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Sample records for adaptive optics scanning

  1. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  2. Adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopy with annular pupils.

    Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Annular apodization of the illumination and/or imaging pupils of an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) for improving transverse resolution was evaluated using three different normalized inner radii (0.26, 0.39 and 0.52). In vivo imaging of the human photoreceptor mosaic at 0.5 and 10° from fixation indicates that the use of an annular illumination pupil and a circular imaging pupil provides the most benefit of all configurations when using a one Airy disk diameter pinhole, in agreement with the paraxial confocal microscopy theory. Annular illumination pupils with 0.26 and 0.39 normalized inner radii performed best in terms of the narrowing of the autocorrelation central lobe (between 7 and 12%), and the increase in manual and automated photoreceptor counts (8 to 20% more cones and 11 to 29% more rods). It was observed that the use of annular pupils with large inner radii can result in multi-modal cone photoreceptor intensity profiles. The effect of the annular masks on the average photoreceptor intensity is consistent with the Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE). This indicates that combinations of images of the same photoreceptors with different apodization configurations and/or annular masks can be used to distinguish cones from rods, even when the former have complex multi-modal intensity profiles. In addition to narrowing the point spread function transversally, the use of annular apodizing masks also elongates it axially, a fact that can be used for extending the depth of focus of techniques such as adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AOOCT). Finally, the positive results from this work suggest that annular pupil apodization could be used in refractive or catadioptric adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes to mitigate undesired back-reflections.

  3. Adaptive optics parallel near-confocal scanning ophthalmoscopy.

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2016-08-15

    We present an adaptive optics parallel near-confocal scanning ophthalmoscope (AOPCSO) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). The imaging light is modulated to be a line of point sources by the DMD, illuminating the retina simultaneously. By using a high-speed line camera to acquire the image and using adaptive optics to compensate the ocular wave aberration, the AOPCSO can image the living human eye with cellular level resolution at the frame rate of 100 Hz. AOPCSO has been demonstrated with improved spatial resolution in imaging of the living human retina compared with adaptive optics line scan ophthalmoscopy.

  4. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  5. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update.

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it.

  6. Closed-loop optical stabilization and digital image registration in adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy.

    Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Nozato, Koji; Saito, Kenichi; Williams, David R; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan A

    2014-09-01

    Eye motion is a major impediment to the efficient acquisition of high resolution retinal images with the adaptive optics (AO) scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Here we demonstrate a solution to this problem by implementing both optical stabilization and digital image registration in an AOSLO. We replaced the slow scanning mirror with a two-axis tip/tilt mirror for the dual functions of slow scanning and optical stabilization. Closed-loop optical stabilization reduced the amplitude of eye-movement related-image motion by a factor of 10-15. The residual RMS error after optical stabilization alone was on the order of the size of foveal cones: ~1.66-2.56 μm or ~0.34-0.53 arcmin with typical fixational eye motion for normal observers. The full implementation, with real-time digital image registration, corrected the residual eye motion after optical stabilization with an accuracy of ~0.20-0.25 μm or ~0.04-0.05 arcmin RMS, which to our knowledge is more accurate than any method previously reported.

  7. Analysis of adaptive laser scanning optical system with focus-tunable components

    Pokorný, P.; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Novák, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a primary analysis of an adaptive laser scanner based on two-mirror beam-steering device and focustunable components (lenses with tunable focal length). It is proposed an optical scheme of an adaptive laser scanner, which can focus the laser beam in a continuous way to a required spatial position using the lens with tunable focal length. This work focuses on a detailed analysis of the active optical or opto-mechanical components (e.g. focus-tunable lenses) mounted in the optical systems of laser scanners. The algebraic formulas are derived for ray tracing through different configurations of the scanning optical system and one can calculate angles of scanner mirrors and required focal length of the tunable-focus component provided that the position of the focused beam in 3D space is given with a required tolerance. Computer simulations of the proposed system are performed using MATLAB.

  8. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope.

    Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth.

  9. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. Methods A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye’s optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. Results The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. Conclusions We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss. PMID:28257458

  10. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  11. Integrated adaptive optics optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope system for simultaneous cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging.

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Jones, Steven M; Pilli, Suman; Balderas-Mata, Sandra; Kim, Dae Yu; Olivier, Scot S; Werner, John S

    2011-06-01

    We describe an ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) retinal imaging system that combines adaptive optics Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) to allow simultaneous data acquisition by the two modalities. The AO-SLO subsystem was integrated into the previously described AO-UHR OCT instrument with minimal changes to the latter. This was done in order to ensure optimal performance and image quality of the AO- UHR OCT. In this design both imaging modalities share most of the optical components including a common AO-subsystem and vertical scanner. One of the benefits of combining Fd-OCT with SLO includes automatic co-registration between two acquisition channels for direct comparison between retinal structures imaged by both modalities (e.g., photoreceptor mosaics or microvasculature maps). Because of differences in the detection scheme of the two systems, this dual imaging modality instrument can provide insight into retinal morphology and potentially function, that could not be accessed easily by a single system. In this paper we describe details of the components and parameters of the combined instrument, including incorporation of a novel membrane magnetic deformable mirror with increased stroke and actuator count used as a single wavefront corrector. We also discuss laser safety calculations for this multimodal system. Finally, retinal images acquired in vivo with this system are presented.

  12. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future.

  13. Comparison of adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopic fluorescein angiography and offset pinhole imaging.

    Chui, Toco Y P; Dubow, Michael; Pinhas, Alexander; Shah, Nishit; Gan, Alexander; Weitz, Rishard; Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances to the adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) have enabled finer in vivo assessment of the human retinal microvasculature. AOSLO confocal reflectance imaging has been coupled with oral fluorescein angiography (FA), enabling simultaneous acquisition of structural and perfusion images. AOSLO offset pinhole (OP) imaging combined with motion contrast post-processing techniques, are able to create a similar set of structural and perfusion images without the use of exogenous contrast agent. In this study, we evaluate the similarities and differences of the structural and perfusion images obtained by either method, in healthy control subjects and in patients with retinal vasculopathy including hypertensive retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal vein occlusion. Our results show that AOSLO OP motion contrast provides perfusion maps comparable to those obtained with AOSLO FA, while AOSLO OP reflectance images provide additional information such as vessel wall fine structure not as readily visible in AOSLO confocal reflectance images. AOSLO OP offers a non-invasive alternative to AOSLO FA without the need for any exogenous contrast agent.

  14. Optical Scanning Applications.

    Wagner, Hans

    The successful use of optical scanning at the University of the Pacific (UOP) indicates that such techniques can simplify a number of administrative data processing tasks. Optical scanning is regularly used at UOP to assist with data processing in the areas of admissions, registration and grade reporting and also has applications for other tasks…

  15. Characterization of single-file flow through human retinal parafoveal capillaries using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    Tam, Johnny; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-03-02

    Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy was used to noninvasively acquire videos of single-file flow through live human retinal parafoveal capillaries. Videos were analyzed offline to investigate capillary flow dynamics. Certain capillaries accounted for a clear majority of leukocyte traffic (Leukocyte-Preferred-Paths, LPPs), while other capillaries primarily featured plasma gap flow (Plasma-Gap-Capillaries, PGCs). LPPs may serve as a protective mechanism to prevent inactivated leukocytes from entering exchange capillaries, and PGCs may serve as relief valves to minimize flow disruption due to the presence of a leukocyte in a neighboring LPP.

  16. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-06-28

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame.

  17. Adaptive CT scanning system

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2016-11-22

    Apparatus, systems, and methods that provide an X-ray interrogation system having a plurality of stationary X-ray point sources arranged to substantially encircle an area or space to be interrogated. A plurality of stationary detectors are arranged to substantially encircle the area or space to be interrogated, A controller is adapted to control the stationary X-ray point sources to emit X-rays one at a time, and to control the stationary detectors to detect the X-rays emitted by the stationary X-ray point sources.

  18. Principles of adaptive optics

    Tyson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    History and BackgroundIntroductionHistoryPhysical OpticsTerms in Adaptive OpticsSources of AberrationsAtmospheric TurbulenceThermal BloomingNonatmospheric SourcesAdaptive Optics CompensationPhase ConjugationLimitations of Phase ConjugationArtificial Guide StarsLasers for Guide StarsCombining the LimitationsLinear AnalysisPartial Phase ConjugationAdaptive Optics SystemsAdaptive Optics Imaging SystemsBeam Propagation Syst

  19. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy.

  20. Fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for cellular resolution in vivo mouse retinal imaging: benefits and drawbacks of implementing adaptive optics (Conference Presentation)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a very important imaging tool in ophthalmology research. By combing with Adaptive Optics (AO) technique, AO-SLO can correct for ocular aberrations resulting in cellular level resolution, allowing longitudinal studies of single cells morphology in the living eyes. The numerical aperture (NA) sets the optical resolution that can be achieve in the "classical" imaging systems. Mouse eye has more than twice NA of the human eye, thus offering theoretically higher resolution. However, in most SLO based imaging systems the imaging beam size at mouse pupil sets the NA of that instrument, while most of the AO-SLO systems use almost the full NA of the mouse eye. In this report, we first simulated the theoretical resolution that can be achieved in vivo for different imaging beam sizes (different NA), assumingtwo cases: no aberrations and aberrations based on published mouse ocular wavefront data. Then we imaged mouse retinas with our custom build SLO system using different beam sizes to compare these results with theory. Further experiments include comparison of the SLO and AO-SLO systems for imaging different type of fluorescently labeled cells (microglia, ganglion, photoreceptors, etc.). By comparing those results and taking into account systems complexity and ease of use, the benefits and drawbacks of two imaging systems will be discussed.

  1. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  2. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  3. Holographic Adaptive Optics

    Andersen, G.

    For the last two decades adaptive optics has been used as a technique for correcting imaging applications and directed energy/laser targeting and laser communications systems affected by atmospheric turbulence. Typically these systems are bulky and limited to system with the potential to operate at speeds of MHz. The system utilizes a hologram to perform an all-optical wavefront analysis that removes the need for any computer. Finally, the sensing is made on a modal basis so it is largely insensitive to scintillation and obscuration. We have constructed a prototype device and will present experimental results from our research. The holographic adaptive optics system begins with the creation of a multiplexed hologram. This hologram is created by recording the maximum and minimum response functions of every actuator in the deformable mirror against a unique focused reference beam. When a wavefront of some arbitrary phase is incident on the processed hologram, a number of focal spots are created -- one pair for each actuator in the DM. The absolute phase error at each particular actuator location is simply related to the ratio of the intensity of each pair of spots. In this way we can use an array of photodetectors to give a direct readout of phase error without the need for any calculations. The advantages of holographic adaptive optics are many. To begin with, the measurement of phase error is made all optically, so the wavefront sensor directly controls the actuators in the DM without any computers. Using fast, photon counting photodetectors allows for closed loop correction limited only by the speed of the deformable mirror which in the case of MEMS devices can be 100 kHz or more. All this can be achieved in an extremely compact and lightweight package making it perfectly suited to applications such as UAV surveillance imagery and free space optical communications systems. Lastly, since the correction is made on a modal basis instead of zonal, it is virtually

  4. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  5. Lighter side of adaptive optics

    Tyson, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive optics has been under development for well over 40 years. It is an indisputable necessity for all major ground-based astronomical telescopes and is the foundation for laser and wavefront sensor design. Lighter Side of Adaptive Optics is a nontechnical explanation of optics, the atmosphere, and the technology for ""untwinkling"" the stars. While interweaving a fictional romantic relationship as an analogy to adaptive optics, and inserting satire, humor, and philosophical rants, Tyson makes a difficult scientific topic understandable. The ""why"" and ""how"" of adaptive optics has never

  6. Handbook of optical and laser scanning

    Marshall, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    From its initial publication titled Laser Beam Scanning in 1985 to Handbook of Optical and Laser Scanning, now in its second edition, this reference has kept professionals and students at the forefront of optical scanning technology. Carefully and meticulously updated in each iteration, the book continues to be the most comprehensive scanning resource on the market. It examines the breadth and depth of subtopics in the field from a variety of perspectives. The Second Edition covers: Technologies such as piezoelectric devices Applications of laser scanning such as Ladar (laser radar) Underwater

  7. ESO adaptive optics facility

    Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Hubin, N.; Paufique, J.; Stroebele, S.; Soenke, C.; Donaldson, R.; Fedrigo, E.; Oberti, S.; Tordo, S.; Downing, M.; Kiekebusch, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Duchateau, M.; Jost, A.; Hackenberg, W.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Delabre, B.; Stuik, R.; Biasi, R.; Gallieni, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Lelouarn, M.; Glindeman, A.

    2008-07-01

    ESO has initiated in June 2004 a concept of Adaptive Optics Facility. One unit 8m telescope of the VLT is upgraded with a 1.1 m convex Deformable Secondary Mirror and an optimized instrument park. The AO modules GALACSI and GRAAL will provide GLAO and LTAO corrections forHawk-I and MUSE. A natural guide star mode is provided for commissioning and maintenance at the telescope. The facility is completed by a Laser Guide Star Facility launching 4 LGS from the telescope centerpiece used for the GLAO and LTAO wavefront sensing. A sophisticated test bench called ASSIST is being designed to allow an extensive testing and characterization phase of the DSM and its AO modules in Europe. Most sub-projects have entered the final design phase and the DSM has entered Manufacturing phase. First light is planned in the course of 2012 and the commissioning phases should be completed by 2013.

  8. The VLT Adaptive Optics Facility Project: Adaptive Optics Modules

    Arsenault, Robin; Hubin, Norbert; Stroebele, Stefan; Fedrigo, Enrico; Oberti, Sylvain; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Bacon, Roland; McDermid, Richard; Bonaccini-Calia, Domenico; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Riccardi, Armando; Donaldson, Rob; Lelouarn, Miska; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Conzelman, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Stuik, Remko; Paufique, Jerome; Kasper, Markus; Vernet, Elise; Downing, Mark; Esposito, Simone; Duchateau, Michel; Franx, Marijn; Myers, Richard; Goodsell, Steven

    2006-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility is a project to convert UT4 into a specialised Adaptive Telescope with the help of a Deformable Secondary Mirror (see previous article). The two instruments that have been identified for the two Nasmyth foci are: Hawk-I with its AO module GRAAL allowing a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction (GLAO) and MUSE with GALACSI for GLAO correction and Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics correction. This article describes the AO modules GRAAL and GALACSI and their Real-Time Computers based on SPARTA.

  9. Field guide to adaptive optics

    Tyson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This SPIE Field Guide provides a summary of the methods for determining the requirements of an adaptive optics system, the performance of the system, and the requirements for the components of the system. This second edition has a greatly expanded presentation of adaptive optics control system design and operation. Discussions of control models are accompanied by various recommendations for implementing the algorithms in hardware.

  10. Optical analysis of scanning microstereolithography systems

    Deshmukh, Suhas P.; Dubey, Shashikant; Gandhi, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    Microstereolithography (MSL) is rapidly developing technique for micro-fabrication. Vector-by-vector scanning MSL has a potential to create true 3D micro-devices as compared to mostly planar (2D-2 1/2 D) devices fabricated by conventional MEMS techniques. Previous literature shows two different scanning methods:(1) Galvanomirror scanning, (2) Photoreactor tank scanning. Galvanomirror scanning technique has higher fabrication speed but poor resolution because of defocusing of laser spot on the resin surface. Photo-reactor tank scanning has higher resolution but produces a wavy structures and limited speed of fabrication. This paper proposes and develops an offaxis lens scanning technique for MSL and carries out optical analysis to compare its performance with the existing techniques mentioned above. The comparison clearly demonstrates improved performance with the proposed offaxis lens scanning technique.

  11. Optical scanning holography for stereoscopic display

    Liu, Jung-Ping; Wen, Hsuan-Hsuan

    2016-10-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a scanning-type digital holographic recording technique. One of OSH's most important properties is that the OSH can record an incoherent hologram, which is free of speckle and thus is suitable for the applications of holographic display. The recording time of a scanning hologram is proportional to the sampling resolution. Hence the viewing angle as well as the resolution of a scanning hologram is limited for avoid too long recording. As a result, the viewing angle is not large enough for optical display. To solve this problem, we recorded two scanning holograms at different viewing angles. The two holograms are synthesized to a single stereoscopic hologram with two main viewing angles. In displaying, two views at the two main viewing angles are reconstructed. Because both views contain full-depth-resolved 3D scenes, the problem of accommodation conflict in conventional stereogram is avoided.

  12. Rotary-scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Qi, Weizhi; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is currently one of the fastest evolving photoacoustic imaging modalities. It has a comparable spatial resolution to pure optical microscopic techniques such as epifluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and two-photon microscopy, but also owns a deeper penetration depth. In this paper, we report a rotary-scanning (RS)-ORPAM that utilizes a galvanometer scanner integrated with objective to achieve rotary laser scanning. A 15 MHz cylindrically focused ultrasonic transducer is mounted onto a motorized rotation stage to follow optical scanning traces synchronously. To minimize the loss of signal to noise ratio, the acoustic focus is precisely adjusted to reach confocal with optical focus. Black tapes and carbon fibers are firstly imaged to evaluate the performance of the system, and then in vivo imaging of vasculature networks inside the ears and brains of mice is demonstrated using this system.

  13. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  14. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility

    Ströbele, S.; Arsenault, R.; Bacon, R.; Biasi, R.; Bonaccini-Calia, D.; Downing, M.; Conzelmann, R. D.; Delabre, B.; Donaldson, R.; Duchateau, M.; Esposito, S.; Fedrigo, E.; Gallieni, D.; Hackenberg, W. K. P.; Hubin, N.; Kasper, M.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Le Louarn, M.; McDermid, R.; Oberti, S.; Paufique, J.; Riccardi, A.; Stuik, R.; Vernet, E.

    2006-06-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility is a project to convert one VLT-UT into a specialized Adaptive Telescope. The present secondary mirror (M2) will be replaced by a new M2-Unit hosting a 1170 actuators deformable mirror. The 3 focal stations will be equipped with instruments adapted to the new capability of this UT. Two instruments are in development for the 2 Nasmyth foci: Hawk-I with its AO module GRAAL allowing a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction and MUSE with GALACSI for GLAO correction and Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics correction. A future instrument still needs to be defined for the Cassegrain focus. Several guide stars are required for the type of adaptive corrections needed and a four Laser Guide Star facility (4LGSF) is being developed in the scope of the AO Facility. Convex mirrors like the VLT M2 represent a major challenge for testing and a substantial effort is dedicated to this. ASSIST, is a test bench that will allow testing of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and both instruments with simulated turbulence. This article describes the Adaptive Optics facility systems composing associated with it.

  15. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  16. [Technical principles of adaptive optics in ophthalmology].

    Reiniger, J L; Domdei, N; Holz, F G; Harmening, W M

    2017-02-13

    During the last 25 years ophthalmic imaging has undergone a revolution. This review gives an overview of the possibilities of adaptive optics (AO) for ophthalmic imaging technologies and their development and illustrates that the role of ophthalmic imaging changed from the documentation of obvious abnormalities to the detection of microscopic yet significant conspicuities. This enables earlier and more precise diagnoses. The implementation of AO for imaging systems like fundus cameras, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography has gained in importance. In recent years a couple of companies started developing commercially available AO systems, thus, indicating a future use in clinical routine.

  17. SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY STUDIES ON OPTICAL DISC

    徐磊; 顾冬红; 等

    1994-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope(STM) is used to investigate the optical dise.The areas with and without data stampers are all observedcarefully.Three-dimensional images of the disc surface clearly demonstrate the period.depth of the grooves and the shape of data stampers.Some phenomena of STM imaging are also discussed.

  18. Optical transmission scanning for damage quantification in impacted GFRP composites

    Khomenko, Anton; Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias G.; Haq, Mahmoodul; Cloud, Gary L.; Udpa, Lalita

    2016-04-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites constitute nearly 90% of the global composites market and are extensively used in aerospace, marine, automotive and construction industries. While their advantages of lightweight and superior mechanical properties are well explored, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that allow for damage/defect detection and assessment of its extent and severity are not fully developed. Some of the conventional NDE techniques for GFRPs include ultrasonics, X-ray, IR thermography, and a variety of optical techniques. Optical methods, specifically measuring the transmission properties (e.g. ballistic optical imaging) of specimens, provide noninvasive, safe, inexpensive, and compact solutions and are commonly used in biomedical applications. In this work, this technique is adapted for rapid NDE of GFRP composites. In its basic form, the system for optical transmission scanning (OTS) consists of a light source (laser diode), a photo detector and a 2D translation stage. The proposed technique provides high-resolution, rapid and non-contact OT (optical transmittance)-scans, and does not require any coupling. The OTS system was used for inspection of pristine and low-velocity impacted (damaged) GFRP samples. The OT-scans were compared with conventional ultrasonic C-scans and showed excellent agreement but with better resolution. Overall, the work presented lays the groundwork for cost-effective, non-contact, and rapid NDE of GFRP composite structures.

  19. Scanning Techniques For Optical Data Storage

    Towner, David K.

    1987-01-01

    It seems almost paradoxical that beams of light can be moved and steered at very high speeds using a variety of scanning methods, yet the optical disk drives now being designed and marketed for data storage applications have comparatively long access times. Knowing that optical data storage has unrealized potential is of interest, but of more immediate concern is the recognition that poor access performance is a serious design issue. Magnetic disk drives offer average seek times in the 15-25ms range, compared to about 80-500ms (or more, for CD ROMS) for current optical drives. This performance disparity exists, in part, because the relatively massive "optical heads" in use today cannot be transported across the radius of a disk as quickly as a stack of much lighter magnetic heads. Any potential distance advantage that the optical drive might have, due to its substantially higher track density, is offset by the magnetic drive's use of a multi-disk stack. As a result, the drive must achieve similar radial accelerations during seeks if it is to have similar average access times. The inability of current optical drives to approach the access speeds of comparable magnetic drives significantly reduces the competitiveness of optical products in major segments of the very large data storage market. This shortcoming is especially disturbing when we know that opto-mechanical scanners typically operate in the 1-10ms range and that non-mechanical scanning techniques can be substantially faster than that.

  20. Optical scanning cryptography for secure wireless transmission.

    Poon, Ting-Chung; Kim, Taegeun; Doh, Kyu

    2003-11-10

    We propose a method for secure wireless transmission of encrypted information. By use of an encryption key, an image or document is optically encrypted by optical heterodyne scanning and hence encryption is performed on the fly. We call this technique optical scanning cryptography. The output of the heterodyne encrypted signal is at radio frequency and can be directly sent through an antenna to a secure site for digital storage to be prepared for decryption. In the secure site, an identical optical scanning system to that used for encryption is used, together with a decryption key, to generate an electrical signal. The electrical signal is then processed and sent to a computer to be used for decryption. Utilizing the stored information received from the encryption stage and the electrical information from the secure site, a digital decryption unit performs a decryption algorithm. If the encryption key and the decryption key are matched, the decryption unit will decrypt the image or document faithfully. The overall cryptosystem can perform the incoherent optical processing counterpart of the well-known coherent double-random phase-encoding technique. We present computer simulations of the idea.

  1. An Adaptive Algorithm to Detect Port Scans

    单蓉胜; 李小勇; 李建华

    2004-01-01

    Detection of port scan is an important component in a network intrusion detection and prevention system. Traditional statistical methods can be easily evaded by stealthy scans and are prone to DeS attacks. This paper presents a new mechanism termed PSD(port scan detection), which is based on TCP packet anomaly evaluation. By learning the port distribution and flags of TCP packets arriving at the protected hosts, PSD can compute the anomaly score of each packet and effectively detect port scans including slow scans and stealthy scans. Experiments show that PSD has high detection accuracy and low detection latency.

  2. Performance of the optical communication adaptive optics testbed

    Troy, Mitchell; Roberts, Jennifer; Guiwits, Steve; Azevedo, Steve; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Brack, Gary; Garkanian, Vachik; Palmer, Dean; Platt, Benjamin; Truong, Tuan; Wilson, Keith; Wallace, Kent

    2005-01-01

    We describe the current performance of an adaptive optics testbed for optical communication. This adaptive optics system allows for simulation of night and day-time observing on a 1 meter telescope with a 97 actuator deformable mirror.

  3. Micromirror Arrays for Adaptive Optics

    Carr, E.J.

    2000-08-07

    The long-range goal of this project is to develop the optical and mechanical design of a micromirror array for adaptive optics that will meet the following criteria: flat mirror surface ({lambda}/20), high fill factor (> 95%), large stroke (5-10 {micro}m), and pixel size {approx}-200 {micro}m. This will be accomplished by optimizing the mirror surface and actuators independently and then combining them using bonding technologies that are currently being developed.

  4. Maritime Adaptive Optics Beam Control

    2010-09-01

    adaptive optics work at the NPS has been applied primarily to vibration control and segment alignment for flexible space telescopes and segmented mirror...a Fourier filter in the form of an iris or aperture stop is placed in the beam to select either the +1 or -1 diffractive order to propagate through...optical components on the table include lenses, mirrors, aperture stops, beamsplitters, and filters which reimage the system pupil plane and

  5. MEMS scanning micromirror for optical coherence tomography.

    Strathman, Matthew; Liu, Yunbo; Keeler, Ethan G; Song, Mingli; Baran, Utku; Xi, Jiefeng; Sun, Ming-Ting; Wang, Ruikang; Li, Xingde; Lin, Lih Y

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an endoscopic-inspired imaging system employing a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) micromirror scanner to achieve beam scanning for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Miniaturization of a scanning mirror using MEMS technology can allow a fully functional imaging probe to be contained in a package sufficiently small for utilization in a working channel of a standard gastroesophageal endoscope. This work employs advanced image processing techniques to enhance the images acquired using the MEMS scanner to correct non-idealities in mirror performance. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  6. Field guide to adaptive optics

    Tyson, Robert K

    2004-01-01

    ""...These field guides will be immensely useful to all scientists and engineers who wish to brush up on authentic definitions, equations, and tables of data in optics. And the format is really user friendly! I...wonder now how I ever got along in optics without this ready reference....a real winner!"" --Dr. Leno S. Pedrotti, Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) Third in the Field Guide Series, this is a summary of the methods for determining the requirements of an adaptive optics system, the performance of the system, and the requirements for the components of th

  7. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    wavefront corrector ophthalmic adaptive optics: design and alignment (oral paper) / Alfredo Dubra and David Williams. High speed simultaneous SLO/OCT imaging of the human retina with adaptive optics (oral paper) / M. Pircher ... [et al.]. Characterization of an AO-OCT system (oral paper) / Julia W. Evans ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for retina imaging (oral paper) / Guohua Shi ... [et al.]. Development, calibration and performance of an electromagnetic-mirror-based adaptive optics system for visual optics (oral paper) / Enrique Gambra ... [et al.]. Adaptive eye model (poster paper) / Sergey O. Galetskzy and Alexty V. Kudryashov. Adaptive optics system for retinal imaging based on a pyramid wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Sabine Chiesa ... [et al.]. Modeling of non-stationary dynamic ocular aberrations (poster paper) / Conor Leahy and Chris Dainty. High-order aberrations and accommodation of human eye (poster paper) / Lixia Xue ... [et al.]. Electromagnetic deformable mirror: experimental assessment and first ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / L. Vabre ... [et al.]. Correcting ocular aberrations in optical coherence tomography (poster paper) / Simon Tuohy ... [et al.] -- pt. 4. Adaptive optics in optical storage and microscopy. The application of liquid crystal aberration compensator for the optical disc systems (invited paper) / Masakazu Ogasawara. Commercialization of the adaptive scanning optical microscope (ASOM) (oral paper) / Benjamin Potsaid ... [et al.]. A practical implementation of adaptive optics for aberration compensation in optical microscopy (oral paper) / A. J. Wright ... [et al.]. Active focus locking in an optically sectioning microscope using adaptive optics (poster paper) / S. Poland, A. J. Wright, J. M. Girkin. Towards four dimensional particle tracking for biological applications / Heather I. Campbell ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics for microscopy (poster paper) / Xavier Levecq -- pt. 5. Adaptive optics in lasers

  8. Future trends in adaptive Optics

    Le Louarn, Miska

    2001-05-01

    In this talk, I will summarize the limitations of current adaptive optics systems (cone effect, anisoplanatism) and I will show what methods can be used to overcome them. I will focus on Multi-Conjugate AO and the polychromatic laser guide star. I will also address AO for Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs), such as OWL (ESO) and CELT (University of California / Caltech).

  9. Driver Code for Adaptive Optics

    Rao, Shanti

    2007-01-01

    A special-purpose computer code for a deformable-mirror adaptive-optics control system transmits pixel-registered control from (1) a personal computer running software that generates the control data to (2) a circuit board with 128 digital-to-analog converters (DACs) that generate voltages to drive the deformable-mirror actuators. This program reads control-voltage codes from a text file, then sends them, via the computer s parallel port, to a circuit board with four AD5535 (or equivalent) chips. Whereas a similar prior computer program was capable of transmitting data to only one chip at a time, this program can send data to four chips simultaneously. This program is in the form of C-language code that can be compiled and linked into an adaptive-optics software system. The program as supplied includes source code for integration into the adaptive-optics software, documentation, and a component that provides a demonstration of loading DAC codes from a text file. On a standard Windows desktop computer, the software can update 128 channels in 10 ms. On Real-Time Linux with a digital I/O card, the software can update 1024 channels (8 boards in parallel) every 8 ms.

  10. Adaptive mode-dependent scan for H.264/AVC intracoding

    Wei, Yung-Chiang; Yang, Jar-Ferr

    2010-07-01

    In image/video coding standards, the zigzag scan provides an effective encoding order of the quantized transform coefficients such that the quantized coefficients can be arranged statistically from large to small magnitudes. Generally, the optimal scan should transfer the 2-D transform coefficients into 1-D data in descending order of their average power levels. With the optimal scan order, we can achieve more efficient variable length coding. In H.264 advanced video coding (AVC), the residuals resulting from various intramode predictions have different statistical characteristics. After analyzing the transformed residuals, we propose an adaptive scan order scheme, which optimally matches up with intraprediction mode, to further improve the efficiency of intracoding. Simulation results show that the proposed adaptive scan scheme can improve the context-adaptive variable length coding to achieve better rate-distortion performance for the H.264/AVC video coder without the increase of computation.

  11. Visual Scan Adaptation During Repeated Visual Search

    2010-01-01

    locating the target, such as fixation durations and the number of fixations to find the target (Hidalgo- Sotelo , Oliva, & Torralba, 2005). Adaptations...6, doi:10.1167/ 3.1.6. [PubMed] [Article] Hidalgo- Sotelo , B., Oliva, A., & Torralba, A. (2005). Human learning of contextual priors for object search

  12. Axial scanning in confocal microscopy employing adaptive lenses (CAL).

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Finkeldey, Markus; Stürmer, Moritz; Leithold, Christoph; Gerhardt, Nils C; Hofmann, Martin R; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-03-10

    In this paper we analyze the capability of adaptive lenses to replace mechanical axial scanning in confocal microscopy. The adaptive approach promises to achieve high scan rates in a rather simple implementation. This may open up new applications in biomedical imaging or surface analysis in micro- and nanoelectronics, where currently the axial scan rates and the flexibility at the scan process are the limiting factors. The results show that fast and adaptive axial scanning is possible using electrically tunable lenses but the performance degrades during the scan. This is due to defocus and spherical aberrations introduced to the system by tuning of the adaptive lens. These detune the observation plane away from the best focus which strongly deteriorates the axial resolution by a factor of ~2.4. Introducing balancing aberrations allows addressing these influences. The presented approach is based on the employment of a second adaptive lens, located in the detection path. It enables shifting the observation plane back to the best focus position and thus creating axial scans with homogeneous axial resolution. We present simulated and experimental proof-of-principle results.

  13. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...

  14. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.;

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...

  15. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  16. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    Marchetti, Enrico; Fedrigo, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Soenke, Christian; Brast, Roland; Conzelmann, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Duchateau, Michel; Frank, Christoph; Klein, Barbara; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Carbonaro, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the new Adaptive Optics based instrument for ESO's VLT aiming at replacing NACO and SINFONI to form a single compact facility with AO fed imaging and integral field unit spectroscopic scientific channels. ERIS completes the instrument suite at the VLT adaptive telescope. In particular it is equipped with a versatile AO system that delivers up to 95% Strehl correction in K band for science observations up to 5 micron It comprises high order NGS and LGS correction enabling the observation from exoplanets to distant galaxies with a large sky coverage thanks to the coupling of the LGS WFS with the high sensitivity of its visible WFS and the capability to observe in dust embedded environment thanks to its IR low order WFS. ERIS will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the VLT unit hosting the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The wavefront correction is provided by the AOF deformable secondary mirror while the Laser Guide Star is provided by one of the four launch units of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility for the AOF. The overall layout of the ERIS AO system is extremely compact and highly optimized: the SPIFFI spectrograph is fed directly by the Cassegrain focus and both the NIX's (IR imager) and SPIFFI's entrance windows work as visible/infrared dichroics. In this paper we describe the concept of the ERIS AO system in detail, starting from the requirements and going through the estimated performance, the opto-mechanical design and the Real-Time Computer design.

  17. Adaptive multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    Bayraktar, Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the development of a new class of optical components to enhance the imaging performance by enabling adaptations of the optics. When used at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths, such ‘adaptive optics’ offers the potential to achieve the highest spatial resolution in imagi

  18. Initial concepts for CELT adaptive optics

    Dekany, Richard G.; Bauman, Brian J.; Gavel, Donald T.; Troy, Mitchell; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Britton, Matthew C.

    2003-02-01

    The California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) project has recently completed a 12-month conceptual design phase that has investigated major technology challenges in a number of Observatory subsystems, including adaptive optics (AO). The goal of this effort was not to adopt one or more specific AO architectures. Rather, it was to investigate the feasibility of adaptive optics correction of a 30-meter diameter telescope and to suggest realistic cost ceilings for various adaptive optics capabilities. We present here the key design issues uncovered during conceptual design and present two non-exclusive ‘baseline" adaptive optics concepts that are expected to be further developed during the following preliminary design phase. Further analysis, detailed engineering trade studies, and certain laboratory and telescope experiments must be performed, and key component technology prototypes demonstrated, prior to adopting one or more adaptive optics systems architectures for realization.

  19. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina.

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  20. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    Rajani Battu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  1. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  2. Binocular adaptive optics visual simulator.

    Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2009-09-01

    A binocular adaptive optics visual simulator is presented. The instrument allows for measuring and manipulating ocular aberrations of the two eyes simultaneously, while the subject performs visual testing under binocular vision. An important feature of the apparatus consists on the use of a single correcting device and wavefront sensor. Aberrations are controlled by means of a liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator, where the two pupils of the subject are projected. Aberrations from the two eyes are measured with a single Hartmann-Shack sensor. As an example of the potential of the apparatus for the study of the impact of the eye's aberrations on binocular vision, results of contrast sensitivity after addition of spherical aberration are presented for one subject. Different binocular combinations of spherical aberration were explored. Results suggest complex binocular interactions in the presence of monochromatic aberrations. The technique and the instrument might contribute to the better understanding of binocular vision and to the search for optimized ophthalmic corrections.

  3. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  4. Selection of Acquisition Scan Methods in Intersatellite Optical Communications

    于思源; 高惠德; 马晶; 董蕴华; 马祖光

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model of the acquisition in intersatellite optical communications (IOC) is founded with the assumption that beacon pointing errors could be modeled as Gaussian random variables. An optimal scan method should be chosen according to the average acquisition time under a certain acquisition probability. With analysis of the most common scan methods during the establishment of IOC, the raster-spiral scanning can substitute the spiral scanning is found. The raster scanning and raster-spiral scanning are simulated using Monte Carlo method and the result shows the first one is optimal for acquisition in IOC.

  5. Progress on the VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Paufique, J.; Ströbele, S.; Pirard, J.-F.; Vernet, É.; Hackenberg, W.; Hubin, N.; Jochum, L.; Kuntschner, H.; Glindemann, A.; Amico, P.; Lelouarn, M.; Kolb, J.; Tordo, S.; Donaldson, R.; Sã¶Nke, C.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Kiekebusch, M.; Duhoux, P.; Guidolin, I.; Quattri, M.; Guzman, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Comin, M.; Dupuy, C.; Quentin, J.; Lizon, J.-L.; Silber, A.; Jolly, P.; Manescau, A.; Hammersley, P.; Reyes, J.; Jost, A.; Duchateau, M.; Heinz, V.; Bechet, C.; Stuik, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Very Large Telescope (VLT) Adaptive Optics Facility is a project that will transform one of the VLT's Unit Telescopes into an adaptive telescope that includes a deformable mirror in its optical train. For this purpose the secondary mirror is to be replaced by a thin shell deformable mirror; it will be possible to launch four laser guide stars from the centrepiece and two adaptive optics modules are being developed to feed the instruments HAWK-I and MUSE. These modules implement innovative correction modes for seeing improvement through ground layer adaptive optics and, for high Strehl ratio performance, laser tomography adaptive correction. The performance of these modes will be tested in Europe with a custom test bench called ASSIST. The project has completed its final design phase and concluded an intense phase of procurement; the year 2011 will see the beginning of assembly, integration and tests.

  6. Five modified boundary scan adaptive test generation algorithms

    Niu Chunping; Ren Zheping; Yao Zongzhong

    2006-01-01

    To study the diagnostic problem of Wire-OR (W-O) interconnect fault of PCB (Printed Circuit Board), five modified boundary scan adaptive algorithms for interconnect test are put forward. These algorithms apply Global-diagnosis sequence algorithm to replace the equal weight algorithm of primary test, and the test time is shortened without changing the fault diagnostic capability. The descriptions of five modified adaptive test algorithms are presented, and the capability comparison between the modified algorithm and the original algorithm is made to prove the validity of these algorithms.

  7. Adaptive optics program at TMT

    Boyer, C.; Adkins, Sean; Andersen, David R.; Atwood, Jenny; Bo, Yong; Byrnes, Peter; Caputa, Kris; Cavaco, Jeff; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gilles, Luc; Gregory, James; Herriot, Glen; Hickson, Paul; Ljusic, Zoran; Manter, Darren; Marois, Christian; Otárola, Angel; Pagès, Hubert; Schoeck, Matthias; Sinquin, Jean-Christophe; Smith, Malcolm; Spano, Paolo; Szeto, Kei; Tang, Jinlong; Travouillon, Tony; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Lianqi; Wei, Kai

    2014-07-01

    The TMT first light Adaptive Optics (AO) facility consists of the Narrow Field Infra-Red AO System (NFIRAOS) and the associated Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF). NFIRAOS is a 60 × 60 laser guide star (LGS) multi-conjugate AO (MCAO) system, which provides uniform, diffraction-limited performance in the J, H, and K bands over 17-30 arc sec diameter fields with 50 per cent sky coverage at the galactic pole, as required to support the TMT science cases. NFIRAOS includes two deformable mirrors, six laser guide star wavefront sensors, and three low-order, infrared, natural guide star wavefront sensors within each client instrument. The first light LGSF system includes six sodium lasers required to generate the NFIRAOS laser guide stars. In this paper, we will provide an update on the progress in designing, modeling and validating the TMT first light AO systems and their components over the last two years. This will include pre-final design and prototyping activities for NFIRAOS, preliminary design and prototyping activities for the LGSF, design and prototyping for the deformable mirrors, fabrication and tests for the visible detectors, benchmarking and comparison of different algorithms and processing architecture for the Real Time Controller (RTC) and development and tests of prototype candidate lasers. Comprehensive and detailed AO modeling is continuing to support the design and development of the first light AO facility. Main modeling topics studied during the last two years include further studies in the area of wavefront error budget, sky coverage, high precision astrometry for the galactic center and other observations, high contrast imaging with NFIRAOS and its first light instruments, Point Spread Function (PSF) reconstruction for LGS MCAO, LGS photon return and sophisticated low order mode temporal filtering.

  8. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    Harrington, David; Hunter, Lisa; Max, Claire; Hoffmann, Mark; Pitts, Mark; Armstrong, J D

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Science and Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts and system design. The work...

  9. A Miniaturized Adaptive Optic Device for Optical Telecommunications Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To advance the state-of-the-art uplink laser communication technology, new adaptive optic beam compensation techniques are needed for removing various time-varying...

  10. Optical ballast and adaptive dynamic stable resonator

    Zhang Guang-Yin; Jiao Zhi-Yong; Guo Shu-Guang; Zhang Xiao-Hua; Gu Xue-Wen; Yan Cai-Fan; Wu Ding-Er; Song Feng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a new concept of ‘optical ballast' is put forward. Optical ballast is a kind of device that can be used to decrease the variation and fluctuation of the propagation characteristics of light beams caused by the disturbance of refractive index of the medium. To illustrate the idea clearly and concretely, a fully adaptive dynamic stable solid-state laser resonator is presented as application example of optical ballast.

  11. Variable - temperature scanning optical and force microscope

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of a scanning microscope capable of working in confocal, atomic force and apertureless near field configurations is presented. The microscope is designed to operate in the temperature range 4 - 300 K, using conventional helium flow cryostats. In AFM mode, the distance between the sample and an etched tungsten tip is controlled by a self - sensing piezoelectric tuning fork. The vertical position of both the AFM head and microscope objective can be accurately controlled using...

  12. Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Gavel, D T

    2003-03-10

    Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.

  13. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    Ammons, S Mark; Armstrong, J D; Crossfield, Ian; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, Mike; Harrington, David; Hickenbotham, Adam; Hunter, Jennifer; Johnson, Jess; Johnson, Luke; Li, Kaccie; Lu, Jessica; Maness, Holly; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Putnam, Nicole; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan; Yelda, Sylvana

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO sys...

  14. Adaptive optics applications in vision science

    Olivier, Scot S.

    2003-06-01

    Adaptive optics can be used to correct the aberrations in the human eye caused by imperfections in the cornea and the lens and thereby, improve image quality both looking into and out of the eye. Under the auspices of the NSF Center for Adaptive Optics and the DOE Biomedical Engineering Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has joined together with leading vision science researchers around the country to develop and test new ophthalmic imaging systems using novel wavefront corrector technologies. Results of preliminary comparative evaluations of these technologies in initial system tests show promise for future clinical utility.

  15. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications

    Abdil Kuş

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Reverse engineering (RE is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters.

  16. Adaptive Optics Simulations for Siding Spring

    Goodwin, Michael; Lambert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Using an observational derived model optical turbulence profile (model-OTP) we have investigated the performance of Adaptive Optics (AO) at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), Australia. The simulations cover the performance for AO techniques of single conjugate adaptive optics (SCAO), multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) and ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO). The simulation results presented in this paper predict the performance of these AO techniques as applied to the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3 m and Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) 3.9 m telescopes for astronomical wavelength bands J, H and K. The results indicate that AO performance is best for the longer wavelengths (K-band) and in the best seeing conditions (sub 1-arcsecond). The most promising results are found for GLAO simulations (field of view of 180 arcsecs), with the field RMS for encircled energy 50% diameter (EE50d) being uniform and minimally affected by the free-atmosphere turbulence. The GLAO performance is reasonably good over...

  17. Adaptive optical antennas: design and evaluation

    Weyrauch, Thomas; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Carhart, Gary W.; Simonova, Galina V.; Beresnev, Leonid A.; Polnau, Ernst E.

    2007-09-01

    We present the design and evaluation of compact adaptive optical antennas with apertures diameters of 16 mm and 100 mm for 5Gbit/s-class free-space optical communication systems. The antennas provide a bi-directional optically transparent link between fiber-optical wavelength-division multiplex systems and allow for mitigation of atmospheric-turbulence induced wavefront phase distortions with adaptive optics components. Beam steering is implemented in the antennas either with mirrors on novel tip/tilt platforms or a fiber-tip positioning system, both enabling operation bandwidths of more than 1 kHz. Bimorph piezoelectric actuated deformable mirrors are used for low-order phase-distortion compensation. An imaging system is integrated in the antennas for coarse pointing and tracking. Beam steering and wavefront control is based on blind maximization of the received signal level using a stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. The adaptive optics control architecture allowed the use of feedback signals provided locally within each transceiver system and remotely by the opposite transceiver system via an RF link. First atmospheric compensation results from communication experiments over a 250 m near-ground propagation path are presented.

  18. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  19. Adaptive optical design in surface plasma resonance sensor

    ZHANG Feng; ZHONG Jin-gang

    2006-01-01

    A double-prism adaptive optical design in surface plasma resonance (SPR) sensor is proposed,which consists of two identical isosceles right-triangular prisms. One prism is used as a component of Kretschmann configuration,and the other is for regulation of the optical path. When double-prism structure is angle-scanned by an immovable incident ray,the output ray will be always parallel with the incident ray and just has a small displacement with the shift of output point.The output ray can be focused on a fixed photodetector by a convex lens.Thus it can be avoided that a prism and a photodetector rotate by θ and 2θ respectively in conventional angular scanning SPR sensor.This new design reduces the number of the movable components,makes the structure simple and compact,and makes the manipulation convenient.

  20. Sensor-Based Technique for Manually Scanned Hand-Held Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Paritosh Pande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging probes offer flexibility to image sites that are otherwise challenging to access. While the majority of hand-held imaging probes utilize galvanometer- or MEMS-scanning mirrors to transversely scan the imaging beam, these probes are commonly limited to lateral fields-of-view (FOV of only a few millimeters. The use of a freehand manually scanned probe can significantly increase the lateral FOV. However, using the traditional fixed-rate triggering scheme for data acquisition in a manually scanned probe results in imaging artifacts due to variations in the scan velocity of the imaging probe. These artifacts result in a structurally inaccurate image of the sample. In this paper, we present a sensor-based manual scanning technique for OCT imaging, where real-time feedback from an optical motion sensor is used to trigger data acquisition. This technique is able to circumvent the problem of motion artifacts during manual scanning by adaptively altering the trigger rate based on the instantaneous scan velocity, enabling OCT imaging over a large lateral FOV. The feasibility of the proposed technique is demonstrated by imaging several biological and nonbiological samples.

