WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive mobile user

  1. Detecting users handedness for ergonomic adaptation of mobile user interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löchtefeld, Markus; Schardt, Phillip; Krüger, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Often, we operate mobile devices using only one hand. The hand thereby serves two purposes: holding the device and operating the touch screen with the thumb. The current trend of increasing screen sizes however, makes it close to impossible to reach all parts of the screen (especially the top area......) for users with average hand sizes. One solution is to offer adaptive user interfaces for such one-handed interactions. These modes have to be triggered manually and thus induce a critical overhead. They are further designed to bring all content closer, regardless of whether the phone is operated...... with the left or right hand. In this paper, we present an algorithm that allows determining the users' interacting hand from their unlocking behavior. Our algorithm correctly distinguishes one- and twohanded usage as well as left- and right handed unlocking in 98.51% of all cases. This is achieved through a k...

  2. User-adaptive mobile video streaming using MPEG-DASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Yuriy A.

    2013-09-01

    We describe an implementation of DASH streaming client for mobile devices which uses adaptation to user behavior and viewing conditions as means for improving efficiency of streaming delivery. Proposed design relies on sensors in a mobile device to detect presence of the user, his proximity to the screen, and other factors such as motion, brightness of the screen and ambient lighting conditions. This information is subsequently used to select stream that delivers adequate resolution implied by viewing conditions and natural limits of human vision. We show that in a mobile environment such adaptation can result in significant reduction of bandwidth usage compared to traditional streaming systems.

  3. Context-based service adaptation platform: Improving the user experience towards mobile location services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Saowanee

    2008-01-01

    Back in 2000 and the, following two or three years, mobile location services gained a great deal of interest and they were considered as one of the few service categories where users would be willing to pay for the usage. Since 2000 countless mobile location services have been launched in different...... parts of the world. However, the mobile location services have obviously not yet met the hyped expectation of mass-market adoption that was expressed in 2000. The lack of adaptability and offerings tailored to different user requirements in specific contexts of use is one of the factors inhibiting...

  4. Adaptive algorithm for mobile user positioning based on environment estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujović Darko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the challenges to realize an infrastructure independent and a low-cost positioning method in cellular networks based on RSS (Received Signal Strength parameter, auxiliary timing parameter and environment estimation. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated using field measurements collected from GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications network, but it is technology independent and can be applied in UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunication Systems and LTE (Long-Term Evolution networks, also.

  5. User-Adapted Recommendation of Content on Mobile Devices Using Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hirotoshi; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Hara, Kousuke; Motomura, Yoichi

    Mobile devices, such as cellular phones and car navigation systems, are essential to daily life. People acquire necessary information and preferred content over communication networks anywhere, anytime. However, usability issues arise from the simplicity of user interfaces themselves. Thus, a recommendation of content that is adapted to a user's preference and situation will help the user select content. In this paper, we describe a method to realize such a system using Bayesian networks. This user-adapted mobile system is based on a user model that provides recommendation of content (i.e., restaurants, shops, and music that are suitable to the user and situation) and that learns incrementally based on accumulated usage history data. However, sufficient samples are not always guaranteed, since a user model would require combined dependency among users, situations, and contents. Therefore, we propose the LK method for modeling, which complements incomplete and insufficient samples using knowledge data, and CPT incremental learning for adaptation based on a small number of samples. In order to evaluate the methods proposed, we applied them to restaurant recommendations made on car navigation systems. The evaluation results confirmed that our model based on the LK method can be expected to provide better generalization performance than that of the conventional method. Furthermore, our system would require much less operation than current car navigation systems from the beginning of use. Our evaluation results also indicate that learning a user's individual preference through CPT incremental learning would be beneficial to many users, even with only a few samples. As a result, we have developed the technology of a system that becomes more adapted to a user the more it is used.

  6. A comparison of computerized adaptive testing and fixed-length short forms for the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-MTM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amtmann, Dagmar; Bamer, Alyssa M; Kim, Jiseon; Bocell, Fraser; Chung, Hyewon; Park, Ryoungsun; Salem, Rana; Hafner, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    New health status instruments can be administered by computerized adaptive test or short forms. The Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-MTM) is a self-report measure of mobility for prosthesis users with lower limb loss. This study used the PLUS-M to examine advantages and disadvantages of computerized adaptive test and short forms. To compare scores obtained from computerized adaptive test to scores obtained from fixed-length short forms (7-item and 12-item) in order to provide guidance to researchers and clinicians on how to select the best form of administration for different uses. Cross-sectional, observational study. Individuals with lower limb loss completed the PLUS-M by computerized adaptive test and short forms. Administration time, correlations between the scores, and standard errors were compared. Scores and standard errors from the computerized adaptive test, 7-item short form, and 12-item short form were highly correlated and all forms of administration were efficient. Computerized adaptive test required less time to administer than either paper or electronic short forms; however, time savings were minimal compared to the 7-item short form. Results indicate that the PLUS-M computerized adaptive test is most efficient, and differences in scores between administration methods are minimal. The main advantage of the computerized adaptive test was more reliable scores at higher levels of mobility compared to short forms. Clinical relevance Health-related item banks, like the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-MTM), can be administered by computerized adaptive testing (CAT) or as fixed-length short forms (SFs). Results of this study will help clinicians and researchers decide whether they should invest in a CAT administration system or whether SFs are more appropriate.

  7. Visual interfaces as an approach for providing mobile services and mobile content to low literate users in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matyila, M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available in the related mobile applications. Exploring typical challenges experienced by low literate users and adapting these mobile applications using visual interfaces can provide low literate users with usable access to mobile services and mobile content....

  8. User acceptance of mobile notifications

    CERN Document Server

    Westermann, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an alternative approach to studying smartphone-app user notifications. It starts with insights into user acceptance of mobile notifications in order to provide tools to support users in managing these. It extends previous research by investigating factors that influence users’ perception of notifications and proposes tools addressing the shortcomings of current systems. It presents a technical framework and testbed as an approach for evaluating the usage of mobile applications and notifications, and then discusses a series of studies based on this framework that investigate factors influencing users’ perceptions of mobile notifications. Lastly, a set of design guidelines for the usage of mobile notifications is derived that can be employed to support users in handling notifications on smartphones.

  9. Exploring the Mobility of Mobile Phone Users

    CERN Document Server

    Csáji, Balázs Cs; Traag, V A; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread ...

  10. User Experience of Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raptis, Dimitrios

    This thesis focuses on mobile devices and it specifically investigates the effect of their physical form on two perceived user experience qualities, usability and coolness. With the term mobile devices, I refer to interactive products that users interact with while being on the move....... The thesis consists of four research papers and a statement. The four individual papers provide answers to the two research questions, while the statement acts as a bridge that brings the papers together into a coherent whole. The statement initially discusses what user experience and physical form are...... studies focus on generating enough data to map out a relatively unknown phenomenon, while validation studies confirm cause-effect relationships that have been identified from previous research. The statement continues with a discussion on the implications of my findings to the broader user experience...

  11. User acquaintance with mobile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Walesa, Magali; Sarrey, Evelyne; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Handheld technology finds slowly its place in the healthcare world. Some clinicians already use intensively dedicated mobile applications to consult clinical references. However, handheld technology hasn't still broadly embraced to the core of the healthcare business, the hospitals. The weak penetration of handheld technology in the hospitals can be partly explained by the caution of stakeholders that must be convinced about the efficiency of these tools before going forward. In a domain where temporal constraints are increasingly strong, caregivers cannot loose time on playing with gadgets. All users are not comfortable with tactile manipulations and the lack of dedicated peripheral complicates entering data for novices. Stakeholders must be convinced that caregivers will be able to master handheld devices. In this paper, we make the assumption that the proper design of an interface may influence users' performances to record information. We are also interested to find out whether users increase their efficiency when using handheld tools repeatedly. To answer these questions, we have set up a field study to compare users' performances on three different user interfaces while recording vital signs. Some user interfaces were familiar to users, and others were totally innovative. Results showed that users' familiarity with smartphone influences their performances and that users improve their performances by repeating a task.

  12. Design Patterns for User Interfaces on Mobile Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik G.

    The objective of this tutorial is to enhance the participants’ skills in designing user interfaces for mobile equipment, including adaptive and context sensitive user interfaces and multimodal interaction. Through a combination of lectures and practical exercises, a collection of patterns addressing issues regarding designing user interfaces on mobile devices is presented. The patterns address typical challenges and opportunities when designing user interfaces that are to run on PDAs and SmartPhones - both challenges connected to characteristics of the equipment and connected to tasks to which designing suitable user interfaces is challenging. The tutorial is intended for user interface designer, systems developers, and project leaders that work with or plan to work on development of applications on mobile devices. The tutorial requires basic knowledge of user interface design in general, and basic understanding of challenges connected to designing user interfaces on mobile devices.

  13. Android Based Mobile Environment for Moodle Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Clunie, Gisela T.; Clunie, Clifton; Castillo, Aris; Rangel, Norman

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about the development of a platform that eases, throughout Android based mobile devices, mobility of users of virtual courses at Technological University of Panama. The platform deploys computational techniques such as "web services," design patterns, ontologies and mobile technologies to allow mobile devices communicate…

  14. Conceptual Model of User Adaptive Enterprise Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inese Šūpulniece

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The user adaptive enterprise application is a software system, which adapts its behavior to an individual user on the basis of nontrivial inferences from information about the user. The objective of this paper is to elaborate a conceptual model of the user adaptive enterprise applications. In order to conceptualize the user adaptive enterprise applications, their main characteristics are analyzed, the meta-model defining the key concepts relevant to these applications is developed, and the user adaptive enterprise application and its components are defined in terms of the meta-model. Modeling of the user adaptive enterprise application incorporates aspects of enterprise modeling, application modeling, and design of adaptive characteristics of the application. The end-user and her expectations are identified as two concepts of major importance not sufficiently explored in the existing research. Understanding these roles improves the adaptation result in the user adaptive applications.

  15. An End User Development Approach for Mobile Web Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bosetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The trend towards mobile devices usage has made it possible for the Web to be conceived not only as an information space but also as a ubiquitous platform where users perform all kinds of tasks. In some cases, users access the Web with native mobile applications developed for well-known sites, such as, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. These native applications might offer further (e.g., location-based functionalities to their users in comparison with their corresponding Web sites because they were developed with mobile features in mind. However, many Web applications have no native counterpart and users access them using a mobile Web browser. Although the access to context information is not a complex issue nowadays, not all Web applications adapt themselves according to it or diversely improve the user experience by listening to a wide range of sensors. At some point, users might want to add mobile features to these Web sites, even if those features were not originally supported. In this paper, we present a novel approach to allow end users to augment their preferred Web sites with mobile features. We support our claims by presenting a framework for mobile Web augmentation, an authoring tool, and an evaluation with 21 end users.

  16. Adaptive mobility for rescue robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitch, John G.

    2003-09-01

    It has often been observed that the most daunting aspect of any crisis response is managing the "unknown unknowns" that inevitably plague incident commanders and emergency personnel at all levels responsible for life and death decisions on a minute by minute basis. In structural collapse situations, for example, rescue crews rarely have even a coarse picture of the number or disposition of people or material scattered amongst the twisted beams and piles of concrete that typically entomb would-be survivors. How can the incident commander decide which beam to lift or even which section of the building to search first in the absence of information of what lies beneath. Even the slightest tug on a concrete slab can collapse potential life harboring void spaces below killing potential survivors in the process. In deploying mobile robots to assist in rescue operations we combined the traditional advantages of machine immunity to fatigue, hazardous materials and environmental controls, with the mechanical design freedom that allowed small platforms to penetrate deep into rubble to expand both situational awareness and operational influence of rescue services at the World Trade Center and mountainous snow-bound caves in Afghanistan. We learned a great deal from these experiences with regard to robot emloyment and design. This paper endeavors to share a few of our more prominent lessons learned regarding portable robot mobility as a means to manage user expectations and stimulate more innovative and adaptive design.

  17. Mining Users Mobility at Public Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    joao ferreira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research work we propose a new approach to estimate the number of passengers in a public transportation and determinate the users’ route path based on a passive approach without user intervention. The method is based on the probe requests of users mobile device through the collected data in wireless access point. This data is manipulated to extract the information about the numbers of users with mobile devices and track their route path and time. This data can be manipulated to extract useful knowledge related with users’ habits at public transportation and extract user mobility patterns.

  18. Intelligent Paging Based Mobile User Tracking Using Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sajal; Dutta, Raju; Debnath, Soumen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.

    2010-11-01

    In general, a mobile user travels in a predefined path that depends mostly on the user's characteristics. Thus, tracking the locations of a mobile user is one of the challenges for location management. In this paper, we introduce a movement pattern learning strategy system to track the user's movements using adaptive fuzzy logic. Our fuzzy inference system extracts patterns from the historical data record of the cell numbers along with the date and time stamp of the users occupying the cell. Implementation of this strategy has been evaluated with the real time user data which proves the efficiency and accuracy of the model. This mechanism not only reduces user location tracking costs, but also significantly decreases the call-loss rates and average paging delays.

  19. Adaptability in CORBA: The Mobile Proxy Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, B.; Jensen, Christian D.

    2000-01-01

    are inherently open, heterogeneous, and dynamic environments integrating a wide range of platforms, operating systems and applications from a number of different sources. In this paper, we propose to use mobile proxies to provide adaptability in distributed applications integrated using the CORBA technology......Adaptability is one of the most important challenges in modern distributed systems. It may be defined as the ease with which a software application satisfies the different system constraints and the requirements of users and other applications. Adaptability is needed because distributed systems...

  20. Mining Users Mobility at Public Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    joao ferreira

    2017-01-01

    In this research work we propose a new approach to estimate the number of passengers in a public transportation and determinate the users’ route path based on a passive approach without user intervention. The method is based on the probe requests of users mobile device through the collected data in wireless access point. This data is manipulated to extract the information about the numbers of users with mobile devices and track their route path and time. This data can be manipulated to extrac...

  1. User-Centered Evaluation of Adaptive and Adaptable Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velsen, Lex Stefan; van der Geest, Thea; Klaassen, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive and adaptable systems provide tailored output to various users in various contexts. While adaptive systems base their output on implicit inferences, adaptable systems use explicitly provided information. Since the presentation or output of these systems is adapted, standard user-centered

  2. Fractal Adaptive Web Service for Mobile Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichraf Tirellil

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes our proposition for adaptive web services which is based on configurable, re-usable adaptive/personalized services. To realize our ideas, we have developed an approach for designing, implementing and maintaining personal service. This approach enables the user to accomplish an activity with a set of services answering to his preferences, his profiles and to a personalized context. In this paper, we describe the principle of our approach that we call fractal adaptation approach, and we discuss the implementation of personalization services in the context of mobile and collaborative scenario of learning. We have realized a platform in this context -a platform for mobile and collaborative learning- based on fractal adaptable web services. The platform is tested with a population of students and tutors, in order to release the gaps and the advantages of the approach suggested.

  3. Adaptive mobility aids for the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Glenn; Gunderson, James; Cvetanovich, Michael; Kell, Steven; Graves, S.; Felder, Robin A.

    2001-10-01

    Loss of mobility in the elderly causes a significant economic burden to caregivers and is one of the most significant determinants of depression and loss of muscle strength and productivity in this age group. Mobility aids can assist with locomotion by providing physical support, however they fail to provide direction guidance and avoidance of obstacles and hazards. This talk will focus on design of intelligent adaptive wheeled walkers. By allowing the user varying degrees of control, from complete to collaborative, these walkers afford the user with the feeling of control, while helping to increase the ease and safety of their daily travels. The control systems of these walkers differ from those of other mobility aids and mobile robots because they must both assist in mobility and provide balance and support, but also give directional aid if necessary. These functions must be performed in a tight loop adaptation with a human whose input may be difficult to predict. Through the use of a wheeled walker equipped with force and sonar sensors, we were able to develop an intelligent self-guided mobility aid that can provide improved independence, autonomy, and quality of life for the elderly.

  4. Unobtrusive user modeling for adaptive hypermedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holz, H.J.; Hofmann, K.; Reed, C.; Uchyigit, G.; Ma, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a technique for user modeling in Adaptive Hypermedia (AH) that is unobtrusive at both the level of observable behavior and that of cognition. Unobtrusive user modeling is complementary to transparent user modeling. Unobtrusive user modeling induces user models appropriate for Educational

  5. User Interface Cultures of Mobile Knowledge Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Mannonen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication tools (ICTs have become a major influencer of how modern work is carried out. Methods of user-centered design do not however take into account the full complexity of technology and the user interface context the users live in. User interface culture analysis aims providing to designers new ways and strategies to better take into account the current user interface environment when designing new products. This paper describes the reasons behind user interface culture analysis and shows examples of its usage when studying mobile and distributed knowledge workers.

  6. User driven innovation in mobile technologies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper Schultz; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    by systems already in function. Stories of prior business successes can be an important tool to ensure further innovative investments since lack of enterprise strategies is often an obstacle for innovation, especially user driven. Both small and large software houses develops dedicated software for coupling......Developing dedicated mobile technology systems for AEC demands the introduction of user driven innovation. A Danish research project collected international examples and user-experiences of mobile and handheld ICT in the building industry i.a. by reading off the functionality of the mobile...... technology systems relying on the concept of affordance. This paper examines how innovation processes mediate between user orientations and technology offers. There is a great potential for mobile handheld ICT-systems to support numerous work processes in the AEC-industry and this can be substantiated...

  7. Mobility-related participation and user satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Aase; Kreiner, Svend; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    scale was good,while themobilityrelated participation scalewas not optimal in discriminating between personswith a high degree ofmobility-related participation. It was demonstrated that mobility-related participation and user satisfaction are separate, not related constructs. Conclusions. It can...

  8. Adaptive Text Entry for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proschowsky, Morten Smidt

    to improve the models of human motor behaviour. TUP-Key is a variant of TUP, designed for 12 key phone keyboards. It is introduced in the thesis but has not been implemented or evaluated. Both text entry methods support adaptive context-aware language models. YourText is a framework for adaptive context...... for mobile devices and a framework for adaptive context-aware language models. Based on analysis of current text entry methods, the requirements to the new text entry methods are established. Transparent User guided Prediction (TUP) is a text entry method for devices with one dimensional touch input. It can...... be touch sensitive wheels, sliders or similar input devices. The interaction design of TUP is done with a combination of high level task models and low level models of human motor behaviour. Three prototypes of TUP are designed and evaluated by more than 30 users. Observations from the evaluations are used...

  9. City users' classification with mobile phone data

    OpenAIRE

    Furletti, Barbara; GABRIELLI, Lorenzo; Trasarti, Roberto; Giannotti, Fosca; Pedreschi, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays mobile phone data are an actual proxy for studying the users' social life and urban dynamics. In this paper we present the Sociometer, and analytical framework aimed at classifying mobile phone users into behavioral categories by means of their call habits. The analytical process starts from spatio-temporal profiles, learns the different behaviors, and returns annotated profiles. After the description of the methodology and its evaluation, we present an application of the Sociometer ...

  10. Adaptive Behavior for Mobile Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2009-01-01

    The term "System for Mobility and Access to Rough Terrain" (SMART) denotes a theoretical framework, a control architecture, and an algorithm that implements the framework and architecture, for enabling a land-mobile robot to adapt to changing conditions. SMART is intended to enable the robot to recognize adverse terrain conditions beyond its optimal operational envelope, and, in response, to intelligently reconfigure itself (e.g., adjust suspension heights or baseline distances between suspension points) or adapt its driving techniques (e.g., engage in a crabbing motion as a switchback technique for ascending steep terrain). Conceived for original application aboard Mars rovers and similar autonomous or semi-autonomous mobile robots used in exploration of remote planets, SMART could also be applied to autonomous terrestrial vehicles to be used for search, rescue, and/or exploration on rough terrain.

  11. Mobile, Flexible, and Adaptable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jytte; Thao, Thi Vu

    2011-01-01

    of the female porters demonstrate a particular way of adapting to the migration process. Also, it is emphasised how women's flexible practices are facilitated by women's own village-based networks. It is suggested that ‘in-betweenness’, which stands for the simultaneous and overlapping presence of urban......Industrialisation and urban growth are constitutive aspects of Vietnam's new economy and are important driving forces behind increasing rural-to-urban migration. Growth in informal sector employment is a significant aspect of this development, which has provided for both male and female migrants......, although they generally are engaged in different occupations. Based on a case study among porters at Hanoi's Long Bien Market, this paper examines rural-to-urban migrants' gendered migration practices. Two interrelated aspects of gendered migration practices are in focus: the role of migration networks...

  12. Prototyping of user interfaces for mobile applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bähr, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates processes for the prototyping of user interfaces for mobile apps, and describes the development of new concepts and tools that can improve the prototype driven app development in the early stages. It presents the development and evaluation of a new requirements catalogue for prototyping mobile app tools that identifies the most important criteria such tools should meet at different prototype-development stages. This catalogue is not just a good point of orientation for designing new prototyping approaches, but also provides a set of metrics for a comparing the performance of alternative prototyping tools. In addition, the book discusses the development of Blended Prototyping, a new approach for prototyping user interfaces for mobile applications in the early and middle development stages, and presents the results of an evaluation of its performance, showing that it provides a tool for teamwork-oriented, creative prototyping of mobile apps in the early design stages.

  13. Towards User-centric Video Transmission in Next Generation Mobile Networks

    OpenAIRE

    El Essaili, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is to design, implement and evaluate novel user-centric approaches for the distribution of the limited wireless network resources across multiple users in a mobile cell. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the uplink distribution of user-generated video content over fourth generation mobile networks. The second part explores the benefit of QoE-based traffic and resource management in the mobile network in the context of adaptive HTTP downlink video deliver...

  14. Object-oriented user interfaces for personalized mobile learning

    CERN Document Server

    Alepis, Efthimios

    2014-01-01

    This book presents recent research in mobile learning and advanced user interfaces. It is shown how the combination of this fields can result in personalized educational software that meets the requirements of state-of-the-art mobile learning software. This book provides a framework that is capable of incorporating the software technologies, exploiting a wide range of their current advances and additionally investigating ways to go even further by providing potential solutions to future challenges. The presented approach uses the well-known Object-Oriented method in order to address these challenges. Throughout this book, a general model is constructed using Object-Oriented Architecture. Each chapter focuses on the construction of a specific part of this model, while in the conclusion these parts are unified. This book will help software engineers build more sophisticated personalized software that targets in mobile education, while at the same time retaining a high level of adaptivity and user-friendliness w...

  15. Adaptive User Profiles in Pervasive Advertising Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Florian; Balz, Moritz; Kristes, Stefanie; Shirazi, Alireza Sahami; Mennenöh, Julian; Schmidt, Albrecht; Schröder, Hendrik; Goedicke, Michael

    Nowadays modern advertising environments try to provide more efficient ads by targeting costumers based on their interests. Various approaches exist today as to how information about the users' interests can be gathered. Users can deliberately and explicitly provide this information or user's shopping behaviors can be analyzed implicitly. We implemented an advertising platform to simulate an advertising environment and present adaptive profiles, which let users setup profiles based on a self-assessment, and enhance those profiles with information about their real shopping behavior as well as about their activity intensity. Additionally, we explain how pervasive technologies such as Bluetooth can be used to create a profile anonymously and unobtrusively.

  16. mUX: the journal of mobile user experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mobile user experience (mUX) encompasses a broad sweep of technology, social and business research - from new interaction techniques for mobile devices, through location-based applications, to mobile services in entertainment...

  17. Technology for the Next-Generation-Mobile User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagi, Greg

    specialized circuits, highly parallel architectures, and new packaging design. Another concern of the smart-mobile-companion user will be that their device is able to deliver an always-on, always-aware environment in a way that is completely seamless and transparent. These handsets will automatically determine the best and most appropriate modem link from the multiple choices on the device, including WiFi, LTE, 5G, and mmWave, based on which link will optimize performance, battery life, and network charges to deliver the best possible user experience. In the future, adaptive connectivity will require many different solutions, including the standard modem technologies of today, as well as new machine-machine interfaces and body-area-networks. All of the new and exciting applications and features of these mobile-companion devices are going to require additional energy due to added computational requirements. However, a gap in energy efficiency is quickly developing between the energy that can be delivered by today's battery technologies, and the energy needed to deliver all-day operation or 2-day always-on standby without a recharge. New innovations ranging from low-voltage digital and analog circuits, non-volatile memory, and adaptive power management, to energy harvesting, will be needed to further improve the battery life of these mobile companion devices. Increased bandwidth combined with decreased latency, higher power efficiency, energy harvesting, massive multimedia processing, and new interconnect technologies will all work together to revolutionize how we interact with our smart-companion devices. The implementation challenges in bringing these technologies to market may seem daunting and numerous at first, but with the strong collaboration in research and development from universities, government agencies, and corporations, the smart-mobile-companion devices of the future will likely become reality within 5 years!

  18. Mobile Phone Usage for M-Learning: Comparing Heavy and Light Mobile Phone Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Norbayah Mohd; Suki, Norazah Mohd

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. The objective of the study is to examine how the usage of mobile phones for m-learning differs between heavy and light mobile phone users. Heavy mobile phone users are hypothesized to have access to/subscribe to one type of mobile content than light…

  19. User assistance for multitasking with interruptions on a mobile device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  20. User Assistance for Multitasking with Interruptions on a Mobile Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  1. A Framework for Mobile User Experiences in Theme Parks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Claus Møller

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework, which contributes to a better theoretical understanding of mobile user experience in theme parks that is not limited to (a) personal smartphones, (b) a specific theme park, or (c) specific mobile content. Thus, the paper contributes to the field of mobile user...... experience in theme parks within HCI. The identified aspects constituting the mobile user experience in theme parks are the environmental context, the social context, the functional context, the mobile interface, and of course the mobile content. The framework is developed based on five diverse case studies...

  2. Mobile user-preference-based data dissemination on mobile P2P networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dohoon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A considerable number of studies have been performed recently on mobile peer-to-peer networks (MOPNETs, as the number of services based on mobile devices has increased. However, existing studies still reveal numerous shortcomings, such as bandwidth overhead, and redundant transmission in terms of multi-broadcast between peers. Especially, owing to the characteristics of MOPNETs, it is extremely important to determine broadcast size and to disseminate data within the limited environment of the network. The mechanism directly affects how well resource information in a mobile device is discovered and how data are transmitted. In this context, it is vital to efficiently disseminate data to be able to arrange hierarchal sequences of resource information of each mobile device for better search performance. Especially, it is also vital to determine the broadcast size, considering the consumption patterns of mobile users. In this article, we propose an adaptable algorithm that determines weighted values and disseminates data using the high-order Markov chain (HoMC. We apply weighted values in consideration of the MOPNET environment. In addition, the proposed HoMC-based Mobile User-preference-based Data Dissemination algorithm was simulated with a Qualnet simulator. Results show that the proposed algorithm performs 17.3% better, on average, in terms of data dissemination, than the existing dissemination methods.

  3. Adaptive multimodal interaction in mobile augmented reality: A conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Rimaniza Zainal; Arshad, Haslina; Shukri, Saidatul A'isyah Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Recently, Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology in many mobile applications. Mobile AR was defined as a medium for displaying information merged with the real world environment mapped with augmented reality surrounding in a single view. There are four main types of mobile augmented reality interfaces and one of them are multimodal interfaces. Multimodal interface processes two or more combined user input modes (such as speech, pen, touch, manual gesture, gaze, and head and body movements) in a coordinated manner with multimedia system output. In multimodal interface, many frameworks have been proposed to guide the designer to develop a multimodal applications including in augmented reality environment but there has been little work reviewing the framework of adaptive multimodal interface in mobile augmented reality. The main goal of this study is to propose a conceptual framework to illustrate the adaptive multimodal interface in mobile augmented reality. We reviewed several frameworks that have been proposed in the field of multimodal interfaces, adaptive interface and augmented reality. We analyzed the components in the previous frameworks and measure which can be applied in mobile devices. Our framework can be used as a guide for designers and developer to develop a mobile AR application with an adaptive multimodal interfaces.

  4. Designing personal attentive user interfaces in the mobile public safety domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, J.W.; Esch van-Bussemakers, M.P.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the mobile computing environment, there is a need to adapt the information and service provision to the momentary attentive state of the user, operational requirements and usage context. This paper proposes to design personal attentive user interfaces (PAUI) for which the content and style of

  5. Influence of a user-adaptive prosthetic knee on quality of life, balance confidence, and measures of mobility: a randomised cross-over trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, Erik Christiaan; Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of a transition from a non-microprocessor controlled to the Rheo Knee® II on quality of life, balance confidence and measures of mobility. Design: Randomised crossover trial. Setting: Research department of a rehabilitation centre. Subjects: Persons with a

  6. Smatphone user segmentation based on trust mobile payment

    OpenAIRE

    Vallespín Arán, María; Molinillo, Sebastian; Célia M. Q. Ramos

    2017-01-01

    The role of trust in mobile payment has been examined in different studies due to its importance in understanding consumer behaviour in mobile transactions,. This investigation contributes with a segmentation and a characterization of smartphone users based on their trust in mobile payment. Data was collected from 456 Spanish smartphone users and cluster analysis was employed to segment Spanish respondents. The results indicate that Spanish smartphone users can be classified into three segmen...

  7. Adaptation Methods in Mobile Communication Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vladimir Wieser

    2003-01-01

    Adaptation methods are the main tool for transmission rate maximization through the mobile channel and today the great attention is directed to them not only in theoretical domain but in standardization process, too...

  8. Adaptation Methods in Mobile Communication Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vladimir Wieser

    2003-01-01

      Adaptation methods are the main tool for transmission rate maximization through the mobile channel and today the great attention is directed to them not only in theoretical domain but in standardization process, too...

  9. A Mobile User Interface For Low-Literacy Users In Rural South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to design a mobile user interface to enable low-literacy users in Dwesa community in South Africa to have access to mobile commerce services. We applied different ethnographic research methods through a usercentred design approach to actively involve the target users in the design process.

  10. Detection of mobile user location on next generation wireless networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Saowanee; Olesen, Henning

    2005-01-01

    of a Mobile IPv6 device can be determined by mapping the geographical location information with the two care-of-addresses and the physical address of the access point where the user is connected. Such a mechanism makes location services for mobile entities available on a global IP network. The end-users can...

  11. A Foundation for Mobile User Experiences in Theme Parks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Claus Møller

    2013-01-01

    Based on case studies, this paper proposes a theoretical understanding of three essential aspects, which affect mobile user experiences in theme parks. The aspect are (a) the controllability of the mobile content, (b) the balance in the hybrid space of proximate physical place and remote digital...... space, and (c) the social space. Furthermore, the social space is exceptionally important in understanding mobile user experiences in theme parks. Thus, this paper proposes to extract the social space from the physical place. This means, that mobile user experiences in theme parks can be understood...

  12. Influence of a user-adaptive prosthetic knee on quality of life, balance confidence, and measures of mobility: a randomised cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Erik C; Nederhand, Marc J; Olsman, Jeroen; Rietman, Johan S

    2015-06-01

    To study the influence of a transition from a non-microprocessor controlled to the Rheo Knee(®) II on quality of life, balance confidence and measures of mobility. Randomised crossover trial. Research department of a rehabilitation centre. Persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation (n=10). Participants were assessed with their own non-microprocessor controlled knee and with the Rheo Knee(®) II. The low-profile Vari-Flex with EVO foot was installed in both knee conditions, followed by eight weeks of acclimatisation. The order in which knees were tested was randomised. Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire with addendum, Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale, Timed "up & go" test, Timed up and down stairs test, Hill Assessment Index, Stairs Assessment Index, Standardized Walking Obstacle Course and One Leg Balance test. Significant higher scores were found for the Rheo Knee(®) II on the Residual Limb Health subscale of the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire when compared to the non-microprocessor controlled prosthetic knee (median [interquartile range] resp. 86.67 [62.21-93.08] and 68.71 [46.15-94.83]; P=0.047) In addition, participants needed significantly more steps to complete an obstacle course when walking with the Rheo Knee(®) II compared to the non-microprocessor controlled prosthetic knee (median [interquartile range] resp. 23.50 [19.92-26.25] and 22.17 [19.50-25.75]; P=0.041). On other outcome measures, no significant differences were found. Transition towards the Rheo Knee(®) II had little effect on the studied outcome measures. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Mobile Games Individualise and Motivate Rehabilitation in Different User Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti; Merilampi, Sari; Sirkka, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Trials on Mobile Games are presenting a huge potential in cognitive, physical and mental rehabilitation. This paper is to discuss user viewpoints of trials with mobile games combining cognitive stimulation and physical exercise in rehabilitation: Game#1 controlled by tilting the mobile phone embedded in a balance board; Game#2 controlled by…

  14. MCloud: Secure Provenance for Mobile Cloud Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-03

    P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 fraud detection , data protection, provenance, mobile device, social network REPORT DOCUMENTATION...trackers. In addition, at mobile application level, we have introduced Marco and Vamos, systems that detect plagiarized videos, falsely claimed to have...our results on each dimension studied. 1. Mobile Video Fraud Detection We have focused on detecting plagiarized mobile videos. For instance, let

  15. Emotion in the Social Practices of Mobile Phone Users

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores emotions that are mediated via the mobile phone and how these emotions are managed and used in the presentation of self. It addresses the question `How does emotion occur in the everyday use of mobile phones? ' The topic is explored using data collected in interviews with UK mobile phone users aged over 40. These respondents' expressions about, comments on and descriptions of their emotional connection with and through their mobile phones are used to explic...

  16. A mobile design lab for user-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ellen; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the history and conceptual foundation for the Mobile Design Lab, ment to support both designers and users in the acts of user-driven innovation. The Mobile Design Lab is based on Vygotsky's theory of tool- and language-mediation, and was created in 2004 to support research...... and teaching of user driven innovation. Being itself an example of user-driven innovation it has taken shape of HCI design research projekcts, in which we have been involved since 2004. The first challenge was to get 'out of the lab', the next to get 'out of the head', and finally we are currently working...... to get 'into the street'. To support these moves might seem simple, but it is in practice not at all easy. As for today the Mobile Design Lab comprises tools and techniques for categorization, articulation and concretizatoin in design projects involving lead users as well as ordinary users, and invisible...

  17. WIRELESS ADVERTISING: A STUDY OF MOBILE PHONE USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurau Calin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Topic: Using a qualitative methodology, this study attempts to provide a general framework of the functions of mobile communication, and to identify the specific preferences of mobile phone users regarding the commercial messages received on their personal devices. Research objectives: (1 To identify the specific characteristics of mobile communication as perceived by mobile users; (2 to define and analyze the functions of wireless communication as perceived by mobile phone users; and (3 to investigate users preference regarding the content of commercial wireless communication. Previous research: Bauer et al. (2002 identified time, location, information and personalization as relevant acceptance factors for mobile advertising. Barwise and Strong (2002 developed a conceptual model, arguing that social norms, user's motives, mode, time, location and personal characteristics will affect the processing of mobile information by consumers. Tsang et al. (2004 evidenced the influence of entertainment, informativeness and irritation, while Bauer et al. (2005 argued that consumer attitudes are influenced by perceived information, entertainment, and social utility. In a similar study, Xu and Gutierrez (2006 tested the effect of entertainment, irritation, informativeness, credibility and personalization on the attitudes of Chinese consumers. Research methodology: First, a series of academic and practical articles and reports have been accessed in order to assess the existing knowledge on this topic. Second, five focus groups have been organized with six mobile phone users, aged between 20 and 40 years old. Each focus group comprised an equal number of male and female participants. The focus groups lasted between 45 and 60 minutes and addressed three main issues: the specific characteristics of the mobile phones as a commercial communication media, the functions of mobile phone communication, and the specific preferences of mobile phones users regarding the

  18. Mobile Adaptive Communication Support for Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Carrie Demmans

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of an adaptive mobile tool for language learning. A school-based deployment study showed that the tool supported learning. A second study is being conducted in informal learning environments. Current work focuses on building models that increase our understanding of the relationship between application usage and learning.

  19. Mobile Augmented Reality enhances indoor navigation for wheelchair users

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oliveira, Luciene Chagas de; Soares, Alcimar Barbosa; Cardoso, Alexandre; Andrade, Adriano de Oliveira; Lamounier Júnior, Edgard Afonso

    2016-01-01

    ...). The main objective of this work is to propose an architecture based on Mobile Augmented Reality to support the development of indoor navigation systems dedicated to wheelchair users, that is also...

  20. Adaptive Activity and Environment Recognition for Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Jussi; Bojja, Jayaprasad; Collin, Jussi; Leppänen, Jussi; Eronen, Antti

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive activity and environment recognition algorithm running on a mobile phone is presented. The algorithm makes inferences based on sensor and radio receiver data provided by the phone. A wide set of features that can be extracted from these data sources were investigated, and a Bayesian maximum a posteriori classifier was used for classifying between several user activities and environments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated on a dataset collected in a real-life trial. In addition, comparison to other state-of-the-art classifiers, namely support vector machines and decision trees, was performed. To make the system adaptive for individual user characteristics, an adaptation algorithm for context model parameters was designed. Moreover, a confidence measure for the classification correctness was designed. The proposed adaptation algorithm and confidence measure were evaluated on a second dataset obtained from another real-life trial, where the users were requested to provide binary feedback on the classification correctness. The results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm is effective at improving the classification accuracy. PMID:25372620

  1. Adaptive Activity and Environment Recognition for Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Parviainen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive activity and environment recognition algorithm running on a mobile phone is presented. The algorithm makes inferences based on sensor and radio receiver data provided by the phone. A wide set of features that can be extracted from these data sources were investigated, and a Bayesian maximum a posteriori classifier was used for classifying between several user activities and environments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated on a dataset collected in a real-life trial. In addition, comparison to other state-of-the-art classifiers, namely support vector machines and decision trees, was performed. To make the system adaptive for individual user characteristics, an adaptation algorithm for context model parameters was designed. Moreover, a confidence measure for the classification correctness was designed. The proposed adaptation algorithm and confidence measure were evaluated on a second dataset obtained from another real-life trial, where the users were requested to provide binary feedback on the classification correctness. The results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm is effective at improving the classification accuracy.

  2. A user experience evaluation of Amazon Kindle mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Musa, Ja'afaru; Mortada, Salah

    2017-10-01

    There is a dramatic increase in the development of mobile applications in recent years. This makes the usability evaluation of these mobile applications an important aspect in the advancement and application of technology. In this paper, a laboratory-based usability evaluation was carried out on the Amazon Kindle app using 15 users who performed 5 tasks on the Kindle e-book mobile app. A post-test questionnaire was administered to elicit users' perception on the usability of the application. The results demonstrate that almost all the participants were satisfied with services provided by the Amazon Kindle e-book mobile app. On all the four user experience factors examined, namely, perceived ease-of-use, perceived visibility, perceived enjoyabilty, and perceived efficiency, the evaluation outcome shows that the participants had a good and rich mobile experience with the application.

  3. Mobility-Aware User Association in Uplink Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Arshad, Rabe

    2017-07-20

    This letter studies the mobility aware user-to-BS association policies, within a stochastic geometry framework, in two tier uplink cellular networks with fractional channel inversion power control. Particularly, we model the base stations’ locations using the widely accepted poisson point process and obtain the coverage probability and handover cost expressions for the coupled and decoupled uplink and downlink associations. To this end, we compute the average throughput for the mobile users and study the merits and demerits of each association strategy.

  4. Seamless Mobile Multimedia Broadcasting Using Adaptive Error Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Lentisco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia services over mobile networks present several challenges, such as ensuring a reliable delivery of multimedia content, avoiding undesired service disruptions, or reducing service latency. HTTP adaptive streaming addresses these problems for multimedia unicast services, but it is not efficient from the point of view of radio resource consumption. In Long-Term Evolution (LTE networks, multimedia broadcast services are provided over a common radio channel using a combination of forward error correction and unicast error recovery techniques at the application level. This paper discusses how to avoid service disruptions and reduce service latency for LTE multimedia broadcast services by adding dynamic adaptation capabilities to the unicast error recovery process. The proposed solution provides a seamless mobile multimedia broadcasting without compromising the quality of the service perceived by the users.

  5. Fraud Detection In Mobile Communications Networks Using User ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fraud detection is an important application, since network operators lose a relevant portion of their revenue to fraud. The intentions of mobile phone users cannot be well observed except through the call data. The call data is used in describing behavioural patterns of users. Neural networks and probabilistic models are ...

  6. Mobile Broadcast DRM Based on User Identity Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Rae Lee

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The current mobile broadcast systems do not provide efficient solution for consumption of service and content based on the user identity card such as a smartcard. This prevents users from consuming broadcast service and contents independent of a specific terminal (e.g., the one used for registration or purchase. To provide usage of broadcast services based on the user identity card, mutual authentication needs to be established among the service provider, the terminal, and the user identity card whenever the terminal is changed. The crucial element for this is assuring the service provider, the terminal, and the user identity card by authenticating each entity to the other entities. In this paper, we propose the new authentication scheme, which provides efficient scheme for three kinds of mutual authentications among the service provider, the terminal, and the user identity card. We also construct mobile broadcast DRM system based on the proposed authentication scheme for consumption of broadcast services with multiple terminals.

  7. Usable SPACE: Security, Privacy, and Context for the Mobile User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, Dawn

    Users breach the security of data within many financial applications daily as human and/or business expediency to access and use information wins over corporate security policy guidelines. Recognizing that changing user context often requires different security mechanisms, we discuss end-to-end solutions combining several security and context mechanisms for relevant security control and information presentation in various mobile user situations. We illustrate key concepts using Dimitri Kanevskys (IBM Research) early 2000s patented inventions for voice security and classification.

  8. Mobility management for highly mobile users and vehicular networks in heterogeneous environments

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Karl; Åhlund, Christer; Gukhool, Balkrishna Sharma; Cherkaoui, Soumaya

    2008-01-01

      With the recent developments in wireless networks, different radio access technologies are used in different places depending on capacity in terms of throughput, cell size, scalability etc. In this context, mobile users, and in particular highly mobile users and vehicular networks, will see an increasing number and variety of wireless access points enabling Internet connectivity. Such a heterogeneous networking environment needs, however, an efficient mobility management scheme offering ...

  9. User Experience of Mobile Interactivity: How Do Mobile Websites Affect Attitudes and Relational Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Mobile media offer new opportunities for fostering communications between individuals and companies. Corporate websites are being increasingly accessed via smart phones and companies are scrambling to offer a mobile-friendly user experience on their sites. However, very little is known about how interactivity in the mobile context affects user…

  10. Attitudes of older mobile phone users towards mobile phones

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, P. de; Lopes, I.

    2016-01-01

    Research on mobile technology adoption has focused predominantly on young adults, and little attention has been paid to older people. But with rapidly aging populations in most developed countries, and evidence from many studies that older adults are as capable of adopting and using mobile technology as everybody else, the academic, business and technology industry worlds are devoting more attention to this group. Research has already demonstrated that older people differ from young people in...

  11. User interface adaptability for all users | Akazue | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, Bean Development kit (BDK) 1.0 tool, an abandoned project of Sun-Java, was modified by adding more applets to make it robust and making application to run on their own instead of a web browser which was its original design. Keywords: User interface, Bean Development kit, graphical user interface, applets

  12. Developing a Mobile Phone Based GUI for Users in the Construction Industry: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammiyavar, Pradeep; Kate, Prasanna

    This paper reports work done in conceptualizing, developing and testing of a mobile phone based graphical user interface (GUI) package targeted at users from the construction industry. System analysis and information design principles were adopted during the development processes. Starting from user requirements based on field studies the development of graphic icons and their testing has been outlined. In addition to integrating individual icons into a GUI, coding and loading the application on a mobile phone has been done to enable testing of the GUI prototype. Users from the construction trade (sample size = 29), randomly selected, were asked to evaluate the designed icons in terms of their acceptance, adaptability and learnability aspects. It was found that learnability of the new GUI was more dependent on age and education level of the user rather than on the length of prior experience they had with mobile phones in general. The length of experience of using mobiles may not be an indicator of learnability in new applications for such user segments due to rapid rise in 'digital literacy' levels amongst semi literate users.

  13. OSCAR: an optimized stall-cautious adaptive bitrate streaming algorithm for mobile networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zahran, Ahmed H.; Quinlan, Jason J.; Raca, Darijo; Sreenan, Cormac J.; Halepovic, Emir; Sinha, Rakesh K.; Jana, Rittwik; Gopalakrishnan, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    The design of an adaptive video client for mobile users is challenged by the frequent changes in operating conditions. Such conditions present a seemingly insurmountable challenge to adaptation algorithms, which may fail to find a balance between video rate, stalls, and rate-switching. In an effort to achieve the ideal balance, we design OSCAR, a novel adaptive streaming algorithm whose adaptation decisions are optimized to avoid stalls while maintaining high video quality. Our performance ev...

  14. Adaptive digital beamforming for a CDMA mobile communications payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Samuel G.; Ruiz, Javier Benedicto

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, Spread-Spectrum Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) has become a very popular access scheme for mobile communications due to a variety of reasons: excellent performance in multipath environments, high scope for frequency reuse, graceful degradation near saturation, etc. In this way, a CDMA system can support simultaneous digital communication among a large community of relatively uncoordinated users sharing a given frequency band. Nevertheless, there are also important problems associated with the use of CDMA. First, in a conventional CDMA scheme, the signature sequences of asynchronous users are not orthogonal and, as the number of active users increases, the self-noise generated by the mutual interference between users considerably degrades the performance, particularly in the return link. Furthermore, when there is a large disparity in received powers - due to differences in slant range or atmospheric attenuation - the non-zero cross-correlation between the signals gives rise to the so-called near-far problem. This leads to an inefficient utilization of the satellite resources and, consequently, to a drastic reduction in capacity. Several techniques were proposed to overcome this problem, such as Synchronized CDMA - in which the signature sequences of the different users are quasi-orthogonal - and power control. At the expense of increased network complexity and user coordination, these techniques enable the system capacity to be restored by equitably sharing the satellite resources among the users. An alternative solution is presented based upon the use of time-reference adaptive digital beamforming on board the satellite. This technique enables a high number of independently steered beams to be generated from a single phased array antenna, which automatically track the desired user signal and null the unwanted interference source. In order to use a time-reference adaptive antenna in a communications system, the main challenge is to obtain a

  15. Optimized adaptive HTTP streaming for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Velibor; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we present a solution to improve the performance of adaptive HTTP streaming services. The proposed approach uses a content aware method to determine whether switching to a higher bitrate can improve video quality. The proposed solution can be implemented as a new parameter in segment description to enable content switching only in cases with meaningful increase in quality. Results of our experiments show clear advantages of using additional parameter in DASH implementation. The proposed approach enables significant bandwidth savings with minimal decrease in quality. It guarantees optimal path of adaptation in various scenarios that can be beneficial both for network providers and end users.

  16. Auditory changes in mobile users: is evidence forthcoming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Naresh K; Modi, Rahul; Munjal, Sanjay; Virk, Ramandeep S

    2011-04-01

    Genuine concerns are being raised as to the potential health risks posed by electromagnetic frequency exposure secondary to mobile phone usage. This study was undertaken to assess and compare potential changes in hearing function at the level of the inner ear and central auditory pathway due to chronic exposure to electromagnetic waves from both global system for mobile communications (GSM) and code division multiple access (CDMA) mobile phone usage. Cohort study. Tertiary referral center. One hundred twenty-five subjects who were long-term mobile phone users (more than 1 year; 63 GSM and 62 CDMA) and 58 controls who had never used mobile phones underwent audiological investigations including pure tone audiometry (250-12 kHz), tympanometry, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brain responses (ABR), and middle latency responses (MLRs). The changes in various parameters were studied in mobile-using and non-mobile-using ears of both GSM and CDMA subjects and corresponding ears of the controls to ascertain the effects of electromagnetic exposure. GSM and CDMA users were found to be at a significantly higher risk of having DPOAE absent as compared with controls (P mobile phone usage emerged as a risk factor (P CDMA. Long-term and intensive GSM and CDMA mobile phone use may cause damage to cochlea as well as the auditory cortex.

