WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

  1. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  3. A comparison of three different adaptive strategies in image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Soendergaard, Jimmi; Petersen, Joergen B. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)), E-mail: annveste@rm.dk; Hoeyer, Morten; Muren, Ludvig Paul (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    The urinary bladder shows considerable individual variation in shape and position during a course of radiotherapy (RT). In this study we have developed and compared three different adaptive RT (ART) strategies for bladder cancer involving daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging and plan selection. Material and methods. Ten patients treated for bladder cancer had daily CBCTs acquired that were registered online using bony anatomy registration. Seven patients received intensity modulated RT (IMRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique to the bladder and pelvic lymph nodes. Three patients received treatment to the bladder only. Retrospectively, we compared three ART strategies that were all based on daily selection of the most suitable plan from a library consisting of three IMRT-plans corresponding to a small, medium and large target volume. ART method A utilised population-based margins while methods B and C used the bladder as seen on CBCT-scans from the first week of treatment; method B without delineation of the bladder on CBCT and method C with delineation of the bladder. Total dose distributions were calculated using the planning CT. For each patient, we calculated ratios of the dose volume histograms (DVHs) for the three ART strategies relative to non-adaptive therapy. Results. The inter-patient variation was large for all three ART strategies. The mean ratios of the volumes receiving 57 Gy or more (corresponding to 95% of prescribed dose) for methods A, B and C were 0.66 (SD: 0.11), 0.67 (SD: 0.13) and 0.67 (SD: 0.16) respectively when compared to the non-adaptive plan. Conclusion. When using any of the ART strategies, it is possible to reduce significantly the volumes receiving high doses compared to the use of a standard non-adaptive plan. The differences in dose volume parameters between the three methods were small compared with the differences from the standard plan.

  4. Prostatic fiducial markers implantation by transrectal ultrasound for adaptive image guided radiotherapy in localized cancer: 7-years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Lacetera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: we present our 7-years’ experience with fiducial gold markers inserted before Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT focusing on our echo-guided technique reporting early and late complications. Material and methods: 78 prostate cancer (PCA patients who underwent fiducial markers placement for adaptive IGRT (period 2007-2014 were selected. Mean patient age was 75 years (range 60-81, mean PSA 7.8 ng/ml (range 3.1-10, clinical stage < T3, mean Gleason Score 6.4 (range 6-7. We recorded early and late complications. Maximum distance between the Clinical Target Volume (CTV and Planning Target Volume (PTV was assessed for each direction and the mean PTV reduction was estimated. Results: we describe in details our echo-guided technique of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers insertion prior to adaptative IGRT. We report rare early toxicity (5-7% grade 1-2, a mean PTV reduction of 37% and a very low late toxicity (only 3.4% bladder G3 and 8% rectal G2 side effects. Conclusion: Our technique of fiducial gold markers implantation for adaptative IGRT is safe and well-tolerated and it resulted helpful to reduce CTV-PTV margin in all cases; the effects on clinical practice seem significant in terms of late toxicity but further investigations are needed with longer follow-up.

  5. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using...... the GEC-ESTRO target concept originally designed for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Treatment included EBRT with 45 Gy in 25 fractions followed by image guided adaptive interstitial BT (IGABT) with a pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) BT boost with 30 Gy in 50 hourly pulses. The D90 for CTVHR was 79.1 Gy...