  1. Nanolubrication of sliding components in adaptive optics used in microprojectors

    Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Hyungoo; Chaparala, Satish C.; Bhatia, Vikram

    2010-10-01

    Integrated microprojectors are being developed to project a large image on any surface chosen by the users. For a laser-based microprojector, a piezo-electric based adaptive optics unit is adopted in the green laser architecture. The operation of this unit depends on stick-slip motion between the sliding components. Nanolubrication of adaptive optics sliding components is needed to reduce wear and for smooth operation. In this study, a methodology to measure lubricant thickness distribution with a nanoscale resolution is developed. Friction, adhesion, and wear mechanisms of lubricant on the sliding components are studied. Effect of actual composite components, scan direction, scale effect, temperature, and humidity to correlate AFM data with the microscale device performance is studied.

  2. Adaptive Matching of the Scanning Aperture of the Environment Parameter

    Choni, Yu. I.; Yunusov, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a matching system for the scanning aperture antenna radiating through a layer with unpredictably changing parameters. Improved matching has been achieved by adaptive motion of a dielectric plate in the gap between the aperture and the radome. The system is described within the framework of an infinite layered structure. The validity of the model has been confirmed by numerical simulation using CST Microwave Studio software and by an experiment. It is shown that the reflection coefficient at the input of some types of a matching device, which is due to the deviation of the load impedance from the nominal value, is determined by a compact and versatile formula. The potential efficiency of the proposed matching system is shown by a specific example, and its dependence on the choice of the starting position of the dielectric plate is demonstrated.

  3. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  4. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    Harrington, D. M.; Ammons, M.; Hunter, L.; Max, C.; Hoffmann, M.; Pitts, M.; Armstrong, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College-hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts, and system design. The workbenches have slightly different designs and performance capabilities. We describe here outlines for several activities utilizing these different designs and some examples of common student learner outcomes and experiences.

  5. A simple focal-length measurement technique for adaptive microlenses using z-scan

    Abdelaziez, Yasser; Banerjee, Partha P.

    2004-10-01

    A simple technique for focal length measurements of adaptive micro-lenses using z-scan is reported. Focal length is one of the most important parameters of any lens. The effective focal length is measured with reference to the principal points that are not easy to find especially for micro-lenses. In addition, variable focal length microlenses pose a different challenge that makes the process of determining their exact focal length a tedious and difficult process. Classical methods such as nodal slide and magnification have been used for focal length determination. Also, advanced Interference techniques such as Talbot, Moire, Digital Speckle, Zygo and Joint Fourier Transform were used for focal length measurements. These techniques require more elaborate setups and difficult to implement, especially for microlenses. Recently a power meter was used to find the focal length of an unknown lens. Most of the techniques mentioned above proof to be not simple for microlens characterization. The z-scan technique has been implemented, for quite sometimes, to characterize the third-order effects of a nonlinear optical material. The z-scan provides information on both the sign and magnitude of the non-linear refractive index and offer advantage of simplicity. We have used a regular lens to collimate and focus light unto the lens under test. By scanning the lens under test and measuring the on-axis intensity, one can find the focal length. This is because the on-axis intensity is proportional to the phase of the lens and therefore the focal length. In the case of an adaptive lens with its focal length is a function of the applied voltage, the scanning occurs for each voltage value that will correspond to the on-axis refractive index change and therefore the far field on-axis intensity. This described technique above is easy to implement and can achieve good accuracy due to the inherent sensitivity of the z-scan.

  6. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  7. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  8. Adaptive optics implementation with a Fourier reconstructor.

    Glazer, Oded; Ribak, Erez N; Mirkin, Leonid

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive optics takes its servo feedback error cue from a wavefront sensor. The common Hartmann-Shack spot grid that represents the wavefront slopes is usually analyzed by finding the spot centroids. In a novel application, we used the Fourier decomposition of a spot pattern to find deviations from grid regularity. This decomposition was performed either in the Fourier domain or in the image domain, as a demodulation of the grid of spots. We analyzed the system, built a control loop for it, and tested it thoroughly. This allowed us to close the loop on wavefront errors caused by turbulence in the optical system.

  9. High-efficiency Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M; Ramaprakash, A N; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limits their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  10. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    Baranec, Christoph [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Hilo, HI, NZ 96720-2700 (United States); Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Law, Nicholas M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Punnadi, Sujit, E-mail: baranec@hawaii.edu [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-07-20

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  11. Extragalactic Fields Optimized for Adaptive Optics

    2011-03-01

    DAVID MONETIO Received 2010 luly 19; accepted 2010 December 30; published 2011 March 1 ABSTRACT. In this article we present the coordinates of 67 55’ x...fields. In some cases adaptive optics observations undertaken in the fields given in this article would be orders of magnitude more efficient than...expectations of considerable pro- gress in this subject with the advent of 30 m class extremely large telescopes ( ELTs ). A basic problem with unde1taking

  12. Optical Property Analyses of Plant Cells for Adaptive Optics Microscopy

    Tamada, Yosuke; Murata, Takashi; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-04-01

    In astronomy, adaptive optics (AO) can be used to cancel aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and to perform diffraction-limited observation of astronomical objects from the ground. AO can also be applied to microscopy, to cancel aberrations caused by cellular structures and to perform high-resolution live imaging. As a step toward the application of AO to microscopy, here we analyzed the optical properties of plant cells. We used leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens, which have a single layer of cells and are thus suitable for optical analysis. Observation of the cells with bright field and phase contrast microscopy, and image degradation analysis using fluorescent beads demonstrated that chloroplasts provide the main source of optical degradations. Unexpectedly, the cell wall, which was thought to be a major obstacle, has only a minor effect. Such information provides the basis for the application of AO to microscopy for the observation of plant cells.

  13. Thermo-optically driven adaptive mirror

    Reinert, Felix; Lüthy, Willy

    2006-02-01

    The ideal adaptive optical mirror combines large aperture with high spatial and temporal resolution and a phase shift of at least 2π. Further, a simple low-cost solution is preferred. No adaptive system can perfectly fulfill all these requirements. We present a system that has the potential to reach this goal with the exception of high temporal resolution. But even with a moderate temporal resolution of one second such a system can find practical applications. For example as a laser resonator mirror that allows to modify the intensity distribution of the emission, or to correct slowly varying aberrations of optical systems. Two possible mechanisms can be used to change the optical path length of the adaptive mirror: thermal expansion of the mirror substrate or the thermally induced change of the refractive index (thermal dispersion) of a medium in front of the mirror. Both mechanisms have been shown to lead to promising results. In both cases heating was performed by irradiation of light in the active medium. The thermal dispersion based adaptive mirror is built with a thin layer of a liquid in front of a mirror. To allow a modification of the refractive index by irradiation with a diode laser at 808 nm, a suitable absorber is dissolved in the water. With chopped irradiation a resolution of 3.8 Hz at 30 % contrast is measured. This mirror has been used in a laser resonator to modify the output distribution of the laser. The thermal expansion based adaptive mirror is built with a thin layer of a silicon elastomer with a gold coated front side. We present a preparation method to produce thin films of Sylgard on sapphire. With an irradiated intensity of only 370 mW/cm2 surface modulations of up to 350 nm are obtained. With a test pattern a resolution of 1.6 line-pairs per millimeter at 30 % contrast is measured. The temporal resolution is better than one second.

  14. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  15. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that, if in collection near-field optical microscopy the probe-sample coupling can be disregarded, a fiber probe can be considered as a detector of the near-field intensity whose size can be accounted for via an intensity transfer function. We show that, in general...... are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  16. Adaptive Optics for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Leroux, Charles Edouard; Derouard, Jacques; Delon, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) yields measurement parameters (number of molecules, diffusion time) that characterize the concentration and kinetics of fluorescent molecules within a supposedly known observation volume. Absolute derivation of concentrations and diffusion constants therefore requires preliminary calibrations of the confocal Point Spread Function with phantom solutions under perfectly controlled environmental conditions. In this paper, we quantify the influence of optical aberrations on single photon FCS and demonstrate a simple Adaptive Optics system for aberration correction. Optical aberrations are gradually introduced by focussing the excitation laser beam at increasing depths in fluorescent solutions with various refractive indices, which leads to drastic depth-dependent bias in the estimated FCS parameters. Aberration correction with a Deformable Mirror stabilizes these parameters within a range of several tens of \\mum into the solution. We also demonstrate, both theoretically...

  17. Overview of Advanced LIGO Adaptive Optics

    Brooks, Aidan F; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; Cole, Ayodele; Grabeel, Greg; Gustafson, Eric; Guido, Chris; Heintze, Matthew; Heptonstall, Alastair; Jacobson, Mindy; Kim, Won; King, Eleanor; Lynch, Alexander; O'Connor, Stephen; Ottaway, David; Mailand, Ken; Mueller, Guido; Munch, Jesper; Sannibale, Virginio; Shao, Zhenhua; Smith, Michael; Veitch, Peter; Vo, Thomas; Vorvick, Cheryl; Willems, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This is an overview of the adaptive optics used in Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), known as the thermal compensation system (TCS). The thermal compensation system was designed to minimize thermally-induced spatial distortions in the interferometer optical modes and to provide some correction for static curvature errors in the core optics of aLIGO. The TCS is comprised of ring heater actuators, spatially tunable CO$_{2}$ laser projectors and Hartmann wavefront sensors. The system meets the requirements of correcting for nominal distortion in Advanced LIGO to a maximum residual error of 5.4nm, weighted across the laser beam, for up to 125W of laser input power into the interferometer.

  18. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for retina imaging

    Guohua Shi; Yun Dai; Ling Wang; Zhihua Ding; Xuejun Rao; Yudong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    When optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for human retina imaging, its transverse resolution is limited by the aberrations of human eyes. To overcome this disadvantage, a high resolution imaging system for living human retina, which consists of a time domain OCT system and a 37-elements adaptive optics (AO) system, has been developed. The AO closed loop rate is 20 frames per second, and the OCT has a 6.7-μm axial resolution. In this paper, this system is introduced and the high resolution imaging results for retina are presented.

  19. Adaptive optics for space debris tracking

    Bennet, Francis; D'Orgeville, Celine; Gao, Yue; Gardhouse, William; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian T.; Smith, Craig H.; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Wang, Yanjie

    2014-07-01

    Space debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is becoming an increasing threat to satellite and spacecraft. A reliable and cost effective method for detecting possible collisions between orbiting objects is required to prevent an exponential growth in the number of debris. Current RADAR survey technologies used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris objects are relied upon to manoeuvre operational satellites to prevent possible collisions. A complimentary technique, ground-based laser LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) have been used to track much smaller objects with higher accuracy than RADAR, giving greater prediction of possible collisions and avoiding unnecessary manoeuvring. Adaptive optics will play a key role in any ground based LIDAR tracking system as a cost effective way of utilising smaller ground stations or less powerful lasers. The use of high power and high energy lasers for the orbital modification of debris objects will also require an adaptive optic system to achieve the high photon intensity on the target required for photon momentum transfer and laser ablation. EOS Space Systems have pioneered the development of automated laser space debris tracking for objects in low Earth orbit. The Australian National University have been developing an adaptive optics system to improve this space debris tracking capability at the EOS Space Systems Mount Stromlo facility in Canberra, Australia. The system is integrated with the telescope and commissioned as an NGS AO system before moving on to LGS AO and tracking operations. A pulsed laser propagated through the telescope is used to range the target using time of flight data. Adaptive optics is used to increase the maximum range and number or targets available to the LIDAR system, by correcting the uplink laser beam. Such a system presents some unique challenges for adaptive optics: high power lasers reflecting off deformable mirrors, high slew rate tracking, and variable off-axis tracking correction. A

  20. Progress of MEMS Scanning Micromirrors for Optical Bio-Imaging

    Lih Y. Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS have an unmatched ability to incorporate numerous functionalities into ultra-compact devices, and due to their versatility and miniaturization, MEMS have become an important cornerstone in biomedical and endoscopic imaging research. To incorporate MEMS into such applications, it is critical to understand underlying architectures involving choices in actuation mechanism, including the more common electrothermal, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric approaches, reviewed in this paper. Each has benefits and tradeoffs and is better suited for particular applications or imaging schemes due to achievable scan ranges, power requirements, speed, and size. Many of these characteristics are fabrication-process dependent, and this paper discusses various fabrication flows developed to integrate additional optical functionality beyond simple lateral scanning, enabling dynamic control of the focus or mirror surface. Out of this provided MEMS flexibility arises some challenges when obtaining high resolution images: due to scanning non-linearities, calibration of MEMS scanners may become critical, and inherent image artifacts or distortions during scanning can degrade image quality. Several reviewed methods and algorithms have been proposed to address these complications from MEMS scanning. Given their impact and promise, great effort and progress have been made toward integrating MEMS and biomedical imaging.

  1. The CHARA Array Adaptive Optics Program

    Ten Brummelaar, Theo; Che, Xiao; McAlister, Harold A.; Ireland, Michael; Monnier, John D.; Mourard, Denis; Ridgway, Stephen T.; sturmann, judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Turner, Nils H.; Tuthill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The CHARA array is an optical/near infrared interferometer consisting of six 1-meter diameter telescopes the longest baseline of which is 331 meters. With sub-millisecond angular resolution, the CHARA array is able to spatially resolve nearby stellar systems to reveal the detailed structures. To improve the sensitivity and scientific throughput, the CHARA array was funded by NSF-ATI in 2011, and by NSF-MRI in 2015, for an upgrade of adaptive optics (AO) systems to all six telescopes. The initial grant covers Phase I of the adaptive optics system, which includes an on-telescope Wavefront Sensor and non-common-path (NCP) error correction. The WFS use a fairly standard Shack-Hartman design and will initially close the tip tilt servo and log wavefront errors for use in data reduction and calibration. The second grant provides the funding for deformable mirrors for each telescope which will be used closed loop to remove atmospheric aberrations from the beams. There are then over twenty reflections after the WFS at the telescopes that bring the light several hundred meters into the beam combining laboratory. Some of these, including the delay line and beam reducing optics, are powered elements, and some of them, in particular the delay lines and telescope Coude optics, are continually moving. This means that the NCP problems in an interferometer are much greater than those found in more standard telescope systems. A second, slow AO system is required in the laboratory to correct for these NCP errors. We will breifly describe the AO system, and it's current status, as well as discuss the new science enabled by the system with a focus on our YSO program.

  2. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

    2013-12-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  3. Design of Scattering Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    Schrecongost, Dustin

    The primary objective of this work is to construct a fully functional scattering type Scanning Near-field Optical Microscope (s-SNOM), and to understand the working mechanisms behind it. An s-SNOM is an instrument made up of two separate instruments working in unison. One instrument is a scanning optical microscope focusing light onto a raster scanning sample surface combined with an interferometer set up. The second instrument is an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) operating in noncontact mode. The AFM uses a small probe that interacts with the raster scanning sample surface to map out the topography of the of the sample surface. An s-SNOM uses both of these instruments simultaneously by focusing the light of the optical microscope onto the probe of the AFM. This probe acts as a nano-antenna and confines the light allowing for light-matter interaction to be inferred far below the resolution of the diffraction limit of light. This specific s-SNOM system is unique to others by having a controllable environment. It is high vacuum compatible and variable temperature. In addition, it is efficient at collecting scattered light due to the focusing objective being a partial elliptical mirror which collects 360° of light around the major axis. This s-SNOM system will be used for direct imaging of surface plasmons. Intended works are inducing surface plasmons on InSe thin films, and seeing the enhancement effect of introducing Au nano-rods. Also dielectric properties of materials will be interpreted such as the metal to insulator phase transition of NbO2.

  4. Phase sensor for solar adaptive-optics

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2011-01-01

    Wavefront sensing in solar adaptive-optics is currently done with correlating Shack-Hartmann sensors, although the spatial- and temporal-resolutions of the phase measurements are then limited by the extremely fast computing required to correlate the sensor signals at the frequencies of daytime atmospheric-fluctuations. To avoid this limitation, a new wavefront-sensing technique is presented, that makes use of the solar brightness and is applicable to extended sources. The wavefront is sent through a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A small, central part of the wavefront is used as reference and is made to interfere with the rest of the wavefront. The contrast of two simultaneously measured interference-patterns provides a direct estimate of the wavefront phase, no additional computation being required. The proposed optical layout shows precise initial alignment to be the critical point in implementing the new wavefront-sensing scheme.

  5. Progress with the lick adaptive optics system

    Gavel, D T; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B; Max, C E; Macintosh, B

    2000-03-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1-2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  6. Adaptive Holographic Fiber-Optic Interferometer

    Kozhevnikov, Nikolai M.; Lipovskaya, Margarita J.

    1990-04-01

    Interaction of phase-modulated light beams in photorefractive local inertial responce media was analysed. Interaction of this type allows to registrate phase-modulated signals adaptively under low frequency phase disturbtion. The experiments on multimode fiber-optic interferometer with demodulation element based on photorefractive bacteriorhodopsin-doped polimer film are described. As the writing of dynamic phase hologram is an inertial process the signal fluctuations with the frequencies up to 100 Hz can be canceled. The hologram efficiencies are enough to registrate high frequency phase shifts ~10-4 radn.

  7. Design considerations for CELT adaptive optics

    Dekany, Richard G.; Nelson, Jerry E.; Bauman, Brian J.

    2000-07-01

    California Institute of Technology and University of California have begun conceptual design studies for a new telescope for astronomical research at visible and infrared wavelengths. The California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) is currently envisioned as a filled-aperture, steerable, segmented telescope of approximately 30 m diameter. The key to satisfying many of the science goals of this observatory is the availability of diffraction-limited wavefront control. We describe potential observing modes of CELT, including a discussion of the several major outstanding AO system architectural design issues to be resolved prior to the initiation of the detailed design of the adaptive optics capability.

  8. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  9. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    Xu, Y; Adamovics, J; Cheeseborough, J C; Chao, K S; Wuu, C S, E-mail: yx2010@columbia.ed

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS' optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  10. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  11. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro

  12. Three-dimensional edge extraction in optical scanning holography

    Zong, Yonghong; Zhou, Changhe; Ma, Jianyong; Jia, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Edge extraction has found applications in various image processing fields, such as in pattern recognition. In this paper, a new method is proposed for edge extraction of three-dimensional objects in optical scanning holography (OSH). Isotropic and anisotropic edge extraction of 3D objects is simulated using spiral phase plates in OSH operating in an incoherent mode. We propose to use a delta function and a spiral phase plate as the pupil functions to realize isotropic and anisotropic edge extraction. Our computer simulations show the capability of extracting the edges of a given 3D object by spiral phase filtering in OSH.

  13. Multi-mode Scanning Near-field Optical Microscope

    2002-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope using uncoated fiber tip is described, which can work in transmission and reflection configurations, both capable of working in illumination and collection-mode, so that either transparent or opaque sample can be investigated. Depending on different applications, either constant-gap or constant-height images can be achieved. A compact homemade translator permits to select interested area of sample in the range of 4mm×4mm. Working in the constant-height as well as transmission and collection-mode configuration, several kinds of samples such as holographic grating, liposome and zeolite were investigated. The experimental results revealed the dependence of the optical resolution of the SNOM on the tip-sample separation.

  14. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  15. Manufacturing of the ESO adaptive optics facility

    Arsenault, R.,; Madec, P.-Y.; Hubin, N.; Stroebele, S.; Paufique, J.; Vernet, E.; Hackenberg, W.; Pirard, J.-F.; Jochum, L.; Glindemann, A.; Jost, A.; Conzelmann, R.; Kiekebusch, M.; Tordo, S.; Lizon, J.-L.; Donaldson, R.; Fedrigo, E.; Soenke, C.; Duchateau, M.; Bruton, A.; Delabre, B.; Downing, M.; Reyes, J.; Kolb, J.; Bechet, C.; Lelouarn, M.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Quattri, M.; Guidolin, I.; Buzzoni, B.; Dupuy, C.; Guzman, R.; Comin, M.; Silber, A.; Quentin, J.; La Penna, P.; Manescau, A.; Jolley, P.; Heinz, V.; Duhoux, P.; Argomedo, J.; Gallieni, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Biasi, R.; Andrighettoni, M.; Angerer, G.; Pescoller, D.; Stuik, R.,; Deep, A.

    2010-07-01

    The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) consists in an evolution of one of the ESO VLT unit telescopes to a laser driven adaptive telescope with a deformable mirror in its optical train, in this case the secondary 1.1m mirror, and four Laser Guide Stars (LGSs). This evolution implements many challenging technologies like the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) including a thin shell mirror (1.1 m diameter and 2mm thin), the high power Na lasers (20W), the low Read-Out Noise (RON) WaveFront Sensor (WFS) camera (< 1e-) and SPARTA the new generation of Real Time Computers (RTC) for adaptive control. It also faces many problematic similar to any Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) and as such, will validate many technologies and solutions needed for the European ELT (E-ELT) 42m telescope. The AOF will offer a very large (7 arcmin) Field Of View (FOV) GLAO correction in J, H and K bands (GRAAL+Hawk-I), a visible integral field spectrograph with a 1 arcmin GLAO corrected FOV (GALACSI-MUSE WFM) and finally a LTAO 7.5" FOV (GALACSI-MUSE NFM). Most systems of the AOF have completed final design and are in manufacturing phase. Specific activities are linked to the modification of the 8m telescope in order to accommodate the new DSM and the 4 LGS Units assembled on its Center-Piece. A one year test period in Europe is planned to test and validate all modes and their performance followed by a commissioning phase in Paranal scheduled for 2014.

  16. Object-oriented Matlab adaptive optics toolbox

    Conan, R.; Correia, C.

    2014-08-01

    Object-Oriented Matlab Adaptive Optics (OOMAO) is a Matlab toolbox dedicated to Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. OOMAO is based on a small set of classes representing the source, atmosphere, telescope, wavefront sensor, Deformable Mirror (DM) and an imager of an AO system. This simple set of classes allows simulating Natural Guide Star (NGS) and Laser Guide Star (LGS) Single Conjugate AO (SCAO) and tomography AO systems on telescopes up to the size of the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT). The discrete phase screens that make the atmosphere model can be of infinite size, useful for modeling system performance on large time scales. OOMAO comes with its own parametric influence function model to emulate different types of DMs. The cone effect, altitude thickness and intensity profile of LGSs are also reproduced. Both modal and zonal modeling approach are implemented. OOMAO has also an extensive library of theoretical expressions to evaluate the statistical properties of turbulence wavefronts. The main design characteristics of the OOMAO toolbox are object-oriented modularity, vectorized code and transparent parallel computing. OOMAO has been used to simulate and to design the Multi-Object AO prototype Raven at the Subaru telescope and the Laser Tomography AO system of the Giant Magellan Telescope. In this paper, a Laser Tomography AO system on an ELT is simulated with OOMAO. In the first part, we set-up the class parameters and we link the instantiated objects to create the source optical path. Then we build the tomographic reconstructor and write the script for the pseudo-open-loop controller.

  17. The Tesat transportable adaptive optical ground station

    Saucke, Karen; Seiter, Christoph; Heine, Frank; Gregory, Mark; Tröndle, Daniel; Fischer, Edgar; Berkefeld, Thomas; Feriencik, Mikael; Feriencik, Marco; Richter, Ines; Meyer, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Tesat together with Synopta have built a Transportable Adaptive Optical Ground Station (TAOGS) under contract of German Aerospace Center DLR for communication with the 1st and 2nd generation of Tesat's spaceborne Laser Communication Terminals (LCTs), which employ coherent homodyne optical communication with 1064 nm and binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation. The TAOGS is able to communicate with space segments on low earth orbit (LEO, high pointing and tracking dynamics, 5.625 Gbps), and with space segments on geostationary orbit (GEO, low pointing dynamics, up to 40,000 km distance, optical data rate of 2.8125 Gbps and user data rate of 1.8 Gbps). After an alignment and testing phase at the location of Izana, Tenerife, using the TDP1 LCT on geostationary Alphasat as counter terminal, the TAOGS is now fully functioning. Several up-links, down-links and bi-directional links have been performed. Experimental results of some of these links are presented. An outlook to further activities is given.

  18. The Coming of Age of Adaptive Optics

    1995-10-01

    How Ground-Based Astronomers Beat the Atmosphere Adaptive Optics (AO) is the new ``wonder-weapon'' in ground-based astronomy. By means of advanced electro-optical devices at their telescopes, astronomers are now able to ``neutralize'' the image-smearing turbulence of the terrestrial atmosphere (seen by the unaided eye as the twinkling of stars) so that much sharper images can be obtained than before. In practice, this is done with computer-controlled, flexible mirrors which refocus the blurred images up to 100 times per second, i.e. at a rate that is faster than the changes in the atmospheric turbulence. This means that finer details in astronomical objects can be studied and also - because of the improved concentration of light in the telescope's focal plane - that fainter objects can be observed. At the moment, Adaptive Optics work best in the infrared part of spectrum, but at some later time it may also significantly improve observations at the shorter wavelengths of visible light. The many-sided aspects of this new technology and its impact on astronomical instrumentation was the subject of a recent AO conference [1] with over 150 participants from about 30 countries, presenting a total of more than 100 papers. The Introduction of AO Techniques into Astronomy The scope of this meeting was the design, fabrication and testing of AO systems, characterisation of the sources of atmospheric disturbance, modelling of compensation systems, individual components, astronomical AO results, non-astronomical applications, laser guide star systems, non-linear optical phase conjugation, performance evaluation, and other areas of this wide and complex field, in which front-line science and high technology come together in a new and powerful symbiosis. One of the specific goals of the meeting was to develop contacts between AO scientists and engineers in the western world and their colleagues in Russia and Asia. For the first time at a conference of this type, nine Russian

  19. Wavelet methods in multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    Helin, T; Yudytskiy, M.

    2013-01-01

    The next generation ground-based telescopes rely heavily on adaptive optics for overcoming the limitation of atmospheric turbulence. In the future adaptive optics modalities, like multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), atmospheric tomography is the major mathematical and computational challenge. In this severely ill-posed problem a fast and stable reconstruction algorithm is needed that can take into account many real-life phenomena of telescope imaging. We introduce a novel reconstruction m...

  20. Visual Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) Uncertainty Analysis (Milestone Report)

    Gray, A.; Lewandowski, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2010-10-01

    In 1997, an uncertainty analysis was conducted of the Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT). In 2010, we have completed a new analysis, based primarily on the geometric optics of the system, and it shows sensitivities to various design and operational parameters. We discuss sources of error with measuring devices, instrument calibrations, and operator measurements for a parabolic trough mirror panel test. These help to guide the operator in proper setup, and help end-users to understand the data they are provided. We include both the systematic (bias) and random (precision) errors for VSHOT testing and their contributions to the uncertainty. The contributing factors we considered in this study are: target tilt; target face to laser output distance; instrument vertical offset; laser output angle; distance between the tool and the test piece; camera calibration; and laser scanner. These contributing factors were applied to the calculated slope error, focal length, and test article tilt that are generated by the VSHOT data processing. Results show the estimated 2-sigma uncertainty in slope error for a parabolic trough line scan test to be +/-0.2 milliradians; uncertainty in the focal length is +/- 0.1 mm, and the uncertainty in test article tilt is +/- 0.04 milliradians.

  1. Integrated optics in an electrically scanned imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Breckinridge, James B. (Inventor); Ocallaghan, Fred G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An efficient, lightweight and stable, Fourier transform spectrometer was developed. The mechanical slide mechanism needed to create a path difference was eliminated by the use of retro-reflecting mirrors in a monolithic interferometer assembly in which the mirrors are not at 90 degrees to the propagation vector of the radiation, but rather at a small angle. The resulting plane wave fronts create a double-sided inteferogram of the source irradiance distribution which is detected by a charge-coupled device image sensor array. The position of each CCD pixel in the array is an indication of the path difference between the two retro-reflecting mirrors in the monolithic optical structure. The Fourier transform of the signals generated by the image sensor provide the spectral irradiance distribution of the source. For imaging, the interferometer assembly scans the source of irradiation by moving the entire instrument, such as would occur if it was fixedly mounted to a moving platform, i.e., a spacecraft. During scanning, the entrace slot to the monolithic optical structure sends different pixels to corresponding interferograms detected by adjacent columns of pixels of the image sensor.

  2. The Durham adaptive optics real-time controller

    Basden, Alastair; Myers, Richard; Younger, Eddy

    2010-01-01

    The Durham adaptive optics real-time controller was initially a proof of concept design for a generic adaptive optics control system. It has since been developed into a modern and powerful CPU based real-time control system, capable of using hardware acceleration (including FPGAs and GPUs), based primarily around commercial off the shelf hardware. It is powerful enough to be used as the real-time controller for all currently planned 8~m class telescope adaptive optics systems. Here we give details of this controller and the concepts behind it, and report on performance including latency and jitter, which is less than 10~$\\mu$s for small adaptive optics systems.

  3. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use.

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2-3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5-0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05-0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3-5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7-1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07-0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing.

  4. Durham adaptive optics real-time controller.

    Basden, Alastair; Geng, Deli; Myers, Richard; Younger, Eddy

    2010-11-10

    The Durham adaptive optics (AO) real-time controller was initially a proof of concept design for a generic AO control system. It has since been developed into a modern and powerful central-processing-unit-based real-time control system, capable of using hardware acceleration (including field programmable gate arrays and graphical processing units), based primarily around commercial off-the-shelf hardware. It is powerful enough to be used as the real-time controller for all currently planned 8 m class telescope AO systems. Here we give details of this controller and the concepts behind it, and report on performance, including latency and jitter, which is less than 10 μs for small AO systems.

  5. Phase retrieval techniques for adaptive optics

    Carrano, C. J., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    We have developed and tested a method for minimizing static aberrations in adaptive optics systems. In order to correct the static phase aberrations, we need to measure the aberrations through the entire system. We have employed various phase retrieval algorithms to detect these aberrations. We have performed simulations of our experimental setup demonstrating that phase retrieval can improve the static aberrations to below the 20 nm rms level, with the limiting factor being local turbulence in the A0 system. Experimentally thus far, we have improved the static aberrations down to the 50 nm level, with the limiting factor being the ability to adjust the deformable mirror. This should be improved with better control algorithms now being implemented.

  6. Electron optics of multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A., E-mail: A.M.Gheidari@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Kruit, P. [Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-07-21

    We have developed a multi-beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM), which delivers a square array of 196 focused beams onto a sample with a resolution and current per beam comparable to a state of the art single beam SEM. It consists of a commercially available FEI Nova-nano 200 SEM column equipped with a novel multi-electron beam source module. The key challenge in the electron optical design of the MBSEM is to minimize the off-axial aberrations of the lenses. This article addresses the electron optical design of the system and presents the result of optics simulations for a specific setting of the system. It is shown that it is possible to design a system with a theoretical axial spot size of 1.2 nm at 15 kV with a probe current of 26 pA. The off-axial aberrations for the outermost beam add up 0.8 nm, increasing the probe size to 1.5 nm.

  7. Optical Design and Optimization of Translational Reflective Adaptive Optics Ophthalmoscopes

    Sulai, Yusufu N. B.

    The retina serves as the primary detector for the biological camera that is the eye. It is composed of numerous classes of neurons and support cells that work together to capture and process an image formed by the eye's optics, which is then transmitted to the brain. Loss of sight due to retinal or neuro-ophthalmic disease can prove devastating to one's quality of life, and the ability to examine the retina in vivo is invaluable in the early detection and monitoring of such diseases. Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy is a promising diagnostic tool in early stages of development, still facing significant challenges before it can become a clinical tool. The work in this thesis is a collection of projects with the overarching goal of broadening the scope and applicability of this technology. We begin by providing an optical design approach for AO ophthalmoscopes that reduces the aberrations that degrade the performance of the AO correction. Next, we demonstrate how to further improve image resolution through the use of amplitude pupil apodization and non-common path aberration correction. This is followed by the development of a viewfinder which provides a larger field of view for retinal navigation. Finally, we conclude with the development of an innovative non-confocal light detection scheme which improves the non-invasive visualization of retinal vasculature and reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segments in healthy and diseased eyes.

  8. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography at 1 MHz.

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Turner, Timothy L; Liu, Zhuolin; Miller, Donald T

    2014-12-01

    Image acquisition speed of optical coherence tomography (OCT) remains a fundamental barrier that limits its scientific and clinical utility. Here we demonstrate a novel multi-camera adaptive optics (AO-)OCT system for ophthalmologic use that operates at 1 million A-lines/s at a wavelength of 790 nm with 5.3 μm axial resolution in retinal tissue. Central to the spectral-domain design is a novel detection channel based on four high-speed spectrometers that receive light sequentially from a 1 × 4 optical switch assembly. Absence of moving parts enables ultra-fast (50ns) and precise switching with low insertion loss (-0.18 dB per channel). This manner of control makes use of all available light in the detection channel and avoids camera dead-time, both critical for imaging at high speeds. Additional benefit in signal-to-noise accrues from the larger numerical aperture afforded by the use of AO and yields retinal images of comparable dynamic range to that of clinical OCT. We validated system performance by a series of experiments that included imaging in both model and human eyes. We demonstrated the performance of our MHz AO-OCT system to capture detailed images of individual retinal nerve fiber bundles and cone photoreceptors. This is the fastest ophthalmic OCT system we know of in the 700 to 915 nm spectral band.

  9. Design and performance optimization of fiber optic adaptive filters.

    Paparao, P; Ghosh, A; Allen, S D

    1991-05-10

    There is a great need for easy-to-fabricate and versatile fiber optic signal processing systems in which optical fibers are used for the delay and storage of wideband guided lightwave signals. We describe the design of the least-mean-square algorithm-based fiber optic adaptive filters for processing guided lightwave signals in real time. Fiber optic adaptive filters can learn to change their parameters or to process a set of characteristics of the input signal. In our realization we employ as few electronic devices as possible and use optical computation to utilize the advantages of optics in the processing speed, parallelism, and interconnection. Many schemes for optical adaptive filtering of electronic signals are available in the literature. The new optical adaptive filters described in this paper are for optical processing of guided lightwave signals, not electronic signals. We analyzed the convergence or learning characteristics of the adaptive filtering process as a function of the filter parameters and the fiber optic hardware errors. From this analysis we found that the effects of the optical round-off errors and noise can be reduced, and the learning speed can be comparatively increased in our design through an optimal selection of the filter parameters. A general knowledge of the fiber optic hardware, the statistics of the lightwave signal, and the desired goal of the adaptive processing are enough for this optimum selection of the parameters. Detailed computer simulations validate the theoretical results of performance optimization.

  10. Proposed Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics Experiment at Lick Observatory

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Flath, L M; Hurd, R L; Max, C E; Olivier, S S

    2001-08-15

    While the theory behind design of multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems is growing, there is still a paucity of experience building and testing such instruments. We propose using the Lick adaptive optics (AO) system as a basis for demonstrating the feasibility/workability of MCAO systems, testing underlying assumptions, and experimenting with different approaches to solving MCAO system issues.

  11. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  12. ComPoScan: Adaptive Scanning for Efficient Concurrent Communications and Positioning with 802.11

    King, Thomas; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2008-01-01

    Using 802.11 concurrently for communications and positioning is problematic, especially if location-based services (e.g., indoor navigation) are concurrently executed with real-time applications (e.g., VoIP, video conferencing). Periodical scanning for measuring the signal strength interrupts...

  13. Numerical Modeling of a Near-Field Scanning Optical System

    Kann, Joshua Louis

    A near-field scanning optical (NFO) system utilizes a subwavelength sized aperture to illuminate a sample. The aperture raster scans the sample. During the scan, the aperture is held in proximity to the sample. At each sampling point, the integrated far-zone energy distribution is stored. This collection of data is used to generate an image of the sample's surface. The main advantage of NFO systems is their very high spatial resolution. In this dissertation a hybrid finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD)/angular spectrum code is used to study the electromagnetic and imaging properties of a NFO scanning system. In addition, a finite-difference thermal (FD-thermal) code is used to calculate the thermal properties of a NFO system. Various aperture/sample geometries are studied numerically using both TE and TM polarization within a two-dimensional metallic waveguide that forms the aperture. The spatial properties of the electric field emitted by the aperture with no sample present are greatly influenced by the polarization. In particular, the electric field with TM polarization exhibits sharp peaks near the corners of the aperture, while the field with TE polarization is smooth and peaked at the center of the aperture. For both polarizations, the electric field remains collimated for a distance comparable to the aperture size. The electric field for both polarizations is altered when a dielectric sample is placed in proximity to the aperture. It is shown that the most representative image of the sample's topography is obtained using TE polarization and the resulting total far-zone energy as the sampled data. It is also shown that simpler scalar methods do not accurately predict the imaging behavior of a NFO system. Under certain circumstances the relationship between the sample's topography and the detected image is nearly linear. Under these conditions a system transfer function is calculated. Using the transfer function, it is shown that the spatial resolution of a NFO

  14. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  15. Linear zonal atmospheric prediction for adaptive optics

    McGuire, Patrick C.; Rhoadarmer, Troy A.; Coy, Hanna A.; Angel, J. Roger P.; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2000-07-01

    We compare linear zonal predictors of atmospheric turbulence for adaptive optics. Zonal prediction has the possible advantage of being able to interpret and utilize wind-velocity information from the wavefront sensor better than modal prediction. For simulated open-loop atmospheric data for a 2- meter 16-subaperture AO telescope with 5 millisecond prediction and a lookback of 4 slope-vectors, we find that Widrow-Hoff Delta-Rule training of linear nets and Back- Propagation training of non-linear multilayer neural networks is quite slow, getting stuck on plateaus or in local minima. Recursive Least Squares training of linear predictors is two orders of magnitude faster and it also converges to the solution with global minimum error. We have successfully implemented Amari's Adaptive Natural Gradient Learning (ANGL) technique for a linear zonal predictor, which premultiplies the Delta-Rule gradients with a matrix that orthogonalizes the parameter space and speeds up the training by two orders of magnitude, like the Recursive Least Squares predictor. This shows that the simple Widrow-Hoff Delta-Rule's slow convergence is not a fluke. In the case of bright guidestars, the ANGL, RLS, and standard matrix-inversion least-squares (MILS) algorithms all converge to the same global minimum linear total phase error (approximately 0.18 rad2), which is only approximately 5% higher than the spatial phase error (approximately 0.17 rad2), and is approximately 33% lower than the total 'naive' phase error without prediction (approximately 0.27 rad2). ANGL can, in principle, also be extended to make non-linear neural network training feasible for these large networks, with the potential to lower the predictor error below the linear predictor error. We will soon scale our linear work to the approximately 108-subaperture MMT AO system, both with simulations and real wavefront sensor data from prime focus.

  16. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  17. Novel adaptive laser scanning sensor for reverse engineering measurement

    Zhao Ji; Ma Zi; Lin Na; Zhu Quanmin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a series of new techniques are used to optimize typical laser scanning sensor. The integrated prototype is compared with traditional approach to demonstrate the much improved performance. In the research and development, camera calibration is achieved by extracting characteristic points of the laser plane, so that the calibration efficiency is improved significantly. With feedback control of its intensity, the laser is automatically adjusted for different material. A modified algorithm is presented to improve the accuracy of laser stripe extraction. The fusion of data extracted from left and right camera is completed with re-sampling technique. The scanner is integrated with a robot arm and some other machinery for on-line measurement and inspection, which provides a flexible measurement tool for reverse engineering.

  18. KAPAO: A Pomona College Adaptive Optics Instrument

    Choi, Philip I.; Severson, S. A.; Rudy, A. R.; Gilbreth, B. N.; Contreras, D. S.; McGonigle, L. P.; Chin, R. M.; Horn, B.; Hoidn, O.; Spjut, E.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe our project (KAPAO) to develop and deploy a low-cost, remote-access, natural guide star adaptive optics system for the Pomona College Table Mountain Observatory (TMO) 1-meter telescope. The system will offer simultaneous dual-band, diffraction-limited imaging at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and will deliver an order-of-magnitude improvement in point source sensitivity and angular resolution relative to the current TMO seeing limits. In order to ensure reliability, minimize costs and encourage replication efforts, off-the-shelf components that include a MEMS deformable mirror, a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a piezo-electric tip-tilt mirror are being adopted for the core hardware elements. We present: the instrument design; performance predictions based on AO simulations; and the current status of the testbed instrument and high-speed control system. Beyond the expanded scientific capabilities enabled by AO-enhanced resolution and sensitivity, the interdisciplinary nature of the instrument development effort provides an exceptional opportunity to train a broad range of undergraduate STEM students in AO technologies and techniques. The breadth of our collaboration, which includes both public (Sonoma State University) and private (Pomona and Harvey Mudd Colleges) undergraduate institutions has enabled us to engage students ranging from physics, astronomy, engineering and computer science in the early stages of this project. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0960343.

  19. Stellar photometry with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics

    Fiorentino, Giuliana; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B; Bono, Giuseppe; Turri, Paolo; Andersen, David; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Schreiber, Laura; Ciliegi, Paolo; Bellazzini, Michele; Tolstoy, Eline; Monelli, Matteo; Iannicola, Giacinto; Ferraro, Ivan; Testa, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We overview the current status of photometric analyses of images collected with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) at 8-10m class telescopes that operated, or are operating, on sky. Particular attention will be payed to resolved stellar population studies. Stars in crowded stellar systems, such as globular clusters or in nearby galaxies, are ideal test particles to test AO performance. We will focus the discussion on photometric precision and accuracy reached nowadays. We briefly describe our project on stellar photometry and astrometry of Galactic globular clusters using images taken with GeMS at the Gemini South telescope. We also present the photometry performed with DAOPHOT suite of programs into the crowded regions of these globulars reaching very faint limiting magnitudes Ks ~21.5 mag on moderately large fields of view (~1.5 arcmin squared). We highlight the need for new algorithms to improve the modeling of the complex variation of the Point Spread Function across the ?eld of view. Finally, we outl...

  20. Recent advances in astronomical adaptive optics.

    Hart, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The imaging performance of large ground-based astronomical telescopes is compromised by dynamic wavefront aberration caused by atmospheric turbulence. Techniques to measure and correct the aberration in real time, collectively called adaptive optics (AO), have been developed over the past half century, but it is only within the past decade that the delivery of diffraction-limited image quality at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths at many of the world's biggest telescopes has become routine. Exploitation of this new capability has led to a number of ground-breaking astronomical results, which has in turn spurred the continued development of AO to address ever more technical challenges that limit its scientific applicability. I review the present state of the art, highlight a number of noteworthy scientific results, and outline several ongoing experiments designed to broaden the scope of observations that can be undertaken with AO. In particular, I explore the significant advances required in AO technology to satisfy the needs for a new generation of extremely large telescopes of diameter 25 m and larger that are now being designed.

  1. Turbulence profiling for adaptive optics tomographic reconstructors

    Laidlaw, Douglas J.; Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard W.; Morris, Timothy J.; Butterley, Timothy; Reeves, Andrew P.; Townson, Matthew J.; Gendron, Éric; Vidal, Fabrice; Morel, Carine

    2016-07-01

    To approach optimal performance advanced Adaptive Optics (AO) systems deployed on ground-based telescopes must have accurate knowledge of atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude. Stereo-SCIDAR is a high-resolution stereoscopic instrument dedicated to this measure. Here, its profiles are directly compared to internal AO telemetry atmospheric profiling techniques for CANARY (Vidal et al. 20141), a Multi-Object AO (MOAO) pathfinder on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma. In total twenty datasets are analysed across July and October of 2014. Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithms dubbed Direct Fitting and Learn 2 Step (L2S; Martin 20142) are used in the recovery of profile information via covariance matrices - respectively attaining average Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients with stereo-SCIDAR of 0.2 and 0.74. By excluding the measure of covariance between orthogonal Wavefront Sensor (WFS) slopes these results have revised values of 0.65 and 0.2. A data analysis technique that combines L2S and SLODAR is subsequently introduced that achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  2. Adaptive Zero-Coefficient Distribution Scan for Inter Block Mode Coding of H.264/AVC

    Wang, Jing-Xin; Su, Alvin W. Y.

    Scanning quantized transform coefficients is an important tool for video coding. For example, the MPEG-4 video coder adopts three different scans to get better coding efficiency. This paper proposes an adaptive zero-coefficient distribution scan in inter block coding. The proposed method attempts to improve H.264/AVC zero coefficient coding by modifying the scan operation. Since the zero-coefficient distribution is changed by the proposed scan method, new VLC tables for syntax elements used in context-adaptive variable length coding (CAVLC) are also provided. The savings in bit-rate range from 2.2% to 5.1% in the high bit-rate cases, depending on different test sequences.

  3. Large Binocular Telescope Adaptive Optics System: New achievements and perspectives in adaptive optics

    Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Agapito, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Fini, Luca; Argomedo, Javier; Gherardi, Alessandro; Brusa, Guido; Miller, Douglas; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Stefanini, Paolo; Salinari, Piero; 10.1117/12.898641

    2012-01-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is a unique telescope featuring two co-mounted optical trains with 8.4m primary mirrors. The telescope Adaptive Optics (AO) system uses two innovative key components, namely an adaptive secondary mirror with 672 actuators and a high-order pyramid wave-front sensor. During the on-sky commissioning such a system reached performances never achieved before on large ground-based optical telescopes. Images with 40mas resolution and Strehl Ratios higher than 80% have been acquired in H band (1.6 micron). Such images showed a contrast as high as 10e-4. Based on these results, we compare the performances offered by a Natural Guide Star (NGS) system upgraded with the state-of-the-art technology and those delivered by existing Laser Guide Star (LGS) systems. The comparison, in terms of sky coverage and performances, suggests rethinking the current role ascribed to NGS and LGS in the next generation of AO systems for the 8-10 meter class telescopes and Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)...

  4. Adaptive optics ophthalmologic systems using dual deformable mirrors

    Jones, S; Olivier, S; Chen, D; Sadda, S; Joeres, S; Zawadzki, R; Werner, J S; Miller, D

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) have been increasingly combined with a variety of ophthalmic instruments over the last decade to provide cellular-level, in-vivo images of the eye. The use of MEMS deformable mirrors in these instruments has recently been demonstrated to reduce system size and cost while improving performance. However, currently available MEMS mirrors lack the required range of motion for correcting large ocular aberrations, such as defocus and astigmatism. In order to address this problem, we have developed an AO system architecture that uses two deformable mirrors, in a woofer/tweeter arrangement, with a bimorph mirror as the woofer and a MEMS mirror as the tweeter. This setup provides several advantages, including extended aberration correction range, due to the large stroke of the bimorph mirror, high order aberration correction using the MEMS mirror, and additionally, the ability to ''focus'' through the retina. This AO system architecture is currently being used in four instruments, including an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system and a retinal flood-illuminated imaging system at the UC Davis Medical Center, a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) at the Doheny Eye Institute, and an OCT system at Indiana University. The design, operation and evaluation of this type of AO system architecture will be presented.

