat were matched according to FFM and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner supplements containing either a placebo (P; 800 mg/day of M; 200 mg of E; or, 1,000 mg/day of CSP3 for 8-weeks during training. At 0, 4, and 8-weeks, subjects donated fasting blood samples and completed comprehensive muscular strength, muscular endurance, anaerobic capacity, and body composition analysis. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05 were observed in training adaptations among groups in the variables FFM, percent body fat, bench press 1 RM, leg press 1 RM or sprint peak power. Anabolic/catabolic analysis revealed no significant differences among groups in active testosterone (AT, free testosterone (FT, cortisol, the AT to cortisol ratio, urea nitrogen, creatinine, the blood urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio. In addition, no significant differences were seen from pre to post supplementation and/or training in AT, FT, or cortisol. Conclusion Results indicate that M, E, and CSP3 supplementation do not affect body composition or training adaptations nor do they influence the anabolic/catabolic hormone status or general markers of catabolism in resistance-trained males.

  7. Adaptive feedback control by constrained approximate dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Silvia; Steck, James E; Chandramohan, Rajeev

    2008-08-01

    A constrained approximate dynamic programming (ADP) approach is presented for designing adaptive neural network (NN) controllers with closed-loop stability and performance guarantees. Prior knowledge of the linearized equations of motion is used to guarantee that the closed-loop system meets performance and stability objectives when the plant operates in a linear parameter-varying (LPV) regime. In the presence of unmodeled dynamics or failures, the NN controller adapts to optimize its performance online, whereas constrained ADP guarantees that the LPV baseline performance is preserved at all times. The effectiveness of an adaptive NN flight controller is demonstrated for simulated control failures, parameter variations, and near-stall dynamics.

  8. Adaptive fuzzy PID control for a quadrotor stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrat, N.; Boubertakh, H.; Arioui, H.

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with the design of an adaptive fuzzy PID control law for attitude and altitude stabilization of a quadrotor despite the system model uncertainties and disturbances. To this end, a PID control with adaptive gains is used in order to approximate a virtual ideal control previously designed to achieve the predefined objective. Specifically, the control gains are estimated and adjusted by mean of a fuzzy system whose parameters are adjusted online via a gradient descent-based adaptation law. The analysis of the closed-loop system is given by the Lyapunov approach. The simulation results are presented to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  9. Linear Perturbation Adaptive Control of Hydraulically Driven Manipulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.O.; Hansen, M.R.; Conrad, Finn

    2004-01-01

    control.Using the Lyapunov approach, under slowly time-varying assumptions, it is shown that the tracking error and the parameter error remain bounded. This bound is a function of the ideal parameters and a bounded disturbance. The control algorithm decouples and linearizes the manipulator so that each......A method for synthesis of a robust adaptive scheme for a hydraulically driven manipulator, that takes full advantage of any known system dynamics to simplify the adaptive control problem for the unknown portion of the dynamics is presented. The control method is based on adaptive perturbation...

  10. Hormesis and adaptive cellular control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormetic dose response occurs for many endpoints associated with exposures of biological organisms to environmental stressors. Cell-based U- or inverted U-shaped responses may derive from common processes involved in activation of adaptive responses required to protect cells from...

  11. Adaptive Feature Based Control of Compact Disk Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Vidal, Enrique Sanchez

    2005-01-01

    -players playing CDs with surface fault is derived and described. This feature based control scheme uses precomputed base to remove the surface fault influence from the position measurements. In this paper an adaptive version of the feature based control scheme is proposed and described. This adaptive scheme can...... result that the adaptive scheme clearly adapts better to the given faults compared with the non-adaptive version of the feature based control scheme.......Many have experienced the problem that their Compact Disc players have difficulties playing Compact Discs with surface faults like scratches and fingerprints. The cause of this is due to the two servo control loops used to keep the Optical Pick-up Unit focused and radially on the information track...

  12. Adaptive mode transition control architecture with an application to unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Zea, Luis Benigno

    In this thesis, an architecture for the adaptive mode transition control of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) is presented. The proposed architecture consists of three levels: the highest level is occupied by mission planning routines where information about way points the vehicle must follow is processed. The middle level uses a trajectory generation component to coordinate the task execution and provides set points for low-level stabilizing controllers. The adaptive mode transitioning control algorithm resides at the lowest level of the hierarchy consisting of a mode transitioning controller and the accompanying adaptation mechanism. The mode transition controller is composed of a mode transition manager, a set of local controllers, a set of active control models, a set point filter, a state filter, an automatic trimming mechanism and a dynamic compensation filter. Local controllers operate in local modes and active control models operate in transitions between two local modes. The mode transition manager determines the actual mode of operation of the vehicle based on a set of mode membership functions and activates a local controller or an active control model accordingly. The adaptation mechanism uses an indirect adaptive control methodology to adapt the active control models. For this purpose, a set of plant models based on fuzzy neural networks is trained based on input/output information from the vehicle and used to compute sensitivity matrices providing the linearized models required by the adaptation algorithms. The effectiveness of the approach is verified through software-in-the-loop simulations, hardware-in-the-loop simulations and flight testing.

  13. Comparing Computerized Adaptive and Self-Adapted Tests: The Influence of Examinee Achievement Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Steven L.; And Others

    This study investigated the relationship between examinee achievement-specific locus of control and the differences between self-adapted testing (SAT) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT) in terms of mean estimated proficiency and posttest state anxiety. Subjects were 379 college students. A disordinal interaction was found between test type…

  14. Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems by Using OS-ELM Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a kind of novel feedforward neural network with single hidden layer, ELM (extreme learning machine neural networks are studied for the identification and control of nonlinear dynamic systems. The property of simple structure and fast convergence of ELM can be shown clearly. In this paper, we are interested in adaptive control of nonlinear dynamic plants by using OS-ELM (online sequential extreme learning machine neural networks. Based on data scope division, the problem that training process of ELM neural network is sensitive to the initial training data is also solved. According to the output range of the controlled plant, the data corresponding to this range will be used to initialize ELM. Furthermore, due to the drawback of conventional adaptive control, when the OS-ELM neural network is used for adaptive control of the system with jumping parameters, the topological structure of the neural network can be adjusted dynamically by using multiple model switching strategy, and an MMAC (multiple model adaptive control will be used to improve the control performance. Simulation results are included to complement the theoretical results.

  15. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy control of ionic polymer metal composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thinh, Nguyen Truong; Yang, Young-Soo; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller was newly designed to overcome the degradation of the actuation performance of ionic polymer metal composite actuators that show highly nonlinear responses such as a straightening-back problem under a step excitation. An adaptive control algorithm with the merits of fuzzy logic and neural networks was applied for controlling the tip displacement of the ionic polymer metal composite actuators. The reference and actual displacements and the change of the error with the electrical inputs were recorded to generate the training data. These data were used for training the adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller to find the membership functions in the fuzzy control algorithm. Software simulation and real-time experiments were conducted by using the Simulink and dSPACE environments. Present results show that the current adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller can be successfully applied to the reliable control of the ionic polymer metal composite actuator for which the performance degrades under long-time actuation

  16. The effects of interday rest on adaptation to 6 weeks of plyometric training in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Meylan, César M P; Álvarez-Lepín, Cristian; Henriquez-Olguín, Carlos; Martinez, Cristian; Andrade, David C; Castro-Sepúlveda, Mauricio; Burgos, Carlos; Baez, Eduardo I; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of short-term plyometric training interposed with 24 or 48 hours of rest between training sessions on explosive and endurance adaptations in young soccer players. A total of 166 players, between 10 and 17 years of age, were randomly divided into 3 groups: a control group (CG; n = 55) and 2 plyometric training groups with 24 hours (PT24; n = 54) and 48 hours (PT48; n = 57) of rest between training sessions. Before and after intervention, players were measured in squat jump, countermovement jump, 20 (RSI20) cm drop jump reactive strength index, broad long jump, 20-m sprint time, 10 × 5-m agility time, 20-m multistage shuttle run test, and sit-and-reach test. The plyometric training program was applied during 6 weeks, 2 sessions per week, with a load from 140 to 260 jumps per session, replacing some soccer-specific drills. After intervention, the CG did not show significant performance changes. PT24 and PT48 groups showed a small-to-moderate significant improvement in all performance tests (p plyometric drills should not be conducted on consecutive days, the study shows that plyometric training applied twice weekly on consecutive or nonconsecutive days results in similar explosive and endurance adaptations in young male soccer players.

  17. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    the period of increased frequency of SET, the value of combining an overload phase with tapering to improve 10-km performance is low. In line with the literature on "muscle memory", performing a second intervention of SET and a basic volume of aerobic training might have a greater impact on short-term...... and proteins related to Ca2+ re-uptake. The changes in 10-km performance were associated with improved running economy and anaerobic capacity, thereby blueprinting the relevance of intense training for long-term performance. Collectively, these findings indicate that short-term performance does continuously...... compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged...

  18. The adaptations to strength training : morphological and neurological contributions to increased strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folland, Jonathan P; Williams, Alun G

    2007-01-01

    High-resistance strength training (HRST) is one of the most widely practiced forms of physical activity, which is used to enhance athletic performance, augment musculo-skeletal health and alter body aesthetics. Chronic exposure to this type of activity produces marked increases in muscular strength, which are attributed to a range of neurological and morphological adaptations. This review assesses the evidence for these adaptations, their interplay and contribution to enhanced strength and the methodologies employed. The primary morphological adaptations involve an increase in the cross-sectional area of the whole muscle and individual muscle fibres, which is due to an increase in myofibrillar size and number. Satellite cells are activated in the very early stages of training; their proliferation and later fusion with existing fibres appears to be intimately involved in the hypertrophy response. Other possible morphological adaptations include hyperplasia, changes in fibre type, muscle architecture, myofilament density and the structure of connective tissue and tendons. Indirect evidence for neurological adaptations, which encompasses learning and coordination, comes from the specificity of the training adaptation, transfer of unilateral training to the contralateral limb and imagined contractions. The apparent rise in whole-muscle specific tension has been primarily used as evidence for neurological adaptations; however, morphological factors (e.g. preferential hypertrophy of type 2 fibres, increased angle of fibre pennation, increase in radiological density) are also likely to contribute to this phenomenon. Changes in inter-muscular coordination appear critical. Adaptations in agonist muscle activation, as assessed by electromyography, tetanic stimulation and the twitch interpolation technique, suggest small, but significant increases. Enhanced firing frequency and spinal reflexes most likely explain this improvement, although there is contrary evidence

  19. Revisionist integral deferred correction with adaptive step-size control

    KAUST Repository

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-03-27

    © 2015 Mathematical Sciences Publishers. Adaptive step-size control is a critical feature for the robust and efficient numerical solution of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations. In this paper, we show that adaptive step-size control can be incorporated within a family of parallel time integrators known as revisionist integral deferred correction (RIDC) methods. The RIDC framework allows for various strategies to implement stepsize control, and we report results from exploring a few of them.

  20. Adaptive Missile Flight Control for Complex Aerodynamic Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    ARL-TR-8085 ● AUG 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Adaptive Missile Flight Control for Complex Aerodynamic Phenomena by Frank...Adaptive Missile Flight Control for Complex Aerodynamic Phenomena by Frank Fresconi and Jubaraj Sahu Weapons and Materials Research Directorate...currently valid OMB control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) August 2017 2. REPORT TYPE

  1. Fully probabilistic control design in an adaptive critic framework

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herzallah, R.; Kárný, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 10 (2011), s. 1128-1135 ISSN 0893-6080 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Stochastic control design * Fully probabilistic design * Adaptive control * Adaptive critic Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 2.182, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/AS/karny-0364820.pdf

  2. Training a Network of Electronic Neurons for Control of a Mobile Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromen, T. G. M.; Steur, E.; Nijmeijer, H.

    An adaptive training procedure is developed for a network of electronic neurons, which controls a mobile robot driving around in an unknown environment while avoiding obstacles. The neuronal network controls the angular velocity of the wheels of the robot based on the sensor readings. The nodes in the neuronal network controller are clusters of neurons rather than single neurons. The adaptive training procedure ensures that the input-output behavior of the clusters is identical, even though the constituting neurons are nonidentical and have, in isolation, nonidentical responses to the same input. In particular, we let the neurons interact via a diffusive coupling, and the proposed training procedure modifies the diffusion interaction weights such that the neurons behave synchronously with a predefined response. The working principle of the training procedure is experimentally validated and results of an experiment with a mobile robot that is completely autonomously driving in an unknown environment with obstacles are presented.

  3. Control Augmentation Using Adaptive Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Wada, Yoshihisa

    Control to improve control characteristics of aircraft, CA (Control Augmentation), is used to realize the desirable motion of aircraft corresponding to pilot's control action. When the control laws using fuzzy inference were designed, trial and error was repeated for optimization of the parameter. Here, in designing control laws using fuzzy neural networks, the systematic optimization of the parameter was possible using the learning algorithm usually used in neural networks, by expressing the fuzzy inference in the form of neural networks. Here, the control laws, which learned the characteristics of the aircraft for one flight condition only, were used in all flight conditions without changing any parameter. Evaluation of the designed control laws showed good performance in all flight conditions. This proves that fuzzy neural networks are an effective and flexible method when applied to control laws for control augmentation of aircraft.

  4. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  5. Performance and neuromuscular adaptations following differing ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas W; Howatson, Glyn; Russell, Mark; French, Duncan N

    2013-12-01

    The interference effect attenuates strength and hypertrophic responses when strength and endurance training are conducted concurrently; however, the influence of training frequency on these responses remain unclear when varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training are performed. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the strength, limb girth, and neuromuscular adaptations to varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training. Twenty-four men with >2 years resistance training experience completed 6 weeks of 3 days per week of (a) strength training (ST), (b) concurrent strength and endurance training ratio 3:1 (CT3), (c) concurrent strength and endurance training ratio 1:1 (CT1), or (d) no training (CON) in an isolated limb model. Assessments of maximal voluntary contraction by means of isokinetic dynamometry leg extensions (maximum voluntary suppression [MVC]), limb girth, and neuromuscular responses through electromyography (EMG) were conducted at baseline, mid-intervention, and postintervention. After training, ST and CT3 conditions elicited greater MVC increases than CT1 and CON conditions (p ≤ 0.05). Strength training resulted in significantly greater increases in limb girth than both CT1 and CON conditions (p = 0.05 and 0.004, respectively). The CT3 induced significantly greater limb girth adaptations than CON condition (p = 0.04). No effect of time or intervention was observed for EMG (p > 0.05). In conclusion, greater frequencies of endurance training performed increased the magnitude of the interference response on strength and limb girth responses after 6 weeks of 3 days a week of training. Therefore, the frequency of endurance training should remain low if the primary focus of the training intervention is strength and hypertrophy.

  6. ENDURANCE TRAINING IN FASTING CONDITIONS: BIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS AND BODY WEIGHT MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Salar, Néstor; Urdampilleta Otegui, Aritz; Roche Collado, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    in the majority of sports the athlete is required to achieve optimal conditions both at a muscular and metabolic level as well as in body composition, increasing the lean body mass and maintaining a low body fat mass. In this context, different training protocols have been proposed in order to reduce body fat content, by maximizing fat use instead of glycogen. to verify if the training while fasting favours the use of fatty acids due to the low glycogen levels, allowing an improvement in the performance ant the control of body weight. protocols have been published, differing in time periods and exercise intensity. In addition, several markers ranging from gene expression analysis to determination of circulating parameters have been assessed in order to interpret the results. Discusion: at low intensities of endurance-based exercises, adipose tissue lipolysis and muscle fat oxidation rate seem to be higher in fasting than in fed state. On the other hand, glucose metabolism is adapted in order to save glycogen stores, possibly through gluconeogenesis activation. Finally, it has been observed that protein degradation is mainly downregulated. Only one study analyses changes in body composition after fasting during long periods, thus further work is necessary to demonstrate that this is the best method to control body fat. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Controlling patient participation during robot-assisted gait training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Alexander; Omlin, Ximena; Bergmann, Jeannine; Zimmerli, Lukas; Bolliger, Marc; Müller, Friedemann; Riener, Robert

    2011-03-23

    The overall goal of this paper was to investigate approaches to controlling active participation in stroke patients during robot-assisted gait therapy. Although active physical participation during gait rehabilitation after stroke was shown to improve therapy outcome, some patients can behave passively during rehabilitation, not maximally benefiting from the gait training. Up to now, there has not been an effective method for forcing patient activity to the desired level that would most benefit stroke patients with a broad variety of cognitive and biomechanical impairments. Patient activity was quantified in two ways: by heart rate (HR), a physiological parameter that reflected physical effort during body weight supported treadmill training, and by a weighted sum of the interaction torques (WIT) between robot and patient, recorded from hip and knee joints of both legs. We recorded data in three experiments, each with five stroke patients, and controlled HR and WIT to a desired temporal profile. Depending on the patient's cognitive capabilities, two different approaches were taken: either by allowing voluntary patient effort via visual instructions or by forcing the patient to vary physical effort by adapting the treadmill speed. We successfully controlled patient activity quantified by WIT and by HR to a desired level. The setup was thereby individually adaptable to the specific cognitive and biomechanical needs of each patient. Based on the three successful approaches to controlling patient participation, we propose a metric which enables clinicians to select the best strategy for each patient, according to the patient's physical and cognitive capabilities. Our framework will enable therapists to challenge the patient to more activity by automatically controlling the patient effort to a desired level. We expect that the increase in activity will lead to improved rehabilitation outcome.

  8. Influence of strength on magnitude and mechanisms of adaptation to power training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2010-08-01

    To determine whether the magnitude of performance improvements and the mechanisms driving adaptation to ballistic power training differ between strong and weak individuals. Twenty-four men were divided into three groups on the basis of their strength level: stronger (n = 8, one-repetition maximum-to-body mass ratio (1RM/BM) = 1.97 +/- 0.08), weaker (n = 8, 1RM/BM = 1.32 +/- 0.14), or control (n = 8, 1RM/BM = 1.37 +/- 0.13). The stronger and weaker groups trained three times per week for 10 wk. During these sessions, subjects performed maximal-effort jump squats with 0%-30% 1RM. The impact of training on athletic performance was assessed using a 2-d testing battery that involved evaluation of jump and sprint performance as well as measures of the force-velocity relationship, jumping mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural drive. Both experimental groups showed significant (P < or = 0.05) improvements in jump (stronger: peak power = 10.0 +/- 5.2 W.kg, jump height = 0.07 +/- 0.04 m; weaker: peak power = 9.1 +/- 2.3 W.kg, jump height = 0.06 +/- 0.04 m) and sprint performance after training (stronger: 40-m time = -2.2% +/- 2.0%; weaker: 40-m time = -3.6% +/- 2.3%). Effect size analyses revealed a tendency toward practically relevant differences existing between stronger and weaker individuals in the magnitude of improvements in jump performance (effect size: stronger: peak power = 1.55, jump height = 1.46; weaker: peak power = 1.03, jump height = 0.95) and especially after 5 wk of training (effect size: stronger: peak power = 1.60, jump height = 1.59; weaker: peak power = 0.95, jump height = 0.61). The mechanisms driving these improvements included significant (P < or = 0.05) changes in the force-velocity relationship, jump mechanics, and neural activation, with no changes to muscle architecture observed. The magnitude of improvements after ballistic power training was not significantly influenced by strength level. However, the training had a tendency toward

  9. Positive train control interoperability and networking research : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document describes the initial development of an ITC PTC Shared Network (IPSN), a hosted : environment to support the distribution, configuration management, and IT governance of Interoperable : Train Control (ITC) Positive Train Control (PTC) s...