  17. User-centric incentive design for participatory mobile phone sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Lu, Haoyang

    2014-05-01

    Mobile phone sensing is a critical underpinning of pervasive mobile computing, and is one of the key factors for improving people's quality of life in modern society via collective utilization of the on-board sensing capabilities of people's smartphones. The increasing demands for sensing services and ambient awareness in mobile environments highlight the necessity of active participation of individual mobile users in sensing tasks. User incentives for such participation have been continuously offered from an application-centric perspective, i.e., as payments from the sensing server, to compensate users' sensing costs. These payments, however, are manipulated to maximize the benefits of the sensing server, ignoring the runtime flexibility and benefits of participating users. This paper presents a novel framework of user-centric incentive design, and develops a universal sensing platform which translates heterogenous sensing tasks to a generic sensing plan specifying the task-independent requirements of sensing performance. We use this sensing plan as input to reduce three categories of sensing costs, which together cover the possible sources hindering users' participation in sensing.

  18. Adapting Web Information to Disabled and Elderly Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobsa, Alfred

    This paper describes work aimed at catering the content of World Wide Web (WWW) pages to the needs of different users, including elderly people and users with vision and motor impairments. An overview is provided of the AVANTI system, a European WWW-based tourist information system that adapts Web pages to each user's individual needs before…

  19. Usability Operations on Touch Mobile Devices for Users with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Angeles; Juárez-Ramírez, Reyes; Jiménez, Samantha; Noriega, Alan Ramírez; Inzunza, Sergio; Garza, Arnulfo Alanis

    2017-10-14

    The Autistic Spectrum Disorder is a cognitive disorder that affects the cognitive and motor skills; due that, users cannot perform digital and fine motor tasks. It is necessary to create software applications that adapt to the abilities of these users. In recent years has been an increase in the research of the use of technology to support autistic users to develop their communication skills and to improve learning. However, the applications' usability for disable users is not assessed objectively as the existing models do not consider interaction operators for disable users. This article focuses on identifying the operations that can easily be performed by autistic users following the metrics of KML-GOMS, TLM and FLM. In addition, users of typical development were included in order to do a comparison between both types of users. The experiment was carried out using four applications designed for autistic users. Participants were subjects divided in two groups: level 1 and level 2 autistic users, and a group of users of typical development. During the experimentation, users performed a use case for each application; the time needed to perform each task was measured. Results show that the easiest operations for autistic users are K (Keystroke), D (Drag), Initial Act (I) and Tapping (T).

  20. Converged Mobile Media: Evaluation of an Interactive User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a PhD thesis exploring various aspects of the end user experience with mobile rich media services. First, the author briefly introduces the background fields that frame the study. Three research questions are then formulated and their scientific contribution is justified....... Subsequently the author proposes a methodology to investigate these questions and reports on two initial user studies. Finally, the thesis' ongoing work and intended future steps are introduced....

  1. User requirements for interruption management in mobile communications in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, Bernd G; Solvoll, Terje; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In hospitals, mobile communication devices increase the occurrence of inappropriate interruptions during clinical task performance. These interruptions have been related to decreased quality of clinical care. User requirements were elicited using a scenario based approach. The results present insights into user requirements for an interruption management system for hospitals. Hospital workflow protocols were identified as a major source of interruptions. Many suggestions for managing these interruptions related to improving workflow using IT. We have shown that even though the hospital is an exceptionally demanding environment, the user requirements for interruption management concur with earlier findings in the broader fields of context aware interruption management and computer supported cooperative work.

  2. Mobile interface for neuroprosthesis control aiming tetraplegic users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Renato G; Aquino Junior, Plinio T; Ferrari de Castro, Maria Claudia

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes the development of a mobile interface for controlling a Neuroprosthesis, designed to restore grasp patterns, aiming tetraplegics users at C5 and C6 levels. Human Computer Interface paradigms and usability concepts guide its planning and development to garantee the quality of user's interaction with the system and thus, the sucess and controlability of the neuroprostheses. The number of screens and menus were optimized, thus the user may feel the interface as more intuitive, leading to fast learning and increasing the trust on it.

  3. A Remote User Authentication Scheme with Anonymity for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soobok Shin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of information technologies, mobile devices have been utilized in a variety of services such as e-commerce. When a remote server provides such e-commerce services to a user, it must verify the legitimacy of the user over an insecure communication channel. Therefore, remote user authentication has been widely deployed to verify the legitimacy of remote user login requests using mobile devices like smart cards. In this paper we propose a smart card-based authentication scheme that provides both user anonymity and mutual authentication between a remote server and a user. The proposed authentication scheme is a simple and efficient system applicable to the limited resource and low computing performance of the smart card. The proposed scheme provides not only resilience to potential attacks in the smart card-based authentication scheme, but also secure authentication functions. A smart card performs a simple one-way hash function, the operations of exclusive-or and concatenation in the authentication phase of the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme also provides user anonymity using a dynamic identity and key agreement, and secure password change.

  4. On user behaviour adaptation under interface change

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Edinburgh, UK Pushmeet Kohli Machine Learning and Perception Microsoft Research Cambridge, UK Abstract Different interfaces allow a user to achieve the same end goal through different action sequences, e.g., command lines vs. drop down menus...

  5. A user profile ontology based approach for assisting people with dementia in mobile environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillen, Kerry-Louise; Chen, Liming; Nugent, Chris D; Donnelly, Mark P; Solheim, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Personalization and context-aware applications have attracted increasing amounts of attention over recent years due to the emergence of pervasive computing applications. Nevertheless, it still remains a challenge to meet the needs of users while they are on the move. This paper introduces a novel approach for providing personalized, context-aware assistance services for users in mobile environments. Central to the approach is the use of ontological user profile modeling which captures various characteristics of a user in order to create a unique set of profile information. In addition, user profiles can adapt to changing user behavior, thus enabling services to respond to evolving user needs and preferences. We describe the overall system architecture of the proposed approach with special emphasis being placed on the user profile modelling and its expected utility based on a typical use case scenario, i.e., using a smart-phone to address the problem of the outdoor mobility of a person with Dementia. A prototype based on the Android OS is used to illustrate the application. The use of everyday technology for a real world problem highlights the potential and utility of our approach.

  6. User's proximity effects for talk mode in mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelosi, Mauro; B. Knudsen, Mikael; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    Thanks to a recent grip study, 3D CAD model of the human hand have been generated, investigating user's proximity effects for talk mode in mobile phones. The simulation results show that the human hand exhibits a major contribution in determining the total loss when compared to the phantom head...

  7. Distribution of Multimedia Streams to Mobile Internet Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselman, C.E.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we consider the efficient distribution of live and scheduled multimedia content (e.g., radio and TV broadcasts) to mobile users via a ubiquitous wireless Internet. The objective is to design and develop a content delivery system that (1) enables content owners to deliver their

  8. fraud detection in mobile communications networks using user

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    Keywords: Call data, fraud detection, neural networks, probabilistic models, user profiling ... Intrusion detection approach can be divided into two classes of .... Raw call data. Call data simulator. SOM Neural. Network. Probabilistic. System. Monitoring. Database. Database. Fig. 3: Mobile communication detection tools.

  9. Adaptive Mobile Positioning in WCDMA Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new technique for mobile tracking in wideband code-division multiple-access (WCDMA systems employing multiple receive antennas. To achieve a high estimation accuracy, the algorithm utilizes the time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements in the forward link pilot channel, the angle of arrival (AOA measurements in the reverse-link pilot channel, as well as the received signal strength. The mobility dynamic is modelled by a first-order autoregressive (AR vector process with an additional discrete state variable as the motion offset, which evolves according to a discrete-time Markov chain. It is assumed that the parameters in this model are unknown and must be jointly estimated by the tracking algorithm. By viewing a nonlinear dynamic system such as a jump-Markov model, we develop an efficient auxiliary particle filtering algorithm to track both the discrete and continuous state variables of this system as well as the associated system parameters. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the excellent performance of the proposed adaptive mobile positioning algorithm in WCDMA networks.

  10. Entropy-Based Privacy against Profiling of User Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Rodriguez-Carrion

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBSs flood mobile phones nowadays, but their use poses an evident privacy risk. The locations accompanying the LBS queries can be exploited by the LBS provider to build the user profile of visited locations, which might disclose sensitive data, such as work or home locations. The classic concept of entropy is widely used to evaluate privacy in these scenarios, where the information is represented as a sequence of independent samples of categorized data. However, since the LBS queries might be sent very frequently, location profiles can be improved by adding temporal dependencies, thus becoming mobility profiles, where location samples are not independent anymore and might disclose the user’s mobility patterns. Since the time dimension is factored in, the classic entropy concept falls short of evaluating the real privacy level, which depends also on the time component. Therefore, we propose to extend the entropy-based privacy metric to the use of the entropy rate to evaluate mobility profiles. Then, two perturbative mechanisms are considered to preserve locations and mobility profiles under gradual utility constraints. We further use the proposed privacy metric and compare it to classic ones to evaluate both synthetic and real mobility profiles when the perturbative methods proposed are applied. The results prove the usefulness of the proposed metric for mobility profiles and the need for tailoring the perturbative methods to the features of mobility profiles in order to improve privacy without completely loosing utility.

  11. Analyzing User Awareness of Privacy Data Leak in Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the resource and computing power limitation of mobile devices in Internet of Things (IoT era, a cloud computing provides an effective platform without human intervention to build a resource-oriented security solution. However, existing malware detection methods are constrained by a vague situation of information leaks. The main goal of this paper is to measure a degree of hiding intention for the mobile application (app to keep its leaking activity invisible to the user. For real-world application test, we target Android applications, which unleash user privacy data. With the TaintDroid-ported emulator, we make experiments about the timing distance between user events and privacy leaks. Our experiments with Android apps downloaded from the Google Play show that most of leak cases are driven by user explicit events or implicit user involvement which make the user aware of the leakage. Those findings can assist a malware detection system in reducing the rate of false positive by considering malicious intentions. From the experiment, we understand better about app’s internal operations as well. As a case study, we also presents a cloud-based dynamic analysis framework to perform a traffic monitor.

  12. Determining the user profile for an adaptable training platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available on their preferred learning style, learning preferences, literacy level and physical disabilities [13][16]. Human-computer interaction (HCI) systems must there- fore take into account this plethora of human factors that influence user interaction, as well..., literacy level and physical disabilities. Included in the profile is the causal relationship each one of these factors has on the adaptation of the user interaction by model- ing the impact on the system input and output modalities. This user profile...

  13. The semen quality of the mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, R; Salacone, P; Caponecchia, L; Sebastianelli, A; Marcucci, I; Calogero, A E; Condorelli, R; Vicari, E; Morgia, G; Favilla, V; Cimino, S; Arcoria, A F; La Vignera, S

    2013-12-01

    The increased use of mobile phones, the media's attention for general health, and the increase of idiopathic male infertility suggest to investigate the possible consequences of an excessive use of mobile phones on semen quality. To evaluate the conventional and some of the main biofunctional sperm parameters in healthy men according to the different use of the mobile phone. All the enrolled subjects in this study were divided into four groups according to their active cell phone use: group A= no use (no.=10 subjects); group B= 4 h/day (no.=20). Among the subjects of the group D (>4 h/day), a further evaluation was made between the "trousers users"(no.=12) and "shirt users"(no.=8), and they underwent semen collection to evaluate conventional and biofunctional sperm parameters (density, total count, morphology, progressive motility, apoptosis, mithocondrial membrane potential, chromatin compaction, DNA fragmentation). None of the conventional sperm parameters examined were significantly altered. However, the group D and the trousers users showed a higher percentage of sperm DNA fragmentation compared to other groups. These results suggest that the sperm DNA fragmentation could represent the only parameter significantly altered in the subjects who use the mobile phone for more than 4 h/day and in particular for those who use the device in the pocket of the trousers.

  14. A Modified Decision Tree Algorithm Based on Genetic Algorithm for Mobile User Classification Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-sheng; Fan, Shu-jiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to offer mobile customers better service, we should classify the mobile user firstly. Aimed at the limitations of previous classification methods, this paper puts forward a modified decision tree algorithm for mobile user classification, which introduced genetic algorithm to optimize the results of the decision tree algorithm. We also take the context information as a classification attributes for the mobile user and we classify the context into public context and private context classes. Then we analyze the processes and operators of the algorithm. At last, we make an experiment on the mobile user with the algorithm, we can classify the mobile user into Basic service user, E-service user, Plus service user, and Total service user classes and we can also get some rules about the mobile user. Compared to C4.5 decision tree algorithm and SVM algorithm, the algorithm we proposed in this paper has higher accuracy and more simplicity. PMID:24688389

  15. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Layton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy.

  16. Barriers and facilitators to community mobility for assistive technology users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy.

  17. Adaptive beamforming in a CDMA mobile satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Samuel G.

    1993-01-01

    Code-Division Multiple-Access (CDMA) stands out as a strong contender for the choice of multiple access scheme in these future mobile communication systems. This is due to a variety of reasons such as the excellent performance in multipath environments, high scope for frequency reuse and graceful degradation near saturation. However, the capacity of CDMA is limited by the self-interference between the transmissions of the different users in the network. Moreover, the disparity between the received power levels gives rise to the near-far problem, this is, weak signals are severely degraded by the transmissions from other users. In this paper, the use of time-reference adaptive digital beamforming on board the satellite is proposed as a means to overcome the problems associated with CDMA. This technique enables a high number of independently steered beams to be generated from a single phased array antenna, which automatically track the desired user signal and null the unwanted interference sources. Since CDMA is interference limited, the interference protection provided by the antenna converts directly and linearly into an increase in capacity. Furthermore, the proposed concept allows the near-far effect to be mitigated without requiring a tight coordination of the users in terms of power control. A payload architecture will be presented that illustrates the practical implementation of this concept. This digital payload architecture shows that with the advent of high performance CMOS digital processing, the on-board implementation of complex DSP techniques -in particular digital beamforming- has become possible, being most attractive for Mobile Satellite Communications.

  18. LTE Adaptation for Mobile Broadband Satellite Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastia Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key factors for the successful deployment of mobile satellite systems in 4G networks is the maximization of the technology commonalities with the terrestrial systems. An effective way of achieving this objective consists in considering the terrestrial radio interface as the baseline for the satellite radio interface. Since the 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE standard will be one of the main players in the 4G scenario, along with other emerging technologies, such as mobile WiMAX; this paper analyzes the possible applicability of the 3GPP LTE interface to satellite transmission, presenting several enabling techniques for this adaptation. In particular, we propose the introduction of an inter-TTI interleaving technique that exploits the existing H-ARQ facilities provided by the LTE physical layer, the use of PAPR reduction techniques to increase the resilience of the OFDM waveform to non linear distortion, and the design of the sequences for Random Access, taking into account the requirements deriving from the large round trip times. The outcomes of this analysis show that, with the required proposed enablers, it is possible to reuse the existing terrestrial air interface to transmit over the satellite link.

  19. MuZeeker - Adapting a music search engine for mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Halling, Søren Christian; Sigurdsson, Magnus Kristinn

    2010-01-01

    We describe MuZeeker, a search engine with domain knowledge based on Wikipedia. MuZeeker enables the user to refine a search in multiple steps by means of category selection. In the present version we focus on multimedia search related to music and we present two prototype search applications (web......-based and mobile) and discuss the issues involved in adapting the search engine for mobile phones. A category based filtering approach enables the user to refine a search through relevance feedback by category selection instead of typing additional text, which is hypothesized to be an advantage in the mobile Mu......Zeeker application. We report from two usability experiments using the think aloud protocol, in which N=20 participants performed tasks using MuZeeker and a customized Google search engine. In both experiments web-based and mobile user interfaces were used. The experiment shows that participants are capable...

  20. On adaptive control of mobile slotted aloha networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim J.-T.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive control scheme for mobile slotted ALOHA is presented and the effect of capture on the adaptive control scheme is investigated. It is shown that with the proper choice of adaptation parameters the adaptive control scheme can be made independent of the effect of capture.

  1. Access point selection game with mobile users using correlated equilibrium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insoo Sohn

    Full Text Available One of the most important issues in wireless local area network (WLAN systems with multiple access points (APs is the AP selection problem. Game theory is a mathematical tool used to analyze the interactions in multiplayer systems and has been applied to various problems in wireless networks. Correlated equilibrium (CE is one of the powerful game theory solution concepts, which is more general than the Nash equilibrium for analyzing the interactions in multiplayer mixed strategy games. A game-theoretic formulation of the AP selection problem with mobile users is presented using a novel scheme based on a regret-based learning procedure. Through convergence analysis, we show that the joint actions based on the proposed algorithm achieve CE. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed algorithm is effective in a realistic WLAN environment with user mobility and achieves maximum system throughput based on the game-theoretic formulation.

  2. Developing adaptive mobile support for crisis response in synthetic task environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, G.M. te; Smets, N.J.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental platform for the development and evaluation of mobile decision support for crisis response operations. Using a game-engine, synthetic task environments can be created in which coordination support and the usability of adaptive user interfaces for first responders

  3. Development of Adaptive Kanji Learning System for Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Liu, Yuqin; Uosaki, Noriko; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive learning system based on mobile phone email to support the study of Japanese Kanji. In this study, the main emphasis is on using the adaptive learning to resolve one common problem of the mobile-based email or SMS language learning systems. To achieve this goal, the authors main efforts focus on three aspects:…

  4. OneWeb: web content adaptation platform based on W3C Mobile Web Initiative guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco O. Martínez P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  Restrictions regardingnavigability and user-friendliness are the main challenges the Mobile Web faces to be accepted worldwide. W3C has recently developed the Mobile Web Initiative (MWI, a set of directives for the suitable design and presentation of mobile Web interfaces. This article presents the main features and functional modules of OneWeb, an MWI-based Web content adaptation platform developed by Mobile Devices Applications Development Interest Group’s  (W@PColombia research activities, forming part of the Universidad de Cauca’s Telematics Engineering Group.Some performance measurementresults and comparison with other Web content adaptation platforms are presented. Tests have shown suitable response times for Mobile Web environments; MWI guidelines were applied to over twenty Web pages selected for testing purposes.  

  5. Adaptive scheduling with postexamining user selection under nonidentical fading

    KAUST Repository

    Gaaloul, Fakhreddine

    2012-11-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive scheduling algorithm for multiuser environments with statistically independent but nonidentically distributed (i.n.d.) channel conditions. The algorithm aims to reduce feedback load by sequentially and arbitrarily examining the user channels. It also provides improved performance by realizing postexamining best user selection. The first part of the paper presents new formulations for the statistics of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the scheduled user under i.n.d. channel conditions. The second part capitalizes on the findings in the first part and presents various performance and processing complexity measures for adaptive discrete-time transmission. The results are then extended to investigate the effect of outdated channel estimates on the statistics of the scheduled user SNR, as well as some performance measures. Numerical results are provided to clarify the usefulness of the scheduling algorithm under perfect or outdated channel estimates. © 1967-2012 IEEE.

  6. Creating adaptive web recommendation system based on user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walek, Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes adaptive web recommendation system based on user behavior. The proposed system uses expert system to evaluating and recommending suitable items of content. Relevant items are subsequently evaluated and filtered based on history of visited items and user´s preferred categories of items. Main parts of the proposed system are presented and described. The proposed recommendation system is verified on specific example.

  7. Mobile Augmented Reality enhances indoor navigation for wheelchair users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Chagas de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Introduction: Individuals with mobility impairments associated with lower limb disabilities often face enormous challenges to participate in routine activities and to move around various environments. For many, the use of wheelchairs is paramount to provide mobility and social inclusion. Nevertheless, they still face a number of challenges to properly function in our society. Among the many difficulties, one in particular stands out: navigating in complex internal environments (indoors. The main objective of this work is to propose an architecture based on Mobile Augmented Reality to support the development of indoor navigation systems dedicated to wheelchair users, that is also capable of recording CAD drawings of the buildings and dealing with accessibility issues for that population. Methods Overall, five main functional requirements are proposed: the ability to allow for indoor navigation by means of Mobile Augmented Reality techniques; the capacity to register and configure building CAD drawings and the position of fiducial markers, points of interest and obstacles to be avoided by the wheelchair user; the capacity to find the best route for wheelchair indoor navigation, taking stairs and other obstacles into account; allow for the visualization of virtual directional arrows in the smartphone displays; and incorporate touch or voice commands to interact with the application. The architecture is proposed as a combination of four layers: User interface; Control; Service; and Infrastructure. A proof-of-concept application was developed and tests were performed with disable volunteers operating manual and electric wheelchairs. Results The application was implemented in Java for the Android operational system. A local database was used to store the test building CAD drawings and the position of fiducial markers and points of interest. The Android Augmented Reality library was used to implement Augmented Reality and the Blender open source

  8. Work environments of people with mobility impairments and limitations: Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kerri A; Gottlieb, Meghan; Hollingsworth, Holly H; Gray, David B

    2014-01-01

    Few studies of employed people who use wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers have been reported in the literature. One reason for this paucity of research reports is that surveys are most often made of unemployed individuals with disabilities a defined broadly. Understanding the work site of successfully employed people who use mobility devices requires the development of as survey that can be used to examine the important features of worksite from employees who use mobility devices at their worksites. This article describes the development and psychometrics of a survey on currently employed people with lower limb impairments and mobility limitations who use mobility devices. The items in the Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS) were based on interviews and survey items pilot tested on employed mobility device users. A sample of 183 employed people who use mobility devices including wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers was recruited using internet postings on disability-related organizations. The average age of the sample was 46.3, most were college educated, 72% used wheelchairs and the average number of years of employment was 24. The MWS was completed by 183 people who met the inclusion criteria. The survey was sent to these same people a second time and 132 of them returned the second survey. The MWS consists of 106 questions on demographic, work and worksite characteristics and 58 subjective evaluation items that were organized into five scales. The internal consistencies (Cronbach's alpha) of the five scales were moderate (0.72) to good (0.93). Stability values of the five scales were calculated using correlations between forms and ranged from 0.70 to 0.80. The evaluative scales were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis. The MWS provides a tool for studying the variables that influence employed people who use mobility devices. Future studies of unemployed people who use mobility devices may benefit from using the results of the MWS to plan

  9. An Attention-Information-Based Spatial Adaptation Framework for Browsing Videos via Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Houqiang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With the growing popularity of personal digital assistant devices and smart phones, more and more consumers are becoming quite enthusiastic to appreciate videos via mobile devices. However, limited display size of the mobile devices has been imposing significant barriers for users to enjoy browsing high-resolution videos. In this paper, we present an attention-information-based spatial adaptation framework to address this problem. The whole framework includes two major parts: video content generation and video adaptation system. During video compression, the attention information in video sequences will be detected using an attention model and embedded into bitstreams with proposed supplement-enhanced information (SEI structure. Furthermore, we also develop an innovative scheme to adaptively adjust quantization parameters in order to simultaneously improve the quality of overall encoding and the quality of transcoding the attention areas. When the high-resolution bitstream is transmitted to mobile users, a fast transcoding algorithm we developed earlier will be applied to generate a new bitstream for attention areas in frames. The new low-resolution bitstream containing mostly attention information, instead of the high-resolution one, will be sent to users for display on the mobile devices. Experimental results show that the proposed spatial adaptation scheme is able to improve both subjective and objective video qualities.

  10. Development of a Mobile User Interface for Image-based Dietary Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungye; Schap, Tusarebecca; Bosch, Marc; Maciejewski, Ross; Delp, Edward J; Ebert, David S; Boushey, Carol J

    2010-12-31

    In this paper, we present a mobile user interface for image-based dietary assessment. The mobile user interface provides a front end to a client-server image recognition and portion estimation software. In the client-server configuration, the user interactively records a series of food images using a built-in camera on the mobile device. Images are sent from the mobile device to the server, and the calorie content of the meal is estimated. In this paper, we describe and discuss the design and development of our mobile user interface features. We discuss the design concepts, through initial ideas and implementations. For each concept, we discuss qualitative user feedback from participants using the mobile client application. We then discuss future designs, including work on design considerations for the mobile application to allow the user to interactively correct errors in the automatic processing while reducing the user burden associated with classical pen-and-paper dietary records.

  11. User acceptance of mobile commerce: an empirical study in Macau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ivan K. W.; Lai, Donny C. F.

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to examine the positive and negative factors that can significantly explain user acceptance of mobile commerce (m-commerce) in Macau. A technology acceptance model for m-commerce with five factors is constructed. The proposed model is tested using data collected from 219 respondents. Confirmatory factor analysis is performed to examine the reliability and validity of the model, and structural equation modelling is performed to access the relationship between behaviour intention and each factor. The acceptance of m-commerce is influenced by factors including performance expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions and privacy concern; while effort expectancy is insignificant in this case. The results of the study are useful for m-commerce service providers to adjust their strategies for promoting m-commerce services. This study contributes to the practice by providing a user technology acceptance model for m-commerce that can be used as a foundation for future research.

  12. Optimizing virtual reality for all users through gaze-contingent and adaptive focus displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Nitish; Konrad, Robert; Stramer, Tal; Cooper, Emily A.; Wetzstein, Gordon

    2017-02-01

    From the desktop to the laptop to the mobile device, personal computing platforms evolve over time. Moving forward, wearable computing is widely expected to be integral to consumer electronics and beyond. The primary interface between a wearable computer and a user is often a near-eye display. However, current generation near-eye displays suffer from multiple limitations: they are unable to provide fully natural visual cues and comfortable viewing experiences for all users. At their core, many of the issues with near-eye displays are caused by limitations in conventional optics. Current displays cannot reproduce the changes in focus that accompany natural vision, and they cannot support users with uncorrected refractive errors. With two prototype near-eye displays, we show how these issues can be overcome using display modes that adapt to the user via computational optics. By using focus-tunable lenses, mechanically actuated displays, and mobile gaze-tracking technology, these displays can be tailored to correct common refractive errors and provide natural focus cues by dynamically updating the system based on where a user looks in a virtual scene. Indeed, the opportunities afforded by recent advances in computational optics open up the possibility of creating a computing platform in which some users may experience better quality vision in the virtual world than in the real one.

  13. Performance of Advanced Hybrid Link Adaptation Algorithms in Mobile Radio Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Psenak

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The fast power adaptation is essential for WCDMA based mobile radio networks, as 3G UMTS. Although the first version of UMTS has been released in 1999 (Release 99 evolution was not finished yet. Quality of Service (QoS and user data rate (e.g. HSDPA and HSUPA are continuously increasing from release to release. Even though link adaptation frequency (1500 times per second seems to be enough to span accidental fadings of mobile radio channel, used link adaptation algorithm is based on non-actual information about mobile radio channel state, which causes transmitter reaction delay to the actual channel state. Usage of appropriate prediction method to estimate near future channel state seems to be a valuable step to improve hybrid link adaptation algorithm. In this article we have described and simulated the new SIR-slot based advanced link adaptation algorithms. Algorithms were designed to increase efficiency of data transmission among a user equipment and base stations (uplink for different simulation environments (pedestrian channel with mobile subscriber speed 5 km/h, 15 km/h and vehicular channel with speed 45 km/h.

  14. [Spanish adaptation of the "Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale" for adolescent population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Olatz; Honrubia-Serrano, Ma Luisa; Freixa-Blanxart, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Problematic use of the mobile telephone is an emerging phenomenon in our society, and one which particularly affects the teenage population. Knowledge from research on the problematic use of this technology is necessary, since such use can give rise to a behavioural pattern with addictive characteristics. There are hardly any scales for measuring possible problematic use of mobile phones, and none at all adapted exclusively for the Spanish adolescent population. The scale most widely used internationally is the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale (MPPUS). The aim of the present study is to adapt the MPPUS for use with Spanish adolescents. The Spanish version of the questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1132 adolescents aged 12 to 18. Reliability and factorial validity were comparable to those obtained in adult population, so that the measure of problematic mobile phone use in Spanish teenagers is one-dimensional. A prevalence of 14.8% of problematic users was detected.

  15. Mobile Tourism Consumer Profile: An approach to experienced users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vallespín-Arán

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze socio demographic and behavioral variables that affect the use of mobile commerce for travel planning. From the review of the theoretical framework and the empirical analysis, the influence of some of the variables traditionally used as segmentation variables is shown. Based on an online survey of 616 tourism consumers services who use a smartphone, we discovered that these consumers present different characteristics related to the following variables: a experience of using Internet via mobile phone, b age, c family life cycle, d employment status, e hours of Internet access, f trips done per year, g number of people living in the household and h household income. Practical implications for tourism companies are reached which allow companies to adapt better segmentation strategies to each target market.

  16. A qualitative study of user perceptions of mobile health apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Kanthawala, Shaheen; Yuan, Shupei; Hussain, Syed Ali

    2016-11-14

    Mobile apps for health exist in large numbers today, but oftentimes, consumers do not continue to use them after a brief period of initial usage, are averse toward using them at all, or are unaware that such apps even exist. The purpose of our study was to examine and qualitatively determine the design and content elements of health apps that facilitate or impede usage from the users' perceptive. In 2014, six focus groups and five individual interviews were conducted in the Midwest region of the U.S. with a mixture of 44 smartphone owners of various social economic status. The participants were asked about their general and health specific mobile app usage. They were then shown specific features of exemplar health apps and prompted to discuss their perceptions. The focus groups and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and coded using the software NVivo. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted to analyze the data and nine themes were identified: 1) barriers to adoption of health apps, 2) barriers to continued use of health apps, 3) motivators, 4) information and personalized guidance, 5) tracking for awareness and progress, 6) credibility, 7) goal setting, 8) reminders, and 9) sharing personal information. The themes were mapped to theories for interpretation of the results. This qualitative research with a diverse pool of participants extended previous research on challenges and opportunities of health apps. The findings provide researchers, app designers, and health care providers insights on how to develop and evaluate health apps from the users' perspective.

  17. How elderly users of a socially interactive robot experience adaptiveness, adaptability and user control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcel Heerink

    2011-01-01

    Older adults prefer an assistive technology that can be adaptive to their needs. However, as an assistive social robot that is autonomous has the possibility of being pro-actively adaptive this could cause feelings of anxiety. Analyzing the results of a study with video’s that feature an assistive

  18. Use of Design Patterns According to Hand Dominance in a Mobile User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Ahmad, Yusof

    2016-01-01

    User interface (UI) design patterns for mobile applications provide a solution to design problems and can improve the usage experience for users. However, there is a lack of research categorizing the uses of design patterns according to users' hand dominance in a learning-based mobile UI. We classified the main design patterns for mobile…

  19. Run-time adaptation of a reconfigurable mobile UMTS receiver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, L.T.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Hurink, Johann L.

    UMTS receivers are mobile devices, which should have a low energy consumption and operates in a frequently changing environment. The idea of this paper is to adapt the amount of signal processing for the reception within an UMTS mobile to this changing environment. In this way the amount of signal

  20. Connection adaption for control of networked mobile chaotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Boccaletti, S

    2017-11-22

    In this paper, we propose a strategy for the control of mobile chaotic oscillators by adaptively rewiring connections between nearby agents with local information. In contrast to the dominant adaptive control schemes where coupling strength is adjusted continuously according to the states of the oscillators, our method does not request adaption of coupling strength. As the resulting interaction structure generated by this proposed strategy is strongly related to unidirectional chains, by investigating synchronization property of unidirectional chains, we reveal that there exists a certain coupling range in which the agents could be controlled regardless of the length of the chain. This feature enables the adaptive strategy to control the mobile oscillators regardless of their moving speed. Compared with existing adaptive control strategies for networked mobile agents, our proposed strategy is simpler for implementation where the resulting interaction networks are kept unweighted at all time.

  1. MOPET: a context-aware and user-adaptive wearable system for fitness training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttussi, Fabio; Chittaro, Luca

    2008-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease, obesity, and lack of physical fitness are increasingly common and negatively affect people's health, requiring medical assistance and decreasing people's wellness and productivity. In the last years, researchers as well as companies have been increasingly investigating wearable devices for fitness applications with the aim of improving user's health, in terms of cardiovascular benefits, loss of weight or muscle strength. Dedicated GPS devices, accelerometers, step counters and heart rate monitors are already commercially available, but they are usually very limited in terms of user interaction and artificial intelligence capabilities. This significantly limits the training and motivation support provided by current systems, making them poorly suited for untrained people who are more interested in fitness for health rather than competitive purposes. To better train and motivate users, we propose the mobile personal trainer (MOPET) system. MOPET is a wearable system that supervises a physical fitness activity based on alternating jogging and fitness exercises in outdoor environments. By exploiting real-time data coming from sensors, knowledge elicited from a sport physiologist and a professional trainer, and a user model that is built and periodically updated through a guided autotest, MOPET can provide motivation as well as safety and health advice, adapted to the user and the context. To better interact with the user, MOPET also displays a 3D embodied agent that speaks, suggests stretching or strengthening exercises according to user's current condition, and demonstrates how to correctly perform exercises with interactive 3D animations. By describing MOPET, we show how context-aware and user-adaptive techniques can be applied to the fitness domain. In particular, we describe how such techniques can be exploited to train, motivate, and supervise users in a wearable personal training system for outdoor fitness activity.

  2. Do Smartphone Power Users Protect Mobile Privacy Better than Nonpower Users? Exploring Power Usage as a Factor in Mobile Privacy Protection and Disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunjin; Shin, Wonsun

    2016-03-01

    This study examines how consumers' competence at using smartphone technology (i.e., power usage) affects their privacy protection behaviors. A survey conducted with smartphone users shows that power usage influences privacy protection behavior not only directly but also indirectly through privacy concerns and trust placed in mobile service providers. A follow-up experiment indicates that the effects of power usage on smartphone users' information management can be a function of content personalization. Users, high on power usage, are less likely to share personal information on personalized mobile sites, but they become more revealing when they interact with nonpersonalized mobile sites.

  3. Autonomy and Housing Accessibility Among Powered Mobility Device Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Åse; Lexell, Eva Månsson; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To describe environmental barriers, accessibility problems, and powered mobility device (PMD) users’ autonomy indoors and outdoors; to determine the home environmental barriers that generated the most housing accessibility problems indoors, at entrances, and in the close exterior surroundings; and to examine personal factors and environmental components and their association with indoor and outdoor autonomy. METHOD. This cross-sectional study was based on data collected from a sample of 48 PMD users with a spinal cord injury (SCI) using the Impact of Participation and Autonomy and the Housing Enabler instruments. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used. RESULTS. More years living with SCI predicted less restriction in autonomy indoors, whereas more functional limitations and accessibility problems related to entrance doors predicted more restriction in autonomy outdoors. CONCLUSION. To enable optimized PMD use, practitioners must pay attention to the relationship between client autonomy and housing accessibility problems. PMID:26356666

  4. The assessment of electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users

    OpenAIRE

    Buckus Raimondas; Strukcinskiene Birute; Raistenskis Juozas

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. During recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has resulted in increased human exposure to electromagnetic field radiation and to health risks. Increased usage of mobile phones at the close proximity raises questions and doubts in safety of mobile phone users. The aim of the study was to assess an electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users by measuring electromagnetic field strength in different settings at the...

  5. Architecture and User-Context Models of CoCare: A Context-Aware Mobile Recommender System for Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Rios, Gineth; López, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Recommender systems (RS) are useful tools for filtering and sorting items and information for users. There is a wide diversity of approaches that help creating personalized recommendations. Context-aware recommender systems (CARS) are a kind of RS which provide adaptation capabilities to the user's environment, e.g., by sensing data through wearable devices or other biomedical sensors. In healthcare and wellbeing, CARS can support health promotion and health education, considering that each individual requires tailored intervention programs. Our research aims at proposing a context-aware mobile recommender system for the promotion of healthy habits. The system is adapted to the user's needs, his/her health information, interests, time, location and lifestyles. In this paper, the CARS computational architecture and the user and context models of health promotion are presented, which were used to implement and test a prototype recommender system.

  6. Motion Mode Recognition and Step Detection Algorithms for Mobile Phone Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Melania; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is playing a key role in the design of the new generation of smartphones. Thanks to their reduced size, reduced power consumption, MEMS sensors can be embedded in above mobile devices for increasing their functionalities. However, MEMS cannot allow accurate autonomous location without external updates, e.g., from GPS signals, since their signals are degraded by various errors. When these sensors are fixed on the user's foot, the stance phases of the foot can easily be determined and periodic Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPTs) are performed to bound the position error. When the sensor is in the hand, the situation becomes much more complex. First of all, the hand motion can be decoupled from the general motion of the user. Second, the characteristics of the inertial signals can differ depending on the carrying modes. Therefore, algorithms for characterizing the gait cycle of a pedestrian using a handheld device have been developed. A classifier able to detect motion modes typical for mobile phone users has been designed and implemented. According to the detected motion mode, adaptive step detection algorithms are applied. Success of the step detection process is found to be higher than 97% in all motion modes. PMID:23348038

  7. Motion mode recognition and step detection algorithms for mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Melania; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-01-24

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is playing a key role in the design of the new generation of smartphones. Thanks to their reduced size, reduced power consumption, MEMS sensors can be embedded in above mobile devices for increasing their functionalities. However, MEMS cannot allow accurate autonomous location without external updates, e.g., from GPS signals, since their signals are degraded by various errors. When these sensors are fixed on the user's foot, the stance phases of the foot can easily be determined and periodic Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPTs) are performed to bound the position error. When the sensor is in the hand, the situation becomes much more complex. First of all, the hand motion can be decoupled from the general motion of the user. Second, the characteristics of the inertial signals can differ depending on the carrying modes. Therefore, algorithms for characterizing the gait cycle of a pedestrian using a handheld device have been developed. A classifier able to detect motion modes typical for mobile phone users has been designed and implemented. According to the detected motion mode, adaptive step detection algorithms are applied. Success of the step detection process is found to be higher than 97% in all motion modes.

  8. Characterizing mobility from the prosthetic limb user's perspective: Use of focus groups to guide development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Abrahamson, Daniel C; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Input from target respondents in the development of patient-reported outcome measures is necessary to ensure that the instrument is meaningful. To solicit perspectives of prosthetic limb users about their mobility experiences and to inform development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility. Qualitative study. Four focus groups of lower limb prosthesis users were held in different regions of the United States. Focus group transcripts were coded, and themes were identified. Feedback from participants was used to develop a framework for measuring mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Focus group participants (N = 37) described mobility as a confluence of factors that included characteristics of the individual, activity, and environment. Identified themes were defined as individual characteristics, forms of movement, and environmental situations. Prosthetic mobility was conceptualized as movement activities performed in an environmental or situational context. Respondent feedback used to guide development of Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility established a foundation for a new person-centered measure of mobility with a prosthetic limb. Perspectives of target respondents are needed to guide development of instruments intended to measure health outcomes. Focus groups of prosthetic limb users were conducted to solicit experiences related to mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Results were used to inform development of a clinically meaningful, person-centered instrument. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  9. The experience of being a motorised mobility scooter user.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomiatti, Ryan; Moir, Lois; Richmond, Janet; Millsteed, Jeannine

    2014-05-01

    To explore the individual experience of being a scooter user and the ways in which scooters impact the individual's community and social engagement, daily activities and enhances mobility. A qualitative, constructive framework utilising purposive sampling and a semi structured interview was used with 14 individuals. Questions were categorised according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework into the three areas of activities, participation and environmental factors. The three main themes identified through the research were knowledge, engagement and environments. Knowledge included a lack of concise information, and adequate trialling and training prior to purchase. Engagement consisted of participation and interaction demonstrating scooter use resulted in increased participation, role maintenance, choice, freedom and social interaction. Environments highlighted discrimination from the wider population and building design and barriers. The research demonstrated a strong positive impact on individual's engagement from using a scooter, while highlighting a lack of adequate knowledge about scooters, batteries, skill ability and design along with environmental challenges of discriminatory attitudes and physical barriers. The research indicates the need for pre-purchase assessments and trials along with improvements in community attitudes and environments. Development of a pre-purchase assessment including specific core skills for scooter use is of great importance to minimise accidents and death as a consequence of scooter driving. Education and training of prescribers and suppliers of scooters is important to match needs and skills to enable a better fit of scooter to user. Incorporation of adjustability of features within the standard design of scooters, including type of driving controls, seat height, and adjustment of distance to controls, will enable greater fit of scooter to the user s needs.

  10. Adapting End Host Congestion Control for Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Swami, Yogesh P.

    2005-01-01

    Network layer mobility allows transport protocols to maintain connection state, despite changes in a node's physical location and point of network connectivity. However, some congestion-controlled transport protocols are not designed to deal with these rapid and potentially significant path changes. In this paper we demonstrate several distinct problems that mobility-induced path changes can create for TCP performance. Our premise is that mobility events indicate path changes that require re-initialization of congestion control state at both connection end points. We present the application of this idea to TCP in the form of a simple solution (the Lightweight Mobility Detection and Response algorithm, that has been proposed in the IETF), and examine its effectiveness. In general, we find that the deficiencies presented are both relatively easily and painlessly fixed using this solution. We also find that this solution has the counter-intuitive property of being both more friendly to competing traffic, and simultaneously more aggressive in utilizing newly available capacity than unmodified TCP.

  11. Investigating a Mobility-Aware QoS Model for Multimedia Streaming Rate Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragkiskos Sardis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supporting high quality multimedia streaming on wireless devices poses several challenges compared to wired networks due to the high variance in network performance encountered in the mobile environment. Although rate adaptation is commonly used in multimedia applications to compensate for fluctuations in network performance, it is a reactive mechanism which is not aware of the frequently changing connectivity that may occur on mobile devices. This paper proposed a performance evaluation model for multimedia streaming applications that is aware of user mobility and network performance. We presented an example of mathematical solution to the model and demonstrated the functionality using common mobility and connectivity examples that may be found in an urban environment. The proposed model is evaluated based on this functionality and how it may be used to enhance application performance.

  12. MOBILE LEARNING: CONTEXT ADAPTATION AND SCENARIO APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Kureichik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a model of an open architecture for component context-dependent systems of computer training to the needs of the software applications of intelligent learning environments and adaptive learning systems. The structure of a content management system is developed based on Semantic Web. The model for developing of the engine is supposed to be based on probabilistic automata. Another part of work is developing of learning scenarios and possibilities for its adaptation. The context approach for personalization of learning style is described in the paper as well. 

  13. Adaptive threshold determination for efficient channel sensing in cognitive radio network using mobile sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, M. N.; Khatun, S.; Kamarudin, L. M.; Aljunid, S. A.; Ahmad, R. B.; Zakaria, A.; Fakir, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    Spectrum saturation problem is a major issue in wireless communication systems all over the world. Huge number of users is joining each day to the existing fixed band frequency but the bandwidth is not increasing. These requirements demand for efficient and intelligent use of spectrum. To solve this issue, the Cognitive Radio (CR) is the best choice. Spectrum sensing of a wireless heterogeneous network is a fundamental issue to detect the presence of primary users' signals in CR networks. In order to protect primary users (PUs) from harmful interference, the spectrum sensing scheme is required to perform well even in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. Meanwhile, the sensing period is usually required to be short enough so that secondary (unlicensed) users (SUs) can fully utilize the available spectrum. CR networks can be designed to manage the radio spectrum more efficiently by utilizing the spectrum holes in primary user's licensed frequency bands. In this paper, we have proposed an adaptive threshold detection method to detect presence of PU signal using free space path loss (FSPL) model in 2.4 GHz WLAN network. The model is designed for mobile sensors embedded in smartphones. The mobile sensors acts as SU while the existing WLAN network (channels) works as PU. The theoretical results show that the desired threshold range detection of mobile sensors mainly depends on the noise floor level of the location in consideration.

  14. The role of organizational strategy in the user-centered design of mobile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshet, Eyal; de Reuver, G.A.; Bouwman, W.A.G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Gathering insights on users and the contexts they use mobile applications is at the core of the user-centered design (UCD). Organizations find it strategically important to efficiently and effectively use these insights. With the proliferation of mobile applications, gaining timely and relevant

  15. Freegaming: Mobile, Collaborative, Adaptive and Augmented Exergaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Görgü

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the obesity epidemic that plagues many societies remains an outstanding public health issue. One innovative approach to addressing this problem is Exergaming. A combination of Exercise and Gaming, the objective is to motivate people participate in exercise regimes, usually in their home environment. In this article a more holistic interpretation of this exercise paradigm is proposed. Freegaming augments Exergaming in a number of key dimensions but especially through the promotion of games in outdoor mobile contexts and within a social environment. The design and implementation of a platform for Freegaming is described and illustrated through the description of a sample game.

  16. Creating a Seamless Cross-Platform Online Experience for Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Lynch

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In creating a mobile-optimized website for Drexel University Libraries, we have strived to preserve the seamless transition between platforms that our desktop users experience. We employ separate technology and coding solutions to make Drupal, WordPress, and HTML sections mobile optimized, while continuously improving the mobile user experience in terms of design, usability, and site performance. This paper details how, through extensive research, design, and development, we found the best solution for creating a steady mobile experience for our users.

  17. User cooperation, virality and gaming in a social mobile network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, C; Blazovics, L; Charaf, H

    2012-01-01

    Social networks and mobile systems are both rapidly developing areas nowadays. In this chapter, we will introduce Gedda-Headz, a novel social mobile gaming concept that brings these two areas together. Gedda-Headz is a social mobile network that mainly focuses on multiplayer mobile gaming. First we...

  18. Elderly users & Mobile Phones: An explorative Study on Designing for Emotion & Aesthetic Experience :

    OpenAIRE

    Molavi Arabshahi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to examine the role that non-instrumental aspects such as aesthetic and emotion play in elderly user interaction with mobile phones. It presents an analysis of the results from in-depth interviews with a selected group of Swedish elderly users, and discusses how the aesthetic experience which they yield in interacting with mobile phones could impact their preference, and their perceived usability of the devices.  A set of mobile phones, different in usability and aesthetic le...

  19. User Experience of a Mobile Speaking Application with Automatic Speech Recognition for EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae youn; Lee, Sangmin-Michelle

    2016-01-01

    With the spread of mobile devices, mobile phones have enormous potential regarding their pedagogical use in language education. The goal of this study is to analyse user experience of a mobile-based learning system that is enhanced by speech recognition technology for the improvement of EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' speaking…

  20. Gesture-based user authentication on mobile devices using accelerometer and gyroscope

    OpenAIRE

    Guse, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices offer their users lots of possibilities and a feeling of freedom. However, this freedom comes along with new security threats. Sensitive data might be stolen and abused, if an unauthorized person gets unrestricted access to such devices. Therefore, user authentication mechanisms are required. So far authentication mechanisms like PINs and passwords do not take into account the limited capabilities of user interfaces of mobile devices. So, it is necessary to create and develop s...

  1. Motion Mode Recognition and Step Detection Algorithms for Mobile Phone Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Lachapelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS technology is playing a key role in the design of the new generation of smartphones. Thanks to their reduced size, reduced power consumption, MEMS sensors can be embedded in above mobile devices for increasing their functionalities. However, MEMS cannot allow accurate autonomous location without external updates, e.g., from GPS signals, since their signals are degraded by various errors. When these sensors are fixed on the user’s foot, the stance phases of the foot can easily be determined and periodic Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPTs are performed to bound the position error. When the sensor is in the hand, the situation becomes much more complex. First of all, the hand motion can be decoupled from the general motion of the user. Second, the characteristics of the inertial signals can differ depending on the carrying modes. Therefore, algorithms for characterizing the gait cycle of a pedestrian using a handheld device have been developed. A classifier able to detect motion modes typical for mobile phone users has been designed and implemented. According to the detected motion mode, adaptive step detection algorithms are applied. Success of the step detection process is found to be higher than 97% in all motion modes.

  2. Social Incentive Mechanism Based Multi-User Sensing Time Optimization in Co-Operative Spectrum Sensing with Mobile Crowd Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Zhu, Qi

    2018-01-16

    Co-operative spectrum sensing emerging as a significant method to improve the utilization of the spectrum needs sufficient sensing users to participate. Existing related papers consider only the limited secondary users in current sensing system and assume that they will always perform the co-operative spectrum sensing out of obligation. However, this assumption is impractical in the realistic situation where the secondary users are rational and they will not join in the co-operative sensing process without a certain reward to compensate their sensing energy consumption, especially the ones who have no data transmitting in current time slot. To solve this problem, we take advantage of the mobile crowd sensing to supply adequate co-operative sensing candidates, in which the sensing users are not only the secondary users but also a crowd of widely distributed mobile users equipped with personal spectrum sensors (such as smartphones, vehicle sensors). Furthermore, a social incentive mechanism is also adapted to motivate the participations of mobile sensing users. In this paper, we model the interactions among the motivated sensing users as a co-operative game where they adjust their own sensing time strategies to maximize the co-operative sensing utility, which eventually guarantees the detection performance and prevents the global sensing cost being too high. We prove that the game based optimization problem is NP-hard and exists a unique optimal equilibrium. An improved differential evolution algorithm is proposed to solve the optimization problem. Simulation results prove the better performance in our proposed multi-user sensing time optimization model and the proposed improved differential evolution algorithm, respectively compared with the non-optimization model and the other two typical equilibrium solution algorithms.