  5. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  6. Adaptive optics retinal imaging in the living mouse eye.

    Geng, Ying; Dubra, Alfredo; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H; Sharma, Robin; Libby, Richard T; Williams, David R

    2012-04-01

    Correction of the eye's monochromatic aberrations using adaptive optics (AO) can improve the resolution of in vivo mouse retinal images [Biss et al., Opt. Lett. 32(6), 659 (2007) and Alt et al., Proc. SPIE 7550, 755019 (2010)], but previous attempts have been limited by poor spot quality in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). Recent advances in mouse eye wavefront sensing using an adjustable focus beacon with an annular beam profile have improved the wavefront sensor spot quality [Geng et al., Biomed. Opt. Express 2(4), 717 (2011)], and we have incorporated them into a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). The performance of the instrument was tested on the living mouse eye, and images of multiple retinal structures, including the photoreceptor mosaic, nerve fiber bundles, fine capillaries and fluorescently labeled ganglion cells were obtained. The in vivo transverse and axial resolutions of the fluorescence channel of the AOSLO were estimated from the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the line and point spread functions (LSF and PSF), and were found to be better than 0.79 μm ± 0.03 μm (STD)(45% wider than the diffraction limit) and 10.8 μm ± 0.7 μm (STD)(two times the diffraction limit), respectively. The axial positional accuracy was estimated to be 0.36 μm. This resolution and positional accuracy has allowed us to classify many ganglion cell types, such as bistratified ganglion cells, in vivo.

  7. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  8. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  9. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  10. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-09-07

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  11. Solar adaptive optics: specificities, lessons learned, and open alternatives

    Montilla, I.; Marino, J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Collados, M.; Montoya, L.; Tallon, M.

    2016-07-01

    First on sky adaptive optics experiments were performed on the Dunn Solar Telescope on 1979, with a shearing interferometer and limited success. Those early solar adaptive optics efforts forced to custom-develop many components, such as Deformable Mirrors and WaveFront Sensors, which were not available at that time. Later on, the development of the correlation Shack-Hartmann marked a breakthrough in solar adaptive optics. Since then, successful Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics instruments have been developed for many solar telescopes, i.e. the National Solar Observatory, the Vacuum Tower Telescope and the Swedish Solar Telescope. Success with the Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems for GREGOR and the New Solar Telescope has proved to be more difficult to attain. Such systems have a complexity not only related to the number of degrees of freedom, but also related to the specificities of the Sun, used as reference, and the sensing method. The wavefront sensing is performed using correlations on images with a field of view of 10", averaging wavefront information from different sky directions, affecting the sensing and sampling of high altitude turbulence. Also due to the low elevation at which solar observations are performed we have to include generalized fitting error and anisoplanatism, as described by Ragazzoni and Rigaut, as non-negligible error sources in the Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics error budget. For the development of the next generation Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope and the European Solar Telescope we still need to study and understand these issues, to predict realistically the quality of the achievable reconstruction. To improve their designs other open issues have to be assessed, i.e. possible alternative sensing methods to avoid the intrinsic anisoplanatism of the wide field correlation Shack-Hartmann, new parameters to estimate the performance of an adaptive optics solar system, alternatives to

  12. How adaptive optics may have won the Cold War

    Tyson, Robert K.

    2013-05-01

    While there are many theories and studies concerning the end of the Cold War, circa 1990, I postulate that one of the contributors to the result was the development of adaptive optics. The emergence of directed energy weapons, specifically space-based and ground-based high energy lasers made practicable with adaptive optics, showed that a successful defense against inter-continental ballistic missiles was not only possible, but achievable in a reasonable period of time.

  13. Astronomy applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Bauman, Brian J.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2003-06-01

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  14. Astronomy Applications of Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T

    2003-04-23

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  15. Laser guide star adaptive optics: Present and future

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.

    1993-03-01

    Feasibility demonstrations using one to two meter telescopes have confirmed the utility of laser beacons as wavefront references for adaptive optics systems. Laser beacon architectures suitable for the new generation of eight and ten meter telescopes are presently under study. This paper reviews the concept of laser guide star adaptive optics and the progress that has been made by groups around the world implementing such systems. A description of the laser guide star program at LLNL and some experimental results is also presented.

  16. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.; Vdovin, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2016-03-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront sensor. This approach is severely limited in fluorescence microscopy, as the use of a wavefront sensor requires the presence of a bright, point like source in the field of view, a condition rarely satisfied in microscopy samples. Previously reported approaches to adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy are therefore limited to the inclusion of fluorescent microspheres in the sample, to use as bright stars for wavefront sensors, or time consuming sensorless optimization procedures, requiring several seconds of optimization before the acquisition of a single image. We propose an alternative approach to the problem, implementing sensorless adaptive optics in a Programmable array microscope. A programmable array microscope is a microscope based on a digital micromirror device, in which the single elements of the micromirror act both as point sources and pinholes.

  17. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  18. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy

    Antonello, J.; Werkhoven, T. van; Verhaegen, M.; Truong, H.H.; Keller, C.U.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The abe

  19. Adaptive Forward Error Correction for Energy Efficient Optical Transport Networks

    Rasmussen, Anders; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel scheme for on the fly code rate adjustment for forward error correcting (FEC) codes on optical links. The proposed scheme makes it possible to adjust the code rate independently for each optical frame. This allows for seamless rate adaption based on the link state...

  20. Photonic crystal-adaptive optical devices

    Buss, Thomas

    -doped liquid crystal gain medium for the realization of cheap and compact optically pumped, electrically tunable lasers. Finally, a transparent projection display is presented which uses sub-wavelength gratings for redirection of light guided inside a waveguide and facilitates electro-optic switching by means...

  1. Optical Field Measurement of Nano-Apertures with a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    XU Tie-Jun; XU Ji-Ying; WANG Jia; TIAN Qian

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate optical near-field distributions of the unconventional C-apertures and the conventional square apertures in preliminary experiment with an aperture scanning near-field optical microscope. These nano-apertures are fabricated in Au film on a glass substrate with focused ion beam technology. The experimental results indicate the uptrend of output light intensity that a C-aperture enables the intensity maximum to increase at least 10times more than a square aperture with same unit length. The measured near-field light spot sizes of C-apertureand square aperture with 200-nm unit length are 439nm × 500nm and 245nm × 216nm, respectively.

  2. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.;

    2001-01-01

    By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical...

  3. Micro-opto-electro-mechanical (MOEM) adaptive optic system

    Clark, Rodney L.; Karpinisky, John R.; Hammer, Jay A.; Anderson, Roland B.; Lindsey, Randall L.; Brown, Daniel M.; Merritt, Paul H.

    1997-04-01

    This paper discusses the application of MOEM technology to adaptive optics. An experiment is described in which a micromachined mirror array is used in a closed loop adaptive optic demonstration. An interferometer wavefront sensor is used for wavefront sensing. Parallel analog electronics are used for the wavefront reconstruction. Parallel operational amplifiers are used to drive the micromirrors. The actuators utilize a novel silicon design developed by SY Technology, Inc. The actuators have a measured frequency response of 15kHz, and a maximum usable stroke of 4 microns. The entire adaptive optic demonstration has a bandwidth exceeding 10kHz. Measured performance is described. The experiments conducted are designed to explore the feasibility of creating a single chip adaptive optic system, also described in this paper. This chip would combine all on a single VLSI chip aspects of a complete adaptive optics system, wavefront sensing, wavefront reconstruction, and wavefront correction. The wavefront sensing would be accomplished with a novel compact shearing interferometer design. The analog refractive and diffractive micro optics will be fabricated using a new single step analog mask technology. The reconstruction circuit would use an analog resistive grid solver. The resistive grid would be fabricated in polysilicon. The drive circuits and micromirror actuators would use standard CMOS silicon fabrication methods.

  4. Adaptive Optics Reveals Photoreceptor Abnormalities in Diabetic Macular Ischemia

    Nesper, Peter L.; Scarinci, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic macular ischemia (DMI) is a phenotype of diabetic retinopathy (DR) associated with chronic hypoxia of retinal tissue. The goal of this prospective observational study was to report evidence of photoreceptor abnormalities using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) in eyes with DR in the setting of deep capillary plexus (DCP) non-perfusion. Eleven eyes from 11 patients (6 women, age 31–68), diagnosed with DR without macular edema, underwent optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and AOSLO imaging. One patient without OCTA imaging underwent fluorescein angiography to characterize the enlargement of the foveal avascular zone. The parameters studied included photoreceptor heterogeneity packing index (HPi) on AOSLO, as well as DCP non-perfusion and vessel density on OCTA. Using AOSLO, OCTA and spectral domain (SD)-OCT, we observed that photoreceptor abnormalities on AOSLO and SD-OCT were found in eyes with non-perfusion of the DCP on OCTA. All eight eyes with DCP non-flow on OCTA showed photoreceptor abnormalities on AOSLO. Six of the eight eyes also had outer retinal abnormalities on SD-OCT. Three eyes with DR and robust capillary perfusion of the DCP had normal photoreceptors on SD-OCT and AOSLO. Compared to eyes with DR without DCP non-flow, the eight eyes with DCP non-flow had significantly lower HPi (P = 0.013) and parafoveal DCP vessel density (P = 0.016). We found a significant correlation between cone HPi and parafoveal DCP vessel density (r = 0.681, P = 0.030). Using a novel approach with AOSLO and OCTA, this study shows an association between capillary non-perfusion of the DCP and abnormalities in the photoreceptor layer in eyes with DR. This observation is important in confirming the significant contribution of the DCP to oxygen requirements of photoreceptors in DMI, while highlighting the ability of AOSLO to detect subtle photoreceptor changes not always visible on SD-OCT. PMID:28068435

  5. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  6. GPU-based computational adaptive optics for volumetric optical coherence microscopy

    Tang, Han; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Untracht, Gavrielle R.; Zhang, Xihao; Adie, Steven G.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that measures reflectance from within biological tissues. Current higher-NA optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technologies with near cellular resolution have limitations on volumetric imaging capabilities due to the trade-offs between resolution vs. depth-of-field and sensitivity to aberrations. Such trade-offs can be addressed using computational adaptive optics (CAO), which corrects aberration computationally for all depths based on the complex optical field measured by OCT. However, due to the large size of datasets plus the computational complexity of CAO and OCT algorithms, it is a challenge to achieve high-resolution 3D-OCM reconstructions at speeds suitable for clinical and research OCM imaging. In recent years, real-time OCT reconstruction incorporating both dispersion and defocus correction has been achieved through parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). We add to these methods by implementing depth-dependent aberration correction for volumetric OCM using plane-by-plane phase deconvolution. Following both defocus and aberration correction, our reconstruction algorithm achieved depth-independent transverse resolution of 2.8 um, equal to the diffraction-limited focal plane resolution. We have translated the CAO algorithm to a CUDA code implementation and tested the speed of the software in real-time using two GPUs - NVIDIA Quadro K600 and Geforce TITAN Z. For a data volume containing 4096×256×256 voxels, our system's processing speed can keep up with the 60 kHz acquisition rate of the line-scan camera, and takes 1.09 seconds to simultaneously update the CAO correction for 3 en face planes at user-selectable depths.

  7. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  8. PASSATA: object oriented numerical simulation software for adaptive optics

    Agapito, G.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the last version of the PyrAmid Simulator Software for Adaptive opTics Arcetri (PASSATA), an IDL and CUDA based object oriented software developed in the Adaptive Optics group of the Arcetri observatory for Monte-Carlo end-to-end adaptive optics simulations. The original aim of this software was to evaluate the performance of a single conjugate adaptive optics system for ground based telescope with a pyramid wavefront sensor. After some years of development, the current version of PASSATA is able to simulate several adaptive optics systems: single conjugate, multi conjugate and ground layer, with Shack Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors. It can simulate from 8m to 40m class telescopes, with diffraction limited and resolved sources at finite or infinite distance from the pupil. The main advantages of this software are the versatility given by the object oriented approach and the speed given by the CUDA implementation of the most computational demanding routines. We describe the software with its last developments and present some examples of application.

  9. PASSATA - Object oriented numerical simulation software for adaptive optics

    Agapito, G; Esposito, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the last version of the PyrAmid Simulator Software for Adaptive opTics Arcetri (PASSATA), an IDL and CUDA based object oriented software developed in the Adaptive Optics group of the Arcetri observatory for Monte-Carlo end-to-end adaptive optics simulations. The original aim of this software was to evaluate the performance of a single conjugate adaptive optics system for ground based telescope with a pyramid wavefront sensor. After some years of development, the current version of PASSATA is able to simulate several adaptive optics systems: single conjugate, multi conjugate and ground layer, with Shack Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors. It can simulate from 8m to 40m class telescopes, with diffraction limited and resolved sources at finite or infinite distance from the pupil. The main advantages of this software are the versatility given by the object oriented approach and the speed given by the CUDA implementation of the most computational demanding routines. We describe the software with its...

  10. 3D manipulation with a scanning near field optical nanotweezers

    Berthelot, J; Juan, M L; Kreuzer, M P; Renger, J; Quidant, R

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in Nanotechnologies have prompted the need for tools to accurately and non-invasively manipulate individual nano-objects. Among possible strategies, optical forces have been foreseen to provide researchers with nano-optical tweezers capable to trap a specimen and move it in 3D. In practice though, the combination of weak optical forces involved and photothermal issues have thus far prevented their experimental realization. Here, we demonstrate first 3D optical manipulation of single 50 nm dielectric objects with near field nano-tweezers. The nano-optical trap is built by engineering a bowtie plasmonic aperture at the extremity of a tapered metal-coated optical fiber. Both the trapping operation and monitoring are performed through the optical fiber making these nano-tweezers totally autonomous and free of bulky optical elements. The achieved trapping performances allow for the trapped specimen to be moved over tens of micrometers during several minutes with very low in-trap intensities. This n...

  11. The VLT Adaptive Optics Facility Project: Telescope Systems

    Arsenault, Robin; Hubin, Norbert; Stroebele, Stefan; Fedrigo, Enrico; Oberti, Sylvain; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Bacon, Roland; McDermid, Richard; Bonaccini-Calia, Domenico; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Riccardi, Armando; Donaldson, Rob; Lelouarn, Miska; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Conzelman, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Stuik, Remko; Paufique, Jerome; Kasper, Markus; Vernet, Elise; Downing, Mark; Esposito, Simone; Duchateau, Michel; Franx, Marijn; Myers, Richard; Goodsell, Steven

    2006-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility is a project to convert UT4 into a specialised Adaptive Telescope. The present secondary mirror (M2) will be replaced by a new M2-Unit hosting a 1170-actuator deformable mirror. The three focal stations will be equipped with instruments adapted to the new capability of this UT. Two instruments have been identified for the two Nasmyth foci: Hawk-I with its AO module GRAAL allowing a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction and MUSE with GALACSI for GLAO correction and Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics correction. A future instrument still needs to be defined for the Cassegrain focus. Several guide stars are required for the type of adaptive corrections needed and a Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) is being developed in the scope of the AO Facility. Convex mirrors like the VLT M2 represent a major challenge for testing and a substantial effort is dedicated to this. ASSIST, is a test bench that will allow testing of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and both instruments with simulated turbulence. This article focusses on the telescope systems (Adaptive Secondary, Four Laser Guide Star Facility, RTC platform and ASSIST Test Bench). The following article describes the AO Modules GALACSI and GRAAL.

  12. Imaging retinal nerve fiber bundles using optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics.

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Cense, Barry; Jonnal, Ravi S; Wang, Qiang; Lee, Sangyeol; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T

    2011-08-15

    Early detection of axonal tissue loss in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is critical for effective treatment and management of diseases such as glaucoma. This study aims to evaluate the capability of ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (UHR-AO-OCT) for imaging the RNFL axonal bundles (RNFBs) with 3×3×3μm(3) resolution in the eye. We used a research-grade UHR-AO-OCT system to acquire 3°×3° volumes in four normal subjects and one subject with an arcuate retinal nerve fiber layer defect (n=5; 29-62years). Cross section (B-scans) and en face (C-scan) slices extracted from the volumes were used to assess visibility and size distribution of individual RNFBs. In one subject, we reimaged the same RNFBs twice over a 7month interval and compared bundle width and thickness between the two imaging sessions. Lastly we compared images of an arcuate RNFL defect acquired with UHR-AO-OCT and commercial OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis). Individual RNFBs were distinguishable in all subjects at 3° retinal eccentricity in both cross-sectional and en face views (width: 30-50μm, thickness: 10-15μm). At 6° retinal eccentricity, RNFBs were distinguishable in three of the five subjects in both views (width: 30-45μm, thickness: 20-40μm). Width and thickness RNFB measurements taken 7months apart were strongly correlated (p<0.0005). Mean difference and standard deviation of the differences between the two measurement sessions were -0.1±4.0μm (width) and 0.3±1.5μm (thickness). UHR-AO-OCT outperformed commercial OCT in terms of clarity of the microscopic retina. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of RNFB cross section reported in the living human eye.

  13. Very Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Community Days Report on the ESO Workshop

    Leibundgut, B.; Kasper, M.; Kuntschner, H.

    2016-12-01

    The future of adaptive optics (AO) instruments at the VLT was discussed during a two-day workshop. Three major directions emerged from these discussions: adaptive optics in the optical; multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO); and extreme adaptive optics (XAO). The science cases for these three options were presented and the discussions are summarised. ESO is now planning to provide detailed science cases for an optical AO system and to prepare upgrade plans for XAO and MOAO.

  14. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    Downie, John D.

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by detecting and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The required control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time. Longer time delays result in larger values of residual wavefront error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper presents a study of the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for the adaptive optics application. An optimization of the adaptive optics correction algorithm with respect to an optical processor's degree of accuracy is also briefly discussed.

  15. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  16. Wavelet methods in multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    Helin, T.; Yudytskiy, M.

    2013-08-01

    The next generation ground-based telescopes rely heavily on adaptive optics for overcoming the limitation of atmospheric turbulence. In the future adaptive optics modalities, like multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), atmospheric tomography is the major mathematical and computational challenge. In this severely ill-posed problem, a fast and stable reconstruction algorithm is needed that can take into account many real-life phenomena of telescope imaging. We introduce a novel reconstruction method for the atmospheric tomography problem and demonstrate its performance and flexibility in the context of MCAO. Our method is based on using locality properties of compactly supported wavelets, both in the spatial and frequency domains. The reconstruction in the atmospheric tomography problem is obtained by solving the Bayesian MAP estimator with a conjugate-gradient-based algorithm. An accelerated algorithm with preconditioning is also introduced. Numerical performance is demonstrated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of European Southern Observatory.

  17. Wavelet methods in multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    Helin, Tapio

    2013-01-01

    The next generation ground-based telescopes rely heavily on adaptive optics for overcoming the limitation of atmospheric turbulence. In the future adaptive optics modalities, like multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), atmospheric tomography is the major mathematical and computational challenge. In this severely ill-posed problem a fast and stable reconstruction algorithm is needed that can take into account many real-life phenomena of telescope imaging. We introduce a novel reconstruction method for the atmospheric tomography problem and demonstrate its performance and flexibility in the context of MCAO. Our method is based on using locality properties of compactly supported wavelets, both in the spatial and frequency domain. The reconstruction in the atmospheric tomography problem is obtained by solving the Bayesian MAP estimator with a conjugate gradient based algorithm. An accelerated algorithm with preconditioning is also introduced. Numerical performance is demonstrated on the official end-to-end simul...

  18. Modeling the Effect of Wave-front Aberrations in Fiber-based Scanning Optical Microscopy

    Verstraete, H.R.G.W.; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Kalkman, J.

    2013-01-01

    In scanning microscopy and optical coherence tomography, aberrations of the wave-front cause a loss in intensity and resolution. Intensity and resolution are quantified using Fresnel propagation, Fraunhofer diffraction, and the calculation of overlap integrals.

  19. Nonlinear optical switching and optical limiting in colloidal CdSe quantum dots investigated by nanosecond Z-scan measurement

    Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Patra, Amitava; Desai, Narayana Rao

    2016-10-01

    The semiconductor nanocrystals are found to be promising class of third order nonlinear optical materials because of quantum confinement effects. Here, we highlight the nonlinear optical switching and optical limiting of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) using nanosecond Z-scan measurement. The intensity dependent nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction of CdSe QDs were investigated by applying the Z-scan technique with 532 nm, nanosecond laser pulses. At lower intensities, the nonlinear process is dominated by saturable absorption (SA) and it is changed to reverse saturable absorption (RSA) at higher intensities. The SA behaviour is attributed to the ground state bleaching and the RSA is ascribed to free carrier absorption (FCA) of CdSe QDs. The nonlinear optical switching behaviour and reverse saturable absorption makes CdSe QDs are good candidate for all-optical device and optical limiting applications.

  20. Surface Plasmon Wave Adapter Designed with Transformation Optics

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn;

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved...... with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal....

  1. Adaptive optics technology for high-resolution retinal imaging.

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2012-12-27

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging.

  2. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    Giuseppe Lombardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging.

  3. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems.

    Downie, J D; Goodman, J W

    1989-10-15

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by measuring and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The necessary control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time, which adds to the residual error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper investigates this possibility by studying the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for adaptive optics use.

  4. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  5. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C.; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: self­interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex-i.e., amplitude plus phase-hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  6. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-07-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located {approx}0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin

  7. GPR Signal Processing with Geography Adaptive Scanning using Vector Radar for Antipersonal Landmine Detection

    Shinsuke Sato; Zakarya Zyada; Takayuki Matsuno; Yasuhiro Kawai; Yasuhisa Hasegawa; Toshio Fukuda

    2007-01-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a promising sensor for landmine detection, however there are two major problems to overcome. One is the rough ground surface. The other problem is the distance between the antennas of GPR. It remains irremovable clutters on a sub-surface image output from GPR by first problem. Geography adaptive scanning is useful to image objects beneath rough ground surface. Second problem makes larger the nonlinearity of the relationship between the time for propagation an...

  8. Non-scanning, non-interferometric, three-dimensional optical profilometer with nanometer resolution

    Chen-Tai Tan; Yuan-Sheng Chan; Jhao-An Chen; Teh-Chao Liao; Ming-Hung Chiu

    2011-01-01

    A non-scanning, non-interferometric, three-dimensional (3D) optical profilometer based on geometric optics, critical angle principle, and the use of a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The surface profile of the test specimen can be transferred into the reflectance profile. The reflectance profile, obtained from a CCD, is the ratio of the intensity at the critical angle to the intensity obtained at the total internal reflection angle. The optical profilometer provides a sub-micron measuring range with nanometer resolution and can be used to measure roughness or surface defects in real time.%A non-scanning,non-interferometric,three-dimensional (3D) optical profilometer based on geometric optics,critical angle principle,and the use of a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented.The surface profile of the test specimen can be transferred into the reflectance profile.The reflectance profile,obtained from a CCD,is the ratio of the intensity at the critical angle to the intensity obtained at the total internal reflection angle.The optical profilometer provides a sub-micron measuring range with nanometer resolution and can be used to measure roughness or surface defects in real time.Optical profilometers may be distinguished into two types:scanning and non-scanning types.Scanning profilometers have better axial resolution but spend much time in measuring.For three-dimensional (3D) surface profile measurement,scanning approaches such as confocal microscopy[1- 3],or near-field microscopy[4],which have high axial and lateral resolutions for measuring a snall scanned area,arc usually not used to measure a large surface profile.Non-scanning approaches such as the noninterferometric method[5,6],interference microscopy[7-10],and second-harmonic generation[11],can measure a large surface field,but the surface height calculation based on the fringe analysis is more complex.

  9. Polarization contrast in fluorescence scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    Jalocha, A.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization contrast is presented in fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer obtained with a scanning near-field optical microscope operated in reflection. A tapered optical fiber is used both to excite and to collect the fluorescence. The lateral resolution in the reflection fluoresce

  10. Conjugate adaptive optics in widefield microscopy with an extended-source wavefront sensor

    Li, Jiang; Paudel, Hari; Barankov, Roman; Bifano, Thomas; Mertz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a strategy to compensate for sample-induced aberrations in microscopy applications. Generally, it requires the presence of "guide stars" in the sample to serve as localized reference targets. We describe an implementation of conjugate adaptive optics that is amenable to widefield (i.e. non-scanning) microscopy, and can provide aberration corrections over potentially large fields of view without the use of guide stars. A unique feature of our implementation is that it is based on wavefront sensing with a single-shot partitioned-aperture sensor that provides large dynamic range compatible with extended samples. Combined information provided by this sensor and the imaging camera enable robust image de-blurring based on a rapid estimation of sample and aberrations obtained by closed-loop feedback. We present the theoretical principle of our technique and proof of concept experimental demonstrations.

  11. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine International Workshop.

    2007-11-02

    81-6-877-0900, e-mail: yoon@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp. 17. Victor I. Shmalhausen, International Laser Center, Moscow State University, Vorob’evy Gory,t 119899...Manuel Toledo - Quinones 3 Adaptive Optics Associates 54 CambridgePark Drive 3 Cambridge, MA 02140 (617)864-0201 (voice) * (617)864-1348 (fax) marty

  12. Wavefront Control for Space Telescope Applications Using Adaptive Optics

    2007-12-01

    science and chemistry . Although many of the principles behind adaptive optics have been understood for quite some time it hasn’t been until recent... SIMULINK and DSPACE by applying a voltage between +/-5 volts. Figure 11 Baker One Inch Fast Steering Mirror 16 E. POSITION SENSING MODULE

  13. On the influence of the Illuminati in astronomical adaptive optics

    Morzinski, Katie M

    2012-01-01

    Astronomical adaptive optics (AO) has come into its own. Major O/IR telescopes are achieving diffraction-limited imaging; major facilities are being built with AO as an integral part. To the layperson, it may seem that AO has developed along a serpentine path. However, with a little illumination, the mark of Galileo's heirs becomes apparent in explaining the success of AO.

  14. Data-Driven Optimal Control for Adaptive Optics

    Hinnen, K.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technique to actively correct the wavefront distortions introduced in a light beam as it propagates through a turbulent medium. Nowadays, it is commonly applied in ground-based telescopes to counteract the devastating effect of atmospheric turbulence. This thesis focuses on

  15. MICADO : The E-ELT adaptive optics imaging camera

    Davies, Richard; Ageorges, N.; Barl, L.; Bedin, L. R.; Bender, R.; Bernardi, P.; Chapron, F.; Clenet, Y.; Deep, A.; Deul, E.; Drost, M.; Eisenhauer, F.; Falomo, R.; Fiorentino, G.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Gendron, E.; Genzel, R.; Gratadour, D.; Greggio, L.; Grupp, F.; Held, E.; Herbst, T.; Hess, H.-J.; Hubert, Z.; Jahnke, K.; Kuijken, K.; Lutz, D.; Magrin, D.; Muschielok, B.; Navarro, R.; Noyola, E.; Paumard, T.; Piotto, G.; Ragazzoni, R.; Renzini, A.; Rousset, G.; Rix, H.-W.; Saglia, R.; Tacconi, L.; Thiel, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Trippe, S.; Tromp, N.; Valentijn, E. A.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Wegner, M.; McLean, I.S.; Ramsay, S.K.; Takami, H.

    2010-01-01

    MICADO is the adaptive optics imaging camera for the E-ELT. It has been designed and optimised to be mounted to the LGS-MCAO system MAORY, and will provide diffraction limited imaging over a wide (~1 arcmin) field of view. For initial operations, it can also be used with its own simpler AO module th

  16. Nonlinear optical properties of natural laccaic acid dye studied using Z-scan technique

    Zongo, S.; Sanusi, K.; Britton, J.; Mthunzi, P.; Nyokong, T.; Maaza, M.; Sahraoui, B.

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear optical properties, including the optical limiting behaviour for five different concentrations of laccaic acid dye in solution and a thin film obtained through doping in poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. The experiments were performed by using single beam Z-scan technique at 532 nm with 10 ns, 10 Hz Nd:YAG laser pulses excitation. From the open-aperture Z-scan data, we derived that the laccaic dye samples exhibit strong two photon absorption (2PA). The nonlinear refractive index was determined through the closed aperture Z-scan data. The estimated absorption coefficient β2, nonlinear refractive index n2 and second order hyperpolarizability γ were found to be of the order of 10-10 m/W, 10-9 esu and 10-32 esu, respectively. The Z-scan study reveals that the natural laccaic acid dye emerges as a promising material for third order nonlinear optical devices application.

  17. Picosecond optical nonlinearities in symmetrical and unsymmetrical phthalocyanines studied using the Z-scan technique

    S Venugopal Rao; P T Anusha; L Giribabu; Surya P Tewari

    2010-11-01

    We present our experimental results on the picosecond nonlinear optical (NLO) studies of symmetrical and unsymmetrical phthalocyanines, examined using the Z-scan technique. Both the open-aperture and closed-aperture Z-scan curves for three samples were recorded and the nonlinear coefficients were extracted from the theoretical fits. The nonlinear absorption/refraction contribution from the solvent was also identified. The observed open aperture behaviour for these molecules is understood in terms of the absorption coefficients of these molecules near 800 nm and the peak intensities used. It is established that these phthalocyanines exhibit large optical nonlinearities and, hence, are suitable for optical limiting applications.

  18. Heterodyne method of apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy on periodic gold nanowells.

    Hall, J. E.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Gray, S. K.; Chang, S.-H.; Jeon, S.; Rogers, J. A.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Technology at Troyes; Inst. of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering

    2007-04-02

    Heterodyne detection for apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy was used to study periodic gold nanowell arrays. Optical near-field amplitude and phase signals were obtained simultaneously with the topography of the gold nanowells and with different polarizations. Theoretical calculations of the near-fields were consistent with the experiments; in particular, the calculated amplitudes were in especially good agreement. The heterodyne method is shown to be particularly effective for these types of periodic photonic structures and other highly scattering media, which can overwhelm the near-field scattered signal when conventional apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy is used.

  19. Differential geometry of the ruled surfaces optically generated by mirror scanning devices: II. Generation of helicoids and hyperbolic paraboloids.

    Li, Yajun

    2011-06-01

    The theory developed in Part I of this study [Y. Li, "Differential geometry of the ruled surfaces optically generated by mirror-scanning devices. I. Intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the scan field," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A28, 667 (2011)] for the ruled surfaces optically generated by single-mirror scanning devices is extended to multimirror scanning systems for an investigation of optical generation of the well-known ruled surfaces, such as helicoid, Plücker's conoid, and hyperbolic paraboloid.

  20. Adaptive optics at Lick Observatory: system architecture and operations

    Brase, James M.; An, Jong; Avicola, Kenneth; Bissinger, Horst D.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Gavel, Donald T.; Johnston, Brooks; Max, Claire E.; Olivier, Scot S.; Presta, Robert W.; Rapp, David A.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Waltjen, Kenneth E.; Fisher, William A.

    1994-05-01

    We will describe an adaptive optics system developed for the 1 meter Nickel and 3 meter Shane telescopes at Lick Observatory. Observing wavelengths will be in the visible for the 1 meter telescope and in the near IR on the 3 meter. The adaptive optics system design is based on a 69 actuator continuous surface deformable mirror and a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with an intensified CCD framing camera. The system has been tested at the Cassegrain focus of the 1 meter telescope where the subaperture size is 12.5 cm. The wavefront control calculations are performed on a four processor single board computer controlled by a Unix-based system. We will describe the optical system and give details of the wavefront control system design. We will present predictions of the system performance and initial test results.

  1. The AVES adaptive optics spectrograph for the VLT: status report

    Pallavicini, Roberto; Delabre, Bernard; Pasquini, Luca; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Bonanno, Giovanni; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Santin, Paolo; Damiani, Francesco; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Franchini, Mariagrazia; Spano, Paolo; Bonifacio, P.; Catalano, Santo; Molaro, Paolo P.; Randich, S.; Rodono, Marcello

    2003-03-01

    We report on the status of AVES, the Adaptive-optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph proposed for the secondary port of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) recently installed at the VLT. AVES is an intermediate resolution (R ≍ 16,000) high-efficiency fixed- format echelle spectrograph which operates in the spectral band 500 - 1,000 nm. In addition to a high intrinsic efficiency, comparable to that of ESI at Keck II, it takes advantage of the adaptive optics correction provided by NAOS to reduce the sky and detector contribution in background-limited observations of weak sources, thus allowing a further magnitude gain with respect to comparable non-adaptive optics spectrographs. Simulations show that the instrument will be capable of reaching a magnitude V = 22.5 at S/N > 10 in two hours, two magnitudes weaker than GIRAFFE at the same resolution and 3 magnitudes weaker than the higher resolution UVES spectrograph. Imaging and coronographic functions have also been implemented in the design. We present the results of the final design study and we dicuss the technical and operational issues related to its implementation at the VLT as a visitor instrument. We also discuss the possibility of using a scaled-up non-adaptive optics version of the same design as an element of a double- or triple-arm intermediate-resolution spectrograph for the VLT. Such an option looks attractive in the context of a high-efficiency large-bandwidth (320 - 1,500 nm) spectrograph ("fast-shooter") being considered by ESO as a 2nd-generation VLT instrument.

  2. Observation of Amorphous Recording Marks Using Reflection-Mode Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope Supported by Optical Interference Method

    Sakai, Masaru; Mononobe, Shuji; Yusu, Keiichiro; Tadokoro, Toshiyasu; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2005-09-01

    A signal enhancing technique for a reflection-mode near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) is proposed. Optical interference between the signal light, from an aperture at the tip of a tapered optical fiber, and the reflected light, from a metallic coating around the aperture, enhances the signal intensity. We used a rewritable high-definition digital versatile disc (HD DVD) with dual recording layers as a sample medium, and demonstrated observation of amorphous recording marks on the semitransparent (the first) recording layer. In spite of low optical contrast between the crystal region and the amorphous region on this layer, we successfully observed recording marks with good contrast.

  3. Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) Uncertainty Analysis: Preprint

    Lewandowski, A.; Gray, A.

    2010-10-01

    This purely analytical work is based primarily on the geometric optics of the system and shows sensitivities to various design and operational parameters. We discuss sources of error with measuring devices, instrument calibrations, and operator measurements for a parabolic trough test. In this paper, we include both the random (precision) and systematic (bias) errors for VSHOT testing and their contributions to the uncertainty. The contributing factors that we considered in this study are target tilt, target face to laser output distance, instrument vertical offset, scanner tilt, distance between the tool and the test piece, camera calibration, and scanner/calibration.

  4. Adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method for estimating tree diameter based on single terrestrial laser scanning

    Bu, Guochao; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to extract accurate forest biophysical parameters for inventory purposes. The diameter at breast height (DBH) is a key parameter for individual trees because it has the potential for modeling the height, volume, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential of the tree based on empirical allometric scaling equations. In order to extract the DBH from the single-scan data of TLS automatically and accurately within a certain range, we proposed an adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method based on the point cloud transect. This proposed method can correct the error caused by the simple circle fitting method when a tree is slanted. A slanted tree was detected by the circle-ellipse fitting analysis, then the corresponding slant angle was found based on the ellipse fitting result. With this information, the DBH of the trees could be recalculated based on reslicing the point cloud data at breast height. Artificial stem data simulated by a cylindrical model of leaning trees and the scanning data acquired with the RIEGL VZ-400 were used to test the proposed adaptive fitting method. The results shown that the proposed method can detect the trees and accurately estimate the DBH for leaning trees.

  5. Optical interferometry and adaptive optics of bright transients

    Millour, Florentin; Meilland, Anthony; Nardetto, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Bright optical transients (i.e. transients typically visible with the naked eye) are populated mainly by novae eruptions plus a few supernovae (among which the SN1987a event). One bright nova happen every two years, either in the North ot in the South hemisphere. It occurs that current interferometers have matching sensitivities, with typically visible or infrared limiting magnitude in the range 5--7. The temporal development of the fireball, followed by a dust formation phase or the appearance of many coronal lines can be sudied with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. The detailed geometry of the first phases of novae in outburst remains virtually unexplored. This paper summarizes the work which has been done to date using the VLTI.

  6. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  7. Two-axis water-immersible microscanning mirror for scanning optics and acoustic microscopy

    Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Fast multiaxis scanning is useful for not only optical but also acoustic microscopic imaging. Although they have been used for optical scanning, the application of (MEMS) scanning mirrors in acoustic microscopy is still very limited due to their small mirror plate size, and more importantly, inability to operate in liquids (as ultrasound coupling media). A microfabricated two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror for optical and acoustic microscopy is reported. It has an optical and acoustically reflective mirror plate (6 mm×4 mm) to provide numerical aperture for ultrasound beam steering. Electromagnetic and mechanical analysis and simulation were conducted to estimate the mechanical tilting angle and resonance frequency of both fast and slow axes, which matches well with the measurement results. The fast axis has a resonant frequency of 320 Hz in air and 220 Hz in water, which is more than 10 times higher than that of the slow axis (24 Hz in air and 14 Hz in water). Under a 100-mA driving current, the scanning angles of the fast axis reached ±9.5 deg in both air and water at the resonance frequency, respectively. The scanning angles of the slow axis reached ±15 deg in air and ±12.5 deg in water at resonant frequencies, respectively. Raster scanning of a collimated laser beam was achieved by driving both axes simultaneously close to their own resonance frequencies. The feasibility of using the two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror in scanning acoustic microscopy was also demonstrated.

  8. Differential geometry of the ruled surfaces optically generated by mirror-scanning devices. I. Intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the scan field.

    Li, Yajun

    2011-04-01

    Rectilinear propagation of light rays in homogeneous isotropic media makes it possible for optical generation of ruled surfaces as the ray is deflected by a rotatable mirror. Scan patterns on a plane or curved surface are merely curves on the ruled surface. Based on this understanding, structures of the scan fields produced by mirror-scanning devices of different configurations are investigated in terms of differential geometry. Expressions of the first and second fundamental coefficients and the first and second Gauss differential forms are given for an investigation of the intrinsic properties of the optically generated ruled surfaces. The Plücker ruled conoid is then generalized for mathematical modeling of the scan fields produced by single-mirror scanning devices of different configurations. Part II will be devoted to a study of multi-mirror scanning systems for optical generation of well-known ruled surfaces such as helicoids and hyperbolic paraboloids.

  9. Pixelized Device Control Actuators for Large Adaptive Optics

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Shea, Brian; Chen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated, compact, adaptive space optic mirror assembly has been developed, incorporating new advances in ultralight, high-performance composite mirrors. The composite mirrors use Q-switch matrix architecture-based pixelized control (PMN-PT) actuators, which achieve high-performance, large adaptive optic capability, while reducing the weight of present adaptive optic systems. The self-contained, fully assembled, 11x11x4-in. (approx.= 28x28x10-cm) unit integrates a very-high-performance 8-in. (approx.=20-cm) optic, and has 8-kHz true bandwidth. The assembled unit weighs less than 15 pounds (=6.8 kg), including all mechanical assemblies, power electronics, control electronics, drive electronics, face sheet, wiring, and cabling. It requires just three wires to be attached (power, ground, and signal) for full-function systems integration, and uses a steel-frame and epoxied electronics. The three main innovations are: 1. Ultralightweight composite optics: A new replication method for fabrication of very thin composite 20-cm-diameter laminate face sheets with good as-fabricated optical figure was developed. The approach is a new mandrel resin surface deposition onto previously fabricated thin composite laminates. 2. Matrix (regenerative) power topology: Waveform correction can be achieved across an entire face sheet at 6 kHz, even for large actuator counts. In practice, it was found to be better to develop a quadrant drive, that is, four quadrants of 169 actuators behind the face sheet. Each quadrant has a single, small, regenerative power supply driving all 169 actuators at 8 kHz in effective parallel. 3. Q-switch drive architecture: The Q-switch innovation is at the heart of the matrix architecture, and allows for a very fast current draw into a desired actuator element in 120 counts of a MHz clock without any actuator coupling.

  10. Adaptive Quality of Transmission Control in Elastic Optical Network

    Cai, Xinran

    Optical fiber communication is becoming increasingly important due to the burgeoning demand in the internet capacity. However, traditional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique fails to address such demand because of its inefficient spectral utilization. As a result, elastic optical networking (EON) has been under extensive investigation recently. Such network allows sub-wavelength and super-wavelength channel accommodation, and mitigates the stranded bandwidth problem in the WDM network. In addition, elastic optical network is also able to dynamically allocate the spectral resources of the network based on channel conditions and impairments, and adaptively control the quality of transmission of a channel. This application requires two aspects to be investigated: an efficient optical performance monitoring scheme and networking control and management algorithms to reconfigure the network in a dynamic fashion. This thesis focuses on the two aspects discussed above about adaptive QoT control. We demonstrated a supervisory channel method for optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) and chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring. In addition, our proof-of-principle testbed experiments show successful impairment aware reconfiguration of the network with modulation format switching (MFS) only and MFS combined with lightpath rerouting (LR) for hundred-GHz QPSK superchannels undergoing time-varying OSNR impairment.

  11. Adaptive optics for improved retinal surgery and diagnostics

    Humayun, M S; Sadda, S R; Thompson, C A; Olivier, S S; Kartz, M W

    2000-08-21

    It is now possible to field a compact adaptive optics (AO) system on a surgical microscope for use in retinal diagnostics and surgery. Recent developments in integrated circuit technology and optical photonics have led to the capability of building an AO system that is compact and significantly less expensive than traditional AO systems. It is foreseen that such an AO system can be integrated into a surgical microscope while maintaining a package size of a lunchbox. A prototype device can be developed in a manner that lends itself well to large-scale manufacturing.

  12. Segmented bimorph mirrors for adaptive optics: morphing strategy.

    Bastaits, Renaud; Alaluf, David; Belloni, Edoardo; Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Preumont, André

    2014-08-01

    This paper discusses the concept of a light weight segmented bimorph mirror for adaptive optics. It focuses on the morphing strategy and addresses the ill-conditioning of the Jacobian of the segments, which are partly outside the optical pupil. Two options are discussed, one based on truncating the singular values and one called damped least squares, which minimizes a combined measure of the sensor error and the voltage vector. A comparison of various configurations of segmented mirrors was conducted; it is shown that segmentation sharply increases the natural frequency of the system with limited deterioration of the image quality.

  13. Toward endoscopes with no distal optics: video-rate scanning microscopy through a fiber bundle.

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bouwmans, Géraud; Monneret, Serge; Rigneault, Hervé

    2013-03-01

    We report a step toward scanning endomicroscopy without distal optics. The focusing of the beam at the distal end of a fiber bundle is achieved by imposing a parabolic phase profile across the exit face with the aid of a spatial light modulator. We achieve video-rate images by galvanometric scanning of the phase tilt at the proximal end. The approach is made possible by the bundle, designed to have very low coupling between cores.

  14. Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO): A performance study

    Tatulli, E

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the on-axis performance of Adaptive Optics systems using a given number of guide stars of arbitrary altitude, distributed at arbitrary angular positions in the sky. The expressions of the residual error are given for cases of both continuous and discrete turbulent atmospheric profiles. Assuming Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with circular apertures, we demonstrate that the error is formally described by integrals of products of three Bessel functions. We compare the performance of Adaptive Optics correction when using natural, Sodium or Rayleigh laser guide stars. For small diameter class telescopes (~5m), we show that a few number of Rayleigh beacons can provide similar performance to that of a single Sodium laser, for a lower overall cost of the instrument. For bigger apertures, using Rayleigh stars may not be such a suitable alternative because of the too severe cone effect that drastically degrades the quality of the correction.

  15. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J R; Oppenheimer, B; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Veran, J

    2005-11-18

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today--the realm of ''Extreme'' adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order ''woofer'' mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  16. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    Davies, R; Lidman, C; Louarn, M Le; Kasper, M; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Roccatagliata, V; Ageorges, N; Amico, P; Dumas, C; Mannucci, F

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  17. Results from the adaptive optics coronagraph at the WHT

    Thompson, S J; Bingham, R G; Charalambous, A; Myers, R M; Bissonauth, N; Clark, P; Talbot, G

    2005-01-01

    Described here is the design and commissioning of a coronagraph facility for the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and its Nasmyth Adaptive Optics system for Multi-purpose Instrumentation (NAOMI). The use of the NAOMI system gives an improved image resolution of ~0.15 arcsecs at a wavelength of 2.2um. This enables the Optimised Stellar Coronagraph for Adaptive optics (OSCA) to suppress stellar light using smaller occulting masks and thus allows regions closer to bright astronomical objects to be imaged. OSCA provides a selection of 10 different occulting masks with sizes of 0.25 - 2.0 arcsecs in diameter, including two with full greyscale Gaussian profiles. There is also a choice of different sized and shaped Lyot stops (pupil plane masks). Computer simulations of the different coronagraphic options with the NAOMI segmented mirror have relevance for the next generation of highly segmented extremely large telescopes.

  18. Limits of spherical blur determined with an adaptive optics mirror.

    Atchison, David A; Guo, Huanqing; Fisher, Scott W

    2009-05-01

    We extended an earlier study (Vision Research, 45, 1967-1974, 2005) in which we investigated limits at which induced blur of letter targets becomes noticeable, troublesome and objectionable. Here we used a deformable adaptive optics mirror to vary spherical defocus for conditions of a white background with correction of astigmatism; a white background with reduction of all aberrations other than defocus; and a monochromatic background with reduction of all aberrations other than defocus. We used seven cyclopleged subjects, lines of three high-contrast letters as targets, 3-6 mm artificial pupils, and 0.1-0.6 logMAR letter sizes. Subjects used a method of adjustment to control the defocus component of the mirror to set the 'just noticeable', 'just troublesome' and 'just objectionable' defocus levels. For the white-no adaptive optics condition combined with 0.1 logMAR letter size, mean 'noticeable' blur limits were +/-0.30, +/-0.24 and +/-0.23 D at 3, 4 and 6 mm pupils, respectively. White-adaptive optics and monochromatic-adaptive optics conditions reduced blur limits by 8% and 20%, respectively. Increasing pupil size from 3-6 mm decreased blur limits by 29%, and increasing letter size increased blur limits by 79%. Ratios of troublesome to noticeable, and of objectionable to noticeable, blur limits were 1.9 and 2.7 times, respectively. The study shows that the deformable mirror can be used to vary defocus in vision experiments. Overall, the results of noticeable, troublesome and objectionable blur agreed well with those of the previous study. Attempting to reduce higher-order aberrations or chromatic aberrations, reduced blur limits to only a small extent.