  10. Disturbance Accommodating Adaptive Control with Application to Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive control techniques are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. Many physical systems experience external disturbances that are persistent or continually recurring. Flexible structures and systems with compliance between components often form a class of systems that fail to meet standard requirements for adaptive control. For these classes of systems, a residual mode filter can restore the ability of the adaptive controller to perform in a stable manner. New theory will be presented that enables adaptive control with accommodation of persistent disturbances using residual mode filters. After a short introduction to some of the control challenges of large utility-scale wind turbines, this theory will be applied to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  11. Training Platoon Leader Adaptive Thinking Skills in a Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    constraints and projected student throughput patterns. Selected findings from this research were presented at the 26th Annual Society for Industrial and...2006). Videogame -based training success: The impact of trainee characteristics - Year 2 (Technical Report 1188). Arlington, VA: U. S

  12. Limb skeletal muscle adaptation in athletes after training at altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizuno, M; Juel, C; Bro-Rasmussen, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    increase in buffer capacity of GAS and short-term running time (P less than 0.05). Thus the present study indicates no effect of 2 wk of altitude training on VO2 max but provides evidence to suggest an improvement in short-term exercise performance, which may be the result of an increase in muscle buffer...

  13. Antioxidant supplementation does not alter endurance training adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yfanti, Christina; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Nielsen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a considerable commercial market, especially within the sports community, claiming the need for antioxidant supplementation. One argument for antioxidant supplementation in sports is that physical exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS...... concentration, citrate synthase (CS), and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (beta-HAD) activity in muscle were significantly higher in response to training (P

  14. Preparing for the Olympic Games: Training adaptation in endurance sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, G.J.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    For most elite athletes winning an Olympic gold medal is the ultimate dream. To make this dream come true, in the first place one needs sufficient talent. However next to this talent, several years of training with large amounts of strenuous work is necessary. It is therefore not remarkable that the

  15. A Transfer of Training Study of Control Loader Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardullo, Frank M.; Stanco, Anthony A.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.; Grube, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    The control inceptor used in a simulated vehicle is an important part in maintaining the fidelity of a simulation. The force feedback provided by the control inceptor gives the operator important cues to maintain adequate performance. The dynamics of a control inceptor are typically based on a second order spring mass damper system with damping, force gradient, breakout force, and natural frequency parameters. Changing these parameters can have a great effect on pilot or driver control of the vehicle. The neuromuscular system has a very important role in manipulating the control inceptor within a vehicle. Many studies by McRuer, Aponso, and Hess have dealt with modeling the neuromuscular system and quantifying the effects of a high fidelity control loader as compared to a low fidelity control loader. Humans are adaptive in nature and their control behavior changes based on different control loader dynamics. Humans will change their control behavior to maintain tracking bandwidth and minimize tracking error. This paper reports on a quasi-transfer of training experiment which was performed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The quasi transfer of training study used a high fidelity control loader and a low fidelity control loader. Subjects trained in both simulations and then were transferred to the high fidelity control loader simulation. The parameters for the high fidelity control loader were determined from the literature. The low fidelity control loader parameters were found through testing of a simple computer joystick. A disturbance compensatory task is employed. The compensatory task involves implementing a simple horizon out the window display. A disturbance consisting of a sum of sines is used. The task consists of the subject compensating for the disturbance on the roll angle of the aircraft. The vehicle dynamics are represented as 1/s and 1/s2. The subject will try to maintain level flight throughout the experiment. The subjects consist of non-pilots to

  16. An adaptive fuzzy logic controller for robot-manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Dac Loc

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy controller is designed for the robot-manipulator. The synthesized controller ensures that 1 the close-loop system is globally stable and 2 the tracking error converges to zero asymptotically and a cost function is minimized. The fuzzy controller is synthesized from a collection of IF-THEN rules. The parameters of the membership functions characterizing the linguistic terms change according to some adaptive law for the purpose of controlling a plant to track a reference trajectory. The proposed control scheme is demonstrated in a typical nonlinear plant two link manipulator. The computer simulation of control is done by the language MATLAB. The results of simulation show that the adaptive controller well operates and provides good qualities of the control system. The presented results are analyzed.

  17. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  18. Adaptive Automation Based on Air Traffic Controller Decision-Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJtsma (Student TU Delft), Martijn; Borst, C.; Mercado Velasco, G.A.; Mulder, M.; van Paassen, M.M.; Tsang, P.S.; Vidulich, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Through smart scheduling and triggering of automation support, adaptive automation has the potential to balance air traffic controller workload. The challenge in the design of adaptive automation systems is to decide how and when the automation should provide support. This paper describes the design

  19. Model-free adaptive sliding mode controller design for generalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M WANG

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... A novel model-free adaptive sliding mode strategy is proposed for a generalized projective synchronization (GPS) ... the neural network theory, a model-free adaptive sliding mode controller is designed to guarantee asymptotic stability of the generalized ..... following optimization parameters are needed: ⎧.

  20. Immersion and Invariance Based Nonlinear Adaptive Flight Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveldt, L.; Van Oort, E.R.; Chu, Q.P.; Mulder, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a theoretical framework for nonlinear adaptive flight control is developed and applied to a simplified, over-actuated nonlinear fighter aircraft model. The framework is based on a modular adaptive backstepping scheme with a new type of nonlinear estimator. The nonlinear estimator is

  1. Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  2. Adaptive online inverse control of a shape memory alloy wire actuator using a dynamic neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, Huanhuan; Liao, Xiaofeng; Song, Gangbing

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators exhibit severe hysteresis, a nonlinear behavior, which complicates control strategies and limits their applications. This paper presents a new approach to controlling an SMA actuator through an adaptive inverse model based controller that consists of a dynamic neural network (DNN) identifier, a copy dynamic neural network (CDNN) feedforward term and a proportional (P) feedback action. Unlike fixed hysteresis models used in most inverse controllers, the proposed one uses a DNN to identify online the relationship between the applied voltage to the actuator and the displacement (the inverse model). Even without a priori knowledge of the SMA hysteresis and without pre-training, the proposed controller can precisely control the SMA wire actuator in various tracking tasks by identifying online the inverse model of the SMA actuator. Experiments were conducted, and experimental results demonstrated real-time modeling capabilities of DNN and the performance of the adaptive inverse controller. (paper)

  3. Can a 5 Week Strength Training Program Produce Range of Motion Adaptations in Amateur Female Tennis Players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. SHIM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess range of motion adaptations in amateur tennis players based on the effects of a five week strength training program on the dominant and non-dominant arm. Subjects: An experimental and control group of six collegiate women tennis players (Div II and NAIA participated. After initial assessment, six subjects participated in a five week, four times a week, pre-season strength training program consisting of five exercises: External Rotation 90°, Seated Row, Scaption, Chest Press, and External Shoulder Rotation (Rubber tubing. Results: Data analysis through a paired t-test showed that there were no significant changes in ROM in the experimental group when compared to the control group. In conclusion, a strength training program is highly recommended for female overhead athletes combined with a proper flexibility regimen to promote best practice.

  4. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control for Hydraulic Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2013-01-01

    . The main target is to overcome problems with linear controllers deteriorating performance due to the inherent nonlinear nature of such systems, without requiring extensive knowledge on system parameters nor advanced control theory. In order to accomplish this task, an integral sliding mode controller...

  5. Adapting existing training standards for unmanned aircraft: finding ways to train staff for unmanned aircraft operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, CR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As unmanned aircraft are introduced into civil airspace, a framework for training and licencing of dispatch and operating staff will be required. This paper assesses existing pilot training unit standards and proposes a framework within which staff...

  6. Virtual Reality as a Medium for Sensorimotor Adaptation Training and Spaceflight Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madansingh, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    With the upcoming shift to extra-long duration missions (1 year) aboard the ISS, sensorimotor adaptations during transitory periods in-and-out of microgravity are more important to understand and prepare for. Advances in virtual reality technology enables everyday adoption of these tools for entertainment and use in training. Experiencing virtual environments (VE) allows for the manipulation of visual flow to elicit automatic motor behavior and produce sensorimotor adaptation (SA). Recently, the ability to train individuals using repeatable and varied exposures to SA challenges has shown success by improving performance during exposure to a novel environment (Batson 2011). This capacity to 'learn to learn' is referred to as sensorimotor adaptive generalizability and, through the use of treadmill training, represents an untapped potential for individualized countermeasures. The goal of this study is to determine the feasibility of present head mounted displays (HMDs) to produce compelling visual flow information and the expected adaptations for use in future SA treadmill-based countermeasures. Participants experience infinite hallways providing congruent (baseline) or incongruent visual information (half or double speed) via HMD while walking on an instrumented treadmill at 1.1m/s. As gait performance approaches baseline levels, an adaptation time constant is derived to establish individual time-to-adapt (TTA). It is hypothesized that decreasing the TTA through SA treadmill training will facilitate sensorimotor adaptation during gravitational transitions. In this way, HMD technology represents a novel platform for SA training using off-the-shelf consumer products for greater training flexibility in astronaut and terrestrial applications alike.

  7. Visuomotor adaptation in head-mounted virtual reality versus conventional training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, J M; Sugiyama, T; Liew, S-L

    2017-04-04

    Immersive, head-mounted virtual reality (HMD-VR) provides a unique opportunity to understand how changes in sensory environments affect motor learning. However, potential differences in mechanisms of motor learning and adaptation in HMD-VR versus a conventional training (CT) environment have not been extensively explored. Here, we investigated whether adaptation on a visuomotor rotation task in HMD-VR yields similar adaptation effects in CT and whether these effects are achieved through similar mechanisms. Specifically, recent work has shown that visuomotor adaptation may occur via both an implicit, error-based internal model and a more cognitive, explicit strategic component. We sought to measure both overall adaptation and balance between implicit and explicit mechanisms in HMD-VR versus CT. Twenty-four healthy individuals were placed in either HMD-VR or CT and trained on an identical visuomotor adaptation task that measured both implicit and explicit components. Our results showed that the overall timecourse of adaption was similar in both HMD-VR and CT. However, HMD-VR participants utilized a greater cognitive strategy than CT, while CT participants engaged in greater implicit learning. These results suggest that while both conditions produce similar results in overall adaptation, the mechanisms by which visuomotor adaption occurs in HMD-VR appear to be more reliant on cognitive strategies.

  8. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plews, Daniel J; Laursen, Paul B; Stanley, Jamie; Kilding, Andrew E; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is often considered a convenient non-invasive assessment tool for monitoring individual adaptation to training. Decreases and increases in vagal-derived indices of HRV have been suggested to indicate negative and positive adaptations, respectively, to endurance training regimens. However, much of the research in this area has involved recreational and well-trained athletes, with the small number of studies conducted in elite athletes revealing equivocal outcomes. For example, in elite athletes, studies have revealed both increases and decreases in HRV to be associated with negative adaptation. Additionally, signs of positive adaptation, such as increases in cardiorespiratory fitness, have been observed with atypical concomitant decreases in HRV. As such, practical ways by which HRV can be used to monitor training status in elites are yet to be established. This article addresses the current literature that has assessed changes in HRV in response to training loads and the likely positive and negative adaptations shown. We reveal limitations with respect to how the measurement of HRV has been interpreted to assess positive and negative adaptation to endurance training regimens and subsequent physical performance. We offer solutions to some of the methodological issues associated with using HRV as a day-to-day monitoring tool. These include the use of appropriate averaging techniques, and the use of specific HRV indices to overcome the issue of HRV saturation in elite athletes (i.e., reductions in HRV despite decreases in resting heart rate). Finally, we provide examples in Olympic and World Champion athletes showing how these indices can be practically applied to assess training status and readiness to perform in the period leading up to a pinnacle event. The paper reveals how longitudinal HRV monitoring in elites is required to understand their unique individual HRV fingerprint. For the first time, we demonstrate how

  9. 49 CFR 236.825 - System, automatic train control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false System, automatic train control. 236.825 Section..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.825 System, automatic train control. A system so arranged that its operation will automatically...

  10. Adaptive control in series load PWM induction heating inverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelitzky, Tibor; Henrietta Dulf, Eva

    2013-12-01

    Permanent variations of the electric properties of the load in induction heating equipment make difficult to control the plant. To overcome these disadvantages, the authors propose a new approach based on adaptive control methods. For real plants it is enough to present desired performances or start-up variables for the controller, from which the algorithms tune the controllers by itself. To present the advantages of the proposed controllers, comparisons are made to a PI controller tuned through Ziegler-Nichols method.

  11. Novel hybrid adaptive controller for manipulation in complex perturbation environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M C Smith

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a hybrid control scheme, combining the advantages of task-space and joint-space control. The controller is based on a human-like adaptive design, which minimises both control effort and tracking error. Our novel hybrid adaptive controller has been tested in extensive simulations, in a scenario where a Baxter robot manipulator is affected by external disturbances in the form of interaction with the environment and tool-like end-effector perturbations. The results demonstrated improved performance in the hybrid controller over both of its component parts. In addition, we introduce a novel method for online adaptation of learning parameters, using the fuzzy control formalism to utilise expert knowledge from the experimenter. This mechanism of meta-learning induces further improvement in performance and avoids the need for tuning through trial testing.

  12. Adaptive slope compensation for high bandwidth digital current mode controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeed, Fazel; Nymand, Morten

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive slope compensation method for digital current mode control of dc-dc converters is proposed in this paper. The compensation slope is used for stabilizing the inner current loop in peak current mode control. In this method, the compensation slope is adapted with the variations...... in converter duty cycle. The adaptive slope compensation provides optimum controller operation in term of bandwidth over wide range of operating points. In this paper operation principle of the controller is discussed. The proposed controller is implemented in an FPGA to control a 100 W buck converter....... The experimental results of measured loop-gain at different operating points are presented to validate the theoretical performance of the controller....

  13. Robust Adaptive Speed Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidstrup, N.

    , (LS) identification and generalized predictive control (GPC) has been implemented and tested on the CVC drive. Allthough GPC is a robust control method, it was not possible to maintain specified controller performance in the entire operating range. This was the main reason for investigating truly...... adaptive speed control of the CVC drive. A direct truly adaptive speed controller has been implemented. The adaptive controller is a moving Average Self-Tuning Regulator which is abbreviated MASTR throughout the thesis. Two practical implementations of this controller were proposed. They were denoted MASTR...... and measurement noise in general, were the major reasons for the drifting parameters. Two approaches was proposed to robustify MASTR2 against the output noise. The first approach consists of filtering the output. Output filtering had a significant effect in simulations, but the robustness against the output noise...

  14. Adaptations with intermittent exercise training in post- and premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Kåre; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann

    2017-01-01

    of approximately one training session per week. RESULTS: In PM, the body fat percentage decreased (P mass increased (P mass and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) were higher, and Yo...... lean leg mass, V˙O2max, YYIET-1 performance, level of procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide, and total leg BMD were maintained, whereas whole-body BMD and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were reduced (P

  15. Cardiorespiratory Adaptations in Elderly Men Following Different Concurrent Training Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadore, E L; Pinto, R S; Teodoro, J L; da Silva, L X N; Menger, E; Alberton, C L; Cunha, G; Schumann, M; Bottaro, M; ZamboM-Ferraresi, F; Izquierdo, M

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of different intra-session exercise orders during concurrent training (CT) on endurance performance in elderly men, as well as to verify its influence on individual responses in endurance performance. Twenty-five healthy elderly men (64.7 ± 4.1 years) were placed into two groups: strength training prior to endurance training (SE, n=13), and one in the reverse order (ES, n=12). CT was performed three times a week during 12 weeks. Before and after training, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), maximal workload (Wmax), absolute and relative cycling economy at 25, 50, 75 and 100 W (i.e., average VO2 at different stages) were assessed. Similar increases in VO2peak were observed in the SE and ES groups (SE: 8.1 ± 9.9%; ES: 9.3 ± 9.8%; P<0.001), as well as in Wmax (SE: 19.9 ± 19.3%; ES: 24.1 ± 24.0%; P<0.001). Moreover, significant reductions were observed in the absolute VO2 at 100 W (P<0.05) in the SE and ES groups. No difference between groups was observed. In the ES group, one subject did not respond positively in terms of both VO2max and Wmax, whereas 4 subjects did not respond positively in terms of both VO2max and Wmax in SE group. CT improved maximal and submaximal endurance performance in elderly men, independent of intra-session exercise order. However, it seems that the ES order elicited more individual responsiveness in terms of maximal endurance performance than SE order.

  16. The Pilates method and cardiorespiratory adaptation to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco-Fernández, Maria; Jiménez-Martín, Miguel; Sánchez-Caravaca, M Angeles; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio M; Ramírez-Rodrigo, Jesús; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Although all authors report beneficial health changes following training based on the Pilates method, no explicit analysis has been performed of its cardiorespiratory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate possible changes in cardiorespiratory parameters with the Pilates method. A total of 45 university students aged 18-35 years (77.8% female and 22.2% male), who did not routinely practice physical exercise or sports, volunteered for the study and signed informed consent. The Pilates training was conducted over 10 weeks, with three 1-hour sessions per week. Physiological cardiorespiratory responses were assessed using a MasterScreen CPX apparatus. After the 10-week training, statistically significant improvements were observed in mean heart rate (135.4-124.2 beats/min), respiratory exchange ratio (1.1-0.9) and oxygen equivalent (30.7-27.6) values, among other spirometric parameters, in submaximal aerobic testing. These findings indicate that practice of the Pilates method has a positive influence on cardiorespiratory parameters in healthy adults who do not routinely practice physical exercise activities.

  17. Limb skeletal muscle adaptation in athletes after training at altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizuno, M; Juel, C; Bro-Rasmussen, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Morphological and biochemical characteristics of biopsies obtained from gastrocnemius (GAS) and triceps brachii muscle (TRI), as well as maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) and O2 deficit, were determined in 10 well-trained cross-country skiers before and after a 2-wk stay (2,100 m above sea level......) and training (2,700 m above sea level) at altitude. On return to sea level, VO2 max was the same as the prealtitude value, whereas an increase in O2 deficit (29%) and in short-term running performance (17%) was observed (P less than 0.05). GAS showed maintained capillary supply but a 10% decrease...... increase in buffer capacity of GAS and short-term running time (P less than 0.05). Thus the present study indicates no effect of 2 wk of altitude training on VO2 max but provides evidence to suggest an improvement in short-term exercise performance, which may be the result of an increase in muscle buffer...

  18. Integrated Damage-Adaptive Control System (IDACS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI, in collaboration with Boeing Phantom Works, proposes to develop and test an efficient Integrated Damage Adaptive Control System (IDACS). The proposed system is...

  19. Vehicle-to-infrastructure program cooperative adaptive cruise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report documents the work completed by the Crash Avoidance Metrics Partners LLC (CAMP) Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) Consortium during the project titled Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC). Participating companies in the V2I Cons...