  3. Weather Effects on Mobile Social Interactions: A Case Study of Mobile Phone Users in Lisbon, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W.; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs) in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy), people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics. PMID:23071523

  4. Weather effects on mobile social interactions: a case study of mobile phone users in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Phithakkitnukoon

    Full Text Available The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy, people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics.

  5. A New Approach to Predict user Mobility Using Semantic Analysis and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Roshan; D'Souza G L, Rio

    2017-10-19

    Mobility prediction is a technique in which the future location of a user is identified in a given network. Mobility prediction provides solutions to many day-to-day life problems. It helps in seamless handovers in wireless networks to provide better location based services and to recalculate paths in Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET). In the present study, a framework is presented which predicts user mobility in presence and absence of mobility history. Naïve Bayesian classification algorithm and Markov Model are used to predict user future location when user mobility history is available. An attempt is made to predict user future location by using Short Message Service (SMS) and instantaneous Geological coordinates in the absence of mobility patterns. The proposed technique compares the performance metrics with commonly used Markov Chain model. From the experimental results it is evident that the techniques used in this work gives better results when considering both spatial and temporal information. The proposed method predicts user's future location in the absence of mobility history quite fairly. The proposed work is applied to predict the mobility of medical rescue vehicles and social security systems.

  6. An Ambient Intelligence Framework for the Provision of Geographically Distributed Multimedia Content to Mobility Impaired Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehagias, Dionysios D.; Giakoumis, Dimitris; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Bekiaris, Evangelos; Wiethoff, Marion

    This chapter presents an ambient intelligence framework whose goal is to facilitate the information needs of mobility impaired users on the move. This framework couples users with geographically distributed services and the corresponding multimedia content, enabling access to context-sensitive information based on user geographic location and the use case under consideration. It provides a multi-modal facility that is realized through a set of mobile devices and user interfaces that address the needs of ten different types of user impairments. The overall ambient intelligence framework enables users who are equipped with mobile devices to access multimedia content in order to undertake activities relevant to one or more of the following domains: transportation, tourism and leisure, personal support services, work, business, education, social relations and community building. User experience is being explored against those activities through a specific usage scenario.

  7. Adaptive Leader-Follower Formation Control for Autonomous Mobile Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Jing; Lin, Zhiyun; Cao, Ming; Yan, Gangfeng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, adaptive formation control is addressed for a network of autonomous mobile robots in which there are only two leaders knowing the prescribed reference velocity while the others just play the role of followers. Assuming that each follower has only two neighbors to form a cascade

  8. Climate finance: Mobilizing the private sector to support adaptation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... Mobilizing private sector actors and innovative financial instruments are crucial to address the gap in climate finance options for the developing world. To accomplish this requires renewed efforts, both to understand and address the key barriers limiting private sector involvement in adaptation financing, and ...

  9. An Infrastructure to Enable Lightweight Context-Awareness for Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Lago

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones enable us to carry out a wider range of tasks every day, and as a result they have become more ubiquitous than ever. However, they are still more limited in terms of processing power and interaction capabilities than traditional computers, and the often distracting and time-constricted scenarios in which we use them do not help in alleviating these limitations. Context-awareness is a valuable technique to address these issues, as it enables to adapt application behaviour to each situation. In this paper we present a context management infrastructure for mobile environments, aimed at controlling context information life-cycle in this kind of scenarios, with the main goal of enabling application and services to adapt their behaviour to better meet end-user needs. This infrastructure relies on semantic technologies and open standards to improve interoperability, and is based on a central element, the context manager. This element acts as a central context repository and takes most of the computational burden derived from dealing with this kind of information, thus relieving from these tasks to more resource-scarce devices in the system.

  10. Dual adaptive dynamic control of mobile robots using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Marvin K; Fabri, Simon G; Camilleri, Liberato

    2009-02-01

    This paper proposes two novel dual adaptive neural control schemes for the dynamic control of nonholonomic mobile robots. The two schemes are developed in discrete time, and the robot's nonlinear dynamic functions are assumed to be unknown. Gaussian radial basis function and sigmoidal multilayer perceptron neural networks are used for function approximation. In each scheme, the unknown network parameters are estimated stochastically in real time, and no preliminary offline neural network training is used. In contrast to other adaptive techniques hitherto proposed in the literature on mobile robots, the dual control laws presented in this paper do not rely on the heuristic certainty equivalence property but account for the uncertainty in the estimates. This results in a major improvement in tracking performance, despite the plant uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. Monte Carlo simulation and statistical hypothesis testing are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the two proposed stochastic controllers as applied to the trajectory-tracking problem of a differentially driven wheeled mobile robot.

  11. Mobile user experience for voice services: A theoretical framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available . Oinas-Kukkonen, H. Mobile Electronic Commerce through the Web. in Second International Conference on Telecommunication and Electronic Commerce (ICTEC '99). 1999. Nashville, TN, USA. 15. Oinas-Kukkonen, H. and V. Kurkela, Developing Successful Mobile...

  12. Adaptive invention: independence and mobility through modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairami, Fatima Fanna; Allotey, Pascale; Warren, Narelle; Mak, Jun Shin; Reidpath, Daniel Diamond

    2017-08-24

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability that limits everyday activities and reduces social participation. Provision of assistive devices helps to achieve independence and social inclusion. However, due to limited resources or a lack of suited objects for their needs, individuals with disabilities in low and middle income countries (LMIC) often do not have access to assistive devices. This has resulted in the creation of purpose built innovative solutions. Methodology and case content: This paper uses a single case derived from a larger ethnographic study of stroke survivors in rural Malaysia to demonstrate the role of assistive devices in shaping stroke recovery and how existing structures can be modified. Second, the concept of affordances in relation to structures within the environment, issues of affordability and accessibility of assistive devices for individuals in LMIC are discussed. Stroke recovery involves adapting to new limitations and discovering the support necessary to live life. These changes are influenced by a range of environmental factors. Healthcare professionals need to support stroke patients in identifying challenges and work to find innovative ways to address them. Stroke survivors may benefit from the use of an assistive device beyond its clinical function to participate purposefully in activities of daily living. Implications for Rehabilitation Stroke is a cause of disability that limits everyday activities and reduces social participation. Assistive devices help achieve independence, social inclusion and shape stroke recovery. Individuals with disabilities in low and middle income countries often do not have access to assistive devices and resort to innovative solutions that are purpose built. Stroke recovery involves adapting to new limitations and discovering the support necessary to live life as best as possible.

  13. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-05-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers’ claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: • The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. • The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs’ departments (9%). • IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. • Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. • Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall

  14. Personalized Behavior Pattern Recognition and Unusual Event Detection for Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junho Ahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones have become widely used for obtaining help in emergencies, such as accidents, crimes, or health emergencies. The smartphone is an essential device that can record emergency situations, which can be used for clues or evidence, or as an alert system in such situations. In this paper, we focus on mobile-based identification of potentially unusual, or abnormal events, occurring in a mobile user's daily behavior patterns. For purposes of this research, we have classified events as “unusual” for a mobile user when an event is an infrequently occurring one from the user's normal behavior patterns–all of which are collected and recorded on a user's mobile phone. We build a general unusual event classification model to be automated on the smartphone for use by any mobile phone users. To classify both normal and unusual events, we analyzed the activity, location, and audio sensor data collected from 20 mobile phone users to identify these users' personalized normal daily behavior patterns and any unusual events occurring in their daily activity. We used binary fusion classification algorithms on the subjects' recorded experimental data and ultimately identified the most accurately performing fusion algorithm for unusual event detection.

  15. Exploring Multi-Scale Spatiotemporal Twitter User Mobility Patterns with a Visual-Analytics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human mobility patterns is of great importance for urban planning, traffic management, and even marketing campaign. However, the capability of capturing detailed human movements with fine-grained spatial and temporal granularity is still limited. In this study, we extracted high-resolution mobility data from a collection of over 1.3 billion geo-located Twitter messages. Regarding the concerns of infringement on individual privacy, such as the mobile phone call records with restricted access, the dataset is collected from publicly accessible Twitter data streams. In this paper, we employed a visual-analytics approach to studying multi-scale spatiotemporal Twitter user mobility patterns in the contiguous United States during the year 2014. Our approach included a scalable visual-analytics framework to deliver efficiency and scalability in filtering large volume of geo-located tweets, modeling and extracting Twitter user movements, generating space-time user trajectories, and summarizing multi-scale spatiotemporal user mobility patterns. We performed a set of statistical analysis to understand Twitter user mobility patterns across multi-level spatial scales and temporal ranges. In particular, Twitter user mobility patterns measured by the displacements and radius of gyrations of individuals revealed multi-scale or multi-modal Twitter user mobility patterns. By further studying such mobility patterns in different temporal ranges, we identified both consistency and seasonal fluctuations regarding the distance decay effects in the corresponding mobility patterns. At the same time, our approach provides a geo-visualization unit with an interactive 3D virtual globe web mapping interface for exploratory geo-visual analytics of the multi-level spatiotemporal Twitter user movements.

  16. Design and Evaluation of the User-Adapted Program Scheduling system based on Bayesian Network and Constraint Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hirotoshi; Sega, Shinichiro; Hiraishi, Hironori; Mizoguchi, Fumio

    In recent years, lots of music content can be stored in mobile computing devices, such as a portable digital music player and a car navigation system. Moreover, various information content like news or traffic information can be acquired always anywhere by a cellular communication and a wireless LAN. However, usability issues arise from the simple interfaces of mobile computing devices. Moreover, retrieving and selecting such content poses safety issues, especially while driving. Thus, it is important for the mobile system to recommend content automatically adapted to user's preference and situation. In this paper, we present the user-adapted program scheduling that generates sequences of content (Program) suiting user's preference and situation based on the Bayesian network and the Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) technique. We also describe the design and evaluation of its realization system, the Personal Program Producer (P3). First, preference such as a genre ratio of content in a program is learned as a Bayesian network model using simple operations such as a skip behavior. A model including each content tends to become large-scale. In order to make it small, we present the model separation method that carries out losslessly compression of the model. Using the model, probabilistic distributions of preference to generate constraints are inferred. Finally satisfying the constraints, a program is produced. This kind of CSP has an issue of which the number of variables is not fixedness. In order to make it variable, we propose a method using metavariables. To evaluate the above methods, we applied them to P3 on a car navigation system. User evaluations helped us clarify that the P3 can produce the program that a user prefers and adapt it to the user.

  17. Design and Implementation of User-Created Information Systems with Mobile RFID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kwoen; Chin, Sungho; Kim, Hee Cheon; Chung, Kwang Sik

    RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) has been usually applied at physical distribution field. The Mobile RFID can be the only technology that we can lead the market. In our country, ETRI standardizes MOBION (MOBile Identification ON), and the mobile-telecommunication companies provide the trial-mobile RFID service from 2006. In the trial-mobile RFID services, the Broker model is used to decode the mobile RFID code. However, the Broker model has some problems, such as communication overhead caused by the frequent ODS query, service performance, and various services for users. In this paper, we developed device application that is capable for filtering unrelated code from RFID service to improve the decoding performance. We also improve the performance through simplifying connection process between device application and the broker. Finally, we propose and develop the user-created information system to widely distribute the Mobile RFID service.

  18. An Adaptive Game Algorithm for an Autonomous, Mobile Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Bak, Thomas; Risager, Claus

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a field study of a physical ball game for elderly based on an autonomous, mobile robot. The game algorithm is based on Case Based Reasoning and adjusts the game challenge to the player’s mobility skills by registering the spatio-temporal behaviour of the player using an on board...... laser scanner.We have investigated the adaptiveness of the game algorithm in an open-ended environment with older adults using different assistive tools playing in at a rehabilitation center. The study shows that the robot operates robustly in the real world and that the game algorithm adjusts...

  19. Tool-Supported User-Centred Prototyping of Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leichtenstern, Karin; André, Elisabeth; Rehm, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    PeDT (Pervasive Interface Development Toolkit for Mobile Phones) that provides assistance to interface developers of applications where mobile phones are used as interaction devices to a user’s everyday pervasive environment. Based on found tool features for UCP tools, a feature study is described between related...

  20. Power mobility with collision avoidance for older adults: user, caregiver, and prescriber perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rosalie H; Korotchenko, Alexandra; Hurd Clarke, Laura; Mortenson, W Ben; Mihailidis, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Collision avoidance technology has the capacity to facilitate safer mobility among older power mobility users with physical, sensory, and cognitive impairments, thus enabling independence for more users. Little is known about consumers' perceptions of collision avoidance. This article draws on interviews (29 users, 5 caregivers, and 10 prescribers) to examine views on design and utilization of this technology. Data analysis identified three themes: "useful situations or contexts," "technology design issues and real-life application," and "appropriateness of collision avoidance technology for a variety of users." Findings support ongoing development of collision avoidance for older adult users. The majority of participants supported the technology and felt that it might benefit current users and users with visual impairments, but might be unsuitable for people with significant cognitive impairments. Some participants voiced concerns regarding the risk for injury with power mobility use and some identified situations where collision avoidance might be beneficial (driving backward, avoiding dynamic obstacles, negotiating outdoor barriers, and learning power mobility use). Design issues include the need for context awareness, reliability, and user interface specifications. User desire to maintain driving autonomy supports development of collaboratively controlled systems. This research lays the groundwork for future development by illustrating consumer requirements for this technology.

  1. Conceptual service architecture for adaptive mobile location services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Saowanee

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual service architecture for adaptive mobile location services designed to be used on the next generation wireless network. The developed service architecture consists of a set of concepts, principles, rules and guidelines for constructing, deploying, and operating...... the mobile location services. The service architecture identifies the components required to build the mobile location services and describes how these components are combined and how they should interact. As a means of exploring the developed conceptual service architecture, an illustrative case study...... of a new-concept tracking service is chosen to demonstrate the applicability of the architecture. Through the case study, the service request and response processes will be illustrated. New possible service functions provided by the developed service architecture will be examined and discussed...

  2. Cultural Differences and User Instructions: Effects of a Culturally Adapted Manual Structure on Western and Chinese Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qian; de Jong, Menno D.T.; Karreman, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Research shows that Western and Chinese technical communicators structure their documents in different ways. The research reported in this article is a first attempt to systematically explore the effects cultural adaptations of user instructions have on users. Specifically, we investigate

  3. Mobile Context-Aware Support for Public Transportation Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Buchwald, Esben; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Murray-Smith, Roderick

    2012-01-01

    compass bearing, in addition to a distance range chosen by a physical gesture. The main application tested in this paper is a system to support public transport users in Copenhagen. Users can point at any bus-stop or train station and be given timetables, next departure times, and buy a ticket via SMS...

  4. User experience of mobile business support services for rural micro and small enterprises

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the power of user experience of mobile phones and technologies and explores how micro and small enterprises use mobile services. The authors also identify the missing gaps and propose a mobi-incubation solution for rural micro...

  5. Exploring the influence of reference situations and reference pricing on mobile service user behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechar, Jennifer; Constantiou, Ioanna; Damsgaard, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Despite widespread proliferation of mobile devices providing access to a variety of advanced and data-rich services, adoption of those services remains low in most of the Western world. Thus, research related to the acceptance and use of mobile technology and services continues to develop. Tradit...... situations and reference prices. The article suggests that users cognitive referencing is an influential factor that must be considered when exploring their usage behaviour in the mobile services market....

  6. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Layton

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired lif...

  7. An adaptable navigation strategy for Virtual Microscopy from mobile platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Germán; Romero, Eduardo; Iregui, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    Real integration of Virtual Microscopy with the pathologist service workflow requires the design of adaptable strategies for any hospital service to interact with a set of Whole Slide Images. Nowadays, mobile devices have the actual potential of supporting an online pervasive network of specialists working together. However, such devices are still very limited. This article introduces a novel highly adaptable strategy for streaming and visualizing WSI from mobile devices. The presented approach effectively exploits and extends the granularity of the JPEG2000 standard and integrates it with different strategies to achieve a lossless, loosely-coupled, decoder and platform independent implementation, adaptable to any interaction model. The performance was evaluated by two expert pathologists interacting with a set of 20 virtual slides. The method efficiently uses the available device resources: the memory usage did not exceed a 7% of the device capacity while the decoding times were smaller than the 200 ms per Region of Interest, i.e., a window of 256×256 pixels. This model is easily adaptable to other medical imaging scenarios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Statistical Investigation of the User Effects on Mobile Terminal Antennas for 5G Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syrytsin, Igor A.; Zhang, Shuai; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the user effects on mobile terminal antennas at 28GHz are statistically investigated with the parameters of body loss, coverage efficiency and power in the shadow. The data are obtained from the measurements of 12 users in data and talk modes, with the antenna placed on the top and ...

  9. Integrating User Interface and Personal Innovativeness into the TAM for Mobile Learning in Cyber University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Ju; Lee, Hyeon Woo; Ham, Yookyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to add new variables, namely user interface, personal innovativeness, and satisfaction in learning, to Davis's technology acceptance model and also examine whether learners are willing to adopt mobile learning. Thus, this study attempted to explain the structural causal relationships among user interface, personal…

  10. Usability Studies on Mobile User Interface Design Patterns: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumpapun Punchoojit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile platforms have called for attention from HCI practitioners, and, ever since 2007, touchscreens have completely changed mobile user interface and interaction design. Some notable differences between mobile devices and desktops include the lack of tactile feedback, ubiquity, limited screen size, small virtual keys, and high demand of visual attention. These differences have caused unprecedented challenges to users. Most of the mobile user interface designs are based on desktop paradigm, but the desktop designs do not fully fit the mobile context. Although mobile devices are becoming an indispensable part of daily lives, true standards for mobile UI design patterns do not exist. This article provides a systematic literature review of the existing studies on mobile UI design patterns. The first objective is to give an overview of recent studies on the mobile designs. The second objective is to provide an analysis on what topics or areas have insufficient information and what factors are concentrated upon. This article will benefit the HCI community in seeing an overview of present works, to shape the future research directions.

  11. Who are mobile app users from healthy lifestyle websites? Analysis of patterns of app use and user characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; Smahel, David; Machackova, Hana

    2017-09-19

    The use of online communities and websites for health information has proliferated along with the use of mobile apps for managing health behaviors such as diet and exercise. The scarce evidence available to date suggests that users of these websites and apps differ in significant ways from non-users but most data come from US- and UK-based populations. In this study, we recruited users of nutrition, weight management, and fitness-oriented websites in the Czech Republic to better understand who uses mobile apps and who does not, including user sociodemographic and psychological profiles. Respondents aged 13-39 provided information on app use through an online survey (n = 669; M age = 24.06, SD = 5.23; 84% female). Among users interested in health topics, respondents using apps for managing nutrition, weight, and fitness (n = 403, 60%) were more often female, reported more frequent smartphone use, and more expert phone skills. In logistic regression models, controlling for sociodemographics, web, and phone activity, mHealth app use was predicted by levels of excessive exercise (OR 1.346, 95% CI 1.061-1.707, p app users, we found differences in types of apps used by gender, age, and weight status. Controlling for sociodemographics and web and phone use, drive for thinness predicted the frequency of use of apps for healthy eating (β = 0.14, p apps for keeping a diet (β = 0.18, p apps for maintaining weight (β = - 0.13, p app users from nutrition, weight management, and fitness websites, helping inform subsequent design of mHealth apps and mobile intervention strategies.

  12. An analysis of user-generated comments on the development of social mobile learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Zha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the authors used a mixed-method approach to analyze user-generated comments on social mobile learning from three leading news sites that report the latest development in higher education. Koole’s mobile learning model was used to code comments made by the public on the three news sites. Results showed that social mobile learning has gained an increasing public engagement in the past four years. Responders’ discussion in the comments primarily focused on four themes of social mobile learning: technology adoption, effective design, faculty training, and student training. In the end, the authors discussed the implications for developers and educators and concluded with recommendations for future research in social mobile learning using user-generated comments.

  13. Developing adaptive user interfaces using a game-based simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, G.M. te; Greef, T.E. de; Lindenberg, J.; Rypkema, J.A.; Smets-Noor, N.J.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In dynamic settings, user interfaces can provide more optimal support if they adapt to the context of use. Providing adaptive user interfaces to first responders may therefore be fruitful. A cognitive engineering method that incorporates development iterations in both a simulated and a real-world

  14. Effect of the Primary User Traffic on Cognitive Relaying with Adaptive Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Anlei

    2012-09-08

    In a cognitive-relay system, the secondary user is permitted to transmit data via a relay when the spectrum bands are detected to be free. The miss detection of spectrum sensing and the primary user traffic will affect the data transmission performance of the secondary user. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the status change of the primary user on the bit error rate (BER) of the adaptive transmission of the secondary user in a cognitive-relay system. Numerical results show that the primary user traffic can significantly degrade the BER of the secondary user transmission.

  15. ADAPTIVE SERVICE PROVISIONING FOR MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Jayapal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing efficient and scalable service provisioning in Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET is a big research challenge. In adaptive service provisioning mechanism an adaptive election procedure is used to select a coordinator node. The role of a service coordinator is crucial in any distributed directory based service provisioning scheme. The existing coordinator election schemes use either the nodeID or a hash function to choose the coordinator. In these schemes, the leader changes are more frequent due to node mobility. We propose an adaptive scheme that makes use of an eligibility factor that is calculated based on the distance to the zone center, remaining battery power and average speed to elect a core node that change according to the network dynamics. We also retain the node with the second highest priority as a backup node. Our algorithm is compared with the existing solution by simulation and the result shows that the core node selected by us is more stable and hence reduces the number of handoffs. This in turn improves the service delivery performance by increasing the packet delivery ratio and decreasing the delay, the overhead and the forwarding cost.

  16. Estimating Skin Cancer Risk: Evaluating Mobile Computer-Adaptive Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Janda, Monika; Olsen, Catherine M; Whiteman, David C; Chien, Tsair-Wei

    2016-01-22

    Response burden is a major detriment to questionnaire completion rates. Computer adaptive testing may offer advantages over non-adaptive testing, including reduction of numbers of items required for precise measurement. Our aim was to compare the efficiency of non-adaptive (NAT) and computer adaptive testing (CAT) facilitated by Partial Credit Model (PCM)-derived calibration to estimate skin cancer risk. We used a random sample from a population-based Australian cohort study of skin cancer risk (N=43,794). All 30 items of the skin cancer risk scale were calibrated with the Rasch PCM. A total of 1000 cases generated following a normal distribution (mean [SD] 0 [1]) were simulated using three Rasch models with three fixed-item (dichotomous, rating scale, and partial credit) scenarios, respectively. We calculated the comparative efficiency and precision of CAT and NAT (shortening of questionnaire length and the count difference number ratio less than 5% using independent t tests). We found that use of CAT led to smaller person standard error of the estimated measure than NAT, with substantially higher efficiency but no loss of precision, reducing response burden by 48%, 66%, and 66% for dichotomous, Rating Scale Model, and PCM models, respectively. CAT-based administrations of the skin cancer risk scale could substantially reduce participant burden without compromising measurement precision. A mobile computer adaptive test was developed to help people efficiently assess their skin cancer risk.

  17. A Mobile Application for User Regulated Self-Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarinis, Fotis; Verykios, Vassilios S.; Panagiotakopoulos, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a mobile application for self-assessment. The work describes the main features of the application and focuses on its acceptance by students and the increase on their learning, through its usage in real testing settings. The application supports the retrieval of questions based on a number of criteria and it was evaluated…

  18. Age Based User Interface in Mobile Operating System

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, Rohitt; Singh, Paramjit; Mahajan, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of different interfaces in the mobile operating system for different age groups. The different age groups identified are kids, elderly people and all others. The motive behind creating different interfaces is to make the smartphones of today's world usable to all age groups.

  19. The assessment of electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckus, Raimondas; Strukcinskiene, Birute; Raistenskis, Juozas

    2014-12-01

    During recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has resulted in increased human ex- posure to electromagnetic field radiation and to health risks. Increased usage of mobile phones at the close proximity raises questions and doubts in safety of mobile phone users. The aim of the study was to assess an electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users by measuring electromagnetic field strength in different settings at the distance of 1 to 30 cm from the mobile user. In this paper, the measurements of electric field strength exposure were conducted on different brand of mobile phones by the call-related factors: urban/rural area, indoor/outdoor setting and moving/stationary mode during calls. The different types of mobile phone were placed facing the field probe at 1 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm distance. The highest electric field strength was recorded for calls made in rural area (indoors) while the lowest electric field strength was recorded for calls made in urban area (outdoors). Calls made from a phone in a moving car gave a similar result like for indoor calls; however, calls made from a phone in a moving car exposed electric field strength two times more than that of calls in a standing (motionless) position. Electromagnetic field radiation depends on mobile phone power class and factors, like urban or rural area, outdoor or indoor, moving or motionless position, and the distance of the mobile phone from the phone user. It is recommended to keep a mobile phone in the safe distance of 10, 20 or 30 cm from the body (especially head) during the calls.

  20. The assessment of electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckus Raimondas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. During recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has resulted in increased human exposure to electromagnetic field radiation and to health risks. Increased usage of mobile phones at the close proximity raises questions and doubts in safety of mobile phone users. The aim of the study was to assess an electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users by measuring electromagnetic field strength in different settings at the distance of 1 to 30 cm from the mobile user. Methods. In this paper, the measurements of electric field strength exposure were conducted on different brand of mobile phones by the call-related factors: urban/rural area, indoor/outdoor setting and moving/stationary mode during calls. The different types of mobile phone were placed facing the field probe at 1 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm distance. Results. The highest electric field strength was recorded for calls made in rural area (indoors while the lowest electric field strength was recorded for calls made in urban area (outdoors. Calls made from a phone in a moving car gave a similar result like for indoor calls; however, calls made from a phone in a moving car exposed electric field strength two times more than that of calls in a standing (motionless position. Conclusion. Electromagnetic field radiation depends on mobile phone power class and factors, like urban or rural area, outdoor or indoor, moving or motionless position, and the distance of the mobile phone from the phone user. It is recommended to keep a mobile phone in the safe distance of 10, 20 or 30 cm from the body (especially head during the calls.

  1. Comparative Perspective of Human Behavior Patterns to Uncover Ownership Bias among Mobile Phone Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Arai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid spread of mobile devices, call detail records (CDRs from mobile phones provide more opportunities to incorporate dynamic aspects of human mobility in addressing societal issues. However, it has been increasingly observed that CDR data are not always representative of the population under study because it only includes device users alone. To understand the discrepancy between the population captured by CDRs and the general population, we profile principal populations of CDRs by analyzing routines based on time spent at key locations and compare these data with those of the general population. We employ a topic model to estimate typical routines of mobile phone users using CDRs as topics. The routines are extracted from field survey data and compared between those of the general population and mobile phone users. We found that there are two main population groups of mobile phone users in Dhaka: males engaged in an income-generating activity at a specific location other than home and females performing household tasks and spending most of their time at home. We determine that CDRs tend to omit students, who form a significant component of the Dhaka population.

  2. Which Users Should Be the Focus of Mobile Personal Health Records? Analysis of User Characteristics Influencing Usage of a Tethered Mobile Personal Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guna; Park, Joong Yeol; Shin, Soo-Yong; Hwang, Jong Su; Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Bates, David W

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the usage pattern of a hospital-tethered mobile personal health records (m-PHRs) application named My Chart in My Hand (MCMH) and to identify user characteristics that influence m-PHR usage. Access logs to MCMH and its menus were collected for a total of 18 months, from August 2011 to January 2013. Usage patterns between users without a patient identification number (ID) and users with a patient ID were compared. Users with a patient ID were divided into light and heavy user groups by the median number of monthly access. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess MCMH usage pattern by characteristics of MCMH user with a patient ID. The total number of MCMH logins was 105,603, and the median number of accesses was 15 times. Users (n = 7,096) mostly accessed the "My Chart" menu, but "OPD [outpatient department] Service Support" and "Health Management" menus were also frequently used. Patients with chronic diseases, experience of hospital visits including emergency room and OPD, and age group of 0-19 years were more frequently found among users with a patient ID (n = 2,186) (p < 0.001). A similar trend was found in the heavy user group (n = 1,123). Submenus of laboratory result, online appointment, and medication lists that were accessed mostly by users with a patient ID were associated with OPD visit and chronic diseases. This study showed that focuses on patients with chronic disease and more hospital visits and empowerment functions in a tethered m-PHR would be helpful to pursue the extensive use.

  3. Near field communication: getting in touch with mobile users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Near field communication is a method for sending and receiving small amounts of data across very short distances wirelessly. This technology is already available in a number of mobile devices and has many possible uses, including electronic payment, access control, and information exchange. This article will explain the basic principles of near field communication, discuss some of the ways it can be used in libraries, and explore some possible concerns with the technology. A list of resources for additional information is also included.

  4. Mobile Applications and Multi-User Virtual Reality Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This is my third internship with NASA and my second one at the Johnson Space Center. I work within the engineering directorate in ER7 (Software Robotics and Simulations Division) at a graphics lab called IGOAL. We are a very well-rounded lab because we have dedicated software developers and dedicated 3D artist, and when you combine the two, what you get is the ability to create many different things such as interactive simulations, 3D models, animations, and mobile applications.

  5. Mobile VoIP user experience in LTE

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Karl; Mostafa, Seraj Al Mahmud; Ul Islam, Raihan

    2011-01-01

    3GPP Long-term Evolution (LTE) systems being deployed are fast gaining market shares. High data rates (approaching 100 Mbit/s in the downlink direction and 50 Mbit/s for uplink connections) and small delays are attractive features of LTE. Spectrum flexibility also makes deployment easy on various frequency bands in different parts of the world. However, as LTE offers packet switched services only, mobile broadband connectivity has become the dominant LTE application so far. This paper studies...

  6. An international prospective cohort study of mobile phone users and health (COSMOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledano, Mireille B; Auvinen, Anssi; Tettamanti, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates validity of self-reported mobile phone use in a subset of 75 993 adults from the COSMOS cohort study. Agreement between self-reported and operator-derived mobile call frequency and duration for a 3-month period was assessed using Cohen's weighted Kappa (κ). Sensitivity...... and specificity of both self-reported high (≥10 calls/day or ≥4h/week) and low (≤6 calls/week or users of one mobile phone, agreement was fair for call frequency (κ=0.35, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.36) and moderate for call duration (κ=0.50, 95......-reported mobile phone use was lower in women, younger age groups and those reporting symptoms during/shortly after using a mobile phone. This study highlights the ongoing value of using self-report data to measure mobile phone use. Furthermore, compared to continuous scale estimates used by previous studies...

  7. User experience with mobile security and privacy mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones have become indispensable in the life of many people. They are constant companions, connections to the world, information sources, and substitutes for other devices and tools that had to be carried individually in the past. While smartphones offer a variety of sources for positive user experience, their downside is their vulnerability to security attacks and the potential they offer to harm a users’ privacy. However, due to their known vulnerabilities, smartphone...

  8. Subband Adaptive Array for DS-CDMA Mobile Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Xuan Nam

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel scheme of subband adaptive array (SBAA for direct-sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA. The scheme exploits the spreading code and pilot signal as the reference signal to estimate the propagation channel. Moreover, instead of combining the array outputs at each output tap using a synthesis filter and then despreading them, we despread directly the array outputs at each output tap by the desired user's code to save the synthesis filter. Although its configuration is far different from that of 2D RAKEs, the proposed scheme exhibits relatively equivalent performance of 2D RAKEs while having less computation load due to utilising adaptive signal processing in subbands. Simulation programs are carried out to explore the performance of the scheme and compare its performance with that of the standard 2D RAKE.

  9. Subband Adaptive Array for DS-CDMA Mobile Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Xuan Nam; Omata, Takanori; Taniguchi, Tetsuki; Karasawa, Yoshio

    2004-12-01

    We propose a novel scheme of subband adaptive array (SBAA) for direct-sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA). The scheme exploits the spreading code and pilot signal as the reference signal to estimate the propagation channel. Moreover, instead of combining the array outputs at each output tap using a synthesis filter and then despreading them, we despread directly the array outputs at each output tap by the desired user's code to save the synthesis filter. Although its configuration is far different from that of 2D RAKEs, the proposed scheme exhibits relatively equivalent performance of 2D RAKEs while having less computation load due to utilising adaptive signal processing in subbands. Simulation programs are carried out to explore the performance of the scheme and compare its performance with that of the standard 2D RAKE.

  10. Supporting User Generated Content for Mobile News Services: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos K. Georgiadis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 applications encourage users to contribute to the production of richer content. In this context, our work mainly focuses on providing mobile users the ability to share content and to support user generated content production. Specifically, in our case study, features both for a mobile Web and for a mobile native application are implemented, capable of providing news services enriched with indicative social networking elements. The results of our work are largely related to the understanding of the required proper solutions, based on the investigation of serious technical challenges: the XML‐RPC library for the Android platform is exploited, as well as a specific Backend Joomla! component is built (Rsstoa to handle consistently external content sources, such as feeds and multipart emails.

  11. Educational Multimedia Profiling Recommendations for Device-Aware Adaptive Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Arghir-Nicolae; Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning is seeing a fast adoption with the increasing availability and affordability of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. As the creation and consumption of educational multimedia content on mobile devices is also increasing fast, educators and mobile learning providers are faced with the challenge to adapt multimedia type…

  12. Psychometric properties of the NOMO 1.0 tested among adult powered-mobility users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Terje; Brandt, Åse; Anttila, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Mobility Related Outcome Evaluation of Assistive Device Intervention (NOMO 1.0) instrument evaluates the effectiveness of mobility devices in assessing mobility-related participation, captured by three scales (Need for Assistance, Frequency, and Ease/Difficulty) and one index...... (Participation Repertoire). PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate a range of psychometric properties of the NOMO 1.0 in a sample of adult powered mobility device (PMD) users. METHOD: Data collected from PMD users ( N = 248) in Denmark, Finland, and Norway as part of a larger study were analyzed using state......-of-the-art statistical methods. FINDINGS: The acceptability and applicability of the NOMO 1.0 items were generally within recommended values. Some floor/ceiling effects were found and the reliability was acceptable for only the Frequency scale. The factor analysis identified one component for the Need for Assistance...

  13. User-independent accelerometer-based gesture recognition for mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian WANG

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Many mobile devices embed nowadays inertial sensors. This enables new forms of human-computer interaction through the use of gestures (movements performed with the mobile device as a way of communication. This paper presents an accelerometer-based gesture recognition system for mobile devices which is able to recognize a collection of 10 different hand gestures. The system was conceived to be light and to operate in a user-independent manner in real time. The recognition system was implemented in a smart phone and evaluated through a collection of user tests, which showed a recognition accuracy similar to other state-of-the art techniques and a lower computational complexity. The system was also used to build a human-robot interface that enables controlling a wheeled robot with the gestures made with the mobile phone

  14. User-independent accelerometer-based gesture recognition for mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo METOLA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many mobile devices embed nowadays inertial sensors. This enables new forms of human-computer interaction through the use of gestures (movements performed with the mobile device as a way of communication. This paper presents an accelerometer-based gesture recognition system for mobile devices which is able to recognize a collection of 10 different hand gestures. The system was conceived to be light and to operate in a user-independent manner in real time. The recognition system was implemented in a smart phone and evaluated through a collection of user tests, which showed a recognition accuracy similar to other state-of-the art techniques and a lower computational complexity. The system was also used to build a human-robot interface that enables controlling a wheeled robot with the gestures made with the mobile phone

  15. The risk of subjective symptoms in mobile phone users in Poland – An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Szyjkowska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the type and incidence of subjective symptoms related to the use of mobile phones in Polish users. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in 2005 using a questionnaire survey. Although it has been quite a long time, up to now, no such data have been published for Poland. The questionnaire consisted of 53 questions concerning sex, age, education, general health, characteristics of a mobile phone (hand-held, loud-speaking unit as well as the habits associated with its use (frequency and duration of calls, text messages, etc. and complaints associated with using a mobile phone. Results: As many as 1800 questionnaires were sent. The response was obtained from 587 subjects aged 32.6±11.3 (48.9% women, 51.1% men; the age did not differ significantly between men and women. The subjects owned a cell phone for an average of 3 years. Majority of the respondents used the phone intensively, i.e. daily (74% or almost daily (20%. Headaches were reported significantly more often by the people who talked frequently and long in comparison with other users (63.2% of the subjects, p = 0.0029, just like the symptoms of fatigue (45%, p = 0.013. Also, the feeling of warmth around the ear and directly to the auricle was reported significantly more frequently by the intensive mobile phone users, compared with other mobile phone users (47.3%, p = 0.00004 vs. 44.6%, p = 0.00063, respectively. Most symptoms appeared during or immediately after a call and disappeared within 2 h after the call. Continuous headache, persisting for longer than 6 h since the end of a call, was reported by 26% of the subjects. Conclusions: Our results show that the mobile phone users may experience subjective symptoms, the intensity of which depends on the intensity of use of mobile phones.

  16. An Adaptive Approach to Locating Mobile HIV Testing Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Gregg S; Crawford, Forrest W; Cleary, Paul D; Kaplan, Edward H; Paltiel, A David

    2017-07-01

    Public health agencies suggest targeting "hotspots" to identify individuals with undetected HIV infection. However, definitions of hotspots vary. Little is known about how best to target mobile HIV testing resources. We conducted a computer-based tournament to compare the yield of 4 algorithms for mobile HIV testing. Over 180 rounds of play, the algorithms selected 1 of 3 hypothetical zones, each with unknown prevalence of undiagnosed HIV, in which to conduct a fixed number of HIV tests. The algorithms were: 1) Thompson Sampling, an adaptive Bayesian search strategy; 2) Explore-then-Exploit, a strategy that initially draws comparable samples from all zones and then devotes all remaining rounds of play to HIV testing in whichever zone produced the highest observed yield; 3) Retrospection, a strategy using only base prevalence information; and; 4) Clairvoyance, a benchmarking strategy that employs perfect information about HIV prevalence in each zone. Over 250 tournament runs, Thompson Sampling outperformed Explore-then-Exploit 66% of the time, identifying 15% more cases. Thompson Sampling's superiority persisted in a variety of circumstances examined in the sensitivity analysis. Case detection rates using Thompson Sampling were, on average, within 90% of the benchmark established by Clairvoyance. Retrospection was consistently the poorest performer. We did not consider either selection bias (i.e., the correlation between infection status and the decision to obtain an HIV test) or the costs of relocation to another zone from one round of play to the next. Adaptive methods like Thompson Sampling for mobile HIV testing are practical and effective, and may have advantages over other commonly used strategies.

  17. The Privacy Calculus: Mobile Apps and User Perceptions of Privacy and Security

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Fife; Juan Orjuela

    2012-01-01

    A continuing stream of new mobile data services are being released that rely upon the collection of personal data to support a business model. New technologies including facial recognition, sensors and Near Field Communications (NFC) will increasingly become a part of everyday services and applications that challenge traditional concepts of individual privacy. The average person as well as the “tech‐savvy” mobile phone user may not yet be fully aware of the extent to which their privacy and s...

  18. A user created content approach to mobile knowledge sharing for advanced language learners

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, L.; Marcus, W.; Fallahkhair, Sanaz

    2009-01-01

    Mobile and ubiquitous learning technologies hold out great promise for students of foreign languages who are resident in a target language country, since they can be used in the contexts in which the language learner needs to use his/her language skills for deploying or interpreting language. The CloudBank project aims to integrate a user created content paradigm with mobile learning technologies so that language learners can upload, share and comment on interesting language items they encoun...

  19. Mobile User Behavior Pattern Analysis by Associated Tree in Web Service Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohbey, Krishna K.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are the most important equipment for accessing various kinds of services. These services are accessed using wireless signals, the same used for mobile calls. Today mobile services provide a fast and excellent way to access all kinds of information via mobile phones. Mobile service providers are interested to know the access behavior pattern of the users from different locations at different timings. In this paper, we have introduced an associated tree for analyzing user behavior patterns while moving from one location to another. We have used four different parameters, namely user, location, dwell time, and services. These parameters provide stronger frequent accessing patterns by matching joins. These generated patterns are valuable for improving web services, recommending new services, and predicting useful services for individuals or groups of users. In addition, an experimental evaluation has been conducted on simulated data. Finally, performance of the proposed approach has been measured in terms of efficiency and scalability. The proposed approach produces excellent results.

  20. Recruiting and Retaining Mobile Young Injection Drug Users in a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Hathazi, Dodi; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal studies that research homeless persons or transient drug users face particular challenges in retaining subjects. Between 2005 and 2006, 101 mobile young injection drug users were recruited in Los Angeles into a 2-year longitudinal study. Several features of ethnographic methodology, including fieldwork and qualitative interviews, and modifications to the original design, such as toll-free calls routed directly to ethnographer cell phones and wiring incentive payments, resulted in retention of 78% of subjects for the first follow-up interview. Longitudinal studies that are flexible and based upon qualitative methodologies are more likely to retain mobile subjects while also uncovering emergent research findings. PMID:20222779

  1. Influence of Mobile Users' Density Distribution on the CDMA Base Station Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebl, Aleksandar; Mitić, Dragan; Popović, Miroslav; Markov, Žarko; Mileusnić, Mladen; Matić, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we analyze the influence of users' density distribution in one cell of CDMA mobile network (ie adjusted power control on the forward link) on base station emission power. This influence is analyzed for different circles radii around base station within which same emission power is generated for all mobile users, and for different values of propagation loss coefficient. It is proved that emission power in this cell must be increased comparing to the similar cell, which uses complete power control. The power increase is greater when greater number of users are situated near base station, and for greater values of propagation loss coefficient. The results are presented, illustrated by numerical examples and verified by simulation for three users' density distributions: uniform, decreasing and increasing density from the base station to the cell rim. The simulation process, which is based on random traffic process, is presented briefly.

  2. Improving an Anonymous and Provably Secure Authentication Protocol for a Mobile User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongho Moon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently many authentication protocols using an extended chaotic map were suggested for a mobile user. Many researchers demonstrated that authentication protocol needs to provide key agreement, mutual authentication, and user anonymity between mobile user and server and resilience to many possible attacks. In this paper, we cautiously analyzed chaotic-map-based authentication scheme and proved that it is still insecure to off-line identity guessing, user and server impersonation, and on-line identity guessing attacks. To address these vulnerabilities, we proposed an improved protocol based on an extended chaotic map and a fuzzy extractor. We proved the security of the proposed protocol using a random oracle and AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications tool. Furthermore, we present an informal security analysis to make sure that the improved protocol is invulnerable to possible attacks. The proposed protocol is also computationally efficient when compared to other previous protocols.

  3. End-User Attitudes towards Location-Based Services and Future Mobile Wireless Devices: The Students’ Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lohan, Elena-Simona; Rusu-Casandra, Alexandru; Cramariuc, Oana; Marghescu, Ion; Cramariuc, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    ..., such as low costs, low battery consumption, and small size. From many users' perspectives, location services and mobile location capabilities are still rather poorly known and poorly understood...

  4. Impact of different cloud deployments on real-time video applications for mobile video cloud users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif A.; Wang, Qi; Luo, Chunbo; Wang, Xinheng; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The latest trend to access mobile cloud services through wireless network connectivity has amplified globally among both entrepreneurs and home end users. Although existing public cloud service vendors such as Google, Microsoft Azure etc. are providing on-demand cloud services with affordable cost for mobile users, there are still a number of challenges to achieve high-quality mobile cloud based video applications, especially due to the bandwidth-constrained and errorprone mobile network connectivity, which is the communication bottleneck for end-to-end video delivery. In addition, existing accessible clouds networking architectures are different in term of their implementation, services, resources, storage, pricing, support and so on, and these differences have varied impact on the performance of cloud-based real-time video applications. Nevertheless, these challenges and impacts have not been thoroughly investigated in the literature. In our previous work, we have implemented a mobile cloud network model that integrates localized and decentralized cloudlets (mini-clouds) and wireless mesh networks. In this paper, we deploy a real-time framework consisting of various existing Internet cloud networking architectures (Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure and Eucalyptus Cloud) and a cloudlet based on Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud over wireless mesh networking technology for mobile cloud end users. It is noted that the increasing trend to access real-time video streaming over HTTP/HTTPS is gaining popularity among both research and industrial communities to leverage the existing web services and HTTP infrastructure in the Internet. To study the performance under different deployments using different public and private cloud service providers, we employ real-time video streaming over the HTTP/HTTPS standard, and conduct experimental evaluation and in-depth comparative analysis of the impact of different deployments on the quality of service for mobile video cloud users. Empirical

  5. A qualitative study of user perceptions of mobile health apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Peng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile apps for health exist in large numbers today, but oftentimes, consumers do not continue to use them after a brief period of initial usage, are averse toward using them at all, or are unaware that such apps even exist. The purpose of our study was to examine and qualitatively determine the design and content elements of health apps that facilitate or impede usage from the users’ perceptive. Methods In 2014, six focus groups and five individual interviews were conducted in the Midwest region of the U.S. with a mixture of 44 smartphone owners of various social economic status. The participants were asked about their general and health specific mobile app usage. They were then shown specific features of exemplar health apps and prompted to discuss their perceptions. The focus groups and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and coded using the software NVivo. Results Inductive thematic analysis was adopted to analyze the data and nine themes were identified: 1 barriers to adoption of health apps, 2 barriers to continued use of health apps, 3 motivators, 4 information and personalized guidance, 5 tracking for awareness and progress, 6 credibility, 7 goal setting, 8 reminders, and 9 sharing personal information. The themes were mapped to theories for interpretation of the results. Conclusions This qualitative research with a diverse pool of participants extended previous research on challenges and opportunities of health apps. The findings provide researchers, app designers, and health care providers insights on how to develop and evaluate health apps from the users’ perspective.

  6. Generating a Corpus of Mobile Forensic Images for Masquerading user Experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Mark; Brooks, Marc; Grover, Justin; Katz, Eric; Ondricek, Jared; Rogers, Marcus; Sharpe, Lauren

    2016-11-01

    The Periodic Mobile Forensics (PMF) system investigates user behavior on mobile devices. It applies forensic techniques to an enterprise mobile infrastructure, utilizing an on-device agent named TractorBeam. The agent collects changed storage locations for later acquisition, reconstruction, and analysis. TractorBeam provides its data to an enterprise infrastructure that consists of a cloud-based queuing service, relational database, and analytical framework for running forensic processes. During a 3-month experiment with Purdue University, TractorBeam was utilized in a simulated operational setting across 34 users to evaluate techniques to identify masquerading users (i.e., users other than the intended device user). The research team surmises that all masqueraders are undesirable to an enterprise, even when a masquerader lacks malicious intent. The PMF system reconstructed 821 forensic images, extracted one million audit events, and accurately detected masqueraders. Evaluation revealed that developed methods reduced storage requirements 50-fold. This paper describes the PMF architecture, performance of TractorBeam throughout the protocol, and results of the masquerading user analysis. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Adaptive Data Gathering in Mobile Sensor Networks Using Speedy Mobile Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxuan Lai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Data gathering is a key operator for applications in wireless sensor networks; yet it is also a challenging problem in mobile sensor networks when considering that all nodes are mobile and the communications among them are opportunistic. This paper proposes an efficient data gathering scheme called ADG that adopts speedy mobile elements as the mobile data collector and takes advantage of the movement patterns of the network. ADG first extracts the network meta-data at initial epochs, and calculates a set of proxy nodes based on the meta-data. Data gathering is then mapped into the Proxy node Time Slot Allocation (PTSA problem that schedules the time slots and orders, according to which the data collector could gather the maximal amount of data within a limited period. Finally, the collector follows the schedule and picks up the sensed data from the proxy nodes through one hop of message transmissions. ADG learns the period when nodes are relatively stationary, so that the collector is able to pick up the data from them during the limited data gathering period. Moreover, proxy nodes and data gathering points could also be timely updated so that the collector could adapt to the change of node movements. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed scheme outperforms other data gathering schemes on the cost of message transmissions and the data gathering rate, especially under the constraint of limited data gathering period.