  19. LIFT: analysis of performance in a laser assisted adaptive optics

    Plantet, Cedric; Meimon, Serge; Conan, Jean-Marc; Neichel, Benoît; Fusco, Thierry

    2014-08-01

    Laser assisted adaptive optics systems rely on Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wave-Front Sensors (WFS) for high order aberration measurements, and rely on Natural Guide Stars (NGS) WFS to complement the measurements on low orders such as tip-tilt and focus. The sky-coverage of the whole system is therefore related to the limiting magnitude of the NGS WFS. We have recently proposed LIFT, a novel phase retrieval WFS technique, that allows a 1 magnitude gain over the usually used 2×2 Shack-Hartmann WFS. After an in-lab validation, LIFT's concept has been demonstrated on sky in open loop on GeMS (the Gemini Multiconjugate adaptive optics System at Gemini South). To complete its validation, LIFT now needs to be operated in closed loop in a laser assisted adaptive optics system. The present work gives a detailed analysis of LIFT's behavior in presence of high order residuals and how to limit aliasing effects on the tip/tilt/focus estimation. Also, we study the high orders' impact on noise propagation. For this purpose, we simulate a multiconjugate adaptive optics loop representative of a GeMS-like 5 LGS configuration. The residual high orders are derived from a Fourier based simulation. We demonstrate that LIFT keeps a high performance gain over the Shack-Hartmann 2×2 whatever the turbulence conditions. Finally, we show the first simulation of a closed loop with LIFT estimating turbulent tip/tilt and focus residuals that could be induced by sodium layer's altitude variations.

  20. Multibeam scanning optics with single laser source for full-color printers.

    Maruo, S; Arimoto, A; Kobayashi, S

    1997-10-01

    In the novel optical system described here, four-color toners can be developed in one rotation of the photoconductor, and the color control information is given when the intensities of the laser power levels are changed and the two polarization directions are switched. A polarizing beam splitter between the common scanning optics and the photoconductor enables the laser beam to pass through a common scanning system and to illuminate two positions on the photoconductive material. The laser beam polarization direction is controlled by an electro-optical device immediately behind the laser. In each illuminated position, two-color toners are developed by a three-level (trilevel) photographic process. This simplified optical system eliminates the registration errors that occur with four-color information items and can be useful in high-speed printing systems.

  1. Stellar populations from adaptive optics observations four test cases

    Bedding, T R; Courbin, F; Sams, B J

    1997-01-01

    We describe a first attempt to apply adaptive optics to the study of resolved stellar populations in galaxies. Advantages over traditional approaches are (i) improved spatial resolution and point-source sensitivity through adaptive optics, and (ii) use of the near-infrared region, where the peak of the spectral energy distribution for old populations is found. Disadvantages are the small area covered and the need for excellent seeing. We made observations with the ADONIS system at the European Southern Observatory of the peculiar elliptical galaxy NGC 5128; the irregular galaxy IC 5152 (a possible outer member of the Local Group); the Sc galaxy NGC 300 (a member of the Sculptor group); and the Sgr window in the bulge of the Milky Way. These different fields give excellent test cases for the potential of adaptive optics. In the first two cases, we failed to obtain photometry of individual stars, which would have required excellent seeing. For NGC 300 we measured magnitudes for nine individual supergiants (H = ...

  2. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  3. Recent progress on the portable solar adaptive optics

    Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Penn, Matt; Wang, Haimin; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhu, Yongtian; Rong, Li; Wang, Xue

    2012-07-01

    The portable solar adaptive optics is a compact adaptive optics system that will be the first visitor solar instrument in the world. As so, it will be able to work with any solar telescope with a aperture size up to ~ 2.0 meters, which will cover the largest solar telescope currently operational. The portable AO features small physical size, high-flexibility and high-performance, and is a duplicable and affordable system. It will provide wave-front correction down to the 0.5-μm wavelength, and will be used for solar high-resolution imaging in the near infrared and the visible. It will be the first AO system that uses LabVIEW based high quality parallel and block-diagram programming, which fully takes advantage of today's multi-core CPUs, and makes a rapid development of an AO system possible. In this publication, we report our recent progress on the portable adaptive optics, which includes the laboratory test for performance characterization, and initial on-site scientific observations.

  4. Measurement of Temperature Change in Nonlinear Optical Materials by Using the Z-Scan Technique

    DONG Shu-Guang; YANG Jun-Yi; SHUI Min; YI Chuan-Xiang; LI Zhong-Guo; SONG Ying-Lin

    2011-01-01

    @@ Spatial and temporal changes of temperature in a novel polymer are investigated by using the Z-scan technique under ns laser pulse excitation.According to the open aperture Z-scan experimental results, the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the polymer is determined.By solving the diffusion equation of heat conduction induced by optical absorption, the spatial and temporal changes in temperature are obtained.This change in temperature drives the photo-acoustic and electromagnetic wave propagating in the polymer and induces the change in refractive index, which serves as a negative lens, and the closed aperture Z-scan shows a peak and valley profile.Based on the numerical calculation, we achieve a good fit to the closed-aperture Z-scan curve with an optimized nonlinear refractive index.This consistency attests the existence of temperature change in the solution, and the Z-scan technique is suitable to investigate this change in temperature.

  5. Two-axis polydimethylsiloxane-based electromagnetic microelectromechanical system scanning mirror for optical coherence tomography

    Kim, Sehui; Lee, Changho; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Jeehyun; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-01

    Compact size and fast imaging abilities are key requirements for the clinical implementation of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Among the various small-sized technology, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror is widely used in a miniaturized OCT system. However, the complexities of conventional MEMS fabrication processes and relatively high costs have restricted fast clinical translation and commercialization of the OCT systems. To resolve these problems, we developed a two-axis polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based MEMS (2A-PDMS-MEMS) scanning mirror through simple processes with low costs. It had a small size of 15×15×15 mm3, was fast, and had a wide scanning range at a low voltage. The AC/DC responses were measured to evaluate the performance of the 2A-PDMS-MEMS scanning mirror. The maximum scanning angles were measured as ±16.6 deg and ±11.6 deg along the X and Y axes, respectively, and the corresponding field of view was 29.8 mm×20.5 mm with an optical focal length of 50 mm. The resonance frequencies were 82 and 57 Hz along the X and Y axes, respectively. Finally, in vivo B-scan and volumetric OCT images of human fingertips and palms were successfully acquired using the developed SD-OCT system based on the 2A-PDMS-MEMS scanning mirror.

  6. Optimizing Photon Collection from Point Sources with Adaptive Optics

    Hill, Alexander; Hervas, David; Nash, Joseph; Graham, Martin; Burgers, Alexander; Paudel, Uttam; Steel, Duncan; Kwiat, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Collection of light from point-like sources is typically poor due to the optical aberrations present with very high numerical-aperture optics. In the case of quantum dots, the emitted mode is nonisotropic and may be quite difficult to couple into single- or even few-mode fiber. Wavefront aberrations can be corrected using adaptive optics at the classical level by analyzing the wavefront directly (e.g., with a Shack-Hartmann sensor); however, these techniques are not feasible at the single-photon level. We present a new technique for adaptive optics with single photons using a genetic algorithm to optimize collection from point emitters with a deformable mirror. We first demonstrate our technique for improving coupling from a subwavelength pinhole, which simulates isotropic emission from a point source. We then apply our technique in situto InAs/GaAs quantum dots, obtaining coupling increases of up to 50% even in the presence of an artificial source of drift.

  7. Anisoplanatism in adaptive optics systems due to pupil aberrations

    Bauman, B

    2005-08-01

    Adaptive optics systems typically include an optical relay that simultaneously images the science field to be corrected and also a set of pupil planes conjugate to the deformable mirror of the system. Often, in the optical spaces where DM's are placed, the pupils are aberrated, leading to a displacement and/or distortion of the pupil that varies according to field position--producing a type of anisoplanatism, i.e., a degradation of the AO correction with field angle. The pupil aberration phenomenon is described and expressed in terms of Seidel aberrations. An expression for anisoplanatism as a function of pupil distortion is derived, an example of an off-axis parabola is given, and a convenient method for controlling pupil-aberration-generated anisoplanatism is proposed.

  8. Manufacturing of glassy thin shell for adaptive optics: results achieved

    Poutriquet, F.; Rinchet, A.; Carel, J.-L.; Leplan, H.; Ruch, E.; Geyl, R.; Marque, G.

    2012-07-01

    Glassy thin shells are key components for the development of adaptive optics and are part of future & innovative projects such as ELT. However, manufacturing thin shells is a real challenge. Even though optical requirements for the front face - or optical face - are relaxed compared to conventional passive mirrors, requirements concerning thickness uniformity are difficult to achieve. In addition, process has to be completely re-defined as thin mirror generates new manufacturing issues. In particular, scratches and digs requirement is more difficult as this could weaken the shell, handling is also an important issue due to the fragility of the mirror. Sagem, through REOSC program, has recently manufactured different types of thin shells in the frame of European projects: E-ELT M4 prototypes and VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror (VLT DSM).

  9. Point spread function optimization for STORM using adaptive optics

    Forouhesh Tehrani, Kayvan; Kner, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) requires a high Strehl ratio point spread function (PSF) to achieve high resolution, especially in the presence of background fluorescence. The PSF is degraded by aberrations caused by imperfections in the optics, the refractive index mismatch between the sample and coverslip, and the refractive index variations of the sample. These aberrations distort the shape of the PSF and increase the PSF width directly reducing the resolution of STORM. Here we discuss the use of Adaptive Optics (AO) to correct aberrations, maintaining a high Strehl ratio even in thick tissue. Because the intensity fluctuates strongly from frame to frame, image intensity is not a reliable measure of PSF quality, and the choice of a robust optimization metric is critical. We demonstrate the use of genetic algorithms with single molecule imaging for optimization of the wavefront and introduce a metric that is relatively insensitive to image intensity. We demonstrate the correction of the wavefront from measurements of single quantum dots.

  10. Design and verification of the miniature optical system for small object surface profile fast scanning

    Chi, Sheng; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Jen, Jen-Yu; Lai, Ti-Yu; Jan, Chia-Ming; Hu, Po-Chi

    2016-04-01

    As the progress of optical technologies, different commercial 3D surface contour scanners are on the market nowadays. Most of them are used for reconstructing the surface profile of mold or mechanical objects which are larger than 50 mm×50 mm× 50 mm, and the scanning system size is about 300 mm×300 mm×100 mm. There are seldom optical systems commercialized for surface profile fast scanning for small object size less than 10 mm×10 mm×10 mm. Therefore, a miniature optical system has been designed and developed in this research work for this purpose. Since the most used scanning method of such system is line scan technology, we have developed pseudo-phase shifting digital projection technology by adopting projecting fringes and phase reconstruction method. A projector was used to project a digital fringe patterns on the object, and the fringes intensity images of the reference plane and of the sample object were recorded by a CMOS camera. The phase difference between the plane and object can be calculated from the fringes images, and the surface profile of the object was reconstructed by using the phase differences. The traditional phase shifting method was accomplished by using PZT actuator or precisely controlled motor to adjust the light source or grating and this is one of the limitations for high speed scanning. Compared with the traditional optical setup, we utilized a micro projector to project the digital fringe patterns on the sample. This diminished the phase shifting processing time and the controlled phase differences between the shifted phases become more precise. Besides, the optical path design based on a portable device scanning system was used to minimize the size and reduce the number of the system components. A screwdriver section about 7mm×5mm×5mm has been scanned and its surface profile was successfully restored. The experimental results showed that the measurement area of our system can be smaller than 10mm×10mm, the precision reached to

  11. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  12. Implant planning and placement using optical scanning and cone beam CT technology

    J.M. van der Zel

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing interest in minimally invasive implant therapy as a standard prosthodontic treatment, providing complete restoration of occlusal function. A new treatment method (CADDIMA), which combines both computerized tomographic (CT) and optical laser-scan data for planning and design of sur

  13. The study of lossy compressive method with different interpolation for holographic reconstruction in optical scanning holography

    HU Zhijuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The lossy hologram compression method with three different interpolations is investigated to compress images holographically recorded with optical scanning holography.Without loss of major reconstruction details,results have shown that the lossy compression method is able to achieve high compression ratio of up to 100.

  14. Kilohertz scanning all-fiber optical delay line using piezoelectric actuation

    Henderson, David A.; Hoffman, Conrad; Culhane, Robert; Viggiano, Dan, III

    2004-12-01

    Commercial applications for fiber sensing and low-coherence interferometry are rapidly growing in medical, industrial and aerospace markets. These new instruments must be smaller, more robust and less expensive. An all-fiber optical delay line or "fiber stretcher", using piezoelectric (PZT) actuation, offers a simple solid-state solution that eliminates free space optics. The challenges for PZT fiber stretchers include: reducing non-linearity and hysteresis, achieving sufficient scan range with minimum fiber length, maximizing scan frequency and reducing losses in the drive electronics. PZT actuators are essentially large ceramic capacitors that must be rapidly charged and discharged to achieve fast scanning. The mechanical response of the PZT ceramic is greater than 10 kHz which makes it practical to scan at four kilohertz. A thin-walled piezoelectric disk or cylinder achieves 4.5 millimeters of fiber stretch using 20 meters of coiled fiber. Digitally controlled series resonant electronics produce a 1200 volt sinusoidal drive signal at a fixed frequency of four kilohertz while dissipating only 16 Watts. An all-fiber optical delay line module, using piezoelectric actuators and a series resonant drive, is a miniature, robust and efficient alternative to free-space optics with dithering mirrors or spinning polygons.

  15. Chemical Silver Coating of Fiber Tips in Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    1998-01-01

    We report what is believed to be the first experimental demonstration of silver coating by a wet chemical process on tapered fiber tips used in near-field scanning optical microscopy. The process is at room temperature and pressure and takes only a few minutes to complete. Many tips can be simultaneously coated.

  16. Adaptive optics at the Subaru telescope: current capabilities and development

    Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Oya, Shin; Minowa, Yosuke; Lai, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Kasdin, Jeremy; Groff, Tyler; Hayashi, Masahiko; Arimoto, Nobuo; Takami, Hideki; Bradley, Colin; Sugai, Hajime; Perrin, Guy; Tuthill, Peter; Mazin, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Current AO observations rely heavily on the AO188 instrument, a 188-elements system that can operate in natural or laser guide star (LGS) mode, and delivers diffraction-limited images in near-IR. In its LGS mode, laser light is transported from the solid state laser to the launch telescope by a single mode fiber. AO188 can feed several instruments: the infrared camera and spectrograph (IRCS), a high contrast imaging instrument (HiCIAO) or an optical integral field spectrograph (Kyoto-3DII). Adaptive optics development in support of exoplanet observations has been and continues to be very active. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme-AO (SCExAO) system, which combines extreme-AO correction with advanced coronagraphy, is in the commissioning phase, and will greatly increase Subaru Telescope's ability to image and study exoplanets. SCExAO currently feeds light to HiCIAO, and will soon be combined with the CHARIS integral field spectrograph and the fast frame MKIDs exoplanet camera, which have both been specifically designed for high contrast imaging. SCExAO also feeds two visible-light single pupil interferometers: VAMPIRES and FIRST. In parallel to these direct imaging activities, a near-IR high precision spectrograph (IRD) is under development for observing exoplanets with the radial velocity technique. Wide-field adaptive optics techniques are also being pursued. The RAVEN multi-object adaptive optics instrument was installed on Subaru telescope in early 2014. Subaru Telescope is also planning wide field imaging with ground-layer AO with the ULTIMATE-Subaru project.

  17. Cellular resolution volumetric in vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography.

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Choi, Stacey S; Fuller, Alfred R; Evans, Julia W; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S

    2009-03-02

    Ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (UHR-AO-OCT) instrumentation allowing monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction was used for volumetric in vivo retinal imaging of various retinal structures including the macula and optic nerve head (ONH). Novel visualization methods that simplify AO-OCT data viewing are presented, and include co-registration of AO-OCT volumes with fundus photography and stitching of multiple AO-OCT sub-volumes to create a large field of view (FOV) high-resolution volume. Additionally, we explored the utility of Interactive Science Publishing by linking all presented AO-OCT datasets with the OSA ISP software.

  18. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  19. Scanning laser optical computed tomography system for large volume 3D dosimetry

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2017-04-01

    Stray light causes artifacts in optical computed tomography (CT) that negatively affect the accuracy of radiation dosimetry in gels or solids. Scatter effects are exacerbated by a large dosimeter volume, which is desirable for direct verification of modern radiotherapy treatment plans such as multiple-isocenter radiosurgery. The goal in this study was to design and characterize an optical CT system that achieves high accuracy primary transmission measurements through effective stray light rejection, while maintaining sufficient scan speed for practical application. We present an optical imaging platform that uses a galvanometer mirror for horizontal scanning, and a translation stage for vertical movement of a laser beam and small area detector for minimal stray light production and acceptance. This is coupled with a custom lens-shaped optical CT aquarium for parallel ray sampling of projections. The scanner images 15 cm diameter, 12 cm height cylindrical volumes at 0.33 mm resolution in approximately 30 min. Attenuation coefficients reconstructed from CT scans agreed with independent cuvette measurements within 2% for both absorbing and scattering solutions as well as small 1.25 cm diameter absorbing phantoms placed within a large, scattering medium that mimics gel. Excellent linearity between the optical CT scanner and the independent measurement was observed for solutions with between 90% and 2% transmission. These results indicate that the scanner should achieve highly accurate dosimetry of large volume dosimeters in a reasonable timeframe for clinical application to radiotherapy dose verification procedures.

  20. Scanning laser optical computed tomography system for large volume 3D dosimetry.

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2017-04-07

    Stray light causes artifacts in optical computed tomography (CT) that negatively affect the accuracy of radiation dosimetry in gels or solids. Scatter effects are exacerbated by a large dosimeter volume, which is desirable for direct verification of modern radiotherapy treatment plans such as multiple-isocenter radiosurgery. The goal in this study was to design and characterize an optical CT system that achieves high accuracy primary transmission measurements through effective stray light rejection, while maintaining sufficient scan speed for practical application. We present an optical imaging platform that uses a galvanometer mirror for horizontal scanning, and a translation stage for vertical movement of a laser beam and small area detector for minimal stray light production and acceptance. This is coupled with a custom lens-shaped optical CT aquarium for parallel ray sampling of projections. The scanner images 15 cm diameter, 12 cm height cylindrical volumes at 0.33 mm resolution in approximately 30 min. Attenuation coefficients reconstructed from CT scans agreed with independent cuvette measurements within 2% for both absorbing and scattering solutions as well as small 1.25 cm diameter absorbing phantoms placed within a large, scattering medium that mimics gel. Excellent linearity between the optical CT scanner and the independent measurement was observed for solutions with between 90% and 2% transmission. These results indicate that the scanner should achieve highly accurate dosimetry of large volume dosimeters in a reasonable timeframe for clinical application to radiotherapy dose verification procedures.

  1. Light amplification by stimulated emission from an optically pumped molecular junction in a scanning tunneling microscope

    Braun, K; Wang, X; Adler, H; Peisert, H; Chasse, T; Zhang, D; Meixner, A J

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce and experimentally demonstrate optical amplification and stimulated emission from a single optically pumped molecular tunneling junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. The gap between a sharp gold tip and a flat gold substrate covered with a self-assembled monolayer of 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole molecules forms an extremely small optical gain medium. When electrons tunnel from the molecules highest occupied molecular orbital to the tip, holes are left behind. These can be repopulated by hot electrons induced by the laser-driven plasmon oscillation on the metal surfaces enclosing the cavity. Solving the laser-rate equations for this system shows that the repopulation process can be efficiently stimulated by the gap modes near field, TERS scattering from neighboring molecules acting as an optical seed. Our results demonstrate how optical enhancement inside the plasmonic cavity can be further increased by a stronger localization via tunneling through molecules. We anticipate that st...

  2. Accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system in the process of making ceramic inlays

    Trifković Branka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. One of the results of many years of Cerec® 3D CAD/CAM system technological development is implementation of one intraoral and two extraoral optical scanning methods which, depending on the current indications, are applied in making fixed restorations. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of precision of optical scanning methods by the use of the Cerec®3D CAD/CAM system in the process of making ceramic inlays. Methods. The study was conducted in three experimental groups of inlays prepared using the procedure of three methods of scanning Cerec ®3D system. Ceramic inlays made by conventional methodology were the control group. The accuracy of optical scanning methods of the Cerec®3D system computer aided designcomputer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM was indirectly examined by measuring a marginal gap size between inlays and demarcation preparation by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results. The results of the study showed a difference in the accuracy of the existing methods of scanning dental CAD/CAM systems. The highest level of accuracy was achieved by the extraoral optical superficial scanning technique. The value of marginal gap size inlays made with the technique of extraoral optical superficial scanning was 32.97 ± 13.17 μ. Techniques of intraoral optical superficial and extraoral point laser scanning showed a lower level of accuracy (40.29 ± 21.46 μ for inlays of intraoral optical superficial scanning and 99.67 ± 37.25 μ for inlays of extraoral point laser scanning. Conclusion. Optical scanning methods in dental CAM/CAM technologies are precise methods of digitizing the spatial models; application of extraoral optical scanning methods provides the hightest precision.

  3. Graphite/Cyanate Ester Face Sheets for Adaptive Optics

    Bennett, Harold; Shaffer, Joseph; Romeo, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that thin face sheets of wide-aperture deformable mirrors in adaptive-optics systems be made from a composite material consisting of cyanate ester filled with graphite. This composite material appears to offer an attractive alternative to low-thermal-expansion glasses that are used in some conventional optics and have been considered for adaptive-optics face sheets. Adaptive-optics face sheets are required to have maximum linear dimensions of the order of meters or even tens of meters for some astronomical applications. If the face sheets were to be made from low-thermal-expansion glasses, then they would also be required to have thicknesses of the order of a millimeter so as to obtain the optimum compromise between the stiffness needed for support and the flexibility needed to enable deformation to controlled shapes by use of actuators. It is difficult to make large glass sheets having thicknesses less than 3 mm, and 3-mm-thick glass sheets are too stiff to be deformable to the shapes typically required for correction of wavefronts of light that has traversed the terrestrial atmosphere. Moreover, the primary commercially produced candidate low-thermal-expansion glass is easily fractured when in the form of thin face sheets. Graphite-filled cyanate ester has relevant properties similar to those of the low-expansion glasses. These properties include a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the order of a hundredth of the CTEs of other typical mirror materials. The Young s modulus (which quantifies stiffness in tension and compression) of graphite-filled cyanate ester is also similar to the Young's moduli of low-thermal-expansion glasses. However, the fracture toughness of graphite-filled cyanate ester is much greater than that of the primary candidate low-thermal-expansion glass. Therefore, graphite-filled cyanate ester could be made into nearly unbreakable face sheets, having maximum linear dimensions greater than a meter and thicknesses of

  4. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz.

  5. Adapting smartphones for low-cost optical medical imaging

    Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José D.; Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Blanco, Kate; Inada, Natalia M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Optical images have been used in several medical situations to improve diagnosis of lesions or to monitor treatments. However, most systems employ expensive scientific (CCD or CMOS) cameras and need computers to display and save the images, usually resulting in a high final cost for the system. Additionally, this sort of apparatus operation usually becomes more complex, requiring more and more specialized technical knowledge from the operator. Currently, the number of people using smartphone-like devices with built-in high quality cameras is increasing, which might allow using such devices as an efficient, lower cost, portable imaging system for medical applications. Thus, we aim to develop methods of adaptation of those devices to optical medical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence. Particularly, smartphones covers were adapted to connect a smartphone-like device to widefield fluorescence imaging systems. These systems were used to detect lesions in different tissues, such as cervix and mouth/throat mucosa, and to monitor ALA-induced protoporphyrin-IX formation for photodynamic treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. This approach may contribute significantly to low-cost, portable and simple clinical optical imaging collection.

  6. Miniaturized magnetic-driven scanning probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography.

    Pang, Ziwei; Wu, Jigang

    2015-06-01

    We designed and implemented a magnetic-driven scanning (MDS) probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). The probe uses an externally-driven tiny magnet in the distal end to achieve unobstructed 360-degree circumferential scanning at the side of the probe. The design simplifies the scanning part inside the probe and thus allows for easy miniaturization and cost reduction. We made a prototype probe with an outer diameter of 1.4 mm and demonstrated its capability by acquiring OCT images of ex vivo trachea and artery samples from a pigeon. We used a spectrometer-based Fourier-domain OCT system and the system sensitivity with our prototype probe was measured to be 91 dB with an illumination power of 850 μW and A-scan exposure time of 1 ms. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are 6.5 μm and 8.1 μm, respectively.

  7. GPR Signal Processing with Geography Adaptive Scanning using Vector Radar for Antipersonal Landmine Detection

    Shinsuke Sato

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR is a promising sensor for landmine detection, however there are two major problems to overcome. One is the rough ground surface. The other problem is the distance between the antennas of GPR. It remains irremovable clutters on a sub-surface image output from GPR by first problem. Geography adaptive scanning is useful to image objects beneath rough ground surface. Second problem makes larger the nonlinearity of the relationship between the time for propagation and the depth of a buried object, imaging the small objects such as an antipersonnel landmine closer to the antennas. In this paper, we modify Kirchhoff migration so as to account for not only the variation of position of the sensor head, but also the antennas alignment of the vector radar. The validity of this method is discussed through application to the signals acquired in experiments.

  8. Optical scanning holography based on compressive sensing using a digital micro-mirror device

    A-qian, Sun; Ding-fu, Zhou; Sheng, Yuan; You-jun, Hu; Peng, Zhang; Jian-ming, Yue; xin, Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Optical scanning holography (OSH) is a distinct digital holography technique, which uses a single two-dimensional (2D) scanning process to record the hologram of a three-dimensional (3D) object. Usually, these 2D scanning processes are in the form of mechanical scanning, and the quality of recorded hologram may be affected due to the limitation of mechanical scanning accuracy and unavoidable vibration of stepper motor's start-stop. In this paper, we propose a new framework, which replaces the 2D mechanical scanning mirrors with a Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) to modulate the scanning light field, and we call it OSH based on Compressive Sensing (CS) using a digital micro-mirror device (CS-OSH). CS-OSH can reconstruct the hologram of an object through the use of compressive sensing theory, and then restore the image of object itself. Numerical simulation results confirm this new type OSH can get a reconstructed image with favorable visual quality even under the condition of a low sample rate.

  9. Design and construction of a fine drive system for scanning optical elements

    Golnabi, H.; Jafari, R.

    2008-09-01

    The design and operation of a simple mechanical drive system, which is able to perform a fine course of angular motion, are reported. The system consists of a lead screw, a drive nut, sine bar legs, and an output shaft that can scan the optical holder mount. With a stepper motor coupled to the lead screw and interfaced to a PC, it is possible to control the scanning operation. When a 800 step/turn motor is used, it is possible to have an angular resolution of about 0.5 mdegree for a dynamic range of about 23°. The reproducibility of the results is about 0.22% for the scan angle and the hysteresis effect of the system is in the range of 1.71%. For a total scan of 51,200 steps, a scan angle of about 23.3° is acheived. The fitted line to the experimental results shows that scan angle changes linearly with the scan length. With good precision in system construction and careful alignment, the overall nonlinearity can be less than 1%.

  10. Novel spectral range expansion method for liquid crystal adaptive optics.

    Mu, Quanquan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Hu, Lifa; Liu, Yonggang; Peng, Zenghui; Xuan, Li

    2010-10-11

    Energy loss is a main problem of liquid crystal adaptive optics systems (LC AOSs). It is caused by the polarization dependence and narrow spectral range. The polarization dependence has been avoided by Love and Mu et al. [Appl. Opt. 32, 2222 (1993); Appl. Opt. 47, 4297 (2008)]. In this paper, a novel method was proposed to extend the spectral range of LC AOSs using multiple liquid crystal wavefront correctors (LCWFCs) to improve the energy utilization. Firstly, the chromatism of an LCWFC was measured and analyzed. The calculated results indicate that one LCWFC is only suitable to perform adaptive correction for a narrow waveband; therefore, multiple LCWFCs must be used to achieve a broadband correction. Secondly, based on open-loop control, a novel optical layout consisting of three LCWFCs was proposed to extend the spectral range of LC AOSs and thus achieve correction in the whole waveband of 520-810 nm. Thirdly, a broadband correction experiment was conducted and near diffraction-limited resolution was achieved in the waveband of 520-690 nm. Finally, a 500 m horizontal turbulence correction experiment was performed in the waveband of 520-690 nm. With adaptive correction, the resolution of the optical system was improved significantly and the image of the single fiber was clearly resolved. Furthermore, compared with a sub-waveband system, the system energy was improved. The energy of the whole waveband is equal to the sum of all the sub-wavebands. The experiment results validated our method and indicate that the chromatism in a broad waveband of LC AOSs can be eliminated. And then, the system energy can be improved greatly using the novel method.

  11. Aberrations and adaptive optics in super-resolution microscopy.

    Booth, Martin; Andrade, Débora; Burke, Daniel; Patton, Brian; Zurauskas, Mantas

    2015-08-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in the biological investigation of cellular structures and dynamic processes, fluorescence microscopy has undergone extraordinary developments in the past decades. The advent of super-resolution techniques has enabled fluorescence microscopy - or rather nanoscopy - to achieve nanoscale resolution in living specimens and unravelled the interior of cells with unprecedented detail. The methods employed in this expanding field of microscopy, however, are especially prone to the detrimental effects of optical aberrations. In this review, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy techniques based upon single-molecule switching, stimulated emission depletion and structured illumination each suffer from aberrations in different ways that are dependent upon intrinsic technical aspects. We discuss the use of adaptive optics as an effective means to overcome this problem.

  12. Supernovae and extragalactic astronomy with laser guide star adaptive optics

    Ryder, Stuart D; Kankare, Erkki; Vaisanen, Petri

    2014-01-01

    Using the latest generation of adaptive optics imaging systems together with laser guide stars on 8m-class telescopes, we are finally revealing the previously-hidden population of supernovae in starburst galaxies. Finding these supernovae and measuring the amount of absorption due to dust is crucial to being able to accurately trace the star formation history of our Universe. Our images of the host galaxies are amongst the sharpest ever obtained from the ground, and reveal much about how and why these galaxies are forming massive stars (that become supernovae) at such a prodigious rate.

  13. Self-characterization of linear and nonlinear adaptive optics systems

    Hampton, Peter J.; Conan, Rodolphe; Keskin, Onur; Bradley, Colin; Agathoklis, Pan

    2008-01-01

    We present methods used to determine the linear or nonlinear static response and the linear dynamic response of an adaptive optics (AO) system. This AO system consists of a nonlinear microelectromechanical systems deformable mirror (DM), a linear tip-tilt mirror (TTM), a control computer, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The system is modeled using a single-input-single-output structure to determine the one-dimensional transfer function of the dynamic response of the chain of system hardware. An AO system has been shown to be able to characterize its own response without additional instrumentation. Experimentally determined models are given for a TTM and a DM.

  14. High Resolution Observations using Adaptive Optics: Achievements and Future Needs

    K. Sankarasubramanian; T. Rimmele

    2008-03-01

    Over the last few years, several interesting observations were obtained with the help of solar Adaptive Optics (AO). In this paper, few observations made using the solarAOare enlightened and briefly discussed. A list of disadvantages with the current AO system are presented. With telescopes larger than 1.5 m expected during the next decade, there is a need to develop the existing AO technologies for large aperture telescopes. Some aspects of this development are highlighted. Finally, the recent AO developments in India are also presented.

  15. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/software/baypass/.

  16. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  17. Harnessing Adaptive Optics for Space Debris Collision Mitigation

    Zovaro, A.; Bennet, F.; Copeland, M.; Rigaut, F.; d'Orgeville, C.; Grosse, D.

    2016-09-01

    Human kind's continued use of space depends upon minimising the build-up of debris in low Earth-orbit (LEO). Preventing collisions between satellites and debris is essential given that a single collision can generate thousands of new debris objects. However, in-orbit manoeuvring of satellites is extremely expensive and shortens their operational life. Adjusting the orbits of debris objects instead of satellites would shift the responsibility of collision avoidance away from satellite operators altogether, thereby offering a superior solution. The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Australian National University, partnered with Electro Optic Systems (EOS) Space Systems, Lockheed Martin Corporation and the Space Environment Research Centre (SERC) Limited, are developing the Adaptive Optics Tracking and Pushing (AOTP) system. AOTP will be used to perturb the orbits of debris objects using photon pressure from a 10 kW IR laser beam launched from the 1.8 m telescope at Mount. Stromlo Observatory, Australia. Initial simulations predict that AOTP will be able to displace debris objects 10 cm in size by up to 100 m with several overhead passes. An operational demonstrator is planned for 2019. Turbulence will distort the laser beam as it propagates through the atmosphere, resulting in a lower photon flux on the target and reduced pointing accuracy. To mitigate these effects, adaptive optics (AO) will be used to apply wavefront correction to the beam prior to launch. A unique challenge in designing the AO system arises from the high slew rate needed to track objects in LEO, which in turn requires laser guide star AO for satisfactory wavefront correction. The optical design and results from simulations of estimated performance of AOTP will be presented. In particular, design considerations associated with the high-power laser will be detailed.

  18. Factors Affecting Cirrus-HD OCT Optic Disc Scan Quality: A Review with Case Examples

    Joshua S. Hardin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral-domain OCT is an established tool to assist clinicians in detecting glaucoma and monitor disease progression. The widespread use of this imaging modality is due, at least in part, to continuous hardware and software advancements. However, recent evidence indicates that OCT scan artifacts are frequently encountered in clinical practice. Poor image quality invariably challenges the interpretation of test results, with potential implications for the care of glaucoma patients. Therefore, adequate knowledge of various imaging artifacts is necessary. In this work, we describe several factors affecting Cirrus HD-OCT optic disc scan quality and their effects on measurement variability.

  19. Imaging of apoptotic HeLa cells by using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    2002-01-01

    By using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), HeLa cells in apoptosis process are imaged with a higher optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Since SNOM provides both topographic and transmitted light intensity information of a cell, it can correlate the structural characteristics and optical properties with the spatial position of the apoptotic cells. Wavelength imaging by using near-field spectroscopy shows that there is a great difference in light propagation and absorption in the cell. This unique technique can be applied to the super high resolution imaging of different components in the cell. The observations by near-field optical imaging and near-field spectroscopy indicate an inhomogeneous aggregation of the inner structure in the apoptotic HeLa cells and the change of transmission intensity of light with the apoptosis status.

  20. Comparasion of Optic Nerve Head with Stereophotometric and Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopic Imaging

    Serek Tekin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare theevaluation results of two experienced clinicians about examination of optic discs in glaucoma patients and healthy inidividuals by stereophotometry and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Material and Method: We studied 116 individuals (217 eyes who were divided as normal, glaucoma and suspected glaucoma in numbers of 54, 42 and 20 respectively. Stereophotometric photographs of optic disc were examined with fundus camera (Zeiss, FF 450 plus. Optic disc was also evaluated with HRT-3 in the same visit. Two experienced clinicians evaluated the cup/disc ratios and whether the optic discs were glaucomatous or not. Evaluation results were analysed and compared with HRT-3 examinations. Results:There were no significant age and gende rdifferences between the groups(p>0.05.Stereophotographic C/D ratio correlations between the clinicians were 0.79 (p

  1. Bow-tie optical antenna probes for single-emitter scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Farahani, Javad N [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Eisler, Hans-Juergen [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Pohl, Dieter W [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Pavius, Michael [Center of MicroNanoTechnology (CMI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Flueckiger, Philippe [Center of MicroNanoTechnology (CMI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gasser, Philippe [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Electronics/Metrology Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hecht, Bert [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-03-28

    A method for the fabrication of bow-tie optical antennas at the apex of pyramidal Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} atomic force microscopy tips is described. We demonstrate that these novel optical probes are capable of sub-wavelength imaging of single quantum dots at room temperature. The enhanced and confined optical near-field at the antenna feed gap leads to locally enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of single quantum dots. Photoluminescence quenching due to the proximity of metal is found to be insignificant. The method holds promise for single quantum emitter imaging and spectroscopy at spatial resolution limited by the engineered antenna gap width exclusively.

  2. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor.

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-27

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller's software identifies the geometric shape's center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user's range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  3. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability. PMID:28134824

  4. Overview of deformable mirror technologies for adaptive optics and astronomy

    Madec, P.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    From the ardent bucklers used during the Syracuse battle to set fire to Romans’ ships to more contemporary piezoelectric deformable mirrors widely used in astronomy, from very large voice coil deformable mirrors considered in future Extremely Large Telescopes to very small and compact ones embedded in Multi Object Adaptive Optics systems, this paper aims at giving an overview of Deformable Mirror technology for Adaptive Optics and Astronomy. First the main drivers for the design of Deformable Mirrors are recalled, not only related to atmospheric aberration compensation but also to environmental conditions or mechanical constraints. Then the different technologies available today for the manufacturing of Deformable Mirrors will be described, pros and cons analyzed. A review of the Companies and Institutes with capabilities in delivering Deformable Mirrors to astronomers will be presented, as well as lessons learned from the past 25 years of technological development and operation on sky. In conclusion, perspective will be tentatively drawn for what regards the future of Deformable Mirror technology for Astronomy.

  5. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Niels Buchhold

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD. The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels, the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force. This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  6. AVES: an adaptive optics visual echelle spectrograph for the VLT

    Pasquini, Luca; Delabre, Bernard; Avila, Gerardo; Bonaccini, Domenico

    1998-07-01

    We present the preliminary study of a low cost, high performance spectrograph for the VLT, for observations in the V, R and I bands. This spectrograph is meant for intermediate (R equals 16,000) resolution spectroscopy of faint (sky and/or detector limited) sources, with particular emphasis on the study of solar-type (F-G) stars belonging to the nearest galaxies and to distant (or highly reddened) galactic clusters. The spectrograph is designed to use the adaptive optics (AO) systems at the VLT Telescope. Even if these AO systems will not provide diffraction limited images in the V, R and I bands, the photon concentration will still be above approximately 60% of the flux in an 0.3 arcsecond aperture for typical Paranal conditions. This makes the construction of a compact, cheap and efficient echelle spectrograph possible. AVES will outperform comparable non adaptive optic instruments by more than one magnitude for sky- and/or detector-limited observations, and it will be very suitable for observations in crowded fields.

  7. Photometric Calibration of the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager

    Stevenson, Sarah Anne; Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) is an instrument available on the Gemini South telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile, utilizing the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). In order to allow users to easily perform photometry with this instrument and to monitor any changes in the instrument in the future, we seek to set up a process for performing photometric calibration with standard star observations taken across the time of the instrument’s operation. We construct a Python-based pipeline that includes IRAF wrappers for reduction and combines the AstroPy photutils package and original Python scripts with the IRAF apphot and photcal packages to carry out photometry and linear regression fitting. Using the pipeline, we examine standard star observations made with GSAOI on 68 nights between 2013 and 2015 in order to determine the nightly photometric zero points in the J, H, Kshort, and K bands. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, processed using the Gemini IRAF and gemini_python packages, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  8. Adaptive optics sky coverage modeling for extremely large telescopes.

    Clare, Richard M; Ellerbroek, Brent L; Herriot, Glen; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2006-12-10

    A Monte Carlo sky coverage model for laser guide star adaptive optics systems was proposed by Clare and Ellerbroek [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 418 (2006)]. We refine the model to include (i) natural guide star (NGS) statistics using published star count models, (ii) noise on the NGS measurements, (iii) the effect of telescope wind shake, (iv) a model for how the Strehl and hence NGS wavefront sensor measurement noise varies across the field, (v) the focus error due to imperfectly tracking the range to the sodium layer, (vi) the mechanical bandwidths of the tip-tilt (TT) stage and deformable mirror actuators, and (vii) temporal filtering of the NGS measurements to balance errors due to noise and servo lag. From this model, we are able to generate a TT error budget for the Thirty Meter Telescope facility narrow-field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS) and perform several design trade studies. With the current NFIRAOS design, the median TT error at the galactic pole with median seeing is calculated to be 65 nm or 1.8 mas rms.

  9. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  10. Adaptive Optics and Lucky Imager (AOLI): presentation and first light

    Velasco, S; Mackay, C; Oscoz, A; King, D L; Crass, J; Díaz-Sánchez, A; Femenía, B; González-Escalera, V; Labadie, L; López, R L; Garrido, A Pérez; Puga, M; Rodríguez-Ramos, L F; Zuther, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI), a state-of-the-art instrument which makes use of two well proved techniques for extremely high spatial resolution with ground-based telescopes: Lucky Imaging (LI) and Adaptive Optics (AO). AOLI comprises an AO system, including a low order non-linear curvature wavefront sensor together with a 241 actuators deformable mirror, a science array of four 1024x1024 EMCCDs, allowing a 120x120 down to 36x36 arcseconds field of view, a calibration subsystem and a powerful LI software. Thanks to the revolutionary WFS, AOLI shall have the capability of using faint reference stars ({\\it I\\/} $\\sim$ 16.5-17.5), enabling it to be used over a much wider part of the sky than with common Shack-Hartmann AO systems. This instrument saw first light in September 2013 at William Herschel Telescope. Although the instrument was not complete, these commissioning demonstrated its feasibility, obtaining a FWHM for the best PSF of 0.151$\\pm$0.005 arcsec and a plate scale o...

  11. Multimodal adaptive optics for depth-enhanced high-resolution ophthalmic imaging

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Lue, Niyom; Ferguson, R. Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The development represents the first ever high performance AO system constructed that combines AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 μm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. The system is designed to operate on a broad clinical population with a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration that allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction. The system also includes a wide field line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation; an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of rotational eye motion; and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation to the subject of stimuli and other visual cues. The system was tested in a limited number of human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. The system was able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within ~0.5 deg (~100-150 μm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve targets deep into the choroid. In addition to instrument hardware development, analysis algorithms were developed for efficient information extraction from clinical imaging sessions, with functionality including automated image registration, photoreceptor counting, strip and montage stitching, and segmentation. The system provides clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help

  12. Calibration-free B-scan images produced by master/slave optical coherence tomography

    Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian G.H.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a novel method to produce B-scan images in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The method proceeds in two steps. In the first step, using a mirror in the sample arm of the interferometer, channeled spectra are acquired for different values of the optical path difference (OPD) and stored as masks. In the second step, the mirror is replaced with an object and the captured channelled spectrum is correlated with each mask, providing the interference strength from t...

  13. Optical characterization of individual semiconductor nanostructures using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Tsuruoka, Tohru; Ushioda, Sukekatsu

    2004-01-01

    By injecting low-energy minority carriers from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and analyzing the light emitted from the tip-sample gap of the STM, it is possible to study the optical and electronic properties of individual semiconductor nanostructures with an extremely high spatial resolution close to the atomic scale. This technique has been applied to investigate the transport properties of hot electrons injected into AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well structures and the optical properties of single self-assembled InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots. The physical principles, usefulness and future expectations of this novel technique are discussed.

  14. Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Route to Femtosecond Ångstrom Technology

    Yamashita, Mikio; Morita, Ryuji

    2005-01-01

    "Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy" deals with both the ultrashort laser-pulse technology in the few- to mono-cycle region and the laser-surface-controlled scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) extending into the spatiotemporal extreme technology. The former covers the theory of nonlinear pulse propagation beyond the slowly-varing-envelope approximation, the generation and active chirp compensation of ultrabroadband optical pulses, the amplitude and phase characterization of few- to mono-cycle pulses, and the feedback field control for the mono-cycle-like pulse generation. In addition, the wavelength-multiplex shaping of ultrabroadband pulse is described. The latter covers the CW-laser-excitation STM, the femtosecond-time-resolved STM and atomic-level surface phenomena controlled by femtosecond pulses.

  15. Resolution of Internal Total Reflection Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy

    GE Huayong; GUO Qizhi; TAN Weihan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the probe-sample interaction equation based on Mie′s scattering theory is derived, and the resolution of scanning near field optical microscopy is calculated numerically. The results show that the offset of far-field component to near-field component in total field plays an important role in the resolution and the size of samples also has influence on resolution.

  16. Fiber-optic raster scanning two-photon endomicroscope using a tubular piezoelectric actuator

    Do, Dukho; Yoo, Hongki; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2014-06-01

    A nonresonant, fiber-optic raster scanning endomicroscope was developed using a quarter-tubular piezoelectric (PZT) actuator. A fiber lever mechanism was utilized to enhance the small actuation range of the tubular PZT actuator and to increase its field-of-view. Finite element method simulation of the endoscopic probe was conducted for various conditions to maximize its scanning range. After fabricating the probe using a double clad fiber, we obtained two-photon fluorescence images using raster beam scanning of the fiber. The outer diameter of the probe was 3.5 mm and its rigid distal length was 30 mm including a high numerical aperture gradient index lens. These features are sufficient for input into the instrumental channel of a commercial colonoscope or gastroscope to obtain high resolution images in vivo.

  17. Development of scanning laser sensor for underwater 3D imaging with the coaxial optics

    Ochimizu, Hideaki; Imaki, Masaharu; Kameyama, Shumpei; Saito, Takashi; Ishibashi, Shoujirou; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed the scanning laser sensor for underwater 3-D imaging which has the wide scanning angle of 120º (Horizontal) x 30º (Vertical) with the compact size of 25 cm diameter and 60 cm long. Our system has a dome lens and a coaxial optics to realize both the wide scanning angle and the compactness. The system also has the feature in the sensitivity time control (STC) circuit, in which the receiving gain is increased according to the time of flight. The STC circuit contributes to detect a small signal by suppressing the unwanted signals backscattered by marine snows. We demonstrated the system performance in the pool, and confirmed the 3-D imaging with the distance of 20 m. Furthermore, the system was mounted on the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and demonstrated the seafloor mapping at the depth of 100 m in the ocean.