  20. Adaptive Trajectory Tracking Control using Reinforcement Learning for Quadrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Lou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inaccurate system parameters and unpredicted external disturbances affect the performance of non-linear controllers. In this paper, a new adaptive control algorithm under the reinforcement framework is proposed to stabilize a quadrotor helicopter. Based on a command-filtered non-linear control algorithm, adaptive elements are added and learned by policy-search methods. To predict the inaccurate system parameters, a new kernel-based regression learning method is provided. In addition, Policy learning by Weighting Exploration with the Returns (PoWER and Return Weighted Regression (RWR are utilized to learn the appropriate parameters for adaptive elements in order to cancel the effect of external disturbance. Furthermore, numerical simulations under several conditions are performed, and the ability of adaptive trajectory-tracking control with reinforcement learning are demonstrated.

  1. Control and adaptation in telecommunication systems mathematical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Popovskij, Vladimir; Titarenko, Larysa

    2011-01-01

    This book is devoted to mathematical foundations providing synthesis and analysis of control and adaptation algorithms targeting modern telecommunication systems (TCS). The most popular technologies and network management methods are discussed.

  2. Optimizing adaptive learning through testing, diagnostic reflection and learner control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, September). Optimizing adaptive learning through testing, diagnostic reflection and learner control. Presentation for visitors of KU Leuven, Open University, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  3. Integrated Damage-Adaptive Control System (IDACS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI proposes to further develop, implement and test the damage-adaptive control algorithms developed in Phase I within the framework of an Integrated Damage...

  4. Fault Adaptive Control of Overactuated Systems Using Prognostic Estimation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Most fault adaptive control research addresses the preservation of system stability or functionality in the presence of a specific failure (fault). This paper...

  5. High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project is the continued development of the High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) system. Solar radiation is not a viable...

  6. High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed project is the development of High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) systems to drive plant growth. Solar...

  7. Analysis of Postural Control Adaptation During Galvanic and Vibratory Stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fransson, P

    2001-01-01

    The objective for this study was to investigate whether the postural control adaptation during galvanic stimulation of the vestibular nerve were similar to that found during vibration stimulation to the calf muscles...

  8. Real-Time Application Performance Steering and Adaptive Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    .... The objective of the Real-time Application Performance Steering and Adaptive Control project is to replace ad hoc, post-mortem performance optimization with an extensible, portable, and distributed...

  9. Lyapunov function-based control laws for revolute robot arms - Tracking control, robustness, and adaptive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Bayard, David S.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of joint level control laws for all-revolute robot arms is introduced. The analysis is similar to a recently proposed energy-like Liapunov function approach, except that the closed-loop potential function is shaped in accordance with the underlying joint space topology. This approach gives way to a much simpler analysis and leads to a new class of control designs which guarantee both global asymptotic stability and local exponential stability. When Coulomb and viscous friction and parameter uncertainty are present as model perturbations, a sliding mode-like modification of the control law results in a robustness-enhancing outer loop. Adaptive control is formulated within the same framework. A linear-in-the-parameters formulation is adopted and globally asymptotically stable adaptive control laws are derived by simply replacing unknown model parameters by their estimates (i.e., certainty equivalence adaptation).

  10. Adaptive control of discrete-time chaotic systems: a fuzzy control approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Gang; Chen Guanrong

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses adaptive control of a class of discrete-time chaotic systems from a fuzzy control approach. Using the T-S model of discrete-time chaotic systems, an adaptive control algorithm is developed based on some conventional adaptive control techniques. The resulting adaptively controlled chaotic system is shown to be globally stable, and its robustness is discussed. A simulation example of the chaotic Henon map control is finally presented, to illustrate an application and the performance of the proposed control algorithm

  11. Stochastic Adaptive Control and Estimation Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    multioutput ARMA system. The plant has constant but unknown parameters. The cautious controller with a one-step horizon and a new dual controller with a two...system is shown to be stable. Multiinput multioutput systems with unknown parameters are encoun- Remark 4.1: tered in many practical situations, and...dual (181 B. Witterunark, "An active suboptimal dual controller for systems with stochastic c irfsoluin applied t-a multiipvt multioutput model

  12. Adaptive Generalized Predictive Control for Mechatronic Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belda, Květoslav; Böhm, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 8 (2006), s. 1830-1837 ISSN 1109-2777 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/06/P275; GA ČR GA102/05/0271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : on-line identification * predictive control * input/output equations of predictions * real-time control Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/belda-0040149.pdf

  13. Scalable Harmonization of Complex Networks With Local Adaptive Controllers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kárný, Miroslav; Herzallah, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2017), s. 394-404 ISSN 2168-2216 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13502S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Adaptive control * Adaptive estimation * Bayes methods * Complex networks * Decentralized control * Feedback * Feedforward systems * Recursive estimation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.350, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/karny-0457337.pdf

  14. Adaptive Non-linear Control of Hydraulic Actuator Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Conrad, Finn

    1998-01-01

    Presentation of two new developed adaptive non-liner controllers for hydraulic actuator systems to give stable operation and improved performance.Results from the IMCIA project supported by the Danish Technical Research Council (STVF).......Presentation of two new developed adaptive non-liner controllers for hydraulic actuator systems to give stable operation and improved performance.Results from the IMCIA project supported by the Danish Technical Research Council (STVF)....

  15. Does subchondral bone of the equine proximal phalanx adapt to race training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Phillipa; Singer, Ellen R; Jeffery, Nathan S

    2016-07-01

    sagittal groove in the central coronal section in the raced than the unraced group. The Contralateral to Fracture group demonstrated significantly greater variance of volumetric bone mineral density compared with the Raced Control and Unraced Control (P bone volumetric bone mineral density and thickness in the Contralateral to Fracture group (P = 0.005). The findings demonstrate that differences exist in subchondral bone volumetric bone mineral density and thickness across the proximal osteochondral surface of the equine first phalanx in horses with different training histories. The findings also demonstrate that the subchondral bone of the sagittal groove of the equine first phalanx adapts to race-training in the race-fit groups (Raced Control and Contralateral to Fracture) with an increase in volumetric bone mineral density relative to unraced controls. Within the race-trained groups, the Contralateral to Fracture bones had a greater variance of volumetric bone mineral density, suggesting that stress-induced bone adaptation had become more erratic, potentially contributing to the aetiology of sagittal fractures of the first phalanx in the Thoroughbred racehorse. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  16. Bi-Objective Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Control for Systems with Input Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new model-reference adaptive control method based on a bi-objective optimal control formulation for systems with input uncertainty. A parallel predictor model is constructed to relate the predictor error to the estimation error of the control effectiveness matrix. In this work, we develop an optimal control modification adaptive control approach that seeks to minimize a bi-objective linear quadratic cost function of both the tracking error norm and predictor error norm simultaneously. The resulting adaptive laws for the parametric uncertainty and control effectiveness uncertainty are dependent on both the tracking error and predictor error, while the adaptive laws for the feedback gain and command feedforward gain are only dependent on the tracking error. The optimal control modification term provides robustness to the adaptive laws naturally from the optimal control framework. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive control approach.

  17. Effects of volume-based overload plyometric training on maximal-intensity exercise adaptations in young basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Abbas; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Meylan, Cesar; Nakamura, Fabio Y; Cañas-Jamett, Rodrigo; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare maximal-intensity exercise adaptations in young basketball players (who were strong individuals at baseline) participating in regular basketball training versus regular plus a volume-based plyometric training program in the pre-season period. Young basketball players were recruited and assigned either to a plyometric with regular basketball training group (experimental group [EG]; N.=8), or a basketball training only group (control group [CG]; N.=8). The athletes in EG performed periodized (i.e., from 117 to 183 jumps per session) plyometric training for eight weeks. Before and after the intervention, players were assessed in vertical and broad jump, change of direction, maximal strength and a 60-meter sprint test. No significant improvements were found in the CG, while the EG improved vertical jump (effect size [ES] 2.8), broad jump (ES=2.4), agility T test (ES=2.2), Illinois agility test (ES=1.4), maximal strength (ES=1.8), and 60-m sprint (ES=1.6) (Ptraining in addition to regular basketball practice can lead to meaningful improvements in maximal-intensity exercise adaptations among young basketball players during the pre-season.

  18. Simple adaptive control for quadcopters with saturated actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Oleg I.; Bobtsov, Alexey A.; Pyrkin, Anton A.; Gromov, Vladislav S.

    2017-01-01

    The stabilization problem for quadcopters with saturated actuators is considered. A simple adaptive output control approach is proposed. The control law "consecutive compensator" is augmented with the auxiliary integral loop and anti-windup scheme. Efficiency of the obtained regulator was confirmed by simulation of the quadcopter control problem.

  19. Spectrum management considerations of adaptive power control in satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitz, P.; Sullivan, T.

    1983-01-01

    Adaptive power control concepts for the compensation of rain attenuation are considered for uplinks and downlinks. The performance of example power-controlled and fixed-EIRP uplinks is compared in terms of C/Ns and C/Is. Provisional conclusions are drawn with regard to the efficacy of uplink and downlink power control orbit/spectrum utilization efficiency.

  20. Physiological and health-related adaptations to low-volume interval training: influences of nutrition and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibala, Martin J; Gillen, Jenna B; Percival, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Interval training refers to the basic concept of alternating periods of relatively intense exercise with periods of lower-intensity effort or complete rest for recovery. Low-volume interval training refers to sessions that involve a relatively small total amount of exercise (i.e. ≤10 min of intense exercise), compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) protocols that are generally reflected in public health guidelines. In an effort to standardize terminology, a classification scheme was recently proposed in which the term 'high-intensity interval training' (HIIT) be used to describe protocols in which the training stimulus is 'near maximal' or the target intensity is between 80 and 100 % of maximal heart rate, and 'sprint interval training' (SIT) be used for protocols that involve 'all out' or 'supramaximal' efforts, in which target intensities correspond to workloads greater than what is required to elicit 100 % of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Both low-volume SIT and HIIT constitute relatively time-efficient training strategies to rapidly enhance the capacity for aerobic energy metabolism and elicit physiological remodeling that resembles changes normally associated with high-volume MICT. Short-term SIT and HIIT protocols have also been shown to improve health-related indices, including cardiorespiratory fitness and markers of glycemic control in both healthy individuals and those at risk for, or afflicted by, cardiometabolic diseases. Recent evidence from a limited number of studies has highlighted potential sex-based differences in the adaptive response to SIT in particular. It has also been suggested that specific nutritional interventions, in particular those that can augment muscle buffering capacity, such as sodium bicarbonate, may enhance the adaptive response to low-volume interval training.

  1. Adaptive Process Control with Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision-making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  2. Adaptive process control using fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  3. Adaptive Control Using a Neural Network Estimator and Dynamic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Tetsujiro; Miyazawa, Yoshikazu

    More and more UAVs are developed for various purposes and their flight controllers are required to have sufficient robustness and performance to realize their versatile missions. To design these sophisticated controller is pretty much time-consuming task by traditional design method. Neural network based adaptive control with dynamic inversion is applied to solve this problem. This method has two advantages. One is that the gain scheduling is not necessary because nonlinear dynamic inversion is applied to control nonlinear systems. The other is that neural network improves the controller performance by estimating parameters of the actual plant. Numerical examples show its effectiveness and its ability to adapt to modeling errors. This paper concludes that proposed method reduces the workload of controller design task and it has ability to adapt various errors of nonlinear systems.

  4. Adaptive pitch control for load mitigation of wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Tang, J.

    2015-04-01

    In this research, model reference adaptive control is examined for the pitch control of wind turbines that may suffer from reduced life owing to extreme loads and fatigue when operated under a high wind speed. Specifically, we aim at making a trade-off between the maximum energy captured and the load induced. The adaptive controller is designed to track the optimal generator speed and at the same time to mitigate component loads under turbulent wind field and other uncertainties. The proposed algorithm is tested on the NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine, and its performance is compared with that those of the gain scheduled proportional integral (GSPI) control and the disturbance accommodating control (DAC). The results show that the blade root flapwise load can be reduced at a slight expense of optimal power output. The generator speed regulation under adaptive controller is better than DAC.

  5. Adaptive Control for Robotic Manipulators Base on RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Jing

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive neural network controller is brought forward by the paper to solve trajectory tracking problems of robotic manipulators with uncertainties. The first scheme consists of a PD feedback and a dynamic compensator which is composed by neural network controller and variable structure controller. Neutral network controller is designed to adaptive learn and compensate the unknown uncertainties, variable structure controller is designed to eliminate approach errors of neutral network. The adaptive weight learning algorithm of neural network is designed to ensure online real-time adjustment, offline learning phase is not need; Global asymptotic stability (GAS of system base on Lyapunov theory is analysised to ensure the convergence of the algorithm. The simulation result s show that the kind of the control scheme is effective and has good robustness.

  6. Open Groups: Adaptations in Implementing a Parent Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna-Jean P. Brock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Programs that focus on positive parenting have been shown to improve parental attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, and increase parent and child bonding. These programs are typically conducted in a closed group format. However, when individual or community needs are more immediate, programmers sometimes opt for an open group format. To determine the effectiveness of this adaptation to an open group format, the present study compared both groups on parental outcomes. Methods: Both closed and open group formats were offered and implemented between January 2009 and December 2012. Participants for both formats were recruited through similar means and the format placement for each family was determined by the immediacy of the need for an intervention, the time lapse until a new cycle would begin, and scheduling flexibility. Chi-Square analyses were conducted to determine demographic differences between the two groups and gain scores were calculated from the pre- and post-test AAPI-2 scales within a mixed MANOVA to determine group for-mat effectiveness. Results: Though open groups contained higher risk families; parental out-come improvements were significant for both groups. All participants, regardless of group membership, demonstrated the same statistically significant improvements following completion of the program. Conclusion: Findings provide support for adapting group formats when necessary to fit community and individual needs.

  7. Combined MIMO adaptive and decentralized controllers for broadband active noise and vibration control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Wesselink, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Recent implementations of multiple-input multiple-output adaptive controllers for reduction of broadband noise and vibrations provide considerably improved performance over traditional adaptive algorithms. The most significant performance improvements are in terms of speed of convergence, the amount

  8. The identification of genetic pathways involved in vascular adaptations after physical deconditioning versus exercise training in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, G.; Duijnhoven, N.T. van; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Horstman, A.M.; Haan, A. de; Janssen, T.W.; Graaf, M.J. de; Pardoel, E.M.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity and exercise training result in opposite adaptations of vascular structure. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these adaptations are not completely understood. We used a unique study design to examine both vascular characteristics of the superficial femoral artery (using

  9. Adaptive Feedfoward Feedback Control Framework, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel approach is proposed for the suppression of the aircraft's structural vibration to increase the resilience of the flight control law in the presence of the...

  10. Adaptive artificial neural network for autonomous robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: neural network controller for robot arm positioning with visual feedback; initial training of the arm; automatic recovery from cumulative fault scenarios; and error reduction by iterative fine movements.

  11. Design of an adaptable nonlinear controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez R, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the behavior of a nuclear reactor is of great importance as it allows to know a priori the conditions at which a reactor is submitted. In the sareactor are the design and simulation of control algorithms based on the theories of modern control with the objective of improving improving the performance criterions as well as to guarantee the the stability of the retrofitting system. (author)

  12. Adaptation to a simulated central scotoma during visual search training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David V; Liu, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Patients with a central scotoma usually use a preferred retinal locus (PRL) consistently in daily activities. The selection process and time course of the PRL development are not well understood. We used a gaze-contingent display to simulate an isotropic central scotoma in normal subjects while they were practicing a difficult visual search task. As compared to foveal search, initial exposure to the simulated scotoma resulted in prolonged search reaction time, many more fixations and unorganized eye movements during search. By the end of a 1782-trial training with the simulated scotoma, the search performance improved to within 25% of normal foveal search. Accompanying the performance improvement, there were also fewer fixations, fewer repeated fixations in the same area of the search stimulus and a clear tendency of using one area near the border of the scotoma to identify the search target. The results were discussed in relation to natural development of PRL in central scotoma patients and potential visual training protocols to facilitate PRL development. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. ADAPTIVE CONTROL OF FEED LOAD CHANGES IN ALCOHOL FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folly R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A fed-batch alcohol fermentation on a pilot plant scale with a digital supervisory control system was evaluated as an experimental application case study of an adaptive controller. The verification of intrinsically dynamic variations in the characteristics of the fermentation, observed in previous work, showed the necessity of an adaptive control strategy for controller parameter tuning in order to adjust the changes in the specific rates of consumption, growth and product formation during the process. Satisfactory experimental results were obtained for set-point variations and sugar feed concentration load changes in the manipulated inlet flow to the fermenter

  14. Variable neural adaptive robust control: a switched system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Żak, Stanislaw H

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multiinput multioutput uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a novel variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. It can determine the network structure online dynamically by adding or removing RBFs according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is systematically considered in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  15. Automated Sequential Pushing of Micro Objects By Using Adaptive Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Shahini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on precision automated pushing of multiple micro objects. An adaptive control system is proposed to accurately push and position the micro objects on a substrate. Each micro object exhibits different characteristics in terms of the surface micro forces governing the manipulation process. The controller is designed to compensate for the effect of the micro forces whose aggregated magnitude varies during the process. An experimental setup is designed to validate the performance of the proposed controller. The results of the experiments confirm that the proposed adaptive controller is capable of learning to adjust its parameters effectively, when the surface micro forces change under varying surface and ambient conditions.

  16. Prolonged training does not result in a greater extent of interlimb transfer following visuomotor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuming; Wang, Jinsung

    2014-11-01

    Learning a visumotor adaptation task with one arm typically facilitates subsequent performance with the other. The extent of transfer across the arms, however, is generally much smaller than that across different conditions within the same arm. This may be attributed to a possibility that intralimb transfer involves both algorithmic and instance-reliant learning, whereas interlimb transfer only involves algorithmic learning. Here, we investigated whether prolonged training with one arm could facilitate subsequent performance with the other arm to a greater extent, by examining the effect of varying lengths of practice trials on the extent of interlimb transfer. We had 18 subjects adapt to a 30° visuomotor rotation with the left arm first (training), then with the right arm (transfer). During the training session, the subjects reached toward multiple targets for 160, 320 or 400 trials; during the transfer session, all subjects performed the same task for 160 trials. Our results revealed substantial initial transfer from the left to the right arm in all three conditions. However, neither the amount of initial transfer nor the rate of adaptation during the transfer session was significantly different across the conditions, indicating that the extent of transfer was similar regardless of the length of initial training. Our findings suggest that interlimb transfer of visuomotor adaptation may only occur through algorithmic learning, which is effector independent, and that prolonged training may only have beneficial effects when instance-reliant learning, which is effector dependent, is also involved in the learning process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mentoring SFRM: A New Approach to International Space Station Flight Control Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Therese; Barshi, Immanuel; Schmidt, Lacey

    2009-01-01

    The Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) of the Johnson Space Center is responsible for providing continuous operations support for the International Space Station (ISS). Operations support requires flight controllers who are skilled in team performance as well as the technical operations of the ISS. Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM), a NASA adapted variant of Crew Resource Management (CRM), is the competency model used in the MOD. ISS flight controller certification has evolved to include a balanced focus on development of SFRM and technical expertise. The latest challenge the MOD faces is how to certify an ISS flight controller (Operator) to a basic level of effectiveness in 1 year. SFRM training uses a twopronged approach to expediting operator certification: 1) imbed SFRM skills training into all Operator technical training and 2) use senior flight controllers as mentors. This paper focuses on how the MOD uses senior flight controllers as mentors to train SFRM skills.