  8. Adaptive support for user interface customization : a study in radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of adaptive customization support in a natural work environment: the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) in radiology. Methods: Adaptive support was given in the form of customization suggestions, generated based on behavioral

  9. Incentive-Rewarding Mechanism for User-position Control in Mobile Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Makoto; Sato, Kenichiro; Shinkuma, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Tatsuro

    When the number of users in a service area increases in mobile multimedia services, no individual user can obtain satisfactory radio resources such as bandwidth and signal power because the resources are limited and shared. A solution for such a problem is user-position control. In the user-position control, the operator informs users of better communication areas (or spots) and navigates them to these positions. However, because of subjective costs caused by subjects moving from their original to a new position, they do not always attempt to move. To motivate users to contribute their resources in network services that require resource contributions for users, incentive-rewarding mechanisms have been proposed. However, there are no mechanisms that distribute rewards appropriately according to various subjective factors involving users. Furthermore, since the conventional mechanisms limit how rewards are paid, they are applicable only for the network service they targeted. In this paper, we propose a novel incentive-rewarding mechanism to solve these problems, using an external evaluator and interactive learning agents. We also investigated ways of appropriately controlling rewards based on user contributions and system service quality. We applied the proposed mechanism and reward control to the user-position control, and demonstrated its validity.

  10. Assessing American Red Cross First Aid mobile app user trends: Implications for resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musigdilok, Visanee V; Demeter, Natalie E; Burke, Rita V; Shook, Eric; Ajayakumar, Jayakrishnan; Berg, Bridget M; Hawkins, Michelle D; Ferree, John; MacAloney, Brenton W; Chung, Sarita; Pellegrino, Jeffrey L; Tolli, Dominick; Hansen, Grant; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Disasters have devastated communities, impacted the economy, and resulted in a significant increase in injuries. As the use of mobile technology increasingly becomes a common aspect of everyday life, it is important to understand how it can be used as a resource. The authors examined the use of American Red Cross mobile apps and aimed to characterize user trends to better understand how mobile apps can help bolster individual and community preparedness, resilience, and response efforts. Tornado data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Weather Service. Data for the mobile apps were provided by the American Red Cross. All data were reviewed for 2013, 2014, and three specific tornado events. Data were organized in Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and then graphed or mapped using ArcMap 10.2(™). Between 2013 and 2014, 1,068 tornado watches and 3,682 tornado warnings were issued. Additionally, 37,957,560 Tornado app users and 1,289,676 First Aid app users were active from 2013 to 2014. Overall, there was an increase in the use of American Red Cross mobile apps during tornado occurrences. Yet the increase does not show a consistent correlation with the number of watches and warnings issued. Mobile apps can be a resourceful tool. This study shows that mobile app use increases during a disaster. The findings indicate that there is potential to use mobile apps for building resilience as the apps provide information to support individuals and communities in helping before, during, and after disasters.

  11. BLAST: Battery Lifetime-constrained Adaptation with Selected Target in Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mercati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices today contain many power hungry subsystems and execute different applications. Standard power management is not aware of the desired battery lifetime and has no visibility into which applications are executing. However, power consumption is strongly dependent on which applications are executed. In this work, we propose a novel power characterization strategy for mobile devices called application-dependent power states (AP-states. Based on that, we formulate a management problem to improve performance under battery lifetime constraints, and we implement the management framework on a real Android device. We call our framework BLAST: Battery Lifetime-constrained Adaptation with Selected Target. The goal of such framework is to maximize performance while letting the device battery to last at least for a certain required lifetime, and only requires the user to select the desired target lifetime. The implementation does not require OS modifications and can be ported and installed to any Android device. We experimentally verify that our strategy can still meets user experience requirements with a selected target battery lifetime extension of at least 25%.

  12. 2D/3D video content adaptation decision engine based on content classification and user assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rui; Andrade, M. T.

    2017-07-01

    Multimedia adaptation depends on several factors, such as the content itself, the consumption device and its characteristics, the transport and access networks and the user. An adaptation decision engine, in order to provide the best possible Quality of Experience to a user, needs to have information about all variables that may influence its decision. For the aforementioned factors, we implement content classification, define device classes, consider limited bandwidth scenarios and categorize user preferences based on a subjective quality evaluation test. The results of these actions generate vital information to pass to the adaptation decision engine so that its operation may provide the indication of the most suitable adaptation to perform that delivers the best possible outcome for the user under the existing constraints.

  13. Creative Teaching and Learning Strategies for Novice Users of Mobile Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses perspectives of creative teaching and learning strategies in the new learning context of mobile technology, particularly for novice learners. The discussion presented here is framed by two case studies and uses an ethnographical approach, informed by participant observation to consider the experiences of users of mobile…

  14. Authentication and Authorisation Infrastructure for the Mobility of Users of Academic Libraries: An Overview of Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudomalj, Emil; Jauk, Avgust

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To give an overview of the current state and trends in authentication and authorisation in satisfying academic library users' mobility and instant access to digital information resources, and to propose that libraries strongly support efforts to establish a global authentication and authorisation infrastructure.…

  15. I Sensed It Was You: Authenticating Mobile Users with Sensor-enhanced Keystroke Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffrida, C.; Majdanik, K.; Conti, M.; Bos, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices have become an important part of our everyday life, harvesting more and more confidential user information. Their portable nature and the great exposure to security attacks, however, call out for stronger authentication mechanisms than simple password-based identification. Biometric

  16. Personal computer versus personal computer/mobile device combination users' preclinical laboratory e-learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Haruka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Naoki; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Yamaga, Yoshiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between personal computer (PC)/mobile device combination and PC-only user patterns. We analyzed access frequency and time spent on a complete denture preclinical website in order to maximize website effectiveness. Fourth-year undergraduate students (N=41) in the preclinical complete denture laboratory course were invited to participate in this survey during the final week of the course to track login data. Students accessed video demonstrations and quizzes via our e-learning site/course program, and were instructed to view online demonstrations before classes. When the course concluded, participating students filled out a questionnaire about the program, their opinions, and devices they had used to access the site. Combination user access was significantly more frequent than PC-only during supplementary learning time, indicating that students with mobile devices studied during lunch breaks and before morning classes. Most students had favorable opinions of the e-learning site, but a few combination users commented that some videos were too long and that descriptive answers were difficult on smartphones. These results imply that mobile devices' increased accessibility encouraged learning by enabling more efficient time use between classes. They also suggest that e-learning system improvements should cater to mobile device users by reducing video length and including more short-answer questions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Engineering of Data Acquiring Mobile Software and Sustainable End-User Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benton T.

    2013-01-01

    The criteria for which data acquiring software and its supporting infrastructure should be designed should take the following two points into account: the reusability and organization of stored online and remote data and content, and an assessment on whether abandoning a platform optimized design in favor for a multi-platform solution significantly reduces the performance of an end-user application. Furthermore, in-house applications that control or process instrument acquired data for end-users should be designed with a communication and control interface such that the application's modules can be reused as plug-in modular components in greater software systems. The application of the above mentioned is applied using two loosely related projects: a mobile application, and a website containing live and simulated data. For the intelligent devices mobile application AIDM, the end-user interface have a platform and data type optimized design, while the database and back-end applications store this information in an organized manner and manage access to that data to only to authorized user end application(s). Finally, the content for the website was derived from a database such that the content can be included and uniform to all applications accessing the content. With these projects being ongoing, I have concluded from my research that the applicable methods presented are feasible for both projects, and that a multi-platform design for the mobile application only marginally drop the performance of the mobile application.

  18. Safety, mobility and comfort assessment methodologies of intelligent transport systems for vulnerable road users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malone, K.; Silla, A.; Johanssen, C.; Bell, D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This paper describes the modification and development of methodologies to assess the impacts of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) applications for Vulnerable Road users (VRUs) in the domains of safety, mobility and comfort. This effort was carried out in the context of the VRUITS

  19. Motivation and User Engagement in Fitness Tracking: Heuristics for Mobile Healthcare Wearables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Asimakopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wearable fitness trackers have gained a new level of popularity due to their ambient data gathering and analysis. This has signalled a trend toward self-efficacy and increased motivation among users of these devices. For consumers looking to improve their health, fitness trackers offer a way to more readily gain motivation via the personal data-based insights the devices offer. However, the user experience (UX that accompanies wearables is critical to helping users interpret, understand, gain motivation and act on their data. Despite this, there is little evidence as to specific aspects of fitness tracker user engagement and long-term motivation. We report on a 4-week situated diary study and Healthcare Technology Self-efficacy (HTSE questionnaire assessment of 34 users of two popular American fitness trackers: JawBone and FitBit. The study results illustrate design implications and requirements for fitness trackers and other self-efficacy mobile healthcare applications.

  20. Cognitive Support using BDI Agent and Adaptive User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Shabbir

    2012-01-01

    challenges of an ageing population. This thesis work is one attempt towards that. The thesis focused on research the approaches to provide cognitive support for users with cognitive disabilities through ICT-based technological solutions. The recent advancement of Articial Intelligence and wireless sensor...... networks have shown potential to improve the quality of life of elder people with disabilities using current technologies. The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct research on the approach to provide support for the elderly users with cognitive disabilities. In our research conduct, we have dened......-known framework to measure the individual health status and functioning level. The third goal is to develop an approach for supporting for users with irrational behaviour due to cognitive impairment. To deal with this challenge, a Belief, Desire and Intention (BDI) agent based approach is proposed due to its...

  1. Human Handheld-Device Interaction : An Adaptive User Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitrianie, S.

    2010-01-01

    The move to smaller, lighter and more powerful (mobile) handheld devices, whe-ther PDAs or smart-phones, looks like a trend that is building up speed. With numerous embedded technologies and wireless connectivity, the drift opens up unlimited opportunities in daily activities that are both more

  2. Predicting the Location and Time of Mobile Phone Users by Using Sequential Pattern Mining Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozer, Mert; Keles, Ilkcan; Toroslu, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, using cell phone log data to model human mobility patterns became an active research area. This problem is a challenging data mining problem due to huge size and non-uniformity of the log data, which introduces several granularity levels for the specification of temporal...... and spatial dimensions. This paper focuses on the prediction of the location of the next activity of the mobile phone users. There are several versions of this problem. In this work, we have concentrated on the following three problems: predicting the location and the time of the next user activity...... the success of these methods with real data obtained from one of the largest mobile phone operators in Turkey. Our results are very encouraging, since we were able to obtain quite high accuracy results under small prediction sets....

  3. Quantitative Analysis Of User Interfaces For Large Electronic Home Appliances And Mobile Devices Based On Lifestyle Categorization Of Older Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Wonkyoung; Park, Minyong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Study Context: The increasing longevity and health of older users as well as aging populations has created the need to develop senior-oriented product interfaces. This study aims to find user interface (UI) priorities according to older user groups based on their lifestyle and develop quality of UI (QUI) models for large electronic home appliances and mobile products. A segmentation table designed to show how older users can be categorized was created through a review of the literature to survey 252 subjects with a questionnaire. Factor analysis was performed to extract six preliminary lifestyle factors, which were then used for subsequent cluster analysis. The analysis resulted in four groups. Cross-analysis was carried out to investigate which characteristics were included in the groups. Analysis of variance was then applied to investigate the differences in the UI priorities among the user groups for various electronic devices. Finally, QUI models were developed and applied to those electronic devices. Differences in UI priorities were found according to the four lifestyles ("money-oriented," "innovation-oriented," "stability- and simplicity-oriented," and "innovation- and intellectual-oriented"). Twelve QUI models were developed for four different lifestyle groups associated with different products. Three washers and three smartphones were used as an example for testing the QUI models. The UI differences of the older user groups by the segmentation in this study using several key (i.e., demographic, socioeconomic, and physical-cognitive) variables are distinct from earlier studies made by a single variable. The differences in responses clearly indicate the benefits of integrating various factors of older users, rather than single variable, in order to design and develop more innovative and better consumer products in the future. The results of this study showed that older users with a potentially high buying power in the future are likely to have

  4. Hidden Markov Model based Mobility Learning for Improving Indoor Tracking of Mobile Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nikolaj Bisgaard; Laursen, Troels; Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen

    2012-01-01

    Indoors, a user's movements are typically confined by walls, corridors, and doorways, and further he is typically repeating the same movements such as walking between certain points in the building. Conventional indoor localization systems do usually not take these properties of the user's moveme...... likely trajectory is then calculated using and extended version of the Viterbi algorithm. The results show significant improvements of the proposed algorithm compared to a simpler moving average smoothing....

  5. Heterogeneous Users in MOOC and their Adaptive Learning Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa SEIN-ECHALUCE LACLETA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Many research works point out the overcrowding and the heterogeneity of participant’s profiles in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC as the main causes of their low completion rate. On the other hand, the methodologies of personalization of the learning, along next to the technologies of the information, that allows to realize techniques of adaptativity, appear in international reports as an effective way to improve the learning. This paper explores the participante’ perception of their adaptive needs in this tupe of course, as well as their relationship with different aspects of the participants, such as: profiles (gender, age, geographical location and academic level, previous experience and knowledge about the topic of the MOOC and motivation to enroll the MOOC. The study is carried out through a survey completes by the participants in the MOOC Campus of Educational Innovation. We conclude that the age or gender of the participants does not significantly influence their need for adaptive techniques in a MOOC. However, living in a Latin American country, working as a manager or enrolling in a MOOC with a specific motivation, are some of the factors that influence in the desire for adaptive techniques in a MOOC. The obtained results will contribute to improve the adaptive designs of the MOOC and will be easily transferable to any online training course, in blended or virtual learning.

  6. Latent Feature Models for Uncovering Human Mobility Patterns from Anonymized User Location Traces with Metadata

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Basma Mohammed

    2017-04-10

    In the mobile era, data capturing individuals’ locations have become unprecedentedly available. Data from Location-Based Social Networks is one example of large-scale user-location data. Such data provide a valuable source for understanding patterns governing human mobility, and thus enable a wide range of research. However, mining and utilizing raw user-location data is a challenging task. This is mainly due to the sparsity of data (at the user level), the imbalance of data with power-law users and locations check-ins degree (at the global level), and more importantly the lack of a uniform low-dimensional feature space describing users. Three latent feature models are proposed in this dissertation. Each proposed model takes as an input a collection of user-location check-ins, and outputs a new representation space for users and locations respectively. To avoid invading users privacy, the proposed models are designed to learn from anonymized location data where only IDs - not geophysical positioning or category - of locations are utilized. To enrich the inferred mobility patterns, the proposed models incorporate metadata, often associated with user-location data, into the inference process. In this dissertation, two types of metadata are utilized to enrich the inferred patterns, timestamps and social ties. Time adds context to the inferred patterns, while social ties amplifies incomplete user-location check-ins. The first proposed model incorporates timestamps by learning from collections of users’ locations sharing the same discretized time. The second proposed model also incorporates time into the learning model, yet takes a further step by considering time at different scales (hour of a day, day of a week, month, and so on). This change in modeling time allows for capturing meaningful patterns over different times scales. The last proposed model incorporates social ties into the learning process to compensate for inactive users who contribute a large volume

  7. Making Sense of Mobile Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Pauleen; John Campbell; Brian Harmer; Ali Intezari

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have facilitated a radical shift in work and private life. In this article, we seek to better understand how individual mobile technology users have made sense of these changes and adapted...

  8. Development, Technical, and User Evaluation of a Web Mobile Application for Self-Control of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Zapirain, Begoña; de la Torre Díez, Isabel; Sainz de Abajo, Beatriz; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Web-based mobile application (app) known as "Diario Diabetes" on both a technical and user level, by means of which individuals with diabetes may monitor their illness easily at any time and in any place using any device that has Internet access. The technologies used to develop the app were HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, and MySQL, all of which are an open source. Once the app was developed, it was evaluated on a technical level (by measuring loading times) and on a user level, through a survey. Different loading times for the application were measured, with it being noted that under no circumstances does this exceed 2 s. Usability was evaluated by 150 users who initially used the application. A majority (71%) of users used a PC to access the app, 83% considered the app's design to be attractive, 67% considered the tasks to be very useful, and 67% found it very easy to use. Although applications exist for controlling diabetes both at mobile virtual shops or on a research level, our app may help to improve the administration of these types of patients and they are the ones who will ultimately opt for one or the other. According to the results obtained, we can state that all users would recommend the app's use to other users.

  9. Adapting a Database of Text Messages to a Mobile-Based Weight Loss Program: The Case of the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Limam Mansar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. Qatar, a rapidly developing country in the Middle East, has seen a sharp increase in the prevalence of obesity. The increase can be attributed to several reasons, including sedentary lifestyles imposed by a harsh climate and the introduction of Western fast food. Mobile technologies have been used and studied as a technology to support individuals’ weight loss. The authors have developed a mobile application that implements three strategies drawn from proven theories of behavioral change. The application is localized to the cultural context of its proposed users. The objective of this paper is to present a method through which we adapted the messaging content of a weight loss application to the context of its users while retaining an effective degree of automation. The adaptation addressed body image, eating and physical exercise habits, and regional/cultural needs. The paper discusses how surveying potential users can be used to build a profile of a target population, find common patterns, and then develop a database of text messages. The text messages are automated and sent to the users at specific times of day, as suggested by the survey results.

  10. Security analysis and enhanced user authentication in proxy mobile IPv6 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwoo Kang

    Full Text Available The Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6 is a network-based mobility management protocol that allows a Mobile Node(MN connected to the PMIPv6 domain to move from one network to another without changing the assigned IPv6 address. The user authentication procedure in this protocol is not standardized, but many smartcard based authentication schemes have been proposed. Recently, Alizadeh et al. proposed an authentication scheme for the PMIPv6. However, it could allow an attacker to derive an encryption key that must be securely shared between MN and the Mobile Access Gate(MAG. As a result, outsider adversary can derive MN's identity, password and session key. In this paper, we analyze Alizadeh et al.'s scheme regarding security and propose an enhanced authentication scheme that uses a dynamic identity to satisfy anonymity. Furthermore, we use BAN logic to show that our scheme can successfully generate and communicate with the inter-entity session key.

  11. Security analysis and enhanced user authentication in proxy mobile IPv6 networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongwoo; Jung, Jaewook; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Hyoungshick; Won, Dongho

    2017-01-01

    The Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6) is a network-based mobility management protocol that allows a Mobile Node(MN) connected to the PMIPv6 domain to move from one network to another without changing the assigned IPv6 address. The user authentication procedure in this protocol is not standardized, but many smartcard based authentication schemes have been proposed. Recently, Alizadeh et al. proposed an authentication scheme for the PMIPv6. However, it could allow an attacker to derive an encryption key that must be securely shared between MN and the Mobile Access Gate(MAG). As a result, outsider adversary can derive MN's identity, password and session key. In this paper, we analyze Alizadeh et al.'s scheme regarding security and propose an enhanced authentication scheme that uses a dynamic identity to satisfy anonymity. Furthermore, we use BAN logic to show that our scheme can successfully generate and communicate with the inter-entity session key.

  12. Analysis of mobile health applications for a broad spectrum of consumers: a user experience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Juan M; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Vicente, Javier; Robles, Montserrat; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J

    2014-03-01

    Mobile health (m-health) apps can bring health prevention and promotion to the general population. The main purpose of this article is to analyze different m-health apps for a broad spectrum of consumers by means of three different experiences. This goal was defined following the strategic documents generated by the main prospective observatories of Information and Communications Technology for health. After a general exploration of the app markets, we analyze the entries of three specific themes focused in this article: type 2 diabetes, obesity, and breast-feeding. The user experiences reported in this study mostly cover the segments of (1) chronically monitored consumers through a Web mobile app for predicting type 2 diabetes (Diab_Alert app), (2) information seekers through a mobile app for maternity (Lactation app) and partially (3) the motivated healthy consumers through a mobile app for a dietetic monitoring and assessment (SapoFit app). These apps were developed by the authors of this work.

  13. The Design and Evaluation of a Computerized Adaptive Test on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillou, Evangelos; Georgiadou, Elissavet; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has expanded rapidly over recent years mainly due to the advances in communication and information technology. Availability of advanced mobile technologies provides several benefits to e-learning by creating an additional channel of access with mobile devices such as PDAs and mobile phones. This paper…

  14. Complex Mobile Learning That Adapts to Learners' Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning is cognitively demanding and frequently the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing means that mobile devices are used in cognitively demanding environments. This paper examines the use of mobile devices from a Learning, Usability and Cognitive Load Theory perspective. It suggests scenarios where these fields interact and presents an…

  15. Real-Time Motion Tracking for Mobile Augmented/Virtual Reality Using Adaptive Visual-Inertial Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Zheng, Lianyu; Deng, Huanjun; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-05-05

    In mobile augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR), real-time 6-Degree of Freedom (DoF) motion tracking is essential for the registration between virtual scenes and the real world. However, due to the limited computational capacity of mobile terminals today, the latency between consecutive arriving poses would damage the user experience in mobile AR/VR. Thus, a visual-inertial based real-time motion tracking for mobile AR/VR is proposed in this paper. By means of high frequency and passive outputs from the inertial sensor, the real-time performance of arriving poses for mobile AR/VR is achieved. In addition, to alleviate the jitter phenomenon during the visual-inertial fusion, an adaptive filter framework is established to cope with different motion situations automatically, enabling the real-time 6-DoF motion tracking by balancing the jitter and latency. Besides, the robustness of the traditional visual-only based motion tracking is enhanced, giving rise to a better mobile AR/VR performance when motion blur is encountered. Finally, experiments are carried out to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results show that this work is capable of providing a smooth and robust 6-DoF motion tracking for mobile AR/VR in real-time.

  16. Insecure Network, Unknown Connection: Understanding Wi-Fi Privacy Assumptions of Mobile Device Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Bonné

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones and other mobile devices have proliferated in the past five years. The expectation of mobile device users to always be online has led to Wi-Fi networks being offered by a variety of providers. Using these networks introduces multiple security risks. In this work, we assess to what extent the privacy stance of mobile device users corresponds with their actual behavior by conducting a study with 108 participants. Our methodology consists of monitoring Wi-Fi networks that the participants’ devices connect to and the connections made by apps on these devices, for a period of 30 days. Afterwards, participants are surveyed about their awareness and privacy sensitiveness. We show that while a higher expertise in computer networks corresponds to more awareness about the connections made by apps, neither this expertise nor the actual privacy stance of the participant translates to better security habits. Moreover, participants in general were unaware about a significant part of connections made by apps on their devices, a matter that is worsened by the fact that one third of Wi-Fi networks that participants connect to do not have any security enabled. Based on our results, we provide recommendations to network providers, developers and users on how to improve Wi-Fi security for mobile devices.

  17. A mobile user-interface for elderly care from the perspective of relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warpenius, Erika; Alasaarela, Esko; Sorvoja, Hannu; Kinnunen, Matti

    2015-03-01

    As the number of elderly people rises, relatives' care-taking responsibilities increase accordingly. This creates a need for developing new systems that enable relatives to keep track of aged family members. To develop new mobile services for elderly healthcare we tried to identify the most wanted features of a mobile user-interface from the perspective of relatives. Feature mapping was based on two online surveys: one administered to the relatives (N = 32) and nurses (N = 3) of senior citizens and the other to nursing students (N = 18). Results of the surveys, confirmed by face-to-face interviews of the relatives (N = 8), indicated that the most valued features of the mobile user-interface are Accident Reporting (e.g. falling), Alarms (e.g. fire-alarm), Doctor Visits and evaluation of the General Condition of the Senior. The averaged importance ratings of these features were 9.2, 9.0, 8.6 and 8.5, respectively (on a scale from 0 to 10). Other important considerations for the user-interface development are aspiration to simplicity and ease-of-use. We recommend that the results are taken into account, when designing and implementing mobile services for elderly healthcare.

  18. Multimodal user interfaces to improve social integration of elderly and mobility impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Miguel Sales; Pires, Carlos Galinho; Pinto, Fernando Miguel; Teixeira, Vítor Duarte; Freitas, João

    2012-01-01

    Technologies for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Communication have evolved tremendously over the past decades. However, citizens such as mobility impaired or elderly or others, still face many difficulties interacting with communication services, either due to HCI issues or intrinsic design problems with the services. In this paper we start by presenting the results of two user studies, the first one conducted with a group of mobility impaired users, comprising paraplegic and quadriplegic individuals; and the second one with elderly. The study participants carried out a set of tasks with a multimodal (speech, touch, gesture, keyboard and mouse) and multi-platform (mobile, desktop) system, offering an integrated access to communication and entertainment services, such as email, agenda, conferencing, instant messaging and social media, referred to as LHC - Living Home Center. The system was designed to take into account the requirements captured from these users, with the objective of evaluating if the adoption of multimodal interfaces for audio-visual communication and social media services, could improve the interaction with such services. Our study revealed that a multimodal prototype system, offering natural interaction modalities, especially supporting speech and touch, can in fact improve access to the presented services, contributing to the reduction of social isolation of mobility impaired, as well as elderly, and improving their digital inclusion.

  19. ASSESSING USER PREFERENCES FOR MOBILE APPLICATIONS IN PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: A PRE-STUDY USING A CONJOINTBASED RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Stephan; Constantine, Philip; Igler, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    Developing a successful mobile application requires the involvement of the user in the development process. Features and functionalities have to be carefully cho- sen to meet user expectations and preferences. This paper presents work in pro- gress and proposes a conjoint-based approach for the assessment of user prefer- ences regarding mobile applications in the context of public transportation. A pre- study was conducted based on a computer-aided online survey with two conjoint analysis v...

  20. Efficient and Stable Routing Algorithm Based on User Mobility and Node Density in Urban Vehicular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mayouf, Yusor Rafid Bahar; Ismail, Mahamod; Abdullah, Nor Fadzilah; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Mahdi, Omar Adil; Khan, Suleman; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) are considered an emerging technology in the industrial and educational fields. This technology is essential in the deployment of the intelligent transportation system, which is targeted to improve safety and efficiency of traffic. The implementation of VANETs can be effectively executed by transmitting data among vehicles with the use of multiple hops. However, the intrinsic characteristics of VANETs, such as its dynamic network topology and intermittent connectivity, limit data delivery. One particular challenge of this network is the possibility that the contributing node may only remain in the network for a limited time. Hence, to prevent data loss from that node, the information must reach the destination node via multi-hop routing techniques. An appropriate, efficient, and stable routing algorithm must be developed for various VANET applications to address the issues of dynamic topology and intermittent connectivity. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel routing algorithm called efficient and stable routing algorithm based on user mobility and node density (ESRA-MD). The proposed algorithm can adapt to significant changes that may occur in the urban vehicular environment. This algorithm works by selecting an optimal route on the basis of hop count and link duration for delivering data from source to destination, thereby satisfying various quality of service considerations. The validity of the proposed algorithm is investigated by its comparison with ARP-QD protocol, which works on the mechanism of optimal route finding in VANETs in urban environments. Simulation results reveal that the proposed ESRA-MD algorithm shows remarkable improvement in terms of delivery ratio, delivery delay, and communication overhead. PMID:27855165

  1. Enhanced visual adaptation in cochlear implant users revealed by concurrent EEG-fNIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Chia; Stropahl, Maren; Schönwiesner, Marc; Debener, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have observed lower visual cortex activation for visual processing in cochlear implant (CI) users compared to normal hearing controls, while others reported enhanced visual speechreading abilities in CI users. The present work investigated whether lower visual cortical activation for visual processing can be explained by a more efficient visual sensory encoding in CI users. Specifically, we investigated whether CI users show enhanced stimulus-specific adaptation for visual stimuli compared to controls. Auditory sensory adaptation was also investigated to explore the sensory specificity of the predicted effect. Twenty post-lingually deafened adult CI users and twenty age-matched controls were presented with repeated visual and auditory stimuli during simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). By integrating EEG and fNIRS signals we found significantly enhanced visual adaptation and lower visual cortex activation in CI users compared to controls. That is, responses to repeated visual stimuli decreased more prominently in CI users than in controls. The results suggest that CI users process visual stimuli more efficiently than controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of the middle-aged and older users' adoption of mobile health services in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhaohua; Mo, Xiuting; Liu, Shan

    2014-03-01

    Given the increasing number of older people, China has become an aging society. A mobile health service is a type of health informatics that provides personalized healthcare advice to those who require it, especially the older people and the middle-aged. However, few studies consider the adoption of mobile health services with regard to older and middle-aged users. This paper explored a research model based on the value attitude behavior model, theory of planned behavior, and four aging characteristic constructs to investigate how older and middle-aged citizens adopted mobile health services. The hypothesized model was empirically tested using data collected from a survey of 424 residents older than 40 years in China. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the significance of the path coefficients. The findings revealed that (1) perceived value, attitude, perceived behavior control, and resistance to change can be used to predict intention to use mobile health services for the middle-aged group; (2) perceived value, attitude, perceived behavior control, technology anxiety, and self-actualization need positively affected the behavior intention of older users; and (3) subjective norm and perceived physical condition showed no significant effects on the behavior intention to use mobile health services for the two groups. The theoretical and practical implications and contributions of this study are then discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-standard user description in mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Rama Rao; Mitrea, Mihai; Joveski, Bojan; Chammem, Afef

    2015-03-01

    By combining four different open standards belonging to the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29 WG11 (a.k.a. MPEG) and W3C, this paper advances an architecture for mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments. The various users are represented according to MPEG-UD (MPEG User Description) while the security issues are dealt with by deploying the WebID principles. On the server side, irrespective of their elementary types (text, image, video, 3D, …), the medical data are aggregated into hierarchical, interactive multimedia scenes which are alternatively represented into MPEG-4 BiFS or HTML5 standards. This way, each type of content can be optimally encoded according to its particular constraints (semantic, medical practice, network conditions, etc.). The mobile device should ensure only the displaying of the content (inside an MPEG player or an HTML5 browser) and the capturing of the user interaction. The overall architecture is implemented and tested under the framework of the MEDUSA European project, in partnership with medical institutions. The testbed considers a server emulated by a PC and heterogeneous user devices (tablets, smartphones, laptops) running under iOS, Android and Windows operating systems. The connection between the users and the server is alternatively ensured by WiFi and 3G/4G networks.

  4. CP-ABE Based Privacy-Preserving User Profile Matching in Mobile Social Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weirong Cui

    Full Text Available Privacy-preserving profile matching, a challenging task in mobile social networks, is getting more attention in recent years. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme that is based on ciphertext-policy attribute-based encryption to tackle this problem. In our scheme, a user can submit a preference-profile and search for users with matching-profile in decentralized mobile social networks. In this process, no participant's profile and the submitted preference-profile is exposed. Meanwhile, a secure communication channel can be established between the pair of successfully matched users. In contrast to existing related schemes which are mainly based on the secure multi-party computation, our scheme can provide verifiability (both the initiator and any unmatched user cannot cheat each other to pretend to be matched, and requires few interactions among users. We provide thorough security analysis and performance evaluation on our scheme, and show its advantages in terms of security, efficiency and usability over state-of-the-art schemes.

  5. CP-ABE Based Privacy-Preserving User Profile Matching in Mobile Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weirong; Du, Chenglie; Chen, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    Privacy-preserving profile matching, a challenging task in mobile social networks, is getting more attention in recent years. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme that is based on ciphertext-policy attribute-based encryption to tackle this problem. In our scheme, a user can submit a preference-profile and search for users with matching-profile in decentralized mobile social networks. In this process, no participant's profile and the submitted preference-profile is exposed. Meanwhile, a secure communication channel can be established between the pair of successfully matched users. In contrast to existing related schemes which are mainly based on the secure multi-party computation, our scheme can provide verifiability (both the initiator and any unmatched user cannot cheat each other to pretend to be matched), and requires few interactions among users. We provide thorough security analysis and performance evaluation on our scheme, and show its advantages in terms of security, efficiency and usability over state-of-the-art schemes.

  6. User's demography and expectation regarding search, purchase and evaluation in mobile application store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Wilson; de Moraes, Anamaria; Quaresma, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    This article is result from a questionnaire about mobile app store usage. The objective of this work was to collect information about user needs and opinion regarding search, purchase and evaluation process in Android Market, Apple App Store, BlackBerry App World and Nokia Ovi Store. The data collected was analyzed to identify the positive and negative usability aspects, if the process to perform these task are any different in those stores and if the users are satisfy with their store or if they have any complains about it. Its covers the brazilian market only.

  7. Directional Hidden Markov Model for Indoor Tracking of Mobile Users and Realistic Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen; Amiot, Nicolas; Madsen, Tatiana Kozlova

    2013-01-01

    Indoors, mobile users tend to exhibit some level of determinism in their movement patterns during a day, for example when arriving to their office, going for coffee, going for lunch break, picking up print outs, etc. In this work we exploit this determinism to improve the accuracy of indoor...... localization systems. We consider two Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based filtering algorithms that use previous observations to estimate a user’s most likely movement trajectory, given a sequence of inaccurate location coordinates. The proposed Directional HMM algorithm is able to learn user habits...

  8. Authentication of Smartphone Users Based on Activity Recognition and Mobile Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehatisham-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Azam, Muhammad Awais; Loo, Jonathan; Shuang, Kai; Islam, Syed; Naeem, Usman; Amin, Yasar

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are context-aware devices that provide a compelling platform for ubiquitous computing and assist users in accomplishing many of their routine tasks anytime and anywhere, such as sending and receiving emails. The nature of tasks conducted with these devices has evolved with the exponential increase in the sensing and computing capabilities of a smartphone. Due to the ease of use and convenience, many users tend to store their private data, such as personal identifiers and bank account details, on their smartphone. However, this sensitive data can be vulnerable if the device gets stolen or lost. A traditional approach for protecting this type of data on mobile devices is to authenticate users with mechanisms such as PINs, passwords, and fingerprint recognition. However, these techniques are vulnerable to user compliance and a plethora of attacks, such as smudge attacks. The work in this paper addresses these challenges by proposing a novel authentication framework, which is based on recognizing the behavioral traits of smartphone users using the embedded sensors of smartphone, such as Accelerometer, Gyroscope and Magnetometer. The proposed framework also provides a platform for carrying out multi-class smart user authentication, which provides different levels of access to a wide range of smartphone users. This work has been validated with a series of experiments, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. PMID:28878177

  9. Authentication of Smartphone Users Based on Activity Recognition and Mobile Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehatisham-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Azam, Muhammad Awais; Loo, Jonathan; Shuang, Kai; Islam, Syed; Naeem, Usman; Amin, Yasar

    2017-09-06

    Smartphones are context-aware devices that provide a compelling platform for ubiquitous computing and assist users in accomplishing many of their routine tasks anytime and anywhere, such as sending and receiving emails. The nature of tasks conducted with these devices has evolved with the exponential increase in the sensing and computing capabilities of a smartphone. Due to the ease of use and convenience, many users tend to store their private data, such as personal identifiers and bank account details, on their smartphone. However, this sensitive data can be vulnerable if the device gets stolen or lost. A traditional approach for protecting this type of data on mobile devices is to authenticate users with mechanisms such as PINs, passwords, and fingerprint recognition. However, these techniques are vulnerable to user compliance and a plethora of attacks, such as smudge attacks. The work in this paper addresses these challenges by proposing a novel authentication framework, which is based on recognizing the behavioral traits of smartphone users using the embedded sensors of smartphone, such as Accelerometer, Gyroscope and Magnetometer. The proposed framework also provides a platform for carrying out multi-class smart user authentication, which provides different levels of access to a wide range of smartphone users. This work has been validated with a series of experiments, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  10. Evidence-based adaptation and scale-up of a mobile phone health information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Engle, Kelly; Plourde, Kate F; Zan, Trinity

    2017-01-01

    The research base recommending the use of mobile phone interventions for health improvement is growing at a rapid pace. The use of mobile phones to deliver health behavior change and maintenance interventions in particular is gaining a robust evidence base across geographies, populations, and health topics. However, research on best practices for successfully scaling mHealth interventions is not keeping pace, despite the availability of frameworks for adapting and scaling health programs. m4RH-Mobile for Reproductive Health-is an SMS, or text message-based, health information service that began in two countries and over a period of 7 years has been adapted and scaled to new population groups and new countries. Success can be attributed to following key principles for scaling up health programs, including continuous stakeholder engagement; ongoing monitoring, evaluation, and research including extensive content and usability testing with the target audience; strategic dissemination of results; and use of marketing and sustainability principles for social initiatives. This article investigates how these factors contributed to vertical, horizontal, and global scale-up of the m4RH program. Vertical scale of m4RH is demonstrated in Tanzania, where the early engagement of stakeholders including the Ministry of Health catalyzed expansion of m4RH content and national-level program reach. Ongoing data collection has provided real-time data for decision-making, information about the user base, and peer-reviewed publications, yielding government endorsement and partner hand-off for sustainability of the m4RH platform. Horizontal scale-up and adaptation of m4RH has occurred through expansion to new populations in Rwanda, Uganda, and Tanzania, where best practices for design and implementation of mHealth programs were followed to ensure the platform meets the needs of target populations. m4RH also has been modified and packaged for global scale-up through licensing and toolkit

  11. Evidence-based adaptation and scale-up of a mobile phone health information service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Kate F.; Zan, Trinity

    2017-01-01

    Background The research base recommending the use of mobile phone interventions for health improvement is growing at a rapid pace. The use of mobile phones to deliver health behavior change and maintenance interventions in particular is gaining a robust evidence base across geographies, populations, and health topics. However, research on best practices for successfully scaling mHealth interventions is not keeping pace, despite the availability of frameworks for adapting and scaling health programs. Methods m4RH—Mobile for Reproductive Health—is an SMS, or text message-based, health information service that began in two countries and over a period of 7 years has been adapted and scaled to new population groups and new countries. Success can be attributed to following key principles for scaling up health programs, including continuous stakeholder engagement; ongoing monitoring, evaluation, and research including extensive content and usability testing with the target audience; strategic dissemination of results; and use of marketing and sustainability principles for social initiatives. This article investigates how these factors contributed to vertical, horizontal, and global scale-up of the m4RH program. Results Vertical scale of m4RH is demonstrated in Tanzania, where the early engagement of stakeholders including the Ministry of Health catalyzed expansion of m4RH content and national-level program reach. Ongoing data collection has provided real-time data for decision-making, information about the user base, and peer-reviewed publications, yielding government endorsement and partner hand-off for sustainability of the m4RH platform. Horizontal scale-up and adaptation of m4RH has occurred through expansion to new populations in Rwanda, Uganda, and Tanzania, where best practices for design and implementation of mHealth programs were followed to ensure the platform meets the needs of target populations. m4RH also has been modified and packaged for global scale

  12. Shoulder kinematics and mobility adaptations in water-polo players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Elif; Yildiz, Taha I; Demirci, Serdar; Eraslan, Leyla; Ulusoy, Burak; Tok, Damla; Harput, Gulcan; Kara, Dilara; Duzgun, Irem; Tunay, Volga B; Ergun, Nevin

    2017-09-29

    There is limited research to demonstrate how scapular kinematics and shoulder-related physical characteristics are affected in water-polo players, who undertake swimming and repetitive throwing activity. The aim of this study was to investigate possible adaptations in the three- dimensional scapular kinematics and in glenohumeral internal rotation, external rotation range of motion and shoulder posterior-capsule tightness in water-polo players. Fourteen water-polo players and 14 asymptomatic volunteers participated in the study. The scapular kinematics were recorded using an electromagnetic tracking device during the scapular plane shoulder elevation. Additionally, shoulder range of motion and posterior-capsule tightness were evaluated. Analysis of variance models were used to make comparisons between groups. Although there was a trend toward increased scapular internal rotation and downward rotation in the throwing shoulders of water-polo players, comparisons revealed there was no significant differences in kinematics, shoulder internal-external range of motion and posterior-capsule tightness between the throwing shoulders of the players and dominant shoulders of the control participants. The throwing shoulders of water-polo players did not demonstrate alterations in shoulder kinematics and mobility parameters.

  13. Culturally adaptive mobile agent dialogue to communicate with people in crisis recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, V.; Winterboer, A.; Pavlin, G.; Groen, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present ongoing research concerning the interaction between users and environmental agencies through autonomous mobile agents in the environmental monitoring domain. The overarching EU FP7 project DIADEM, concerns the development of a system that detects potentially hazardous situations in

  14. Adapting a historical dictionary for the modern online user: The case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apart from this, the general layout of the dic-tionary is also being re-evaluated and redesigned to make it more usable on online platforms. To accommodate new users and to bring the DSAEHist into the digital era (with regard to standard web and mobile practices) stylistic, navigational and functional changes are being ...

  15. Mobile technology-based interventions for adult users of alcohol: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Lauren A; Holt, Sidney L; Joshi, Deepti

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, 16% of people aged 15 and older engage in harmful use of alcohol. Harmful alcohol use leads to a host of preventable negative social and health consequences. Mobile technology-based interventions provide a particularly promising avenue for the widespread and cost-effective delivery of treatment that is accessible, affordable, individualized, and destigmatized to both alcohol-dependent and nondependent individuals. The present review sought to summarize the current literature on mobile technology-based interventions among adult users of alcohol and determine the efficacy of such interventions. Five databases were searched in December 2015 (Jan. 2004-Dec. 2015). Inclusion criteria were: participants aged 18 or older, interventions delivered through mobile-technology, and outcome measurement of alcohol reduction/cessation. Eight studies met inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies reviewed found positive effects of the intervention, even though the interventions themselves varied in design, length, dosage, and target population, and were pilot or preliminary in nature. Findings from this review highlight the promising, yet preliminary state of research in this area. Studies with adequate power and valid design are necessary to evaluate the potential of mobile technology-based interventions on long-term alcohol behavior outcomes. Furthermore, future research should elucidate what the most effective length of time is for a mobile technology-based intervention, how often individuals should receive messages for maximum benefit, and determine the comparative effectiveness of mobile technology interventions with other efficacious interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. User Behaviour Before Mobile Phone Disposal and Recycling in the State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Akio Koga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the privatization of the Telebras system in 1998 and the constant development of new technologies, mobile phone consumption picked up in the form of a craze in Brazil to the extent of in 2010 mile stoning 100% density, i.e., more than 190 million units were then in use within the domestic market. On the other hand, it seems appropriate to wonder what happens to this equipment once their lifecycle ends. Sheltered by this context, the prime purpose of this study is not only to evaluate user behaviour in the State of São Paulo in as much as mobile phone disposal and recycling is concerned, but also to contribute with the improvement of the current scenario. To this effect, some aspects of existing Brazilian mobile telephony market post-consumption reverse logistics practices were diagnosed. A quantitative exploratory survey centred on São Paulo State respondents was also conducted so as to pinpoint their behaviour in terms of mobile phone recycling and assess the factors that influence their disposal and recycling. Outcomes unveiled that although 60% of respondents are aware of the fact that mobile phones are recyclable, only 7% have so done with their old phones. Finally, the study sought to contribute with suggested mobile phone market actions so as to increase post-consumption recycling.

  17. An Efficient SDN Load Balancing Scheme Based on Variance Analysis for Massive Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a traditional network, server load balancing is used to satisfy the demand for high data volumes. The technique requires large capital investment while offering poor scalability and flexibility, which difficultly supports highly dynamic workload demands from massive mobile users. To solve these problems, this paper analyses the principle of software-defined networking (SDN and presents a new probabilistic method of load balancing based on variance analysis. The method can be used to dynamically manage traffic flows for supporting massive mobile users in SDN networks. The paper proposes a solution using the OpenFlow virtual switching technology instead of the traditional hardware switching technology. A SDN controller monitors data traffic of each port by means of variance analysis and provides a probability-based selection algorithm to redirect traffic dynamically with the OpenFlow technology. Compared with the existing load balancing methods which were designed to support traditional networks, this solution has lower cost, higher reliability, and greater scalability which satisfy the needs of mobile users.

  18. Utilizing Mobile Sensing to Investigate the Effects of Urban Space on Users Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, I. H.; El Meouche, R.; Khan, A.; Aboud, N.

    2015-10-01

    Space syntax theory was used by many researcher to determine the correlation between people behaviour and urban configuration. However, The data collected for these studies using traditional data collection methods such as questionnaire and interviews, this is associated with inaccurate and biased in data. Wireless devices and smart phones and their sensing capabilities now can be involved in solving several issue. Many mobile applications have been developed with which people are able to keep track of their daily life details. In this research mobile sensing is used to track the location and activities of users in university campuses, the collected data is correlated to space properties to interfere the open space effects on student activities in a university campus. The paper utilize Mobile GPS and accelerometer sensors to sense people behaviour in urban configuration.

  19. The Privacy Calculus: Mobile Apps and User Perceptions of Privacy and Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fife

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A continuing stream of new mobile data services are being released that rely upon the collection of personal data to support a business model. New technologies including facial recognition, sensors and Near Field Communications (NFC will increasingly become a part of everyday services and applications that challenge traditional concepts of individual privacy. The average person as well as the “tech‐savvy” mobile phone user may not yet be fully aware of the extent to which their privacy and security are being affected through their mobile activities and how comparable this situation is to personal computer usage. We investigate perceptions and usage of mobile data services that appear to have specific privacy and security sensitivities, specifically social networking,\tbanking/payments\tand\thealth‐related activities. Our annual survey of smartphone users in the U.S. and Japan is presented from 2011. This nationally representative survey data is used to show demographic and cultural differences, and substantiate our hypotheses about the links between use and privacy concerns

  20. Application-adapted mobile 3D video coding and streaming — A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanwei; Ci, Song; Tang, Hui; Ye, Yun

    2012-03-01

    3D video technologies have been gradually matured to be moved into mobile platforms. In the mobile environments, the specific characteristics of wireless network and mobile device present great challenges for 3D video coding and streaming. The application-adapted mobile 3D video coding and streaming technologies are urgently needed. Based on the mobile 3D video application framework, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art technologies of mobile 3D video coding and streaming. Specifically, the mobile 3D video formats and the corresponding coding methods are firstly reviewed and then the streaming adaptation technologies including 3D video transcoding, 3D video rate control and cross-layer optimized 3D video streaming are surveyed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Mobile phones, non-ionizing radiofrequency fields and brain cancer: is there an adaptive response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Prihoda, Thomas J

    2014-07-01

    There is widespread concern among the general public regarding the ever increasing use of mobile phones. The concern is mainly because the antenna which transmits nonionizing radiofrequency fields is held close to the head during use and thus might cause brain cancer. By far, the largest epidemiological study was conducted by the INTER-PHONE study group and the results were published in 2011. The author's conclusions were (i) no increased risk of meningioma and glioma in mobile phone users and (ii) there were suggestions of an increased risk for glioma at the highest exposure levels but, bias and error prevented a causal interpretation. We have carefully examined all of the odd ratios presented in the INTERPHONE study publication: our results showed 24.3% decreased and 0.7% increased risk for meningioma and 22.1% decreased and 6.6% increased risk for glioma. Hence, we hypothesize that the overwhelming evidence for the decreased risk for both diseases may be due to the induction of 'adaptive response' which is well-documented in scientific literature.

  2. A Comparative Study of Current and Potential Users of Mobile Payment Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchai Phonthanukitithaworn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of mobile payment (m-payment services have primarily focused on a single group of adopters. This study identifies the factors that influence an individual’s intention to use m-payment services and compares groups of current users (adopters with potential users (non-adopters. A research model that reflects the behavioral intention to use m-payment services is developed and empirically tested using structural equation modeling on a data set consisting of 529 potential users and 256 current users of m-payment services in Thailand. The results show that the factors that influence current users’ intentions to use m-payment services are compatibility, subjective norms, perceived trust, and perceived cost. Subjective norms, compatibility, ease of use, and perceived risk influenced potential users’ intentions to use m-payment. Subjective norms and perceived risk had a stronger influence on potential users, while perceived cost had a stronger influence on current users, in terms of their intentions to use m-payment services. Discussions, limitations, and recommendations for future research are addressed.

  3. Evaluating mobile learning practice. Towards a framework for analysis of user-generated contexts with reference to the socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Seipold

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Against the conceptual and theoretical background of a socio-culturally orientated approach to mobile learning (Pachler, Bachmair and Cook, 2010, this paper examines the evaluation of user-generated contexts by referring to an example from the use of mobile phones in schools. We discuss how mobile device-related, user- generated contexts around structures, agency and cultural practices might be brought into a fruitful relationship with institution-based learning. And, we provide categories for evaluating the use of mobile devices to generate meaning from and with fragmented and discontinuous media and modes at the interface of learning in formal, institutionalised and informal, self-directed settings. The evaluation criteria build on the framework of a socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning developed by the London Mobile Learning Group.