  18. Adaptive distributed Kalman filtering with wind estimation for astronomical adaptive optics.

    Massioni, Paolo; Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of adaptive optics (AO) for astronomy, it is a common assumption to consider the atmospheric turbulent layers as "frozen flows" sliding according to the wind velocity profile. For this reason, having knowledge of such a velocity profile is beneficial in terms of AO control system performance. In this paper we show that it is possible to exploit the phase estimate from a Kalman filter running on an AO system in order to estimate wind velocity. This allows the update of the Kalman filter itself with such knowledge, making it adaptive. We have implemented such an adaptive controller based on the distributed version of the Kalman filter, for a realistic simulation of a multi-conjugate AO system with laser guide stars on a 30 m telescope. Simulation results show that this approach is effective and promising and the additional computational cost with respect to the distributed filter is negligible. Comparisons with a previously published slope detection and ranging wind profiler are made and the impact of turbulence profile quantization is assessed. One of the main findings of the paper is that all flavors of the adaptive distributed Kalman filter are impacted more significantly by turbulence profile quantization than the static minimum mean square estimator which does not incorporate wind profile information.

  19. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Special Session on Adaptive Optics in Russia and China. Volume 23

    1995-01-01

    OOpm MA4 - Adaptive optics system for the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Lunch on your own Roberto Ragazzoni, Astronomical Observatory of Padova, Italy...adaptive optics testing, Enrico dislocations in the reference beam. (p. 88) Marchetti, Roberto Ragazzoni, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Italy. TuA24 o...whatever data is available will be presented. 10 / MA4-1 The Adaptive Optics system for the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) R. Ragazzonii, D

  1. Postural adaptations to repeated optic flow stimulation in older adults.

    O'Connor, Kathryn W; Loughlin, Patrick J; Redfern, Mark S; Sparto, Patrick J

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the processes of adaptation (changes in within-trial postural responses) and habituation (reductions in between-trial postural responses) to visual cues in older and young adults. Of particular interest were responses to sudden increases in optic flow magnitude. The postural sway of 25 healthy young adults and 24 healthy older adults was measured while subjects viewed anterior-posterior 0.4 Hz sinusoidal optic flow for 45 s. Three trials for each of three conditions were performed: (1) constant 12 cm optic flow amplitude (24 cm peak-to-peak), (2) constant 4 cm amplitude (8 cm p-t-p), and (3) a transition in amplitude from 4 to 12 cm. The average power of head sway velocity (P(vel)) was calculated for consecutive 5s intervals during the trial to examine the changes in sway within and between trials. A mixed factor repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effects of subject Group, Trial, and Interval on the P(vel). P(vel) was greater in older adults in all conditions (phabituation. P(vel) of the older adults decreased significantly between all 3 trials, but decreased only between Trials 1 and 2 in young adults. While the responses of the young adults to the transition in optic flow from 4 to 12 cm did not significantly change, older adults had an increase in P(vel) following the transition, ranging from 6.5 dB for the first trial to 3.4 dB for the third trial. These results show that older adults can habituate to repeated visual perturbation exposures; however, this habituation requires a greater number of exposures than young adults. This suggests aging impacts the ability to quickly modify the relative weighting of the sensory feedback for postural stabilization.

  2. Imaging of InGaN inhomogeneities using visible aperturelessnear-field scanning optical microscope

    Stebounova, Larissa V.; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Chen, Dongxue; Leone, Stephen R.

    2007-06-14

    The optical properties of epitaxially grown islands of InGaN are investigated with nanometer-scale spatial resolution using visible apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy. Scattered light from the tip-sample system is modulated by cantilever oscillations and detected at the third harmonic of the oscillation frequency to distinguish the near-field signal from unwanted scattered background light. Scattered near-field measurements indicate that the as-grown InGaN islanded film may exhibit both inhomogeneous In composition and strain-induced changes that affect the optical signal at 633 nm and 532 nm. Changes are observed in the optical contrast for large 3D InGaN islands (100's of nm) of the same height. Near-field optical mapping of small grains on a finer scale reveals InGaN composition or strain-induced irregularities in features with heights of only 2 nm, which exhibit different near-field signals at 633 nm and 532 nm incident wavelengths. Optical signal contrast from topographic features as small as 30 nm is detected.

  3. Three-dimensional microscope vision system based on micro laser line scanning and adaptive genetic algorithms

    Apolinar, J.; Rodríguez, Muñoz

    2017-02-01

    A microscope vision system to retrieve small metallic surface via micro laser line scanning and genetic algorithms is presented. In this technique, a 36 μm laser line is projected on the metallic surface through a laser diode head, which is placed to a small distance away from the target. The micro laser line is captured by a CCD camera, which is attached to the microscope. The surface topography is computed by triangulation by means of the line position and microscope vision parameters. The calibration of the microscope vision system is carried out by an adaptive genetic algorithm based on the line position. In this algorithm, an objective function is constructed from the microscope geometry to determine the microscope vision parameters. Also, the genetic algorithm provides the search space to calculate the microscope vision parameters with high accuracy in fast form. This procedure avoids errors produced by the missing of references and physical measurements, which are employed by the traditional microscope vision systems. The contribution of the proposed system is corroborated by an evaluation via accuracy and speed of the traditional microscope vision systems, which retrieve micro-scale surface topography.

  4. Efficacy of visual-scanning training and prism adaptation for neglect rehabilitation.

    Spaccavento, Simona; Cellamare, Fara; Cafforio, Elisabetta; Loverre, Anna; Craca, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral spatial neglect consists of the inability of a patient to respond, orient, and attend to stimuli on the left side of a space following a right-hemisphere lesion. Many rehabilitation approaches have been proposed to reduce neglect. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of visual-scanning training (VST) and prismatic adaptation (PA) on patients with neglect following a right-hemisphere lesion. Twenty patients with left neglect were enrolled in the study. Before and after training, a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of visuospatial abilities, evaluating personal, peripersonal, and extrapersonal neglect, was performed. After assessment, patients were alternately assigned to 1 of 2 groups, VST or PA. Both trainings consisted of 20 sessions, 1 per day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks. The results showed that both treatments improved patient neglect, especially in personal and peripersonal spaces. No difference between pretreatment and posttreatment was found in extrapersonal subscales. This finding could be due to the fact that there were no exercises requiring the use of objects within reach in either training. In conclusion, no difference between the 2 approaches was found, and both are useful rehabilitation techniques that appear to improve neglect.

  5. Binary stars observed with adaptive optics at the starfire optical range

    Drummond, Jack D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, RDSAM, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In reviewing observations taken of binary stars used as calibration objects for non-astronomical purposes with adaptive optics on the 3.5 m Starfire Optical Range telescope over the past 2 years, one-fifth of them were found to be off-orbit. In order to understand such a high number of discrepant position angles and separations, all previous observations in the Washington Double Star Catalog for these rogue binaries were obtained from the Naval Observatory. Adding our observations to these yields new orbits for all, resolving the discrepancies. We have detected both components of γ Gem for the first time, and we have shown that 7 Cam is an optical pair, not physically bound.

  6. A Tuning Fork with a Short Fibre Probe Sensor for a Near-FieldScanning Optical Microscope

    王沛; 鲁拥华; 章江英; 明海; 谢建平; 黄建文; 高宗圣; 蔡定平

    2002-01-01

    We report on a tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope. The method demonstrates how to fabricate the short fibre probe. This tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe can provide stable and high Q at the tapping frequency of the tuning fork, and can give high-quality near-field scanning optical microscope and atomic force microscope images of samples. We present the results of using the tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope performed on an eight-channel silica waveguide.

  7. Enhancing stellar spectroscopy with extreme adaptive optics and photonics

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Cvetojevic, Nick; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    Extreme adaptive optics systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of 90% in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a sp...

  8. Atmospheric refractivity effects on mid-infrared ELT adaptive optics

    Kendrew, S; Mathar, R J; Stuik, R; Hippler, S; Brandl, B

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the effect of atmospheric dispersion on the performance of a mid-infrared adaptive optics assisted instrument on an extremely large telescope (ELT). Dispersion and atmospheric chromaticity is generally considered to be negligible in this wavelength regime. It is shown here, however, that with the much-reduced diffraction limit size on an ELT and the need for diffraction-limited performance, refractivity phenomena should be carefully considered in the design and operation of such an instrument. We include an overview of the theory of refractivity, and the influence of infrared resonances caused by the presence of water vapour and other constituents in the atmosphere. `Traditional' atmospheric dispersion is likely to cause a loss of Strehl only at the shortest wavelengths (L-band). A more likely source of error is the difference in wavelengths at which the wavefront is sensed and corrected, leading to pointing offsets between wavefront sensor and science instrument that evolve with time over a long e...

  9. WISE An Adaptative Simulation of the LHC Optics

    Hagen, P; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Risselada, Thys; Sanfilippo, S; Todesco, E; Wildner, E

    2006-01-01

    The beam dynamics in LHC requires a tight control of the field quality and geometry of the magnets. As the production advances, decisions have to be made on the acceptance of possible imperfections. To ease decision making, an adaptative model of the LHC optics has been built, based on the information available on the day (e.g. magnetic measurements at warm or cold, magnet allocation to machine slots) as well as on statistical evaluations for the missing information (e.g. magnets yet to be built, measured, or for non-allocated slots). The uncertainties are included: relative and absolute measurement errors, warm-to-cold correlations for the fraction of magnets not measured at cold, hysteresis and power supply accuracy. The pre-processor WISE generates instances of the LHC field errors for the MAD-X program, with the possibility of selecting various sources. We present an application to estimate the expected beta-beating.

  10. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  11. Adaptive fiber optics collimator based on flexible hinges.

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Pengfei; Si, Lei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2014-08-20

    In this manuscript, we present a new design for an adaptive fiber optics collimator (AFOC) based on flexible hinges by using piezoelectric stacks actuators for X-Y displacement. Different from traditional AFOC, the new structure is based on flexible hinges to drive the fiber end cap instead of naked fiber. We fabricated a real AFOC based on flexible hinges, and the end cap's deviation and resonance frequency of the device were measured. Experimental results show that this new AFOC can provide fast control of tip-tilt deviation of the laser beam emitting from the end cap. As a result, the fiber end cap can support much higher power than naked fiber, which makes the new structure ideal for tip-tilt controlling in a high-power fiber laser system.

  12. Adaptive optics imaging of low and intermediate redshift quasars

    Márquez, I; Theodore, B; Bremer, M; Monnet, G; Beuzit, J L

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of adaptive-optics imaging in the H and K bands of 12 low and intermediate redshift (z15.0) themselves as reference for the correction, have typical spatial resolution of FWHM~0.3 arcsec before deconvolution. The deconvolved H-band image of PG1700+514 has a spatial resolution of 0.16 arcsec and reveals a wealth of details on the companion and the host-galaxy. Four out of the twelve quasars have close companions and obvious signs of interactions. The two-dimensional images of three of the host-galaxies unambiguously reveal bars and spiral arms. The morphology of the other objects are difficult to determine from one dimensional surface brightness profile and deeper images are needed. Analysis of mocked data shows that elliptical galaxies are always recognized as such, whereas disk hosts can be missed for small disk scale lengths and large QSO contributions.

  13. Chromatic effects of the atmosphere on astronomical adaptive optics.

    Devaney, Nicholas; Goncharov, Alexander V; Dainty, J Christopher

    2008-03-10

    The atmosphere introduces chromatic errors that may limit the performance of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large telescopes. Various aspects of this problem have been considered in the literature over the past two decades. It is necessary to revisit this problem in order to examine the effect on currently planned systems, including very high-order AO on current 8-10 m class telescopes and on future 30-42 m extremely large telescopes. We review the literature on chromatic effects and combine an analysis of all effects in one place. We examine implications for AO and point out some effects that should be taken into account in the design of future systems. In particular we show that attention should be paid to chromatic pupil shifts, which may arise in components such as atmospheric dispersion compensators.

  14. Performance of the Keck Observatory adaptive optics system

    van Dam, M A; Mignant, D L; Macintosh, B A

    2004-01-19

    In this paper, the adaptive optics (AO) system at the W.M. Keck Observatory is characterized. The authors calculate the error budget of the Keck AO system operating in natural guide star mode with a near infrared imaging camera. By modeling the control loops and recording residual centroids, the measurement noise and band-width errors are obtained. The error budget is consistent with the images obtained. Results of sky performance tests are presented: the AO system is shown to deliver images with average Strehl ratios of up to 0.37 at 1.58 {micro}m using a bright guide star and 0.19 for a magnitude 12 star.

  15. MICADO: the E-ELT Adaptive Optics Imaging Camera

    Davies, R

    2010-01-01

    MICADO is the adaptive optics imaging camera for the E-ELT. It has been designed and optimised to be mounted to the LGS-MCAO system MAORY, and will provide diffraction limited imaging over a wide (about 1 arcmin) field of view. For initial operations, it can also be used with its own simpler AO module that provides on-axis diffraction limited performance using natural guide stars. We discuss the instrument's key capabilities and expected performance, and show how the science drivers have shaped its design. We outline the technical concept, from the opto-mechanical design to operations and data processing. We describe the AO module, summarise the instrument performance, and indicate some possible future developments.

  16. Synthetic Modeling of Astronomical Closed Loop Adaptive Optics

    Jolissaint, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We present an analytical model of a single natural guide star astronomical adaptive optics system, in closed loop mode. The model is used to simulate the long exposure system point spread function, using the spatial frequency (or Fourier) approach, and complement an initial open loop model. Applications range from system design, science case analysis and AO data reduction. All the classical phase errors have been included: deformable mirror fitting error, wavefront sensor spatial aliasing, wavefront sensor noise, and the correlated anisoplanatic and servo-lag error. The model includes the deformable mirror spatial transfer function, and the actuator array geometry can be different from the wavefront sensor lenslet array geometry. We also include the dispersion between the sensing and the correction wavelengths. Illustrative examples are given at the end of the paper.

  17. High-redshift quasar host galaxies with adaptive optics

    Kuhlbrodt, B; Wisotzki, L; Jahnke, K

    2005-01-01

    We present K band adaptive optics observations of three high-redshift (z ~ 2.2) high-luminosity quasars, all of which were studied for the first time. We also bserved several point spread function (PSF) calibrators, non-simultaneously because of the small field of view. The significant temporal PSF variations on timescales of minutes inhibited a straightforward scaled PSF removal from the quasar images. Characterising the degree of PSF concentration by the radii encircling 20% and 80% of the total flux, respectively, we found that even under very different observing conditions the r20 vs. r80 relation varied coherently between individual short exposure images, delineating a well-defined relation for point sources. Placing the quasar images on this relation, we see indications that all three objects were resolved. We designed a procedure to estimate the significance of this result, and to estimate host galaxy parameters, by reproducing the statistical distribution of the individual short exposure images. We fi...

  18. Development of large aperture elements for active and adaptive optics

    Stranakova E.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-aperture elements for laser active and adaptive optics are investigated in collaboration within IOP AcSci CR, FEng CTU and 5M. A bimorph deformable mirror for high-power lasers based on a lightweight structure with a composite core is currently in development. In order to realize a sufficiently large working aperture we are using new technologies for production of core, bimorph actuator and DM reflector. Detailed simulation of components and structure is validated by measurement and testing. A research of DM actuation and response of a complicated mirror structure needed for an accurate control of a deformation is performed. Testing of samples and subscale measurements are currently performed, measurement of a complete structure is in preparation.

  19. `imaka - a ground-layer adaptive optics system on Maunakea

    Chun, Mark; Toomey, Douglas; Lu, Jessica; Service, Max; Baranec, Christoph; Thibault, Simon; Brousseau, Denis; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Santi, Shane; Kingery, Christopher; Loss, Keith; Gardiner, John; Steele, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We present the integration status for `imaka, the ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system on the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. This wide-field GLAO pathfinder system exploits Maunakea's highly confined ground layer and weak free-atmosphere to push the corrected field of view to ~1/3 of a degree, an areal field approaching an order of magnitude larger than any existing or planned GLAO system, with a FWHM ~ 0.33 arcseconds in the visible and near infrared. We discuss the unique design aspects of the instrument, the driving science cases and how they impact the system, and how we will demonstrate these cases on the sky.

  20. 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    Wittrock, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    This book treats the development and application of adaptive optics for industry and medicine. The contributions describe recently developed components for adaptive-optics systems such as deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, and mirror drivers as well as complete adaptive optical systems and their applications in industry and medicine. Applications range from laser-beam forming and adaptive aberration correction for high-power lasers to retinal imaging in ophthalmology. The contributions are based on presentations made at the 4th International Workshop on Adaptive Optics in Industry and Medicine which took place in Münster, Germany, in October 2003. This highly successful series of workshops on adaptive optics started in 1997 and continues with the 5th workshop in Beijing in 2005.

  1. Multi-modal adaptive optics system including fundus photography and optical coherence tomography for the clinical setting.

    Salas, Matthias; Drexler, Wolfgang; Levecq, Xavier; Lamory, Barbara; Ritter, Markus; Prager, Sonja; Hafner, Julia; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pircher, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We present a new compact multi-modal imaging prototype that combines an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera with AO-optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a single instrument. The prototype allows acquiring AO fundus images with a field of view of 4°x4° and with a frame rate of 10fps. The exposure time of a single image is 10 ms. The short exposure time results in nearly motion artifact-free high resolution images of the retina. The AO-OCT mode allows acquiring volumetric data of the retina at 200kHz A-scan rate with a transverse resolution of ~4 µm and an axial resolution of ~5 µm. OCT imaging is acquired within a field of view of 2°x2° located at the central part of the AO fundus image. Recording of OCT volume data takes 0.8 seconds. The performance of the new system is tested in healthy volunteers and patients with retinal diseases.

  2. ESO adaptive optics facility progress and first laboratory test results

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jérome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Haguenauer, Pierre; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gerhard; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Reyes Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Friedenauer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project is completing the integration of its systems at ESO Headquarters in Garching. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM has undergone a series of tests on ASSIST in 2013 which have validated its optical performance and launched the System Test Phase of the AOF. This has been followed by the performance evaluation of the GRAAL natural guide star mode on-axis and will continue in 2014 with its Ground Layer AO mode. The GALACSI module (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO) will then be tested. The AOF has also taken delivery of the second scientific thin shell mirror and the first 22 Watt Sodium laser Unit. We will report on the system tests status, the performances evaluated on the ASSIST bench and advancement of the 4Laser Guide Star Facility. We will also present the near future plans for commissioning on the telescope and some considerations on tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  3. A Bayesian regularized artificial neural network for adaptive optics forecasting

    Sun, Zhi; Chen, Ying; Li, Xinyang; Qin, Xiaolin; Wang, Huiyong

    2017-01-01

    Real-time adaptive optics is a technology for enhancing the resolution of ground-based optical telescopes and overcoming the disturbance of atmospheric turbulence. The performance of the system is limited by delay errors induced by the servo system and photoelectrons noise of wavefront sensor. In order to cut these delay errors, this paper proposes a novel model to forecast the future control voltages of the deformable mirror. The predictive model is constructed by a multi-layered back propagation network with Bayesian regularization (BRBP). For the purpose of parallel computation and less disturbance, we adopt a number of sub-BP neural networks to substitute the whole network. The Bayesian regularized network assigns a probability to the network weights, allowing the network to automatically and optimally penalize excessively complex models. The simulation results show that the BRBP introduces smaller mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square errors (MSE) than other typical algorithms. Meanwhile, real data analysis results show that the BRBP model has strong generalization capability and parallelism.

  4. The Inner Kiloparsec of Mrk 273 with Keck Adaptive Optics

    Vivian, U; Sanders, David; Max, Claire; Armus, Lee; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Evans, Aaron; Kewley, Lisa; Fazio, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    There is X-ray, optical, and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic evidence that the late-stage ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Mrk 273 hosts a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, the exact location of the AGN and the nature of the nuclei have been difficult to determine due to dust obscuration and the limited wavelength coverage of available high-resolution data. Here we present near-infrared integral-field spectra and images of the nuclear region of Mrk 273 taken with OSIRIS and NIRC2 on the Keck II Telescope with laser guide star adaptive optics. We observe three spatially resolved components, and analyze the local molecular and ionized gas emission lines and their kinematics. We confirm the presence of the hard X-ray AGN in the southwest nucleus. In the north nucleus, we find a strongly rotating gas disk whose kinematics indicate a central black hole of mass 1.04 +/- 0.1 x 10^9 Msun. The H2 emission line shows an increase in velocity dispersion along the minor axis in both directions, a...

  5. Near-field scanning optical microscopy in cell biology and cytogenetics.

    Hausmann, Michael; Perner, Birgit; Rapp, Alexander; Wollweber, Leo; Scherthan, Harry; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    2006-01-01

    Light microscopy has proven to be one of the most versatile analytical tools in cell biology and cytogenetics. The growing spectrum of scientific knowledge demands a continuous improvement of the optical resolution of the instruments. In far-field light microscopy, the attainable resolution is dictated by the limit of diffraction, which, in practice, is about 250 nm for high-numerical-aperture objective lenses. Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) was the first technique that has overcome this limit up to about one order of magnitude. Typically, the resolution range below 100 nm is accessed for biological applications. Using appropriately designed scanning probes allows for obtaining an extremely small near-field light excitation volume (some tens of nanometers in diameter). Because of the reduction of background illumination, high contrast imaging becomes feasible for light transmission and fluorescence microscopy. The height of the scanning probe is controlled by atomic force interactions between the specimen surface and the probe tip. The control signal can be used for the production of a topographic (nonoptical) image that can be acquired simultaneously. In this chapter, the principle of NSOM is described with respect to biological applications. A brief overview of some requirements in biology and applications described in the literature are given. Practical advice is focused on instruments with aperture-type illumination probes. Preparation protocols focussing on NSOM of cell surfaces and chromosomes are presented.

  6. Satellite Imaging with Adaptive Optics on a 1 M Telescope

    Bennet, F.; Price, I.; Rigaut, F.; Copeland, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, Australia, have been developing adaptive optic (AO) systems for space situational awareness applications. We report on the development and demonstration of an AO system for satellite imaging using a 1 m telescope. The system uses the orbiting object as a natural guide star to measure atmospheric turbulence, and a deformable mirror to provide an optical correction. The AO system utilised modern, high speed and low noise EMCCD technology on both the wavefront sensor and imaging camera to achieve high performance, achieving a Strehl ratio in excess of 30% at 870 nm. Images are post processed with lucky imaging algorithms to further improve the final image quality. We demonstrate the AO system on stellar targets and Iridium satellites, achieving a near diffraction limited full width at half maximum. A specialised realtime controller allows our system to achieve a bandwidth above 100 Hz, with the wavefront sensor and control loop running at 2 kHz. The AO systems we are developing show how ground-based optical sensors can be used to manage the space environment. AO imaging systems can be used for satellite surveillance, while laser ranging can be used to determine precise orbital data used in the critical conjunction analysis required to maintain a safe space environment. We have focused on making this system compact, expandable, and versatile. We are continuing to develop this platform for other space situational awareness applications such as geosynchronous satellite astrometry, space debris characterisation, satellite imaging, and ground-to-space laser communication.

  7. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of acid green 25 dye by Z-scan method

    Jeyaram, S.; Geethakrishnan, T.

    2017-03-01

    Third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of aqueous solutions of an anthraquinone dye (Acid green 25 dye, color index: 61570) have been studied by Z-scan method with a 5 mW continuous wave (CW) diode laser operating at 635 nm. The nonlinear refractive index (n2) and the absorption coefficient (β) have been evaluated respectively from the closed and open aperture Z-scan data and the values of these parameters are found to increase with increase in concentration of the dye solution. The negative sign of the observed nonlinear refractive index (n2) indicates that the aqueous solution of acid green 25 dye exhibits self-defocusing type optical nonlinearity. The mechanism of the observed nonlinear absorption (NLA) and nonlinear refraction (NLR) is attributed respectively to reverse saturable absorption (RSA) and thermal nonlinear effects. The magnitudes of n2 and β are found to be of the order of 10-7 cm2/W and 10-3 cm/W respectively. With these experimental results, the authors suggest that acid green 25 dye may have potential applications in nonlinear optics.

  8. Super-resolution imaging in optical scanning holography using structured illumination

    Ren, Zhenbo; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2016-10-01

    As a specific digital holographic microscopy system, optical scanning holography (OSH) is an appealing technique that makes use of the advantages of holography in the application of optical microscopy. In OSH system, a three-dimensional object is scanned with a Fresnel zone plate in a raster fashion, and the electrical signals are demodulated into a complex hologram by heterodyne detection. Then the recorded light wavefront information contained in the hologram allows one to digitally reconstruct the specimen for multiple purposes such as optical sectioning, extended focused imaging as well as three-dimensional imaging. According to Abbe criterion, however, akin to those conventional microscopic imaging systems, OSH suffers from limited resolving power due to the finite sizes of the objective lens and the aperture, i.e., low numerical aperture. To bypass the diffraction barrier in light microscopy, various super-resolution imaging techniques have been proposed. Among those methods, structured illumination is an ensemble imaging concept that modulates the spatial frequency by projecting additional well-defined patterns with different orientation and phase shift onto the specimen. Computational algorithms are then applied to remove the effect of the structure and to reconstruct a super-resolved image beyond the diffraction-limit. In this paper, we introduce this technique in OSH system to scale down the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit. The performance of the proposed method is validated by simulation and experimental results.

  9. Historical review and future trends of scanning optical systems for laser-beam printers

    Minoura, Kazuo

    1993-12-01

    Flying spot scanning technologies providing a constant velocity were presented in 1963 and in 1969, although the concept of `f-0' was not yet explained definitely. After the middle of the 1970s, laser diodes became worthy of notice and a compact-sized laser beam printer was developed. Along with that development, the `f-0 lens' was defined based on the optical design theory in 1979 and also popular-type `f-0 lenses' were developed through the analytical design method. On the other hand, the author and colleagues worked out the best way of enabling metal light deflectors to apply in a popular-type system in 1984; which means the optical system of `deflection error compensation' with the simple composition including a toric lens. The epoch-making optical system raised the productivity of laser beam printers and also has been providing high-definition image printing. As for recent trends, low-priced and compact- sized printers are expanding their share of the market. The author predicts that future laser scanning technologies will be focused in low-priced and process-simplified printers looking closely into high-definition image quality.

  10. Concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery: adaptive optics and optical coherence tomography for laser beam shaping and positioning

    Matthias, Ben; Brockmann, Dorothee; Hansen, Anja; Horke, Konstanze; Knoop, Gesche; Gewohn, Timo; Zabic, Miroslav; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Fs-lasers are well established in ophthalmic surgery as high precision tools for corneal flap cutting during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and increasingly utilized for cutting the crystalline lens, e.g. in assisting cataract surgery. For addressing eye structures beyond the cornea, an intraoperative depth resolved imaging is crucial to the safety and success of the surgical procedure due to interindividual anatomical disparities. Extending the field of application even deeper to the posterior eye segment, individual eye aberrations cannot be neglected anymore and surgery with fs-laser is impaired by focus degradation. Our demonstrated concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery combines adaptive optics (AO) for spatial beam shaping and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for focus positioning guidance. The laboratory setup comprises an adaptive optics assisted 800 nm fs-laser system and is extended by a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system. Phantom structures are targeted, which mimic tractional epiretinal membranes in front of excised porcine retina within an eye model. AO and OCT are set up to share the same scanning and focusing optics. A Hartmann-Shack sensor is employed for aberration measurement and a deformable mirror for aberration correction. By means of adaptive optics the threshold energy for laser induced optical breakdown is lowered and cutting precision is increased. 3D OCT imaging of typical ocular tissue structures is achieved with sufficient resolution and the images can be used for orientation of the fs-laser beam. We present targeted dissection of the phantom structures and its evaluation regarding retinal damage.

  11. Characterization of Line Nanopatterns on Positive Photoresist Produced by Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    Sadegh Mehdi Aghaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Line nanopatterns are produced on the positive photoresist by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM. A laser diode with a wavelength of 450 nm and a power of 250 mW as the light source and an aluminum coated nanoprobe with a 70 nm aperture at the tip apex have been employed. A neutral density filter has been used to control the exposure power of the photoresist. It is found that the changes induced by light in the photoresist can be detected by in situ shear force microscopy (ShFM, before the development of the photoresist. Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the developed photoresist have been used to optimize the scanning speed and the power required for exposure, in order to minimize the final line width. It is shown that nanometric lines with a minimum width of 33 nm can be achieved with a scanning speed of 75 µm/s and a laser power of 113 mW. It is also revealed that the overexposure of the photoresist by continuous wave laser generated heat can be prevented by means of proper photoresist selection. In addition, the effects of multiple exposures of nanopatterns on their width and depth are investigated.

  12. Analytical analysis of modulated signal in apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Lo, Y L; Chuang, C H

    2007-11-26

    Eliminating background-scattering effects from the detected signal is crucial in improving the performance of super-high-resolution apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (A-SNOM). Using a simple mathematical model of the A-SNOM detected signal, this study explores the respective effects of the phase modulation depth, the wavelength and angle of the incident light, and the amplitude of the tip vibration on the signal contrast and signal intensity. In general, the results show that the background-noise decays as the order of the Bessel function increases and that higher-order harmonic frequencies yield an improved signal contrast. Additionally, it is found that incident light with a longer wavelength improves the signal contrast for a constant order of modulation frequency. The signal contrast can also be improved by reducing the incident angle of the incident light. Finally, it is demonstrated that sample stage scanning yields an improved imaging result. However, tip scanning provides a reasonable low-cost and faster solution in the smaller scan area. The analytical results presented in this study enable a better understanding of the complex detected signal in A-SNOM and provide insights into methods of improving the signal contrast of the A-SNOM measurement.

  13. Three-dimensional microscopy and sectional image reconstruction using optical scanning holography.

    Lam, Edmund Y; Zhang, Xin; Vo, Huy; Poon, Ting-Chung; Indebetouw, Guy

    2009-12-01

    Fast acquisition and high axial resolution are two primary requirements for three-dimensional microscopy. However, they are sometimes conflicting: imaging modalities such as confocal imaging can deliver superior resolution at the expense of sequential acquisition at different axial planes, which is a time-consuming process. Optical scanning holography (OSH) promises to deliver a good trade-off between these two goals. With just a single scan, we can capture the entire three-dimensional volume in a digital hologram; the data can then be processed to obtain the individual sections. An accurate modeling of the imaging system is key to devising an appropriate image reconstruction algorithm, especially for real data where random noise and other imaging imperfections must be taken into account. In this paper we demonstrate sectional image reconstruction by applying an inverse imaging sectioning technique to experimental OSH data of biological specimens and visualizing the sections using the OSA Interactive Science Publishing software.

  14. Adaptive Q control for Tapping-mode Nano-scanning Using a Piezo-actuated Bimorph Probe

    Gunev, Ihsan; Karaman, Sertac; Basdogan, Cagatay

    2012-01-01

    A new approach, called Adaptive Q-control, for tapping-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is introduced and implemented on a home-made AFM set-up utilizing a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and a piezo-actuated bimorph probe. In the standard Q-control, the effective Q-factor of the scanning probe is adjusted prior to the scanning depending on the application. However, there is a trade-off in setting the effective Q-factor of an AFM probe. The Q-factor is either increased to reduce the tapping forces or decreased to increase the maximum achievable scan speed. Realizing these two benefits simultaneously using the standard Q-control is not possible. In adaptive Q-control, the Q-factor of the probe is set to an initial value as in standard Q-control, but then modified on the fly during scanning when necessary to achieve this goal. In this paper, we present the basic theory behind the adaptive Q-control, the electronics enabling the on-line modification of the probe's effective Q-factor, and the results of the expe...

  15. Lasers, lenses and light curves : adaptive optics microscopy and peculiar transiting exoplanets

    Werkhoven, Theodorus Isaak Mattheus van

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we present an adaptive optics implementation for multi-photon microscopy correcting sample-induced wavefront aberrations using either direct wavefront sensing to run a close-loop adaptive optics system (Chapter 3), or use a model-based sensorless approach to iterati

  16. Field enhancement analysis of an apertureless near field scanning optical microscope probe with finite element method

    Weibin Chen; Qiwen Zhan

    2007-01-01

    Plasmonic field enhancement in a fully coated dielectric near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM)probe under radial polarization illumination is analyzed using an axially symmetric three-dimensional (3D)finite element method (FEM) model. The enhancement factor strongly depends on the illumination spot size, taper angle of the probe, and the metal film thickness. The tolerance of the alignment angle is investigated. Probe designs with different metal coatings and their enhancement performance are studied as well. The nanometric spot size at the tip apex and high field enhancement of the apertureless NSOM probe have important potential application in semiconductor metrology.

  17. Adaptive-optic approach to mitigating aero-optic disturbances for a forced shear layer

    Nightingale, Alice M.

    Non-uniform, variable-density fields, resulting from compressibility effects in turbulent flows, are the source of aero-optical distortions which cause significant reductions in optical system performance. As a laser beam transverses through an optically active medium, containing index-of-refraction variations, several optical phenomena occur including beam wander, image distortion, and beam defocus. When encountering a variation in the index field, light waves refract causing an otherwise planar wavefront of a laser beam to become aberrated, contributing to the adverse effects mentioned above. Adaptive-Optics (AO) is a technique used to correct for such spatially and temporally varying aberrations on an optical beam by applying a conjugate waveform correction prior to the beams transmission through the flow. Conventional AO systems are bandwidth limited by real-time processing issues and wavefront sensor limitations. Therefore, an alternative to the conventional AO approach has been proposed, developed and evaluated with the goal of overcoming such bandwidth limitations. The alternative AO system, presented throughout this document, consists of two main features; feed-forward flow control and a phase-locked-loop AO control strategy. Initially irregular, unpredictable large-scale structures within a shear layer are regularized using flow control. Subsequently, the resulting optical wavefront, and corresponding optical signal, emerging from the regularized flow becomes more periodic and predictable effectively reducing the bandwidth necessary to make real-time corrections. A phase-lock-loop controller is then used to perform real-time corrections. Wavefront corrections are estimated based upon the regularized flow, while two small aperture laser beams provide a non-intrusive means of acquiring amplitude and phase error measurements. The phase-lock-loop controller uses these signals as feedback to synchronize the deformable mirror's waveform to that of the shear

  18. Acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy: Applications and implications for optical neurobiology

    Iyer, Vijay

    Multiphoton excitation of molecular probes has become an important tool in experimental neurobiology owing to the intrinsic optical sectioning and low light scattering it affords. Using molecular functional indicators, multiphoton excitation allows physiological signals within single neurons to be observed from within living brain tissue. Ideally, it would be possible to record from multiple sites located throughout the elaborately branching dendritic arbors, in order to study the correlations of structure and function both within and across experiments. However, existing multiphoton microscope systems based on scanning mirrors do not allow optical recordings to be obtained from more than a handful of sites simultaneously at the high rates required to capture the fast physiological signals of interest (>100Hz for Ca2+ signals, >1kHz for membrane potential transients). In order to overcome this limitation, two-dimensional acousto-optic deflection was employed, to allow an ultrafast laser beam suited for multiphoton excitation to be rapidly repositioned with low latency (˜15mus). This supports a random-access scanning mode in which the beam can repeatedly visit a succession of user-selected sites of interest within the microscope's field-of-view at high rates, with minimal sacrifice of pixel dwell time. This technique of acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM) was demonstrated to allow the spatial profile of signals arising in response to physiological stimulation to be rapidly mapped. Means to compensate or avoid problems of dispersion which have hampered AO-MPLSM in the past are presented, with the latter being implemented. Separately, the combination of photon counting detection with multiphoton excitation, termed generally multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy (MP-PCS), was also considered, with particular emphasis on the technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). MP-PCS was shown to allow information about molecular

  19. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic bloc...

  20. Initial experience with optical-CT scanning of RadBall Dosimeters

    Oldham, M; Clift, C; Thomas, A; Farfan, E; Foley, T; Jannik, T; Adamovics, J; Holmes, C; Stanley, S, E-mail: Mark.Oldham@Duke.ed

    2010-11-01

    The RadBall dosimeter is a novel device for providing 3-D information on the magnitude and distribution of contaminant sources of unknown radiation in a given hot cell, glovebox, or contaminated room. The device is presently under evaluation by the National Nuclear Lab (NNL, UK) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL, US), for application as a diagnostic device for such unknown contaminants in the nuclear industry. A critical component of the technique is imaging the dose distribution recorded in the RadBall using optical-CT scanning. Here we present our initial investigations using the Duke Mid-sized Optical-CT Scanner (DMOS) to image dose distributions deposited in RadBalls exposed to a variety of radiation treatments.

  1. TH-C-BRD-09: Successes and Limitations of Online Range Adaptive Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for NSCLC

    Cheung, JP [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, P [Emory University, Scottsdale, GA (United States); Zhu, XR; Kudchadker, RJ; Frank, SJ; Court, LE [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the ability to adapt discrete spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT) plans based on geometric changes of anatomy to minimize normal tissue dose and maintain target coverage. Methods: We developed and tested a range-correction algorithm to compensate for anatomy changes in SSPT with correction factors for target lateral size changes and energy scaling. This algorithm adjusts the energy of each spot from the original optimized treatment plan to match the new daily anatomy based on water equivalent path-length. To correct for the lateral target size changes, the peripheral spots were scaled based on phantom studies with variable target size. For energy change corrections, alternative cumulative scaling factor lookup tables were generated based on calculated central-axis and integral depth dose calculations for different energies. These various adaptive algorithms were performed on 7 lung cancer patients that were previously treated with proton therapy and who required at least one adaptive intervention. Single-field optimized SSPT plans were generated for these patients with clinical beam angles. Dose-volume histogram metrics were obtained for these patients for both the non-adaptive and the different adaptive plans applied to the last available weekly CT scan. Results: The doses to normal tissue were largely reduced for the spinal cord (Dmax), total lung (V20Gy), and contralateral lung (V20Gy) for all different methods of adaptive planning. With both corrections applied, the average changes for these metrics were −6.2Gy, −2.7%, and −4.9%, respectively. The same method generated unacceptably high target hot spots with average target V110% increase of 12.3%. Conclusion: Adaptive methods based on direct adjustments to proton range can reduce normal tissue doses under large anatomical changes but are insufficient in achieving clinically acceptable target doses and generate unacceptably sizeable hot spots. Adaptive planning methods for proton

  2. Update on Optical Design of Adaptive Optics System at Lick Observatory

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Waltjen, K E; Freeze, G J; Hurd, R L; Gates, E I; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M

    2001-07-31

    In 1999, we presented our plan to upgrade the adaptive optics (AO) system on the Lick Observatory Shane telescope (3m) from a prototype instrument pressed into field service to a facility instrument. This paper updates the progress of that plan and details several important improvements in the alignment and calibration of the AO bench. The paper also includes a discussion of the problems seen in the original design of the tip/tilt (t/t) sensor used in laser guide star mode, and how these problems were corrected with excellent results.

  3. Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems

    Wu, Zhizheng; Ben Amara, Foued

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems presents a novel design of wavefront correctors based on magnetic fluid deformable mirrors (MFDM) as well as corresponding control algorithms. The presented wavefront correctors are characterized by their linear, dynamic response. Various mirror surface shape control algorithms are presented along with experimental evaluations of the performance of the resulting adaptive optics systems. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used in various fields of application to enhance the performance of optical systems, such as imaging, laser, free space optical communication systems, etc. This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students, professors, engineers, scientists and researchers working on the design of adaptive optics systems and their various emerging fields of application. Zhizheng Wu is an associate professor at Shanghai University, China. Azhar Iqbal is a research associate at the University of Toronto, Canada. Foue...

  4. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated.

  5. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with reconstruction of vertical interaction

    Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2015-11-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy provides access to super-resolution spectroscopic imaging of the surfaces of a variety of materials and nanostructures. In addition to chemical identification, it enables observations of nano-optical phenomena, such as mid-infrared plasmons in graphene and phonon polaritons in boron nitride. Despite the high lateral spatial resolution, scattering-type near-field optical microscopy is not able to provide characteristics of near-field responses in the vertical dimension, normal to the sample surface. Here, we present an accurate and fast reconstruction method to obtain vertical characteristics of near-field interactions. For its first application, we investigated the bound electromagnetic field component of surface phonon polaritons on the surface of boron nitride nanotubes and found that it decays within 20 nm with a considerable phase change in the near-field signal. The method is expected to provide characterization of the vertical field distribution of a wide range of nano-optical materials and structures.

  6. Comparison of the marginal adaptation of direct and indirect composite inlay restorations with optical coherence tomography

    TÜRK, Ayşe Gözde; SABUNCU, Metin; ÜNAL, Sena; ÖNAL, Banu; ULUSOY, Mübin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of the study was to use the photonic imaging modality of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to compare the marginal adaptation of composite inlays fabricated by direct and indirect techniques. Material and Methods Class II cavities were prepared on 34 extracted human molar teeth. The cavities were randomly divided into two groups according to the inlay fabrication technique. The first group was directly restored on cavities with a composite (Esthet X HD, Dentsply, Germany) after isolating. The second group was indirectly restored with the same composite material. Marginal adaptations were scanned before cementation with an invisible infrared light beam of OCT (Thorlabs), allowing measurement in 200 µm intervals. Restorations were cemented with a self-adhesive cement resin (SmartCem2, Dentsply), and then marginal adaptations were again measured with OCT. Mean values were statistically compared by using independent-samples t-test and paired samples t-test (prestorations after cementation (p=0.00008839, p=0.000000952 for direct and indirect inlays, respectively). The mean marginal discrepancy value of the direct group increased from 56.88±20.04 µm to 91.88±31.7 µm, whereas the indirect group increased from 107.54±35.63 µm to 170.29±54.83 µm. Different techniques are available to detect marginal adaptation of restorations, but the OCT system can give quantitative information about resin cement thickness and its interaction between tooth and restoration in a nondestructive manner. Conclusions Direct inlays presented smaller marginal discrepancy than indirect inlays. The marginal discrepancy values were increased for all restorations that refer to cement thickness after cementation. PMID:27556210

  7. Ultrafast random-access scanning in two-photon microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors.

    Salomé, R; Kremer, Y; Dieudonné, S; Léger, J-F; Krichevsky, O; Wyart, C; Chatenay, D; Bourdieu, L

    2006-06-30

    Two-photon scanning microscopy (TPSM) is a powerful tool for imaging deep inside living tissues with sub-cellular resolution. The temporal resolution of TPSM is however strongly limited by the galvanometric mirrors used to steer the laser beam. Fast physiological events can therefore only be followed by scanning repeatedly a single line within the field of view. Because acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) are non-mechanical devices, they allow access at any point within the field of view on a microsecond time scale and are therefore excellent candidates to improve the temporal resolution of TPSM. However, the use of AOD-based scanners with femtosecond pulses raises several technical difficulties. In this paper, we describe an all-digital TPSM setup based on two crossed AODs. It includes in particular an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at 45 degrees with respect to the AODs to pre-compensate for the large spatial distortions of femtosecond pulses occurring in the AODs, in order to optimize the spatial resolution and the fluorescence excitation. Our setup allows recording from freely selectable point-of-interest at high speed (1kHz). By maximizing the time spent on points of interest, random-access TPSM (RA-TPSM) constitutes a promising method for multiunit recordings with millisecond resolution in biological tissues.

  8. Reciprocity theory of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy with point-dipole probes.

    Esslinger, Moritz; Vogelgesang, Ralf

    2012-09-25

    Near-field microscopy offers the opportunity to reveal optical contrast at deep subwavelength scales. In scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), the diffraction limit is overcome by a nanoscopic probe in close proximity to the sample. The interaction of the probe with the sample fields necessarily perturbs the bare sample response, and a critical issue is the interpretation of recorded signals. For a few specific SNOM configurations, individual descriptions have been modeled, but a general and intuitive framework is still lacking. Here, we give an exact formulation of the measurable signals in SNOM which is easily applicable to experimental configurations. Our results are in close analogy with the description Tersoff and Hamann have derived for the tunneling currents in scanning tunneling microscopy. For point-like scattering probe tips, such as used in apertureless SNOM, the theory simplifies dramatically to a single scalar relation. We find that the measured signal is directly proportional to the field of the coupled tip-sample system at the position of the tip. For weakly interacting probes, the model thus verifies the empirical findings that the recorded signal is proportional to the unperturbed field of the bare sample. In the more general case, it provides guidance to an intuitive and faithful interpretation of recorded images, facilitating the characterization of tip-related distortions and the evaluation of novel SNOM configurations, both for aperture-based and apertureless SNOM.

  9. Wide field of view adaptive optical system for lightweight deployable telescope technologies

    McComas, Brian K.; Cermak, Michael A.; Friedman, Edward J.

    2003-02-01

    A NASA research contract (NAS1-00116) was awarded to Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in January 2000 to study wide field-of-view adaptive optical systems. These systems will be required on future high resolution Earth remote sensing systems that employ large, flexible, lightweight, deployed primary mirrors. The deformations from these primary mirrors will introduce aberrations into the optical system, which must be removed by corrective optics. For economic reasons, these remote sensing systems must have a large field-of-view (a few degrees). Unlike ground-based adaptive optical systems, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct for the deformations in the primary mirror over the entire field-of-view. A new error function, which is an enhancement to conventional adaptive optics, for wide field-of-view optical systems will be introduced. This paper will present the goals of the NASA research project and its progress. The initial phase of this research project is a demonstration of the wide field-of-view adaptive optics theory. A breadboard has been designed and built for this purpose. The design and assembly of the breadboard will be presented, along with the final results for this phase of the research project. Finally, this paper will show the applicability of wide field-of-view adaptive optics to space-based astronomical systems.

  10. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  11. Novel adaptive fiber-optics collimator for coherent beam combination.

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Pengfei; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2014-12-15

    In this manuscript, we experimentally validate a novel design of adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC), which utilizes two levers to enlarge the movable range of the fiber end cap. The enlargement of the range makes the new AFOC possible to compensate the end-cap/tilt aberration in fiber laser beam combining system. The new AFOC based on flexible hinges and levers was fabricated and the performance of the new AFOC was tested carefully, including its control range, frequency response and control accuracy. Coherent beam combination (CBC) of two 5-W fiber amplifiers array with simultaneously end-cap/tilt control and phase-locking control was implemented successfully with the novel AFOC. Experimental results show that the average normalized power in the bucket (PIB) value increases from 0.311 to 0.934 with active phasing and tilt aberration compensation simultaneously, and with both controls on, the fringe contrast improves to more than 82% from 0% for the case with both control off. This work presents a promising structure for tilt aberration control in high power CBC system.