  18. A Submaximal Running Test With Postexercise Cardiac Autonomic and Neuromuscular Function in Monitoring Endurance Training Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari; Laine, Tanja; Hynynen, Esa; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-01-01

    Vesterinen, V, Nummela, A, Laine, T, Hynynen, E, Mikkola, J, and Häkkinen, K. A submaximal running test with postexercise cardiac autonomic and neuromuscular function in monitoring endurance training adaptation. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 233-243, 2017-The aim of this study was to investigate whether a submaximal running test (SRT) with postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR), heart rate variability (HRV), and countermovement jump (CMJ) measurements could be used to monitor endurance training adaptation. Thirty-five endurance-trained men and women completed an 18-week endurance training. Maximal endurance performance and maximal oxygen uptake were measured every 8 weeks. In addition, SRTs with postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ measurements were carried out every 4 weeks. Submaximal running test consisted of two 6-minute stages at 70 and 80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) and a 3-minute stage at 90% HRmax, followed by a 2-minute recovery stage for measuring postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ test. The highest responders according to the change of maximal endurance performance showed a significant improvement in running speeds during stages 2 and 3 in SRT, whereas no changes were observed in the lowest responders. The strongest correlation was found between the change of maximal endurance performance and running speed during stage 3, whereas no significant relationships were found between the change of maximal endurance performance and the changes of postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ. Running speed at 90% HRmax intensity was the most sensitive variable to monitor adaptation to endurance training. The present submaximal test showed potential to monitor endurance training adaptation. Furthermore, it may serve as a practical tool for athletes and coaches to evaluate weekly the effectiveness of training program without interfering in the normal training habits.

  19. The Preparation Period in Basketball: Training Load and Neuromuscular Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferioli, Davide; Bosio, Andrea; Bilsborough, Johann C; Torre, Antonio La; Tornaghi, Michele; Rampinini, Ermanno

    2018-01-18

    To investigate the 1) effect of the preparation period on the neuromuscular characteristics of 12 professional (PRO) and 16 semi-professional (SEMI-PRO) basketball players; 2) relationships between training load indices and changes in neuromuscular physical performance. Prior to and following the preparation period, players underwent a counter-movement jump (CMJ) test, followed by a repeated change of direction (COD) test consisting of 4 levels with increasing intensities. The peripheral neuromuscular functions of the knee extensors (peak torque, PT) were measured using electrical stimulations after each level (PT1, PT2, PT3 and PT4). Furthermore, PT Max (the highest value of PT) and PT Dec (PT decrement from PT Max to PT4) were calculated. Trivial-to-small (effect size, ES: -0.17 to 0.46) improvements were found in CMJ variables, regardless of the competitive levels. After the preparation period, peripheral fatigue induced by a COD test was similarly reduced in both PRO (PT Dec: from 27.8±21.3% to 11.4±13.7%, ES±90%CI= -0.71±0.30) and SEMI-PRO (PT Dec: from 26.1±21.9% to 10.2±8.2%, ES±90%CI= -0.69±0.32). Moderate-to-large relationships were found between session rating of perceived exertion training load and changes in PPO measured during the CMJs (r s ±90%CI: PPOabs, -0.46±0.26; PPOrel, -0.53±0.23) and in some PTs measured during the COD test (PT1, -0.45±0.26; PT2, -0.44±0.26; PT3, -0.40±0.27 and PT Max, -0.38±0.28). Preparation period induced minimal changes in the CMJ, while the ability to sustain repeated COD efforts was improved. Reaching high session rating of perceived exertion training loads might partially and negatively affect the ability to produce strength and power.

  20. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller of switched reluctance motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahour Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS control for switched reluctance motor (SRM speed. The ANFIS has the advantages of expert knowledge of the fuzzy inference system and the learning capability of neural networks. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller of the motor speed is then designed and simulated. Digital simulation results show that the designed ANFIS speed controller realizes a good dynamic behaviour of the motor, a perfect speed tracking with no overshoot and a good rejection of impact loads disturbance. The results of applying the adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller to a SRM give better performance and high robustness than those obtained by the application of a conventional controller (PI.

  1. Control Reallocation Strategies for Damage Adaptation in Transport Class Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, Greg; Bryant, Don

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility, potential benefits and implementation issues associated with retrofitting a neural-adaptive flight control system (NFCS) to existing transport aircraft, including both cable/hydraulic and fly-by-wire configurations. NFCS uses a neural network based direct adaptive control approach for applying alternate sources of control authority in the presence of damage or failures in order to achieve desired flight control performance. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions, adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and to make the controller easy to apply when implemented on different aircraft. Full-motion piloted simulation studies were performed on two different transport models: the Boeing 747-400 and the Boeing C-17. Subjects included NASA, Air Force and commercial airline pilots. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increased survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  2. Hybrid adaptive ascent flight control for a flexible launch vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Brian D.

    For the purpose of maintaining dynamic stability and improving guidance command tracking performance under off-nominal flight conditions, a hybrid adaptive control scheme is selected and modified for use as a launch vehicle flight controller. This architecture merges a model reference adaptive approach, which utilizes both direct and indirect adaptive elements, with a classical dynamic inversion controller. This structure is chosen for a number of reasons: the properties of the reference model can be easily adjusted to tune the desired handling qualities of the spacecraft, the indirect adaptive element (which consists of an online parameter identification algorithm) continually refines the estimates of the evolving characteristic parameters utilized in the dynamic inversion, and the direct adaptive element (which consists of a neural network) augments the linear feedback signal to compensate for any nonlinearities in the vehicle dynamics. The combination of these elements enables the control system to retain the nonlinear capabilities of an adaptive network while relying heavily on the linear portion of the feedback signal to dictate the dynamic response under most operating conditions. To begin the analysis, the ascent dynamics of a launch vehicle with a single 1st stage rocket motor (typical of the Ares 1 spacecraft) are characterized. The dynamics are then linearized with assumptions that are appropriate for a launch vehicle, so that the resulting equations may be inverted by the flight controller in order to compute the control signals necessary to generate the desired response from the vehicle. Next, the development of the hybrid adaptive launch vehicle ascent flight control architecture is discussed in detail. Alterations of the generic hybrid adaptive control architecture include the incorporation of a command conversion operation which transforms guidance input from quaternion form (as provided by NASA) to the body-fixed angular rate commands needed by the

  3. Adaptive Gain Scheduled Semiactive Vibration Control Using a Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an adaptive gain scheduled semiactive control method using an artificial neural network for structural systems subject to earthquake disturbance. In order to design a semiactive control system with high control performance against earthquakes with different time and/or frequency properties, multiple semiactive control laws with high performance for each of multiple earthquake disturbances are scheduled with an adaptive manner. Each semiactive control law to be scheduled is designed based on the output emulation approach that has been proposed by the authors. As the adaptive gain scheduling mechanism, we introduce an artificial neural network (ANN. Input signals of the ANN are the measured earthquake disturbance itself, for example, the acceleration, velocity, and displacement. The output of the ANN is the parameter for the scheduling of multiple semiactive control laws each of which has been optimized for a single disturbance. Parameters such as weight and bias in the ANN are optimized by the genetic algorithm (GA. The proposed design method is applied to semiactive control design of a base-isolated building with a semiactive damper. With simulation study, the proposed adaptive gain scheduling method realizes control performance exceeding single semiactive control optimizing the average of the control performance subject to various earthquake disturbances.

  4. 78 FR 5767 - Positive Train Control Systems (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... [Docket No. FRA-2011-0061, Notice No. 2] RIN 2130-AC32 Positive Train Control Systems (RRR) AGENCY... positive train control (PTC) systems. The present document clarifies FRA's responses to several elements of... otherwise amend the rules concerning the ``limited operations'' exception, en route failures of trains...

  5. Dose-response relationship of the cardiovascular adaptation to endurance training in healthy adults: how much training for what benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Ken-Ichi; Zhang, Rong; Zuckerman, Julie H; Levine, Benjamin D

    2003-10-01

    Occupational or recreational exercise reduces mortality from cardiovascular disease. The potential mechanisms for this reduction may include changes in blood pressure (BP) and autonomic control of the circulation. Therefore, we conducted the present long-term longitudinal study to quantify the dose-response relationship between the volume and intensity of exercise training, and regulation of heart rate (HR) and BP. We measured steady-state hemodynamics and analyzed dynamic cardiovascular regulation by spectral and transfer function analysis of cardiovascular variability in 11 initially sedentary subjects during 1 yr of progressive endurance training sufficient to allow them to complete a marathon. From this, we found that 1) moderate exercise training for 3 mo decreased BP, HR, and total peripheral resistance, and increased cardiovascular variability and arterial baroreflex sensitivity; 2) more prolonged and intense training did not augment these changes further; and 3) most of these changes returned to control values at 12 mo despite markedly increased training duration and intensity equivalent to that routinely observed in competitive athletes. In conclusion, increases in R-wave-R-wave interval and cardiovascular variability indexes are consistent with an augmentation of vagal modulation of HR after exercise training. It appears that moderate doses of training for 3 mo are sufficient to achieve this response as well as a modest hypotensive effect from decreasing vascular resistance. However, more prolonged and intense training does not necessarily lead to greater enhancement of circulatory control and, therefore, may not provide an added protective benefit via autonomic mechanisms against death by cardiovascular disease.

  6. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  7. Hyperchaos control and adaptive synchronization with uncertain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mathieu and van der Pol equations, for studying dynamical behaviour, chaos control and its synchronization. The van der Pol oscillator is a nonconservative oscillator with nonlinear damping. Due to this feature, it has become popular for systems with limit cycle oscillations in physics, biology, sociology and even economics.

  8. Developing eco-adaptive cruise control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The study demonstrates the feasibility of two eco-driving applications which reduces vehicle fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In particular, the study develops an eco-drive system that combines eco-cruise control logic with state-of-the...

  9. Muscle ion transporters and antioxidative proteins have different adaptive potential in arm than in leg skeletal muscle with exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Tobias Schmidt; Weihe, Pál

    2017-01-01

    It was evaluated whether upper-body compared to lower-body musculature exhibits a different phenotype in relation to capacity for handling reactive oxygen species (ROS), H(+), La(-), Na(+), K(+) and also whether it differs in adaptive potential to exercise training. Eighty-three sedentary...... premenopausal women aged 45 ± 6 years (mean ± SD) were randomized into a high-intensity intermittent swimming group (HIS, n = 21), a moderate-intensity swimming group (MOS, n = 21), a soccer group (SOC, n = 21), or a control group (CON, n = 20). Intervention groups completed three weekly training sessions...... for 15 weeks, and pre- and postintervention biopsies were obtained from deltoideus and vastus lateralis muscle. Before training, monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), Na(+)/K(+) pump α2, and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expressions were lower (P

  10. Adaptive nonlinear neural network controller for rotorcraft vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael G.; Sanner, Robert M.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents research into developing an adaptive nonlinear neural network control algorithm that can be used with smart structure actuators and sensors to control the vibrations of rotor blades. The dynamic equations of motion for a blade have the same form as a multilink manipulator (robot arm) and adaptive nonlinear control algorithms have proven successful in active control of these manipulators. The recent development of neural network control algorithms has provided the ability to adaptively learn in real time a set of parameters that will approximate external forces operating on the blades. The controller combines these two control techniques enabling the controller to adapt its parameters in response to changes in blade properties such as its mass or stiffness and to also learn the parameters necessary to account for the unknown but bounded, periodic disturbance forces such as those caused by the unsteady, periodic aerodynamic forces in the rotor system. Current efforts have been directed at testing the control algorithm on real beams with piezoceramic actuators and sensors. The initial test results have shown that vibration reduction and desired beam motion tracking can be achieved even under the influences of periodic disturbances.

  11. Training working memory to improve attentional control in anxiety: A proof-of-principle study using behavioral and electrophysiological measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Berna A; Koster, Ernst H W; Pourtois, Gilles; Derakshan, Nazanin

    2016-12-01

    Trait anxiety is associated with impairments in attentional control and processing efficiency (see Berggren & Derakshan, 2013, for a review). Working memory training using the adaptive dual n-back task has shown to improve attentional control in subclinical depression with transfer effects at the behavioral and neural level on a working memory task (Owens, Koster, & Derakshan, 2013). Here, we examined the beneficial effects of working memory training on attentional control in pre-selected high trait anxious individuals who underwent a three week daily training intervention using the adaptive dual n-back task. Pre and post outcome measures of attentional control were assessed using a Flanker task that included a stress induction and an emotional a Antisaccade task (with angry and neutral faces as target). Resting state EEG (theta/beta ratio) was recorded to as a neural marker of trait attentional control. Our results showed that adaptive working memory training improved attentional control with transfer effects on the Flanker task and resting state EEG, but effects of training on the Antisaccade task were less conclusive. Finally, training related gains were associated with lower levels of trait anxiety at post (vs pre) intervention. Our results demonstrate that adaptive working memory training in anxiety can have beneficial effects on attentional control and cognitive performance that may protect against emotional vulnerability in individuals at risk of developing clinical anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct adaptive control of a PUMA 560 industrial robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Lee, Thomas; Delpech, Michel

    1989-01-01

    The implementation and experimental validation of a new direct adaptive control scheme on a PUMA 560 industrial robot is described. The testbed facility consists of a Unimation PUMA 560 six-jointed robot and controller, and a DEC MicroVAX II computer which hosts the Robot Control C Library software. The control algorithm is implemented on the MicroVAX which acts as a digital controller for the PUMA robot, and the Unimation controller is effectively bypassed and used merely as an I/O device to interface the MicroVAX to the joint motors. The control algorithm for each robot joint consists of an auxiliary signal generated by a constant-gain Proportional plus Integral plus Derivative (PID) controller, and an adaptive position-velocity (PD) feedback controller with adjustable gains. The adaptive independent joint controllers compensate for the inter-joint couplings and achieve accurate trajectory tracking without the need for the complex dynamic model and parameter values of the robot. Extensive experimental results on PUMA joint control are presented to confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme, in spite of strong interactions between joint motions. Experimental results validate the capabilities of the proposed control scheme. The control scheme is extremely simple and computationally very fast for concurrent processing with high sampling rates.

  13. Neural and Fuzzy Adaptive Control of Induction Motor Drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensalem, Y.; Sbita, L.; Abdelkrim, M. N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive neural network speed control scheme for an induction motor (IM) drive. The proposed scheme consists of an adaptive neural network identifier (ANNI) and an adaptive neural network controller (ANNC). For learning the quoted neural networks, a back propagation algorithm was used to automatically adjust the weights of the ANNI and ANNC in order to minimize the performance functions. Here, the ANNI can quickly estimate the plant parameters and the ANNC is used to provide on-line identification of the command and to produce a control force, such that the motor speed can accurately track the reference command. By combining artificial neural network techniques with fuzzy logic concept, a neural and fuzzy adaptive control scheme is developed. Fuzzy logic was used for the adaptation of the neural controller to improve the robustness of the generated command. The developed method is robust to load torque disturbance and the speed target variations when it ensures precise trajectory tracking with the prescribed dynamics. The algorithm was verified by simulation and the results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the IM designed controller

  14. Physiological adaptations to interval training and the role of exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnis, Martin J; Gibala, Martin J

    2017-05-01

    Interval exercise typically involves repeated bouts of relatively intense exercise interspersed by short periods of recovery. A common classification scheme subdivides this method into high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 'near maximal' efforts) and sprint interval training (SIT; 'supramaximal' efforts). Both forms of interval training induce the classic physiological adaptations characteristic of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) such as increased aerobic capacity (V̇O2 max ) and mitochondrial content. This brief review considers the role of exercise intensity in mediating physiological adaptations to training, with a focus on the capacity for aerobic energy metabolism. With respect to skeletal muscle adaptations, cellular stress and the resultant metabolic signals for mitochondrial biogenesis depend largely on exercise intensity, with limited work suggesting that increases in mitochondrial content are superior after HIIT compared to MICT, at least when matched-work comparisons are made within the same individual. It is well established that SIT increases mitochondrial content to a similar extent to MICT despite a reduced exercise volume. At the whole-body level, V̇O2 max is generally increased more by HIIT than MICT for a given training volume, whereas SIT and MICT similarly improve V̇O2 max despite differences in training volume. There is less evidence available regarding the role of exercise intensity in mediating changes in skeletal muscle capillary density, maximum stroke volume and cardiac output, and blood volume. Furthermore, the interactions between intensity and duration and frequency have not been thoroughly explored. While interval training is clearly a potent stimulus for physiological remodelling in humans, the integrative response to this type of exercise warrants further attention, especially in comparison to traditional endurance training. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  15. High-performance adaptive intelligent Direct Torque Control schemes for induction motor drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed comparison between viable adaptive intelligent torque control strategies of induction motor, emphasizing advantages and disadvantages. The scope of this paper is to choose an adaptive intelligent controller for induction motor drive proposed for high performance applications. Induction motors are characterized by complex, highly non-linear, time varying dynamics, inaccessibility of some states and output for measurements and hence can be considered as a challenging engineering problem. The advent of torque and flux control techniques have partially solved induction motor control problems, because they are sensitive to drive parameter variations and performance may deteriorate if conventional controllers are used. Intelligent controllers are considered as potential candidates for such an application. In this paper, the performance of the various sensor less intelligent Direct Torque Control (DTC techniques of Induction motor such as neural network, fuzzy and genetic algorithm based torque controllers are evaluated. Adaptive intelligent techniques are applied to achieve high performance decoupled flux and torque control. This paper contributes: i Development of Neural network algorithm for state selection in DTC; ii Development of new algorithm for state selection using Genetic algorithm principle; and iii Development of Fuzzy based DTC. Simulations have been performed using the trained state selector neural network instead of conventional DTC and Fuzzy controller instead of conventional DTC controller. The results show agreement with those of the conventional DTC.

  16. Virtual Training of Compressor Control Room, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MYMIC will analyze, design, develop and evaluate the Virtual Control Room – Compressor Station (VCoR-CS) training system. VCoR-CS will provide procedural training to...

  17. Learning to walk with an adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller for a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Jeffrey R; Jacobs, Daniel A; Ferris, Daniel P; Remy, C David

    2015-11-04

    Robotic ankle exoskeletons can provide assistance to users and reduce metabolic power during walking. Our research group has investigated the use of proportional myoelectric control for controlling robotic ankle exoskeletons. Previously, these controllers have relied on a constant gain to map user's muscle activity to actuation control signals. A constant gain may act as a constraint on the user, so we designed a controller that dynamically adapts the gain to the user's myoelectric amplitude. We hypothesized that an adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller would reduce metabolic energy expenditure compared to walking with the ankle exoskeleton unpowered because users could choose their preferred control gain. We tested eight healthy subjects walking with the adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller with bilateral ankle exoskeletons. The adaptive gain was updated each stride such that on average the user's peak muscle activity was mapped to maximal power output of the exoskeleton. All subjects participated in three identical training sessions where they walked on a treadmill for 50 minutes (30 minutes of which the exoskeleton was powered) at 1.2 ms(-1). We calculated and analyzed metabolic energy consumption, muscle recruitment, inverse kinematics, inverse dynamics, and exoskeleton mechanics. Using our controller, subjects achieved a metabolic reduction similar to that seen in previous work in about a third of the training time. The resulting controller gain was lower than that seen in previous work (β=1.50±0.14 versus a constant β=2). The adapted gain allowed users more total ankle joint power than that of unassisted walking, increasing ankle power in exchange for a decrease in hip power. Our findings indicate that humans prefer to walk with greater ankle mechanical power output than their unassisted gait when provided with an ankle exoskeleton using an adaptive controller. This suggests that robotic assistance from an exoskeleton can allow

  18. Physiological Adaptations to Hypoxic vs. Normoxic Training during Intermittent Living High

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan De Smet; Paul van Herpt; Gommaar D'Hulst; Ruud Van Thienen; Marc Van Leemputte; Peter Hespel; Peter Hespel

    2017-01-01

    In the setting of “living high,” it is unclear whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) should be performed “low” or “high” to stimulate muscular and performance adaptations. Therefore, 10 physically active males participated in a 5-week “live high-train low or high” program (TR), whilst eight subjects were not engaged in any altitude or training intervention (CON). Five days per week (~15.5 h per day), TR was exposed to normobaric hypoxia simulating progressively increasing altitude o...