  4. A Mobile Phone User Interface for Image-Based Dietary Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ziad; Khanna, Nitin; Kerr, Deborah A; Boushey, Carol J; Delp, Edward J

    2014-02-02

    Many chronic diseases, including obesity and cancer, are related to diet. Such diseases may be prevented and/or successfully treated by accurately monitoring and assessing food and beverage intakes. Existing dietary assessment methods such as the 24-hour dietary recall and the food frequency questionnaire, are burdensome and not generally accurate. In this paper, we present a user interface for a mobile telephone food record that relies on taking images, using the built-in camera, as the primary method of recording. We describe the design and implementation of this user interface while stressing the solutions we devised to meet the requirements imposed by the image analysis process, yet keeping the user interface easy to use.

  5. Efficient Proximity Detection among Mobile Users via SelfTuning Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Hou U, Leong; Saltenis, Simonas

    2010-01-01

    Given a set of users, their friend relationships, and a distance threshold per friend pair, the proximity detection problem is to find each pair of friends such that the Euclidean distance between them is within the given threshold. This problem plays an essential role in friend-locator applicati......Given a set of users, their friend relationships, and a distance threshold per friend pair, the proximity detection problem is to find each pair of friends such that the Euclidean distance between them is within the given threshold. This problem plays an essential role in friend......-locator applications and massively multiplayer online games. Existing proximity detection solutions either incur substantial location update costs or their performance does not scale well to a large number of users. Motivated by this, we present a centralized proximity detection solution that assigns each mobile...

  6. A new user-centered design approach: a hair washing assistive device design for users with shoulder mobility restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fong-Gong; Ma, Min-Yuan; Chang, Ro-Han

    2009-09-01

    This study utilized a user-centered design approach as the foundation for a new Assistive Device (AD) design process. Observation and evaluation results from a Usability Context Analysis (UCA) was used to improve the analysis of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT Analysis) and the matrix of Threats, Opportunities, Weaknesses, and Strengths (TOWS matrix), resulting in two assistive device design methods named AD-SWOT and AD-TOWS. Thus, an AD-design process, tailored for designing assistive devices, was both established and tested. Owing to the information gained from using the design processes and evaluating product efficiency with various cases in the early part of the research, it was decided to use the AD-design process for the entire design process. Using this process, an adjustable hair washer for physically disabled individuals to wash their hair using normal postures was developed. Furthermore, the method derived in this study can also be applied to users suffering from single-sided shoulder-joint mobility disabilities, such as frontal flexion, scapular plan elevation, and restricted abductors.

  7. The user model, vocabulary and logical architecture for adaptive augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Tenemaza Vera, Maritzol; Antonio Jiménez, Angélica de; Ramírez Rodríguez, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Augmented reality is an emerging technology that can support users in their daily life with useful information in real time activities. However, one of the problems identified is the lack of a formal definition of the models required for the development of a A2R system. Therefore our aim is to propose a detailed definition of the User Model required for this type of systems. We explored state of the art ontologies, particularly ontologies, with the objective define the characteristic...

  8. Social sensing of urban land use based on analysis of Twitter users' mobility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Aiman; Soltani, Kiumars; Yin, Junjun; Padmanabhan, Anand; Wang, Shaowen

    2017-01-01

    A number of recent studies showed that digital footprints around built environments, such as geo-located tweets, are promising data sources for characterizing urban land use. However, challenges for achieving this purpose exist due to the volume and unstructured nature of geo-located social media. Previous studies focused on analyzing Twitter data collectively resulting in coarse resolution maps of urban land use. We argue that the complex spatial structure of a large collection of tweets, when viewed through the lens of individual-level human mobility patterns, can be simplified to a series of key locations for each user, which could be used to characterize urban land use at a higher spatial resolution. Contingent issues that could affect our approach, such as Twitter users' biases and tendencies at locations where they tweet the most, were systematically investigated using 39 million geo-located Tweets and two independent datasets of the City of Chicago: 1) travel survey and 2) parcel-level land use map. Our results support that the majority of Twitter users show a preferential return, where their digital traces are clustered around a few key locations. However, we did not find a general relation among users between the ranks of locations for an individual-based on the density of tweets-and their land use types. On the contrary, temporal patterns of tweeting at key locations were found to be coherent among the majority of users and significantly associated with land use types of these locations. Furthermore, we used these temporal patterns to classify key locations into generic land use types with an overall classification accuracy of 0.78. The contribution of our research is twofold: a novel approach to resolving land use types at a higher resolution, and in-depth understanding of Twitter users' location-related and temporal biases, promising to benefit human mobility and urban studies in general.

  9. Social sensing of urban land use based on analysis of Twitter users' mobility patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Soliman

    Full Text Available A number of recent studies showed that digital footprints around built environments, such as geo-located tweets, are promising data sources for characterizing urban land use. However, challenges for achieving this purpose exist due to the volume and unstructured nature of geo-located social media. Previous studies focused on analyzing Twitter data collectively resulting in coarse resolution maps of urban land use. We argue that the complex spatial structure of a large collection of tweets, when viewed through the lens of individual-level human mobility patterns, can be simplified to a series of key locations for each user, which could be used to characterize urban land use at a higher spatial resolution. Contingent issues that could affect our approach, such as Twitter users' biases and tendencies at locations where they tweet the most, were systematically investigated using 39 million geo-located Tweets and two independent datasets of the City of Chicago: 1 travel survey and 2 parcel-level land use map. Our results support that the majority of Twitter users show a preferential return, where their digital traces are clustered around a few key locations. However, we did not find a general relation among users between the ranks of locations for an individual-based on the density of tweets-and their land use types. On the contrary, temporal patterns of tweeting at key locations were found to be coherent among the majority of users and significantly associated with land use types of these locations. Furthermore, we used these temporal patterns to classify key locations into generic land use types with an overall classification accuracy of 0.78. The contribution of our research is twofold: a novel approach to resolving land use types at a higher resolution, and in-depth understanding of Twitter users' location-related and temporal biases, promising to benefit human mobility and urban studies in general.

  10. Perceptions of Smartphone User-Centered Mobile Health Tracking Apps Across Various Chronic Illness Populations: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhoff, Susan D; Smeltzer, Suzanne C

    2017-07-01

    This integrative review presents a synthesis of the current qualitative research addressing the motivating factors, usability, and experiences of mobile health tracking applications (apps) across various chronic disease populations. Integrative review of the literature. Databases used to conduct this integrative review included: PubMed Plus, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Google Scholar, Science Direct, and EBSCO megafile. The following search terms were used in all five databases: smartphone apps, apps, mHealth, eHealth, mobile health apps, health tracking apps, user-centered apps, wireless technology, engagement, qualitative, and usability. The initial literature review yielded 689 results. Once inclusion and exclusion criteria were employed, 11 studies met the criteria set forth for this review. The reviewed studies provided insight into users' perceptions, experiences, and motivations to incorporate smartphone mobile health apps into their daily lives when living with chronic illnesses. This review indicates the growing interest in user-centered mobile health tracking apps, but with little understanding of motivating factors that foster sustained app use. Mobile health tracking apps targeted to users with chronic conditions need to have a high level of usability in order to motivate users to sustain engagement with their mobile health tracking app. User-centered mobile health tracking app technology is being used with increasing frequency to potentially provide individualized support to chronic illness populations. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Adoption of mobile learning among 3g-enabled handheld users using extended technology acceptance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadare Oluwaseun Gbenga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines various constructs of an extended TAM, Technology Acceptance Model, that are theoretically influencing the adoption and acceptability of mobile learning among 3G enabled mobile users. Mobile learning activity- based, used for this study were drawn from behaviourist and “learning and teaching support” educational paradigms. An online and manual survey instruments were used to gather data. The structural equation modelling techniques were then employed to explain the adoption processes of hypothesized research model. A theoretical model ETAM is developed based on TAM. Our result proved that psychometric constructs of TAM can be extended and that ETAM is well suited, and of good pedagogical tool in understanding mobile learning among 3G enabled handheld devices in southwest part of Nigeria. Cognitive constructs, attitude toward m-learning, self-efficacy play significant roles in influencing behavioural intention for mobile learning, of which self-efficacy is the most importance construct. Implications of results and directions for future research are discussed.

  12. AdaM: Adapting Multi-User Interfaces for Collaborative Environments in Real-Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Seonwook; Gebhardt, Christoph; Rädle, Roman

    2018-01-01

    Developing cross-device multi-user interfaces (UIs) is a challenging problem. There are numerous ways in which content and interactivity can be distributed. However, good solutions must consider multiple users, their roles, their preferences and access rights, as well as device capabilities. Manual...... and rule-based solutions are tedious to create and do not scale to larger problems nor do they adapt to dynamic changes, such as users leaving or joining an activity. In this paper, we cast the problem of UI distribution as an assignment problem and propose to solve it using combinatorial optimization. We...

  13. Impact of a Mobile Health Application on User Engagement and Pregnancy Outcomes Among Wyoming Medicaid Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, James; Barlow, Dilek E; Echols, Jennie; Wilkerson, Jasmine; Bellevin, Katherine

    2017-05-08

    Pregnancy and birth outcomes are a critical area of healthcare, yet negative outcomes like C-sections and preterm births remain widespread. Studies show that early and ongoing prenatal care can improve outcomes; however, in-person care is difficult to deliver in rural areas. This article examines the impact of mobile health technology on user engagement and birth outcomes in a Wyoming pilot study. The pilot did face some limitations; namely, the small app user group size and scant demographic information collected from users. Wyoming Medicaid contracted with Xerox State Healthcare to launch WYhealth Due Date Plus, a pregnancy application by Wildflower Health. Pregnant Medicaid members registering for the app and providing a Medicaid ID were assigned to the app user group (N = 85). The non-app user group consisted of other pregnant Medicaid members with delivery outcome records (N = 5,158). Downloads and utilization frequency were tracked to gauge user engagement. Among pregnant Medicaid members, data were collected on app usage and four outcomes of interest-6-month or more prenatal visit, C-section, low birth weight, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission-to examine the association between app use and pregnancy/birth outcomes. Chi-square tests were conducted to analyze associations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to assess potential confounding. Strong user engagement was observed with over 1,730 downloads. App users had a statistically significant association between app usage and completion of a 6-month or more prenatal visit (p = 0.022). There was a borderline significant association between app use and decreased incidence of low birth weight (p = 0.055). Maternal age was not a possible confounder. Preliminary data indicate that Due Date Plus attracted an engaged user base and that app usage was associated with improvements in prenatal visit completion and reduced incidence of low-birth weight delivery. These promising results

  14. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gervasio Varela

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC and Ambient Intelligence (AmI systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  15. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Gervasio; Paz-Lopez, Alejandro; Becerra, Jose A; Duro, Richard

    2016-07-07

    This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC) and Ambient Intelligence (AmI) systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  16. User Evaluation of the MOBOT Rollator Type Robotic Mobility Assistive Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis Koumpouros

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on the evaluation strategy and the results that were obtained from the final end-user evaluation process of an innovative robotic assistive device supporting mobility. More specifically, the paper deals with the evaluation of the MOBOT robotic rollator as regards to the system’s overall performance and its individual assistive characteristics and functionalities, as implemented in respect to (i the provided cognitive assistance, and (ii the adopted audio-gestural human-robot communication model. User evaluation was designed on the basis of an extensive survey of scales and methodologies widely reported in the relevant literature. The actual evaluation phase exploited the QUEST 2.0, ATDPA-Device Form, and PYTHEIA scales to measure the subjective satisfaction of the users. The PYTHEIA scale, in particular, was structured in order to fill the gaps that were identified during the study of previously existing tools for measuring assistive device user satisfaction. The scale was applied for the first time during the reported evaluation process. An analysis of the results showed that MOBOT was ranked very high by end users in all of the aspects addressed by the three employed assessment scales, thus providing significant evidence for positive acceptance of any industrialized outcome of the current prototype in the assistive robots market.

  17. How Users Search the Mobile Web: A Model for Understanding the Impact of Motivation and Context on Search Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study explores how search motivation and context influence mobile Web search behaviors. Design/methodology/approach: We studied 30 experienced mobile Web users via questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, and an online diary tool that participants used to record their daily search activities. SQLite Developer was used to extract data from the users' phone logs for correlation analysis in Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS. Findings: One quarter of mobile search sessions were driven by two or more search motivations. It was especially difficult to distinguish curiosity from time killing in particular user reporting. Multi-dimensional contexts and motivations influenced mobile search behaviors, and among the context dimensions, gender, place, activities they engaged in while searching, task importance, portal, and interpersonal relations (whether accompanied or alone when searching correlated with each other. Research limitations: The sample was comprised entirely of college students, so our findings may not generalize to other populations. More participants and longer experimental duration will improve the accuracy and objectivity of the research. Practical implications: Motivation analysis and search context recognition can help mobile service providers design applications and services for particular mobile contexts and usages. Originality/value: Most current research focuses on specific contexts, such as studies on place, or other contextual influences on mobile search, and lacks a systematic analysis of mobile search context. Based on analysis of the impact of mobile search motivations and search context on search behaviors, we built a multi-dimensional model of mobile search behaviors.

  18. Differences Between Landline and Mobile Phone Users in Sexual Behavior Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Paul B; Patrick, Kent; Smith, Anthony M A; Simpson, Judy M; Pennay, Darren; Rissel, Chris E; de Visser, Richard O; Grulich, Andrew E; Richters, Juliet

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated differences between the demographic characteristics, participation rates (i.e., agreeing to respond to questions about sexual behavior), and sexual behaviors of landline and mobile phone samples in Australia. A nationally representative sample of Australians aged 18 years and over was recruited via random digit dialing in December 2011 to collect data via computer-assisted telephone interviews. A total of 1012 people (370 men, 642 women) completed a landline interview and 1002 (524 men, 478 women) completed a mobile phone interview. Results revealed that telephone user status was significantly related to all demographic variables: gender, age, educational attainment, area of residence, country of birth, household composition, and current ongoing relationship status. In unadjusted analyses, telephone status was also associated with women's participation rates, participants' number of other-sex sexual partners in the previous year, and women's lifetime sexual experience. However, after controlling for significant demographic factors, telephone status was only independently related to women's participation rates. Post hoc analyses showed that significant, between-group differences for all other sexual behavior outcomes could be explained by demographic covariates. Results also suggested that telephone status may be associated with participation bias in research on sexual behavior. Taken together, these findings highlight the importance of sampling both landline and mobile phone users to improve the representativeness of sexual behavior data collected via telephone interviews.

  19. An Authentication Protocol for Mobile IPTV Users Based on an RFID-USB Convergence Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoon-Su; Kim, Yong-Tae

    With the growing trend towards convergence in broadcast and communications media, Internet Protocol television (IPTV) that delivers real-time multimedia content over diverse types of communications networks (e.g., broadband Internet, cable TV, and satellite TV) has become a mainstream technology. Authenticating mobile IPTV subscribers who are continuously on the move is a challenge. A complex authentication process often impairs conditional access security or service quality as increasing illegal users and delaying service. This paper proposes an RFID-USB authentication protocol, for mobile IPTV users, combined with USIM-based personalized authentication and lightweight authentication that utilizes the RFID-USB technology with an implanted agent module (called an "agent tag") which temporarily enhanced user status information. The proposed authentication protocol adopts a plug-and-play security agent module that is placed in both an RFID tag and an RFID-USB. The implanted security agents cooperate in such a way that multiple RFID tags are connected seamlessly to an RFID-USB.

  20. Usability and acceptability by a younger and older user group regarding a mobile robot-supported gait rehabilitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Cornelia; Haesner, Marten; Spranger, Matthias; Kuzmicheva, Olena; Gräser, Axel; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth

    2017-07-12

    The aim of the study was to identify differences regarding usability, acceptability, and barriers of usage of a robot-supported gait rehabilitation system between a younger and older group of patients with gait impairments. A mobile robot-supported gait rehabilitation prototype was tested on a group of geriatric patients aged 60 and above, and on a group of young patients aged 59 and below in a clinical setting during five therapy sessions. The involved therapists received 2 days training with the system and could test it profoundly. Data on usability, acceptability, and barriers to system usage were collected with questionnaires and structured interviews with the patients. The robotic system received overall moderate usability and good acceptability ratings; it was rated as clearly structured, practical, and safe. Analyses identified a few barriers, such as time-intensive setup of the system or tight leg shells, which can be minimized with regular training and system adaptations. Differences between the two user groups could be revealed and will be used for future investigation. This study showed the potential of the mobile robot-supported system for gait rehabilitation, but also pointed out further need for action. Efficacy studies are the next step in the evaluation process.

  1. User modeling and adaptation for daily routines providing assistance to people with special needs

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, Estefanía; Carro, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines is motivated by the need to bring attention to how people with special needs can benefit from adaptive methods and techniques in their everyday lives. Assistive technologies, adaptive systems and context-aware applications are three well-established research fields. There is, in fact, a vast amount of literature that covers HCI-related issues in each area separately. However, the contributions in the intersection of these areas have been less visible, despite the fact that such synergies may have a great impact on improving daily living.Presentin

  2. Modeling and Analyzing Adaptive User-Centric Systems in Real-Time Maude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schroeder

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pervasive user-centric applications are systems which are meant to sense the presence, mood, and intentions of users in order to optimize user comfort and performance. Building such applications requires not only state-of-the art techniques from artificial intelligence but also sound software engineering methods for facilitating modular design, runtime adaptation and verification of critical system requirements. In this paper we focus on high-level design and analysis, and use the algebraic rewriting language Real-Time Maude for specifying applications in a real-time setting. We propose a generic component-based approach for modeling pervasive user-centric systems and we show how to analyze and prove crucial properties of the system architecture through model checking and simulation. For proving time-dependent properties we use Metric Temporal Logic (MTL and present analysis algorithms for model checking two subclasses of MTL formulas: time-bounded response and time-bounded safety MTL formulas. The underlying idea is to extend the Real-Time Maude model with suitable clocks, to transform the MTL formulas into LTL formulas over the extended specification, and then to use the LTL model checker of Maude. It is shown that these analyses are sound and complete for maximal time sampling. The approach is illustrated by a simple adaptive advertising scenario in which an adaptive advertisement display can react to actions of the users in front of the display.

  3. Mobilization and Adaptation of a Rural Cradle-to-Career Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    This case study explored the development of a rural cradle-to-career network with a dual focus on the initial mobilization of network members and subsequent adaptations made to maintain mobilization, while meeting local needs. Data sources included interviews with network members, observations of meetings, and documentary evidence. Network-based…

  4. Adaptive radiointerferometer with microprocessor of a signal in the mobile station of a troposphere communication

    OpenAIRE

    Rudakov, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    In the presentation is decides scientific problem of the application of adaptive radiointerferometer in the mobile station of a troposphere communication by modern realization of digital regimes for two-contours processing of troposphere signals, which is allow to increase signals stability and information reliability of the mobile station.

  5. User evaluation of two electronic mobility aids for persons who are visually impaired: a quasi-experimental study using a standardized mobility course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roentgen, Uta R; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; de Witte, Luc P

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to enhance insight into the functionality, usability, and efficacy of two systematically selected Electronic Mobility Aids (EMA) aimed at obstacle detection and orientation. Eight persons who are visually impaired participated in a user evaluation of the UltraCane and the Miniguide. The participants' mobility performance was observed while completing a standardized indoor mobility course with their regular mobility aid, then with each EMA, and assessed in terms of speed, Percentage Preferred Walking Speed (PPWS), type and number of mobility incidents made. Interviews were administered to ascertain users' satisfaction with the functionality, effectiveness and specific features of the assistive devices. Walking speed and PPWS declined when using an EMA compared to the long cane. The mean total number of previously defined mobility incidents decreased significantly and also the type of mobility incidents changed. Generally, participants were quite satisfied with the use of the EMA, and detailed advantageous as well as disadvantageous aspects concerning functionality and certain features of both devices. The UltraCane and the Miniguide have proven to be effective on an indoor mobility course. Individual users' characteristics and preferences appear to be critical for their appraisal of the devices.

  6. Gaze-X: Adaptive affective multimodal interface for single-user office scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, Ludo; Pantic, Maja

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent system that we developed to support affective multimodal human-computer interaction (AMMHCI) where the user’s actions and emotions are modeled and then used to adapt the HCI and support the user in his or her activity. The proposed system, which we named Gaze-X,

  7. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Background Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the TIMSS 2011 background questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the TIMSS 2011 background variables. Background questionnaire adaptations…

  8. Gaze-X: Adaptive affective, multimodal interface for single-user office scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, L.; Huang, T.S; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pentland, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent system that we developed to support affective multimodal human-computer interaction (AMM-HCI) where the user’s actions and emotions are modeled and then used to adapt the interaction and support the user in his or her activity. The proposed system, which we named

  9. Towards Situation Driven Mobile Tutoring System for Learning Languages and Communication Skills: Application to Users with Specific Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemaja, Maha; Taamallah, Aroua

    2016-01-01

    Current advances in portable devices and wireless technologies had drastically impacted mobile and pervasive computing development and use. Nowadays, mobile and or pervasive applications, are increasingly being used to support users' everyday activities. These apps either distributed or standalone are characterized by the variability of the…

  10. Educational Requirements for Mobile Applications in Nursing: Applying the User-Task-Context Matrix to Identify User Classes and Contexts of Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W; Turner, Paul; Kaipio, Johanna; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications are increasingly being deployed in healthcare and nurses are expected to use them during their education, practice and during training of patients. In this paper we describe how an approach to modelling user needs known as the user-task-context matrix has been applied to help guide in developing requirements for new mobile applications as well as for selecting applications to be used in different aspects of nursing and patient education. The approach involves first brainstorming the different classes of users of an application and then specifying possible tasks the application can be used for. In addition, different contexts of use of the application are then specified. Application of the method is described for improving understanding of user needs in both design and procurement of healthcare apps related to nursing education.

  11. A Framework to Formulate Adaptivity for Adaptive e-Learning System Using User Response Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Dominic; Britto Anthony Xavier; Sagayaraj Francis

    2015-01-01

    These days different e-learning architecture provide different kinds of e-learning experiences due to “one size fits for all” concept. This is no way better than the traditional learning and does not exploit the technological advances. Thus the e-learning system began to evolve to adaptable e-learning systems which adapts or personalizes the learning experience of the learners. Systems infer the characteristics of the learners and identify the preferences of the learners and automatically gen...

  12. User Adaptive and Context-Aware Smart Home Using Pervasive and Semantic Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggeliki Vlachostergiou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous Computing is moving the interaction away from the human-computer paradigm and towards the creation of smart environments that users and things, from the IoT perspective, interact with. User modeling and adaptation is consistently present having the human user as a constant but pervasive interaction introduces the need for context incorporation towards context-aware smart environments. The current article discusses both aspects of the user modeling and adaptation as well as context awareness and incorporation into the smart home domain. Users are modeled as fuzzy personas and these models are semantically related. Context information is collected via sensors and corresponds to various aspects of the pervasive interaction such as temperature and humidity, but also smart city sensors and services. This context information enhances the smart home environment via the incorporation of user defined home rules. Semantic Web technologies support the knowledge representation of this ecosystem while the overall architecture has been experimentally verified using input from the SmartSantander smart city and applying it to the SandS smart home within FIRE and FIWARE frameworks.

  13. A user-centered model for designing consumer mobile health (mHealth) applications (apps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Rojas, Marlene; Bakken, Suzanne; Brown, William; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Carry, Monique; Gelaude, Deborah; Mosley, Jocelyn Patterson; Travers, Jasmine

    2016-04-01

    Mobile technologies are a useful platform for the delivery of health behavior interventions. Yet little work has been done to create a rigorous and standardized process for the design of mobile health (mHealth) apps. This project sought to explore the use of the Information Systems Research (ISR) framework as guide for the design of mHealth apps. Our work was guided by the ISR framework which is comprised of 3 cycles: Relevance, Rigor and Design. In the Relevance cycle, we conducted 5 focus groups with 33 targeted end-users. In the Rigor cycle, we performed a review to identify technology-based interventions for meeting the health prevention needs of our target population. In the Design Cycle, we employed usability evaluation methods to iteratively develop and refine mock-ups for a mHealth app. Through an iterative process, we identified barriers and facilitators to the use of mHealth technology for HIV prevention for high-risk MSM, developed 'use cases' and identified relevant functional content and features for inclusion in a design document to guide future app development. Findings from our work support the use of the ISR framework as a guide for designing future mHealth apps. Results from this work provide detailed descriptions of the user-centered design and system development and have heuristic value for those venturing into the area of technology-based intervention work. Findings from this study support the use of the ISR framework as a guide for future mHealth app development. Use of the ISR framework is a potentially useful approach for the design of a mobile app that incorporates end-users' design preferences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing user acceptance of mandated mobile health information systems: the ePOC (electronic point-of-care project) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Lois; Sargent, Jason

    2007-01-01

    From a clinical perspective, the use of mobile technologies, such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) within hospital environments is not new. A paradigm shift however is underway towards the acceptance and utility of these systems within mobile-based healthcare environments. Introducing new technologies and associated work practices has intrinsic risks which must be addressed. This paper contends that intervening to address user concerns as they arise throughout the system development lifecycle will lead to greater levels of user acceptance, while ultimately enhancing the deliverability of a system that provides a best fit with end user needs. It is envisaged this research will lead to the development of a formalised user acceptance framework based on an agile approach to user acceptance measurement. The results of an ongoing study of user perceptions towards a mandated electronic point-of-care information system in the Northern Illawarra Ambulatory Care Team (TACT) are presented.

  15. Towards User Experience-Driven Adaptive Uplink Video Transmission for Automotive Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lottermann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is to enable user experience-driven uplink video streaming from mobile video sources with limited computational capacity and to apply these to resource-constraint automotive environments. The first part investigates perceptual quality-aware encoding of videos, the second part proposes camera context-based estimators of temporal and spatial activities for videos captured by a front-facing camera of a vehicle, and the last part studies the upstreaming of videos from a m...

  16. A user-centered model for designing consumer mobile health application (apps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Rojas, Marlene; Bakken, Suzanne; Brown, William; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Carry, Monique; Gelaude, Deborah; Mosley, Jocelyn Patterson; Travers, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies are a useful platform for the delivery of health behavior interventions. Yet little work has been done to create a rigorous and standardized process for the design of mobile health (mHealth) apps. This project sought to explore the use of the Information Systems Research (ISR) framework as guide for the design of mHealth apps. Methods Our work was guided by the ISR framework which is comprised of 3 cycles: Relevance, Rigor and Design. In the Relevance cycle, we conducted 5 focus groups with 33 targeted end-users. In the Rigor cycle, we performed a review to identify technology-based interventions for meeting the health prevention needs of our target population. In the ISR Design Cycle, we employed usability evaluation methods to iteratively develop and refine mock-ups for a mHealth app. Results Through an iterative process, we identified barriers and facilitators to the use of mHealth technology for HIV prevention for high-risk MSM, developed ‘use cases’ and identified relevant functional content and features for inclusion in a design document to guide future app development. Findings from our work support the use of the ISR framework as a guide for designing future mHealth apps. Discussion Results from this work provide detailed descriptions of the user-centered design and system development and have heuristic value for those venturing into the area of technology-based intervention work. Findings from this study support the use of the ISR framework as a guide for future mobile health (mHealth) app development. Conclusion Use of the ISR framework is a potentially useful approach for the design of a mobile app that incorporates end-users’ design preferences. PMID:26903153

  17. The biased reptation model of DNA gel electrophoresis: a user guide for constant field mobilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, G W; Mayer, P; Hubert, S J; Drouin, G

    1994-01-01

    The biased reptation model of DNA gel electrophoresis is simple enough to allow one to obtain detailed analytical and numerical predictions for experimentally relevant situations. Although it is not always applicable for explaining experimental results, the biased reptation model is usually a good starting point for data analysis. Unfortunately, the model is often reported as being incapable of explaining experimental data because the users have not analyzed the data properly or because they attempted to use the model outside its expected range of applicability. This article presents a detailed practical guide to the model and its limitations, as well as a complete description of its predictions regarding the analysis of constant field mobilities.

  18. Agent-based user-adaptive service provision in ubiquitous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddiki, H.; Harroud, H.; Karmouch, A.

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing availability of smartphones, tablets and other computing devices, technology consumers have grown accustomed to performing all of their computing tasks anytime, anywhere and on any device. There is a greater need to support ubiquitous connectivity and accommodate users by providing software as network-accessible services. In this paper, we propose a MAS-based approach to adaptive service composition and provision that automates the selection and execution of a suitable composition plan for a given service. With agents capable of autonomous and intelligent behavior, the composition plan is selected in a dynamic negotiation driven by a utility-based decision-making mechanism; and the composite service is built by a coalition of agents each providing a component necessary to the target service. The same service can be built in variations for catering to dynamic user contexts and further personalizing the user experience. Also multiple services can be grouped to satisfy new user needs.

  19. The role of user resistance in the adoption of a mobile data service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Clive; Oh, Hyunok

    2010-12-01

    While prior research has focused predominantly on enabling factors such as perceived usefulness in shaping users' information technology (IT) adoption/usage behaviors, this research explores the role of inhibiting factors such as user resistance to change, and their resultant impact on organizations' methods and systems. We elaborate on the interdependent and asymmetric effects of resistance to usage vis-à-vis usage enablers by postulating that resistance not only has a direct negative effect on IT usage, but also biases enabling factors such as perceived usefulness and intention to use in a negative manner. The resulting model is empirically validated with a longitudinal survey of mobile data service that supports real estate title claim processing by administrators and staff personnel at an Eastern European governmental agency. Our study advances IT usage research by demonstrating the salience of previously ignored inhibiting factors, establishing user resistance as an important construct to consider in IT usage research, and by elaborating the nomological relationships between resistance and current predictors of IT usage. We expect that these findings will provide the basis for a more comprehensive investigation of IT usage inhibitors and for building a theoretical model of user resistance.

  20. Adaptive Control for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots Considering Time Delay and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, Stephen Kofi

    Autonomous control of mobile robots has attracted considerable attention of researchers in the areas of robotics and autonomous systems during the past decades. One of the goals in the field of mobile robotics is development of platforms that robustly operate in given, partially unknown, or unpredictable environments and offer desired services to humans. Autonomous mobile robots need to be equipped with effective, robust and/or adaptive, navigation control systems. In spite of enormous reported work on autonomous navigation control systems for mobile robots, achieving the goal above is still an open problem. Robustness and reliability of the controlled system can always be improved. The fundamental issues affecting the stability of the control systems include the undesired nonlinear effects introduced by actuator saturation, time delay in the controlled system, and uncertainty in the model. This research work develops robustly stabilizing control systems by investigating and addressing such nonlinear effects through analytical, simulations, and experiments. The control systems are designed to meet specified transient and steady-state specifications. The systems used for this research are ground (Dr Robot X80SV) and aerial (Parrot AR.Drone 2.0) mobile robots. Firstly, an effective autonomous navigation control system is developed for X80SV using logic control by combining 'go-to-goal', 'avoid-obstacle', and 'follow-wall' controllers. A MATLAB robot simulator is developed to implement this control algorithm and experiments are conducted in a typical office environment. The next stage of the research develops an autonomous position (x, y, and z) and attitude (roll, pitch, and yaw) controllers for a quadrotor, and PD-feedback control is used to achieve stabilization. The quadrotor's nonlinear dynamics and kinematics are implemented using MATLAB S-function to generate the state output. Secondly, the white-box and black-box approaches are used to obtain a linearized

  1. A Context-Aware Self-Adaptive Fractal Based Generalized Pedagogical Agent Framework for Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulehouache, Soufiane; Maamri, Ramdane; Sahnoun, Zaidi

    2015-01-01

    The Pedagogical Agents (PAs) for Mobile Learning (m-learning) must be able not only to adapt the teaching to the learner knowledge level and profile but also to ensure the pedagogical efficiency within unpredictable changing runtime contexts. Therefore, to deal with this issue, this paper proposes a Context-aware Self-Adaptive Fractal Component…

  2. Green heterogeneous small-cell networks: Toward reducing the CO2 emissions of mobile communications industry using uplink power adaptation

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous small cell networks, or Het- SNets, are considered as a standard part of future mobile networks in which multiple lowpower low-cost user deployed base stations complement the existing macrocell infrastructure. This article proposes an energy-efficient deployment of the cells where the small cell base stations are arranged around the edge of the reference macrocell, and the deployment is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) deployment. The proposed deployment ensures an increase in the network spectral and energy efficiency by facilitating cell edge mobile users with small cells. Moreover, COE deployment guarantees reduction of the carbon footprint of mobile operations by employing adaptive uplink power control. In order to calibrate the reduction in CO2 emissions, this article quantifies the ecological and associated economical impacts of energy savings in the proposed deployment. Simulation results quantify the improvements in CO2 emissions and spectral and energy gains of the proposed COE deployment compared to macro-only networks and typical small cell deployment strategies where small cells are randomly deployed within a given macrocell. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. User-centered development of a smart phone mobile application delivering personalized real-time advice on sun protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Lantz, Kathleen; Buller, Mary Klein

    2013-09-01

    Smart phones are changing health communication for Americans. User-centered production of a mobile application for sun protection is reported. Focus groups (n = 16 adults) provided input on the mobile application concept. Four rounds of usability testing were conducted with 22 adults to develop the interface. An iterative programming procedure moved from a specification document to the final mobile application, named Solar Cell. Adults desired a variety of sun protection advice, identified few barriers to use and were willing to input personal data. The Solar Cell prototype was improved from round 1 (seven of 12 tasks completed) to round 2 (11 of 12 task completed) of usability testing and was interoperable across handsets and networks. The fully produced version was revised during testing. Adults rated Solar Cell as highly user friendly (mean = 5.06). The user-centered process produced a mobile application that should help many adults manage sun safety.

  4. Impact of Primary User Traffic on Adaptive Transmission for Cognitive Radio with Partial Relay Selection

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Anlei

    2012-09-08

    In a cognitive relay system, the secondary user is permitted to transmit data via a relay when licensed frequency bands are detected to be free. Previous studies mainly focus on reducing or limiting the interference of the secondary transmission on the primary users. On the other hand, however, the primary user traffic will also affect the data transmission performance of the secondary users. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the primary user traffic on the bit error rate (BER) of the secondary transmission, when the secondary user adopts adaptive transmission with a relay partially selected. From the numerical results, we can see that the primary user traffic seriously degrades average BER. The worse-link partial selection can perform almost as well as the global selection when the channel conditions of the source-relay links and the relay-destination links differ a lot. In addition, although the relay selection improves the spectral efficiency of the secondary transmission, numerical results show that it only has slight impact on the overall average BER, so that the robustness of the system will not be affected by the relay selection.

  5. How does playing adapted sports affect quality of life of people with mobility limitations? Results from a mixed-method sequential explanatory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté-Leclerc, Félix; Boileau Duchesne, Gabrielle; Bolduc, Patrick; Gélinas-Lafrenière, Amélie; Santerre, Corinne; Desrosiers, Johanne; Levasseur, Mélanie

    2017-01-25

    Occupations, including physical activity, are a strong determinant of health. However, mobility limitations can restrict opportunities to perform these occupations, which may affect quality of life. Some people will turn to adapted sports to meet their need to be involved in occupations. Little is known, however, about how participation in adapted sports affects the quality of life of people with mobility limitations. This study thus aimed to explore the influence of adapted sports on quality of life in adult wheelchair users. A mixed-method sequential explanatory design was used, including a quantitative and a qualitative component with a clinical research design. A total of 34 wheelchair users aged 18 to 62, who regularly played adapted sports, completed the Quality of Life Index (/30). Their scores were compared to those obtained by people of similar age without limitations (general population). Ten of the wheelchair users also participated in individual semi-structured interviews exploring their perceptions regarding how sports-related experiences affected their quality of life. The participants were 9 women and 25 men with paraplegia, the majority of whom worked and played an individual adapted sport (athletics, tennis or rugby) at the international or national level. People with mobility limitations who participated in adapted sports had a quality of life comparable to the group without limitations (21.9 ± 3.3 vs 22.3 ± 2.9 respectively), except for poorer family-related quality of life (21.0 ± 5.3 vs 24.1 ± 4.9 respectively). Based on the interviews, participants reported that the positive effect of adapted sports on the quality of life of people with mobility limitations operates mainly through the following: personal factors (behavior-related abilities and health), social participation (in general and through interpersonal relationships), and environmental factors (society's perceptions and support from the environment). Some contextual

  6. Experimental setup for evaluating an adaptive user interface for teleoperation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Indika B.; Peetha, Srikanth; Abubakar, Shamsudeen; Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser; Cremer, Sven; Popa, Dan O.

    2017-05-01

    A vital part of human interactions with a machine is the control interface, which single-handedly could define the user satisfaction and the efficiency of performing a task. This paper elaborates the implementation of an experimental setup to study an adaptive algorithm that can help the user better tele-operate the robot. The formulation of the adaptive interface and associate learning algorithms are general enough to apply when the mapping between the user controls and the robot actuators is complex and/or ambiguous. The method uses a genetic algorithm to find the optimal parameters that produce the input-output mapping for teleoperation control. In this paper, we describe the experimental setup and associated results that was used to validate the adaptive interface to a differential drive robot from two different input devices; a joystick, and a Myo gesture control armband. Results show that after the learning phase, the interface converges to an intuitive mapping that can help even inexperienced users drive the system to a goal location.

  7. LPTA: Location Predictive and Time Adaptive Data Gathering Scheme with Mobile Sink for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper exploits sink mobility to prolong the lifetime of sensor networks while maintaining the data transmission delay relatively low. A location predictive and time adaptive data gathering scheme is proposed. In this paper, we introduce a sink location prediction principle based on loose time synchronization and deduce the time-location formulas of the mobile sink. According to local clocks and the time-location formulas of the mobile sink, nodes in the network are able to calculate the current location of the mobile sink accurately and route data packets timely toward the mobile sink by multihop relay. Considering that data packets generating from different areas may be different greatly, an adaptive dwelling time adjustment method is also proposed to balance energy consumption among nodes in the network. Simulation results show that our data gathering scheme enables data routing with less data transmission time delay and balance energy consumption among nodes.

  8. Mobilization and Adaptation of a Rural Cradle-to-Career Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Zuckerman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This case study explored the development of a rural cradle-to-career network with a dual focus on the initial mobilization of network members and subsequent adaptations made to maintain mobilization, while meeting local needs. Data sources included interviews with network members, observations of meetings, and documentary evidence. Network-based social capital facilitated mobilization. Where networks were absent and where distrust and different values were evident, mobilization faltered. Three network adaptations were discovered: Special rural community organizing strategies, district-level action planning, and a theory of action focused on out-of-school factors. All three were attributable to the composition of mobilized stakeholders and this network’s rural social geography. These findings illuminate the importance of social geography in the development and advancement of rural cradle-to-career networks.

  9. The Effect of Screen Size on Mobile Phone User Comprehension of Health Information and Application Structure: An Experimental Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghamdi, Ebtisam; Yunus, Faisal; Da'ar, Omar; El-Metwally, Ashraf; Khalifa, Mohamed; Aldossari, Bakheet; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    This research analyzes the impact of mobile phone screen size on user comprehension of health information and application structure. Applying experimental approach, we asked randomly selected users to read content and conduct tasks on a commonly used diabetes mobile application using three different mobile phone screen sizes. We timed and tracked a number of parameters, including correctness, effectiveness of completing tasks, content ease of reading, clarity of information organization, and comprehension. The impact of screen size on user comprehension/retention, clarity of information organization, and reading time were mixed. It is assumed on first glance that mobile screen size would affect all qualities of information reading and comprehension, including clarity of displayed information organization, reading time and user comprehension/retention of displayed information, but actually the screen size, in this experimental research, did not have significant impact on user comprehension/retention of the content or on understanding the application structure. However, it did have significant impact on clarity of information organization and reading time. Participants with larger screen size took shorter time reading the content with a significant difference in the ease of reading. While there was no significant difference in the comprehension of information or the application structures, there were a higher task completion rate and a lower number of errors with the bigger screen size. Screen size does not directly affect user comprehension of health information. However, it does affect clarity of information organization, reading time and user's ability to recall information.

  10. A practical application of CP-ABE for mobile PHR system: a study on the user accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hanshu; Chen, Di; Sun, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Attribute based encryption has been widely applied for secure data protection in PHR systems. However, since different users may share the same attributes in the system, a user may leaks his private key for illegal data sharing without being detected. This will add more threat to the private data stored in PHR system. To help users achieve higher efficiency and more secure data sharing in mobile PHR system, based on previous works, we study the traitor tracing mechanism in attribute based cryptosystem and propose a high efficient attribute based encryption with user accountability in mobile PHR system. If a malicious PHR user exposes his private key for illegal data sharing, his identity can be accurately pinpointed by the system manager. During the whole process of data sharing, no bilinear pairing operations are needed, hence this will the mobile terminal devices from heavy computation burden. As a further study, in this short report, we show that using a novel attribute based encryption with user accountability can help users achieve better efficiency and more secure data sharing in mobile PHR system.

  11. Mobilizing Private Sector Investment in Adaptation to Climate Change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This research aims to address how to expand the spectrum of options available for private sector financing of climate adaptation. It will also explore ways to leverage private finance to scale up adaptation efforts in developing countries. Climate change and the private sector Private sector investment in climate change ...

  12. Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access and Carrierless Amplitude Phase Modulation for Flexible Multi-User Provisioning in 5G Mobile Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Altabas, Jose Antonio; Puerta Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a combined non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and multiband carrierless amplitude phase modulation (multiCAP) scheme is proposed for capacity enhancement of and flexible resource provisioning in 5G mobile networks. The proposed scheme is experimentally evaluated over a W......-band millimeter wave radio-over fiber system. The evaluated NOMACAP system consists of six 1.25 GHz multiCAP bands and two NOMA levels with quadrature phase shift keying and can provide an aggregated transmission rate of 30 Gbit/s. The proposed system can dynamically adapt to different user densities and data...

  13. Development and Validation of the User Version of the Mobile Application Rating Scale (uMARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Stoyan R; Hides, Leanne; Kavanagh, David J; Wilson, Hollie

    2016-06-10

    The Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) provides a reliable method to assess the quality of mobile health (mHealth) apps. However, training and expertise in mHealth and the relevant health field is required to administer it. This study describes the development and reliability testing of an end-user version of the MARS (uMARS). The MARS was simplified and piloted with 13 young people to create the uMARS. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the uMARS was then examined in a second sample of 164 young people participating in a randomized controlled trial of a mHealth app. App ratings were collected using the uMARS at 1-, 3,- and 6-month follow up. The uMARS had excellent internal consistency (alpha = .90), with high individual alphas for all subscales. The total score and subscales had good test-retest reliability over both 1-2 months and 3 months. The uMARS is a simple tool that can be reliably used by end-users to assess the quality of mHealth apps.

  14. Prediction of Speech Recognition in Cochlear Implant Users by Adapting Auditory Models to Psychophysical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svante Stadler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Users of cochlear implants (CIs vary widely in their ability to recognize speech in noisy conditions. There are many factors that may influence their performance. We have investigated to what degree it can be explained by the users' ability to discriminate spectral shapes. A speech recognition task has been simulated using both a simple and a complex models of CI hearing. The models were individualized by adapting their parameters to fit the results of a spectral discrimination test. The predicted speech recognition performance was compared to experimental results, and they were significantly correlated. The presented framework may be used to simulate the effects of changing the CI encoding strategy.

  15. A novel smartphone ophthalmic imaging adapter: User feasibility studies in Hyderabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Cassie A; Murthy, Somasheila I; Pappuru, Rajeev R; Jais, Alexandre; Myung, David J; Chang, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the ability of ancillary health staff to use a novel smartphone imaging adapter system (EyeGo, now known as Paxos Scope) to capture images of sufficient quality to exclude emergent eye findings. Secondary aims were to assess user and patient experiences during image acquisition, interuser reproducibility, and subjective image quality. The system captures images using a macro lens and an indirect ophthalmoscopy lens coupled with an iPhone 5S. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 229 consecutive patients presenting to L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. Primary outcome measure was mean photographic quality (FOTO-ED study 1-5 scale, 5 best). 210 patients and eight users completed surveys assessing comfort and ease of use. For 46 patients, two users imaged the same patient's eyes sequentially. For 182 patients, photos taken with the EyeGo system were compared to images taken by existing clinic cameras: a BX 900 slit-lamp with a Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera and an FF 450 plus Fundus Camera with VISUPAC™ Digital Imaging System. Images were graded post hoc by a reviewer blinded to diagnosis. Nine users acquired 719 useable images and 253 videos of 229 patients. Mean image quality was ≥ 4.0/5.0 (able to exclude subtle findings) for all users. 8/8 users and 189/210 patients surveyed were comfortable with the EyeGo device on a 5-point Likert scale. For 21 patients imaged with the anterior adapter by two users, a weighted κ of 0.597 (95% confidence interval: 0.389-0.806) indicated moderate reproducibility. High level of agreement between EyeGo and existing clinic cameras (92.6% anterior, 84.4% posterior) was found. The novel, ophthalmic imaging system is easily learned by ancillary eye care providers, well tolerated by patients, and captures high-quality images of eye findings.

  16. A novel smartphone ophthalmic imaging adapter: User feasibility studies in Hyderabad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Cassie A; Murthy, Somasheila I; Pappuru, Rajeev R; Jais, Alexandre; Myung, David J; Chang, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: To evaluate the ability of ancillary health staff to use a novel smartphone imaging adapter system (EyeGo, now known as Paxos Scope) to capture images of sufficient quality to exclude emergent eye findings. Secondary aims were to assess user and patient experiences during image acquisition, interuser reproducibility, and subjective image quality. Materials and Methods: The system captures images using a macro lens and an indirect ophthalmoscopy lens coupled with an iPhone 5S. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 229 consecutive patients presenting to L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. Primary outcome measure was mean photographic quality (FOTO-ED study 1–5 scale, 5 best). 210 patients and eight users completed surveys assessing comfort and ease of use. For 46 patients, two users imaged the same patient's eyes sequentially. For 182 patients, photos taken with the EyeGo system were compared to images taken by existing clinic cameras: a BX 900 slit-lamp with a Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera and an FF 450 plus Fundus Camera with VISUPAC™ Digital Imaging System. Images were graded post hoc by a reviewer blinded to diagnosis. Results: Nine users acquired 719 useable images and 253 videos of 229 patients. Mean image quality was ≥ 4.0/5.0 (able to exclude subtle findings) for all users. 8/8 users and 189/210 patients surveyed were comfortable with the EyeGo device on a 5-point Likert scale. For 21 patients imaged with the anterior adapter by two users, a weighted κ of 0.597 (95% confidence interval: 0.389–0.806) indicated moderate reproducibility. High level of agreement between EyeGo and existing clinic cameras (92.6% anterior, 84.4% posterior) was found. Conclusion: The novel, ophthalmic imaging system is easily learned by ancillary eye care providers, well tolerated by patients, and captures high-quality images of eye findings. PMID:27146928

  17. A Novel Mobile Communications Authentication Scheme with Roaming Service and User Anonymity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many novel, effective, and efficient applications and networking services are being developed for the Social Internet of Things. Recently, Li proposed a more secure and efficient authentication scheme with roaming service and user anonymity for mobile communications. The security analysis and discussion of the agreement phase is sufficiently safe; however, an attacker can intercept the identity of a mobile user’s home agent in the authentication phase. By using this information, the attacker can mount distributed denial-of-service attacks in the roaming phase through replay attacks targeting the network’s foreign agent and mobile user’s home agent by using their corresponding session keys. Li’s method also has some shortcomings regarding anonymity that we aim to address. To overcome these issues, this study proposes an elliptic curve–based wireless roaming anonymous login method for the authentication phase. The problems faced in the roaming phase are resolved, and this approach provides balanced session key computation between senders and receivers. Burrows-Abadi-Needham logic (BAN-logic is used to verify the security of the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme affords good security, efficiency, and integrity and maintains anonymity.

  18. Fingerprint Quality Evaluation in a Novel Embedded Authentication System for Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Vitello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The way people access resources, data and services, is radically changing using modern mobile technologies. In this scenario, biometry is a good solution for security issues even if its performance is influenced by the acquired data quality. In this paper, a novel embedded automatic fingerprint authentication system (AFAS for mobile users is described. The goal of the proposed system is to improve the performance of a standard embedded AFAS in order to enable its employment in mobile devices architectures. The system is focused on the quality evaluation of the raw acquired fingerprint, identifying areas of poor quality. Using this approach, no image enhancement process is needed after the fingerprint acquisition phase. The Agility RC2000 board has been used to prototype the embedded device. Due its different image resolution and quality, the experimental tests have been conducted on both PolyU and FVC2002 DB2-B free databases. Experimental results show an interesting trade-off between used resources, authentication time, and accuracy rate. The best achieved false acceptance rate (FAR and false rejection rate (FRR indexes are 0% and 6.25%, respectively. The elaboration time is 62.6 ms with a working frequency of 50 MHz.