  6. SU-E-J-151: Dosimetric Evaluation of DIR Mapped Contours for Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy with 4D Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balik, S [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Weiss, E; Williamson, J; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Jan, N; Zhang, L [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Roman, N [San Antonio Precision Center Ctr, San Antonio, TX (United States); Christensen, G [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate dosimetric errors resulting from using contours deformably mapped from planning CT to 4D cone beam CT (CBCT) images for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ten locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent one planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and weekly 4DCBCT scans. Multiple physicians delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal structures in planning CT images and only GTV in CBCT images. Manual contours were mapped from planning CT to CBCTs using small deformation, inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) algorithm for two scans in each patient. Two physicians reviewed and rated the DIR-mapped (auto) and manual GTV contours as clinically acceptable (CA), clinically acceptable after minor modification (CAMM) and unacceptable (CU). Mapped normal structures were visually inspected and corrected if necessary, and used to override tissue density for dose calculation. CTV (6mm expansion of GTV) and PTV (5mm expansion of CTV) were created. VMAT plans were generated using the DIR-mapped contours to deliver 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 95% and 100% coverage (V66) to PTV and CTV, respectively. Plan evaluation for V66 was based on manual PTV and CTV contours. Results: Mean PTV V66 was 84% (range 75% – 95%) and mean CTV V66 was 97% (range 93% – 100%) for CAMM scored plans (12 plans); and was 90% (range 80% – 95%) and 99% (range 95% – 100%) for CA scored plans (7 plans). The difference in V66 between CAMM and CA was significant for PTV (p = 0.03) and approached significance for CTV (p = 0.07). Conclusion: The quality of DIR-mapped contours directly impacted the plan quality for 4DCBCT-based adaptation. Larger safety margins may be needed when planning with auto contours for IGART with 4DCBCT images. Reseach was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  7. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  8. Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) Eliminates the Risk of Biochemical Failure Caused by the Bias of Rectal Distension in Prostate Cancer Treatment Planning: Clinical Evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sean S.; Yan Di; McGrath, Samuel; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Liang Jian; Ye Hong; Krauss, Daniel J.; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Kestin, Larry L., E-mail: lkestin@comcast.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Rectal distension has been shown to decrease the probability of biochemical control. Adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) corrects for target position and volume variations, reducing the risk of biochemical failure while yielding acceptable rates of gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2006, 962 patients were treated with computed tomography (CT)-based offline adaptive IGRT. Patients were stratified into low (n = 400) vs. intermediate/high (n = 562) National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. Target motion was assessed with daily CT during the first week. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used to measure daily setup error. Patient-specific confidence-limited planning target volumes (cl-PTV) were then constructed, reducing the standard PTV and compensating for geometric variation of the target and setup errors. Rectal volume (RV), cross-sectional area (CSA), and rectal volume from the seminal vesicles to the inferior prostate (SVP) were assessed on the planning CT. The impact of these volumetric parameters on 5-year biochemical control (BC) and chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GU and GI toxicity were examined. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years. Median minimum dose covering cl-PTV was 75.6 Gy. Median values for RV, CSA, and SVP were 82.8 cm{sup 3}, 5.6 cm{sup 2}, and 53.3 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The 5-year BC was 89% for the entire group: 96% for low risk and 83% for intermediate/high risk (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences in BC were seen with stratification by RV, CSA, and SVP in quartiles. Maximum chronic Grades {>=}2 and 3 GI toxicities were 21.2% and 2.9%, respectively. Respective values for GU toxicities were 15.5% and 4.3%. No differences in GI or GU toxicities were noted when patients were stratified by RV. Conclusions: Incorporation of adaptive IGRT reduces the risk of geometric miss and results in excellent biochemical control that is

  9. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutschmann, Heinz, E-mail: h.deutschmann@salk.at [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Kametriser, Gerhard [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Steininger, Philipp [radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Gaisberger, Christoph [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Mooslechner, Michaela [radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Jeschke, Stephan [University Clinic for Urology and Andrology, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Clinic for Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Sedlmayer, Felix [University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-08-01

    adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated prostate protocol on a standard linear accelerator to correct 6 degrees of freedom of internal organ motion, allowing safe and straightforward implementation of margin reduction and dose escalation.