  19. Effect of additional speed endurance training on performance and muscle adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Thomas; Christensen, Peter Møller; Holse, Kris

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study examined the effect of additional speed-endurance training during the season on muscle adaptations and performance of trained soccer players. METHODS: Eighteen sub-elite soccer players performed one session with 6-9 30-s intervals at an intensity of 90-95 % ofmaximal...... intensity (speed endurance training; SET) a week for 5 weeks (SET-intervention). Before and after the SET-intervention the players carried out the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (Yo- Yo IR2) test, a sprint test (10- and 30-m) and an agility test. In addition, seven of the players had a resting muscle...

  20. Adaptation of perceptual responses to low-load blood flow restriction training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín-Hernández, Juan; Ruiz-Aguado, Jorge; Herrero, Azael Juan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the adaptive response of ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and pain over six consecutive training sessions. Thirty subjects were assigned to either a blood flow restricted training group (BFRT) or a high intensity group (HIT). BFRT group performed four.......01). No between-group differences were found at any time point. In summary, BFRT induces a high perceptual response to training. However, this perceptual response is rapidly attenuated, leading to values similar to those experienced during HIT. Low load BFRT should not be limited to highly motivated individuals...

  1. Parameter Identification and Adaptive Control Applied to the Inverted Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Saldarriaga-Cortés

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to implement an adaptive control of the inverted pendulum system; which uses the recursive square minimum method for the identification of a dynamic digital model of the plant and then, with its estimated parameters, tune in real time a pole placement control. The plant to be used is an unstable and nonlinear system. This fact, combined with the adaptive controller characteristics, allows the obtained results to be extended to a great variety of systems. The results show that the above methodology was implemented satisfactorily in terms of estimation, stability and control of such a system. It was established that adaptive techniques have a proper performance even in systems with complex features such as nonlinearity and instability.

  2. Design of adaptive switching control for hypersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jiao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a novel adaptive switching control of hypersonic aircraft based on type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy sliding mode control and focuses on the problem of stability and smoothness in the switching process. This method uses full-state feedback to linearize the nonlinear model of hypersonic aircraft. Combining the interval type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy approach with sliding mode control keeps the adaptive switching process stable and smooth. For rapid stabilization of the system, the adaptive laws use a direct constructive Lyapunov analysis together with an established type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy logic system. Simulation results indicate that the proposed control scheme can maintain the stability and smoothness of switching process for the hypersonic aircraft.

  3. On Using Exponential Parameter Estimators with an Adaptive Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical adaptive controllers are restricted to using a specific update law to generate parameter estimates. This paper investigates the possibility of using any exponential parameter estimator with an adaptive controller such that the system tracks a desired trajectory. The goal is to provide flexibility in choosing any update law suitable for a given application. The development relies on a previously developed concept of controller/update law modularity in the adaptive control literature, and the use of a converse Lyapunov-like theorem. Stability analysis is presented to derive gain conditions under which this is possible, and inferences are made about the tracking error performance. The development is based on a class of Euler-Lagrange systems that are used to model various engineering systems including space robots and manipulators.

  4. Adaptive Control of Truss Structures for Gossamer Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bong-Jun; Calise, Anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Neural network-based adaptive control is considered for active control of a highly flexible truss structure which may be used to support solar sail membranes. The objective is to suppress unwanted vibrations in SAFE (Solar Array Flight Experiment) boom, a test-bed located at NASA. Compared to previous tests that restrained truss structures in planar motion, full three dimensional motions are tested. Experimental results illustrate the potential of adaptive control in compensating for nonlinear actuation and modeling error, and in rejecting external disturbances.

  5. ADAPTIVE OUTPUT CONTROL: SUBJECT MATTER, APPLICATION TASKS AND SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Bobtsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of adaptive output control for parametric and functionally uncertain plants is considered. Application examples illustrating the practical use of the discussed theory are given along with the mathematical formulation of the problem. A brief review of adaptive output control methods, by both linear and non-linear systems, is presented and an extensive bibliography, in which the reader will find a detailed description of the specific algorithms and their properties, is represented. A new approach to the output control problem - a method of consecutive compensator - is considered in detail.

  6. Adaptive Control with Finite Time Persistency of Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Adaptive FilteringL Prediction and Control, pp. 178-181, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1984. 3. Astrom , Karl J. and Wittenmark, B., Computer Controlled Systems, pp...Academic Press, Inc., 1980. 7. Astrom , K.J., "Theory and Applications of Adaptive Control: A Survey," Automatica, V. 19, pp. 471-473, September, 1983...September, 1984. 9. Astrom , K.J., Hagander, P., and Sternby, J., "Zeros of Sampled Systems, " Automatica, V. 20, pp. 31-38, January, 1984. 10. Tuschak, R

  7. Adaptive Incentive Controls for Stackelberg Games with Unknown Cost Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    APR EZT:: F I AN 73S e OsL:-: UNCLASSI?:-- Q4~.’~- .A.., 6, *~*i i~~*~~*.- U ADAPTIVE INCENTIVE CONTROLS FOR STACKELBERG GAMES WITH UNKNOWN COST...AD-A161 885 ADAPTIVE INCENTIVE CONTROLS FOR STACKELBERG GAMES WITH i/1 UNKNOWN COST FUNCTIONALSCU) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DECISION AND CONTROL LAB T...ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7.. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION CoriaeLcenef~pda~ Joint Services Electronics Program Laboratory, Univ. of Illinois N/A

  8. An Adaptive Multivariable Control System for Hydroelectric Generating Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunne J. Hegglid

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an adaptive multivariable control system for hydroelectric generating units. The system is based on a detailed mathematical model of the synchronous generator, the water turbine, the exiter system and turbine control servo. The models of the water penstock and the connected power system are static. These assumptions are not considered crucial. The system uses a Kalman filter for optimal estimation of the state variables and the parameters of the electric grid equivalent. The multivariable control law is computed from a Riccatti equation and is made adaptive to the generators running condition by means of a least square technique.

  9. Adaptive control of chaotic continuous-time systems with delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu-Chu; Gao, Furong

    1998-06-01

    A simple delay system governed by a first-order differential-delay equation may behave chaotically, but the conditions for the system to have such behaviors have not been well recognized. In this paper, a set of rules is postulated first for the conditions for the delay system to display chaos. A model-reference adaptive control scheme is then proposed to control the chaotic system state to converge to an arbitrarily given reference trajectory with certain and uncertain system parameters. Numerical examples are given to analyze the chaotic behaviors of the delay system and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive control scheme.

  10. Adaptive Tracking Control of an Electro-Pneumatic Clutch Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn-Ole Kaasa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of a simple adaptive algorithm for robust tracking control of an electro-pneumatic clutch actuator with output feedback. We present a mathematical model of the strongly nonlinear system, and implement an adaptive algorithm, based on a parallel feedforward compensator (PFC to remove the relative-degree-1 restriction. We propose a practical method of constructing the PFC, and introduce a simple modification that removes an inherent restriction on bandwidth of the nonlinear system. We show that the adaptive algorithm deals well with nonlinearities, and we achieve tracking corresponding to a settling-time of 150 ms.

  11. Vastus lateralis exhibits non-homogenous adaptation to resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adam J; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Mangine, Gerald T; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Variations in transverse point of measure on the vastus lateralis (VL) may significantly affect the relationship between structure and function. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in muscle architecture at 2 commonly used points of measure (VL0 and VL5). Maximal strength (1-repetition maximum [1RM] barbell squat) and muscle architecture were assessed PRE and POST 15 weeks of periodized resistance training. VL0 was 50% of the straight line distance between the greater trochanter and lateral epicondyle of the femur. VL5 was 5cm medial to VL0. Increases in 1RM strength (3.7 ± 2.4 kg; P = 0.004) were observed. Changes in muscle thickness (MT) at VL5 were significantly greater than at VL0 (P = 0.006). Changes in strength correlated with changes in muscle architecture at VL0 only (MT: r = 0.561; fascicle length: r = 0.503). Changes in muscle architecture appear to occur in a non-homogeneous manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Physiological Adaptations to Training in Competitive Swimming: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Mário J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize longitudinal studies on swimming physiology and get implications for daily practice. A computerized search of databases according to the PRISMA statement was employed. Studies were screened for eligibility on inclusion criteria: (i present two testing points; (ii on swimming physiology; (iii using adult elite swimmers; (iv no case-studies or with small sample sizes. Two independent reviewers used a checklist to assess the methodological quality of the studies. Thirty-four studies selected for analysis were gathered into five main categories: blood composition (n=7, endocrine secretion (n=11, muscle biochemistry (n=7, cardiovascular response (n=8 and the energetic profile (n=14. The mean quality index was 10.58 ± 2.19 points demonstrating an almost perfect agreement between reviewers (K = 0.93. It can be concluded that the mixed findings in the literature are due to the diversity of the experimental designs. Micro variables obtained at the cellular or molecular level are sensitive measures and demonstrate overtraining signs and health symptoms. The improvement of macro variables (i.e. main physiological systems is limited and may depend on the athletes’ training background and experience.

  13. Peripheral heart action (PHA) training as a valid substitute to high intensity interval training to improve resting cardiovascular changes and autonomic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Alessandro; Persiani, Michela; Damiani, Nicholas; Perazzolo, Monica; Raffi, Milena

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of peripheral heart action training compared with high intensity interval training on changes in autonomic regulation and physical fitness. Eighteen young adults (9 women, 9 men) (age 24 ± 3 years, BMI of 22.67 kg/m(2), V'O2max 32.89 ml/kg/min) were randomly assigned to either a high intensity interval training group (n = 8) or a peripheral heart action training (PHA) group (n = 10). Before and after training, maximal whole-body muscular strength, time series of beat-to-beat intervals for heart rate variability, and baroreflex sensitivity were recorded. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability were estimated on both time and frequency domains. Physical fitness level was evaluated with maximum oxygen consumption test. The effects of PHA whole-body resistance training increased muscular strength and maximum oxygen consumption, with an effect on vagal-cardiac control and cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity. After 30 training sessions performed in 3 months, PHA resistance exercise promoted cardiovascular adaptations, with a decrease in the power spectral component of vascular sympathetic activity and an increase in the vagal modulation. Low-frequency oscillation estimated from systolic blood pressure variability seems to be a suitable index of the sympathetic modulation of vasomotor activity. This investigation also want to emphasize the beneficial effects of this particular resistance exercise training, considering also that the increase in muscular strength is inversely associated with all-cause mortality and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, independent of cardiorespiratory fitness levels.

  14. Online Adaptive Error Compensation SVM-Based Sliding Mode Control of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaijia Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV is a nonlinear dynamic system with uncertainties and noises. Therefore, an appropriate control system has an obligation to ensure the stabilization and navigation of UAV. This paper mainly discusses the control problem of quad-rotor UAV system, which is influenced by unknown parameters and noises. Besides, a sliding mode control based on online adaptive error compensation support vector machine (SVM is proposed for stabilizing quad-rotor UAV system. Sliding mode controller is established through analyzing quad-rotor dynamics model in which the unknown parameters are computed by offline SVM. During this process, the online adaptive error compensation SVM method is applied in this paper. As modeling errors and noises both exist in the process of flight, the offline SVM one-time mode cannot predict the uncertainties and noises accurately. The control law is adjusted in real-time by introducing new training sample data to online adaptive SVM in the control process, so that the stability and robustness of flight are ensured. It can be demonstrated through the simulation experiments that the UAV that joined online adaptive SVM can track the changing path faster according to its dynamic model. Consequently, the proposed method that is proved has the better control effect in the UAV system.

  15. The Basal Ganglia and Adaptive Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, Ann M.; Aosaki, Toshihiko; Flaherty, Alice W.; Kimura, Minoru

    1994-09-01

    The basal ganglia are neural structures within the motor and cognitive control circuits in the mammalian forebrain and are interconnected with the neocortex by multiple loops. Dysfunction in these parallel loops caused by damage to the striatum results in major defects in voluntary movement, exemplified in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. These parallel loops have a distributed modular architecture resembling local expert architectures of computational learning models. During sensorimotor learning, such distributed networks may be coordinated by widely spaced striatal interneurons that acquire response properties on the basis of experienced reward.

  16. On flexible CAD of adaptive control and identification algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Ravn, Ole

    1988-01-01

    SLLAB is a MATLAB-family software package for solving control and identification problems. This paper concerns the planning of a general-purpose subroutine structure for solving identification and adaptive control problems. A general-purpose identification algorithm is suggested, which allows a t...

  17. Optimal adaptive control for a class of stochastic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Chen, Han-Fu

    1995-01-01

    We study linear-quadratic adaptive tracking problems for a special class of stochastic systems expressed in the state-space form. This is a long-standing problem in the control of aircraft flying through atmospheric turbulence. Using an ELS-based algorithm and introducing dither in the control law

  18. Optimal adaptive control for a class of stochastic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Chen, Han-Fu

    1997-01-01

    We study linear-quadratic adaptive tracking problems for a special class of stochastic systems expressed in the state-space form. This is a long-standing problem in the control of aircraft flying through atmospheric turbulence. Using an ELS-based algorithm and introducing dither in the control law

  19. Automated Merging in a Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Wolterink, W.; Heijenk, Geert; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) is a form of cruise control in which a vehicle maintains a constant headway to its preceding vehicle using radar and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. Within the Connect & Drive1 project we have implemented and tested a prototype of such a system,

  20. Automated Merging in a Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Wolterink, W.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Brogle, Marc; Masip Bruin, Xavier; Braun, Torsten; Heijenk, Gerhard J.

    Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) is a form of cruise control in which a vehicle maintains a constant headway to its preceding vehicle using radar and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. Within the Connect & Drive1 project we have implemented and tested a prototype of such a system,

  1. Developed adaptive neuro-fuzzy algorithm to control air conditioning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper developed artificial intelligence technique adaptive neuro-fuzzy controller for air conditioning systems at different pressures. The first order Sugeno fuzzy inference system was implemented and utilized for modeling and controller design. In addition, the estimation of the heat transfer rate and water mass flow rate ...

  2. The impact of power clean ability and training age on adaptations to weightlifting-style training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lachlan P; Comfort, Paul; Suchomel, Timothy J; Kelly, Vincent G; Beckman, Emma M; Haff, G Gregory

    2018-03-14

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether weightlifting actions are a viable method for improving athletic performance amongst weaker, inexperienced lifters when compared to individuals with a greater power clean result, and hence weightlifting ability and experience. Two groups of males with distinctly different power clean performances (higher performance (HP): N = 8; BM = 78.1±4.0 kg; 1RM PC = 1.08±0.09 kgBM; lower performance (LP): N = 8; BM=82.6±14.0 kg; 1RM PC=0.78±0.1 kg·BM) and resistance training age (HP: resistance training experience=3.5±1.2 years; LP: resistance training experience=1.44±1.50 years) undertook 10 weeks of training involving weightlifting derivatives, in addition to supplemental ballistic and plyometric exercises. Testing of athletic performance (represented by measures derived from the countermovement jump) occurred at baseline, after five weeks of training, and after ten weeks of training. Both groups significantly improved across the majority of outcome variables following training (Hedges g=0.98-2.55, P≤0.01-0.05). Only the HP participants experienced significant changes at mid-test (g = 0.99-1.27, P ≤ 0.01-0.05), while no significant changes were revealed between mid- and post-test in this group. In contrast to this, the LP participants displayed a significant improvement in relative impulse (g=1.39, Pweightlifting derivative focused training, practitioners should consider early implementation of such exercises. However, it is important for coaches to note that a delayed training effect might be present in weaker, less experienced lifters.

  3. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almada Anthony

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior to going to sleep during 8-weeks of standardized resistance-training. Subjects completed testing sessions at 0, 4, and 8 weeks that included body composition assessment as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1-RM and muscular endurance tests on the bench and leg press, a Wingate anaerobic power test, and blood analysis to assess anabolic/catabolic status as well as markers of health. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicated that ZMA supplementation non-significantly increased serum zinc levels by 11 – 17% (p = 0.12. However, no significant differences were observed between groups in anabolic or catabolic hormone status, body composition, 1-RM bench press and leg press, upper or lower body muscular endurance, or cycling anaerobic capacity. Results indicate that ZMA supplementation during training does not appear to enhance training adaptations in resistance trained populations.

  4. Adaptations to short, frequent sessions of endurance and strength training are similar to longer, less frequent exercise sessions when the total volume is the same

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilen, Anders; Hjelvang, Line B; Dall, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular......Kilen, A, Hjelvang, LB, Dall, N, Kruse, NL, and Nordsborg, NB. Adaptations to short, frequent sessions of endurance and strength training are similar to longer, less frequent exercise sessions when the total volume is the same. J Strength Cond Res 29(11S): S46-S51, 2015-The hypothesis...... that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI...

  5. Mission-Driven Adaptability in a Changing National Training System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Don; Stephens, Anne; Joseph, Victor; Monro, Davena

    2017-01-01

    This case study of an adult and community education provider based in far north Queensland describes its capacity to balance various iterations of public policy against its vision for the future of Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islanders. Community-controlled organisations wanting to contribute to economic and social development in regional/remote…

  6. Nonlinear underwater robot controller design with adaptive disturbance prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Songa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A new hybrid adaptive control algorithm is proposed for the nonlinear system controller design of underwater robot. Compared with the previous works in the controller design of underwater robot, the main advantages of this work are: (1 A new disturbance prediction and compensation model is proposed; (2 A new adaptive fuzzy smoother is proposed for the control input; (3 A time-varying flow disturbance is considered for the control design which is always neglected in many previous works and several practical experiments under different environment were implemented to verify the control performance. The Lyapunov stability theory proves the stability and convergence of this new control system. Simulation and experiment results demonstrate the performance and the effectiveness of this new algorithm.