  19. Exploiting metadata, ontologies and semantics to design/enhance new end-user experiences for adaptive pervasive computing environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Soylu, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Systems and Pervasive Computing change the face of computing and redefine the way people interact with the technology. Pioneers pursue a vision that technology is seamlessly situated in people’s life and adapts itself to the characteristics, requirements, and needs of the users and the environment without any distraction at the user side. Adaptive Systems research mostly focuses on individual applications that can alter their interface, behavior, presentation etc. mainly with respect...

  20. Proximal Design: Users as Designers of Mobility in the Russian North.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenyuk, Svetlana; Hyysalo, Sampsa; Whalen, Jack

    By examining mobility in remote Arctic areas, we analyze how challenging environmental conditions, while affecting technology performance, evoke people's creativity and efforts as technology users. Based on historical materials and ethnographic observations of user inventiveness in the transport sector in the Russian North, we define and document a phenomenon of "proximal design" in three different modes: the proximal complementation of "distant design" machines (trucks and military equipment) to ascertain their reliability; the emergence of a new type of homemade all-terrain vehicle called a "karakat," made from salvaged parts to specialize in times and locations where other vehicles turn unreliable; and the traditional craft of sledge-making by nomadic reindeer herders of the Yamal area, where even materials are proximally collected and shaped. Our main argument is that continuous tuning, modification, and redesign of technology carried out by immediate users in situ make it possible for humans and machines to function in extreme settings and that this can lead also to emergence of enduring design principles. We outline key characteristics of proximal design such as constraining environment, inventiveness by necessity, flexible construction, personalization and symbolic meaning, and social embeddedness of making/maintaining practices.

  1. Adapted User-Centered Design: A Strategy for the Higher User Acceptance of Innovative e-Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Dinevski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Being familiar with all the benefits of e-Health and the strategic plan for the Slovenian health sector’s informatization, Telekom Slovenia and the Faculty of Medicine from the University of Maribor, along with other partners, have initiated an e-Health project. The project group is developing various e-Health services that are based on modern ICT (information and communications technology solutions and will be available on several screens. In order to meet the users’ needs and expectations and, consequently, achieve the high acceptance of e-Health services, the user-centered design (UCD approach was employed in the e-Health project. However, during the research it was found that conventional UCD methods are not completely appropriate for older adults: the target population of the e-Health services. That is why the selected UCD methods were modified and adapted for older adults. The modified UCD methods used in the research study are presented in this paper. Using the results of the adapted UCD methods, a prototype for a service named MedReminder was developed. The prototype was evaluated by a group of 12 study participants. The study participants evaluated the MedReminder service as acceptable with a good potential for a high adoption rate among its target population, i.e., older adults.

  2. Genetic algorithm approach for adaptive power and subcarrier allocation in multi-user OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Y. B.; Naraghi-Pour, Mort

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, a novel genetic algorithm application is proposed for adaptive power and subcarrier allocation in multi-user Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems. To test the application, a simple genetic algorithm was implemented in MATLAB language. With the goal of minimizing the overall transmit power while ensuring the fulfillment of each user's rate and bit error rate (BER) requirements, the proposed algorithm acquires the needed allocation through genetic search. The simulations were tested for BER 0.1 to 0.00001, data rate of 256 bit per OFDM block and chromosome length of 128. The results show that genetic algorithm outperforms the results in [3] in subcarrier allocation. The convergence of GA model with 8 users and 128 subcarriers performs better in power requirement compared to that in [4] but converges more slowly.

  3. Wheeled-mobility correlates of life-space and social participation in adult manual wheelchair users aged 50 and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Brodie M; Routhier, François; Miller, William C

    2017-08-01

    To characterize the life-space mobility and social participation of manual wheelchair users using objective measures of wheeled mobility. Individuals (n = 49) were included in this cross-sectional study if they were aged 50 or older, community-dwelling and used their wheelchair on a daily basis for the past 6 months. Life-space mobility and social participation were measured using the life-space assessment and late-life disability instrument. The wheeled mobility variables (distance travelled, occupancy time, number of bouts) were captured using a custom-built data logger. After controlling for age and sex, multivariate regression analyses revealed that the wheeled mobility variables accounted for 24% of the life-space variance. The number of bouts variable, however, did not account for any appreciable variance above and beyond the occupancy time and distance travelled. Occupancy time and number of bouts were significant predictors of social participation and accounted for 23% of the variance after controlling for age and sex. Occupancy time and distance travelled are statistically significant predictors of life-space mobility. Lower occupancy time may be an indicative of travel to more distant life-spaces, whereas the distance travelled is likely a better reflection of mobility within each life-space. Occupancy time and number of bouts are significant predictors of participation frequency. Implications for rehabilitation Component measures of wheelchair mobility, such as distance travelled, occupancy time and number of bouts, are important predictors of life-space mobility and social participation in adult manual wheelchair users. Lower occupancy time is an indication of travel to more distant life-spaces, whereas distance travelled is likely a better reflection of mobility within each life-space. That lower occupancy time and greater number of bouts are associated with more frequent participation raises accessibility and safety issues for manual wheelchair

  4. Adaptive dynamic capacity borrowing in road-covering mobile networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ule, A.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Li, W.; Pan, Y.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces adaptive dynamic capacity borrowing strategies for wireless networks covering a road. In a F/TDMA-based model, road traffic prediction models are used to characterise the movement of hot spots, such as traffic jams, and subsequently to predict the teletraffic load offered to

  5. Mobilizing the Private Sector for Adaptation Finance | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Private-sector finance has been widely seen as a step to scale up access to resources in order to respond to climate change, but researchers have paid little attention to how the private sector is responding to the risks and opportunities from climate change adaptation. This research project will help fill that gap. Engaging ...

  6. Preventive effects of stretching and stabilization exercises on muscle fatigue in mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Young; Yeun, Young-Ran; Kim, Sung-Joong

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of stretching and stabilization exercises on muscle fatigue of the neck erector spine and upper trapezius muscles. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 healthy university students (14 males and 12 females). Each subject was assigned randomly to each of three study groups in order to prevent order effect. The three groups included in this study were the no-exercise, stretching exercise, and neck stabilization exercise groups. The median electromyographic frequency was used as a gauge of muscle fatigue. [Results] Decreased muscle fatigue was demonstrated by an increase in the median electromyographic frequency values in all the four muscle groups in the comparison between conditions 1 and 3. In particular, statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions in the right upper trapezius muscle group. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the effect of stretching and stabilization exercises can reduce muscle fatigue in mobile phone users.

  7. Weather Effects on the Patterns of People's Everyday Activities: A Study Using GPS Traces of Mobile Phone Users

    OpenAIRE

    Horanont, Teerayut; Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W.; Sekimoto, Yoshihide; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eate...

  8. A mobile communication device adapted to provide a dynamic display arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to a mobile communication device comprising a light projector adapted to project a multi-coloured image onto a surface; a hinged mirror comprising a first mirror part adapted to be tilted around the hinge into the light path of the light projector; wherein the first mirror...... part comprises means for correcting a skew angle in the multi-coloured image projected onto a surface. Thereby is achieved that the mobile communication device is able to provide RGB full colour dynamic image projection which is preferred over monochromatic laser projection because it is a speckle free...... and eye-friendly projection....

  9. Sliding-mode adaptive control of Pioneer 3-DX wheeled mobile robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian FILIPESCU

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Parameter identification scheme and discrete-time adaptive sliding-mode controller applied to Pioneer 3-DX wheeled mobile robot (WMR are presented in this paper. The dynamical model for mobile robot with one pair of active wheels, time–varying mass and moment of inertia have been used in sliding-mode control. Two closed-loop, on-line parameter estimators have been used in order to achieve robustness against parameter uncertainties (robot mass and moment of inertia. Two sliding-mode adaptive controllers corresponding to angular and position motion have been designed. Closed-loop circular trajectory tracking Pioneer 3-DX real-time control is presented.

  10. SMR-Based Adaptive Mobility Management Scheme in Hierarchical SIP Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KwangHee Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In hierarchical SIP networks, paging is performed to reduce location update signaling cost for mobility management. However, the cost efficiency largely depends on each mobile node’s session-to-mobility-ratio (SMR, which is defined as a ratio of the session arrival rate to the movement rate. In this paper, we propose the adaptive mobility management scheme that can determine the policy regarding to each mobile node’s SMR. Each mobile node determines whether the paging is applied or not after comparing its SMR with the threshold. In other words, the paging is applied to a mobile node when a mobile node’s SMR is less than the threshold. Therefore, the proposed scheme provides a way to minimize signaling costs according to each mobile node’s SMR. We find out the optimal threshold through performance analysis, and show that the proposed scheme can reduce signaling cost than the existing SIP and paging schemes in hierarchical SIP networks.

  11. An adaptive actuator failure compensation scheme for two linked 2WD mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yajie; Al-Dujaili, Ayad; Cocquempot, Vincent; El Badaoui El Najjar, Maan

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a new adaptive compensation control scheme for two linked mobile robots with actuator failurs. A configuration with two linked two-wheel drive (2WD) mobile robots is proposed, and the modelling of its kinematics and dynamics are given. An adaptive failure compensation scheme is developed to compensate actuator failures, consisting of a kinematic controller and a multi-design integration based dynamic controller. The kinematic controller is a virtual one, and based on which, multiple adaptive dynamic control signals are designed which covers all possible failure cases. By combing these dynamic control signals, the dynamic controller is designed, which ensures system stability and asymptotic tracking properties. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  12. Studying user experience: issues and problems of mobile services:– Case ADAMOS: User experience (im)possible to catch?

    OpenAIRE

    Arhippainen, L. (Leena)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract User experience has become a popular term in research and industry. There has been a great attempt to study and design user experiences. This thesis gives a practical view to user experience studies and methods by reporting test settings and results of the ADAMOS case studies. The goal of the ADAMOS project was to investigate context- and action-sensitive services in terms of how users experience when the system can detect one’s location and actions, and then adjust according to t...

  13. Mobilizing Private Sector Investment in Adaptation to Climate Change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    La modélisation intégrée des changements climatiques et les liens entre la recherche et les politiques pour une planification adaptative. Les changements climatiques influencent la fréquence et l'intensité des phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes, exposant à la fois les populations et les économies à des pertes de vie, ...

  14. Free mobile apps on depression for Indian users: A brief overview and critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Mehrotra, Seema

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the nature of mobile apps available to Indian android phone users who might search for free apps to help them deal with depression. The specific objectives were to examine the available interactive self-care apps in terms of guidance provided to users to make decisions regarding use of app, inclusion of elements that encourage professional help-seeking, guidance regarding managing psychological crisis and the range of therapeutic strategies incorporated. Using the search term 'depression', 278 apps were identified in the first step and these spanned a wide range of categories. Information on coping with depression and stand alone screening tools formed the two largest types of free apps. Features of interactive self-care apps (N = 33) were reviewed further and this exercise showed that less than 10% of the apps incorporated explicit delineation of their scope or initial screening for suitability. Guidance regarding managing suicidal crisis were incorporated in only about 12% of the interactive apps. Slightly more than one third of these apps included content aimed at encouraging professional help seeking when needed or an explicit mention of their theoretical or empirical basis. Monitoring moods, thoughts and behaviors were the commonest therapeutic strategies incorporated in these apps, in addition, to a wide range of other strategies such as behavioral activation, identifying and correcting cognitive errors, mindfulness exercises, cultivation of gratitude, and medication management. The challenges for a potential user of these apps are discussed and ways to address the same are highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Going to where the users are! Making the collaborative resource management and science workspace mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, D.; Osti, A.

    2013-12-01

    People are very busy today and getting stakeholders the information they need is an important part of our jobs. The BDL application is the mobile extension of the California collaborative resource management portal www.baydeltalive.com. BDL has been visited by more than 250,000 unique visitors this past year from various areas of water use and management including state and federal agencies, agriculture, scientists, policy makers, water consumers, voters, operations management and more. The audience is a qualified user group of more than 15,000 individuals participating in California hydrological ecosystem science, water management and policy. This is an important effort aimed to improve how scientists and policy makers are working together to understand this complicated and divisive system and how they are becoming better managers of that system. The BayDetaLive mobile application gives California watershed management stakeholders and water user community unprecedented access to real time natural resource management information. The application provides user with the following: 1. Access to Real Time Environmental Conditions from the more than the 600 California Data Exchange Sensors including hydrodynamic, water quality and meteorological data. Save important stations as favorites for easy access later. 2. Daily Delta Operations Data including estimated hydrology, daily exports, status of infrastructure operations, reservoir storage, salvage data, major stations, drinking water quality reports, weather forecasts and more. 3. Photos/Videos/Documents: Browse and share from the more than 1000 current documents in the BDL library. Relevant images, videos, science journals, presentations and articles. 4. Science: Access the latest science articles, news, projects and journals. 5. Data Visualizations: View recently published real time data interpolations of Delta Conditions. From 30-day turbidity models to daily forecasts. This service is published as conditions

  16. Construct Validity of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-M) in Adults With Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; Morgan, Sara J; Amtmann, Dagmar; Salem, Rana; Gailey, Robert S

    2017-02-01

    To assess construct validity of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility (PLUS-M), a self-report mobility measure for people with lower limb amputation (LLA). Cross-sectional study. Private prosthetic clinics (n=37). Current lower limb prosthesis users (N=199; mean age ± SD, 55.4±14.3y; 71.4% men) were assessed before receiving a replacement prosthesis, prosthetic socket, and/or prosthetic knee. Not applicable. Convergent construct validity was examined using correlations between participants' PLUS-M T-scores and measures of physical function, mobility, and balance, including the Amputee Mobility Predictor (AMP), timed Up and Go (TUG), Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Physical Function (PROMIS-PF), Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire-Mobility Subscale (PEQ-MS), and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Known-groups construct validity was evaluated by comparing differences in PLUS-M T-scores among participants grouped by Medicare Functional Classification Level (MFCL). PLUS-M T-scores demonstrated a moderate positive relationship with AMP scores (ρ=.54, Pprosthetic mobility. Correlations between PLUS-M and measures of physical function, mobility, and balance indicate convergent construct validity. Similarly, significant differences in PLUS-M T-scores across MFCL groups provide evidence of known-groups construct validity. In summary, evidence indicates that PLUS-M has good construct validity among people with LLA. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ISLAND: Interactive solution language for an adaptive NIKE driver. User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, B.E.; Whirley, R.G.

    1991-10-01

    Effective solution strategies to solve the global nonlinear equations are a vital part of an implicit nonlinear finite element analysis code such as NIKE2D. Efficient strategies make good use of computational resources, and allow larger and more complex analysis models to be studied. Robust algorithms are essential to handle the complex nonlinearities which arise in many engineering applications, such as metalforming process simulation. Our research indicates that robustness can be best achieved through adaptive solution strategies. This adaptivity and flexibility has recently been incorporated into NIKE2D. Temporal and algorithmic adaptivity is achieved through the development of ISLAND (Interactive Solution Language for an Adaptive Nike Driver). This report serves as a User Manual for the ISLAND language and its application to the definition of adaptive solution strategies in NIKE2D. ISLAND substantially improves the robustness of NIKE2D when solving strongly nonlinear problems. In addition, ISLAND allows new classes of constrained problems to be solved which could not previously be studied. Applications span many process simulation problems, including superplastic forming. These new solution control features make NIKE2D a ``smart code,`` and permit many new and challenging problems to be addressed.

  18. Impacts of Different Mobile User Interfaces on Students’ Satisfaction for Learning Dijkstra’s Shortest Path Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Seraj

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental study of learning Dijkstra’s shortest path algorithm on mobile devices. The aim of the study is to investigate and compare the impacts of two different mobile screen user interfaces on students’ satisfaction for learning the technical subject. A mobile learning prototype was developed for learning Dijkstra’s shortest path algorithm on Apple iPhone 4 operated on iPhone operating system (iOS, and Acer Inconia Tab operated on an Android operating system. Thirty students, who are either currently studying or had previously studied Computer Networks, were recruited for the usability trial. At the end of each single session, students’ satisfaction interacting with the two mobile devices was measured using QUIS questionnaire. Although there is no significant difference in students’ satisfaction between the two different mobile screen interfaces, the subjective findings indicate that Acer Inconia Tab gained higher scores as compared to Apple iPhone 4.

  19. Map-based mobile services design, interaction and usability

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Liqiu; Winter, Stephan; Popovich, Vasily

    2008-01-01

    This book reports the newest research and technical achievements on the following theme blocks: Design of mobile map services and its constraints; Typology and usability of mobile map services; Visualization solutions on small displays for time-critical tasks; Mobile map users; Interaction and adaptation in mobile environments; and Applications of map-based mobile services.

  20. A novel smartphone ophthalmic imaging adapter: User feasibility studies in Hyderabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassie A Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: To evaluate the ability of ancillary health staff to use a novel smartphone imaging adapter system (EyeGo, now known as Paxos Scope to capture images of sufficient quality to exclude emergent eye findings. Secondary aims were to assess user and patient experiences during image acquisition, interuser reproducibility, and subjective image quality. Materials and Methods: The system captures images using a macro lens and an indirect ophthalmoscopy lens coupled with an iPhone 5S. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 229 consecutive patients presenting to L. V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. Primary outcome measure was mean photographic quality (FOTO-ED study 1–5 scale, 5 best. 210 patients and eight users completed surveys assessing comfort and ease of use. For 46 patients, two users imaged the same patient's eyes sequentially. For 182 patients, photos taken with the EyeGo system were compared to images taken by existing clinic cameras: a BX 900 slit-lamp with a Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera and an FF 450 plus Fundus Camera with VISUPAC™ Digital Imaging System. Images were graded post hoc by a reviewer blinded to diagnosis. Results: Nine users acquired 719 useable images and 253 videos of 229 patients. Mean image quality was ≥ 4.0/5.0 (able to exclude subtle findings for all users. 8/8 users and 189/210 patients surveyed were comfortable with the EyeGo device on a 5-point Likert scale. For 21 patients imaged with the anterior adapter by two users, a weighted κ of 0.597 (95% confidence interval: 0.389–0.806 indicated moderate reproducibility. High level of agreement between EyeGo and existing clinic cameras (92.6% anterior, 84.4% posterior was found. Conclusion: The novel, ophthalmic imaging system is easily learned by ancillary eye care providers, well tolerated by patients, and captures high-quality images of eye findings.

  1. Methods of Adapting Digital Content for the Learning Process via Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J. L. Gimenez; Royo, T. Magal; Laborda, Jesus Garcia; Calvo, F. Garde

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses different methods of adapting digital content for its delivery via mobile devices taking into account two aspects which are a fundamental part of the learning process; on the one hand, functionality of the contents, and on the other, the actual controlled navigation requirements that the learner needs in order to acquire high…

  2. Adaptive end-to-end optimization of mobile video streaming using QoS negotiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, Jacco R.; Langendoen, Koen; van der Schaaf, Arjen; van Dijk, H.W.; Lagendijk, R. (Inald) L.

    Video streaming over wireless links is a non-trivial problem due to the large and frequent changes in the quality of the underlying radio channel combined with latency constraints. We believe that every layer in a mobile system must be prepared to adapt its behavior to its environment. Thus layers

  3. Modeling and Simulation of An Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) for Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hmouz, A.; Shen, Jun; Al-Hmouz, R.; Yan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    With recent advances in mobile learning (m-learning), it is becoming possible for learning activities to occur everywhere. The learner model presented in our earlier work was partitioned into smaller elements in the form of learner profiles, which collectively represent the entire learning process. This paper presents an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy…

  4. Adaptive Power Saving Method for Mobile Walking Guidance Device Using Motion Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognize the motion of the user and the surrounding environment with multiple sensors. We developed a guidance system based on mobile device for visually impaired person that helps the user to walk safely to the destination in the previous study. However, a mobile device having multiple sensors spends more power when the sensors are activated simultaneously and continuously. We propose a method for reducing the power consumption of a mobile device by considering the motion context of the user. We analyze and classify the user’s motion accurately by means of a decision tree and HMM (Hidden Markov Model that exploit the data from a triaxial accelerometer sensor and a tilt sensor. We can reduce battery power consumption by controlling the number of active ultrasonic sensors and the frame rate of the camera used to acquire spatial context around the user. This helps us to extend the operating time of the device and reduce the weight of the device’s built-in battery.

  5. Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kurapati, Shalini; Lukosch, Heide; Specht, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses how multi-user mobile games can be beneficial to educational scenarios. It does so in several steps: Firstly, we introduce the field of logistics as a problem domain for an educational challenge. Secondly, we describe the design of an educational board game for the field of

  6. Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kurapati, Shalini; Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Klemke, R., Kurapati, S., & Kolfschoten, G. (2013, 6 June). Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness. Presentation at the 3rd Irish Symposium on Game Based Learning, Dublin, Ireland. Please see also

  7. Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Kurapati, Shalini; Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Klemke, R., Kurapati, S., & Kolfschoten, G. (2013, 6 June). Transferring an educational board game to a multi-user mobile learning game to increase shared situational awareness. In P. Rooney (Ed.), Proceedings of the 3rd Irish Symposium on Game Based Learning (pp. 8-9). Dublin, Ireland. Please see

  8. An international prospective cohort study of mobile phone users and health (COSMOS): Factors affecting validity of self-reported mobile phone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Mireille B; Auvinen, Anssi; Tettamanti, Giorgio; Cao, Yang; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Fremling, Karin; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Kojo, Katja; Knowles, Gemma; Smith, Rachel B; Schüz, Joachim; Johansen, Christoffer; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Deltour, Isabelle; Vermeulen, Roel; Kromhout, Hans; Elliott, Paul; Hillert, Lena

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates validity of self-reported mobile phone use in a subset of 75 993 adults from the COSMOS cohort study. Agreement between self-reported and operator-derived mobile call frequency and duration for a 3-month period was assessed using Cohen's weighted Kappa (κ). Sensitivity and specificity of both self-reported high (≥10 calls/day or ≥4h/week) and low (≤6 calls/week or mobile phone use were calculated, as compared to operator data. For users of one mobile phone, agreement was fair for call frequency (κ=0.35, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.36) and moderate for call duration (κ=0.50, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.50). Self-reported low call frequency and duration demonstrated high sensitivity (87% and 76% respectively), but for high call frequency and duration sensitivity was lower (38% and 56% respectively), reflecting a tendency for greater underestimation than overestimation. Validity of self-reported mobile phone use was lower in women, younger age groups and those reporting symptoms during/shortly after using a mobile phone. This study highlights the ongoing value of using self-report data to measure mobile phone use. Furthermore, compared to continuous scale estimates used by previous studies, categorical response options used in COSMOS appear to improve validity considerably, most likely by preventing unrealistically high estimates from being reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Translation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Danish Version: Wheelchair Users Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Bruun, Poul; S Hansen, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Translation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Danish Version: Wheelchair Users Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI). Larsen CM1,2; Hansen SS2; Hansen LH2; Bruun P1; Juul-Kristensen B1,3. 1Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark. 2Health Sciences Research...... interviewing of eleven participants (26-63 years, n=1 woman) with SCI. Results The translation processes revealed minor discrepancies concerning wording and understanding in few items. After minor revision the expert committee agreed on a preliminary version for cognitive interviewing. The questionnaire...

  10. Does a Mobile Phone Depression-Screening App Motivate Mobile Phone Users With High Depressive Symptoms to Seek a Health Care Professional's Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    BinDhim, Nasser F; Alanazi, Eman M; Aljadhey, Hisham; Basyouni, Mada H; Kowalski, Stefan R; Pont, Lisa G; Shaman, Ahmed M; Trevena, Lyndal; Alhawassi, Tariq M

    2016-06-27

    The objective of disease screening is to encourage high-risk subjects to seek health care diagnosis and treatment. Mobile phone apps can effectively screen mental health conditions, including depression. However, it is not known how effective such screening methods are in motivating users to discuss the obtained results of such apps with health care professionals. Does a mobile phone depression-screening app motivate users with high depressive symptoms to seek health care professional advice? This study aimed to address this question. This was a single-cohort, prospective, observational study of a free mobile phone depression app developed in English and released on Apple's App Store. Apple App Store users (aged 18 or above) in 5 countries, that is, Australia, Canada, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States (US), were recruited directly via the app's download page. The participants then completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and their depression screening score was displayed to them. If their score was 11 or above and they had never been diagnosed with depression before, they were advised to take their results to their health care professional. They were to follow up after 1 month. A group of 2538 participants from the 5 countries completed PHQ-9 depression screening with the app. Of them, 322 participants were found to have high depressive symptoms and had never been diagnosed with depression, and received advice to discuss their results with health care professionals. About 74% of those completed the follow-up; approximately 38% of these self-reported consulting their health care professionals about their depression score. Only positive attitude toward depression as a real disease was associated with increased follow-up response rate (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, CI 1.38-8.29). A mobile phone depression-screening app motivated some users to seek a depression diagnosis. However, further study should investigate how other app users use

  11. An evaluation framework and a pilot study of a mobile platform for diabetes self-management: insights from pediatric users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padman, Rema; Jaladi, Sravani; Kim, Sean; Kumar, Saumitra; Orbeta, Philip; Rudolph, Kate; Tran, Tony

    2013-01-01

    According to WHO, pediatric diabetes is a rising global public health problem, with increasing impact on developing nations. This study summarizes a multidimensional, scalable pilot evaluation of a diabetes self-management platform combining mobile technology with social networking to capture four key metrics of Type 1 diabetes self-management, associated social interactions, and gaming features providing targeted feedback to 8 pediatric users. Based on their 2-month interaction with the application, we analyze click-stream data from social interactions, key health metrics, text comments, and usability and satisfaction surveys to evaluate engagement with the platform and effectiveness in controlling blood glucose using a product-process-program framework. Our preliminary results indicate that this framework was successful in demonstrating the potential of the mobile health platform to effectively leverage the growing use of mobile applications and social media to present a unique benefit that engaged pediatric users and provided useful insights for self-health management.

  12. A Comparison of Field-Based and Lab-Based Experiments to Evaluate User Experience of Personalised Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing debate in the literature regarding the tradeoffs between lab and field evaluation of mobile devices. This paper presents a comparison of field-based and lab-based experiments to evaluate user experience of personalised mobile devices at large sports events. A lab experiment is recommended when the testing focus is on the user interface and application-oriented usability related issues. However, the results suggest that a field experiment is more suitable for investigating a wider range of factors affecting the overall acceptability of the designed mobile service. Such factors include the system function and effects of actual usage contexts aspects. Where open and relaxed communication is important (e.g., where participant groups are naturally reticent to communicate, this is more readily promoted by the use of a field study.

  13. Adaptive Remote-Sensing Techniques Implementing Swarms of Mobile Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, S.M.; Loubriel, G.M.; Rbinett, R.D. III; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper focuses on our recent work at Sandia National Laboratories toward engineering a physics-based swarm of mobile vehicles for distributed sensing applications. Our goal is to coordinate a sensor array that optimizes sensor coverage and multivariate signal analysis by implementing artificial intelligence and evolutionary computational techniques. These intelligent control systems integrate both globally operating decision-making systems and locally cooperative information-sharing modes using genetically-trained neural networks. Once trained, neural networks have the ability to enhance real-time operational responses to dynamical environments, such as obstacle avoidance, responding to prevailing wind patterns, and overcoming other natural obscurants or interferences (jammers). The swarm realizes a collective set of sensor neurons with simple properties incorporating interactions based on basic community rules (potential fields) and complex interconnecting functions based on various neural network architectures, Therefore, the swarm is capable of redundant heterogeneous measurements which furnishes an additional degree of robustness and fault tolerance not afforded by conventional systems, while accomplishing such cognitive tasks as generalization, error correction, pattern recognition, and sensor fission. The robotic platforms could be equipped with specialized sensor devices including transmit/receive dipole antennas, chemical or biological sniffers in combination with recognition analysis tools, communication modulators, and laser diodes. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of an autonomous, multi-agent system applied to emerging threat applications. To accomplish such tasks, research in the fields of robotics, sensor technology, and swarms are being conducted within an integrated program. Mission scenarios under consideration include ground penetrating impulse radar (GPR) for detection of under-ground structures, airborne systems, and plume

  14. Adaptive Remote-Sensing Techniques Implementing Swarms of Mobile Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asher, R.B.; Cameron, S.M.; Loubriel, G.M.; Robinett, R.D.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-25

    In many situations, stand-off remote-sensing and hazard-interdiction techniques over realistic operational areas are often impractical "and difficult to characterize. An alternative approach is to implement an adap- tively deployable array of sensitive agent-specific devices. Our group has been studying the collective be- havior of an autonomous, multi-agent system applied to chedbio detection and related emerging threat applications, The current physics-based models we are using coordinate a sensor array for mukivanate sig- nal optimization and coverage as re,alized by a swarm of robots or mobile vehicles. These intelligent control systems integrate'glob"ally operating decision-making systems and locally cooperative learning neural net- works to enhance re+-timp operational responses to dynarnical environments examples of which include obstacle avoidance, res~onding to prevailing wind patterns, and overcoming other natural obscurants or in- terferences. Collectively',tkensor nefirons with simple properties, interacting according to basic community rules, can accomplish complex interconnecting functions such as generalization, error correction, pattern recognition, sensor fusion, and localization. Neural nets provide a greater degree of robusmess and fault tolerance than conventional systems in that minor variations or imperfections do not impair performance. The robotic platforms would be equipped with sensor devices that perform opticaI detection of biologicais in combination with multivariate chemical analysis tools based on genetic and neural network algorithms, laser-diode LIDAR analysis, ultra-wideband short-pulsed transmitting and receiving antennas, thermal im- a:ing sensors, and optical Communication technology providing robust data throughput pathways. Mission scenarios under consideration include ground penetrating radar (GPR) for detection of underground struc- tures, airborne systems, and plume migration and mitigation. We will describe our

  15. Evaluating user perceptions of mobile medication management applications with older adults: a usability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Kelly Anne; Li, Melissa; Gates, Allison

    2014-03-14

    Medication nonadherence has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals with chronic disease. Several mobile medication management applications are available to help users track, remember, and read about their medication therapy. The objective of this study was to explore the usability and usefulness of existing medication management applications for older adults. We recruited 35 participants aged 50 and over to participate in a 2-hour usability session. The average age ranged from 52-78 years (mean 67 years) and 71% (25/35) of participants were female. Each participant was provided with an iPad loaded with four medication management applications: MyMedRec, DrugHub, Pillboxie, and PocketPharmacist. These applications were evaluated using the 10 item System Usability Scale (SUS) and visual analog scale. An investigator-moderated 30-minute discussion followed, and was recorded. We used a grounded theory (GT) approach to analyze qualitative data. When assessing mobile medication management applications, participants struggled to think of a need for the applications in their own lives. Many were satisfied with their current management system and proposed future use only if cognition and health declined. Most participants felt capable of using the applications after a period of time and training, but were frustrated by their initial experiences with the applications. The early experiences of participants highlighted the benefits of linear navigation and clear wording (eg, "undo" vs "cancel") when designing for older users. While there was no order effect, participants attributed their poor performance to the order in which they tried the applications. They also described being a part of a technology generation that did not encounter the computer until adulthood. Of the four applications, PocketPharmacist was found to be the least usable with a score of 42/100 (Papplications for their medication management. However, in order to adopt such technology

  16. Adaptive evolution of social traits: origin, trajectories, and correlations of altruism and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Galliard, Jean-François; Ferrière, Régis; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2005-02-01

    Social behavior involves "staying and helping," two individual attributes that vary considerably among organisms. Investigating the ultimate causes of such variation, this study integrates previously separate lines of research by analyzing the joint evolution of altruism and mobility. We unfold the network of selective pressures and derive how these depend on physiological costs, eco-evolutionary feedbacks, and a complex interaction between the evolving traits. Our analysis highlights habitat saturation, both around individuals (local aggregation) and around unoccupied space (local contention), as the key mediator of altruism and mobility evolution. Once altruism and mobility are allowed to evolve jointly, three general insights emerge. First, the cost of mobility affects the origin of altruism, determining whether and how quickly selfishness is overcome. Second, the cost of altruism determines which of two qualitatively different routes to sociality are taken: an evolutionary reduction of mobility, resulting in higher habitat saturation, is either preceded or followed by the adaptive rise of altruism. Third, contrary to conventional expectations, a positive correlation between evolutionarily stable levels of altruism and mobility can arise; this is expected when comparing populations that evolved under different constraints on mobility or that differ in other life-history traits.

  17. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia's Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-10-27

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis--Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)--were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung's Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia.

  18. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia’s Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis—Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)—were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung’s Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia. PMID:26516881

  19. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia’s Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Fa Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis—Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA—were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung’s Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia.

  20. Intuitive control of mobile robots: an architecture for autonomous adaptive dynamic behaviour integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melidis, Christos; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Marocco, Davide

    2017-06-05

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to human-robot control. Taking inspiration from behaviour-based robotics and self-organisation principles, we present an interfacing mechanism, with the ability to adapt both towards the user and the robotic morphology. The aim is for a transparent mechanism connecting user and robot, allowing for a seamless integration of control signals and robot behaviours. Instead of the user adapting to the interface and control paradigm, the proposed architecture allows the user to shape the control motifs in their way of preference, moving away from the case where the user has to read and understand an operation manual, or it has to learn to operate a specific device. Starting from a tabula rasa basis, the architecture is able to identify control patterns (behaviours) for the given robotic morphology and successfully merge them with control signals from the user, regardless of the input device used. The structural components of the interface are presented and assessed both individually and as a whole. Inherent properties of the architecture are presented and explained. At the same time, emergent properties are presented and investigated. As a whole, this paradigm of control is found to highlight the potential for a change in the paradigm of robotic control, and a new level in the taxonomy of human in the loop systems.

  1. Neural indicators of the depth of cognitive processing for user-adaptive neurotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae, I E; Acqualagna, L; Blankertz, B

    2015-08-01

    The ability to infer implicit user variables in realtime and in an unobtrusive way would open a broad variety of applications such as adapting the user interface in human-computer interaction or developing safety assistance systems in industrial workplaces. Such information may be extracted from behavior, peripheral physiology and brain activity. Each of these sensors has its advantages and disadvantages suggesting that finally all available features should be fused. While in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research powerful methods for the real-time extraction of information from brain signals have been developed, comparatively little effort was spent on the extraction of hidden user states. As a further step in this direction, we propose a novel experimental paradigm to study the feasibility of quantifying how deeply presented information is processed in the brain. An investigation of event-related potentials (ERPs) demonstrates the effectiveness of our task in inducing different levels of cognitive processing and shows which features of brain activity provide discriminative information.

  2. Earth science big data at users' fingertips: the EarthServer Science Gateway Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Roberto; Bruno, Riccardo; Calanducci, Antonio; Fargetta, Marco; Pappalardo, Marco; Rundo, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The EarthServer project (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program, aims at establishing open access and ad-hoc analytics on extreme-size Earth Science data, based on and extending leading-edge Array Database technology. The core idea is to use database query languages as client/server interface to achieve barrier-free "mix & match" access to multi-source, any-size, multi-dimensional space-time data -- in short: "Big Earth Data Analytics" - based on the open standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Coverage Processing Service (OGC WCPS) and the W3C XQuery. EarthServer combines both, thereby achieving a tight data/metadata integration. Further, the rasdaman Array Database System (www.rasdaman.com) is extended with further space-time coverage data types. On server side, highly effective optimizations - such as parallel and distributed query processing - ensure scalability to Exabyte volumes. In this contribution we will report on the EarthServer Science Gateway Mobile, an app for both iOS and Android-based devices that allows users to seamlessly access some of the EarthServer applications using SAML-based federated authentication and fine-grained authorisation mechanisms.

  3. A Location-Based Service Using Geometric Location Methods to Unite Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chen Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of iPhone in 2007, many location-based services (LBSs have been created and new LBSs are found every day. This research proposes yet another LBS, which is practical and was not found before to the best of authors' knowledge. The problem is described as follows. It happens all the times while several groups of people are traveling towards a destination, they lose contact from each other on the way. This research tries to have the groups travel as closely as possible until they reach the destination. It uses a method of minimum covering ellipses to find whether the groups are separated by more than a threshold/distance. If they are, the system will find a convenient rendezvous for all groups by using a method of geometric median. After meeting at the rendezvous, the groups reset the service and continue their journey. By using this LBS, travelers do not need to worry about losing connections with others. This method can also be applied to the problem of finding a convenient meeting place for mobile users.

  4. Adaptive Monocular Visual-Inertial SLAM for Real-Time Augmented Reality Applications in Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jin-Chun; Kim, Shin-Dug

    2017-11-07

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is emerging as a prominent issue in computer vision and next-generation core technology for robots, autonomous navigation and augmented reality. In augmented reality applications, fast camera pose estimation and true scale are important. In this paper, we present an adaptive monocular visual-inertial SLAM method for real-time augmented reality applications in mobile devices. First, the SLAM system is implemented based on the visual-inertial odometry method that combines data from a mobile device camera and inertial measurement unit sensor. Second, we present an optical-flow-based fast visual odometry method for real-time camera pose estimation. Finally, an adaptive monocular visual-inertial SLAM is implemented by presenting an adaptive execution module that dynamically selects visual-inertial odometry or optical-flow-based fast visual odometry. Experimental results show that the average translation root-mean-square error of keyframe trajectory is approximately 0.0617 m with the EuRoC dataset. The average tracking time is reduced by 7.8%, 12.9%, and 18.8% when different level-set adaptive policies are applied. Moreover, we conducted experiments with real mobile device sensors, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of performance improvement using the proposed method.

  5. Adaptive physical activity improves mobility function and quality of life in chronic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, Richard F; Benvenuti, Francesco; Stanhope, Steven; Macellari, Velio; Taviani, Antonia; Nesi, Barbara; Weinrich, Michael; Stuart, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of an adaptive physical activity (APA) program on mobility function and quality of life (QOL) in chronic stroke patients. Twenty subjects with chronic hemiparesis completed a 2-month, combined group, class-home exercise regimen that emphasized mobility training. APA improved Berg Balance Scale scores (35 +/- 2 vs 45 +/- 2, p = 0.001), 6-minute walk distances (114 +/- 15 vs 142 +/- 7 m, p APA (p APA has the potential to improve gait, balance, and basic but not instrumental activities of daily living profiles in individuals with chronic stroke. Improved depression and SIS scores suggest APA improves stroke-specific outcomes related to QOL.

  6. Can existing mobile apps support healthier food purchasing behaviour? Content analysis of nutrition content, behaviour change theory and user quality integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Sarah-Jane; McCarthy, Mary; Collins, Alan; McAuliffe, Fionnuala

    2018-02-01

    To assess the quality of nutrition content and the integration of user quality components and behaviour change theory relevant to food purchasing behaviour in a sample of existing mobile apps. Descriptive comparative analysis of eleven mobile apps comprising an assessment of their alignment with existing evidence on nutrition, behaviour change and user quality, and their potential ability to support healthier food purchasing behaviour. Mobile apps freely available for public use in GoogePlay were assessed and scored according to agreed criteria to assess nutrition content quality and integration of behaviour change theory and user quality components. A sample of eleven mobile apps that met predefined inclusion criteria to ensure relevance and good quality. The quality of the nutrition content varied. Improvements to the accuracy and appropriateness of nutrition content are needed to ensure mobile apps support a healthy behaviour change process and are accessible to a wider population. There appears to be a narrow focus towards behaviour change with an overemphasis on behavioural outcomes and a small number of behaviour change techniques, which may limit effectiveness. A significant effort from the user was required to use the mobile apps appropriately which may negatively influence user acceptability and subsequent utilisation. Existing mobile apps may offer a potentially effective approach to supporting healthier food purchasing behaviour but improvements in mobile app design are required to maximise their potential effectiveness. Engagement of mobile app users and nutrition professionals is recommended to support effective design.

  7. Does a torsion adapter improve functional mobility, pain, and fatigue in patients with transtibial amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Ava D; Kracht, Rose; Klute, Glenn K

    2014-10-01

    Turning gait is an integral part of daily ambulation and likely poses a greater challenge for patients with transtibial amputation compared with walking a straight pathway. A torsion adapter is a prosthetic component that can increase transverse plane compliance of the prosthesis and decrease the torque applied to the residual limb, but whether this will improve patients' mobility, pain, and fatigue remains unknown. Does prescription of a torsion adapter translate to improvements in (1) functional mobility and (2) self-perceived pain and fatigue in moderately active patients with lower limb amputation? Ten unilateral transtibial amputees wore a torsion or rigid adapter in random order. Functional mobility was assessed through a field measurement using an activity monitor and through a laboratory measurement using a 6-minute walk test that included turns. The residual limb pain grade assessed self-perceived pain and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory assessed fatigue. We found relatively small functional differences for amputees wearing a torsion adapter versus a rigid adapter. Amputees wearing a torsion adapter tended to take more low- and medium-intensity steps per day (331 ± 365 and 437 ± 511 difference in steps; effect size = 0.44 and 0.17; confidence interval [CI], 70-592 and 71-802; p = 0.019 and 0.024, respectively). They also experienced less pain interference with activities (1.9 ± 1.7 change in score; effect size = 0.83; CI, 0.3-3.4; p = 0.026) when wearing a torsion adapter. However, these patients took a similar number of total steps per day, walked a comparable distance in 6 minutes, and reported similar residual limb pain and fatigue. For a moderately active group of amputees, the torsion adapter did not translate to substantial improvements in functional mobility and self-perceived pain and fatigue. The small increases in low- and medium-intensity activities with less pain interference when wearing a torsion adapter provides evidence to support

  8. Adaptive Measurement of Well-Being: Maximizing Efficiency and Optimizing User Experience during Individual Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraatz, Miriam; Sears, Lindsay E; Coberley, Carter R; Pope, James E

    2016-08-01

    Well-being is linked to important societal factors such as health care costs and productivity and has experienced a surge in development activity of both theories and measurement. This study builds on validation of the Well-Being 5 survey and for the first time applies Item Response Theory, a modern and flexible measurement paradigm, to form the basis of adaptive population well-being measurement. Adaptive testing allows survey questions to be administered selectively, thereby reducing the number of questions required of the participant. After the graded response model was fit to a sample of size N = 12,035, theta scores were estimated based on both the full-item bank and a simulation of Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). Comparisons of these 2 sets of score estimates with each other and of their correlations with external outcomes of job performance, absenteeism, and hospital admissions demonstrate that the CAT well-being scores maintain accuracy and validity. The simulation indicates that the average survey taker can expect a reduction in number of items administered during the CAT process of almost 50%. An increase in efficiency of this extent is of considerable value because of the time savings during the administration of the survey and the potential improvement of user experience, which in turn can help secure the success of a total population-based well-being improvement program. (Population Health Management 2016;19:284-290).

  9. Estimating Position of Mobile Robots From Omnidirectional Vision Using an Adaptive Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luyang; Liu, Yun-Hui; Wang, Kai; Fang, Mu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel and simple adaptive algorithm for estimating the position of a mobile robot with high accuracy in an unknown and unstructured environment by fusing images of an omnidirectional vision system with measurements of odometry and inertial sensors. Based on a new derivation where the omnidirectional projection can be linearly parameterized by the positions of the robot and natural feature points, we propose a novel adaptive algorithm, which is similar to the Slotine-Li algorithm in model-based adaptive control, to estimate the robot's position by using the tracked feature points in image sequence, the robot's velocity, and orientation angles measured by odometry and inertial sensors. It is proved that the adaptive algorithm leads to global exponential convergence of the position estimation errors to zero. Simulations and real-world experiments are performed to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  10. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taesik; Min, Hong; Jung, Jinman

    2017-02-23

    Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment) and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile.

  11. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taesik Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile.

  12. Distributed Consensus-Based Robust Adaptive Formation Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots with Partial Known Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the distributed consensus-based robust adaptive formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots with partially known dynamics. Firstly, multirobot formation control problem has been converted into a state consensus problem. Secondly, the practical control strategies, which incorporate the distributed kinematic controllers and the robust adaptive torque controllers, are designed for solving the formation control problem. Thirdly, the specified reference trajectory for the geometric centroid of the formation is assumed as the trajectory of a virtual leader, whose information is available to only a subset of the followers. Finally, numerical results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approaches.

  13. Welcome message for the Special Issue "USCIAMO: Urban Sustainable, CollaboratIve, and Adaptive MObility"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gabrielli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Transportation is a key domain to address for promoting sustainability as it accounts for about one third of the energy consumption in the EU and in the US. Nevertheless, changing the transportation habits of citizens is a hard challenge. In this Special Issue of the EAI Endorsed Transactions on Ambient Systems, we present a selection of high-quality papers presented at the workshop on “Urban Sustainable, CollaboratIve, and Adaptive MObility” (USCIAMO, held at the COOP 2014 Conference. The articles address different topics related to the design and deployment of innovative systems and techniques for behavior change in the domain of sustainable mobility, from gamification models and mechanics to encourage sustainable travel behavior to segmentation techniques for personalizing mobility behavior interventions, from participatory design of sustainable mobility applications to innovative frameworks for sustainable commuting at work and transport mode detection.

  14. User Preferences for Mobile Health Interventions: A Survey among Intermittent Claudication Patients and Their Physical Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Houten, Marijn M L; Spruijt, Steffie; Fokkenrood, Hugo J P; Scheltinga, Marc R M; Teijink, Joep A W

    2017-09-08

    Smartphone apps provide novel ways for triggering lifestyle change by coupling objective measurements of health behavior with tailored feedback. Little is known about end-user preferences regarding the content of mobile health (mHealth) interventions. The aim of this study was to assess smartphone use and preferences regarding app content among intermittent claudication patients and their treating physical therapists. A cross-sectional survey was sent via an internal email system to 1,514 physical therapists specialized in treating patients with intermittent claudication. They were asked to complete one questionnaire themselves and administer a second to their intermittent claudication patients currently under treatment. Data on participant characteristics and smartphone use were collected from all respondents. The preferred app components were obtained from participants owning a smartphone. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to explore the adjusted association between age and attained educational level, and smartphone use. The response rate of therapists was 40.8% (617/1,514), and a total of 488 patients completed the survey. After excluding incomplete forms, a total of 615 physical therapist forms and 483 patient forms were analyzed. Overall, 40.6% of patients and 95% of therapists owned a smartphone. Higher educational level was associated with smartphone ownership (adjusted odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.41-4.27, P = 0.001). Compared to patients aged ≥75 years, lower age was associated with higher odds of owning a smartphone (adjusted odds ratios for patients aged ≤54 years = 21.27, 95% CI = 6.82-66.30, P intermittent claudication patients in possession of a smartphone included monitoring treadmill-measured walking distances (71%), global positioning system tracking of walks (50%), and daily physical activity monitoring (49%). Physical therapists were most interested in global positioning system tracking of walks (89

  15. Managing the safe mobility of older road users: How to cope with their diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Marin-Lamellet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Against the background of an ageing population, the management of older people's safe mobility is becoming an increasingly important issue. Mobility is vital for older people's quality of life and several examples of good practice that support older people's safe mobility already exist. However, ...

  16. An application to estimate the cyber-risk detection skill of mobile device users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaff, G.; Harpes, C.; Martin, Romain; Junger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    According to experts’ predictions, mobile devices (smartphones, tablet computers) will replace the widespread personal computer by 2017 for personal and work tasks (emergence of BYOD). In parallel, the expert community has observed an increase of cyber-attacks against mobile devices. Mobile device

  17. MOBILE APPLICATIONS FOR TOURISM. STUDY REGARDING THEIR USE BY ROMANIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUTUNEA MIHAELA FILOFTEIA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The amazing development of the ICT industry and mobile technologies impressed a behavioural change and adaptation on individual and corporate users revealed at the level of current activities as well as in the consumer behaviours. Tourism industry has always been one of the most adaptable sectors, following the trends imposed by the two abovementioned industries. The increase in tourists’ mobility, users of mobile devices, also made necessary the adaptation of the distribution of tourism products and services and their redirecting towards the mobile environment. Taking into account these aspects, the present study was conceived on two levels. The first level identifies important aspects of mobile applications in general, by types and classifications, as well as presents a concise static image of them at global level. It also describes aspects related to mobile applications dedicated to tourism as offers to mobile device users. The second level comprises the study regarding the usage of tourism-specific mobile applications by Romanian mobile device users. The results of this study indicate the profile of the tourist-user of mobile devices from Romania, captured on three levels, namely: a socio-demographic profile, a mobility profile and a tourism-related mobile application user profile. We consider that these results provide useful information to companies belonging to the tourism and software industries, as well as indie developers of mobile applications, and users of mobile devices.