  12. Keck Adaptive Optics Observations of TW Hydrae Association Members

    Macintosh, B; Max, C; Zuckerman, B; Becklin, E E; Kaisler, D; Lowrance, P; Weinberger, A; Chirstou, J; Schneider, G; Acton, S

    2001-05-30

    Adaptive optics (AO) on 8-10 m telescopes is an enormously powerful tool for studying young nearby stars. It is especially useful for searching for companions. Using AO on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope we have measured the position of the brown dwarf companion to TWA5 and resolved the primary into an 0.055{double_prime} double. Over the next several years follow-up astrometry should permit an accurate determination of the masses of these young stars. We have also re-observed the candidate extrasolar planet TWAGB, but measurements of its motion relative to TWA6A are inconclusive. We are carrying out a search for new planetary or brown dwarf companions to TWA stars and, if current giant planet models are correct, are currently capable of detecting a 1 Jupiter-mass companion at {approx} 1.0{double_prime} and a 5 Jupiter-mass companion at {approx} 0.5{double_prime} around a typical TWA member.

  13. New challenges for Adaptive Optics Extremely Large Telescopes

    Le Louarn, M; Sarazin, M; Tokovinin, A

    2000-01-01

    The performance of an adaptive optics (AO) system on a 100m diameter ground based telescope working in the visible range of the spectrum is computed using an analytical approach. The target Strehl ratio of 60% is achieved at 0.5um with a limiting magnitude of the AO guide source near R~10, at the cost of an extremely low sky coverage. To alleviate this problem, the concept of tomographic wavefront sensing in a wider field of view using either natural guide stars (NGS) or laser guide stars (LGS) is investigated. These methods use 3 or 4 reference sources and up to 3 deformable mirrors, which increase up to 8-fold the corrected field size (up to 60\\arcsec at 0.5 um). Operation with multiple NGS is limited to the infrared (in the J band this approach yields a sky coverage of 50% with a Strehl ratio of 0.2). The option of open-loop wavefront correction in the visible using several bright NGS is discussed. The LGS approach involves the use of a faint (R ~22) NGS for low-order correction, which results in a sky cov...

  14. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of the Globular Cluster NGC 6496

    Fraga, Luciano; Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m - M) V = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V - I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  15. AdapTube: Adaptive Optics animations for tutorial purpose

    Dima, Marco; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Bergomi, Maria; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marafatto, Luca; Viotto, Valentina

    2013-12-01

    As it happens in most scientific fields, many Adaptive Optics concepts and instrumental layouts are not easily understandable. Both in outreach and in the framework of addressing experts, computer graphics (CG) and, in particular, animation can aid the speaker and the auditor to simplify concept description, translating them into a more direct message. This paper presents a few examples of how some instruments, as Shack-Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors, or concepts, like MCAO and MOAO, have been depicted and sometimes compared in a more intuitive way, emphasizing differences, pros and cons. Some example linking animation to the real world are also outlined, pushing the boundaries of the way a complicated concept can be illustrated embedding complex drawings into the explanation of a human. The used CG software, which is completely open source and will be presented and briefly described, turns out to be a valid communication tool to highlight what, on a piece of paper, could seem obscure. This poster aims at showing how concepts, such as Pyramid WFS, GLAO, MCAO and GMCAO, sometimes very difficult to explain on paper, can be much more easily outlined by means of dedicated animation SW. Blender is a very powerful freeware SW, used by our group since years to make tutorial videos and explanatory movies, a few examples of which are presented here.

  16. Point spread function determination for Keck adaptive optics

    Ragland, S.; Jolissaint, L.; Wizinowich, P.; van Dam, M. A.; Mugnier, L.; Bouxin, A.; Chock, J.; Kwok, S.; Mader, J.; Witzel, G.; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, M.; Ghez, A.; Lu, J.; Martinez, G.; Morris, M. R.; Sitarski, B.

    2016-07-01

    One of the primary scientific limitations of adaptive optics (AO) has been the incomplete knowledge of the point spread function (PSF), which has made it difficult to use AO for accurate photometry and astrometry in both crowded and sparse fields, for extracting intrinsic morphologies and spatially resolved kinematics, and for detecting faint sources in the presence of brighter sources. To address this limitation, we initiated a program to determine and demonstrate PSF reconstruction for science observations obtained with Keck AO. This paper aims to give a broad view of the progress achieved in implementing a PSF reconstruction capability for Keck AO science observations. This paper describes the implementation of the algorithms, and the design and development of the prototype operational tools for automated PSF reconstruction. On-sky performance is discussed by comparing the reconstructed PSFs to the measured PSF's on the NIRC2 science camera. The importance of knowing the control loop performance, accurate mapping of the telescope pupil to the deformable mirror and the science instrument pupil, and the telescope segment piston error are highlighted. We close by discussing lessons learned and near-term future plans.

  17. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    Simeoni, G. G., E-mail: ggsimeoni@outlook.com [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E13, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Valicu, R. G. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E13, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E21, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Borchert, G. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Böni, P. [Physics Department E21, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rasmussen, N. G. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A. [Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, D-51170 Köln (Germany)

    2015-12-14

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4–10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  18. Adaptive optics near infrared integral field spectroscopy of NGC 2992

    Friedrich, S; Hicks, E K S; Engel, H; Müller-Sánchez, F; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J

    2010-01-01

    NGC 2992 is an intermediate Seyfert 1 galaxy showing outflows on kilo parsec scales which might be due either to AGN or starburst activity. We therefore aim at investigating its central region for a putative starburst in the past and its connection to the AGN and the outflows. Observations were performed with the adaptive optics near infrared integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the VLT, complemented by longslit observations with ISAAC on the VLT, as well as N- and Q-band data from the Spitzer archive. The spatial and spectral resolutions of the SINFONI data are 50 pc and 83 km/s, respectively. The field of view of 3" x 3" corresponds to 450 pc x 450 pc. Br_gamma equivalent width and line fluxes from PAHs were compared to stellar population models to constrain the age of the putative recent star formation. A simple geometric model of two mutually inclined disks and an additional cone to describe an outflow was developed to explain the observed complex velocity field in H_2 1-0S(1). The morphologies of the B...

  19. Adaptive optics imaging of the MBM 12 association

    Chauvin, G; Fusco, T; Lagrange, A M; Beuzit, J L; Mouillet, D; Augereau, J C

    2002-01-01

    We report adaptive optics (AO) observations of the young and nearby association MBM 12 obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Our main observational result is the discovery of six new binary systems, LkHa 264, E 0255+2018, RX J0255.4+2005, S18, MBM 12-10, RX J0255.3+1915, and the confirmation of HD 17332, already known as a binary. We also detected a possible quadruple system. It is composed of the close binary LkHa 263 AB (separation of 0.41 ''), of LkH\\alpha 262 located 15.25 '' from LkHa 263 A, and of LkHa 263 C, located 4.1 '' from LkH\\alpha 263 A. A preliminary study of the binary fraction suggests a binary excess in the MBM 12 association as compared to the field and IC 348. Because of the high binarity rate, previous estimations of spectral types and measurements of IR excesses for several candidate members of MBM 12 have to be revised. LkH\\alpha 263 C is a nebulous object that we interpret as a disk oriented almost perfectly edge-on and seen in scattered light. This object has already been ...

  20. Multimodal imaging of the human temporal bone: A comparison of CT and optical scanning techniques

    Voie, Arne H.; Whiting, Bruce; Skinner, Margaret; Neely, J. Gail; Lee, Kenneth; Holden, Tim; Brunsden, Barry

    2003-10-01

    A collaborative effort between Washington University in St. Louis and Spencer Technologies in Seattle, WA has been undertaken to create a multimodal 3D reconstruction of the human cochlea and vestibular system. The goal of this project is to improve the accuracy of in vivo CT reconstructions of implanted cochleae, and to expand the knowledge of high-resolution anatomical detail provided by orthogonal-plane optical sectioning (OPFOS). At WUSL, computed tomography (CT) images of the cochlea are used to determine the position of cochlear implant electrodes relative to target auditory neurons. The cochlear implant position is determined using pre- and post-operative CT scans. The CT volumes are cross-registered to align the semicircular canals and internal auditory canal, which have a unique configuration in 3-D space. The head of a human body donor was scanned with a clinical CT device, after which the temporal bones were removed, fixed in formalin and trimmed prior to scanning with a laboratory Micro CT scanner. Following CT, the temporal bones were sent to the OPFOS Imaging Lab at Spencer Technologies for a further analysis. 3-D reconstructions of CT and OPFOS imaging modalities were compared, and results are presented. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants R44-03623-5 and R01-00581-13.

  1. Laser-based technology of scanning near-field optical probes fabrication: study of kinetics and progress of measuring

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Kalachev, Alexey I.; Kaporsky, Lev N.; Volkov, Sergey A.; Voznesensky, Nikolay B.

    2003-02-01

    Basic principles of laser assisted process of fiber etching for scanning near-field optical (SNO) probes formation and control technique are presented. The thermal and temporal regimes are considered in order to provide stable reproducibility and high quality of a tapered end of the optical fiber. Problems of adequate definition of the scanning imaging properties of a SNO probe are discussed. Thus an optical method of far-field registration and processing together with a new autoelectronic emission method are considered for solution of the task of a subwavelength SNO probe aperture measurement and estimation of its apparatus function.

  2. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  3. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning-imaging X-ray microscope optics.

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning-imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown.

  4. Composite cavity based fiber optic Fabry Perot strain sensors demodulated by an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with an electrical scanning mirror

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Yang, Jun; Sun, Weimin; Jin, Wencai; Yuan, Libo; Peng, G. D.

    2008-08-01

    A composite cavity based fiber optic Fabry-Perot strain sensor system, interrogated by a white light source and demodulated by an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with an electrical scanning mirror, is proposed and demonstrated. Comparing with the traditional extrinsic fiber optic Fabry-Perot strain sensor, the potential multiplexing capability and the dynamic measurement range are improved simultaneously. At the same time, the measurement stability of the electrical scanning mirror system is improved by the self-referenced signal of the sensor structure.

  5. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team.

  6. SD-OCT and Adaptive Optics Imaging of Outer Retinal Tubulation

    King, Brett J.; Sapoznik, Kaitlyn A.; Elsner, Ann E.; Gast, Thomas J.; Papay, Joel A.; Clark, Christopher A.; Burns, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To investigate outer retinal tubulation (ORT) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). To document the frequency of ORT in atrophic retinal conditions and quantify ORT dimensions versus adjacent retinal layers. Methods SD-OCT images were reviewed for the presence of retinal atrophy, scarring, and/or exudation. The greatest width of each ORT was quantified. Inner and outer retinal thicknesses adjacent to and within the area of ORT were measured for 18 patients. AOSLO imaged ORTs in five subjects with direct and scattered light imaging. Results ORT was identified in 47 of 76 subjects (61.8%) and in 65 eyes via SD-OCT in a wide range of conditions and ages, and in peripapillary atrophy. ORTs appeared as finger-like projections in atrophy, seen in the en face images. AOSLO showed some ORTs with bright cones that guide light within atrophic areas. Multiply scattered light mode AOSLO visualized variegated lines (18–35 μm) radiating from ORTs. The ORTs’ width on OCT b-scan images varied from 70 to 509 μm. The inner retina at the ORT was significantly thinner than the adjacent retina, 135 vs.170 μm (P = .004), whereas the outer retina was significantly thicker, 115 vs. 80 μm (P = .03). Conclusions ORTs are quite common in eyes with retinal atrophy in various disorders. ORTs demonstrate surviving photoreceptors in tubular structures found within otherwise nonsupportive atrophic areas that lack retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris. PMID:27984506

  7. Configurable adaptive optical system for imaging of ground-based targets from space

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.; Hooker, R. Brian; Cermak, Michael A.

    2003-03-01

    Space-based, high resolution, Earth remote sensing systems, that employ large, flexible, lightweight primary mirrors, will require active wavefront correction, in the form of active and adaptive optics, to correct for thermally and vibrationally induced deformations in the optics. These remote sensing systems typically have a large field-of-view. Unlike the adaptive optics on ground-based astronomical telescopes, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct the wavefront over the entire field-of-view, which can be several degrees. The error functions for astronomical adaptive optics have been developed for the narrow field-of-view correction of atmospheric turbulence and do not address the needs of wide field space-based systems. To address these needs, a new wide field adaptive optics theory and a new error function are developed. Modeling and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the wide field adaptive optics theory and new error function. This new error function, which is a new extension of conventional adaptive optics, lead to the development of three new types of imaging systems: wide field-of-view, selectable field-of-view, and steerable field-of-view. These new systems can have nearly diffraction-limited performance across the entire field-of-view or a narrow movable region of high-resolution imaging. The factors limiting system performance will be shown. The range of applicability of the wide field adaptive optics theory is shown. The range of applicability is used to avoid limitations in system performance and to estimate the optical systems parameters, which will meet the system"s performance requirements.

  8. The Inner Kiloparsec of Mrk 273 with Keck Adaptive Optics

    U, Vivian; Medling, Anne; Sanders, David; Max, Claire; Armus, Lee; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Evans, Aaron; Kewley, Lisa; Fazio, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    There is X-ray, optical, and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic evidence that the late-stage ultraluminous infrared galaxy merger Mrk 273 hosts a powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN). However, the exact location of the AGN and the nature of the nucleus have been difficult to determine due to dust obscuration and the limited wavelength coverage of available high-resolution data. Here we present near-infrared integral-field spectra and images of the nuclear region of Mrk 273 taken with OSIRIS and NIRC2 on the Keck II Telescope with laser guide star adaptive optics. We observe three spatially resolved components, and analyze the nuclear molecular and ionized gas emission lines and their kinematics. We confirm the presence of the hard X-ray AGN in the southwest nucleus. In the north nucleus, we find a strongly rotating gas disk whose kinematics indicate a central black hole of mass 1.04 ± 0.1 × 109 M ⊙. The H2 emission line shows an increase in velocity dispersion along the minor axis in both directions, and an increased flux with negative velocities in the southeast direction; this provides direct evidence for a collimated molecular outflow along the axis of rotation of the disk. The third spatially distinct component appears to the southeast, 640 and 750 pc from the north and southwest nuclei, respectively. This component is faint in continuum emission but shows several strong emission line features, including [Si VI] 1.964 μm which traces an extended coronal-line region. The geometry of the [Si VI] emission combined with shock models and energy arguments suggest that [Si VI] in the southeast component must be at least partly ionized by the SW AGN or a putative AGN in the northern disk, either through photoionization or through shock-heating from strong AGN- and circumnuclear-starburst-driven outflows. This lends support to a scenario in which Mrk 273 may be a dual AGN system.

  9. Assessment of the Optic Disc Morphology Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    Pilar Calvo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the equivalent optic nerve head (OHN parameters obtained with confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT3 and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT in healthy and glaucoma patients. Methods. One hundred and eighty-two consecutive healthy subjects and 156 patients with open-angle glaucoma were divided into 2 groups according to intraocular pressure and visual field outcomes. All participants underwent imaging of the ONH with the HRT3 and the Cirrus OCT. The ONH parameters and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were compared between both groups. Results. Mean age did not differ between the normal and glaucoma groups (59.55 ± 9.7 years and 61.05 ± 9.4 years, resp.; P=0.15. Rim area, average cup-to-disc (C/D ratio, vertical C/D ratio, and cup volume were different between both instruments (P<0.001. All equivalent ONH parameters, except disc area, were different between both groups (P<0.001. The best areas under the ROC curve were observed for vertical C/D ratio (0.980 for OCT and 0.942 for HRT3; P=0.11. Sensitivities at 95% fixed-specificities of OCT parameters were higher than those of HRT3. Conclusions. Equivalent ONH parameters of Cirrus OCT and HRT3 are different and cannot be used interchangeably. ONH parameters measured with OCT yielded a slightly better diagnostic performance.

  10. Extrapolating Zernike Moments to Predict Future Optical Wave-fronts in Adaptive Optics Using Real Time Data Mining

    Vyas, Akondi; Prasad, B Raghavendra

    2010-01-01

    We present the details of predicting atmospheric turbulence by mining Zernike moment data obtained from simulations as well as experiments. Temporally correlated optical wave-fronts were simulated such that they followed Kolmogorov phase statistics. The wave-fronts reconstructed either by modal or zonal methods can be represented in terms of Zernike moments. The servo lag error in adaptive optics is minimized by predicting Zernike moments in the near future by using the data from the immediate past. It is shown statistically that the prediction accuracy depends on the number of past phase screens used for prediction and servo lag time scales. The algorithm is optimized in terms of these parameters for real time and efficient operation of the adaptive optics system. On an average, we report more than 3% improvement in the wave-front compensation after prediction. This analysis helps in optimizing the design parameters for sensing and correction in closed loop adaptive optics systems.

  11. Adaptive optics in nonlinear microscopy implemented with open-loop control and EMCCD-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    Sun, Wei

    Nonlinear microscopy, with its unique advantages over conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, has been widely adopted to study biological processes at the cellular level. However, like all other high-resolution optical imaging techniques, nonlinear microscopy suffers from focal degradation due to optical aberrations in the sample as a result of refractive index mismatch. Optical aberrations distort the wavefront of the excitation beam, causing the focal spot to be larger than the diffraction limit. Since the fluorescence efficiency scales nonlinearly with the profile of the focusing excitation beam, aberrations further degrade the image brightness in addition to resolution. In this dissertation I describe the design, characterization and experimentation of an adaptive optics (AO) nonlinear laser scanning microscope implemented with open-loop control and an EMCCD-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (EMCCD SHWFS) for aberration compensation. Adaptive optics (AO), originally designed for ground-based astronomical observatories to correct for the aberrations from atmospheric turbulence while imaging distant stars and planets, has benefited many biomedical imaging platforms. We integrated a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) into our nonlinear laser scanning microscope. With an accurate open-loop control mechanism, which predicts the control voltages and generates a prescribed surface shape on the MEMS DM, known aberrations in the system can be compensated for with this computationally simple and inherently fast method. The use of a nonlinear guide star imbedded within the sample can reflect the sample aberration. However, the low level of nonlinear fluorescence signal is usually detected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and is below the sensitivity of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. This dissertation also describes the design of an EMCCD SHWFS to measure the wavefront distortion from the

  12. Enhancing Stellar Spectroscopy with Extreme Adaptive Optics and Photonics

    Jovanovic, N.; Schwab, C.; Cvetojevic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (AO) systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of ∼ 90 % in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers (SMFs) or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a spectrograph’s line profile becomes considerably easier, as modal noise or imperfect scrambling of the fiber output are no longer an issue. It also opens up the possibility of exploiting photonic technologies for their advanced functionalities, inherent replicability, and small, lightweight footprint to design and build future instrumentation. In this work, we outline how extreme AO systems will enable advanced photonic and diffraction-limited technologies to be exploited in spectrograph design and the impact it will have on spectroscopy. We illustrate that the precision of an instrument based on these technologies, with light injected from an efficient SMF feed would be entirely limited by the spectral content and stellar noise alone on cool stars and would be capable of achieving a radial velocity precision of several m/s; the level required for detecting an exo-Earth in the habitable zone of a nearby M-dwarf.

  13. Probing other solar systems with current and future adaptive optics

    Macintosh, B; Marois, C; Phillion, D; Poyneer, L; Graham, J; Zuckerman, B; Gavel, D; Veran, J; Wilhelmsen-Evans, J; Mellis, C

    2008-09-08

    Over the past decade, the study of extrasolar planets through indirect techniques--primarily Doppler measurements--has revolutionized our understanding of other solar systems. The next major step in this field will be the direct detection and characterization, via imaging and spectroscopy, of the planets themselves. To achieve this, we must separate the light from the faint planet from the extensive glare of its parent star. We pursued this goal using the current generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large ground-based telescopes, using infrared imaging to search for the thermal emission from young planets and developing image processing techniques to distinguish planets from telescope-induced artifacts. Our new Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) technique, which uses the sidereal rotation of the Earth and telescope, is now standard for ground-based high-contrast imaging. Although no young planets were found in our surveys, we placed the strongest limits yet on giant planets in wide orbits (>30 AU) around young stars and characterized planetary companion candidates. The imaging of planetary companions on solar-system-like scales (5-30 AU) will require a new generation of advanced AO systems that are an order of magnitude more powerful than the LLNL-built Keck AO system. We worked to develop and test the key technologies needed for these systems, including a spatially-filtered wavefront sensor, efficient and accurate wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and precision AO wavefront control at the sub-nm level. LLNL has now been selected by the Gemini Observatory to lead the construction of the Gemini Planet Imager, a $24M instrument that will be the most advanced AO system in the world.

  14. Investigation of nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials by the Z-scan method

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials (vegetable oil, juice, wine, cognac, Coca-Cola and Fanta drinks, Nescafé coffee, tea, gasoline, clock oil, glycerol, and polyphenyl ether) that are used in everyday life. Their nonlinearities have been studied by the Z-scan method in the near-IR and visible spectral ranges. We have shown that the majority of samples possess a nonlinear absorption; however, some of the studied materials show a strong saturated absorption and nonlinear refraction. Red wine and glycerol proved to be the most interesting materials. For these samples, we have observed a change in the sign of the nonlinear absorption with increasing laser intensity, which was attributed to the competition between two-photon absorption and saturated absorption.

  15. Novel grid-based optical Braille conversion: from scanning to wording

    Yoosefi Babadi, Majid; Jafari, Shahram

    2011-12-01

    Grid-based optical Braille conversion (GOBCO) is explained in this article. The grid-fitting technique involves processing scanned images taken from old hard-copy Braille manuscripts, recognising and converting them into English ASCII text documents inside a computer. The resulted words are verified using the relevant dictionary to provide the final output. The algorithms employed in this article can be easily modified to be implemented on other visual pattern recognition systems and text extraction applications. This technique has several advantages including: simplicity of the algorithm, high speed of execution, ability to help visually impaired persons and blind people to work with fax machines and the like, and the ability to help sighted people with no prior knowledge of Braille to understand hard-copy Braille manuscripts.

  16. Measurements of nonlinear optical properties of PVDF/ZnO using Z-scan technique

    Shanshool, Haider Mohammed, E-mail: haidshan62@gmail.com [Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Yahaya, Muhammad [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang (Malaysia); Abdullah, Ibtisam Yahya [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Mosul, Mosul (Iraq)

    2015-10-15

    The nonlinear optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) polymer are investigated. PVDF/ZnO nanocomposites were prepared by mixing different concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles, as the filler, with PVDF, as the polymer matrix, using casting method. Acetone was used as a solvent for the polymer. FTIR spectra of the samples were analyzed thus confirming the formation of α and β phases. The absorbance spectra of the samples were obtained, thereby showing high absorption in the UV region. The linear absorption coefficient was calculated. The single-beam Z-scan technique was used to measure the nonlinear refractive index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the PVDF/ZnO nanocomposite samples. We observed that the nonlinear refractive index is in the order of 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/W with the negative sign, whereas the nonlinear absorption coefficient is in the order of 10{sup -8} cm/W. (author)

  17. Scanning laser optical tomography resolves structural plasticity during regeneration in an insect brain.

    René Eickhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical Projection Tomography (OPT is a microscopic technique that generates three dimensional images from whole mount samples the size of which exceeds the maximum focal depth of confocal laser scanning microscopes. As an advancement of conventional emission-OPT, Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOTy allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and absorbance with high sensitivity. In the present study, we employ SLOTy in a paradigm of brain plasticity in an insect model system. METHODOLOGY: We visualize and quantify volumetric changes in sensory information procession centers in the adult locust, Locusta migratoria. Olfactory receptor neurons, which project from the antenna into the brain, are axotomized by crushing the antennal nerve or ablating the entire antenna. We follow the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the olfactory centers (antennal lobes and mushroom bodies by measuring their size in reconstructed SLOTy images with respect to the untreated control side. Within three weeks post treatment antennal lobes with ablated antennae lose as much as 60% of their initial volume. In contrast, antennal lobes with crushed antennal nerves initially shrink as well, but regain size back to normal within three weeks. The combined application of transmission-and fluorescence projections of Neurobiotin labeled axotomized fibers confirms that recovery of normal size is restored by regenerated afferents. Remarkably, SLOTy images reveal that degeneration of olfactory receptor axons has a trans-synaptic effect on second order brain centers and leads to size reduction of the mushroom body calyx. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SLOTy is a suitable method for rapid screening of volumetric plasticity in insect brains and suggests its application also to vertebrate preparations.

  18. All-optical histology using two photon laser scanning microscopy and ablation with ultrashort pulses

    Tsai, Philbert S.

    This dissertation discusses the use of ultrashort laser pulses to image and manipulate tissue for the purpose of three-dimensional histological reconstruction of extended brain structures. Two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and ultrashort pulsed laser ablation are used to provide in situ three-dimensional imaging through thick preparations of fixed tissue. Surface regions of fixed tissue are first imaged using TPLSM. The imaged regions are then removed by ablation with amplified, ultrashort laser pulses, thereby exposing a previously underlying tissue region for imaging. This process of imaging and ablation proceeds iteratively until the desired tissue volume has been processed. First, the principles, design, and construction of a two photon laser scanning microscope are discussed, followed by a discussion of the physical mechanisms of tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses. The compatibility of tissue ablation using ultrashort pulses with subsequent histological analysis, particularly with fluorescent microscopy, is evaluated. Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses is found to produce ablated tissue surfaces that are smooth to within a micrometer. Intrinsic fluorescence as well as immunoreactivity are found to be resilient to the ablation process. The all-optical histological technique is demonstrated on brain tissue from rats and mice, including tissue from embryonic mouse as early at E15. The ablation process is shown to preserve both macroscopic and microscopic structures within tissue. To facilitate the all-optical histological analysis of neuronal vasculature and its relative distribution to surrounding neuronal tissue, a fluorescent gel perfusion technique is developed that provides a temperature-stabilized fluorescent label of the neuronal vasculature. The use of immunohistochemistry to label specific cell populations throughout an 800 micrometer-thick tissue section is demonstrated. Additionally, the immersion of fixed tissue in high

  19. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  20. Combining scanning haptic microscopy and fibre optic Raman spectroscopy for tissue characterization.

    Candefjord, S; Murayama, Y; Nyberg, M; Hallberg, J; Ramser, K; Ljungberg, B; Bergh, A; Lindahl, O A

    2012-08-01

    The tactile resonance method (TRM) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) are promising for tissue characterization in vivo. Our goal is to combine these techniques into one instrument, to use TRM for swift scanning, and RS for increasing the diagnostic power. The aim of this study was to determine the classification accuracy, using support vector machines, for measurements on porcine tissue and also produce preliminary data on human prostate tissue. This was done by developing a new experimental set-up combining micro-scale TRM-scanning haptic microscopy (SHM)-for assessing stiffness on a micro-scale, with fibre optic RS measurements for assessing biochemical content. We compared the accuracy using SHM alone versus SHM combined with RS, for different degrees of tissue homogeneity. The cross-validation classification accuracy for healthy porcine tissue types using SHM alone was 65-81%, and when RS was added it increased to 81-87%. The accuracy for healthy and cancerous human tissue was 67-70% when only SHM was used, and increased to 72-77% for the combined measurements. This shows that the potential for swift and accurate classification of healthy and cancerous prostate tissue is high. This is promising for developing a tool for probing the surgical margins during prostate cancer surgery.

  1. Low-dose adaptive sequential scan for dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with high heart rate: Comparison with retrospective ECG gating

    Xu Lei, E-mail: leixu2001@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Yang Lin, E-mail: anna7949@163.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Zhang Zhaoqi, E-mail: zhaoqi5000@vip.sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Li Yu, E-mail: athen06@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Fan Zhanming, E-mail: fanzm120@tom.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Ma Xiaohai, E-mail: maxi8238@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Lv Biao, E-mail: biao_lu2007@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Yu Wei, E-mail: yuwei02@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To explore feasibility of dual-source CT (DS-CT) prospective ECG-gated coronary angiography in patients with heart rate (HR) higher than 70 beat per minute (bpm), and evaluate image quality and radiation dose with comparison to retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. Materials and methods: One hundred patients who underwent DS-CT coronary angiography (DS-CTCA) with mean HR higher than 70 bpm but below 110 bpm were enrolled in the study, 50 were scanned by adaptive sequential scan and another 50 were analyzed by retrospectively gated CT scan. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments in the two groups was evaluated using a four-point grading scale by two independent reviewers. Patient radiation dose was calculated by multiplying dose length product by conversion coefficient of 0.017. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups for mean HR (p = 0.305), HR variability (p = 0.103), body mass index (p = 0.472), and scan length (p = 0.208). There was good agreement for image quality scoring between the two reviewers (Kappa = 0.72). Coronary evaluability of adaptive sequential scan was 99.7% (608 of 610 segments), while that of retrospective gated scan was 98.7% (614 of 622 segments), showing similar coronary evaluability (p = 0.061). Effective doses of adaptive sequential scan and retrospective gated scan were 5.1 {+-} 1.6 and 11.8 {+-} 4.5 mSv, respectively (p < 0.001), showing that adaptive sequential scan reduced radiation dose by 57% compared with that of retrospective gated scan. Conclusions: In patients with 70-110 bpm HR, DS-CTCA adaptive sequential scan shows similar image quality as retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan with 57% reduction of radiation dose.

  2. The numerical simulation tool for the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Agapito, Guido; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco; Oberti, Sylvain; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Lombini, Matteo; Butler, Chris R; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cortecchia, Fausto; Patti, Mauro; Esposito, Simone; Feautrier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is a hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implements the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and uses libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.

  3. The numerical simulation tool for the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    Arcidiacono, C.; Schreiber, L.; Bregoli, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Foppiani, I.; Agapito, G.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Oberti, S.; Cosentino, G.; Lombini, M.; Butler, R. C.; Ciliegi, P.; Cortecchia, F.; Patti, M.; Esposito, S.; Feautrier, P.

    2016-07-01

    The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is an hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implement the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and use libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.

  4. Robo-AO: An Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics and Science System

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, Nicholas; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Dekany, Richard; Bui, Khanh; Davis, Jack; Zolkower, Jeff; Fucik, Jason; Burse, Mahesh; Das, Hillol; Chordia, Pravin; Kasliwal, Mansi; Ofek, Eran; Morton, Timothy; Johnson, John

    2011-07-01

    Robo-AO, a fully autonomous, laser guide star adaptive optics and science system, is being commissioned at Palomar Observatory's 60-inch telescope. Here we discuss the instrument, scientific goals and results of initial on-sky operation.

  5. Robo-AO: An Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics and Science System

    Baranec, Christoph; Ramaprakash, A N; Law, Nicholas; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Dekany, Richard; Bui, Khanh; Davis, Jack; Zolkower, Jeff; Fucik, Jason; Burse, Mahesh; Das, Hillol; Chordia, Pravin; Kasliwal, Mansi; Ofek, Eran; Morton, Timothy; Johnson, John

    2012-01-01

    Robo-AO, a fully autonomous, laser guide star adaptive optics and science system, is being commissioned at Palomar Observatory's 60-inch telescope. Here we discuss the instrument, scientific goals and results of initial on-sky operation.

  6. Experimental Adaptive Digital Performance Monitoring for Optical DP-QPSK Coherent Receiver

    Borkowski, Robert; Zhang, Xu; Zibar, Darko;

    2011-01-01

    We report on a successful experimental demonstration of a digital optical performance monitoring (OPM) yielding satisfactory estimation accuracy along with adaptive impairment equalization. No observable penalty is measured when equalizer is driven by monitoring module....

  7. An Introduction to the E-ELT Instrumentation and Post-focal Adaptive Optics Module Studies

    D'Odorico, S.; Ramsay, S.; Hubin, N.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2010-06-01

    The following eleven articles provide short summaries of the conceptual design studies for the European Extremely Large Telescope instruments and post-focal adaptive optics modules. The background and scope of these studies is outlined in this introduction.

  8. Adaptive Integrated Optical Bragg Grating in Semiconductor Waveguide Suitable for Optical Signal Processing

    Moniem, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    This article presents a methodology for an integrated Bragg grating using an alloy of GaAs, AlGaAs, and InGaAs with a controllable refractive index to obtain an adaptive Bragg grating suitable for many applications on optical processing and adaptive control systems, such as limitation and filtering. The refractive index of a Bragg grating is controlled by using an external electric field for controlling periodic modulation of the refractive index of the active waveguide region. The designed Bragg grating has refractive indices programmed by using that external electric field. This article presents two approaches for designing the controllable refractive indices active region of a Bragg grating. The first approach is based on the modification of a planar micro-strip structure of the iGaAs traveling wave as the active region, and the second is based on the modification of self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots of an alloy from GaAs and InGaAs with a GaP traveling wave. The overall design and results are discussed through numerical simulation by using the finite-difference time-domain, plane wave expansion, and opto-wave simulation methods to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  9. Dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Li, Yongbo; Shinohara, Ryosuke; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2010-08-01

    A novel method to observe pH distribution by dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is developed. In this method, in order to investigate not only the pH of mitochondrial membrane but also its distribution in the vicinity, a pH sensitive fluorescent reagent covers mitochondria instead of injecting it to mitochondria. This method utilizes a dual-emission pH sensitive dye and SNOM with a themally-pulled and metal-coated optical fiber to improve the spatial resolution. Time-dependence of Fluorescent intensity ratio (FIR) under acid addition is investigated. As the distances between the dropped point and the SNOM probe becomes closer, the time when FIR changes becomes earlier. The response of mitochondria under supplement of nutrition is studied by using this method. While the probe is near to mitochondria, the ratio quickly becomes to increase. In conclusion, it was confirmed that the temporal variation of pH can be detected by this method, and pH distribution in the vicinity of mitochondria is able to be measured by this method.

  10. Investigation of Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Optical and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Rigosi, Albert F.

    The goal of this dissertation is not only to present works completed and projects initiated and accomplished, but to also attempt to teach some of the material to readers who have limited exposure to condensed matter. I will offer an introduction to two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide materials (2D TMDCs) and the mathematics required to understand the research conducted. Some effort will be given on explaining the experimental setups and preparations. Projects that required elaborate sample fabrication and the yielded results will be summarized. These results have heavy implications for the science behind bound electron-hole pairs, the effects of magnetic fields on such pairs, and extracting the useful optical properties from the material systems in which these pairs reside. Specialized fabrication techniques of samples for longer term projects that I led will also be presented, namely those of constructing heterostructures by stacking various 2D TMDCs for exploring the modulated properties of these novel arrangements. The latter portion of this dissertation will cover the nanoscopic dynamics of TMDC heterostructures. The Kramers-Kronig relations will be derived and discussed in detail. Data and results regarding the electronic structure of these materials, their heterostructures, and their custom alloys measured via scanning tunneling microscopy will be presented. Coupled with the measured optical properties, significant numerical quantities that characterize these materials are extracted. There will be several appendices that offer some supplementary information and basic summaries about all the projects that were initiated.

  11. Auto-elimination of fiber optical path-length drift in a frequency scanning interferometer for absolute distance measurements

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo

    2015-09-01

    Because of its compact size and portability, optical fiber has been wildly used as optical paths in frequency-scanning interferometers for high-precision absolute distance measurements. However, since the fiber is sensitive to ambient temperature, its length and refractive index change with temperature, resulting in an optical path length drift that influences the repeatability of measurements. To improve the thermal stability of the measurement system, a novel frequency-scanning interferometer composed of two Michelson-type interferometers sharing a common fiber optical path is proposed. One interferometer defined as origin interferometer is used to monitor the drift of the measurement origin due to the optical path length drift of the optical fiber under on-site environment. The other interferometer defined as measurement interferometer is used to measure the distance to the target. Because the optical path length drift of the fiber appears in both interferometers, its influence can be eliminated by subtracting the optical path difference of the origin interferometer from the optical path difference of the measurement interferometer. A prototype interferometer was developed in our research, and experimental results demonstrate its robustness and stability. Under on-site environment, an accuracy about 4 μm was achieved for a distance of about 1 m.

  12. 自适应光传送网%Adaptive Optical Transport Network

    王加莹; 赵继军; 刘赛

    2005-01-01

    提出未来光网络的智能化特征,包括连接智能化、业务智能化和传输自适应三个方面.这几个方面的特征将成为未来自适应光传送网的标志.%Intelligent features of future optical transport self-adaptation' ,which will construct an integrated earmark of future self-adaptive optical transport network.

  13. Estimation of Satellite Orientation from Space Surveillance Imagery Measured with an Adaptive Optics Telescope

    1996-12-01

    SATELLITE ORIENTATION FROM SPACE SURVEILLANCE IMAGERY MEASURED WITH AN ADAPTIVE OPTICS TELESCOPE THESIS Gregory E. Wood Lieutenant, USAF AFIT/GSO/ENP...the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U. S. Government. AFIT/GSO/ENP/96D-02 ESTIMATION OF SATELLITE ORIENTATION FROM...surveillance operations. xii ESTIMATION OF SATELLITE ORIENTATION FROM SPACE SURVEILLANCE IMAGERY MEASURED WITH AN ADAPTIVE OPTICS TELESCOPE

  14. Sensitivity calibration procedures in optical-CT scanning of BANG 3 polymer gel dosimeters

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Maryanski, Marek J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 and MGS Research Inc., Madison, Connecticut 06443 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The dose response of the BANG 3 polymer gel dosimeter (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) was studied using the OCTOPUS laser CT scanner (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT). Six 17 cm diameter and 12 cm high Barex cylinders, and 18 small glass vials were used to house the gel. The gel phantoms were irradiated with 6 and 10 MV photons, as well as 12 and 16 MeV electrons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Three calibration methods were used to obtain the dose response curves: (a) Optical density measurements on the 18 glass vials irradiated with graded doses from 0 to 4 Gy using 6 or 10 MV large field irradiations; (b) optical-CT scanning of Barex cylinders irradiated with graded doses (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy) from four adjacent 4x4 cm{sup 2} photon fields or 6x6 cm{sup 2} electron fields; and (c) percent depth dose (PDD) comparison of optical-CT scans with ion chamber measurements for 6x6 cm{sup 2}, 12 and 16 MeV electron fields. The dose response of the BANG 3 gel was found to be linear and energy independent within the uncertainties of the experimental methods (about 3%). The slopes of the linearly fitted dose response curves (dose sensitivities) from the four field irradiations (0.0752{+-}3%, 0.0756{+-}3%, 0.0767{+-}3%, and 0.0759{+-}3% cm{sup -1} Gy{sup -1}) and the PDD matching methods (0.0768{+-}3% and 0.0761{+-}3% cm{sup -1} Gy{sup -1}) agree within 2.2%, indicating a good reproducibility of the gel dose response within phantoms of the same geometry. The dose sensitivities from the glass vial approach are different from those of the cylindrical Barex phantoms by more than 30%, owing probably to the difference in temperature inside the two types of phantoms during gel formation and irradiation, and possible oxygen contamination of the glass vial walls. The dose response curve obtained from the PDD matching approach with 16 MeV electron field was used to calibrate the gel phantom irradiated with the 12 MeV, 6x6 cm{sup 2} electron field. Three-dimensional dose distributions

  15. Scan-based volume animation driven by locally adaptive articulated registrations.

    Rhee, Taehyun; Lewis, J P; Neumann, Ulrich; Nayak, Krishna S

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a complete system to create anatomically accurate example-based volume deformation and animation of articulated body regions, starting from multiple in vivo volume scans of a specific individual. In order to solve the correspondence problem across volume scans, a template volume is registered to each sample. The wide range of pose variations is first approximated by volume blend deformation (VBD), providing proper initialization of the articulated subject in different poses. A novel registration method is presented to efficiently reduce the computation cost while avoiding strong local minima inherent in complex articulated body volume registration. The algorithm highly constrains the degrees of freedom and search space involved in the nonlinear optimization, using hierarchical volume structures and locally constrained deformation based on the biharmonic clamped spline. Our registration step establishes a correspondence across scans, allowing a data-driven deformation approach in the volume domain. The results provide an occlusion-free person-specific 3D human body model, asymptotically accurate inner tissue deformations, and realistic volume animation of articulated movements driven by standard joint control estimated from the actual skeleton. Our approach also addresses the practical issues arising in using scans from living subjects. The robustness of our algorithms is tested by their applications on the hand, probably the most complex articulated region in the body, and the knee, a frequent subject area for medical imaging due to injuries.

  16. High resolution mesospheric sodium properties for adaptive optics applications

    Pfrommer, T.; Hickson, P.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The performance of laser guide star adaptive optics (AO) systems for large optical and infrared telescopes is affected by variability of the sodium layer, located at altitudes between 80 and 120 km in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The abundance and density structure of the atomic sodium found in this region is subject to local and global weather effects, planetary and gravity waves and magnetic storms, and is variable on time scales down to tens of milliseconds, a range relevant to AO. Aims: It is therefore important to characterize the structure and dynamical evolution of the sodium region on small, as well as large spatial and temporal scales. Parameters of particular importance for AO are the mean sodium altitude, sodium layer width and the temporal power spectrum of the centroid altitude. Methods: We have conducted a three-year campaign employing a high-resolution lidar system installed on the 6-m Large Zenith Telescope (LZT) located near Vancouver, Canada. During this period, 112 nights of useful data were obtained. Results: The vertical density profile of atomic sodium shows remarkable structure and variability. Smooth Gaussian-shaped profiles rarely occur. Multiple internal layers are frequently found. These layers often have sharp lower edges, with scale heights of just a few hundred meters, and tend to drift downwards at a typical rate of one kilometer every two to three hours. Individual layers can persist for many hours, but their density and internal structure can be highly variable. Sporadic layers are seen reaching peak densities several times the average, often in just a few minutes. Coherent vertical oscillations are often found, typically extending over tens of kilometers in altitude. Regions of turbulence are evident and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are sometimes seen. The mean value of the centroid altitude is found to be 90.8 ± 0.1 km. The sodium layer width was determined by computing the altitude range that contains a

  17. Measurement of the Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Coefficient of ZnO Crystals by Using ICCD-Z-Scan

    JIA Guang-Ming; ZHANG Gui-Zhong; XIANG Wang-Hua; J.B.Ketterson

    2004-01-01

    We present an image-intensified charge-coupled-device (ICCD) version of Z-scan by employing an ICCD detector and fixing the sample at the beam waist, and a measurement of the third-order nonlinear optical coefficient of single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO). The X(3) value of -9.1 × 10-15 cm2/W measured is in agreement with the published result. Our Z-scan configuration of placing sample at beam waist and collecting the whole wavefront by an ICCD detector is simple and can be deployed in cryogenic research where the sample cannot be Z-scanned.

  18. Scanning second-harmonic optical microscopy of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    or in the illumination itself. Thus, a combination of scanning microscopy with SH detection may be a highly suitable candidate to reveal the presence of QD's embedded in an otherwise isotropic material. We have used scanning far-field (SFOM) and scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) techniques to locally probe......Microscopy provides a suitable technique for local probing of small ensembles of (or even individual) QD's, and when combined with the detection of second-harmonic (SH) generation the technique becomes suitable to reveal tiny changes of symmetry originating either in the material structures...

  19. Nonlinear optical processes at quadrupole polariton resonance in Cu2O as probed by a Z-scan technique

    Mani, S.; Jang, J. I.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2010-09-01

    Employing a modified Z-scan technique at 2 K, we monitor not only the fundamental (ω) but also the frequency-doubled (2ω) and tripled (3ω) Z-scan responses in Cu2O when the input laser frequency ω is tuned to the two-photon quadrupole polariton resonance. The Z-scan response at ω allows us to accurately estimate the absolute number of polaritons generated via two-photon absorption. A striking dip is observed near the 2ω Z-scan focus which basically arises from Auger-type recombination of polaritons. Under high excitation levels, the 3ω Z-scan shows strong third harmonic generation. Based on the nonlinear optical parameters determined, we estimate the experimental polariton density achievable and propose a direction for polariton-based Bose-Einstein condensation in Cu2O .

  20. Increased illumination uniformity and reduced photodamage offered by the Lissajous scanning in fiber-optic two-photon endomicroscopy.

    Liang, Wenxuan; Murari, Kartikeya; Zhang, Yuying; Chen, Yongping; Li, Ming-Jun; Li, Xingde

    2012-02-01

    We compare the illumination uniformity and the associated effects of the spiral and Lissajous scanning patterns that are commonly used in an endomicroscope. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations were first performed to quantitatively investigate the area illumination density in the spiral scanning pattern. The results revealed the potential problem of manifest photodamage due to the very high illumination density in the center of the spiral scan. Similar analyses of the Lissajous scanning pattern, which can be conveniently implemented on the same endomicroscope with no hardware modifications, showed a more uniform illumination density with about an 80-fold reduction in the peak illumination density. To underscore the benefit offered by the improved illumination uniformity, we conducted in vitro two-photon fluorescence imaging of cultured cells stained with a LIVE/DEAD viability assay using our home-built, fiber-optic, two-channel endomicroscopy system. Both the spiral and the Lissajous scans were implemented. Our experimental results showed that cells near the spiral scan center experienced obvious photodamage, whereas cells remained alive over the entire region under the Lissajous beam scanning, confirming the predicted advantage offered by the Lissajous scan over this spiral scan in an endomicroscopy setting.

  1. Whole-Genome Scans Provide Evidence of Adaptive Evolution in Malawian Plasmodium falciparum Isolates

    Ocholla, Harold; Preston, Mark D; Mipando, Mwapatsa;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Selection by host immunity and antimalarial drugs has driven extensive adaptive evolution in Plasmodium falciparum and continues to produce ever-changing landscapes of genetic variation. METHODS:  We performed whole-genome sequencing of 69 P. falciparum isolates from Malawi and used ...

  2. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (i...

  3. Three dimensional laser microfabrication in diamond using a dual adaptive optics system.

    Simmonds, Richard D; Salter, Patrick S; Jesacher, Alexander; Booth, Martin J

    2011-11-21

    Femtosecond laser fabrication of controlled three dimensional structures deep in the bulk of diamond is facilitated by a dual adaptive optics system. A deformable mirror is used in parallel with a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to compensate the extreme aberrations caused by the refractive index mismatch between the diamond and the objective immersion medium. It is shown that aberration compensation is essential for the generation of controlled micron-scale features at depths greater than 200 μm, and the dual adaptive optics approach demonstrates increased fabrication efficiency relative to experiments using a single adaptive element.