  7. Adaptive landing gear concept—feedback control validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulowski, Grzegorz M.; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an integrated feedback control concept for adaptive landing gears (ALG) and its experimental validation. Aeroplanes are subjected to high dynamic loads as a result of the impact during each landing. Classical landing gears, which are in common use, are designed in accordance with official regulations in a way that ensures the optimal energy dissipation for the critical (maximum) sink speed. The regulations were formulated in order to ensure the functional capability of the landing gears during an emergency landing. However, the landing gears, whose characteristics are optimized for these critical conditions, do not perform well under normal impact conditions. For that situation it is reasonable to introduce a system that would adapt the characteristics of the landing gears according to the sink speed of landing. The considered system assumes adaptation of the damping force generated by the landing gear, which would perform optimally in an emergency situation and would adapt itself for regular landings as well. This research covers the formulation and design of the control algorithms for an adaptive landing gear based on MR fluid, implementation of the algorithms on an FPGA platform and experimental verification on a lab-scale landing gear device. The main challenge of the research was to develop a control methodology that could operate effectively within 50 ms, which is assumed to be the total duration of the phenomenon. The control algorithm proposed in this research was able to control the energy dissipation process on the experimental stand.

  8. Implementation of an adaptive training and tracking game in statistics teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, C.M.; Kalz, M.; Ras, E.

    2014-01-01

    Statistics teaching in higher education has a number of challenges. An adaptive training, tracking and teaching tool in a gaming environment aims to address problems inherent in statistics teaching. This paper discusses the implementation of this tool in a large first year university programme and

  9. Enhancing Cultural Adaptation through Friendship Training: A Single-Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Ching; Baker, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Four-year-old girl from mainland China experienced culture shock when attending American university day-care center. Counseling intern from Taiwan designed friendship training program based on assumptions concerning adaptation, acculturation, and peer relationships. Evaluated as intensive single-case study, findings indicated the program may be…

  10. Oral quercetin supplementation hampers skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, R A; Martínez-López, E J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test exercise-induced adaptations on skeletal muscle when quercetin is supplemented. Four groups of rats were tested: quercetin sedentary, quercetin exercised, placebo sedentary, and placebo exercised. Treadmill exercise training took place 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Quercetin groups ...

  11. Effect of adapted karate training on quality of life and body balance in 50-year-old men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Ludivine Chateau-Degat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Ludivine Chateau-Degat1, Gérard Papouin2, Philippe Saint-Val3, Antonio Lopez21Axe sante des populations et environmentale, CHUQ, Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 2Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Territorial du Taone, 3Fédération Tahitienne de Karaté, Papeete, French PolynesiaBackground: Aging is associated with a decrease in physical skills, sometimes accompanied by a change in quality of life (QOL. Long-term martial arts practice has been proposed as an avenue to counter these deleterious effects. The general purpose of this pilot study was to identify the effects of an adapted karate training program on QOL, depression, and motor skills in 50-year-old men.Methods and design: Fifteen 50-year-old men were enrolled in a one-year prospective experiment. Participants practiced adapted karate training for 90 minutes three times a week. Testing sessions, involving completion of the MOS 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF36 and Beck Depression Inventory, as well as motor and effort evaluation, were done at baseline, and six and 12 months.Results: Compared with baseline, participants had better Beck Depression Inventory scores after one year of karate training (P < 0.01 and better perception of their physical health (P < 0.01, but not on the mental dimension (P < 0.49. They also improved their reaction time scores for the nondominant hand and sway parameters in the eyes-closed position (P < 0.01.Conclusion: Regular long-term karate practice had favorable effects on mood, perception of physical health confirmed by better postural control, and improved performance on objective physical testing. Adapted karate training would be an interesting option for maintaining physical activity in aging.Keywords: karate, balance, training, sport, aging

  12. Mental training in surgical education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenroth, Marc; Bürger, Thomas; Brenner, Jürgen; Nagelschmidt, Manfred; Eberspächer, Hans; Troidl, Hans

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of a cognitive training method on the performance of simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomy in laparoscopic training courses. Surgeons are like professional sportsmen in that they have to be able to perform complicated, fine-motor movements under stressful conditions. Mental training, systematically and repeatedly imagining a movement's performance, is a well-established technique in sports science, and this study aimed to determine its value in training surgeons. A total of 98 surgeons undergoing basic laparoscopic training participated in a randomized controlled trial; 31 received additional mental training, 32 additional practical training, and 35 received no additional training (control group). All used a Pelvi-Trainer simulator to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy at baseline and follow-up, after any additional intervention. We used a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) instrument to assess performance. Principle outcome variables were the OSATS task-specific checklist (11 procedural steps, scored as correctly [1] or wrongly [0] performed) and the global rating scale (an overall performance evaluation, scored 1-5). Improvement in the task-specific checklist score between baseline and follow-up differed significantly between groups (P = 0.046 on ANOVA). Least significant difference tests yielded differences between the mental and practical training groups (P = 0.024) and between the mental training and control groups (P = 0.040), but not between the practical training and control groups (P = 0.789). Paired Student t test showed that performance at follow-up was significantly better in the mental training and control groups (mental training group, P = 0.001; control group, P = 0.018) but not the practical training group (P = 0.342). There were no significant intergroup differences in global rating scale results. Additional mental training is an effective way of optimizing the outcomes of further training

  13. Adaptive Contingency Control: Wind Turbine Operation Integrated with Blade Condition Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We report here on first steps towards integrating systems health monitoring with adaptive contingency controls. In the scenario considered, the adaptive controller...

  14. VLSI PARTITIONING ALGORITHM WITH ADAPTIVE CONTROL PARAMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Filippenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of very large-scale integration circuit partitioning. A graph is selected as a mathematical model describing integrated circuit. Modification of ant colony optimization algorithm is presented, which is used to solve graph partitioning problem. Ant colony optimization algorithm is an optimization method based on the principles of self-organization and other useful features of the ants’ behavior. The proposed search system is based on ant colony optimization algorithm with the improved method of the initial distribution and dynamic adjustment of the control search parameters. The experimental results and performance comparison show that the proposed method of very large-scale integration circuit partitioning provides the better search performance over other well known algorithms.

  15. Development of fault tolerant adaptive control laws for aerospace systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Rocha, Andres E.

    The main topic of this dissertation is the design, development and implementation of intelligent adaptive control techniques designed to maintain healthy performance of aerospace systems subjected to malfunctions, external parameter changes and/or unmodeled dynamics. The dissertation is focused on the development of novel adaptive control configurations that rely on non-linear functions that appear in the immune system of living organisms as main source of adaptation. One of the main goals of this dissertation is to demonstrate that these novel adaptive control architectures are able to improve overall performance and protect the system while reducing control effort and maintaining adequate operation outside bounds of nominal design. This research effort explores several phases, ranging from theoretical stability analysis, simulation and hardware implementation on different types of aerospace systems including spacecraft, aircraft and quadrotor vehicles. The results presented in this dissertation are focused on two main adaptivity approaches, the first one is intended for aerospace systems that do not attain large angles and use exact feedback linearization of Euler angle kinematics. A proof of stability is presented by means of the circle Criterion and Lyapunov's direct method. The second approach is intended for aerospace systems that can attain large attitude angles (e.g. space systems in gravity-less environments), the adaptation is incorporated on a baseline architecture that uses partial feedback linearization of quaternions kinematics. In this case, the closed loop stability was analyzed using Lyapunov's direct method and Barbalat's Lemma. It is expected that some results presented in this dissertation can contribute towards the validation and certification of direct adaptive controllers.

  16. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method.

  17. Integration of Online Parameter Identification and Neural Network for In-Flight Adaptive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Jacob J.; Smith, Mark S.; Stachowiak, Susan

    2003-01-01

    An indirect adaptive system has been constructed for robust control of an aircraft with uncertain aerodynamic characteristics. This system consists of a multilayer perceptron pre-trained neural network, online stability and control derivative identification, a dynamic cell structure online learning neural network, and a model following control system based on the stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback technique. The pre-trained neural network and model following control system have been flight-tested, but the online parameter identification and online learning neural network are new additions used for in-flight adaptation of the control system model. A description of the modification and integration of these two stand-alone software packages into the complete system in preparation for initial flight tests is presented. Open-loop results using both simulation and flight data, as well as closed-loop performance of the complete system in a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom, flight validated simulation, are analyzed. Results show that this online learning system, in contrast to the nonlearning system, has the ability to adapt to changes in aerodynamic characteristics in a real-time, closed-loop, piloted simulation, resulting in improved flying qualities.

  18. Physiological Adaptations to Hypoxic vs. Normoxic Training during Intermittent Living High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Stefan; van Herpt, Paul; D'Hulst, Gommaar; Van Thienen, Ruud; Van Leemputte, Marc; Hespel, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In the setting of "living high," it is unclear whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) should be performed "low" or "high" to stimulate muscular and performance adaptations. Therefore, 10 physically active males participated in a 5-week "live high-train low or high" program (TR), whilst eight subjects were not engaged in any altitude or training intervention (CON). Five days per week (~15.5 h per day), TR was exposed to normobaric hypoxia simulating progressively increasing altitude of ~2,000-3,250 m. Three times per week, TR performed HIIT, administered as unilateral knee-extension training, with one leg in normobaric hypoxia (~4,300 m; TR HYP ) and with the other leg in normoxia (TR NOR ). "Living high" elicited a consistent elevation in serum erythropoietin concentrations which adequately predicted the increase in hemoglobin mass ( r = 0.78, P 0.05). Muscle oxygenation during training was lower in TR HYP vs. TR NOR ( P 0.05). In conclusion, muscular and performance adaptations were largely similar following normoxic vs. hypoxic HIIT. However, hypoxic HIIT stimulated adaptations in isometric strength and muscle perfusion during intermittent sprinting.

  19. Muscle Fiber Specific Antioxidative System Adaptation to Swim Training in Rats: Influence of Intermittent Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchar, Olga

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day-1, 5 days·wk-1, for 4 wk). Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min), interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk). Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix) and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius) muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity. Key PointsSingle high-intensity exercise induces a significant increase in TBARS content

  20. Neuro adaptive control for aerospace and distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Abhijit

    Nonlinear and adaptive control is generally considered one of the most effective techniques for stabilizing complex nonlinear systems, where linear control techniques may fail completely. Thousands of research papers are published on either theory or applications of nonlinear and adaptive control. But often one obvious question arises how to implement these techniques in real life model? The best answer that one can think of is to develop simple nonlinear control laws which are easy to implement. Moreover for controlling multi-agent systems, it is often required to distribute the control laws based on limited information available among the agents. This research provides some of these issues in the following way. a) Autopilot design for Aerospace systems: this research developes adaptive backstepping and dynamic inversion methods with internal dynamics stabilization for the quadrotor. Quadrotor helicopter models usually show two main characteristics. First, strong coupling among the system states and second, under-actuation where many states are to be controlled with few control inputs. Due to these unique characteristics, the design of stabilizing control inputs is always challenging for quadrotor models. To confront these problems, first, a dynamic inversion technique with zero dynamics stabilization loop is introduced to a practical quadrotor model, second, an adaptive-backstepping technique is developed to a lagrangian quadrotor model. The stabilizing control laws for both of these techniques are developed using on Lyapunov based method; and b) Coordination of multi-agent systems: coordination among multiple agents is generally done based on balanced or bi-directed communication graph models. If the agents are nonlinear and passive then for a balanced graph model synchronization is possible. But, for other than balanced and bi-directed graph models, it is difficult to synchronize nonlinear systems. Moreover, the performance of synchronization is normally

  1. Principles of exercise physiology: responses to acute exercise and long-term adaptations to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Brown, Anita M; Frontera, Walter R

    2012-11-01

    Physical activity and fitness are associated with a lower prevalence of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. This review discusses the body's response to an acute bout of exercise and long-term physiological adaptations to exercise training with an emphasis on endurance exercise. An overview is provided of skeletal muscle actions, muscle fiber types, and the major metabolic pathways involved in energy production. The importance of adequate fluid intake during exercise sessions to prevent impairments induced by dehydration on endurance exercise, muscular power, and strength is discussed. Physiological adaptations that result from regular exercise training such as increases in cardiorespiratory capacity and strength are mentioned. The review emphasizes the cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations that lead to improvements in maximal oxygen capacity. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The order of concurrent training does not affect soccer-related performance adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGawley, K; Andersson, P-I

    2013-11-01

    Despite the wealth of evidence regarding physical training strategies in soccer, there is little information regarding soccer-specific concurrent training and the effects of training order. The current study aimed to: i) quantify the effects of concurrent high-intensity run-based training (HIT) and strength- and power-based training (STR) on soccer-specific performance, and ii) investigate the order effect of completing HIT and STR either first or second within training sessions. Eighteen semi- and fully-professional players completed a battery of field- and gym-based tests before and after a 5-week pre-season training intervention. Players were pair-matched and completed 3 sessions per week of HIT followed by STR (n=9) or STR followed by HIT (n=9). ANCOVA tests revealed no differences between groups for changes in any of the measures (p>0.05). However, a training effect was observed for all measures (pconcurrent training approach on key measures of soccer performance, but the order of completing HIT and STR appears inconsequential to performance adaptations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. 49 CFR 236.566 - Locomotive of each train operating in train stop, train control or cab signal territory; equipped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive of each train operating in train stop, train control or cab signal territory; equipped. 236.566 Section 236.566 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. Parallel computation of geometry control in adaptive truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. V.; Utku, S.; Wada, B. K.

    1992-01-01

    The fast computation of geometry control in adaptive truss structures involves two distinct parts: the efficient integration of the inverse kinematic differential equations that govern the geometry control and the fast computation of the Jacobian, which appears on the right-hand-side of the inverse kinematic equations. This paper present an efficient parallel implementation of the Jacobian computation on an MIMD machine. Large speedup from the parallel implementation is obtained, which reduces the Jacobian computation to an O(M-squared/n) procedure on an n-processor machine, where M is the number of members in the adaptive truss. The parallel algorithm given here is a good candidate for on-line geometry control of adaptive structures using attached processors.

  5. Design of Adaptive Switching Controller for Robotic Manipulators with Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two adaptive switching control strategies are proposed for the trajectory tracking problem of robotic manipulator in this paper. The first scheme is designed for the supremum of the bounded disturbance for robot manipulator being known; while the supremum is not known, the second scheme is proposed. Each proposed scheme consists of an adaptive switching law and a PD controller. Based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, it is shown that two new schemes can guarantee tracking performance of the robotic manipulator and be adapted to the alternating unknown loads. Simulations for two-link robotic manipulator are carried out and show that the two schemes can avoid the overlarge input torque, and the feasibility and validity of the proposed control schemes are proved.

  6. Robot-Control Station Would Adapt To Operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Daniel B.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed control station for remote robot adapts control system to personal characteristics and preferences of operator. Automatically adjusts positions and angles of video cameras and monitors, adjusts characteristics of hand controller, process images, and provides graphical displays serving operator best. System of one or more video cameras, controlled by computer, views workspace of robot, as shown in article, "Movable Cameras and Monitors For Viewing Telemanipulator" (NPO-17837). Control station includes several video monitors, hand controller, image-processing system providing graphical displays, voice-input command system, keyboards, and mouse.

  7. Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Control Algorithms and Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Huaguang; Luo, Yanhong; Wang, Ding

    2013-01-01

    There are many methods of stable controller design for nonlinear systems. In seeking to go beyond the minimum requirement of stability, Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Control approaches the challenging topic of optimal control for nonlinear systems using the tools of  adaptive dynamic programming (ADP). The range of systems treated is extensive; affine, switched, singularly perturbed and time-delay nonlinear systems are discussed as are the uses of neural networks and techniques of value and policy iteration. The text features three main aspects of ADP in which the methods proposed for stabilization and for tracking and games benefit from the incorporation of optimal control methods: • infinite-horizon control for which the difficulty of solving partial differential Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equations directly is overcome, and  proof provided that the iterative value function updating sequence converges to the infimum of all the value functions obtained by admissible control law sequences; • finite-...

  8. Adaptive Backstepping Control of Lightweight Tower Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Borup, Kasper Trolle; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of operating a wind turbine with lightweight tower in the full load region exploiting an adaptive nonlinear controller that allows the turbine to dynamically lean against the wind while maintaining nominal power output. The use of lightweight structures...... for towers and foundations would greatly reduce the construction cost of the wind turbine, however extra features ought be included in the control system architecture to avoid tower collapse. An adaptive backstepping collective pitch controller is proposed for tower point tracking control, i.e. to modify...... the angular deflection of the tower with respect to the vertical axis in response to variations in wind speed. The controller is shown to guarantee asymptotic tracking of the reference trajectory. The performance of the control system is evaluated through deterministic and stochastic simulations including...

  9. Robust Optimal Adaptive Trajectory Tracking Control of Quadrotor Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Navabi

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper focuses on robust optimal adaptive control strategy to deal with tracking problem of a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV in presence of parametric uncertainties, actuator amplitude constraints, and unknown time-varying external disturbances. First, Lyapunov-based indirect adaptive controller optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO is developed for multi-input multi-output (MIMO nonlinear quadrotor to prevent input constraints violation, and then disturbance observer-based control (DOBC technique is aggregated with the control system to attenuate the effects of disturbance generated by an exogenous system. The performance of synthesis control method is evaluated by a new performance index function in time-domain, and the stability analysis is carried out using Lyapunov theory. Finally, illustrative numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented approach in altitude and attitude tracking under several conditions, including large time-varying uncertainty, exogenous disturbance, and control input constraints.

  10. An adaptive fuzzy logic controller for robot-manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thu Ha

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy controller is designed for the robot-manipulator. The synthesized controller ensures that 1 the close-loop system is globally stable and 2 the tracking error converges to zero asymptotically and a cost function is minimized. The fuzzy controller is synthesized from a collection of IF-THEN rules. The parameters of the membership functions characterizing the linguistic terms change according to some adaptive law for the purpose of controlling a plant to track a reference trajectory. The proposed control scheme is demonstrated in a typical nonlinear plant two link manipulator. The computer simulation of control is done by the language MATLAB. The results of simulation show that the adaptipresented results are analyzed.

  11. Effects of supervisory train control technology on operator attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-31

    This report describes an experiment evaluating the effects of supervisory control automation on attention allocation while operating : a train. The study compared two levels of supervisory control (partial and full) to manual control, in terms of how...

  12. Working Memory Training in Post-Secondary Students with ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karizma Mawjee

    Full Text Available To determine whether standard-length computerized training enhances working memory (WM, transfers to other cognitive domains and shows sustained effects, when controlling for motivation, engagement, and expectancy.97 post-secondary students (59.8% female aged 18-35 years with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, were randomized into standard-length adaptive Cogmed WM training (CWMT; 45-min/session, a shortened-length adaptive version of CWMT (15 min/session that controlled for motivation, engagement and expectancy of change, or into a no training group (waitlist-control group. All three groups received weekly telephone calls from trained coaches, who supervised the CWMT and were independent from the research team. All were evaluated before and 3 weeks post-training; those in the two CWMT groups were also assessed 3 months post-training. Untrained outcome measures of WM included the WAIS-IV Digit Span (auditory-verbal WM, CANTAB Spatial Span (visual-spatial WM and WRAML Finger Windows (visual-spatial WM. Transfer-of-training effects included measures of short-term memory, cognitive speed, math and reading fluency, complex reasoning, and ADHD symptoms.Performance on 5/7 criterion measures indicated that shortened-length CWMT conferred as much benefit on WM performance as did standard-length training, with both CWMT groups improving more than the waitlist-control group. Only 2 of these findings remained robust after correcting for multiple comparisons. Follow-up analyses revealed that post-training improvements on WM performance were maintained for at least three months. There was no evidence of any transfer effects but the standard-length group showed improvement in task-specific strategy use.This study failed to find robust evidence of benefits of standard-length CWMT for improving WM in college students with ADHD and the overall pattern of findings raise questions about the specificity of training effects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01657721.