  18. Valuable features in mobile health apps for patients and consumers: content analysis of apps and user ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola, Martin F; Kalnicki, Miriam; Lindenauer, Sarah

    2015-05-13

    The explosion of mobile phones with app capabilities coupled with increased expectations of the patient-consumers' role in managing their care presents a unique opportunity to use mobile health (mHealth) apps. The aim of this paper is to identify the features and characteristics most-valued by patient-consumers ("users") that contribute positively to the rating of an app. A collection of 234 apps associated with reputable health organizations found in the medical, health, and fitness categories of the Apple iTunes store and Google Play marketplace was assessed manually for the presence of 12 app features and characteristics. Regression analysis was used to determine which, if any, contributed positively to a user's rating of the app. Analysis of these 12 features explained 9.3% (R(2)=.093 n=234, Pimpact of synergistic features, incentives, social media, and gamification are also warranted to identify possible future trends.

  19. Adaptive Hybrid Visual Servo Regulation of Mobile Robots Based on Fast Homography Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the monocular camera-based mobile robot system, an adaptive hybrid visual servo regulation algorithm which is based on a fast homography decomposition method is proposed to drive the mobile robot to its desired position and orientation, even when object’s imaging depth and camera’s position extrinsic parameters are unknown. Firstly, the homography’s particular properties caused by mobile robot’s 2-DOF motion are taken into account to induce a fast homography decomposition method. Secondly, the homography matrix and the extracted orientation error, incorporated with the desired view’s single feature point, are utilized to form an error vector and its open-loop error function. Finally, Lyapunov-based techniques are exploited to construct an adaptive regulation control law, followed by the experimental verification. The experimental results show that the proposed fast homography decomposition method is not only simple and efficient, but also highly precise. Meanwhile, the designed control law can well enable mobile robot position and orientation regulation despite the lack of depth information and camera’s position extrinsic parameters.

  20. An adaptive sliding mode backstepping control for the mobile manipulator with nonholonomic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Naijian; Song, Fangzhen; Li, Guoping; Sun, Xuan; Ai, Changsheng

    2013-10-01

    To solve disturbances, nonlinearity, nonholonomic constraints and dynamic coupling between the platform and its mounted robot manipulator, an adaptive sliding mode controller based on the backstepping method applied to the robust trajectory tracking of the wheeled mobile manipulator is described in this article. The control algorithm rests on adopting the backstepping method to improve the global ultimate asymptotic stability and applying the sliding mode control to obtain high response and invariability to uncertainties. According to the Lyapunov stability criterion, the wheeled mobile manipulator is divided into several stabilizing subsystems, and an adaptive law is designed to estimate the general nondeterminacy, which make the controller be capable to drive the trajectory tracking error of the mobile manipulator to converge to zero even in the presence of perturbations and mathematical model errors. We compare our controller with the robust neural network based algorithm in nonholonomic constraints and uncertainties, and simulation results prove the effectivity and feasibility of the proposed method in the trajectory tracking of the wheeled mobile manipulator.

  1. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  2. Test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Aspects of Wheelchair Mobility Test as a measure of the mobility of wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispin, Karen L; Huff, Kara; Wee, Joy

    2017-01-01

    The Aspects of Wheelchair Mobility Test (AWMT) was developed for use in a repeated measures format to provide comparative effectiveness data on mobility facilitated by different wheelchair types. It has been used in preliminary studies to compare the mobility of wheelchairs designed for low-resource areas and is intended to be simple and flexible enough so as to be used in low-technology settings. However, to reliably compare the impact of different types of wheelchairs on the mobility of users, a measure must first be a reliable and valid measure of mobility. This study investigated the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity for the AWMT 2.0 as a measure of mobility. For reliability testing, participants in a low-resource setting completed the tests twice in their own wheelchairs at least one week apart. For concurrent validity, participants also completed the Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q), a related but not identical validated assessment tool. Concurrent validity was indicated by a significant positive correlation with an r value of 0.7 between the WST-Q capacity score and the AWMT 2.0 score. Test-retest reliability was confirmed by an intraclass correlation coefficient greater than 0.7 between the two trials. Results support the preliminary reliability and validity of the AWMT 2.0, supporting its effectiveness in comparing the mobility provided by different wheelchair types. This information can be used to enable effective use of limited funds for wheelchair selection at individual and organisational scales.

  3. Educating parents about the vaccination status of their children: A user-centered mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Lea; Conrad, Tim; Hoppe, Christian; Obermeier, Patrick; Chen, Xi; Karsch, Katharina; Muehlhans, Susann; Tief, Franziska; Boettcher, Sindy; Diedrich, Sabine; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Rath, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Parents are often uncertain about the vaccination status of their children. In times of vaccine hesitancy, vaccination programs could benefit from active patient participation. The Vaccination App (VAccApp) was developed by the Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative, enabling parents to learn about the vaccination status of their children, including 25 different routine, special indication and travel vaccines listed in the WHO Immunization Certificate of Vaccination (WHO-ICV). Between 2012 and 2014, the VAccApp was validated in a hospital-based quality management program in Berlin, Germany, in collaboration with the Robert Koch Institute. Parents of 178 children were asked to transfer the immunization data of their children from the WHO-ICV into the VAccApp. The respective WHO-ICV was photocopied for independent, professional data entry (gold standard). Demonstrating the status quo in vaccine information reporting, a Recall Group of 278 parents underwent structured interviews for verbal immunization histories, without the respective WHO-ICV. Only 9% of the Recall Group were able to provide a complete vaccination status; on average 39% of the questions were answered correctly. Using the WHO-ICV with the help of the VAccApp resulted in 62% of parents providing a complete vaccination status; on average 95% of the questions were answered correctly. After using the VAccApp, parents were more likely to remember key aspects of the vaccination history. User-friendly mobile applications empower parents to take a closer look at the vaccination record, thereby taking an active role in providing accurate vaccination histories. Parents may become motivated to ask informed questions and to keep vaccinations up-to-date.

  4. Educating parents about the vaccination status of their children: A user-centered mobile application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Seeber

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Parents are often uncertain about the vaccination status of their children. In times of vaccine hesitancy, vaccination programs could benefit from active patient participation. The Vaccination App (VAccApp was developed by the Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative, enabling parents to learn about the vaccination status of their children, including 25 different routine, special indication and travel vaccines listed in the WHO Immunization Certificate of Vaccination (WHO-ICV. Between 2012 and 2014, the VAccApp was validated in a hospital-based quality management program in Berlin, Germany, in collaboration with the Robert Koch Institute. Parents of 178 children were asked to transfer the immunization data of their children from the WHO-ICV into the VAccApp. The respective WHO-ICV was photocopied for independent, professional data entry (gold standard. Demonstrating the status quo in vaccine information reporting, a Recall Group of 278 parents underwent structured interviews for verbal immunization histories, without the respective WHO-ICV. Only 9% of the Recall Group were able to provide a complete vaccination status; on average 39% of the questions were answered correctly. Using the WHO-ICV with the help of the VAccApp resulted in 62% of parents providing a complete vaccination status; on average 95% of the questions were answered correctly. After using the VAccApp, parents were more likely to remember key aspects of the vaccination history. User-friendly mobile applications empower parents to take a closer look at the vaccination record, thereby taking an active role in providing accurate vaccination histories. Parents may become motivated to ask informed questions and to keep vaccinations up-to-date.

  5. Self-reported difficulty and preferences of wheeled mobility device users for simulated low-floor bus boarding, interior circulation and disembarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Clive; Paquet, Victor L; Lenker, James A; Steinfeld, Edward

    2017-11-13

    Low ridership of public transit buses among wheeled mobility device users suggests the need to identify vehicle design conditions that are either particularly accommodating or challenging. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of low-floor bus interior seating configuration and passenger load on wheeled mobility device user-reported difficulty, overall acceptability and design preference. Forty-eight wheeled mobility users evaluated three interior design layouts at two levels of passenger load (high vs. low) after simulating boarding and disembarking tasks on a static full-scale low-floor bus mockup. User self-reports of task difficulty, acceptability and design preference were analyzed across the different test conditions. Ramp ascent was the most difficult task for manual wheelchair users relative to other tasks. The most difficult tasks for users of power wheelchairs and scooters were related to interior circulation, including moving to the securement area, entry and positioning in the securement area and exiting the securement area. Boarding and disembarking at the rear doorway was significantly more acceptable and preferred compared to the layouts with front doorways. Understanding transit usability barriers, perceptions and preferences among wheeled mobility users is an important consideration for clinicians who recommend mobility-related device interventions to those who use public transportation. Implications for Rehabilitation In order to maximize community participation opportunities for wheeled mobility users, clinicians should consider potential public transit barriers during the processes of wheelchair device selection and skills training. Usability barriers experienced by wheeled mobility device users on transit vehicles differ by mobility device type and vehicle configurations. Full-scale environment simulations are an effective means of identifying usability barriers and design needs in people with mobility impairments and may

  6. Does a Mobile Phone Depression-Screening App Motivate Mobile Phone Users With High Depressive Symptoms to Seek a Health Care Professional’s Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Eman M; Aljadhey, Hisham; Basyouni, Mada H; Kowalski, Stefan R; Pont, Lisa G; Shaman, Ahmed M; Trevena, Lyndal; Alhawassi, Tariq M

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of disease screening is to encourage high-risk subjects to seek health care diagnosis and treatment. Mobile phone apps can effectively screen mental health conditions, including depression. However, it is not known how effective such screening methods are in motivating users to discuss the obtained results of such apps with health care professionals. Does a mobile phone depression-screening app motivate users with high depressive symptoms to seek health care professional advice? This study aimed to address this question. Method This was a single-cohort, prospective, observational study of a free mobile phone depression app developed in English and released on Apple’s App Store. Apple App Store users (aged 18 or above) in 5 countries, that is, Australia, Canada, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States (US), were recruited directly via the app’s download page. The participants then completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and their depression screening score was displayed to them. If their score was 11 or above and they had never been diagnosed with depression before, they were advised to take their results to their health care professional. They were to follow up after 1 month. Results A group of 2538 participants from the 5 countries completed PHQ-9 depression screening with the app. Of them, 322 participants were found to have high depressive symptoms and had never been diagnosed with depression, and received advice to discuss their results with health care professionals. About 74% of those completed the follow-up; approximately 38% of these self-reported consulting their health care professionals about their depression score. Only positive attitude toward depression as a real disease was associated with increased follow-up response rate (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, CI 1.38-8.29). Conclusions A mobile phone depression-screening app motivated some users to seek a depression diagnosis. However, further study

  7. An Adaptive and Integrated Low-Power Framework for Multicore Mobile Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmoo Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing multicore in mobile computing such as smartphone and IoT (Internet of Things device is a double-edged sword. It provides ample computing capabilities required in recent intelligent mobile services including voice recognition, image processing, big data analysis, and deep learning. However, it requires a great deal of power consumption, which causes creating a thermal hot spot and putting pressure on the energy resource in a mobile device. In this paper, we propose a novel framework that integrates two well-known low-power techniques, DPM (Dynamic Power Management and DVFS (Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling for energy efficiency in multicore mobile systems. The key feature of the proposed framework is adaptability. By monitoring the online resource usage such as CPU utilization and power consumption, the framework can orchestrate diverse DPM and DVFS policies according to workload characteristics. Real implementation based experiments using three mobile devices have shown that it can reduce the power consumption ranging from 22% to 79%, while affecting negligibly the performance of workloads.

  8. An adaptive handover prediction scheme for seamless mobility based wireless networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Ali Safa; Fisal, Norsheila Binti; Ghafoor, Kayhan Zrar; Lloret, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We propose an adaptive handover prediction (AHP) scheme for seamless mobility based wireless networks. That is, the AHP scheme incorporates fuzzy logic with AP prediction process in order to lend cognitive capability to handover decision making. Selection metrics, including received signal strength, mobile node relative direction towards the access points in the vicinity, and access point load, are collected and considered inputs of the fuzzy decision making system in order to select the best preferable AP around WLANs. The obtained handover decision which is based on the calculated quality cost using fuzzy inference system is also based on adaptable coefficients instead of fixed coefficients. In other words, the mean and the standard deviation of the normalized network prediction metrics of fuzzy inference system, which are collected from available WLANs are obtained adaptively. Accordingly, they are applied as statistical information to adjust or adapt the coefficients of membership functions. In addition, we propose an adjustable weight vector concept for input metrics in order to cope with the continuous, unpredictable variation in their membership degrees. Furthermore, handover decisions are performed in each MN independently after knowing RSS, direction toward APs, and AP load. Finally, performance evaluation of the proposed scheme shows its superiority compared with representatives of the prediction approaches.

  9. An Adaptive Handover Prediction Scheme for Seamless Mobility Based Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Safa Sadiq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an adaptive handover prediction (AHP scheme for seamless mobility based wireless networks. That is, the AHP scheme incorporates fuzzy logic with AP prediction process in order to lend cognitive capability to handover decision making. Selection metrics, including received signal strength, mobile node relative direction towards the access points in the vicinity, and access point load, are collected and considered inputs of the fuzzy decision making system in order to select the best preferable AP around WLANs. The obtained handover decision which is based on the calculated quality cost using fuzzy inference system is also based on adaptable coefficients instead of fixed coefficients. In other words, the mean and the standard deviation of the normalized network prediction metrics of fuzzy inference system, which are collected from available WLANs are obtained adaptively. Accordingly, they are applied as statistical information to adjust or adapt the coefficients of membership functions. In addition, we propose an adjustable weight vector concept for input metrics in order to cope with the continuous, unpredictable variation in their membership degrees. Furthermore, handover decisions are performed in each MN independently after knowing RSS, direction toward APs, and AP load. Finally, performance evaluation of the proposed scheme shows its superiority compared with representatives of the prediction approaches.

  10. INVESTIGATION THE ROLE OF MOBILE USER’S GENDER ON ACCEPTANCE OF PERMISSION BASE MOBILE MARKETING ON IRANIAN MOBILE USERS AND CONSUMER RIGHTS PROTECTION GUIDELINES

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Bigdeli; Pejman Jafari; Farhad Ghaffari

    2014-01-01

    Recent progression on Internet, mobile phones and also the other communication tools allow companies to gain benefit from new applications such as SMS advertisement. Despite of these commercial opportunities, development of SMS advertisements are limited by some barriers such as invasion of mobile user’s consumer rights with unsolicited sms advertising. On one hand in developed countries, there are regulations for mobile user’s privacy protection, but on the other hand, these rule...

  11. A neural learning classifier system with self-adaptive constructivism for mobile robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jacob; Bull, Larry

    2006-01-01

    For artificial entities to achieve true autonomy and display complex lifelike behavior, they will need to exploit appropriate adaptable learning algorithms. In this context adaptability implies flexibility guided by the environment at any given time and an open-ended ability to learn appropriate behaviors. This article examines the use of constructivism-inspired mechanisms within a neural learning classifier system architecture that exploits parameter self-adaptation as an approach to realize such behavior. The system uses a rule structure in which each rule is represented by an artificial neural network. It is shown that appropriate internal rule complexity emerges during learning at a rate controlled by the learner and that the structure indicates underlying features of the task. Results are presented in simulated mazes before moving to a mobile robot platform.

  12. Learning from adaptive neural network output feedback control of a unicycle-type mobile robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Wang, Qinghui; Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies learning from adaptive neural network (NN) output feedback control of nonholonomic unicycle-type mobile robots. The major difficulties are caused by the unknown robot system dynamics and the unmeasurable states. To overcome these difficulties, a new adaptive control scheme is proposed including designing a new adaptive NN output feedback controller and two high-gain observers. It is shown that the stability of the closed-loop robot system and the convergence of tracking errors are guaranteed. The unknown robot system dynamics can be approximated by radial basis function NNs. When repeating same or similar control tasks, the learned knowledge can be recalled and reused to achieve guaranteed stability and better control performance, thereby avoiding the tremendous repeated training process of NNs. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of the mode of survey administration on estimates of daily smoking for mobile phone only users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Joseph; Cordery, Damien V; Steel, David G; Davis, Walter; Harrold, Timothy C

    2017-04-20

    Over the past decade, there have been substantial changes in landline and mobile phone ownership, with a substantial increase in the proportion of mobile-only households. Estimates of daily smoking rates for the mobile phone only (MPO) population have been found to be substantially higher than the rest of the population and telephone surveys that use a dual sampling frame (landline and mobile phones) are now considered best practice. Smoking is seen as an undesirable behaviour; measuring such behaviours using an interviewer may lead to lower estimates when using telephone based surveys compared to self-administered approaches. This study aims to assess whether higher daily smoking estimates observed for the mobile phone only population can be explained by administrative features of surveys, after accounting for differences in the phone ownership population groups. Data on New South Wales (NSW) residents aged 18 years or older from the NSW Population Health Survey (PHS), a telephone survey, and the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS), a self-administered survey, were combined, with weights adjusted to match the 2013 population. Design-adjusted prevalence estimates and odds ratios were calculated using survey analysis procedures available in SAS 9.4. Both the PHS and NDSHS gave the same estimates for daily smoking (12%) and similar estimates for MPO users (20% and 18% respectively). Pooled data showed that daily smoking was 19% for MPO users, compared to 10% for dual phone owners, and 12% for landline phone only users. Prevalence estimates for MPO users across both surveys were consistently higher than other phone ownership groups. Differences in estimates for the MPO population compared to other phone ownership groups persisted even after adjustment for the mode of collection and demographic factors. Daily smoking rates were consistently higher for the mobile phone only population and this was not driven by the mode of survey collection. This supports

  14. The impact of the mode of survey administration on estimates of daily smoking for mobile phone only users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Hanna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade, there have been substantial changes in landline and mobile phone ownership, with a substantial increase in the proportion of mobile-only households. Estimates of daily smoking rates for the mobile phone only (MPO population have been found to be substantially higher than the rest of the population and telephone surveys that use a dual sampling frame (landline and mobile phones are now considered best practice. Smoking is seen as an undesirable behaviour; measuring such behaviours using an interviewer may lead to lower estimates when using telephone based surveys compared to self-administered approaches. This study aims to assess whether higher daily smoking estimates observed for the mobile phone only population can be explained by administrative features of surveys, after accounting for differences in the phone ownership population groups. Methods Data on New South Wales (NSW residents aged 18 years or older from the NSW Population Health Survey (PHS, a telephone survey, and the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS, a self-administered survey, were combined, with weights adjusted to match the 2013 population. Design-adjusted prevalence estimates and odds ratios were calculated using survey analysis procedures available in SAS 9.4. Results Both the PHS and NDSHS gave the same estimates for daily smoking (12% and similar estimates for MPO users (20% and 18% respectively. Pooled data showed that daily smoking was 19% for MPO users, compared to 10% for dual phone owners, and 12% for landline phone only users. Prevalence estimates for MPO users across both surveys were consistently higher than other phone ownership groups. Differences in estimates for the MPO population compared to other phone ownership groups persisted even after adjustment for the mode of collection and demographic factors. Conclusions Daily smoking rates were consistently higher for the mobile phone only population and this was

  15. Pain, fatigue, function and participation among long-term manual wheelchair users partnered with a mobility service dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claude; Gagnon, Dany H; Dumont, Frédéric

    2017-11-20

    To assess the effects of a mobility service dog (MSD) on pain, fatigue, wheelchair-related functional tasks, participation and satisfaction among manual wheelchair users over a nine-month period. A longitudinal study with repeated assessment times before and three, six and nine months after intervention was achieved. Intervention consisted in partnering each participant with a MSD. The setting is a well-established provincial service dog training school and participants homes. A convenience sample of 24 long-term manual wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury was involved. Outcome measures were: Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI), Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE), vitality scale from the SF-36, grip strength, Wheelchair Skills Test (WST), Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNLI), Life Space Assessment, Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS) and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0). Shoulder and wrist pain as well as fatigue decreased significantly over time with the use of a MSD as evidenced by scores from WUSPI, RPE and SF-36 (feeling less worn out). Manual wheelchair propulsion skills (steep slopes, soft surfaces and thresholds) improved significantly over time as confirmed by the WST. Participation increased significantly over time as revealed by the COPM (for five occupations) and the RNLI (for five items). Satisfaction with the MSD was high over time (QUEST: nine items) and with a high positive psychosocial impact (PIADS: 10 items). MSD represents a valuable mobility assistive technology option for manual wheelchair users. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION   For manual wheelchair users partenered with mobility service dog  • Shoulder pain and fatigue significantly decreased and continued to decrease between the third and sixth month and the ninth month.   • Performance with propelling the wheelchair up steep slopes

  16. The role of organizational culture in policy mobilities – the case of South Korean climate change adaptation policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The conceptualization of policies as mobile and mutable knowledge is the key feature of the recent debate on policy mobilities. Policy mobility studies have focused on the movement and translation of policies as well as on the impact of mobile policies on policy-making processes and governed spaces. Given that policy mobilities have mainly been examined in comparable institutional contexts, the current debate has neglected the role of organizational culture in the translation of policies. Organizational culture is understood as a set of shared assumptions that guide what happens in organizations by defining appropriate practices of policy making. The case study, South Korean adaptation policy, illustrates that organizational culture has a significant impact on the translation of mobile adaptation policy. Besides the claim to consider organizational culture more prominently in the field of policy mobility studies, this paper illustrates the translation process of adaptation policy in the South Korean political system. The practices in South Korean political institutions dealing with climate change adaptation are highly characterized by the avoidance of risks. The propensity to avoid risks leads policy makers to focus on technical solutions to climate change adaptation and to neglect the participation of civil society.

  17. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation...

  18. The added value of a gaming context and intelligent adaptation for a mobile application for vocabulary learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandberg, J.; Maris, M.; Hoogendoorn, P.

    2014-01-01

    Two groups participated in a study on the added value of a gaming context and intelligent adaptation for a mobile learning application. The control group worked at home for a fortnight with the original Mobile English Learning application (MEL-original) developed in a previous project. The

  19. Analisis Perilaku User pada Pemanfaatan Layanan Pemesanan Tiket Online pada Aplikasi Mobile (Prespektif Kepercayaan dan Resiko oleh Konsumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiawan Assegaff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between the elements of trust, risk, perceived usefulness, and ease of use and their impact on consumer behavior in the intention of use of mobile commerce services for online ticketing. A research model with five hypotheses was developed for this research. Conducting this research is important in term off to understand the relationship of trust and risk in order to understand people behavior in using mobile commerce. Research model and hypotheses was validated using online questionnaire that distrubed in social media. 110 questionnaire was obtained from the survey and 95 validated questionnaire then use for next analysis. Partial Smart Square (PLS was used for data analysis using Smart PLS V2. This study reveals that perceived usefulness and ease of use has significant effect for people behavior in using mobile application for purchase online ticketing, this research also identified that trust has relationship with risk element. However, this research did not found any significant relationship between risk and people behavior in using mobile application. Keyword: User Behavior, Mobile Commerce, Trust, Risk, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM

  20. End-User Attitudes towards Location-Based Services and Future Mobile Wireless Devices: The Students’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Cramariuc

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, location-enabled mobile phones are becoming more and more widespread. Various players in the mobile business forecast that, in the future, a significant part of total wireless revenue will come from Location-Based Services (LBS. An LBS system extracts information about the user’s geographical location and provides services based on the positioning information. A successful LBS service should create value for the end-user, by satisfying some of the users’ needs or wants, and at the same time preserving the key factors of the mobile wireless device, such as low costs, low battery consumption, and small size. From many users’ perspectives, location services and mobile location capabilities are still rather poorly known and poorly understood. The aim of this research is to investigate users’ views on the LBS, their requirements in terms of mobile device characteristics, their concerns in terms of privacy and usability, and their opinion on LBS applications that might increase the social wellbeing in the future wireless world. Our research is based on two surveys performed among 105 students (average student age: 24 years from two European technical universities. The survey questions were intended to solicit the youngsters’ views on present and future technological trends and on their perceived needs and wishes regarding Location-Based Services, with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of designer constraints when building a location receiver and generating new ideas related to potential future killer LBS applications.

  1. Client Mobile Software Design Principles for Mobile Learning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Tan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a client-server mobile learning system, client mobile software must run on the mobile phone to acquire, package, and send student’s interaction data via the mobile communications network to the connected mobile application server. The server will receive and process the client data in order to offer appropriate content and learning activities. To develop the mobile learning systems there are a number of very important issues that must be addressed. Mobile phones have scarce computing resources. They consist of heterogeneous devices and use various mobile operating systems, they have limitations with their user/device interaction capabilities, high data communications cost, and must provide for device mobility and portability. In this paper we propose five principles for designing Client mobile learning software. A location-based adaptive mobile learning system is presented as a proof of concept to demonstrate the applicability of these design principles.

  2. Methodology for measuring the impact of mobile technology change from 2nd to 3th generation percerved by users of smes in Barranquilla

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jairo Polo; Diego Cardona

    2011-01-01

    ... and test a methodology to measure the impact exerted by thechange from 2nd to 3rd generation mobile tech, based on the perception of users belongingto Barranquilla SME, motivated by the influence...

  3. User Acceptance of Mobile Technology: A Campus-Wide Implementation of Blackboard's Mobile™ Learn Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyun; Sivo, Stephen; Seilhamer, Ryan; Sugar, Amy; Mao, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Mobile learning is a fast growing trend in higher education. This study examined how an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) could evaluate and predict the use of a mobile application in learning. A path analysis design was used to measure the mediating effects on the use of Blackboard's Mobile™ Learn application in coursework (N = 77). The…

  4. Key Issues in Expansion of End-User Mobile Communication in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sangwan (Sunanda); G. Chong (Guan); L-F. Pau (Louis-François)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChina’s mobile communications market presents unique market challenges. With a high subscriber growth rate but polarized and stratified consumer adoption trends, an investigation into the current status of this market will improve our understanding on how adoption of mobile

  5. Green Mobile Clouds: Network Coding and User Cooperation for Improved Energy Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Fitzek, Frank; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the benefits of user cooperation and network coding for energy saving in cellular networks. It is shown that these techniques allow for reliable and efficient multicast services from both a user and network perspective. The working principles and advantages in terms of energy...... and spectrum usage is explained for user cooperation, network coding and a combination of both. For multicast services it is shown that the proposed approaches can save as much as 90% of the energy on the user side and 66% on network provider side for the topologies under investigation. One interesting finding...

  6. Prevalence and risk factors associated with musculoskeletal complaints among users of mobile handheld devices: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanfei; Szeto, Grace; Dai, Jie

    2017-03-01

    This systematic review aimed at evaluating the prevalence and risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints associated with mobile handheld device use. Pubmed, Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL and Embase were searched. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed. Strength of evidence for risk factors was determined based on study designs, methodological quality and consistency of results. Five high-quality, eight acceptable-quality and two low-quality peer-reviewed articles were included. This review demonstrates that the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints among mobile device users ranges from 1.0% to 67.8% and neck complaints have the highest prevalence rates ranging from 17.3% to 67.8%. This study also finds some evidence for neck flexion, frequency of phone calls, texting and gaming in relation to musculoskeletal complaints among mobile device users. Inconclusive evidence is shown for other risk factors such as duration of use and human-device interaction techniques due to inconsistent results or a limited number of studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Making Sense of Mobile Technology: The Integration of Work and Private Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauleen, David; Campbell, John; Harmer, Brian; Intezari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have facilitated a radical shift in work and private life. In this article, we seek to better understand how individual mobile technology users have made sense of these changes and adapted...

  8. Adaptive Tracking and Obstacle Avoidance Control for Mobile Robots with Unknown Sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Cui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive control approach is proposed for trajectory tracking and obstacle avoidance for mobile robots with consideration given to unknown sliding. A kinematic model of mobile robots is established in this paper, in which both longitudinal and lateral sliding are considered and processed as three time-varying parameters. A sliding model observer is introduced to estimate the sliding parameters online. A stable tracking control law for this nonholonomic system is proposed to compensate the unknown sliding effect. From Lyapunov-stability analysis, it is proved, regardless of unknown sliding, that tracking errors of the controlled closed-loop system are asymptotically stable, the tracking errors converge to zero outside the obstacle detection region and obstacle avoidance is guaranteed inside the obstacle detection region. The efficiency and robustness of the proposed control system are verified by simulation results.

  9. Design and Test of a Hybrid Foot Force Sensing and GPS System for Richer User Mobility Activity Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals. PMID:24189333

  10. Design and test of a hybrid foot force sensing and GPS system for richer user mobility activity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  11. Design and Test of a Hybrid Foot Force Sensing and GPS System for Richer User Mobility Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Poslad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95% with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  12. Study of the Interaction User Head-Ultrawideband MIMO Antenna Array for Mobile Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhekov, Stanislav Stefanov; Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Franek, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    aspects of the interaction are considered: 1) the influence of the user head on the antenna operation, and 2) the exposure of the human head tissue to antenna electromagnetic radiation. The first aspect is related to the degradation of the antenna performance in a proximity to the user which is evaluated...

  13. Spatial narratives from mobile GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Lasse

    2007-01-01

    Principles of a mobile gps-enabled gis acting as a tourist infor­mation sys­tem are discussed and exemplified with special focus on the narrative aspects of tourist guidance. Flexible adaptation to user movements is accomplished by providing information about objects that the user passes as well ...

  14. Spatial narratives from mobile GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Lasse

    2007-01-01

    Principles of a mobile gps-enabled gis acting as a tourist infor­mation sys­tem are discussed and exemplified with special focus on the narrative aspects of tourist guidance. Flexible adaptation to user movements is accomplished by providing information about objects that the user passes as well...

  15. Online, social media and mobile technologies for psychosis treatment: a systematic review on novel user-led interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Jimenez, M; Alcazar-Corcoles, M A; González-Blanch, C; Bendall, S; McGorry, P D; Gleeson, J F

    2014-06-01

    Internet and mobile-based interventions provide a unique opportunity to deliver cost-effective, accessible, time-unlimited support to people with psychosis. The aims of this study were to systematically compile and analyze the evidence on the acceptability, feasibility, safety and benefits of online and mobile-based interventions for psychosis. Systematic review of peer-reviewed studies examining the usability, acceptability, feasibility, safety or efficacy of user-led, Internet or mobile-based interventions, with at least 80% of participants diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Of 38 potentially relevant articles, 12 were eligible for inclusion. Interventions included web-based psycho-education; web-based psycho-education plus moderated forums for patients and supporters; integrated web-based therapy, social networking and peer and expert moderation; web-based CBT; personalized advice based on clinical monitoring; and text messaging interventions. Results showed that 74-86% of patients used the web-based interventions efficiently, 75-92% perceived them as positive and useful, and 70-86% completed or were engaged with the interventions over the follow-up. Preliminary evidence indicated that online and mobile-based interventions show promise in improving positive psychotic symptoms, hospital admissions, socialization, social connectedness, depression and medication adherence. Internet and mobile-based interventions for psychosis seem to be acceptable and feasible and have the potential to improve clinical and social outcomes. The heterogeneity, poor quality and early state of current research precludes any definite conclusions. Future research should investigate the efficacy of online and mobile interventions through controlled, well-powered studies, which investigate intervention and patient factors associated with take-up and intervention effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An infrastructure to enable lightweight context-awareness for mobile users

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, Pablo; Lago, Ana B

    2013-01-01

    .... In this paper we present a context management infrastructure for mobile environments, aimed at controlling context information life-cycle in this kind of scenarios, with the main goal of enabling...

  17. User-centred and context-aware identity management in mobile ad-hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Arabo, Abdullahi

    2013-01-01

    The emergent notion of ubiquitous computing makes it possible for mobile devices to communicate and provide services via networks connected in an ad-hoc manner. These have resulted in the proliferation of wireless technologies such as Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANets), which offer attractive solutions for services that need flexible setup as well as dynamic and low cost wireless connectivity. However, the growing trend outlined above also raises serious concerns over Identity Management (IM) du...

  18. Effects of transit bus interior configuration on performance of wheeled mobility users during simulated boarding and disembarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Clive; Paquet, Victor; Lenker, James A; Steinfeld, Edward

    2017-07-01

    The emergence of low-floor bus designs and related regulatory standards in the U.S. have resulted in substantial improvements in public transit accessibility. However, passengers using wheeled mobility devices still experience safety concerns and inefficiencies in boarding, disembarking, and interior circulation on low-floor buses. This study investigates effects of low-floor bus interior configuration and passenger crowding on boarding and disembarking efficiency and safety. Users of manual wheelchairs (n = 18), powered wheelchairs (n = 21) and electric scooters (n = 9) simulated boarding and disembarking in three interior layout configurations at low and high passenger crowding conditions on a full-scale laboratory mock-up of a low-floor bus. Dependent measures comprised task times and critical incidents during access ramp use, fare payment, and movement to and from the doorway and wheeled mobility securement area. Individual times for unassisted boarding ranged from 15.2 to 245.3 s and for disembarking ranged from 9.1 to 164.6 s across layout and passenger crowding conditions. Nonparametric analysis of variance showed significant differences and interactions across vehicle design conditions, passenger load and mobility device type on user performance. The configuration having electronic on-board fare payment, rear-bus entrance doorways and adjacent device securement areas demonstrated greatest efficiency and safety. High passenger load adversely impacted efficiency and frequency of critical incidents during on-board circulation across all three layouts. Findings have broader implications for improving transit system efficiency and quality of service across the spectrum of transit users. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A mobile Virtual Butler to bridge the gap between users and ambient assisted living: a Smart Home case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nuno; Domingues, Patricio; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2014-08-06

    Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly promoting them to a new class of thinking and reasoning everyday objects. Although there are strong expectations that most of the users' needs can be fulfilled without their intervention, there are still situations where interaction is required. This paper presents work being done in the field of human-computer interaction, focusing on smart home environments, while being a part of a larger project called Aging Inside a Smart Home. This initiative arose as a way to deal with a large scourge of our country, where lots of elderly persons live alone in their homes, often with limited or no physical mobility. The project relies on the mobile agent computing paradigm in order to create a Virtual Butler that provides the interface between the elderly and the smart home infrastructure. The Virtual Butler is receptive to user questions, answering them according to the context and knowledge of the AISH. It is also capable of interacting with the user whenever it senses that something has gone wrong, notifying next of kin and/or medical services, etc. The Virtual Butler is aware of the user location and moves to the computing device which is closest to the user, in order to be always present. Its avatar can also run in handheld devices keeping its main functionality in order to track user when s/he goes out. According to the evaluation carried out, the Virtual Butler is assessed as a very interesting and loved digital friend, filling the gap between the user and the smart home. The

  20. A Mobile Virtual Butler to Bridge the Gap between Users and Ambient Assisted Living: A Smart Home Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nuno; Domingues, Patricio; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2014-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly promoting them to a new class of thinking and reasoning everyday objects. Although there are strong expectations that most of the users' needs can be fulfilled without their intervention, there are still situations where interaction is required. This paper presents work being done in the field of human-computer interaction, focusing on smart home environments, while being a part of a larger project called Aging Inside a Smart Home. This initiative arose as a way to deal with a large scourge of our country, where lots of elderly persons live alone in their homes, often with limited or no physical mobility. The project relies on the mobile agent computing paradigm in order to create a Virtual Butler that provides the interface between the elderly and the smart home infrastructure. The Virtual Butler is receptive to user questions, answering them according to the context and knowledge of the AISH. It is also capable of interacting with the user whenever it senses that something has gone wrong, notifying next of kin and/or medical services, etc. The Virtual Butler is aware of the user location and moves to the computing device which is closest to the user, in order to be always present. Its avatar can also run in handheld devices keeping its main functionality in order to track user when s/he goes out. According to the evaluation carried out, the Virtual Butler is assessed as a very interesting and loved digital friend, filling the gap between the user and the smart home. The

  1. Self-expression, group affiliation, pleasure and memory as predictors of consumer product attachment and satisfaction among mobile phone users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagiso Tlhabano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the post-purchase behaviour of a product, there are challenges with change in the degree of consumer product attachment, and these challenges affect consumer product satisfaction overtime. This study investigated how self-expression, group affiliation, memory, and demographic variables predicted consumer product attachment and satisfaction among mobile phone users in Ibadan. Three hundred students of the University of Ibadan were selected using convenient random selection. Their mean age was 20.7 and standard deviation of 2.52. A structured questionnaire consisting of the socio demographic section, measure of self-expression, group affiliation, memory, pleasure, consumer attachment and product satisfaction was used to collect the data. Using multiple regression analysis, the results showed that self-expression, group affiliation, memories and pleasure jointly predicted consumer attachment among mobile phone users, F (4,299 = 48.47; P<0.05 and they contributed 40% to the variance of consumer attachment. Self-expression (β = 0.26, t = 4.44, P<0.05, memory (β = 0.29, t = 4.97, P<0.05, and pleasure (β = 0.28, t =5.01, P<0.05 independently predicted consumer attachment while group affiliation did not. In addition, self- expression, group affiliation, memories and pleasure jointly predicted product satisfaction, F (4,299 =39.79; P<0.05 and they contributed 35% to the variance of product satisfaction. Pleasure (β=0.596, t =10.35, P<0.05 independently predicted product satisfaction while self-expression, group affiliation and memory did not. Furthermore, age, gender, mobile type, ethnicity and religion did not jointly and independently predict consumer product satisfaction. These findings have implication for mobile phone manufacturers in terms of product improvement and building a strategic marketing channel that would meet the needs of global consumers.

  2. Automated motive-based user review analysis in the context of mobile app acceptance: Opportunities and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Pergler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount and importance of user-generated content that is available in the web necessitates methods of its effective and efficient utilization. In this paper a system is presented that enables automated classification of user reviews concerning the usage motives mentioned in the reviews. Four possible applications of the system are discussed in detail in the course of this paper: a learning environment for mobile app development, a download prognosis mechanism, an app prizing decision support system, and a recommendation system. These applications are evaluated concerning state-of-the-art methods that currently address the challenge as well as advantages of the implementation of a motive-based system in the particular business processes.

  3. Adaptive Control Parameters for Dispersal of Multi-Agent Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) Swarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2013-11-01

    A mobile ad hoc network is a collection of independent nodes that communicate wirelessly with one another. This paper investigates nodes that are swarm robots with communications and sensing capabilities. Each robot in the swarm may operate in a distributed and decentralized manner to achieve some goal. This paper presents a novel approach to dynamically adapting control parameters to achieve mesh configuration stability. The presented approach to robot interaction is based on spring force laws (attraction and repulsion laws) to create near-optimal mesh like configurations. In prior work, we presented the extended virtual spring mesh (EVSM) algorithm for the dispersion of robot swarms. This paper extends the EVSM framework by providing the first known study on the effects of adaptive versus static control parameters on robot swarm stability. The EVSM algorithm provides the following novelties: 1) improved performance with adaptive control parameters and 2) accelerated convergence with high formation effectiveness. Simulation results show that 120 robots reach convergence using adaptive control parameters more than twice as fast as with static control parameters in a multiple obstacle environment.

  4. A Mobile Application Recommendation Framework by Exploiting Personal Preference with Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konglin Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosive mobile applications (Apps are proliferating with the popularity of mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets. These Apps are developed to satisfy different function needs of users. Majority of existing App Stores have difficulty in recommending proper Apps for users. Therefore, it is of significance to recommend mobile Apps for users according to personal preference and various constraints of mobile devices (e.g., battery power. In this paper, we propose a mobile App recommendation framework by incorporating different requirements from users. We exploit modern portfolio theory (MPT to combine the popularity of mobile Apps, personal preference, and mobile device constraints for mobile App recommendation. Based on this framework, we discuss the recommendation approaches by constraints of phone power and limited mobile data plan. Extensive evaluations show that the proposed mobile App recommendation framework can well adapt to power and network data plan constraints. It satisfies the user App preference and mobile device constraints.

  5. Improving safety and mobility for older road users in Australia and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Age-related declines in vision, cognition, and physical ability affect how older road users drive and use other transportation modes. The Federal Highway Administration, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, and National...

  6. Authentication of Smartphone Users Based on Activity Recognition and Mobile Sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muhammad Ehatisham-ul-Haq; Muhammad Awais Azam; Jonathan Loo; Kai Shuang; Syed Islam; Usman Naeem; Yasar Amin

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are context-aware devices that provide a compelling platform for ubiquitous computing and assist users in accomplishing many of their routine tasks anytime and anywhere, such as sending and receiving emails...

  7. Using "big data" to guide implementation of a web and mobile adaptive learning platform for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ashwin; Gaglani, Shiv; Haynes, M Ryan; Tackett, Sean

    2017-09-01

    Adaptive learning platforms (ALPs) can revolutionize medical education by making learning more efficient, but their potential has not been realized because students do not use them persistently. We applied educational data mining methods to study United States medical students who used an ALP called Osmosis ( www.osmosis.org ) from 1 August 2014 to 31 July 2015. Multivariate logistic regressions modeled persistence on Osmosis as the dependent variable and Osmosis-collected variables as predictors. The 6787 students included in our analysis responded to a total of 887,193 items, with 2138 (31.5%) using Osmosis persistently. Number of items per student, mobile device use, subscription payment, and group membership were independently associated with persisting (p < 0.001 in all models). Persistent users rated quality more favorably (p < 0.01) but were not more confident in answer selections (p = 0.80). While persisters were more accurate than non-persisters (55% (SD 18%) vs 52% (SD 22%), p < 0.001), after adjusting for number of items, lower accuracy was associated with persistent use (OR 0.93 [95% CI 0.90-0.97], p < 0.01). Our study of a large sample of U.S. medical students illustrates big data medical education research and provides guidance for improving implementation of ALPs and further investigation.

  8. Intelligent Broadcasting in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks: Three Classes of Adaptive Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colagrosso Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Because adaptability greatly improves the performance of a broadcast protocol, we identify three ways in which machine learning can be applied to broadcasting in a mobile ad hoc network (MANET. We chose broadcasting because it functions as a foundation of MANET communication. Unicast, multicast, and geocast protocols utilize broadcasting as a building block, providing important control and route establishment functionality. Therefore, any improvements to the process of broadcasting can be immediately realized by higher-level MANET functionality and applications. While efficient broadcast protocols have been proposed, no single broadcasting protocol works well in all possible MANET conditions. Furthermore, protocols tend to fail catastrophically in severe network environments. Our three classes of adaptive protocols are pure machine learning, intra-protocol learning, and inter-protocol learning. In the pure machine learning approach, we exhibit a new approach to the design of a broadcast protocol: the decision of whether to rebroadcast a packet is cast as a classification problem. Each mobile node (MN builds a classifier and trains it on data collected from the network environment. Using intra-protocol learning, each MN consults a simple machine model for the optimal value of one of its free parameters. Lastly, in inter-protocol learning, MNs learn to switch between different broadcasting protocols based on network conditions. For each class of learning method, we create a prototypical protocol and examine its performance in simulation.

  9. Intelligent Broadcasting in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks: Three Classes of Adaptive Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Colagrosso

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Because adaptability greatly improves the performance of a broadcast protocol, we identify three ways in which machine learning can be applied to broadcasting in a mobile ad hoc network (MANET. We chose broadcasting because it functions as a foundation of MANET communication. Unicast, multicast, and geocast protocols utilize broadcasting as a building block, providing important control and route establishment functionality. Therefore, any improvements to the process of broadcasting can be immediately realized by higher-level MANET functionality and applications. While efficient broadcast protocols have been proposed, no single broadcasting protocol works well in all possible MANET conditions. Furthermore, protocols tend to fail catastrophically in severe network environments. Our three classes of adaptive protocols are pure machine learning, intra-protocol learning, and inter-protocol learning. In the pure machine learning approach, we exhibit a new approach to the design of a broadcast protocol: the decision of whether to rebroadcast a packet is cast as a classification problem. Each mobile node (MN builds a classifier and trains it on data collected from the network environment. Using intra-protocol learning, each MN consults a simple machine model for the optimal value of one of its free parameters. Lastly, in inter-protocol learning, MNs learn to switch between different broadcasting protocols based on network conditions. For each class of learning method, we create a prototypical protocol and examine its performance in simulation.

  10. A Novel Low-Cost Adaptive Scanner Concept for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Stančić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in mobile robot applications is the need for accurate knowledge of the position of a vehicle for localizing itself and for avoiding obstacles in its path. In the search for a solution to this problem, researchers and engineers have developed different sensors, systems and techniques. Modern mobile robots relay information obtained from a variety of sensors and sophisticated data fusion algorithms. In this paper, a novel concept for a low-cost adaptive scanner based on a projected light pattern is proposed. The main advantage of the proposed system is its adaptivity, which enables the rapid scanning of the robot’s surroundings in search of obstacles and a more detailed scan of a single object to retrieve its surface configuration and perform some limited analyses. This paper addresses the concept behind such a scanner, where a proof-of-concept is achieved using an office DLP projector. During the measurements, the accuracy of the proposed system was tested on obstacles and objects with known configurations. The obtained results are presented and analyzed, and conclusions about the system’s performance and possible improvements are discussed.

  11. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control of Mobile Manipulators with Markovian Switching Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid joints of manipulators can be switched to either active (actuated or passive (underactuated mode as needed. Consider the property of hybrid joints, the system switches stochastically between active and passive systems, and the dynamics of the jump system cannot stay on each trajectory errors region of subsystems forever; therefore, it is difficult to determine whether the closed-loop system is stochastically stable. In this paper, we consider stochastic stability and sliding mode control for mobile manipulators using stochastic jumps switching joints. Adaptive parameter techniques are adopted to cope with the effect of Markovian switching and nonlinear dynamics uncertainty and follow the desired trajectory for wheeled mobile manipulators. The resulting closed-loop system is bounded in probability and the effect due to the external disturbance on the tracking errors can be attenuated to any preassigned level. It has been shown that the adaptive control problem for the Markovian jump nonlinear systems is solvable if a set of coupled linear matrix inequalities (LMIs have solutions. Finally, a numerical example is given to show the potential of the proposed techniques.

  12. An efficient contents-adaptive backlight control method for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao Song; Yan, Ya Xing; Zhang, Xiao Mou; Cai, Hua; Deng, Xin; Wang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    For most of mobile devices with a large screen, image quality and power consumption are both of the major factors affecting the consumers' preference. Contents-adaptive backlight control (CABC) method can be utilized to adjust the backlight and promote the performance of mobile devices. Unlike the previous works mostly focusing on the reduction of power consumption, both of image quality and power consumption are taken into account in the proposed method. Firstly, region of interest (ROI) is detected to divide image into two parts: ROI and non-ROI. Then, three attributes including entropy, luminance, and saturation information in ROI are calculated. To achieve high perceived image quality in mobile devices, optimal value of backlight can be calculated by a linear combination of the aforementioned attributes. Coefficients of the linear combination are determined by applying the linear regression to the subjective scores of human visual experiments and objective values of the attributes. Based on the optimal value of backlight, displayed image data are processed brightly and backlight is darkened to reduce the power consumption of backlight later. Here, the ratios of increasing image data and decreasing backlight functionally depend on the luminance information of displayed image. Also, the proposed method is hardware implemented. Experimental results indicate that the proposed technique exhibits better performance compared to the conventional methods.

  13. Patterns of User Engagement With the Mobile App, Manage My Pain: Results of a Data Mining Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Quazi Abidur; Janmohamed, Tahir; Pirbaglou, Meysam; Ritvo, Paul; Heffernan, Jane M; Clarke, Hance; Katz, Joel

    2017-07-12

    of males taking an opioid was significantly greater (all P ≤.05) than that of females. The proportion of males with mild pain was significantly higher than that of females in 3 clusters (all P ≤.008). Although most users of the app reported being female, male users were more likely to be highly engaged in the app. Users in the most engaged clusters self-reported a higher number of pain conditions, a higher number of current medications, and a higher incidence of opioid usage. The high engagement by males in these clusters does not appear to be driven by pain severity which may, in part, be the case for females. Use of a mobile pain app may be relatively more attractive to highly-engaged males than highly-engaged females, and to those with relatively more complex chronic pain problems.