  4. A fully automatic framework for cell segmentation on non-confocal adaptive optics images

    Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Tam, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    By the time most retinal diseases are diagnosed, macroscopic irreversible cellular loss has already occurred. Earlier detection of subtle structural changes at the single photoreceptor level is now possible, using the adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). This work aims to develop a fully automatic segmentation framework to extract cell boundaries from non-confocal split-detection AOSLO images of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living human eye. Significant challenges include anisotropy, heterogeneous cell regions arising from shading effects, and low contrast between cells and background. To overcome these challenges, we propose the use of: 1) multi-scale Hessian response to detect heterogeneous cell regions, 2) convex hulls to create boundary templates, and 3) circularlyconstrained geodesic active contours to refine cell boundaries. We acquired images from three healthy subjects at eccentric retinal regions and manually contoured cells to generate ground-truth for evaluating segmentation accuracy. Dice coefficient, relative absolute area difference, and average contour distance were 82±2%, 11±6%, and 2.0±0.2 pixels (Mean±SD), respectively. We find that strong shading effects from vessels are a main factor that causes cell oversegmentation and false segmentation of non-cell regions. Our segmentation algorithm can automatically and accurately segment photoreceptor cells on non-confocal AOSLO images, which is the first step in longitudinal tracking of cellular changes in the individual eye over the time course of disease progression.

  5. Deriving comprehensive error breakdown for wide field adaptive optics systems using end-to-end simulations

    Ferreira, F.; Gendron, E.; Rousset, G.; Gratadour, D.

    2016-07-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) adaptive optics (AO) systems will aim at wide field correction and large sky coverage. Their performance will be improved by using post processing techniques, such as point spread function (PSF) deconvolution. The PSF estimation involves characterization of the different error sources in the AO system. Such error contributors are difficult to estimate: simulation tools are a good way to do that. We have developed in COMPASS (COMputing Platform for Adaptive opticS Systems), an end-to-end simulation tool using GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) acceleration, an estimation tool that provides a comprehensive error budget by the outputs of a single simulation run.

  6. Adaptive Optical Phase Estimation Using Time-Symmetric Quantum Smoothing

    Wheatley, T A; Yonezawa, H; Nakane, D; Arao, H; Pope, D T; Ralph, T C; Wiseman, H M; Furusawa, A; Huntington, E H

    2009-01-01

    Quantum parameter estimation has many applications, from gravitational wave detection to quantum key distribution. We present the first experimental demonstration of the time-symmetric technique of quantum smoothing. We consider both adaptive and non-adaptive quantum smoothing, and show that both are better than their well-known time-asymmetric counterparts (quantum filtering). For the problem of estimating a stochastically varying phase shift on a coherent beam, our theory predicts that adaptive quantum smoothing (the best scheme) gives an estimate with a mean-square error up to $2\\sqrt{2}$ times smaller than that from non-adaptive quantum filtering (the standard quantum limit). The experimentally measured improvement is $2.24 \\pm 0.14$.

  7. Characterization of Si3N4/SiO2 optical channel waveguides by photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    Wang, Yan; Chudgar, Mona H.; Jackson, Howard E.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1993-01-01

    Photon scanning tunneling microscopy (PSTM) is used to characterize Si3N4/Si02 optical channel waveguides being used for integrated optical-micromechanical sensors. PSTM utilizes an optical fiber tapered to a fine point which is piezoelectrically positioned to measure the decay of the evanescent field intensity associated with the waveguide propagating mode. Evanescent field decays are recorded for both ridge channel waveguides and planar waveguide regions. Values for the local effective refractive index are calculated from the data for both polarizations and compared to model calculations.

  8. A genome scan for candidate genes involved in the adaptation of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    Vilas, Román; Vandamme, Sara G; Vera, Manuel; Bouza, Carmen; Maes, Gregory E; Volckaert, Filip A M; Martínez, Paulino

    2015-10-01

    Partitioning phenotypic variance in genotypic and environmental variance may benefit from the population genomic assignment of genes putatively involved in adaptation. We analyzed a total of 256 markers (120 microsatellites and 136 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms - SNPs), several of them associated to Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for growth and resistance to pathologies, with the aim to identify potential adaptive variation in turbot Scophthalmus maximus L. The study area in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean, from Iberian Peninsula to the Baltic Sea, involves a gradual change in temperature and an abrupt change in salinity conditions. We detected 27 candidate loci putatively under selection. At least four of the five SNPs identified as outliers are located within genes coding for ribosomal proteins or directly related with the production of cellular proteins. One of the detected outliers, previously identified as part of a QTL for growth, is a microsatellite linked to a gene coding for a growth factor receptor. A similar set of outliers was detected when natural populations were compared with a sample subjected to strong artificial selection for growth along four generations. The observed association between FST outliers and growth-related QTL supports the hypothesis of changes in growth as an adaptation to differences in temperature and salinity conditions. However, further work is needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  9. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in subgroups of multiple sclerosis, measured by optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry

    T.A.M. Siepman (Theodora); M. Wefers Bettink-Remeijer (Marijke); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOptical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry (GDx ECC) are non-invasive methods used to assess retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, which may be a reliable tool used to monitor axonal loss in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objectives of this study are (1) to com

  10. Direct characterization of ultraviolet-light-induced refractive index structures by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Madsen, S.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    1998-01-01

    We have applied a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope to directly probe ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced refractive index structures in planar glass samples. This technique permits direct comparison between topography and refractive index changes (10(-5)-10(-3)) with submicrometer...

  11. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Test-Bed for Vision Science

    Wilks, S C; Thomspon, C A; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B J; Barnes, T; Werner, J S

    2001-09-27

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  12. Adaptive optics for in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of neuronal networks

    Meimon, Serge; Conan, Jean-Marc; Mugnier, Laurent M.; Michau, Vincent; Cossart, Rosa; Malvache, Arnaud

    2014-03-01

    The landscape of biomedical research in neuroscience has changed dramatically in recent years as a result of spectacular progress in dynamic microscopy. However, the optical accessibility of deep brain structures or deeper regions of the surgically exposed hippocampus (a few 100 microns typically) remains limited, due to volumic aberrations created by the sample inhomogeneities. Adaptive optics can correct for these aberrations. Our goal is to realize a novel adaptive optics module dedicated to in vivo two-photon calcium imaging of the hippocampus. The key issue in adaptive optics is the ability to perform an accurate and reliable wavefront sensing. In two- photon microscopy indirect methods are required. Two families of approaches have been proposed so far, the modal sensorless technique and a method based on pupil segmentation. We present here a formal comparison of these approaches, in particular as a function of the amount of aberrations.

  13. Scanning near-field optical microscopy on rough surfaces: applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear-force apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM with very sharp uncoated tapered waveguides relies on the unexpected enhancement of reflection in the shear-force gap. It is the technique for obtaining chemical (materials contrast in the optical image of “real world” surfaces that are rough and very rough without topographical artifacts, and it is by far less complicated than other SNOM techniques that can only be used for very flat surfaces. The experimental use of the new photophysical effect is described. The applications of the new technique are manifold. Important mechanistic questions in solid-state chemistry (oxidation, diazotization, photodimerization, surface hydration, hydrolysis are answered with respect to simultaneous AFM (atomic force microscopy and detailed crystal packing. Prehistoric petrified bacteria and concomitant pyrite inclusions are also investigated with local RAMAN SNOM. Polymer beads and unstained biological objects (rabbit heart, shrimp eye allow for nanoscopic analysis of cell organelles. Similarly, human teeth and a cancerous tissue are analyzed. Bladder cancer tissue is clearly differentiated from healthy tissue without staining and this opens a new highly promising diagnostic tool for precancer diagnosis. Industrial applications are demonstrated at the corrosion behavior of dental alloys (withdrawal of a widely used alloy, harmless substitutes, improvement of paper glazing, behavior of blood bags upon storage, quality assessment of metal particle preparations for surface enhanced RAMAN spectroscopy, and determination of diffusion coefficient and light fastness in textile fiber dyeing. The latter applications include fluorescence SNOM. Local fluorescence SNOM is also used in the study of partly aggregating dye nanoparticles within resin/varnish preparations. Unexpected new insights are obtained in all of the various fields that cannot be obtained by other techniques.

  14. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  15. Third-order nonlinear optical responses in derivatives of phenylhydrazone by Z-scan and optical limiting studies-influence of noble metal nanoparticles

    Sudheesh, P.; Siji Narendran, N. K.; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2013-12-01

    Here we report a study on the third-order nonlinear optical properties of a new class of phenylhydrazones and the influence of silver and gold metal nanoparticles on their nonlinear response. Metal nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation method. Single beam Z-scan technique with a 7 ns, 10 Hz Nd: YAG laser pulses at 532 nm were employed for the measurements. The compounds exhibit well optical limiting properties. Hence, these compounds are a promising class of materials for the optical device applications.

  16. Tuning of successively scanned two monolithic Vernier-tuned lasers and selective data sampling in optical comb swept source optical coherence tomography.

    Choi, Dong-Hak; Yoshimura, Reiko; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Monolithic Vernier tuned super-structure grating distributed Bragg reflector (SSG-DBR) lasers are expected to become one of the most promising sources for swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) with a long coherence length, reduced sensitivity roll-off, and potential capability for a very fast A-scan rate. However, previous implementations of the lasers suffer from four main problems: 1) frequencies deviate from the targeted values when scanned, 2) large amounts of noise appear associated with abrupt changes in injection currents, 3) optically aliased noise appears due to a long coherence length, and 4) the narrow wavelength coverage of a single chip limits resolution. We have developed a method of dynamical frequency tuning, a method of selective data sampling to eliminate current switching noise, an interferometer to reduce aliased noise, and an excess-noise-free connection of two serially scanned lasers to enhance resolution to solve these problems. An optical frequency comb SS-OCT system was achieved with a sensitivity of 124 dB and a dynamic range of 55-72 dB that depended on the depth at an A-scan rate of 3.1 kHz with a resolution of 15 μm by discretely scanning two SSG-DBR lasers, i.e., L-band (1.560-1.599 μm) and UL-band (1.598-1.640 μm). A few OCT images with excellent image penetration depth were obtained.

  17. Feasibility of fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for imaging of dental cavity

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Che Ani, Adi Izhar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Yasin, Moh.; Apsari, Retna; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for the imaging of dental cavity. Here, we discuss our preliminary results in the imaging of cavities on various teeth surfaces, as well as measurement of the diameter of the cavities which are represented by drilled holes on the teeth surfaces. Based on the analysis of displacement measurement, the sensitivities and linear range for the molar, canine, hybrid composite resin, and acrylic surfaces are obtained at 0.09667 mV/mm and 0.45 mm 0.775 mV/mm and 0.4 mm 0.5109 mV/mm and 0.5 mm and 0.25 mV/mm and 0.5 mm, respectively, with a good linearity of more than 99%. The results also show a clear distinction between the cavity and surrounding tooth region. The stability, simplicity of design, and low cost of fabrication make it suitable for restorative dentistry.

  18. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  19. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  20. Hyperspectral nanoscale imaging on dielectric substrates with coaxial optical antenna scan probes.

    Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Schwartzberg, Adam; Cornaglia, Matteo; Ismach, Ariel; Urban, Jeffrey J; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven; Bokor, Jeffrey; Salmeron, Miquel B; Ogletree, D Frank; Ashby, Paul; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P James

    2011-03-09

    We have demonstrated hyperspectral tip-enhanced Raman imaging on dielectric substrates using linearly polarized light and nanofabricated coaxial antenna tips. A full Raman spectrum was acquired at each pixel of a 256 by 256 pixel contact-mode atomic force microscope image of carbon nanotubes grown on a fused silica microscope coverslip, allowing D and G mode intensity and D-mode peak shifts to be measured with ∼20 nm spatial resolution. Tip enhancement was sufficient to acquire useful Raman spectra in 50-100 ms. Coaxial scan probes combine the efficiency and enhanced, ultralocalized optical fields of plasmonically coupled antennae with the superior topographical imaging properties of sharp metal tips. The yield of the coaxial tip fabrication process is close to 100%, and the tips are sufficiently durable to support hours of contact-mode force microscope imaging. Our coaxial probes avoid the limitations associated with the "gap-mode" imaging geometry used in most tip-enhanced Raman studies to date, where a sharp metal tip is held ∼1 nm above a metallic substrate with the sample located in the gap.

  1. Off-Resonant Third-Order Optical Nonlinearity of Au Nanoparticle Array by Femtosecond Z-scan Measurement

    WANG Kai; LONG Hua; FU Ming; YANG Guang; LU Pei-Xiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ A periodic triangular-shaped Au nanoparticle array is fabricated on a quartz substrate using nanosphere lithography and pulled laser deposition,and the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metal particles are studied.The morphology of the polystyrene nanosphere mask(D=820 nm)and the A u nanoparticle array are investigated by scanning electron microscopy.The surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is observed at 606 nm,which is in good agreement with the calculated result using the discrete dipole approximation method.By performing the Z-scan method with femtosecond laser(800nm,50fs),the optical nonlinearities of Au nanoparticle array are determined.The results show that the Au particles exhibit negative nonlinear absorption and positive nonlinear refractive index with the effective third-order optical nonlinear susceptibility Xeff(3)can be up to(8.8±1.0)×10-10 esu under non-resonant femtosecond laser excitation.

  2. Segmentation of the Optic Disc and Optic Cup Using Histogram Feature-Based Adaptive Threshold for Cup to Disk Ratio

    Nugraha Gibran Satya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a condition of increased intraocular pressure within the eyes. Such increase then causes the damage on optic nerves as the organ bringing information to be processed in brain. One of the parameters to detect the glaucoma is the ratio between the optic cup and optic disc that can be identified through an examination towards the retinal fundus image of the patient. The ratio is obtained by firstly calculating the width of the area of the optic cup and the optic disc. This research was aimed to propose a method of the segmentation of the optic cup and optic disc with the adaptive threshold. The value of the adaptive threshold was obtained once calculating the mean value and standard deviation on the retinal fundus image of the patient. Before conducting the segmentation, the red component of the image would firstly be extracted followed by doing the contrast stretching. The last one was to perform the morphological operation such as closing and opening to remove the blood vessel to make the ratio calculation more accurate. This method has been tested in a number of retinal fundus images coming from DRISTHI-GS and RIM-ONE.

  3. Development of a scanning nearfield optical microscope for low-temperature investigations of semiconductor nanostructures

    Hodeck, Kai Friedrich

    2009-02-19

    In the present work the electronic structure of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/GaAs and InAs/GaAs quantum dots which are characterized by a particularly low ground state transition energy, was investigated using Scanning Nearfield Optical Microscopy (SNOM). The pivotal question of the presented investigations is, which influence the interaction of the confined carriers has on the energy states of the biexcitons and the multiexcitons in a quantum dot. Therefore, photoluminescence spectra of single quantum dots were investigated under varying excitation intensity at different temperatures between 5 K and 300 K. The construction of a novel scanning nearfield microscope especially for low temperatures allowed the investigation of single quantum dots. Due to significant improvements of the positioning technology and the shear-force distance control between the sample and the nearfield probe a stable scanning of the quantum dot samples at 5 K could be demonstrated, showing a lateral optical resolution of 200 nm. This way, in the photoluminescence spectroscopy of single quantum dots the thermal linewidth broadening of the detected light was reduced down to a value of less than 1 meV, which allowed the identification of the transitions of biexcitons and multiexcitons. On the basis of the performed measurements, for the InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots a biexciton state was identified, with variable binding energies of 2-7 meV. Furthermore, a positively charged trion state with a binding energy of 11 meV was observed, showing high emission intensity, which can be assigned to the sample doping. Accordingly, for the positively charged biexciton state a binding energy of 11 meV can be announced. For the investigated InAs/GaAs quantum dots a biexciton state with binding energies of 3-4 meV was found. Some of the investigated InAs/GaAs quantum dots showed the formation of positively charged states, in particular of a trion state with a binding energy of 3 meV, and of the positively charged

  4. Interferometric velocity measurements through a fluctuating gas-liquid interface employing adaptive optics.

    Büttner, Lars; Leithold, Christoph; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-12-16

    Optical transmission through fluctuating interfaces of mediums with different refractive indexes is limited by the occurring distortions. Temporal fluctuations of such distortions deteriorate optical measurements. In order to overcome this shortcoming we propose the use of adaptive optics. For the first time, an interferometric velocity measurement technique with embedded adaptive optics is presented for flow velocity measurements through a fluctuating air-water interface. A low order distortion correction technique using a fast deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack camera with high frame rate is employed. The obtained high control bandwidth enables precise measurements also at fast fluctuating media interfaces. This methodology paves the way for several kinds of optical flow measurements in various complex environments.

  5. A scanning probe-based pick-and-place procedure for assembly of integrated quantum optical hybrid devices

    Schell, Andreas W; Schröder, Tim; Wolters, Janik; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Integrated quantum optical hybrid devices consist of fundamental constituents such as single emitters and tailored photonic nanostructures. A reliable fabrication method requires the controlled deposition of active nanoparticles on arbitrary nanostructures with highest precision. Here, we describe an easily adaptable technique that employs picking and placing of nanoparticles with an atomic force microscope combined with a confocal setup. In this way, both the topography and the optical response can be monitored simultaneously before and after the assembly. The technique can be applied to arbitrary particles. Here, we focus on nanodiamonds containing single nitrogen vacancy centers, which are particularly interesting for quantum optical experiments on the single photon and single emitter level.

  6. Quality evaluation of adaptive optical image based on DCT and Rényi entropy

    Xu, Yuannan; Li, Junwei; Wang, Jing; Deng, Rong; Dong, Yanbing

    2015-04-01

    The adaptive optical telescopes play a more and more important role in the detection system on the ground, and the adaptive optical images are so many that we need find a suitable method of quality evaluation to choose good quality images automatically in order to save human power. It is well known that the adaptive optical images are no-reference images. In this paper, a new logarithmic evaluation method based on the use of the discrete cosine transform(DCT) and Rényi entropy for the adaptive optical images is proposed. Through the DCT using one or two dimension window, the statistical property of Rényi entropy for images is studied. The different directional Rényi entropy maps of an input image containing different information content are obtained. The mean values of different directional Rényi entropy maps are calculated. For image quality evaluation, the different directional Rényi entropy and its standard deviation corresponding to region of interest is selected as an indicator for the anisotropy of the images. The standard deviation of different directional Rényi entropy is obtained as the quality evaluation value for adaptive optical image. Experimental results show the proposed method that the sorting quality matches well with the visual inspection.

  7. Packetisation in Optical Packet Switch Fabrics using adaptive timeout values

    Mortensen, Brian Bach

    2006-01-01

    to the inter arrival rate at the individual VOQs. The remaining thresholds applies to the optical slot level inter arrival rate at the input and output line cards. If any measurements are beyond a given threshold, the higher timeout value is used. The proposed method can be used to make a trade-off between...... either because the timer reaches a specific timeout value, or because the optical packet is completely filled with segments. Only two distinct values of the timeout value are used. Which of the two timeout values to use, is selected by 3 different control thresholds. The first threshold level applies...

  8. Oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces by scanning near-field optical lithography using uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes

    Madsen, Steen; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Birkelund, Karen;

    1997-01-01

    Optically induced oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces using a scanning near-field optical microscope was achieved with both uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes. Line scans on amorphous silicon using uncoated fiber probes display a three-peak profile after etching in potassium ...

  9. Adaptive Optics for EUV Lithography: Phase Retrieval for Wavefront Metrology

    Polo, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, optical lithography is presently the most widespread technology used to print a geometrical pattern on a semiconductor wafer. Because of the plans imposed by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) for more powerful and smaller chips, new printin

  10. Elastic all-optical multi-hop interconnection in data centers with adaptive spectrum allocation

    Hong, Yuanyuan; Hong, Xuezhi; Chen, Jiajia; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel flex-grid all-optical interconnect scheme that supports transparent multi-hop connections in data centers is proposed. An inter-rack all-optical multi-hop connection is realized with an optical loop employed at flex-grid wavelength selective switches (WSSs) in an intermediate rack rather than by relaying through optical-electric-optical (O-E-O) conversions. Compared with the conventional O-E-O based approach, the proposed all-optical scheme is able to off-load the traffic at intermediate racks, leading to a reduction of the power consumption and cost. The transmission performance of the proposed flex-grid multi-hop all-optical interconnect scheme with various modulation formats, including both coherently detected and directly detected approaches, are investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations. To enhance the spectrum efficiency (SE), number-of-hop adaptive bandwidth allocation is introduced. Numerical results show that the SE can be improved by up to 33.3% at 40 Gbps, and by up to 25% at 100 Gbps. The impact of parameters, such as targeted bit error rate (BER) level and insertion loss of components, on the transmission performance of the proposed approach are also explored. The results show that the maximum SE improvement of the adaptive approach over the non-adaptive one is enhanced with the decrease of the targeted BER levels and the component insertion loss.

  11. Development of a scalable generic platform for adaptive optics real time control

    Surendran, Avinash; Ramaprakash, A N; Parihar, Padmakar

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present project is to explore the viability of an adaptive optics control system based exclusively on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), making strong use of their parallel processing capability. In an Adaptive Optics (AO) system, the generation of the Deformable Mirror (DM) control voltages from the Wavefront Sensor (WFS) measurements is usually through the multiplication of the wavefront slopes with a predetermined reconstructor matrix. The ability to access several hundred hard multipliers and memories concurrently in an FPGA allows performance far beyond that of a modern CPU or GPU for tasks with a well defined structure such as Adaptive Optics control. The target of the current project is to generate a signal for a real time wavefront correction, from the signals coming from a Wavefront Sensor, wherein the system would be flexible to accommodate all the current Wavefront Sensing techniques and also the different methods which are used for wavefront compensation. The system ...

  12. Sky coverage modeling for the whole sky for laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    Wang, Lianqi; Andersen, David; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2012-06-01

    The scientific productivity of laser guide star adaptive optics systems strongly depends on the sky coverage, which describes the probability of finding natural guide stars for the tip/tilt wavefront sensor(s) to achieve a certain performance. Knowledge of the sky coverage is also important for astronomers planning their observations. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute the sky coverage for the laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics system, the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope project. We show that NFIRAOS can achieve more than 70% sky coverage over most of the accessible sky with the requirement of 191 nm total rms wavefront.

  13. Adaptive, optical, radial basis function neural network for handwritten digit recognition

    Foor, Wesley E.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    1995-11-01

    An adaptive, optical, radial basis function classifier for handwritten digit recognition is experimentally demonstrated. We describe a spatially multiplexed system that incorporates an on-line adaptation of weights and basis function widths to provide robustness to optical system imperfections and system noise. The optical system computes the Euclidean distances between a 100-dimensional input vector and 198 stored reference patterns in parallel by using dual vector-matrix multipliers and a contrast-reversing spatial light modulator. Software is used to emulate an electronic chip that performs the on-line learning of the weights and basis function widths. An experimental recognition rate of 92.7% correct out of 300 testing samples is achieved with the adaptive training, versus 31.0% correct for nonadaptive training. We compare the experimental results with a detailed computer model of the system in order to analyze the influence of various noise sources on the system performance.

  14. Laboratory comparison of coronagraphic concepts under dynamical seeing and high-order adaptive optics correction

    Martinez, P; Kasper, M; Boccaletti, A; Dorrer, C; Baudrand, J

    2011-01-01

    The exoplanetary science through direct imaging and spectroscopy will largely expand with the forthcoming development of new instruments at the VLT (SPHERE), Gemini (GPI), Subaru (HiCIAO), and Palomar (Project 1640) observatories. All these ground-based adaptive optics instruments combine extremely high performance adaptive optics (XAO) systems correcting for the atmospheric turbulence with advanced starlight-cancellation techniques such as coronagraphy to deliver contrast ratios of about 10-6 to 10-7. While the past fifteen years have seen intensive research and the development of high-contrast coronagraph concepts, very few concepts have been tested under dynamical seeing conditions (either during sky observation or in a realistic laboratory environment). In this paper, we discuss the results obtained with four different coronagraphs -- phase and amplitude types -- on the High-Order Testbench (HOT), the adaptive optics facility developed at ESO. This facility emphasizes realistic conditions encountered at a...

  15. Influence of the probe-sample interaction on scanning near-field optical microscopic images in the far field

    Li Zhi; Zhang Jia-Sen; Yang Jing; Gong Qi-Huang

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the influence of probe-sample interaction in a scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) in the far field by using samples with a step structure. For a sample with a step height of ~λ/4, the SNOM image contrast between the two sides of the step changes periodically at different scan heights. For a step height of ~λ/2, the image contrast remains approximately the same. The probe-sample interaction determines the SNOM image contrast here. The influence of different refractive indices of the sample has been also analysed by using a simple theoretical model.

  16. Radio over fiber link with adaptive order n‐QAM optical phase modulated OFDM and digital coherent detection

    Arlunno, Valeria; Borkowski, Robert; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Successful digital coherent demodulation of asynchronous optical phase‐modulated adaptive order QAM (4, 16, and 64) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing signals is achieved by a single reconfigurable digital receiver after 78 km of optical deployed fiber transmission....

  17. Fixation light hue bias revisited: implications for using adaptive optics to study color vision.

    Hofer, H J; Blaschke, J; Patolia, J; Koenig, D E

    2012-03-01

    Current vision science adaptive optics systems use near infrared wavefront sensor 'beacons' that appear as red spots in the visual field. Colored fixation targets are known to influence the perceived color of macroscopic visual stimuli (Jameson, D., & Hurvich, L. M. (1967). Fixation-light bias: An unwanted by-product of fixation control. Vision Research, 7, 805-809.), suggesting that the wavefront sensor beacon may also influence perceived color for stimuli displayed with adaptive optics. Despite its importance for proper interpretation of adaptive optics experiments on the fine scale interaction of the retinal mosaic and spatial and color vision, this potential bias has not yet been quantified or addressed. Here we measure the impact of the wavefront sensor beacon on color appearance for dim, monochromatic point sources in five subjects. The presence of the beacon altered color reports both when used as a fixation target as well as when displaced in the visual field with a chromatically neutral fixation target. This influence must be taken into account when interpreting previous experiments and new methods of adaptive correction should be used in future experiments using adaptive optics to study color.

  18. Robo-AO: The First Autonomous Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System for Small Telescopes

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E.; Zolkower, J.

    2011-01-01

    Robo-AO will be the first fully autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics and science system. Specifically designed to take advantage of small (1 to 3 meter) telescopes, Robo-AO will deliver high angular resolution science in the visible and near infrared for up to hundreds of targets per night. This will enable the exploration of science programs not practical for larger aperture adaptive optics systems. This presentation discusses the current status of the Robo-AO project, including the laboratory testbed, laser guide star facility and plans for a demonstration of the fully autonomous system next year.

  19. Investigation of Power8 processors for astronomical adaptive optics real-time control

    Basden, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    The forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes all require adaptive optics systems for their successful operation. The real-time control for these systems becomes computationally challenging, in part limited by the memory bandwidths required for wavefront reconstruction. We investigate new POWER8 processor technologies applied to the problem of real-time control for adaptive optics. These processors have a large memory bandwidth, and we show that they are suitable for operation of first-light ELT instrumentation, and propose some potential real-time control system designs. A CPU-based real-time control system significantly reduces complexity, improves maintainability, and leads to increased longevity for the real-time control system.

  20. AVES-IMCO: an adaptive optics visible spectrograph and imager/coronograph for NAOS

    Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Lagrange, A.-M.; Mouillet, D.; Chauvin, G.; Stadler, E.; Charton, J.; Lacombe, F.; AVES-IMCO Team

    2001-05-01

    The NAOS adaptive optics system will very soon provide diffraction-limited images on the VLT, down to the visible wavelengths (0.020 arcseconds at 0.83 micron for instance). At the moment, the only instrument dedicated to NAOS is the CONICA spectro-imager, operating in the near-infrared from 1 to 5 microns. We are now proposing to ESO, in collaboration with an Italian group, the development of a visible spectrograph/imager/coronograph, AVES-IMCO (Adaptive Optics Visual Echelle Spectrograph and IMager/COronograph). We present here the general concept of the new instrument as well as its expected performances in the different modes.

  1. Adaptive Optics Concept For Multi-Objects 3D Spectroscopy on ELTs

    Neichel, B; Puech, M; Conan, J M; Lelouarn, M; Gendron, E; Hammer, F; Rousset, G; Jagourel, P; Bouchet, P

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a first comparison of different Adaptive Optics (AO) concepts to reach a given scientific specification for 3D spectroscopy on Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). We consider that a range of 30%-50% of Ensquarred Energy (EE) in H band (1.65um) and in an aperture size from 25 to 100mas is representative of the scientific requirements. From these preliminary choices, different kinds of AO concepts are investigated : Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO), Multi-Object AO (MOAO) and Laser Guide Stars AO (LGS). Using Fourier based simulations we study the performance of these AO systems depending on the telescope diameter.

  2. Axial range of conjugate adaptive optics in two-photon microscopy

    Paudel, Hari P; Mertz, Jerome; Bifano, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe an adaptive optics technique for two-photon microscopy in which the deformable mirror used for aberration compensation is positioned in a plane conjugate to the plane of the aberration. We demonstrate in a proof-of-principle experiment that this technique yields a large field of view advantage in comparison to standard pupil-conjugate adaptive optics. Further, we show that the extended field of view in conjugate AO is maintained over a relatively large axial translation of the deformable mirror with respect to the conjugate plane. We conclude with a discussion of limitations and prospects for the conjugate AO technique in two-photon biological microscopy.

  3. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope.

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S; Melville, C David; Seibel, Eric J

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This paper proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm.

  4. Optical properties of the cirrus cloud ice crystals with preferred azimuthal orientation for polarization lidars with azimuthal scanning

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Nasonov, Sergey V.; Bryukhanov, Ilia D.; Shishko, Viktor A.; Timofeev, Dmitriy N.; Borovoi, Anatoly G.

    2016-10-01

    Optical properties of the cirrus cloud ice crystals with preferred azimuthal orientation are required for current numerical models of the Earth's radiation balance. Retrieving the orientation distributions function of the crystals from a vertically pointing polarization lidar measuring the full Mueller matrix is a very complicated problem because of lake of information. Lidars with zenith scanning can be used only to retrieve the properties of horizontally oriented particles. The paper shows that if the particles have preferred azimuthal orientation, the polarization lidars with azimuthal scanning should be used. It is also shown that all the elements of the Mueller matrix give no extra information compare to the depolarization ratio. Optical properties of preferred azimuthal oriented hexagonal ice columns with size from 10 to 1000 μm for wavelengths of 0.355, 0.532 and 1.064 μm were collected as a data bank.

  5. Femtosecond THz time domain spectroscopy at 36 kHz scan rate using an acousto-optic delay

    Urbanek, B; Eisele, M; Baierl, S; Kaplan, D; Lange, C; Huber, R

    2016-01-01

    We present a rapid-scan, time-domain terahertz spectrometer employing femtosecond Er:fiber technology and an acousto-optic delay with attosecond precision, enabling scanning of terahertz transients over a 12.4 ps time window at a waveform refresh rate of 36 kHz, and a signal-to-noise ratio of $1.7 \\times 10^5/\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$. Our approach enables real-time monitoring of dynamic THz processes at unprecedented speeds, which we demonstrate through rapid 2D thickness mapping of a spinning teflon disc at a precision of $10\\,\\rm nm/\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$. The compact, all-optical design ensures alignment-free operation even in harsh environments.

  6. Femtosecond terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at 36 kHz scan rate using an acousto-optic delay

    Urbanek, B.; Möller, M.; Eisele, M.; Baierl, S.; Kaplan, D.; Lange, C.; Huber, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a rapid-scan, time-domain terahertz spectrometer employing femtosecond Er:fiber technology and an acousto-optic delay with attosecond precision, enabling scanning of terahertz transients over a 12.4-ps time window at a waveform refresh rate of 36 kHz, and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.7 × 105 / √{ H z } . Our approach enables real-time monitoring of dynamic THz processes at unprecedented speeds, which we demonstrate through rapid 2D thickness mapping of a spinning teflon disc at a precision of 10 nm/ √{ H z } . The compact, all-optical design ensures alignment-free operation even in harsh environments.

  7. Towards feasible and effective predictive wavefront control for adaptive optics

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2008-06-04

    We have recently proposed Predictive Fourier Control, a computationally efficient and adaptive algorithm for predictive wavefront control that assumes frozen flow turbulence. We summarize refinements to the state-space model that allow operation with arbitrary computational delays and reduce the computational cost of solving for new control. We present initial atmospheric characterization using observations with Gemini North's Altair AO system. These observations, taken over 1 year, indicate that frozen flow is exists, contains substantial power, and is strongly detected 94% of the time.

  8. Adaptive optics for reduced threshold energy in femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in water based eye model

    Hansen, Anja; Krueger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-03-01

    In ophthalmic microsurgery tissue dissection is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses to create an optical breakdown. For vitreo-retinal applications the irradiance distribution in the focal volume is distorted by the anterior components of the eye causing a raised threshold energy for breakdown. In this work, an adaptive optics system enables spatial beam shaping for compensation of aberrations and investigation of wave front influence on optical breakdown. An eye model was designed to allow for aberration correction as well as detection of optical breakdown. The eye model consists of an achromatic lens for modeling the eye's refractive power, a water chamber for modeling the tissue properties, and a PTFE sample for modeling the retina's scattering properties. Aberration correction was performed using a deformable mirror in combination with a Hartmann-Shack-sensor. The influence of an adaptive optics aberration correction on the pulse energy required for photodisruption was investigated using transmission measurements for determination of the breakdown threshold and video imaging of the focal region for study of the gas bubble dynamics. The threshold energy is considerably reduced when correcting for the aberrations of the system and the model eye. Also, a raise in irradiance at constant pulse energy was shown for the aberration corrected case. The reduced pulse energy lowers the potential risk of collateral damage which is especially important for retinal safety. This offers new possibilities for vitreo-retinal surgery using femtosecond laser pulses.

  9. Investigation of optical nanostructures for photovoltaics with near-field scanning microscopy; Untersuchung optischer Nanostrukturen fuer die Photovoltaik mit Nahfeldmikroskopie

    Beckers, Thomas

    2011-09-26

    Textured and rough surfaces are known to increase light trapping in solar cells significantly. The development and optimization of these nano-structures is essential to improve the energy conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. In the past, first research approaches covered classical and macroscopic investigations, e.g. determining the haze or angularly resolved scattering. These methods do not provide precise explanation for the optical improvement of the devices, because layer thicknesses and structure sizes in thin-film solar cells are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. The impact of local nano-structures and their contribution to the local absorption enhancement is not resolved by macroscopic measurements. In this thesis, near-field scanning optical microscopy is introduced as first near-field investigations of nano-structures for photovoltaics. This provides an insight into local optical effects for relevant surfaces of photovoltaic devices. Investigating the distribution of the electric fields in layer stacks is crucial to understand the absorption in solar cells. Evanescent fields, which occur due to total internal reflection at the interfaces, are measurable by near-field scanning optical microscopy and yield important information about local light trapping. Within the framework of this thesis, correlations between local surface structures and optical near-field effects are shown. In this case structure features of randomly textured surfaces, which optimize local light trapping, are identified. It paves the way to connect microscopic optical effects on the surface with the macroscopic performance of thin-film solar cells. Moreover, the measurement yields a 3D illustration of the electric field distribution over the sample surface. It is an important criterion to prove the results of rigorous diffraction theory. An excellent agreement between experiment and simulation is found. The simulations provide an insight into the material, which is

  10. A review of astronomical science with visible light adaptive optics

    Close, Laird M.

    2016-07-01

    We review astronomical results in the visible (λRobo-AO system (Baranec, et al. 2016) on the robotic Palomar D=1.5 m telescope (currently relocated to the Kitt Peak 1.8m; Salama et al. 2016). Robo-AO uniquely offers the ability to target >15 objects/hr, which has enabled large (>3000 discrete targets) companion star surveys and has resulted in 23 refereed science publications. The most productive large telescope visible AO system is the D=6.5m Magellan telescope AO system (MagAO). MagAO is an advanced Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM) AO system at the Magellan 6.5m in Chile (Morzinski et al. 2016). This ASM secondary has 585 actuators with 10m) diameter telescopes in the infrared.

  11. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of the Globular Cluster NGC6496

    Fraga, Luciano; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump is $\\mMv = 15.71 \\pm 0.02$\\,mag and $\\EVI = 0.28 \\pm 0.02$\\,mag. An age of $10.5 \\pm 0.5$\\,Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of $\\feh = -0.65$\\,dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete $BVRI$ data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal.

  12. Soar adaptive optics observations of the globular cluster NGC 6496

    Fraga, Luciano [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei, E-mail: lfraga@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: lfraga@lna.br [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m – M) {sub V} = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V – I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = –0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal.

  13. Dynamic optical aberration correction with adaptive coded apertures techniques in conformal imaging

    Li, Yan; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Pengbin; Zhang, Binglong

    2015-02-01

    Conformal imaging systems are confronted with dynamic aberration in optical design processing. In classical optical designs, for combination high requirements of field of view, optical speed, environmental adaption and imaging quality, further enhancements can be achieved only by the introduction of increased complexity of aberration corrector. In recent years of computational imaging, the adaptive coded apertures techniques which has several potential advantages over more traditional optical systems is particularly suitable for military infrared imaging systems. The merits of this new concept include low mass, volume and moments of inertia, potentially lower costs, graceful failure modes, steerable fields of regard with no macroscopic moving parts. Example application for conformal imaging system design where the elements of a set of binary coded aperture masks are applied are optimization designed is presented in this paper, simulation results show that the optical performance is closely related to the mask design and the reconstruction algorithm optimization. As a dynamic aberration corrector, a binary-amplitude mask located at the aperture stop is optimized to mitigate dynamic optical aberrations when the field of regard changes and allow sufficient information to be recorded by the detector for the recovery of a sharp image using digital image restoration in conformal optical system.

  14. Push-pull membrane mirrors for adaptive optics.

    Bonora, Stefano; Poletto, Luca

    2006-12-11

    We propose an improvement to the electrostatic membrane deformable mirror technique introducing push-pull capability that increases the performance in the correction of optical aberrations. The push-pull effect is achieved by the addition of some transparent electrodes on the top of the device. The transparent electrode is an indium-tin-oxide coated glass. The improvement of the mirror in generating surfaces is demonstrated by the comparison with a pull membrane mirror. The control is carried out in open loop by the knowledge of the response of each single electrode. An effective iterative strategy for the clipping management is presented. The performances are evaluated both in terms of Zernike polynomials generation and in terms of aberrations compensation based on the statistics of human eyes.

  15. Push-pull membrane mirrors for adaptive optics

    Bonora, Stefano; Poletto, Luca

    2006-12-01

    We propose an improvement to the electrostatic membrane deformable mirror technique introducing push-pull capability that increases the performance in the correction of optical aberrations. The push-pull effect is achieved by the addition of some transparent electrodes on the top of the device. The transparent electrode is an indium-tin-oxide coated glass. The improvement of the mirror in generating surfaces is demonstrated by the comparison with a pull membrane mirror. The control is carried out in open loop by the knowledge of the response of each single electrode. An effective iterative strategy for the clipping management is presented. The performances are evaluated both in terms of Zernike polynomials generation and in terms of aberrations compensation based on the statistics of human eyes.

  16. Comparative study of infrared wavefront sensing solutions for adaptive optics

    Plantet, C.; Fusco, T.; Guerineau, N.; Derelle, S.; Robert, C.

    2016-07-01

    The development of new low-noise infrared detectors, such as RAPID (CEA LETI/Sofradir) or SAPHIRA (Selex), has given the possibility to consider infrared wavefront sensing at low ux. We propose here a comparative study of near infrared (J and H bands) wavefront sensing concepts for mid and high orders estimation on a 8m- class telescope, relying on three existing wavefront sensors: the Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer. We consider several conceptual designs using the RAPID camera, making a trade-off between background flux, optical thickness and compatibility with a compact cryostat integration. We then study their sensitivity to noise in order to compare them in different practical scenarios. The pyramid provides the best performance, with a gain up to 0.5 magnitude, and has an advantageous setup.

  17. Adaptive PMD Compensation in 10 Gbit/s RZ Optical Communication System

    Yu; Li; Zhang; Xiaoguang; Zhou; Guangtao; Shen; Yu; Zheng; Yuan; Li; Chaoyang; Liu; Yumin; Chen; Lin; Yang; Bojun

    2003-01-01

    We report an experiment of adaptive compensation for polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in 10Gbit/s return zero (RZ) optical communication system. The quasi-real-time PMD compensation is realized. The algorithm so-called particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to control feedback compensation system.

  18. A data-driven H2-optimal control approach for adaptive optics

    Hinnen, K.; Verhaegen, M.; Doelman, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is used in ground-based astronomical telescopes to improve the resolution by counteracting the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Most AO systems are based on a simple control law that neglects the temporal evolution of the distortions introduced by the atmosphere. This paper pr

  19. Extracting hysteresis from nonlinear measurement of wavefront-sensorless adaptive optics system

    Song, H.; Vdovin, G.; Fraanje, R.; Schitter, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2008-01-01

    In many scientific and medical applications wavefront-sensorless adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to correct the wavefront aberration by optimizing a certain target parameter, which is nonlinear with respect to the control signal to the deformable mirror (DM). Hysteresis is the most common nonl

  20. Placing Limits on Extragalactic Substructure with Gravitational Lenses and Adaptive Optics

    Lagattuta, David J.; Vegetti, S.; Auger, M. W.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; McKean, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results from a systematic search for extragalactic substructure, using high resolution Adaptive Optics (AO) images of known strong gravitational lenses. In particular we focus on two lens systems, B0128+437 and B1939+666, placing limits on both luminous and dark matter substruct

  1. Development of a scalable generic platform for adaptive optics real time control

    Surendran, Avinash; Burse, Mahesh P.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Parihar, Padmakar

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of the present project is to explore the viability of an adaptive optics control system based exclusively on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), making strong use of their parallel processing capability. In an Adaptive Optics (AO) system, the generation of the Deformable Mirror (DM) control voltages from the Wavefront Sensor (WFS) measurements is usually through the multiplication of the wavefront slopes with a predetermined reconstructor matrix. The ability to access several hundred hard multipliers and memories concurrently in an FPGA allows performance far beyond that of a modern CPU or GPU for tasks with a well-defined structure such as Adaptive Optics control. The target of the current project is to generate a signal for a real time wavefront correction, from the signals coming from a Wavefront Sensor, wherein the system would be flexible to accommodate all the current Wavefront Sensing techniques and also the different methods which are used for wavefront compensation. The system should also accommodate for different data transmission protocols (like Ethernet, USB, IEEE 1394 etc.) for transmitting data to and from the FPGA device, thus providing a more flexible platform for Adaptive Optics control. Preliminary simulation results for the formulation of the platform, and a design of a fully scalable slope computer is presented.

  2. High-accuracy calibration of an adaptive optics system using a phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    Bauman, B J; Campbell, E W; Olivier, S S; Sweider, D R

    1999-06-23

    A phase-shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) has been integrated into an adaptive optics (AO) system developed by LLNL for use on the three meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The interferometer is an all fiber optic design, which is extremely compact. It is useful for calibrating the control sensors, measuring the aberrations of the entire AO optical train, and measuring the influence functions of the individual actuators on the deformable mirror. The PSDI is particularly well suited for this application because it measures converging, quasi-spherical wavefronts, such as are produced by an AO imaging system. Thus, a PSDI can be used to measure the aberrations of the entire AO system, in-situ and without errors introduced by auxiliary optics. This provides an extremely accurate measurement ({approximately} 5 nm RMS) of the optical properties of the AO system.

  3. A comparative study on the optical limiting properties of different nano spinel ferrites with Z-scan technique

    Thomas, Jeevan Job; Krishnan, Shiji [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala 686560 (India); Sridharan, K.; Philip, Reji [Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Kalarikkal, Nandakumar, E-mail: nkkalarikkal@mgu.ac.in [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala 686560 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala 686560 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► First report in which the optical limiting properties of five different nano spinel ferrites are compared. ► The obtained nonlinearity fits to a two-photon like absorption process. ► Except for NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the observed nonlinearity has contributions from excited state absorption. ► A size dependent optical limiting response is obtained. ► Among the investigated ferrites, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is found to be a better candidate for the optical limiting applications. -- Abstract: We report the optical limiting properties of five different spinel ferrites, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with an average particle grain size of 8 nm. The optical limiting properties are investigated using the open aperture Z-scan technique. The obtained nonlinearity fits to a two-photon like absorption process. Except for NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the observed nonlinearity has contributions from excited state absorption. The optical limiting response is also studied against particle size and the nonlinearity is found to increase with increasing particle size within the range of our investigations. On comparing the optical limiting properties, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is found to be a better candidate for the optical limiting applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where the optical limiting properties of spinel ferrites are compared.

  4. Investigations on nucleation, HRXRD, optical, piezoelectric, polarizability and Z-scan analysis of L-arginine maleate dihydrate single crystals

    Sakthy Priya, S.; Alexandar, A.; Surendran, P.; Lakshmanan, A.; Rameshkumar, P.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2017-04-01

    An efficient organic nonlinear optical single crystal of L-arginine maleate dihydrate (LAMD) has been grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) and slow cooling technique (SCT). The crystalline perfection of the crystal was examined using high-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) analysis. Photoluminescence study confirmed the optical properties and defects level in the crystal lattice. Electromechanical behaviour was observed using piezoelectric co-efficient (d33) analysis. The photoconductivity analysis confirmed the negative photoconducting nature of the material. The dielectric constant and loss were measured as a function of frequency with varying temperature and vice-versa. The laser damage threshold (LDT) measurement was carried out using Nd:YAG Laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm (Focal length is 35 cm) and the obtained results showed that LDT value of the crystal is high compared to KDP crystal. The high laser damage threshold of the grown crystal makes it a potential candidate for second and higher order nonlinear optical device application. The third order nonlinear optical parameters of LAMD crystal is determined by open-aperture and closed-aperture studies using Z-scan technique. The third order linear and nonlinear optical parameters such as the nonlinear refractive index (n2), two photon absorption coefficient (β), Real part (Reχ3) and imaginary part (Imχ3) of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility are calculated.

  5. Variable Delay With Directly-Modulated R-SOA and Optical Filters for Adaptive Antenna Radio-Fiber Access

    Prince, Kamau; Presi, Marco; Chiuchiarelli, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    We present an all-optical adaptive-antenna radio over fiber transport system that uses proven, commercially-available components to effectively deliver standard-compliant optical signaling to adaptive multiantenna arrays for current and emerging radio technology implementations. The system is based...