  13. Working Memory Training in Post-Secondary Students with ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawjee, Karizma; Woltering, Steven; Tannock, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether standard-length computerized training enhances working memory (WM), transfers to other cognitive domains and shows sustained effects, when controlling for motivation, engagement, and expectancy. 97 post-secondary students (59.8% female) aged 18-35 years with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, were randomized into standard-length adaptive Cogmed WM training (CWMT; 45-min/session), a shortened-length adaptive version of CWMT (15 min/session) that controlled for motivation, engagement and expectancy of change, or into a no training group (waitlist-control group). All three groups received weekly telephone calls from trained coaches, who supervised the CWMT and were independent from the research team. All were evaluated before and 3 weeks post-training; those in the two CWMT groups were also assessed 3 months post-training. Untrained outcome measures of WM included the WAIS-IV Digit Span (auditory-verbal WM), CANTAB Spatial Span (visual-spatial WM) and WRAML Finger Windows (visual-spatial WM). Transfer-of-training effects included measures of short-term memory, cognitive speed, math and reading fluency, complex reasoning, and ADHD symptoms. Performance on 5/7 criterion measures indicated that shortened-length CWMT conferred as much benefit on WM performance as did standard-length training, with both CWMT groups improving more than the waitlist-control group. Only 2 of these findings remained robust after correcting for multiple comparisons. Follow-up analyses revealed that post-training improvements on WM performance were maintained for at least three months. There was no evidence of any transfer effects but the standard-length group showed improvement in task-specific strategy use. This study failed to find robust evidence of benefits of standard-length CWMT for improving WM in college students with ADHD and the overall pattern of findings raise questions about the specificity of training effects. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01657721.

  14. MUSCLE FIBER SPECIFIC ANTIOXIDATIVE SYSTEM ADAPTATION TO SWIM TRAINING IN RATS: INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gonchar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day-1, 5 days·wk-1, for 4 wk. Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min, interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk. Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity

  15. Prolonged adaptation to fat-rich diet and training; effects on body fat stores and insulin resistance in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effect of prolonged adaptation to training and fat- or carbohydrate-rich diet on body composition and insulin resistance.......To investigate the effect of prolonged adaptation to training and fat- or carbohydrate-rich diet on body composition and insulin resistance....

  16. How does high-intensity intermittent training affect recreational endurance runners? Acute and chronic adaptations: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe García-Pinillos

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: HIIT-based running plans (2 to 3 HIIT sessions per week, combining HIIT and CR runs show athletic performance improvements in endurance runners by improving maximal oxygen uptake and running economy along with muscular and metabolic adaptations. To maximize the adaptations to training, both HIIT and CR must be part of training programs for endurance runners.

  17. An adaptive sliding mode control technology for weld seam tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Youmin; Wu, Bo; Zhou, Kaibo; Ge, Mingfeng

    2015-03-01

    A novel adaptive sliding mode control algorithm is derived to deal with seam tracking control problem of welding robotic manipulator, during the process of large-scale structure component welding. The proposed algorithm does not require the precise dynamic model, and is more practical. Its robustness is verified by the Lyapunov stability theory. The analytical results show that the proposed algorithm enables better high-precision tracking performance with chattering-free than traditional sliding mode control algorithm under various disturbances.

  18. Algorithms for Optimal Model Distributions in Adaptive Switching Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarghya Ghosh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several multiple model adaptive control architectures have been proposed in the literature. Despite many advances in theory, the crucial question of how to synthesize the pairs model/controller in a structurally optimal way is to a large extent not addressed. In particular, it is not clear how to place the pairs model/controller is such a way that the properties of the switching algorithm (e.g., number of switches, learning transient, final performance are optimal with respect to some criteria. In this work, we focus on the so-called multi-model unfalsified adaptive supervisory switching control (MUASSC scheme; we define a suitable structural optimality criterion and develop algorithms for synthesizing the pairs model/controller in such a way that they are optimal with respect to the structural optimality criterion we defined. The peculiarity of the proposed optimality criterion and algorithms is that the optimization is carried out so as to optimize the entire behavior of the adaptive algorithm, i.e., both the learning transient and the steady-state response. A comparison is made with respect to the model distribution of the robust multiple model adaptive control (RMMAC, where the optimization considers only the steady-state ideal response and neglects any learning transient.

  19. L1 Adaptive Control for a Vertical Rotor Orientation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bottom-fixed vertical rotating devices are widely used in industrial and civilian fields. The free upside of the rotor will cause vibration and lead to noise and damage during operation. Meanwhile, parameter uncertainties, nonlinearities and external disturbances will further deteriorate the performance of the rotor. Therefore, in this paper, we present a rotor orientation control system based on an active magnetic bearing with L 1 adaptive control to restrain the influence of the nonlinearity and uncertainty and reduce the vibration amplitude of the vertical rotor. The boundedness and stability of the adaptive system are analyzed via a theoretical derivation. The impact of the adaptive gain is discussed through simulation. An experimental rig based on dSPACE is designed to test the validity of the rotor orientation system. The experimental results show that the relative vibration amplitude of the rotor using the L 1 adaptive controller will be reduced to ∼50% of that in the initial state, which is a 10% greater reduction than can be achieved with the nonadaptive controller. The control approach in this paper is of some significance to solve the orientation control problem in a low-speed vertical rotor with uncertainties and nonlinearities.

  20. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System based DVR Controller Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim FERDI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PI controller is very common in the control of DVRs. However, one disadvantage of this conventional controller is its inability to still working well under a wider range of operating conditions. So, as a solution fuzzy controller is proposed in literature. But, the main problem with the conventional fuzzy controllers is that the parameters associated with the membership functions and the rules depend broadly on the intuition of the experts. To overcome this problem, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS based controller design is proposed. The resulted controller is composed of Sugeno fuzzy controller with two inputs and one output. According to the error and error rate of the control system and the output data, ANFIS generates the appropriate fuzzy controller. The simulation results have proved that the proposed design method gives reliable powerful fuzzy controller with a minimum number of membership functions.

  1. Adaptive control system having hedge unit and related apparatus and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric Norman (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention includes an adaptive control system used to control a plant. The adaptive control system includes a hedge unit that receives at least one control signal and a plant state signal. The hedge unit generates a hedge signal based on the control signal, the plant state signal, and a hedge model including a first model having one or more characteristics to which the adaptive control system is not to adapt, and a second model not having the characteristic(s) to which the adaptive control system is not to adapt. The hedge signal is used in the adaptive control system to remove the effect of the characteristic from a signal supplied to an adaptation law unit of the adaptive control system so that the adaptive control system does not adapt to the characteristic in controlling the plant.

  2. Adaptive control strategies for interlimb coordination in legged robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoi, Shinya; Manoonpong, Poramate; Ambe, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    for legged robots induced by various factors (locomotion speed, environmental situation, body properties, and task). In addition, we show characteristic properties of adaptive interlimb coordination, such as gait hysteresis and different time-scale adaptations. We also discuss the underlying mechanisms......Walking animals produce adaptive interlimb coordination during locomotion in accordance with their situation. Interlimb coordination is generated through the dynamic interactions of the neural system, the musculoskeletal system, and the environment, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear....... Recently, investigations of the adaptationmechanisms of living beings have attracted attention, and bio-inspired control systems based on neurophysiological findings regarding sensorimotor interactions are being developed for legged robots. In this review, we introduce adaptive interlimb coordination...

  3. Multiple Estimation Architecture in Discrete-Time Adaptive Mixing Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Baldi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive mixing control (AMC is a recently developed control scheme for uncertain plants, where the control action coming from a bank of precomputed controller is mixed based on the parameter estimates generated by an on-line parameter estimator. Even if the stability of the control scheme, also in the presence of modeling errors and disturbances, has been shown analytically, its transient performance might be sensitive to the initial conditions of the parameter estimator. In particular, for some initial conditions, transient oscillations may not be acceptable in practical applications. In order to account for such a possible phenomenon and to improve the learning capability of the adaptive scheme, in this paper a new mixing architecture is developed, involving the use of parallel parameter estimators, or multi-estimators, each one working on a small subset of the uncertainty set. A supervisory logic, using performance signals based on the past and present estimation error, selects the parameter estimate to determine the mixing of the controllers. The stability and robustness properties of the resulting approach, referred to as multi-estimator adaptive mixing control (Multi-AMC, are analytically established. Besides, extensive simulations demonstrate that the scheme improves the transient performance of the original AMC with a single estimator. The control scheme and the analysis are carried out in a discrete-time framework, for easier implementation of the method in digital control.

  4. Early-Phase Satellite Cell and Myonuclear Domain Adaptations to Slow-Speed vs. Traditional Resistance Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Montemayor, Jennifer R; Hikida, Robert S; Staron, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify adaptations in satellite cell (SC) content and myonuclear domain (MND) after 6-week slow-speed vs. "normal-speed" resistance training programs. Thirty-four untrained females were divided into slow speed (SS), traditional strength (TS), traditional muscular endurance (TE), and nontraining control (C) groups. Three sets each of leg press, squat, and knee extension were performed 2 days per week for the first week and 3 days per week for the following 5 weeks. The SS group performed 6-10 repetition maximum (6-10RM) for each set with 10-second concentric (con) and 4-second eccentric (ecc) contractions for each repetition. Traditional strength and TE performed 6-10RM and 20-30RM, respectively, at "normal" speed (1-2 seconds per con and ecc contractions). Traditional muscular endurance and SS trained at the same intensity (40-60% 1RM), whereas TS trained at 80-85% 1RM. Pretraining and posttraining muscle biopsies were analyzed for fiber cross-sectional area, fiber type, SC content, myonuclear number, and MND. Satellite cell content of type I, IIA, IIAX, and IIX fibers significantly increased in TS. However, SC content of only type IIAX and IIX fibers increased in SS, and there was no change in TE or C. Myonuclear number did not change in any group. Myonuclear domain of type I, IIA, IIAX, and IIX fibers increased in TS, whereas MND of only type IIA fibers increased in SS, and there was no change in TE or C. In conclusion, slow-speed resistance training increased SC content and MND more than training with a similar resistance at normal speed. However, high-intensity normal-speed training produced the greatest degree of fiber adaptation for each variable.

  5. Evaluation of a culturally adapted training course in Indigenous e-mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, Kylie M; Puszka, Stefanie; Sweet, Michelle; Mills, Patj Patj Janama Robert; Nagel, Tricia

    2015-12-01

    To report the impact of the Indigenous e-mental health training course 'Yarning about Indigenous Mental Health using the AIMhi Stay Strong App'. Participants were trained in e-mental health and the use of one of the first culturally adapted e-mental health interventions - The AIMhi Stay Strong App. Between October 2013 and December 2014, 138 participants completed the 'Yarning about Indigenous Mental Health using the AIMhi Stay Strong App' training course and 130 completed pre- and post-training questionnaires to explore knowledge and confidence in a number of areas trained. Paired t-tests showed significant improvements across all measures of skill and knowledge except for confidence in using computers. E-mental health is a relatively new development that may contribute to improved access to mental health services for rural and remote Indigenous Australians, particularly where such tools are culturally adapted. Whilst current knowledge and use of e-mental health tools in this group of Northern Territory service providers was limited, perceived knowledge and confidence in use was significantly improved following training. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  6. Efficacy of Adaptive Biofeedback Training in Treating Constipation-Related Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofeedback therapy is a well-known and effective therapeutic treatment for constipation. A previous study suggested that adaptive biofeedback (ABF training was more effective than traditional (fixed training parameters biofeedback training. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of ABF in relieving constipation-related symptoms. We noticed that in traditional biofeedback training, a patient usually receives the training twice per week. The long training sessions usually led to poor compliance. This study proposes an intensive biofeedback therapy and compares intensive therapy with nonintensive therapy in patients with constipation-related symptoms. Methods. 63 patients with constipation-related symptoms were treated with ABF between 2012 and 2013. These patients were further divided into the intensive therapy and nonintensive therapy groups. Results. A total of 63 patients were enrolled in the study, including 24 in the nonintensive therapy group and 39 in the intensive therapy group. 100% (N=21 of constipation patients achieved the primary efficacy endpoint (≥3 bowel movements/week. There was significant improvement in constipation-related symptoms after adaptive biofeedback. The intensive biofeedback therapy did not show better performance compared to nonintensive biofeedback therapy. Conclusions. This investigation provides support for the efficacy of biofeedback for constipation-related symptoms. The efficacy of intensive therapy is similar to nonintensive therapy.

  7. Heart rate-running speed index may be an efficient method of monitoring endurance training adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Ville; Hokka, Laura; Hynynen, Esa; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo; Nummela, Ari

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel heart rate (HR)-running speed index could be used in monitoring adaptation to endurance training. Forty-five recreational runners underwent a 2-phased 28-week training regime. The first 14 weeks included basic endurance training, whereas the second 14 weeks were more intensive (increased volume and intensity). A maximal treadmill running test was performed in the beginning of the experiment, in the middle of basic endurance training, and at the end of each training period (PRE, WEEK 7, WEEK 14, and POST). The novel HR-running speed index was calculated from every continuous-type running exercise during the 28-week experiment based on exercise HR-running speed relation accompanied by individual information on resting and maximal HR and speed. The change in the novel index correlated significantly with the changes of peak running speed in the treadmill tests (r = 0.43-0.61, p speed at respiratory compensation threshold (r = 0.35-0.39, p ≤ 0.05) during the experiment. The change in the index also correlated significantly (r = 0.49, p = 0.001) with relative changes in maximal oxygen uptake (in ml·kg·min). According to these findings, it seems that the novel index based on exercise HR and running speed may serve as a practical tool for daily monitoring of individual's training adaptation without the need to realize a maximal running test in laboratory conditions.

  8. Wrist Resistance Training Improves Motor Control and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Edward; Kim, You-Sin; Hill, Genevieve; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Chang Kook; Shim, Jae Kun

    2018-04-01

    Chu, E, Kim, Y-S, Hill, G, Kim, YH, Kim, CK, and Shim, JK. Wrist resistance training improves motor control and strength. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 962-969, 2018-The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-week direction-specific resistance training program on isometric torque control and isokinetic torque strength of the wrist joint. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to either the wrist training group (n = 9) or the control group (n = 10). The training group performed wrist exercises in 6 directions (flexion, extension, pronation, supination, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation), whereas the control group did not. Data were collected on the isometric torque control, 1-repetition maximum (1RM) strength, and isokinetic maximum torque (angular velocity of 60° per second wrist movements) before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and at 2-week intervals during training. The training group showed significant decreases in isometric torque control error in all 6 directions after 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the control group did not show significant increase or decrease. After 4 weeks of training, the training group showed significant increases in maximum strength in all 6 directions as assessed by 1RM strength and isokinetic strength tests, whereas the control group did not show any statistically significant changes. This study shows that motor control significantly improves within the first 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the wrist strength significantly improves within the first 4 weeks of resistance training. Based on the findings of this study, coaches and trainers should consider wrist resistance training to improve athletes' muscular strength and control of the wrist muscles.

  9. 12 CFR 1731.5 - Internal controls, procedures, and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Internal controls, procedures, and training... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS MORTGAGE FRAUD REPORTING § 1731.5 Internal controls, procedures, and training. An Enterprise shall establish adequate and efficient internal controls and...

  10. Training Attentional Control Improves Cognitive and Motor Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, Emmanuel; Wilson, Mark; Vine, Sam; Derakshan, Nazanin

    2016-10-01

    Attentional control is a necessary function for the regulation of goal-directed behavior. In three experiments we investigated whether training inhibitory control using a visual search task could improve task-specific measures of attentional control and performance. In Experiment 1 results revealed that training elicited a near-transfer effect, improving performance on a cognitive (antisaccade) task assessing inhibitory control. In Experiment 2 an initial far-transfer effect of training was observed on an index of attentional control validated for tennis. The principal aim of Experiment 3 was to expand on these findings by assessing objective gaze measures of inhibitory control during the performance of a tennis task. Training improved inhibitory control and performance when pressure was elevated, confirming the mechanisms by which cognitive anxiety impacts performance. These results suggest that attentional control training can improve inhibition and reduce taskspecific distractibility with promise of transfer to more efficient sporting performance in competitive contexts.

  11. Training Volume, Not Frequency, Indicative of Maximal Strength Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Ryan J; Gai, Christopher M; Aguilar, Danielle; Bove, Daniel; Dolan, Jeffrey; Vargas, Andres; Couvillion, Kaylee; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Campbell, Bill I

    2018-01-05

    To compare the effects of a high- versus a moderate-training frequency on maximal strength and body composition. 28 young, healthy resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either: 3x/week (3x; n=16) or 6x/week (6x; n=12). Dependent variables (DVs) assessed at baseline and after the 6-week training intervention included: squat 1RM (SQ1RM), bench press 1RM (BP1RM), deadlift 1RM (DL1RM), powerlifting total (PLT), Wilk's coefficient (WC), fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). Data for each DV was analyzed via a 2x2 between-within factorial repeated measures ANOVA. There was a main effect for time (p < 0.001) for SQ1RM (3x: + 16.8 kg; 6x: + 16.7 kg), BP1RM (3x: + 7.8 kg; 6x: + 8.8 kg), DL1RM (3x: + 19 kg; 6x: + 21 kg), PLT (3x: + 43.6 kg; 6x: + 46.5 kg), WC (3x: + 27; 6x: + 27.1), and FFM (3x: + 1.7 kg; 6x: + 2.6 kg). There were no group x time interactions or main effects for group. The primary finding was that 6-weeks of resistance training lead to significant increases in maximal strength and fat-free mass. Additionally, it appears that increased training frequency does not lead to additional strength improvements when volume and intensity are equated. Practical Application: High frequency (6x/wk) resistance training does not appear to offer additional strength and hypertrophy benefits over lower frequency (3x/wk), when volume and intensity are equated. Coaches and practitioners can therefore expect similar increases in strength and lean body mass with both 3- and 6-weekly sessions.

  12. Comparison of the effects of aerobic and resistance training on cardiac autonomic adaptations in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Larissa C R; Tezini, Geisa C S V; Schujmann, Débora S; Porto, Jaqueline M; Rossi, Bruno R O; Souza, Hugo C D

    2011-07-05

    We have compared the effects of two types of physical training on the cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized and sham-operated rats according to different approaches: double autonomic blockade (DAB) with methylatropine and propranolol; baroreflex sensibility (BRS) and spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Wistar female rats (±250g) were divided into two groups: sham-operated and ovariectomized. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: sedentary rats, rats submitted to aerobic trained and rats submitted to resistance training. Ovariectomy did not change arterial pressure, basal heart rate (HR), DAB and BRS responses, but interfered with HRV by reducing the low-frequency oscillations (LF=0.20-0.75Hz) in relation to sedentary sham-operated rats. The DAB showed that both types of training promoted an increase in the predominance of vagal tonus in sham-operated rats, but HR variations due to methylatropine were decreased in the resistance trained rats compared to sedentary rats. Evaluation of BRS showed that resistance training for sham-operated and ovariectomized rats reduced the tachycardic responses in relation to aerobic training. Evaluation of HRV in trained rats showed that aerobic training reduced LF oscillations in sham-operated rats, whereas resistance training had a contrary effect. In the ovariectomized rats, aerobic training increased high frequency oscillations (HF=0.75-2.5Hz), whereas resistance training produced no effect. In sham-operated rats, both types of training increased the vagal autonomic tonus, but resistance training reduced HF oscillations and BRS as well. In turn, both types of training had similar results in ovariectomized rats, except for HRV, as aerobic training promoted an increase in HF oscillations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of regenerative braking on energy-efficient train control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, G.M.; Goverde, R.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    An important topic to reduce the energy consumption in railways is the use of energy-efficient train control (EETC). Modern trains allow regen-erative braking where the released kinetic energy can be reused. This regener-ative braking has an effect on the optimal driving regimes compared to trains

  14. Training- and education system in network control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichner, M.; Koentges, U.