  14. A Mobile Virtual Butler to Bridge the Gap between Users and Ambient Assisted Living: A Smart Home Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly promoting them to a new class of thinking and reasoning everyday objects. Although there are strong expectations that most of the users’ needs can be fulfilled without their intervention, there are still situations where interaction is required. This paper presents work being done in the field of human-computer interaction, focusing on smart home environments, while being a part of a larger project called Aging Inside a Smart Home. This initiative arose as a way to deal with a large scourge of our country, where lots of elderly persons live alone in their homes, often with limited or no physical mobility. The project relies on the mobile agent computing paradigm in order to create a Virtual Butler that provides the interface between the elderly and the smart home infrastructure. The Virtual Butler is receptive to user questions, answering them according to the context and knowledge of the AISH. It is also capable of interacting with the user whenever it senses that something has gone wrong, notifying next of kin and/or medical services, etc. The Virtual Butler is aware of the user location and moves to the computing device which is closest to the user, in order to be always present. Its avatar can also run in handheld devices keeping its main functionality in order to track user when s/he goes out. According to the evaluation carried out, the Virtual Butler is assessed as a very interesting and loved digital friend, filling the gap between the user and the

  15. There's not an app for that mobile user experience design for life

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Simon; Jones, Matt

    2014-01-01

    There's Not an App for That will make your work stand out from the crowd. It walks you through mobile experiences, and teaches you to evaluate current UX approaches, enabling you to think outside of the screen and beyond the conventional. You'll review diverse aspects of mobile UX: the screens, the experience, how apps are used, and why they're used. You'll find special sections on ""challenging your approach"", as well as a series of questions you can use to critique and evaluate your own designs. Whether the authors are discussing real-world products in conjunction with suggested improvemen

  16. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-02-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients' self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists' toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation.

  17. Capturing User Experiences Of Mobile Information Technology With The Repertory Grid Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fallman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the application of the repertory grid technique (RGT as a tool for capturing the user experience of technological artifacts. In noting the artificiality of assessing the emotional impact of interactive artifacts in isolation from cognitive judgments, we argue that HCI techniques must provide practical solutions regarding how to assess the holistic meaning of users' interactive experiences. RGT is a candidate for this role. This paper takes the reader step by step through setting up, conducting, and analyzing a RGT study. RGT is a technique on the border between qualitative and quantitative research, unique in that it respects the wholeness of cognition and does not separate the intellectual from the emotional aspects of the user experience. Compared to existing methods in HCI, RGT has the advantage of treating experiences holistically, while also providing a degree of quantitative precision and generalizability in their capture.

  18. User Acceptance of Mobile Knowledge Management Learning System: Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Thanks to advanced developments in wireless technology, learners can now utilize digital learning websites at anytime and anywhere. Mobile learning captures more and more attention in the wave of digital learning. Evolving use of knowledge management plays an important role to enhance problem solving skills. Recently, innovative approaches for…

  19. Evaluating user preferences for video transfer methods from a mobile device to a TV screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre; Pedersen, Jakob Schou; Larsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the evaluation of four methods for transferring video content from a mobile device to a fixed television. The methods have been investigated in a Wizard-of-Oz approach through two consecutive studies. The first experiment aimed at collecting general opinions toward such a ...

  20. Mobile Access to Libraries: Librarians and Users Experience for "I-Mode" Applications in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Masamitsu

    Recent penetration of the Internet in every aspect of society is remarkable. Along with various types of access methods being developed, information contents and services provided through them have also become available in a broad variety. The mobile phone systems capable of accessing the Internet have become very popular in Japan in the past…

  1. Design and User Evaluation of a Mobile Application to Teach Chinese Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell-Aguilar, Fernando; Qian, Kan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents both the pedagogical design principles and the challenges faced during the development of a mobile app, Chinese Characters First Steps, to support recognising, learning and practising writing Chinese characters at beginners' level, including the difficult balance between pedagogy and technical affordances. We also present the…

  2. Pursuing the Anonymous User: Privacy Rights and Mandatory Registration of Prepaid Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Gordon A.; Parisi, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been concern among law enforcement and national security organizations about the use of "anonymous" prepaid mobile phone service and its purported role in supporting criminal and terrorist activities. As a result, a number of countries have implemented registration requirements for such service. Privacy rights advocates…

  3. Evaluation of Potential Dog Guide Users: The Role of the Orientation and Mobility Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 13 dog-guide schools found that, in the majority of schools, between 91% and 100% of graduates received orientation and mobility (O&M) training before obtaining a dog guide. Eight schools require O&M for admittance, and 10 schools solicit recommendations from O&M specialists before admitting an applicant. (CR)

  4. Mean Effective Gain for Data Mode Operation of Mobile Handsets with Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Yanakiev, Boyan; Bonev, Ivan Bonev

    2010-01-01

    The current paper presents statistics on the mean effective gain (MEG) for mobile handsets. The results are based on a large measurement campaign in an urban environment where the propagation channel from two different base sta- tions to seven different handsets were measured in two bands (776 MH...

  5. User Influence on the Mean Effective Gain for Data Mode Operation of Mobile Handsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Bonev, Ivan Bonev

    2012-01-01

    The current paper presents statistics on the mean effective gain (MEG) for mobile handsets. The results are based on a large measurement campaign in an urban environment where the propagation channel from two different base stations to seven different handsets were measured in two bands (776 MHz ...

  6. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiwinkel, Till; Hey, Stefan; Bock, Olaf; Rössler, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks), and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user's daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  7. Designing a meta-level architecture in Java for adaptive parallelism by mobile software agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, Stephen Victor

    Adaptive parallelism refers to a parallel computation that runs on a pool of processors that may join or withdraw from a running computation. In this dissertation, a functional system of agents and agent behaviors for adaptive parallelism is developed. Software agents have the properties of robustness and have capacity for fault-tolerance. Adaptation and fault-tolerance emerge from the interaction of self-directed autonomous software agents for a parallel computation application. The multi-agent system can be considered an object-oriented system with a higher-level architectural component, i.e., a meta level for agent behavior. The meta-level object architecture is based on patterns of behavior and communication for mobile agents, which are developed to support cooperative problem solving in a distributed-heterogeneous computing environment. Although parallel processing is a suggested application domain for mobile agents implemented in the Java language, the development of robust agent behaviors implemented in an efficient manner is an active research area. Performance characteristics for three versions of a pattern recognition problem are used to demonstrate a linear speed-up with efficiency that is compared to research using a traditional client-server protocol in the C language. The best ideas from existing approaches to adaptive parallelism are used to create a single general-purpose paradigm that overcomes problems associated with nodefailure, the use of a single-centralized or shared resource, requirements for clients to actively join a computation, and a variety of other limitations that are associated with existing systems. The multi-agent system, and experiments, show how adaptation and parallelism can be exploited by a meta-architecture for a distributed-scientific application that is of particular interest to design of signal-processing ground stations. To a large extent the framework separates concern for algorithmic design from concern for where and

  8. Micro practices of coordination based on complex adaptive systems: user needs and strategies for coordinating public health in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Deleuran Terkildsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many highly formalised approaches to coordination poorly fit public health and recent studies call for coordination based on complex adaptive systems. Our contribution is two-fold. Empirically, we focus on public health, and theoretically we build on the patient perspective and treat coordination as a process of contingent, two-level negotiations of user needs. Theory and Methods: The paper draws on the concept of user needs-based coordination and sees coordination as a process, whereby needs emerging from the life world of the user are made amenable to the health system through negotiations. The analysis is based on an explorative case study of a health promotion initiative in Denmark. It adopts an anthropological qualitative approach and uses a range of qualitative data. Results: The analysis identifies four strategies of coordination: the coordinator focusing on the individual user or on relations with other professionals; and the manager coaching the coordinator or providing structural support. Crucially, the coordination strategies by management remain weak as they do not directly relate to specific user needs. Discussion: In process of bottom-up negotiations user needs become blurred and this is especially a challenge for management. The study therefore calls for an increased focus on the level nature of negotiations to bridge the gap that currently weakens coordination strategies by management.

  9. Micro practices of coordination based on complex adaptive systems: user needs and strategies for coordinating public health in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Deleuran Terkildsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many highly formalised approaches to coordination poorly fit public health and recent studies call for coordination based on complex adaptive systems. Our contribution is two-fold. Empirically, we focus on public health, and theoretically we build on the patient perspective and treat coordination as a process of contingent, two-level negotiations of user needs.Theory and Methods: The paper draws on the concept of user needs-based coordination and sees coordination as a process, whereby needs emerging from the life world of the user are made amenable to the health system through negotiations. The analysis is based on an explorative case study of a health promotion initiative in Denmark. It adopts an anthropological qualitative approach and uses a range of qualitative data.Results: The analysis identifies four strategies of coordination: the coordinator focusing on the individual user or on relations with other professionals; and the manager coaching the coordinator or providing structural support. Crucially, the coordination strategies by management remain weak as they do not directly relate to specific user needs.Discussion: In process of bottom-up negotiations user needs become blurred and this is especially a challenge for management. The study therefore calls for an increased focus on the level nature of negotiations to bridge the gap that currently weakens coordination strategies by management.

  10. Adaptive mobile tracking in unknown non-line-of-sight conditions with application to digital TV networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Piché, Robert; Kuusniemi, Heidi; Chen, Ruizhi

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracking a mobile device in mixed line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. NLOS error is assumed to be Gaussian with unknown mean and variance. An adaptive Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) is proposed for mobile tracking in such scenarios. An extended Kalman filter is used to approximately estimate the mobile state, and the particle filter is applied to estimate the posterior distribution of sight conditions and the unknown static parameters, the distribution of which is updated by sufficient statistics. To improve the efficiency of the particle filtering, we use the approximate optimal proposal distribution for particle inference. Algorithm performance is investigated in the scenario of mobile tracking using signals of opportunity from digital TV (DTV) network. Simulation results show that the adaptive RBPF method is effective to infer the unknown NLOS parameter and can achieve good tracking accuracy using a small number of particles.

  11. Design of a Mobile Agent-Based Adaptive Communication Middleware for Federations of Critical Infrastructure Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görbil, Gökçe; Gelenbe, Erol

    The simulation of critical infrastructures (CI) can involve the use of diverse domain specific simulators that run on geographically distant sites. These diverse simulators must then be coordinated to run concurrently in order to evaluate the performance of critical infrastructures which influence each other, especially in emergency or resource-critical situations. We therefore describe the design of an adaptive communication middleware that provides reliable and real-time one-to-one and group communications for federations of CI simulators over a wide-area network (WAN). The proposed middleware is composed of mobile agent-based peer-to-peer (P2P) overlays, called virtual networks (VNets), to enable resilient, adaptive and real-time communications over unreliable and dynamic physical networks (PNets). The autonomous software agents comprising the communication middleware monitor their performance and the underlying PNet, and dynamically adapt the P2P overlay and migrate over the PNet in order to optimize communications according to the requirements of the federation and the current conditions of the PNet. Reliable communications is provided via redundancy within the communication middleware and intelligent migration of agents over the PNet. The proposed middleware integrates security methods in order to protect the communication infrastructure against attacks and provide privacy and anonymity to the participants of the federation. Experiments with an initial version of the communication middleware over a real-life networking testbed show that promising improvements can be obtained for unicast and group communications via the agent migration capability of our middleware.

  12. Talk and Tools : The best of both worlds in mobile user interfaces for E-coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beun, RJ; Fitrianie, S.; Griffioen-Both, Fiemke; Spruit, Sandor; Horsch, C.H.G.; Lancee, J; Brinkman, W.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a user interface paradigm, called Talk-and-Tools, is presented for automated e-coaching. The paradigm is based on the idea that people interact in two ways with their environment: symbolically and physically. The main goal is to show how the paradigm can be applied in the design of

  13. User perspectives on mobile apps for anxiety and depression: a pilot quantitative and qualitative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kok, Robin; Huisman, Annemiek; Fazel, Khatera

    apps, we analysed 234 Play Store ratings and 7 in-depth contextual inquiry interviews with adults who were currently depressed or had been previously depressed. The grounded theory method was used to extract themes from ratings and interviews. Users were shown the 4 apps on an Android and were asked...

  14. Tailor-Made News: Meeting the demands of news users on mobile and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological possibilities for portable, personalized, and participatory news use, the public has not turned en masse from passive receivers who consume news on the producers' terms, into active users who tailor news to fit their personal preferences and practices. Unmistakably, some

  15. Leakiness and Creepiness in App Space: User Perceptions of Privacy and Mobile App Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Mainwaring, Scott; Skúladóttir, Halla Hrund

    2014-01-01

    confronted with app behaviors and their reactions assessed. Users felt their personal space had been violated in “creepy” ways. Using Altman’s notions of personal space and territoriality, and Nissenbaum’s theory of contextual integrity, we account for these emotional reactions and sug- gest that they point...

  16. Climate change, adaptation strategies and mobility: evidence from four settlements in Senegal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sall, Mohamadou [Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (Senegal); Tall, Serigne Mansour [ONU-Habitat (UN); Tandian, Aly [Universite Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis (Senegal); Samb, Al Assane

    2011-11-15

    This research investigates the impact of climate change on the mobility of people in four settlements in Senegal: Ngueye Ngueye, Gandiole, the Senegal River delta and Ourossogui. A qualitative approach involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups was used to determine how daily life in these communities is being affected by environmental change. Some migrants spend long periods as far afield as Mauritania, the Gambia or Spain, while others stay closer to home, going to places like Saint-Louis, Dakar and Mbour for short periods. Mobility is an opportunity for migrants to generate funds and send money home. It is a key factor in adaptation to climate change, as a strategy for survival and for diversifying incomes. The problems encountered in the ecological study zones are not entirely due to climate change, for migration is also triggered by factors such as the opening of the breach in Saint-Louis or lack of support for rural development. However, climate change is certainly accelerating disruptions and transformations in the study sites. Moreover, while migrants' financial transfers help improve daily life for some families, they also increase socio-economic inequalities between households that include migrants and those that do not. People are moving away from (but not necessarily abandoning) purely agricultural livelihoods and seeking to diversify their sources of income. This may come from migration, or from artisanal activities undertaken in the locality - such as metalwork, woodwork, sewing or hairdressing. Another option that many women have taken is using micro-credit facilities to start processing local produce, crushing groundnuts and preparing cereals to sell at the weekly markets. Other adaptation strategies are developed and adopted through technical innovations or awareness-raising and educational activities. These activities often require institutional support from the State or from NGOs involved in implementing projects and helping

  17. Adaptive Content Management for UGC Video Delivery in Mobile Internet Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilin Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand of storing and transferring user generated content (UGC has been rapidly growing with the popularization of mobile devices equipped with video recording and playback capabilities. As a typical application of software-defined networks/network functions virtualization-based pervasive communications infrastructure, content delivery networks (CDNs have been widely leveraged to distribute contents across different geographical locations. Nevertheless, the content delivery for UGC is inefficient with the existing “pull-based” caching mechanism in traditional CDNs, because there exists a huge volume of lukewarm or cold UGC which results in a low cache hit ratio. In this paper, we propose a “push-based” caching mechanism to efficiently and economically deliver UGC videos. Different from traditional CDNs which separate the original content storage and caching, we directly store UGC videos into selective servers which serve as both reliable storages and user-facing uploading servers. By carefully and dynamically selecting the storage locations of each UGC object based on its popularity and locality, we not only guarantee the data availability but also remarkably improve the content distribution performance and reduce the distribution cost.

  18. Motion Mode Recognition and Step Detection Algorithms for Mobile Phone Users

    OpenAIRE

    Susi, Melania; Renaudin, Val?rie; Lachapelle, G?rard

    2013-01-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is playing a key role in the design of the new generation of smartphones. Thanks to their reduced size, reduced power consumption, MEMS sensors can be embedded in above mobile devices for increasing their functionalities. However, MEMS cannot allow accurate autonomous location without external updates, e.g., from GPS signals, since their signals are degraded by various errors. When these sensors are fixed on the user’s foot, the stance ph...

  19. Multi-Layer 5G Mobile Phone Antenna for Multi-User MIMO Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2015-01-01

    for 5G wireless communications. Two identical linear sub arrays can be simultaneously used at different sides of the mobile-phone printed circuit board (PCB) for operation in diversity or multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) modes. Each sub array contains eight elements of very compact off......-center dipole antennas with dimensions of 5.4×0.67 mm2. The feature of compact design with good beam-steering function makes them well-suited to integrate into the mobile-phone mock-up. The fundamental properties of the proposed antenna have been investigated. Simulations show that the proposed 5G antenna......In this study, a new design of multi-layer phased array antenna for millimeter-wave (mm-Wave) fifth generation (5G) mobile terminals is proposed. The proposed linear phased array antenna is designed on four layers of the Rogers RT5880 substrates to operate at 28 GHz which is under consideration...

  20. An Optimized Player Taxonomy Model for Mobile MMORPGs with Millions of Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang You

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs have great potential as sites for research within the social and human-computer interaction. In the MMORPGs, a stability player taxonomy model is very important for game design. It helps to balance different types of players and improve business strategy of the game. The players in mobile MMORPGs are also connected with social networks; many studies only use the player's own attributes statistics or questionnaire survey method to predict player taxonomy, so lots of social network relations' information will be lost. In this paper, by analyzing the impacts of player's social network, commercial operating data from mobile MMORPGs is used to establish our player taxonomy model (SN model. From the model results, social network-related information in mobile MMORPGs will be considered as important factors to pose this optimized player taxonomy model. As experimental results showed, compared with another player taxonomy model (RA model, our proposed player taxonomy model can achieve good results: classification is more stable.

  1. Flexibility and adaptability - key elements of end-user participation in living space designing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakšić Željko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An end-user has the main role in the creation of space where spends most of its lifetime (home, workplace. That is why important that a designer (he first recognizes what requests of the end-user are. In the reference literature and researches that deal with the spatial organisations and designing of living area, the role of an end-user is essential. However, what does the end user participation mean, actually? At what level an end-user makes a final decision? Is it a choice among several alternative solutions provided by an architect or end-user himself? This article precisely deals with that subject - where begins and where ends participation of the end-user when the theme is the final spatial solution and under what circumstances. In this case, habitation represents the much more sensitive area than any other area for human needs or activities. In technical terms, an end-user could be someone who either knows nothing or knows a lot but not enough about both the spatial and functional organisations. His role should be reduced to choice of one from the group of high-quality solutions and, in a technical sense, logical solutions made by an expert. No more than that.

  2. A Comprehensive Review on Adaptability of Network Forensics Frameworks for Mobile Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid; Han, Qi; Bin Abdul Rahman, Zulkanain

    2014-01-01

    Network forensics enables investigation and identification of network attacks through the retrieved digital content. The proliferation of smartphones and the cost-effective universal data access through cloud has made Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) a congenital target for network attacks. However, confines in carrying out forensics in MCC is interrelated with the autonomous cloud hosting companies and their policies for restricted access to the digital content in the back-end cloud platforms. It implies that existing Network Forensic Frameworks (NFFs) have limited impact in the MCC paradigm. To this end, we qualitatively analyze the adaptability of existing NFFs when applied to the MCC. Explicitly, the fundamental mechanisms of NFFs are highlighted and then analyzed using the most relevant parameters. A classification is proposed to help understand the anatomy of existing NFFs. Subsequently, a comparison is given that explores the functional similarities and deviations among NFFs. The paper concludes by discussing research challenges for progressive network forensics in MCC. PMID:25097880

  3. Connectivity-Preserving Approach for Distributed Adaptive Synchronized Tracking of Networked Uncertain Nonholonomic Mobile Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sung Jin; Park, Bong Seok

    2017-09-06

    This paper addresses a distributed connectivity-preserving synchronized tracking problem of multiple uncertain nonholonomic mobile robots with limited communication ranges. The information of the time-varying leader robot is assumed to be accessible to only a small fraction of follower robots. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a new distributed nonlinear error surface for dealing with both the synchronized tracking and the preservation of the initial connectivity patterns among nonholonomic robots. Based on this nonlinear error surface, the recursive design methodology is presented to construct the approximation-based local adaptive tracking scheme at the robot dynamic level. Furthermore, a technical lemma is established to analyze the stability and the connectivity preservation of the total closed-loop control system in the Lyapunov sense. An example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  4. Adaptive Trajectory Tracking of Nonholonomic Mobile Robots Using Vision-Based Position and Velocity Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luyang; Liu, Yun-Hui; Jiang, Tianjiao; Wang, Kai; Fang, Mu

    2018-02-01

    Despite tremendous efforts made for years, trajectory tracking control (TC) of a nonholonomic mobile robot (NMR) without global positioning system remains an open problem. The major reason is the difficulty to localize the robot by using its onboard sensors only. In this paper, a newly designed adaptive trajectory TC method is proposed for the NMR without its position, orientation, and velocity measurements. The controller is designed on the basis of a novel algorithm to estimate position and velocity of the robot online from visual feedback of an omnidirectional camera. It is theoretically proved that the proposed algorithm yields the TC errors to asymptotically converge to zero. Real-world experiments are conducted on a wheeled NMR to validate the feasibility of the control system.

  5. A comprehensive review on adaptability of network forensics frameworks for mobile cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suleman; Shiraz, Muhammad; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Gani, Abdullah; Han, Qi; Rahman, Zulkanain Bin Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Network forensics enables investigation and identification of network attacks through the retrieved digital content. The proliferation of smartphones and the cost-effective universal data access through cloud has made Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) a congenital target for network attacks. However, confines in carrying out forensics in MCC is interrelated with the autonomous cloud hosting companies and their policies for restricted access to the digital content in the back-end cloud platforms. It implies that existing Network Forensic Frameworks (NFFs) have limited impact in the MCC paradigm. To this end, we qualitatively analyze the adaptability of existing NFFs when applied to the MCC. Explicitly, the fundamental mechanisms of NFFs are highlighted and then analyzed using the most relevant parameters. A classification is proposed to help understand the anatomy of existing NFFs. Subsequently, a comparison is given that explores the functional similarities and deviations among NFFs. The paper concludes by discussing research challenges for progressive network forensics in MCC.

  6. The facilitation of adoption and use of text intensive mobile services by low-literate users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matyila, M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available is the concept of functional illiteracy which is noted to be interchangeable with functional literacy. Functional illiteracy is based on whether an individual can utilize written information in their day to day activities at home, work or in their communities... (Functional Literacy In Eastern And Western Europe, 1990). Low-literate users are considered to experience degrees of functional illiteracy and are as a result of the different categorization of levels of literacy skills from no literacy skills to limited...

  7. User-centered applications: Use of mobile information technologies to promote sustainable school healthcare services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida Veldsman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The youth, especially school going children, are the future of any society. It is therefore important that children should receive adequate healthcare support at an early age in order to strive to preserve and ensure better education and welfare of the children and continuity in societal success. Despite the strategic initiatives that aim at improving the general health of school going children, such as South Africa’s Integrated School Health Policy, there still exist challenges in support programmes meant to alleviate the barriers to effective healthcare towards improved education for the school children. Advances in ICT enable a fundamental redesign of healthcare processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to user-centric applications. This paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of user-centred technologies for healthcare in schools. The paper employs the User Experience Management Model (UXM2 to review the current and emerging trends, and highlights challenges related to the design of a typical m-ICT application that supports delivery of healthcare in schools. The paper reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain.

  8. Identification and Evaluation of Medical Translator Mobile Applications Using an Adapted APPLICATIONS Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khander, Amrin; Farag, Sara; Chen, Katherine T

    2017-12-22

    With an increasing number of patients requiring translator services, many providers are turning to mobile applications (apps) for assistance. However, there have been no published reviews of medical translator apps. To identify and evaluate medical translator mobile apps using an adapted APPLICATIONS scoring system. A list of apps was identified from the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores, using the search term, "medical translator." Apps not found on two different searches, not in an English-based platform, not used for translation, or not functional after purchase, were excluded. The remaining apps were evaluated using an adapted APPLICATIONS scoring system, which included both objective and subjective criteria. App comprehensiveness was a weighted score defined by the number of non-English languages included in each app relative to the proportion of non-English speakers in the United States. The Apple iTunes and Google Play stores. Medical translator apps identified using the search term "medical translator." Main Outcomes and Measures: Compilation of medical translator apps for provider usage. A total of 524 apps were initially found. After applying the exclusion criteria, 20 (8.2%) apps from the Google Play store and 26 (9.2%) apps from the Apple iTunes store remained for evaluation. The highest scoring apps, Canopy Medical Translator, Universal Doctor Speaker, and Vocre Translate, scored 13.5 out of 18.7 possible points. A large proportion of apps initially found did not function as medical translator apps. Using the APPLICATIONS scoring system, we have identified and evaluated medical translator apps for providers who care for non-English speaking patients.

  9. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Beiwinkel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile health (mHealth could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks, and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user’s daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  10. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Weir-Sen

    2016-03-02

    The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients' true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access.

  11. User acceptance of mobile health services from users' perspectives: The role of self-efficacy and response-efficacy in technology acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Han, Xiaocui; Dang, Yuanyuan; Meng, Fanbo; Guo, Xitong; Lin, Jiayue

    2017-03-01

    With the swift emergence of electronic medical information, the global popularity of mobile health (mHealth) services continues to increase steadily. This study aims to investigate the efficacy factors that directly or indirectly influence individuals' acceptance of mHealth services. Based on the technology acceptance model, this research incorporates efficacy factors into the acceptance decision process. A research model was proposed involving the direct and indirect effects of self-efficacy and response-efficacy on acceptance intention, along with their moderating effects. The model and hypotheses were validated using data collected from a field survey of 650 potential service users. The results reveal that: (1) self-efficacy and response-efficacy are both positively associated with perceived ease of use; and (2) self-efficacy and response-efficacy moderate the impact of perceived usefulness toward adoption intention. Self-efficacy and response-efficacy both play an important role in individuals' acceptance of mHealth services, which not only affect their perceived ease of use of mHealth services, but also positively moderate the effects of perceived usefulness on adoption intention. Our findings serve to provide recommendations that are specifically customized for mHealth service providers and their marketers.

  12. Adaptive Video Streaming Using Bandwidth Estimation for 3.5G Mobile Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyeong-Min; Park, Chun-Su; Jung, Seung-Won; Ko, Sung-Jea

    Currently deployed mobile networks including High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) offer only best-effort Quality of Service (QoS). In wireless best effort networks, the bandwidth variation is a critical problem, especially, for mobile devices with small buffers. This is because the bandwidth variation leads to packet losses caused by buffer overflow as well as picture freezing due to high transmission delay or buffer underflow. In this paper, in order to provide seamless video streaming over HSDPA, we propose an efficient real-time video streaming method that consists of the available bandwidth (AB) estimation for the HSDPA network and the transmission rate control to prevent buffer overflows/underflows. In the proposed method, the client estimates the AB and the estimated AB is fed back to the server through real-time transport control protocol (RTCP) packets. Then, the server adaptively adjusts the transmission rate according to the estimated AB and the buffer state obtained from the RTCP feedback information. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves seamless video streaming over the HSDPA network providing higher video quality and lower transmission delay.

  13. Agile Development of Various Computational Power Adaptive Web-Based Mobile-Learning Software Using Mobile Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadahmad, Manouchehr; Yousefzadehfard, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) aims to improve all mobile applications such as m-learning systems. This study presents an innovative method to use web technology and software engineering's best practices to provide m-learning functionalities hosted in a MCC-learning system as service. Components hosted by MCC are used to empower developers to create…

  14. Demographic and health related data of users of a mobile application to support drug adherence is associated with usage duration and intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefan; Brandl, Christopher; Meister, Sven; Nagel, Eckhard; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Mitchell, Anna; Kribben, Andreas; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Mertens, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of mobile applications are designed to support users in their drug intake. When developing software for patients, it is important to understand the differences between individuals who have, who will or who might never adopt mobile interventions. This study analyzes demographic and health-related factors associated with real-life "longer usage" and the "usage-intensity per day" of the mobile application "Medication Plan". Between 2010-2012, the mobile application "Medication Plan" could be downloaded free of charge from the Apple-App-Store. It was aimed at supporting the regular and correct intake of medication. Demographic and health-related data were collected via an online questionnaire. This study analyzed captured data. App-related activities of 1799 users (1708 complete data sets) were recorded. 69% (1183/1708) applied "Medication Plan" for more than a day. 74% were male (872/1183), the median age 45 years. Variance analysis showed a significant effect of the users' age with respect to duration of usage (p = 0.025). While the mean duration of use was only 23.3 days for users younger than 21 years, for older users, there was a substantial increase over all age cohorts up to users of 60 years and above (103.9 days). Sex and educational status had no effect. "Daily usage intensity" was directly associated with an increasing number of prescribed medications and increased from an average of 1.87 uses per day and 1 drug per day to on average 3.71 uses per day for users stating to be taking more than 7 different drugs a day (pMobile applications may be a promising approach to support the treatment of patients with chronic conditions.

  15. [Functional capabilities of users of mobility devices after femoral hip fracture. A comparison study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischker, A; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2010-10-01

    The present study investigates the functional skills and capabilities of a sample of 105 patients treated at the Lutheran Geriatric Center Berlin after a hip fracture during a period of two years between 2004 and 2006. Geriatric assessment instruments (Barthel index, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL), Timed Up & Go (TUG), Tinetti, grip strength, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)) were implemented to measure the functional capabilities in this prospective study. The subjects were divided into three groups, characterized by the type of mobility device they used: crutches, a four-wheeled walker, or a wheel chair. Furthermore, the data were measured at three test intervals (t(0:): baseline before discharge, t(1): 4 weeks after discharge, t(2): 4 months after discharge). The results of the study differ significantly for each of the three groups at the different test intervals (Barthel index, IADL, TUG, Tinetti, grip strength, all pTinetti, grip strength, IADL, TUG, p≤0.05, general linear model). The results of the study differ significantly for each of the three groups at the different test intervals (Barthel index, IADL, TUG, Tinetti, grip strength, all p Tinetti, grip strength, IADL, TUG, p≤0.001, general linear model) A group-specific approach, based on the mobility devices used, allowed for better differentiation of functional capabilities after femoral hip fracture.

  16. Giving Users the Steering Wheel for Guiding Resource-Adaptive Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sousa, Joao P; Balan, Rajesh K; Poladian, Vahe; Garlan, David; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev

    2005-01-01

    .... However, existing solutions stop short of addressing the fact that different user tasks often have specific goals of quality of service, and that such goals often entail multiple aspects of quality of service...

  17. User-centered Service Design for Sustainable Mobility Innovations : Mapping Users’ Needs and Service Requirements for Electric Car Sharing Service Design

    OpenAIRE

    Sopjani, Liridona

    2015-01-01

    Electric car sharing is gradually expanding as an innovative and more sustainable mobility alternative to private cars. Though, the use of such mobility service has not yet reached the desired levels worldwide despite attracting large number of customers. For car sharing operators, thus, it is imperative to understand the users and their needs beyond the existing demographics and quantitative data in order to design more desirable and useful services that expand customer acceptance and usage ...

  18. Fusion of gait and fingerprint for user authentication on mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derawi, Mohammad; Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    A new multi-modal biometric authentication approach using gait signals and fingerprint images as biometric traits is proposed. The individual comparison scores derived from the gait and fingers are normalized using four methods (min-max, z-score, median absolute deviation, tangent hyperbolic......) and then four fusion approaches (simple sum, user-weighting, maximum score and minimum core) are applied. Gait samples are obtained by using a dedicated accelerometer sensor attached to the hip. The proposed method is evaluated using 7200 fingerprint images and gait samples. Fingerprints are collected...

  19. Mobile health IT: The effect of user interface and form factor on doctor-patient communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsos, Ole Andreas; Das, Anita; Svanæs, Dag

    2012-01-01

    a paper chart, a PDA, and a laptop mounted on a trolley. Video recordings from the simulations were analyzed qualitatively. Interviews with clinicians and patients were used to triangulate the findings and to verify the realism and results of the simulations. Result The paper chart afforded smooth re......-establishment of eye contact, better verbal and non-verbal contact, more gesturing, good visibility of actions, and quick information retrieval. The digital information devices lacked many of these affordances; physicians’ actions were not visible for the patients, the user interfaces required much attention...

  20. Experience with technology dynamics of user experience with mobile media devices

    CERN Document Server

    al-Azzawi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    With a focus on gaining an empirically derived understanding of the underlying psychological dimensions and processes behind people’s experiences with technology, this book contributes to the debate of user experience (UX) within several disciplines, including HCI, design and marketing. It analyses UX dynamics at various time scales, and explores the very nature of time and meaning in the context of UX.Experience with Technology uses personal construct theory (PCT) as a theoretical and methodological starting point to this project. Major case-studies are described that examine people’s exp

  1. Rate Adaptation for Cognitive Radio under Interference from Primary Spectrum User

    OpenAIRE

    Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki; Nishimori, Kentaro; Di Taranto, Rocco

    2007-01-01

    A cognitive radio can operate as a secondary system in a given spectrum. This operation should use limited power in order not to disturb the communication by primary spectrum user. Under such conditions, in this paper we investigate how to maximize the spectral efficiency in the secondary system. A secondary receiver observes a multiple access channel of two users, the secondary and the primary transmitter, respectively. We show that, for spectrally-efficient operation, the secondary system s...

  2. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have completely transformed the way we live, work, learn and conduct our everyday activities. Mobile phones have also changed the way users access lexicographic data. In fact, it can be argued that mobile phones and lexicography are not yet compatible. Modern users...... are already mobile – but lexicography is not yet fully ready for the mobile challenge, mobile users and mobile user situations. The article is based on empirical data from two surveys comprising 10 medical doctors, who were asked to look up five medical substances with the medical dictionary app Medicin...... and that lexicographic innovation is needed. A new type of users, new user situations and new access methods call for new lexicographic solutions, and this article proposes a six-pointed hexagram model, which can be used during dictionary app design to lexicographically calibrate the six dimensions in mobile...

  3. Short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale adapted to Spanish and French: Towards a cross-cultural research in problematic mobile phone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz

    2017-01-01

    Research into smartphone addiction has followed the scientific literature on problematic mobile phone use developed during the last decade, with valid screening scales being developed to identify maladaptive behaviour associated with this technology, usually in adolescent populations. This study adapts the short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale [SAS-SV] into Spanish and into French. The aim of the study was to (i) examine the scale's psychometric properties in both languages, (ii) estimate the prevalence of potential excessive smartphone use among Spanish and Belgian adults, and (iii) compare the addictive symptomatology measured by the SAS-SV between potentially excessive users from both countries. Data were collected via online surveys administered to 281 and 144 voluntary participants from both countries respectively, aged over 18years and recruited from academic environments. Results indicated that the reliability was excellent (i.e., Cronbach alphas: Spain: .88 and Belgium: .90), and the validity was very good (e.g., unifactoriality with a 49% and 54% of variance explained through explorative factor analysis, respectively). Findings showed that the prevalence of potential excessive smartphone use 12.5% for Spanish and 21.5% for francophone Belgians. The scale showed that at least 60% of excessive users endorsed withdrawal and tolerance symptoms in both countries, although the proposed addictive symptomatology did not cover the entire group of estimated excessive users and cultural differences appeared. This first cross-cultural study discusses the smartphone excessive use construct from its addictive pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of dynamic sitting balance tests and their correlations with functional mobility for wheelchair users with chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring the dynamic sitting balance of wheelchair users with spinal cord injury. The balance tests were performed in nine patients with chronic spinal cord injury (average of 17.2 years postinjury between levels C6 and L1, while they were sitting in their wheelchairs and on a standardized stool (unsupported sitting, twice, 7 days apart. Limits of stability (LOS and sequential weight shifting (SWS were designed in this study. The balance tests measured participants' volitional weight shifting in multiple directions within their base of support. Their mobility scores on the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III were correlated with the balance test results. The LOS results showed moderate to excellent test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.673 to 0.990 for both the wheelchair and the unsupported sitting. The SWS results showed moderate to excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.688 to 0.952. The LOS results correlated significantly with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility scores only in case of unsupported sitting, but the SWS test results showed significant correlations in both sitting conditions. To sum up, the sitting LOS and SWS tests are reliable and valid tools for assessing the dynamic sitting balance control of patients with spinal cord injury.

  5. Validation and User Evaluation of a Sensor-Based Method for Detecting Mobility-Related Activities in Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde A E Geraedts

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity is essential for older adults to stay healthy and independent. However, daily physical activity is generally low among older adults and mainly consists of activities such as standing and shuffling around indoors. Accurate measurement of this low-energy expenditure daily physical activity is crucial for stimulation of activity. The objective of this study was to assess the validity of a necklace-worn sensor-based method for detecting time-on-legs and daily life mobility related postures in older adults. In addition user opinion about the practical use of the sensor was evaluated. Twenty frail and non-frail older adults performed a standardized and free movement protocol in their own home. Results of the sensor-based method were compared to video observation. Sensitivity, specificity and overall agreement of sensor outcomes compared to video observation were calculated. Mobility was assessed based on time-on-legs. Further assessment included the categories standing, sitting, walking and lying. Time-on-legs based sensitivity, specificity and percentage agreement were good to excellent and comparable to laboratory outcomes in other studies. Category-based sensitivity, specificity and overall agreement were moderate to excellent. The necklace-worn sensor is considered an acceptable valid instrument for assessing home-based physical activity based upon time-on-legs in frail and non-frail older adults, but category-based assessment of gait and postures could be further developed.

  6. Weather effects on the patterns of people's everyday activities: a study using GPS traces of mobile phone users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerayut Horanont

    Full Text Available This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy. When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM-1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics.

  7. Weather effects on the patterns of people's everyday activities: a study using GPS traces of mobile phone users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanont, Teerayut; Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W; Sekimoto, Yoshihide; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree) at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy). When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM-1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics.

  8. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Anderson

    Full Text Available Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications ('apps' for consumers' self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps.'Health app' was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively.Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male participated, 13 of whom were aged 26-35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers' data.The semi-structured interviews provided insight into usage, benefits and challenges of

  9. Mobile Health Apps to Facilitate Self-Care: A Qualitative Study of User Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin; Burford, Oksana; Emmerton, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Consumers are living longer, creating more pressure on the health system and increasing their requirement for self-care of chronic conditions. Despite rapidly-increasing numbers of mobile health applications ('apps') for consumers' self-care, there is a paucity of research into consumer engagement with electronic self-monitoring. This paper presents a qualitative exploration of how health consumers use apps for health monitoring, their perceived benefits from use of health apps, and suggestions for improvement of health apps. 'Health app' was defined as any commercially-available health or fitness app with capacity for self-monitoring. English-speaking consumers aged 18 years and older using any health app for self-monitoring were recruited for interview from the metropolitan area of Perth, Australia. The semi-structured interview guide comprised questions based on the Technology Acceptance Model, Health Information Technology Acceptance Model, and the Mobile Application Rating Scale, and is the only study to do so. These models also facilitated deductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Implicit and explicit responses not aligned to these models were analyzed inductively. Twenty-two consumers (15 female, seven male) participated, 13 of whom were aged 26-35 years. Eighteen participants reported on apps used on iPhones. Apps were used to monitor diabetes, asthma, depression, celiac disease, blood pressure, chronic migraine, pain management, menstrual cycle irregularity, and fitness. Most were used approximately weekly for several minutes per session, and prior to meeting initial milestones, with significantly decreased usage thereafter. Deductive and inductive thematic analysis reduced the data to four dominant themes: engagement in use of the app; technical functionality of the app; ease of use and design features; and management of consumers' data. The semi-structured interviews provided insight into usage, benefits and challenges of health monitoring

  10. MotorBrain: A mobile app for the assessment of users' motor performance in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Chittaro, Luca; Burigat, Stefano; Budai, Riccardo

    2017-05-01

    Human motor skills or impairments have been traditionally assessed by neurologists by means of paper-and-pencil tests or special hardware. More recently, technologies such as digitizing tablets and touchscreens have offered neurologists new assessment possibilities, but their use has been restricted to a specific medical condition, or to stylus-operated mobile devices. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, we propose a mobile app (MotorBrain) that offers six computerized versions of traditional motor tests, can be used directly by patients (with and without the supervision of a clinician), and aims at turning millions of smartphones and tablets available to the general public into data collection and assessment tools. Then, we carry out a study to determine whether the data collected by MotorBrain can be meaningful for describing aging in human motor performance. A sample of healthy participants (N= 133) carried out the motor tests using MotorBrain on a smartphone. Participants were split into two groups (Young, Old) based on their age (less than or equal to 30 years, greater than or equal to 50 years, respectively). The data collected by the app characterizes accuracy, reaction times, and speed of movement. It was analyzed to investigate differences between the two groups. The app does allow measuring differences in neuromotor performance. Data collected by the app allowed us to assess performance differences due to the aging of the neuromuscular system. Data collected through MotorBrain is suitable to make meaningful distinctions among different kinds of performance, and allowed us to highlight performance differences associated to aging. MotorBrain supports the building of a large database of neuromotor data, which can be used for normative purposes in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reducing user error in dipstick urinalysis with a low-cost slipping manifold and mobile phone platform (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Dwork, Nicholas; Khan, Saara A.; Millet, Matthew; Magar, Kiran; Javanmard, Mehdi; Bowden, Audrey K.

    2017-03-01

    Urinalysis dipsticks were designed to revolutionize urine-based medical diagnosis. They are cheap, extremely portable, and have multiple assays patterned on a single platform. They were also meant to be incredibly easy to use. Unfortunately, there are many aspects in both the preparation and the analysis of the dipsticks that are plagued by user error. This high error is one reason that dipsticks have failed to flourish in both the at-home market and in low-resource settings. Sources of error include: inaccurate volume deposition, varying lighting conditions, inconsistent timing measurements, and misinterpreted color comparisons. We introduce a novel manifold and companion software for dipstick urinalysis that eliminates the aforementioned error sources. A micro-volume slipping manifold ensures precise sample delivery, an opaque acrylic box guarantees consistent lighting conditions, a simple sticker-based timing mechanism maintains accurate timing, and custom software that processes video data captured by a mobile phone ensures proper color comparisons. We show that the results obtained with the proposed device are as accurate and consistent as a properly executed dip-and-wipe method, the industry gold-standard, suggesting the potential for this strategy to enable confident urinalysis testing. Furthermore, the proposed all-acrylic slipping manifold is reusable and low in cost, making it a potential solution for at-home users and low-resource settings.

  12. Consumer value of context aware and location based mobile services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, Henny; Haaker, Timber; Teerling, Marije; Kleijnen, M.H.P.

    2008-01-01

    Context aware services have the ability to utilize information about the user's context to adapt services to the user's current situation and needs. In this paper we consider users' perceptions of the added value of location awareness and presence information in mobile services. We use an

  13. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion......, consumption, surveillance and mobilities history to mention some of the many themes covered by this reference work. This new title will focus on the academic contributions to this understanding by primarily focusing on works and publications in the aftermath of the seminal book and landmark text ‘Sociology...

  14. Self-Adaptive Correction of Heading Direction in Stair Climbing for Tracked Mobile Robots Using Visual Servoing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Song, Aiguo; Song, Zimo; Liu, Yuqing; Jiang, Guohua; Zhao, Guopu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a heading direction correction algorithm for a tracked mobile robot. To save hardware resources as far as possible, the mobile robot’s wrist camera is used as the only sensor, which is rotated to face stairs. An ensemble heading deviation detector is proposed to help the mobile robot correct its heading direction. To improve the generalization ability, a multi-scale Gabor filter is used to process the input image previously. Final deviation result is acquired by applying the majority vote strategy on all the classifiers’ results. The experimental results show that our detector is able to enable the mobile robot to correct its heading direction adaptively while it is climbing the stairs.

  15. Devices for visually impaired people: High technological devices with low user acceptance and no adaptability for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Monica; Cappagli, Giulia; Tonelli, Alessia; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Finocchietti, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Considering that cortical plasticity is maximal in the child, why are the majority of technological devices available for visually impaired users meant for adults and not for children? Moreover, despite high technological advancements in recent years, why is there still no full user acceptance of existing sensory substitution devices? The goal of this review is to create a link between neuroscientists and engineers by opening a discussion about the direction that the development of technological devices for visually impaired people is taking. Firstly, we review works on spatial and social skills in children with visual impairments, showing that lack of vision is associated with other sensory and motor delays. Secondly, we present some of the technological solutions developed to date for visually impaired people. Doing this, we highlight the core features of these systems and discuss their limits. We also discuss the possible reasons behind the low adaptability in children. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. A User-Centric Adaptive Learning System for E-Learning 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiu-Li; Shiu, Jung-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The success of Web 2.0 inspires e-learning to evolve into e-learning 2.0, which exploits collective intelligence to achieve user-centric learning. However, searching for suitable learning paths and content for achieving a learning goal is time consuming and troublesome on e-learning 2.0 platforms. Therefore, introducing formal learning in these…

  17. Adapting interaction environments to diverse users through online action set selection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hassan Mahmud, MM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive interfaces are a common feature of many systems ranging from field robotics to video games. In most applications, these interfaces must be used by a heterogeneous set of users, with substantial variety in effectiveness with the same...

  18. Assessment of Postflight Locomotor Performance Utilizing a Test of Functional Mobility: Strategic and Adaptive Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, L. E.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Ruttley, T. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function, allowing crewmembers to operate in the unique microgravity environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a terrestrial environment. During a re-adaptation period upon their return to Earth, crewmembers experience alterations in sensorimotor function, causing various disturbances in perception, spatial orientation, posture, gait, and eye-head coordination. Following long duration space flight, sensorimotor dysfunction would prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the vehicle; compromising crew safety and mission objectives. We are investigating two types of motor learning that may interact with each other and influence a crewmember's ability to re-adapt to Earth's gravity environment. In strategic learning, crewmembers make rapid modifications in their motor control strategy emphasizing error reduction. This type of learning may be critical during the first minutes and hours after landing. In adaptive learning, long-term plastic transformations occur, involving morphological changes and synaptic modification. In recent literature these two behavioral components have been associated with separate brain structures that control the execution of motor strategies: the strategic component was linked to the posterior parietal cortex and the adaptive component was linked to the cerebellum (Pisella, et al. 2004). The goal of this paper was to demonstrate the relative contributions of the strategic and adaptive components to the re-adaptation process in locomotor control after long duration space flight missions on the International Space Station (ISS). The Functional Mobility Test (FMT) was developed to assess crewmember s ability to ambulate postflight from an operational and functional perspective. Sixteen crewmembers were tested preflight (3 sessions) and postflight (days 1, 2, 4, 7, 25) following a long duration space flight (approx 6 months) on the ISS. We

  19. Implications of New Technological Adaptions on Switching Barriers: An Empirical Study of Mobile Telecommunication Subscribers in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EACP Karunarathne

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the technological advancements in the past few years in the mobile telecommunication industry, customer requirements and their behavioral patterns changed a lot. Implications of two of most popular such technological approaches which are independent from the service provider were discussed in this paper. Usually, firms have identified the value of maintaining a higher level of switching barriers since it is one kind of successful strategic aspects in mobile telecommunication. But, the importance of these strategies was challenged with the adoptions of new technologies. Therefore, to study its’ implication, data set was obtained by conducting a survey from randomly select mobile subscribers in Sri Lanka. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, t-test and factorial ANOVA test were used for the data analysis purpose. According to the analysis, it is revealed that these two technological advancements are weakened the level of switching barriers significantly. It may allow subscribers to switch service providers easily. On the other hand, subscribers with higher relationship age are having the highest switching barrier level even though they are users of those new technologies. But a significant difference among users and non-users has been identified through the study. Thus, policy makers are required to come up with new strategies to retain those subscribers within the network.

  20. Functional Mobility Performance and Balance Confidence in Older Adults after Sensorimotor Adaptation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccello-Stout, Regina R.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Weaver, G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates a main contributor of injury in older adults is from falling. The decline in sensory systems limits information needed to successfully maneuver through the environment. The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged exposure to the realignment of perceptual-motor systems increases adaptability of balance, and if balance confidence improves after training. A total of 16 older adults between ages 65-85 were randomized to a control group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a static visual scene) and an experimental group (walking on a treadmill while viewing a rotating visual scene). Prior to visual exposure, participants completed six trials of walking through a soft foamed obstacle course. Participants came in twice a week for 4 weeks to complete training of walking on a treadmill and viewing the visual scene for 20 minutes each session. Participants completed the obstacle course after training and four weeks later. Average time, penalty, and Activity Balance Confidence Scale scores were computed for both groups across testing times. The older adults who trained, significantly improved their time through the obstacle course F (2, 28) = 9.41, p train. There was no difference in balance confidence scores between groups across testing times F (2, 28) = 0.503, p > 0.05. Although the training group improved mobility through the obstacle course, there were no differences between the groups in balance confidence.