  6. Characterization of a tunable astigmatic fluidic lens with adaptive optics correction for compact phoropter application

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Huang, Chieh-Tse

    2014-07-01

    Fluidically controlled lenses which adaptively correct prescribed refractive error without mechanically moving parts are extensively applied in the ophthalmic applications. Capable of variable-focusing properties, however, the associated aberrations due to curvature change and refractive index mismatch can inherently degrade image quality severely. Here we present the experimental study of the aberrations in tunable astigmatic lens and use of adaptive optics to compensate for the wavefront errors. Characterization of the optical properties of the individual lenses is carried out by Shack-Hartmann measurements. An adaptive optics (AO) based scheme is demonstrated for three injected fluidic volumes, resulting in a substantial reduction of the wavefront errors from -0.12, -0.25, -0.32 to 0.01, -0.01, -0.20 μm, respectively, corresponding to the optical power tenability of 0.83 to 1.84 D. Furthermore, an integrated optical phoroptor consisting of adjustable astigmatic lenses and AO correction is demonstrated such that an induced refraction error of -1 D cylinder at 180° of a model eye vision is experimentally corrected.

  7. The adaptive optics and transmit system for NASA's Laser Communications Relay Demonstration project

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Burruss, Rick; Fregoso, Santos; Herzog, Harrison; Piazzola, Sabino; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Truong, Tuan N.

    2016-09-01

    The Laser Communication Relay Demonstration is NASA's multi-year demonstration of laser communication to a geosynchronous satellite. We are currently assembling the optical system for the first of the two baseline ground stations. The optical system consists of an adaptive optics system, the transmit system and a camera for target acquisition. The adaptive optics system is responsible for compensating the downlink beam for atmospheric turbulence and coupling it into the modem's single mode fiber. The adaptive optics system is a woofer/tweeter design, with one deformable mirror correcting for low spatial frequencies with large amplitude and a second deformable mirror correcting for high spatial frequencies with small amplitude. The system uses a Shack- Hartmann wavefront sensor. The transmit system relays four beacon beams and one communication laser to the telescope for propagation to the space terminal. Both the uplink and downlink beams are centered at 1.55 microns. We present an overview of the design of the system as well as performance predictions including time series of coupling efficiency and expected uplink beam quality.

  8. Adaptive optics imaging of the outer retinal tubules in Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.

    Battu, R; Akkali, M C; Bhanushali, D; Srinivasan, P; Shetty, R; Berendschot, T T J M; Schouten, J S A G; Webers, C A

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo study the outer retinal tubules using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics and in patients with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.MethodsTen eyes of five subjects from five independent families with Bietti's crystalline Dystrophy (BCD) were characterized with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), full-field electroretinography, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). High-resolution images were obtained with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO).ResultsSD-OCT showed prominent outer retinal layer loss and outer retinal tubulations at the margin of outer retinal loss. AO images displayed prominent macrotubules and microtubules with characteristic features in eight out of the 10 eyes. Crystals were present in all ten eyes. There was a reduction in the cone count in all eyes in the area outside the outer retinal tubules (ORT).ConclusionsThis study describes the morphology of the outer retinal tubules when imaged enface on the adaptive optics in patients with BCD. These findings provide insight into the macular structure of these patients. This may have prognostic implications and refine the study on the pathogenesis of BCD.

  9. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples.

  10. A novel data adaptive detection scheme for distributed fiber optic acoustic sensing

    Ölçer, Íbrahim; Öncü, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new approach for distributed fiber optic sensing based on adaptive processing of phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) signals. Instead of conventional methods which utilizes frame averaging of detected signal traces, our adaptive algorithm senses a set of noise parameters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved detection performance. This data set is called the secondary data set from which a weight vector for the detection of a signal is computed. The signal presence is sought in the primary data set. This adaptive technique can be used for vibration detection of health monitoring of various civil structures as well as any other dynamic monitoring requirements such as pipeline and perimeter security applications.

  11. Adaptive optics via pupil segmentation for high-resolution imaging in biological tissues.

    Ji, Na; Milkie, Daniel E; Betzig, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Biological specimens are rife with optical inhomogeneities that seriously degrade imaging performance under all but the most ideal conditions. Measuring and then correcting for these inhomogeneities is the province of adaptive optics. Here we introduce an approach to adaptive optics in microscopy wherein the rear pupil of an objective lens is segmented into subregions, and light is directed individually to each subregion to measure, by image shift, the deflection faced by each group of rays as they emerge from the objective and travel through the specimen toward the focus. Applying our method to two-photon microscopy, we could recover near-diffraction-limited performance from a variety of biological and nonbiological samples exhibiting aberrations large or small and smoothly varying or abruptly changing. In particular, results from fixed mouse cortical slices illustrate our ability to improve signal and resolution to depths of 400 microm.

  12. Focal Plane Wavefront Sensing using Residual Adaptive Optics Speckles

    Codona, Johanan L

    2013-01-01

    Optical imperfections, misalignments, aberrations, and even dust can significantly limit sensitivity in high-contrast imaging systems such as coronagraphs. An upstream deformable mirror (DM) in the pupil can be used to correct or compensate for these flaws, either to enhance Strehl ratio or suppress residual coronagraphic halo. Measurement of the phase and amplitude of the starlight halo at the science camera is essential for determining the DM shape that compensates for any non-common-path (NCP) wavefront errors. Using DM displacement ripples to create a series of probe and anti-halo speckles in the focal plane has been proposed for space-based coronagraphs and successfully demonstrated in the lab. We present the theory and first on-sky demonstration of a technique to measure the complex halo using the rapidly-changing residual atmospheric speckles at the 6.5m MMT telescope using the Clio mid-IR camera. The AO system's wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements are used to estimate the residual wavefront, allowing ...

  13. FOCAL PLANE WAVEFRONT SENSING USING RESIDUAL ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECKLES

    Codona, Johanan L.; Kenworthy, Matthew, E-mail: jlcodona@gmail.com [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    Optical imperfections, misalignments, aberrations, and even dust can significantly limit sensitivity in high-contrast imaging systems such as coronagraphs. An upstream deformable mirror (DM) in the pupil can be used to correct or compensate for these flaws, either to enhance the Strehl ratio or suppress the residual coronagraphic halo. Measurement of the phase and amplitude of the starlight halo at the science camera is essential for determining the DM shape that compensates for any non-common-path (NCP) wavefront errors. Using DM displacement ripples to create a series of probe and anti-halo speckles in the focal plane has been proposed for space-based coronagraphs and successfully demonstrated in the lab. We present the theory and first on-sky demonstration of a technique to measure the complex halo using the rapidly changing residual atmospheric speckles at the 6.5 m MMT telescope using the Clio mid-IR camera. The AO system's wavefront sensor measurements are used to estimate the residual wavefront, allowing us to approximately compute the rapidly evolving phase and amplitude of speckle halo. When combined with relatively short, synchronized science camera images, the complex speckle estimates can be used to interferometrically analyze the images, leading to an estimate of the static diffraction halo with NCP effects included. In an operational system, this information could be collected continuously and used to iteratively correct quasi-static NCP errors or suppress imperfect coronagraphic halos.

  14. Hollow-pyramid based scanning near-field optical microscope coupled to femtosecond pulses: A tool for nonlinear optics at the nanoscale

    Celebrano, Michele; Biagioni, Paolo; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Polli, Dario; Labardi, Massimiliano; Allegrini, Maria; Finazzi, Marco; Duò, Lamberto; Cerullo, Giulio

    2009-03-01

    We describe an aperture scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) using cantilevered hollow pyramid probes coupled to femtosecond laser pulses. Such probes, with respect to tapered optical fibers, present higher throughput and laser power damage threshold, as well as greater mechanical robustness. In addition, they preserve pulse duration and polarization in the near field. The instrument can operate in two configurations: illumination mode, in which the SNOM probe is used to excite the nonlinear response in the near field, and collection mode, where it collects the nonlinear emission following far-field excitation. We present application examples highlighting the capability of the system to observe the nonlinear optical response of nanostructured metal surfaces (gold projection patterns and gold nanorods) with sub-100-nm spatial resolution.

  15. Optical design and multi-length-scale scanning spectro-microscopy possibilities at the Nanoscopium beamline of Synchrotron Soleil.

    Somogyi, Andrea; Medjoubi, Kadda; Baranton, Gil; Le Roux, Vincent; Ribbens, Marc; Polack, François; Philippot, Pascal; Samama, Jean Pierre

    2015-07-01

    The Nanoscopium 155 m-long beamline of Synchrotron Soleil is dedicated to scanning hard X-ray nanoprobe techniques. Nanoscopium aims to reach ≤100 nm resolution in the 5-20 keV energy range for routine user experiments. The beamline design tackles the tight stability requirements of such a scanning nanoprobe by creating an overfilled secondary source, implementing all horizontally reflecting main beamline optics, applying high mechanical stability equipment and constructing a dedicated high-stability building envelope. Multi-technique scanning imaging and tomography including X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and spectro-microscopy, absorption, differential phase and dark-field contrasts are implemented at the beamline in order to provide simultaneous information on the elemental distribution, speciation and sample morphology. This paper describes the optical concept and the first measured performance of the Nanoscopium beamline followed by the hierarchical length-scale multi-technique imaging experiments performed with dwell times down to 3 ms per pixel.

  16. Visual Scanning Training, Limb Activation Treatment, and Prism Adaptation for rehabilitating left neglect: Who is the winner?

    Konstantinos ePriftis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We compared, for the first time, the overall and differential effects of three of the most widely used left neglect (LN treatments: Visual Scanning Training (VST, Limb Activation Treatment (LAT, and Prism Adaptation (PA. Thirty-three LN patients were assigned in quasi-random order to the three groups (VST, LAT, or PA. Each patient received only one type of treatment. LN patients’ performance on everyday life tasks was assessed four times (over a period of six weeks: A1 and A2 (i.e., the two pre-treatment assessments; A3 and A4 (i.e., the two post-treatment assessments. LN patients in each of the three treatment conditions were treated for the same number of sessions (i.e., 20. The results showed that improvements were present in the majority of the tests assessing the peripersonal space in everyday life activities. Our findings were independent of unspecific factors and lasted for at least two weeks following the end of the treatments. There were no interactions, however, between LN treatments and assessments. We suggest that all three treatments can be considered as valid rehabilitation interventions for LN and could be employed for ameliorating LN signs.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of marginal adaptation of composite resines to enamel after using of standard and gradual photopolimerization

    Dačić Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bonding between composite and hard dental tissue is most commonly assessed by measuring bonding strength or absence of marginal gap along the restoration interface. Marginal index (MI is a significant indicator of the efficiency of the bond between material and dental tissue because it also shows the values of width and length of marginal gap. Objective. The aim of this investigation was to estimate quantitative and qualitative features of the bond between composite resin and enamel and to determine the values of MI in enamel after application of two techniques of photopolymerization with two composite systems. Methods. Forty Class V cavities on extracted teeth were prepared and restored for scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis of composite bonding to enamel. Adhesion to enamel was achieved by Adper Single Bond 2 - ASB (3M ESPE, or by Adper Easy One - AEO (3M ESPE. Photopolymerization of Filtek Ultimate - FU (3M ESPE was performed using constant halogen light (HIP or soft start program (SOF. Results. Quantitative and qualitative analysis, showed better mikromorphological bonding with SOF photopolymerization and ASB/FU composite system. Differences in MI between different photopolymerization techniques (HIP: 0.6707; SOF: 0.2395 were statistically significant (p<0.001, as well as differences between the composite systems (ASB/FU: 0.0470; AEO/ FU: 0.8651 (p<0.001 by two-way ANOVA test. Conclusion. Better marginal adaptation of composite to enamel was obtained with SOF photopolymerization in both composite systems.

  18. Nonlinear optical properties of cobalt and iron doped CdSe nanoparticles using Z-scan technique

    Gaur, Poonam, E-mail: poonam.gaur612@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Sonipat 131001, Haryana (India); Malik, B.P. [Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Sonipat 131001, Haryana (India); Gaur, Arun [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonipat 131001, Haryana (India)

    2015-01-15

    The present work aims at the synthesis of pure, Cobalt (Co) and Iron (Fe) doped CdSe nanoparticles by the wet chemical method. The optical properties of synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy to find the optical direct band gap and estimation of particle size by using Debye–Scherrer formula and HRTEM. The nonlinear optical properties such as nonlinear absorption co-efficient, nonlinear refraction co-efficient and third order nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (3)} are investigated. The calculations have been performed with the help of Z-scan experimental set-up using Nd: YAG laser emitting 532 nm, 5 ns laser pulses with intensity maintained at 2.296 TW/cm{sup 2}. The nanoparticles clearly exhibit a negative value of nonlinear refraction, which is attributed to the two photon absorption and free carrier absorption. Further the optical limiting behavior is determined (figure of merit (FOM)). The presence of RSA in these nanoparticles makes them a potential material for the development of optical limiter.

  19. Diffraction by a small aperture in conical geometry: Application to metal coated tips used in near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Drezet, A; Huant, S; 10.1103/PhysRevE.65.046611

    2010-01-01

    Light diffraction through a subwavelength aperture located at the apex of a metallic screen with conical geometry is investigated theoretically. A method based on a multipole field expansion is developed to solve Maxwell's equations analytically using boundary conditions adapted both for the conical geometry and for the finite conductivity of a real metal. The topological properties of the diffracted field are discussed in detail and compared to those of the field diffracted through a small aperture in a flat screen, i. e. the Bethe problem. The model is applied to coated, conically tapered optical fiber tips that are used in Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy. It is demonstrated that such tips behave over a large portion of space like a simple combination of two effective dipoles located in the apex plane (an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole parallel to the incident fields at the apex) whose exact expressions are determined. However, the large "backward" emission in the P plane - a salient experimen...

  20. Scanned ion beam therapy for prostate carcinoma. Comparison of single plan treatment and daily plan-adapted treatment

    Hild, Sebastian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); University Clinic Erlangen and Friedrich- Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Graeff, Christian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Rucinski, Antoni [University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Sapienza Universit' a di Roma, Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Roma (Italy); INFN, Roma (Italy); Zink, Klemens [University of Applied Sciences, Institute for Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany); University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Marburg (Germany); Habl, Gregor [University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Faculty of Physics, Darmstadt (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [University Clinic Heidelberg, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); University Clinic Erlangen and Friedrich- Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital Erlangen, Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Intensity-modulated particle therapy (IMPT) for tumors showing interfraction motion is a topic of current research. The purpose of this work is to compare three treatment strategies for IMPT to determine potential advantages and disadvantages of ion prostate cancer therapy. Simulations for three treatment strategies, conventional one-plan radiotherapy (ConvRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), and online adaptive radiotherapy (ART) were performed employing a dataset of 10 prostate cancer patients with six CT scans taken at one week intervals. The simulation results, using a geometric margin concept (7-2 mm) as well as patient-specific internal target volume definitions for IMPT were analyzed by target coverage and exposure of critical structures on single fraction dose distributions. All strategies led to clinically acceptable target coverage in patients exhibiting small prostate motion (mean displacement < 4 mm), but IGRT and especially ART led to significant sparing of the rectum. In 20 % of the patients, prostate motion exceeded 4 mm causing insufficient target coverage for ConvRT (V95{sub mean} = 0.86, range 0.63-0.99) and IGRT (V95{sub mean} = 0.91, range 0.68-1.00), while ART maintained acceptable target coverage. IMPT of prostate cancer demands consideration of rectal sparing and adaptive treatment replanning for patients exhibiting large prostate motion. (orig.) [German] Adaptive Therapieansaetze fuer sich interfraktionell bewegende Zielvolumina in der intensitaetsmodulierten Partikeltherapie (IMPT) befinden sich zurzeit in der Entwicklung. In dieser Arbeit werden drei Behandlungsstrategien auf moegliche Vor- und Nachteile in der IMPT des Prostatakarzinoms hin untersucht. Auf Basis eines anonymisierten Datensatzes aus 10 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden die drei Bestrahlungsstrategien, konventionelle Ein-Plan-Strahlentherapie (ConvRT), bildunterstuetzte Strahlentherapie (IGRT) und tagesaktuelle Strahlentherapie (adaptive radiotherapy,ART), simuliert

  1. Adaptive Optics Facility: control strategy and first on-sky results of the acquisition sequence

    Madec, P.-Y.; Kolb, J.; Oberti, S.; Paufique, J.; La Penna, P.; Hackenberg, W.; Kuntschner, H.; Argomedo, J.; Kiekebusch, M.; Donaldson, R.; Suarez, M.; Arsenault, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility is an ESO project aiming at converting Yepun, one of the four 8m telescopes in Paranal, into an adaptive telescope. This is done by replacing the current conventional secondary mirror of Yepun by a Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and attaching four Laser Guide Star (LGS) Units to its centerpiece. In the meantime, two Adaptive Optics (AO) modules have been developed incorporating each four LGS WaveFront Sensors (WFS) and one tip-tilt sensor used to control the DSM at 1 kHz frame rate. The four LGS Units and one AO module (GRAAL) have already been assembled on Yepun. Besides the technological challenge itself, one critical area of AOF is the AO control strategy and its link with the telescope control, including Active Optics used to shape M1. Another challenge is the request to minimize the overhead due to AOF during the acquisition phase of the observation. This paper presents the control strategy of the AOF. The current control of the telescope is first recalled, and then the way the AO control makes the link with the Active Optics is detailed. Lab results are used to illustrate the expected performance. Finally, the overall AOF acquisition sequence is presented as well as first results obtained on sky with GRAAL.

  2. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics.

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-Li; Hu, Bin

    2016-09-02

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10(-5) in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10(-5) in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method.

  3. Dynamic Aberration Correction for Conformal Window of High-Speed Aircraft Using Optimized Model-Based Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics

    Dong, Bing; Li, Yan; Han, Xin-li; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed aircraft, a conformal window is used to optimize the aerodynamic performance. However, the local shape of the conformal window leads to large amounts of dynamic aberrations varying with look angle. In this paper, deformable mirror (DM) and model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSLAO) are used for dynamic aberration correction of an infrared remote sensor equipped with a conformal window and scanning mirror. In model-based WSLAO, aberration is captured using Lukosz mode, and we use the low spatial frequency content of the image spectral density as the metric function. Simulations show that aberrations induced by the conformal window are dominated by some low-order Lukosz modes. To optimize the dynamic correction, we can only correct dominant Lukosz modes and the image size can be minimized to reduce the time required to compute the metric function. In our experiment, a 37-channel DM is used to mimic the dynamic aberration of conformal window with scanning rate of 10 degrees per second. A 52-channel DM is used for correction. For a 128 × 128 image, the mean value of image sharpness during dynamic correction is 1.436 × 10−5 in optimized correction and is 1.427 × 10−5 in un-optimized correction. We also demonstrated that model-based WSLAO can achieve convergence two times faster than traditional stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) method. PMID:27598161

  4. Adaptive control of modal properties of optical beams using photothermal effects.

    Arain, Muzammil A; Korth, William Z; Williams, Luke F; Martin, Rodica M; Mueller, Guido; Tanner, D B; Reitze, David H

    2010-02-01

    We present an experimental demonstration of adaptive control of modal properties of optical beams. The control is achieved via heat-induced photothermal actuation of transmissive optical elements. We apply the heat using four electrical heaters in thermal contact with the element. The system is capable of controlling both symmetrical and astigmatic aberrations providing a powerful means for in situ correction and control of thermal aberrations in high power laser systems. We demonstrate a tunable lens with a focusing power varying from minus infinity to -10 m along two axes using SF57 optical glass. Applications of the proposed system include laser material processing, thermal compensation of high laser power radiation, and optical beam steering.

  5. Four-probe scanning tunnelling microscope with atomic resolution for electrical and electro-optical property measurements of nanosystems

    Lin Xiao; He Xiao-Bo; Lu Jun-Ling; Gao Li; Huan Qing; Shi Dong-Xia; Gao Hong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a special four-probe scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) system in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV),which can provide coarse positioning for every probe independently with the help of scanning electron microscope (SEM)and fine positioning down to nanometre using the STM technology. The system allows conductivity measurement by means of a four-point probe method, which can draw out more accurate electron transport characteristics in nanostructures, and provides easy manipulation of low dimension materials. All measurements can be performed in variable temperature (from 30K to 500K), magnetic field (from 0 to 0.1T), and different gas environments. Simultaneously, the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum can be achieved through an optical subsystem. Test measurements using some nanowire samples show that this system is a powerful tool in exploring electron transport characteristics and spectra in nanoscale physics.

  6. Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus.

    Gagnon, Yakir L; Shashar, Nadav; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2011-08-15

    Vision is an important source of information for many animals. The crystalline lens plays a central role in the visual pathway and hence the ecology of fishes. In this study, we tested whether the different light regimes in the Mediterranean and Red Seas have an effect on the optical properties of the lenses in the rivulated rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus. This species has migrated through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea and established a vital population in the Mediterranean Sea. Longitudinal spherical aberration curves and focal lengths of the fish lenses were measured by laser scans and compared between the two populations. In addition, rivulated rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were exposed to colored light (yellow, green and blue) and unfiltered light for periods of 1 or 13 days to test for short-term adjustments. Lens focal length was significantly longer (3%) in the Rea Sea population. The shorter focal length of the Mediterranean population can be explained as an adaptation to the dimmer light environment, as this difference makes the Mediterranean eyes 5% more sensitive than the eyes of the Red Sea population. The difference may be due to genetic differences or, more likely, adaptive developmental plasticity. Short-term regulatory mechanisms do not seem to be involved.

  7. Adaptive Bit Rate Video Streaming Through an RF/Free Space Optical Laser Link

    A. Akbulut

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a channel-adaptive video streaming scheme which adjusts video bit rate according to channel conditions and transmits video through a hybrid RF/free space optical (FSO laser communication system. The design criteria of the FSO link for video transmission to 2.9 km distance have been given and adaptive bit rate video streaming according to the varying channel state over this link has been studied. It has been shown that the proposed structure is suitable for uninterrupted transmission of videos over the hybrid wireless network with reduced packet delays and losses even when the received power is decreased due to weather conditions.

  8. Experimental verification of the frozen flow atmospheric turbulence assumption with use of astronomical adaptive optics telemetry.

    Poyneer, Lisa; van Dam, Marcos; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-01

    We use closed-loop deformable mirror telemetry from Altair and Keck adaptive optics (AO) to determine whether atmospheric turbulence follows the frozen flow hypothesis. Using telemetry from AO systems, our algorithms (based on the predictive Fourier control framework) detect frozen flow >94% of the time. Usually one to three layers are detected. Between 20% and 40% of the total controllable phase power is due to frozen flow. Velocity vector RMS variability is less than 0.5 m/s (per axis) on 10-s intervals, indicating that the atmosphere is stable enough for predictive control to measure and adapt to prevailing atmospheric conditions before they change.

  9. Bases for time-resolved probing of transient carrier dynamics by optical pump-probe scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Yokota, Munenori; Yoshida, Shoji; Mera, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2013-10-07

    The tangled mechanism that produces optical pump-probe scanning tunneling microscopy spectra from semiconductors was analyzed by comparing model simulation data with experimental data. The nonlinearities reflected in the spectra, namely, the excitations generated by paired laser pulses with a delay time, the logarithmic relationship between carrier density and surface photovoltage (SPV), and the effect of the change in tunneling barrier height depending on SPV, were examined along with the delay-time-dependent integration process used in measurement. The optimum conditions required to realize reliable measurement, as well as the validity of the microscopy technique, were demonstrated for the first time.

  10. Use of scanning near-field optical microscope with an aperture probe for detection of luminescent nanodiamonds

    Shershulin, V. A.; Samoylenko, S. R.; Shenderova, O. A.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    The suitability of scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to image photoluminescent diamond nanoparticles with nanoscale resolution is demonstrated. Isolated diamond nanocrystals with an average size of 100 nm, containing negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers, were chosen as tested material. The NV- luminescence was stimulated by continuous 532 nm laser light. Sizes of analyzed crystallites were monitored by an atomic force microscope. The lateral resolution of the order of 100 nm was reached in SNOM imaging of diamond nanoparticles using 150 nm square aperture of the probe.

  11. Laser fabrication of gold nanoparticle clustered tips for use in apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy.

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Park, Jung Su; Park, Jin-Ho; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2014-08-01

    A laser fabrication method was developed to make gold nanoparticle clustered (GNC) tips for apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopes (ANSOMs) and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The near-field Rayleigh and Raman scattering of samples are highly enhanced when a gold nanoparticle cluster is synthesized on the end of the tip. This is due to the lightning rod effect in the sharp tips. The localized electromagnetic field enhancement and the spatial resolution (~30 nm) of the fabricated GNC tip were verified by TERS and ANSOM measurements of carbon nanotubes.

  12. A Scanning Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy System for Measurement of Tropospheric NO2 in Beijing

    LI Ang; XIE Pin-Hua; LIU Cheng; LIU Jian-Guo; LIU Wen-Qing

    2007-01-01

    A scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system is developed for monitoring tropospheric NO2 abundance. Measurements at different viewing angles near the horizon can be performed sequentially with one telescope collecting scattered sunlight reflected by a moving mirror. Tropospheric NO2 diurnal variations can be derived from slant column densities (SCDs) of different elevation angles. The result from a field campaign in Beijing in summer of 2005 reveals potential possibility for the monitoring of tropospheric NO2 by multi-axis DOAS technique.

  13. Experimentally observe the effect of spherical aberration on diffractive intraocular lens using adaptive optics

    Guo, Huanqing; DeLestrange, Elie

    2015-03-01

    We first investigated the similarity in optical quality of a batch of diffractive intraocular lenses (DIOLs), providing experimental evidence for one DIOL as representative of a batch. Using adaptive optics, we then evaluated one DIOL under different levels of Zernike spherical aberration (SA) by applying both a point spread function test and a psychophysical visual acuity test. We found that for small aperture size SA has the effect of shifting the through-focus curve of DIOL. Also, for a relatively large aperture size, it has different effects on the distant and near foci.

  14. Cellular resolution volumetric in vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography◊

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Choi, Stacey S.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Evans, Julia W.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography (UHR-AO-OCT) instrumentation allowing monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction was used for volumetric in vivo retinal imaging of various retinal structures including the macula and optic nerve head (ONH). Novel visualization methods that simplify AO-OCT data viewing are presented, and include co-registration of AO-OCT volumes with fundus photography and stitching of multiple AO-OCT sub-volumes to create a large field of view (FOV) high-resolution volume. Additionally, we explored the utility of Interactive Science Publishing by linking all presented AO-OCT datasets with the OSA ISP software. PMID:19259248

  15. Thermo-optically driven adaptive mirror based on thermal expansion: preparation and resolution

    Reinert, Felix; Lüthy, W.

    2005-12-01

    A thermo-optically driven adaptive mirror is presented. It is based on the thermal expansion of a thin film heated with a light pattern. We describe a procedure for the preparation of a silicon elastomer with a high-quality optical surface. This material, Sylgard 184, has a high linear thermal expansion coefficient of 3.1μ10-4 K-1. Surface modulations are recorded in an interferometer. Modulations of 350 nm result at an intensity of 370 mW/cm2. The resolution is measured with a line pattern. The contrast drops to 30 % at 1.6 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm).

  16. Design and Development of an Optical Path Difference Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometers using High Displacement RAINBOW Actuators

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Hardy, Robin C.; Dausch, David E.

    1997-01-01

    A new piezoelectric drive mechanism has been developed for optical translation in space-based spectrometer systems. The mechanism utilizes a stack of RAINBOW high displacement piezoelectric actuators to move optical components weighing less than 250 grams through a one centimeter travel. The mechanism uses the direct motion of the piezoelectric devices, stacked such that the displacement of the individual RAINBOW actuators is additive. A prototype device has been built which utilizes 21 RAINBOWs to accomplish the necessary travel. The mechanism weighs approximately 0.6 kilograms and uses less than 2 Watts of power at a scanning frequency of 0.5 Hertz, significantly less power than that required by state-of-the-art motor systems.

  17. Extending resolution of scanning optical microscopy beyond the Abbe limit through the assistance of InSb thin layers.

    Ding, Chenliang; Wei, Jingsong; Li, Qisong; Liang, Xin; Wei, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The resolution of light imaging is required to extend beyond the Abbe limit to the subdiffraction, or even nanoscale. In this Letter, we propose to extend the resolution of scanning optical microscopy (SOM) beyond the Abbe limit as a kind of subdiffraction imaging technology through the assistance of InSb thin layers due to obvious nonlinear saturation absorption and reversible formation of an optical pinhole channel. The results show that the imaging resolution is greatly improved compared with the SOM itself. This work provides a way to improve the resolution of SOM without changing the SOM itself, but through the assistance of InSb thin layers. This is also a simple and practical way to extend the resolution of SOM beyond the Abbe limit.

  18. Adaptive optics correction of a tunable fluidic lens for ophthalmic applications

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Lin, Ming-Xin

    2013-11-01

    Tunable fluidic lenses are utilizing curvature change via continuously adjusting injected liquid volumes to achieve variable-focusing properties. Nevertheless, the nature of curvature change and refractive index mismatch causes inherent spatial aberrations that severely degrade image quality. Here we present the experimental study of the aberrations in tunable fluidic lenses and use of adaptive optics to compensate for the wavefront errors. Adaptive optics based scheme is demonstrated for three injected liquid volumes, resulting in a substantial reduction of the wavefront errors from 0.42, 1.05, 1.49 to 0.20, 0.21, 0.23 μm, respectively, corresponding to the focal length tunability of 100-200 mm.

  19. Perceptual image quality in normalized LOG domain for Adaptive Optics image post-processing

    Guo, Shiping; Zhang, Rongzhi; Li, Jisheng; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Changhai; Gao, Weizhe

    2015-08-01

    Adaptive Optics together with subsequent post-processing techniques obviously improve the resolution of turbulencedegraded images in ground-based space objects detection and identification. The most common method for frame selection and stopping iteration in post-processing has always been subjective viewing of the images due to a lack of widely agreed-upon objective quality metric. Full reference metrics are not applicable for assessing the field data, no-reference metrics tend to perform poor sensitivity for Adaptive Optics images. In the present work, based on the Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) local contrast feature, a nonlinear normalization is applied to transform the input image into a normalized LOG domain; a quantitative index is then extracted in this domain to assess the perceptual image quality. Experiments show this no-reference quality index is highly consistent with the subjective evaluation of input images for different blur degree and different iteration number.

  20. Adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy: comparison of two, three and four photon fluorescence.

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P; Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Bifano, Thomas G; Xu, Chris

    2015-11-30

    We demonstrate adaptive optics system based on nonlinear feedback from 3- and 4-photon fluorescence. The system is based on femtosecond pulses created by soliton self-frequency shift of a 1550-nm fiber-based femtosecond laser together with micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) phase spatial light modulator (SLM). We perturb the 1020-segment SLM using an orthogonal Walsh sequence basis set with a modified version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. We show the improvement after aberrations correction in 3-photon signal from fluorescent beads. In addition, we compare the improvement obtained in the same adaptive optical system for 2-, 3- and 4-photon fluorescence using dye pool. We show that signal improvement resulting from aberration correction grows exponentially as a function of the order of nonlinearity.

  1. The Robo-AO KOI Survey: laser adaptive optics imaging of every Kepler exoplanet candidate

    Ziegler, Carl; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Nofi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star (KOI) with laser adaptive optics imaging to hunt for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions. With the unparalleled efficiency provided by the first fully robotic adaptive optics system, we perform the critical search for nearby stars (0.15" to 4.0" separation with contrasts up to 6 magnitudes) that dilute the observed planetary transit signal, contributing to inaccurate planetary characteristics or astrophysical false positives. We present 3313 high resolution observations of Kepler planetary hosts from 2012-2015, discovering 479 nearby stars. We measure an overall nearby star probability rate of 14.5\\pm0.8%. With this large data set, we are uniquely able to explore broad correlations between multiple star systems and the properties of the planets which they host, providing insight into the formation and evolution of planetary systems in our galaxy. Several KOIs of particular interest...

  2. On distributed wavefront reconstruction for large-scale adaptive optics systems.

    de Visser, Cornelis C; Brunner, Elisabeth; Verhaegen, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The distributed-spline-based aberration reconstruction (D-SABRE) method is proposed for distributed wavefront reconstruction with applications to large-scale adaptive optics systems. D-SABRE decomposes the wavefront sensor domain into any number of partitions and solves a local wavefront reconstruction problem on each partition using multivariate splines. D-SABRE accuracy is within 1% of a global approach with a speedup that scales quadratically with the number of partitions. The D-SABRE is compared to the distributed cumulative reconstruction (CuRe-D) method in open-loop and closed-loop simulations using the YAO adaptive optics simulation tool. D-SABRE accuracy exceeds CuRe-D for low levels of decomposition, and D-SABRE proved to be more robust to variations in the loop gain.

  3. End to end numerical simulations of the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Lombini, Matteo; Butler, R C; Ciliegi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    MAORY is the adaptive optics module of the E-ELT that will feed the MICADO imaging camera through a gravity invariant exit port. MAORY has been foreseen to implement MCAO correction through three high order deformable mirrors driven by the reference signals of six Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) feeding as many Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensors. A three Natural Guide Stars (NGSs) system will provide the low order correction. We develop a code for the end-to-end simulation of the MAORY adaptive optics (AO) system in order to obtain high-delity modeling of the system performance. It is based on the IDL language and makes extensively uses of the GPUs. Here we present the architecture of the simulation tool and its achieved and expected performance.

  4. Improved performance of the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory

    An, J R; Avicola, K; Bauman, B J; Brase, J M; Campbell, E W; Carrano, C; Cooke, J B; Freeze, G J; Friedman, H W; Max, C E; Gates, E L; Gavel, D T; Kanz, V K; Kuklo, T C; Macintosh, B A; Newman, M J; Olivier, S S; Pierce, E L; Waltjen, K E; Watson, A

    1999-07-20

    Results of experiments with the laser guide star adaptive optics system on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory have demonstrated a factor of 4 performance improvement over previous results. Stellar images recorded at a wavelength of 2 {micro}m were corrected to over 40% of the theoretical diffraction-limited peak intensity. For the previous two years, this sodium-layer laser guide star system has corrected stellar images at this wavelength to {approx}10% of the theoretical peak intensity limit. After a campaign to improve the beam quality of the laser system, and to improve calibration accuracy and stability of the adaptive optics system using new techniques for phase retrieval and phase-shifting diffraction interferometry, the system performance has been substantially increased. The next step will be to use the Lick system for astronomical science observations, and to demonstrate this level of performance with the new system being installed on the 10-meter Keck II telescope.

  5. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  6. Gemini multi-conjugate adaptive optics system review I: Design, trade-offs and integration

    Rigaut, Francois; Boccas, Maxime; d'Orgeville, Céline; Vidal, Fabrice; van Dam, Marcos A; Arriagada, Gustavo; Fesquet, Vincent; Galvez, Ramon L; Gausachs, Gaston; Cavedoni, Chad; Ebbers, Angelic W; Karewicz, Stan; James, Eric; Lührs, Javier; Montes, Vanessa; Perez, Gabriel; Rambold, William N; Rojas, Roberto; Walker, Shane; Bec, Matthieu; Trancho, Gelys; Sheehan, Michael; Irarrazaval, Benjamin; Boyer, Corinne; Ellerbroek, Brent L; Flicker, Ralf; Gratadour, Damien; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Daruich, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The Gemini Multi-conjugate adaptive optics System (GeMS) at the Gemini South telescope in Cerro Pach{\\'o}n is the first sodium-based multi-Laser Guide Star (LGS) adaptive optics system. It uses five LGSs and two deformable mirrors to measure and compensate for atmospheric distortions. The GeMS project started in 1999, and saw first light in 2011. It is now in regular operation, producing images close to the diffraction limit in the near infrared, with uniform quality over a field of view of two square arcminutes. The present paper (I) is the first one in a two-paper review of GeMS. It describes the system, explains why and how it was built, discusses the design choices and trade-offs, and presents the main issues encountered during the course of the project. Finally, we briefly present the results of the system first light.

  7. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    Basden, A G; Bharmal, N A; Bitenc, U; Brangier, M; Buey, T; Butterley, T; Cano, D; Chemla, F; Clark, P; Cohen, M; Conan, J -M; de Cos, F J; Dickson, C; Dipper, N A; Dunlop, C N; Feautrier, P; Fusco, T; Gach, J L; Gendron, E; Geng, D; Goodsell, S J; Gratadour, D; Greenaway, A H; Guesalaga, A; Guzman, C D; Henry, D; Holck, D; Hubert, Z; Huet, J M; Kellerer, A; Kulcsar, C; Laporte, P; Roux, B Le; Looker, N; Longmore, A J; Marteaud, M; Martin, O; Meimon, S; Morel, C; Morris, T J; Myers, R M; Osborn, J; Perret, D; Petit, C; Raynaud, H; Reeves, A P; Rousset, G; Lasheras, F Sanchez; Rodriguez, M Sanchez; Santos, J D; Sevin, A; Sivo, G; Stadler, E; Stobie, B; Talbot, G; Todd, S; Vidal, F; Younger, E J

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory adaptive optics real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  8. Adaptive simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for retrieving refractive index profiles of optical fiber

    Chang, Zheng; Huang, Sujuan; Wang, Tingyun; Shang, Yi; Zhang, Qianwu; Yan, Cheng; Zou, Fang

    2016-09-01

    An efficient adaptive simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (ASART) to calculate optical fiber refractive index profiles is proposed based on phase difference curves obtained by digital holography technique. We develop adaptive relaxation parameter (ARP) on simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) to increase the convergence speed and improve the reconstruction accuracy. A formula of ARP is derived mathematically and multilevel scheme (MLS) is used to increase convergence speed in the first iteration. Experimental results show the proposed ASART convergences over 40% faster than SART and achieve significantly higher reconstruction accuracy. Experimental verification shows that ASART is more efficient than SART and filtered back projection in image reconstruction, especially with few projection views. The running time of ASART is much shorter than that of SART, and ASART needs fewer iteration numbers to obtain the same reconstruction effects. In addition, it can be used to measure optical fibers with various diameters that cannot be measured with S14 refractive index profiler (S14).

  9. Coherent free space optics communications over the maritime atmosphere with use of adaptive optics for beam wavefront correction.

    Li, Ming; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2015-02-20

    We evaluate the performance of the coherent free space optics (FSO) employing quadrature array phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation over the maritime atmosphere with atmospheric turbulence compensated by use of adaptive optics (AO). We have established a comprehensive FSO channel model for maritime conditions and also made a comprehensive comparison of performance between the maritime and terrestrial atmospheric links. The FSO links are modeled based on the intensity attenuation resulting from scattering and absorption effects, the log-amplitude fluctuations, and the phase distortions induced by turbulence. The obtained results show that the FSO system performance measured by the bit-error-rate (BER) can be significantly improved when the optimization of the AO system is achieved. Also, we find that the higher BER is observed in the maritime FSO channel with atmospheric turbulence, as compared to the terrestrial FSO systems if they experience the same turbulence strength.

  10. Adaptive Optics Assisted 3D spectroscopy observations for black hole mass measurements

    Pastorini, Guia

    2006-01-01

    The very high spatial resolution provided by Adaptive Optics assisted spectroscopic observations at 8m-class telescopes (e.g. with SINFONI at the VLT) will allow to greatly increase the number of direct black hole (BH) mass measurements which is currently very small. This is a fundamental step to investigate the tight link between galaxy evolution and BH growth, revealed by the existing scaling relations between $M_{BH}$ and galaxy structural parameters. I present preliminary results from SIN...

  11. Neptune’s zonal winds from near-IR Keck adaptive optics imaging in August 2001

    Martin, S.C.; De Pater, I.; Marcus, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present H-band (1.4–1.8 μm) images of Neptune with a spatial resolution of ∼0.06″, taken with the W.M. Keck II telescope using the slit-viewing camera (SCAM) of the NIRSPEC instrument backed with Adaptive Optics. Images with 60-second integration times span 4 hours each on UT 20 and 21 August, 20

  12. Adaptive Optics at Optical Wavelengths: Test Observations of Kyoto 3DII Connected to Subaru Telescope AO188

    Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Akita, A.; Hattori, T.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) enables us to observe objects with high spatial resolution, which is important in most astrophysical observations. Most AO systems are operational at near-infrared wavelengths but not in the optical range, because optical observations require a much higher performance to obtain the same Strehl ratio as near-infrared observations. Therefore, to enable AO-assisted observations at optical wavelengths, we connected the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII), which can perform integral field spectroscopy, to the second generation AO system of the Subaru Telescope (AO188). We developed a new beam-splitter that reflects light below 594 nm for the wavefront sensors of AO188 and transmits above 644 nm for Kyoto 3DII. We also developed a Kyoto 3DII mount at the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru Telescope. In test observations, the spatial resolution of the combined AO188-Kyoto 3DII was higher than that in natural seeing conditions, even at 6500 Å. The full width at half maximum of an undersampled (1.5 spaxels) bright guide star (7.0 mag in the V-band) was 0.″12.

  13. Traceability of Height Measurements on Green Sand Molds using Optical 3D Scanning

    Mohaghegh, K.; Yazdanbakhsh, S.A.; Tiedje, N. S.;

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a reliable measurement procedure for dimensional measurements on green sand molds is a prerequisite for analysis of geometric deviations in mass production of quality castings. Surface of the green sand mold is not suitable for measurements using a tactile coordinate measuring machine....... This paper presents a metrological approach for height measurement on green sand molds using an optical 3D scanner with fringe projection. A new sand sample was developed with a hard binder to withstand the contact force of a touch probe, while keeping optical cooperativeness similar to green sand...

  14. Multianalyte electrochemical biosensor on a monolith electrode by optically scanning the electrical double layer.

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Saraf, Ravi F

    2014-07-15

    Redox on an electrode is an interfacial phenomenon that modulates the charge in the electrical double layer (EDL). A novel instrument, the Scanning Electrometer for Electrical Double-layer (SEED) has been developed to measure multiple enzyme reactions on a monolith electrode due to immunospecific binding with a mixture of respective analytes. SEED quantitatively maps the local redox reaction by scanning a laser on the array of enzyme monolayer spots immobilized on the monolith electrode. SEED measures the change in local charge state of the EDL that abruptly changes due to the redox reaction. The measurement spot size defined by the size of the laser beam is ~10 µm. The SEED signal is linearly proportional to the local redox current density and analyte concentration. The specificity is close to 100%. The SEED readout is compatible with microfluidics platform where the signal degrades less than 2% due to the poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) body.

  15. Clear widens the field for observations of the Sun with multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    Schmidt, Dirk; Gorceix, Nicolas; Goode, Philip R.; Marino, Jose; Rimmele, Thomas; Berkefeld, Thomas; Wöger, Friedrich; Zhang, Xianyu; Rigaut, François; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    The multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) pathfinder Clear on the New Solar Telescope in Big Bear Lake has provided the first-ever MCAO-corrected observations of the Sun that show a clearly and visibly widened corrected field of view compared to quasi-simultaneous observations with classical adaptive optics (CAO) correction. Clear simultaneously uses three deformable mirrors, each conjugated to a different altitude, to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. While the MCAO correction was most effective over an angle that is approximately three times wider than the angle that was corrected by CAO, the full 53'' field of view did benefit from MCAO correction. We further demonstrate that ground-layer-only correction is attractive for solar observations as a complementary flavor of adaptive optics for observational programs that require homogenous seeing improvement over a wide field rather than diffraction-limited resolution. We show illustrative images of solar granulation and of a sunspot obtained on different days in July 2016, and present a brief quantitative analysis of the generalized Fried parameters of the images. The movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  16. MAD Adaptive Optics Imaging of High Luminosity Quasars: A Pilot Project

    Liuzzo, E; Paiano, S; Treves, A; Uslenghi, M; Arcidiacono, C; Baruffolo, A; Diolaiti, E; Farinato, J; Lombini, M; Moretti, A; Ragazzoni, R; Brast, R; Donaldson, R; Kolb, J; Marchetti, E; Tordo, S

    2016-01-01

    We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z~2 and one at z~4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these non optimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ~0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for 2 sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with adaptive optics systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2-3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for QSOs at z = ...

  17. Optical nonlinearity of organic dyes as studied by Z-scan and transient grating techniques

    Umakanta Tripathy; R Justin Rajesh; Prem B Bisht; A Subrahamanyam

    2002-12-01

    The excited state absorption cross-section of 5,5′-dichloro-11-diphenylamino- 3,3′-diethyl-10,12-ethylinethiatricarbocyanine perchlorate (IR140) have been measured by using a single beam transmission technique. Z-scan experiments have been used to find out a few nonlinear parameters. The excited state relaxation times have also been measured by using laser induced transient grating (LITG) technique.

  18. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    Zhang Fang; Zhang Guo-Feng; Dong Shuang-Li; Sun Jian-Hu; Chen Rui-Yun; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2009-01-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  19. Single quantum dot coupled to a scanning optical antenna: a tunable superemitter.

    Farahani, J N; Pohl, D W; Eisler, H-J; Hecht, B

    2005-07-01

    The interaction of a single quantum dot with a bowtie antenna is demonstrated for visible light. The antenna is generated at the apex of a Si3N4 atomic force microscopy tip by focused ion beam milling. When scanned over the quantum dot, its photoluminescence is enhanced while its excited-state lifetime is decreased. Our observations demonstrate that the relaxation channels of a single quantum emitter can be controlled by coupling to an efficiently radiating metallic nanoantenna.

  20. Validation Through Simulations of a Cn2 Profiler for the ESO/VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    Garcia-Rissmann, A; Kolb, J; Louarn, M Le; Madec, P -Y; Neichel, B

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project envisages transforming one of the VLT units into an adaptive telescope and providing its ESO (European Southern Observatory) second generation instruments with turbulence corrected wavefronts. For MUSE and HAWK-I this correction will be achieved through the GALACSI and GRAAL AO modules working in conjunction with a 1170 actuators Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). Multiple wavefront sensors will enable GLAO and LTAO capabilities, whose performance can greatly benefit from a knowledge about the stratification of the turbulence in the atmosphere. This work, totally based on end-to-end simulations, describes the validation tests conducted on a Cn2 profiler adapted for the AOF specifications. Because an absolute profile calibration is strongly dependent on a reliable knowledge of turbulence parameters r0 and L0, the tests presented here refer only to normalized output profiles. Uncertainties in the input parameters inherent t...