    1987-03-01

    The training system for the project network control center of Duesseldorf city is described. Reasons for the implementation of the training system are presented, the main requirements are brought forward, and the envisaged solutions are described. The main training element is a network simulator including also the network protection systems. The software requirements are outlined.

  15. 78 FR 11236 - Positive Train Control Public Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Positive Train Control Public Forum On Wednesday, February 27, 2013, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Forum titled, ``Positive Train..., the NTSB has investigated many train collisions and over-speed derailments caused by operational...

  16. Long-term fat diet adaptation effects on performance, training capacity, and fat utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that adaptation to a fat-rich carbohydrate-poor diet results in lower resting muscle glycogen content and a higher rate of fat oxidation during exercise when compared with a carbohydrate-rich diet. The net effect of such an adaptation could potentially be a sparing of muscle...... glycogen, and because muscle glycogen storage is coupled to endurance performance, it is possible that adaptation to a high-fat diet potentially could enhance endurance performance. Therefore, the first issue in this review is to critically evaluate the available evidence for a potential endurance...... performance enhancement after long-term fat-rich diet adaptation. Attainment of optimal performance is among other factors dependent also on the quality and quantity of the training performed. When exercise intensity is increased, there is an increased need for carbohydrates. On the other hand, consumption...

  17. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides lesson plans for training radiological control technicians. Covered here is basic radiological documentation, counting errors, dosimetry, environmental monitoring, and radiation instruments

  18. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  19. Evaluation-Function-based Model-free Adaptive Fuzzy Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Naba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Designs of adaptive fuzzy controllers (AFC are commonly based on the Lyapunov approach, which requires a known model of the controlled plant. They need to consider a Lyapunov function candidate as an evaluation function to be minimized. In this study these drawbacks were handled by designing a model-free adaptive fuzzy controller (MFAFC using an approximate evaluation function defined in terms of the current state, the next state, and the control action. MFAFC considers the approximate evaluation function as an evaluative control performance measure similar to the state-action value function in reinforcement learning. The simulation results of applying MFAFC to the inverted pendulum benchmark verified the proposed scheme’s efficacy.

  20. Gait Adaptability Training Improves Both Postural Stability and Dual-Tasking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Batson, Crystal D.; Peters, Brian T.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    After spaceflight, the process of readapting to Earth's gravity commonly presents crewmembers with a variety of locomotor challenges. Our recent work has shown that the ability to adapt to a novel discordant sensorimotor environment can be increased through preflight training, so one focus of our laboratory has been the development of a gait training countermeasure to expedite the return of normal locomotor function after spaceflight. We used a training system comprising a treadmill mounted on a motion base facing a virtual visual scene that provided a variety of sensory challenges. As part of their participation in a larger retention study, 10 healthy adults completed 3 training sessions during which they walked on a treadmill at 1.1 m/s while receiving discordant support-surface and visual manipulations. After a single training session, subjects stride frequencies improved, and after 2 training sessions their auditory reaction times improved, where improvement was indicated by a return toward baseline values. Interestingly, improvements in reaction time came after stride frequency improvements plateaued. This finding suggests that postural stability was given a higher priority than a competing cognitive task. Further, it demonstrates that improvement in both postural stability and dual-tasking can be achieved with multiple training exposures. We conclude that, with training, individuals become more proficient at walking in discordant sensorimotor conditions and are able to devote more attention to competing tasks.

  1. SEVERE OBESITY SHIFTS METABOLIC THRESHOLDS BUT DOES NOT ATTENUATE AEROBIC TRAINING ADAPTATIONS IN ZUCKER RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Santos Rosa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10 were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60% (obese = 78±9% and lean = 68±5%, P 0.05, whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P <0.05 vs. lean. In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations.

  2. Baroreflex deficit blunts exercise training-induced cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, I C; De La Fuente, R N; Mostarda, C; Rosa, K; Flues, K; Damaceno-Rodrigues, N R; Caldini, E G; De Angelis, K; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2010-03-01

    1. Baroreceptors regulate moment-to-moment blood pressure (BP) variations, but their long-term effect on the cardiovascular system remains unclear. Baroreceptor deficit accompanying hypertension contributes to increased BP variability (BPV) and sympathetic activity, whereas exercise training has been associated with an improvement in these baroreflex-mediated changes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic, haemodynamic and cardiac morphofunctional effects of long-term sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in trained and sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Rats were subjected to SAD or sham surgery and were then further divided into sedentary and trained groups. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill (five times per week, 50-70% maximal running speed). All groups were studied after 10 weeks. 3. Sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation in SHR had no effect on basal heart rate (HR) or BP, but did augment BPV, impairing the cardiac function associated with increased cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition. Exercise training reduced BP and HR, re-established baroreflex sensitivity and improved both HR variability and BPV. However, SAD in trained SHR blunted all these improvements. Moreover, the systolic and diastolic hypertensive dysfunction, reduced left ventricular chamber diameter and increased cardiac collagen deposition seen in SHR were improved after the training protocol. These benefits were attenuated in trained SAD SHR. 4. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that the arterial baroreflex mediates cardiac disturbances associated with hypertension and is crucial for the beneficial cardiovascular morphofunctional and autonomic adaptations induced by chronic exercise in hypertension.

  3. An Improved Adaptive Tracking Controller of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat-Bao-Thien Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new adaptive fuzzy neural control to suppress chaos and also to achieve the speed tracking control in a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM drive system with unknown parameters and uncertainties. The control scheme consists of fuzzy neural and compensatory controllers. The fuzzy neural controller with online parameter tuning is used to estimate the unknown nonlinear models and construct linearization feedback control law, while the compensatory controller is employed to attenuate the estimation error effects of the fuzzy neural network and ensure the robustness of the controlled system. Moreover, due to improvement in controller design, the singularity problem is surely avoided. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate that the proposed control scheme can successfully remove chaotic oscillations and allow the speed to follow the desired trajectory in a chaotic PMSM despite the existence of unknown models and uncertainties.

  4. Discriminative training of self-structuring hidden control neural models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Hartmann, Uwe; Hunnerup, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new training algorithm for self-structuring hidden control neural (SHC) models. The SHC models were trained non-discriminatively for speech recognition applications. Better recognition performance can generally be achieved, if discriminative training is applied instead. Thus...... we developed a discriminative training algorithm for SHC models, where each SHC model for a specific speech pattern is trained with utterances of the pattern to be recognized and with other utterances. The discriminative training of SHC neural models has been tested on the TIDIGITS database...

  5. Adaptive Control of Artificial Pancreas Systems - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamuran Turksoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial pancreas (AP systems offer an important improvement in regulating blood glucose concentration for patients with type 1 diabetes, compared to current approaches. AP consists of sensors, control algorithms and an insulin pump. Different AP control algorithms such as proportional-integral-derivative, model-predictive control, adaptive control, and fuzzy logic control have been investigated in simulation and clinical studies in the past three decades. The variability over time and complexity of the dynamics of blood glucose concentration, unsteady disturbances such as meals, time-varying delays on measurements and insulin infusion, and noisy data from sensors create a challenging system to AP. Adaptive control is a powerful control technique that can deal with such challenges. In this paper, a review of adaptive control techniques for blood glucose regulation with an AP system is presented. The investigations and advances in technology produced impressive results, but there is still a need for a reliable AP system that is both commercially viable and appealing to patients with type 1 diabetes.

  6. Early-phase muscular adaptations in response to slow-speed versus traditional resistance-training regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenke, Mark D; Herman, Jennifer R; Gliders, Roger M; Hagerman, Fredrick C; Hikida, Robert S; Rana, Sharon R; Ragg, Kerry E; Staron, Robert S

    2012-10-01

    Thirty-four untrained women participated in a 6-week program to investigate slow-speed versus "normal" speed resistance-training protocols. Subjects were divided into: slow-speed (SS), normal-speed/traditional-strength (TS), normal-speed/traditional muscular endurance (TE), and non-exercising control (C) groups. Leg press, squats, and knee extensions were performed 2 days/week for the first week and 3 days/week for the remaining 5 weeks (~2 min rest). The SS group performed 6-10 repetitions maximum (6-10RM) for each set with 10 s concentric (con) and 4 s eccentric (ecc) contractions. The TS and TE groups performed sets of 6-10RM and 20-30RM, respectively, at "normal" speed (1-2 s/con and ecc contractions). TE and SS trained at the same relative intensity (~40-60% 1RM), whereas TS trained at ~80-85% 1RM. Pre- and post-training muscle biopsies were analyzed for fiber-type composition, cross-sectional area (CSA), and myosin heavy chain (MHC) content. The percentage of type IIX fibers decreased and IIAX increased in all three training groups. However, only TS showed an increase in percentage of type IIA fibers. CSA of fiber types I, IIA, and IIX increased in TS. In SS, only the CSA of IIA and IIX fibers increased. These changes were supported by MHC data. No significant changes for any parameters were found for the C group. In conclusion, slow-speed strength training induced a greater adaptive response compared to training with a similar resistance at "normal" speed. However, training with a higher intensity at "normal" speed resulted in the greatest overall muscle fiber response in each of the variables assessed.

  7. Distributed Adaptive Droop Control for DC Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasirian, Vahidreza; Davoudi, Ali; Lewis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A distributed-adaptive droop mechanism is proposed for secondary/primary control of dc Microgrids. The conventional secondary control, that adjusts the voltage set point for the local droop mechanism, is replaced by a voltage regulator. A current regulator is then added to fine-tune the droop...... controller precisely accounts for the transmission/distribution line impedances. The controller on each converter exchanges data with only its neighbor converters on a sparse communication graph spanned across the Microgrid. Global dynamic model of the Microgrid is derived, with the proposed controller...

  8. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  9. Dynamic Control of High-speed Train Following Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Pan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Both safety and efficiency should be considered in high-speed train following control. The real-time calculation of dynamic safety following distance is used by the following train to understand the quality of its own following behavior. A new velocity difference control law can help the following train to adjust its own behavior from a safe and efficient steady-following state to another one if the actual following distance is greater than the safe following distance. Meanwhile, the stopping control law would work for collision avoidance when the actual following distance is less than the safe following distance. The simulation shows that the dynamic control of actual inter-train distance can be well accomplished by the behavioral adjustment of the following train, and verifies the effectiveness and feasibility of our presented methods for train following control.

  10. PI controller based model reference adaptive control for nonlinear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    efficiently updating the weight is useful in many applications such identification of nonlinear systems. Off-line iterative algorithm can be employed in such care of identification or modeling. However, in the aspect of control, the NN should work in on line manner. In the control system structure, the output of NN is the control ...

  11. Cerebellar-inspired algorithm for adaptive control of nonlinear dielectric elastomer-based artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emma D; Assaf, Tareq; Pearson, Martin J; Rossiter, Jonathan M; Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Dean, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Electroactive polymer actuators are important for soft robotics, but can be difficult to control because of compliance, creep and nonlinearities. Because biological control mechanisms have evolved to deal with such problems, we investigated whether a control scheme based on the cerebellum would be useful for controlling a nonlinear dielectric elastomer actuator, a class of artificial muscle. The cerebellum was represented by the adaptive filter model, and acted in parallel with a brainstem, an approximate inverse plant model. The recurrent connections between the two allowed for direct use of sensory error to adjust motor commands. Accurate tracking of a displacement command in the actuator's nonlinear range was achieved by either semi-linear basis functions in the cerebellar model or semi-linear functions in the brainstem corresponding to recruitment in biological muscle. In addition, allowing transfer of training between cerebellum and brainstem as has been observed in the vestibulo-ocular reflex prevented the steady increase in cerebellar output otherwise required to deal with creep. The extensibility and relative simplicity of the cerebellar-based adaptive-inverse control scheme suggests that it is a plausible candidate for controlling this type of actuator. Moreover, its performance highlights important features of biological control, particularly nonlinear basis functions, recruitment and transfer of training. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  13. System identification and adaptive control theory and applications of the neurofuzzy and fuzzy cognitive network models

    CERN Document Server

    Boutalis, Yiannis; Kottas, Theodore; Christodoulou, Manolis A

    2014-01-01

    Presenting current trends in the development and applications of intelligent systems in engineering, this monograph focuses on recent research results in system identification and control. The recurrent neurofuzzy and the fuzzy cognitive network (FCN) models are presented.  Both models are suitable for partially-known or unknown complex time-varying systems. Neurofuzzy Adaptive Control contains rigorous proofs of its statements which result in concrete conclusions for the selection of the design parameters of the algorithms presented. The neurofuzzy model combines concepts from fuzzy systems and recurrent high-order neural networks to produce powerful system approximations that are used for adaptive control. The FCN model  stems  from fuzzy cognitive maps and uses the notion of “concepts” and their causal relationships to capture the behavior of complex systems. The book shows how, with the benefit of proper training algorithms, these models are potent system emulators suitable for use in engineering s...

  14. An alternative approach for adaptive real-time control using a nonparametric neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves da Silva, A.P.; Nascimento, P.C.; Lambert-Torres, G.; Borges da Silva, L.E. [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a nonparametric Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for adaptive control of nonlinear systems. The proposed ANN, Functional Polynomial Network (FPN), mixes the concept of orthogonal basis functions with the idea of polynomial networks. A combination of orthogonal functions can be used to produce a desired mapping. However, there is no way besides trial and error to choose which orthogonal functions should be selected. Polynomial nets can be used for function approximation, but, it is not easy to set the order of the activation function. The combination of the two concepts produces a very powerful ANN model due to the automatic input selection capability of the polynomial networks. The proposed FPN has been tested for speed control of a DC motor. The results have been compared with the ones provided by an indirect adaptive control scheme based on multilayer perceptrons trained by backpropagation.

  15. Training Behavioral Control in Adolescents Using a Serious Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boendermaker, Wouter J; Veltkamp, Remco C; Peeters, Margot

    2017-12-01

    Risk taking, such as heavy alcohol use, is commonplace among adolescents. Nevertheless, prolonged alcohol use at this age can lead to severe health problems. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate a serious game training ("The Fling"), aimed at increasing behavioral control in adolescents and thereby helping them to improve control over their alcohol use. The game training was compared to a game placebo and a nongame training version in a randomized controlled trial. A sample of 185 adolescents (mean age 14.9 years) in secondary education participated in the study. They performed four sessions of training, as well as a set of questionnaires and cognitive assessment tasks before and after the training. The basis for the training was the stop-signal paradigm, aimed at increasing behavioral control. The game variants were shown to motivate adolescents beyond the level of the nongame version. Behavioral control improved significantly over time, but this effect was also present in the game placebo, suggesting that the game activities alone may have had a beneficial effect on our measures of behavioral control. As baseline drinking levels were low, no significant training effects on drinking behavior were found. Although the current results are not yet conclusive as to whether "The Fling" is effective as a cognitive training, they do warrant further research in this direction. This study also shows that serious games may be uniquely suitable to bridge the gap between an evidence-based training paradigm and an attractive, motivating training environment.

  16. Embedded two level direct adaptive fuzzy controller for DC motor speed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Zaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposed approach based on an adaptive fuzzy logic controller for precise control of the DC motor speed. In this concern, the proposed Direct Adaptive Fuzzy Logic Controller (DAFLC is estimated from two levels, where the lower level uses a Mamdani fuzzy controller and the upper level is an inverse model based on a Takagi–Sugeno (T–S method in which its output is used to adapt the parameters of the fuzzy controller in the lower level. The proposed controller is implemented using an Arduino DUE kit. From the practical results, it is proved that the proposed adaptive controller improves, successfully both the performance response and the disturbance due to the load in the speed control of the DC motor.

  17. Adaptive Current Control Method for Hybrid Active Power Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Minh Thuyen

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive current control method for Hybrid Active Power Filter (HAPF). It consists of a fuzzy-neural controller, identification and prediction model and cost function. The fuzzy-neural controller parameters are adjusted according to the cost function minimum criteria. For this reason, the proposed control method has a capability on-line control clings to variation of the load harmonic currents. Compared to the single fuzzy logic control method, the proposed control method shows the advantages of better dynamic response, compensation error in steady-state is smaller, able to online control is better and harmonics cancelling is more effective. Simulation and experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  18. Adaptive Wavelet Coding Applied in a Wireless Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Felipe O. S.; O. Salazar, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Wireless control systems can sense, control and act on the information exchanged between the wireless sensor nodes in a control loop. However, the exchanged information becomes susceptible to the degenerative effects produced by the multipath propagation. In order to minimize the destructive effects characteristic of wireless channels, several techniques have been investigated recently. Among them, wavelet coding is a good alternative for wireless communications for its robustness to the effects of multipath and its low computational complexity. This work proposes an adaptive wavelet coding whose parameters of code rate and signal constellation can vary according to the fading level and evaluates the use of this transmission system in a control loop implemented by wireless sensor nodes. The performance of the adaptive system was evaluated in terms of bit error rate (BER) versus Eb/N0 and spectral efficiency, considering a time-varying channel with flat Rayleigh fading, and in terms of processing overhead on a control system with wireless communication. The results obtained through computational simulations and experimental tests show performance gains obtained by insertion of the adaptive wavelet coding in a control loop with nodes interconnected by wireless link. These results enable the use of this technique in a wireless link control loop. PMID:29236048

  19. Adaptive Wavelet Coding Applied in a Wireless Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe O. S. Gama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless control systems can sense, control and act on the information exchanged between the wireless sensor nodes in a control loop. However, the exchanged information becomes susceptible to the degenerative effects produced by the multipath propagation. In order to minimize the destructive effects characteristic of wireless channels, several techniques have been investigated recently. Among them, wavelet coding is a good alternative for wireless communications for its robustness to the effects of multipath and its low computational complexity. This work proposes an adaptive wavelet coding whose parameters of code rate and signal constellation can vary according to the fading level and evaluates the use of this transmission system in a control loop implemented by wireless sensor nodes. The performance of the adaptive system was evaluated in terms of bit error rate (BER versus E b / N 0 and spectral efficiency, considering a time-varying channel with flat Rayleigh fading, and in terms of processing overhead on a control system with wireless communication. The results obtained through computational simulations and experimental tests show performance gains obtained by insertion of the adaptive wavelet coding in a control loop with nodes interconnected by wireless link. These results enable the use of this technique in a wireless link control loop.

  20. Adaptive control and synchronization of a fractional-order chaotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tem based on the stability theory of fractional-order dynamic systems. The presented schemes, which contain only a single-state variable, are simple and flexible. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the presented methods. Keywords. Fractional order; adaptive scheme; control; synchronization.