  10. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  11. 肿瘤精确放疗新进展——图像引导自适应放疗%New Advance of Precise Radiotherapy: Image-guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锐濠; 张书旭; 林生趣

    2012-01-01

    图像引导自适应放疗(ART)是一种新型的肿瘤精确放疗技术,它是继三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)和三维调强放疗(IMRT)之后,随着图像引导放疗(IGRT)的普遍应用而发展起来的.ART可以较好地解决放疗分次间的靶区位置和形态变化问题,适用于各种部位的肿瘤.对于鼻咽癌患者和(或)体重明显下降的头颈部肿瘤患者,采用ART可使PTV的边界缩小,减少腮腺等危及器官所受剂量,降低放疗毒副反应.对于胸腹部肿瘤,ART可有效解决分次治疗间的靶区运动问题,在提高肿瘤照射剂量的同时有效降低同侧正常肺组织的受照剂量,使肺毒性降到最低.前列腺癌由于受膀胱和直肠充盈程度的影响,靶区的变形有时会比较大,采用ART可显著降低直肠副反应发生的概率,也可消除直肠扩张对治疗的影响.而对膀胱癌和宫颈癌患者进行分次治疗时,采用在线ART技术更新治疗计划,可明显减少肿瘤靶区周围危及器官的辐射剂量,保护直肠和大肠等危及器官,从而降低放射性直肠炎、放射性膀胱炎等放疗并发症的发生概率.%Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is one of the newly techniques in the field of precise radiotherapy, which is developed with the universal application of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) following by the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (MRT). ART can effectively correct for inter- and intra-fraction variation during radiation therapy and is applicable for the treatment of various anatomical parts of the tumor. For patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and (or) weight loss, ART can achieve significant clinical efficacy of which reduces the margin of the planning target volume (PTV), accordingly reducing radiation dose of organs at risk such as the parotid so as to minimize the radioactive toxic side effects. ART really reduces the impact of interfractional variations in patient

  12. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  13. Deformable image registration for image guided prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassetta, Roberto; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido [DEIB, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Leandro, Kleber; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo [Hospital Vitoria, Santos, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, Vinicius; Sakuraba, Roberto [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fattori, Giovanni [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Proton Therapy, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we present a CT to CBCT deformable registration method based on the ITK library. An algorithm was developed in order to explore the soft tissue information of the CT-CBCT images to perform deformable image registration (DIR), making efforts to overcome the poor signal-to-noise ratio and HU calibration issues that limits CBCT use for treatment planning purposes. Warped CT images and contours were generated and their impact in adaptive radiotherapy was evaluated by DVH analysis for photon and proton treatments. Considerable discrepancies, related to the treatment planning dose distribution, might be found due to changes in patient’s anatomy. (author)

  14. Health technology assessment of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT): A systematic review of current evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Mousavinezhad, Seyedeh Maryam; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Pooyandjoo, Morvarid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiotherapy used multiple imaging during the radiation therapy course to improve the precision and accuracy of health care provider's treatment. Objectives: This study aims to assess the safety, effectiveness and economic aspects of image-guided radiation therapy for decision-making about this technology in Iran. Methods: In this study, the most important medical databases such as PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched until November 2014. The systematic reviews, ...

  15. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  16. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cor...

  17. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps...

  18. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  19. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  20. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray JR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Julia R Murray,1,2 Helen A McNair,2 David P Dearnaley1,2 1Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK Abstract: The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. Keywords: radiotherapy, prostate cancer, post-prostatectomy, image-guided radiation therapy

  1. Integration between in vivo dosimetry and image guided radiotherapy for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca; Sabatino, Domenico; Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Mameli, Alessandra; Balducci, Mario; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Frascino, Vincenzo; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; D'Onofrio, Guido; Zini, Giampaolo; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesu', Cinzia; Morganti, Alessio G; Clemente, Stefania; Cozzolino, Mariella; Pedicini, Piernicola; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-06-01

    The article reports a feasibility study about the potentiality of an in vivo dosimetry method for the adaptive radiotherapy of the lung tumors treated by 3D conformal radiotherapy techniques (3D CRTs). At the moment image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has been used for this aim, but it requires taking many periodic radiological images during the treatment that increase workload and patient dose. In vivo dosimetry reported here can reduce the above efforts, alerting the medical staff for the commissioning of new radiological images for an eventual adaptive plan. The in vivo dosimetry method applied on 20 patients makes use of the transit signal St on the beam central axis measured by a small ion chamber positioned on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) or by the EPID itself. The reconstructed in vivo dosimetry at the isocenter point Diso requires a convolution between the transit signal St and a dose reconstruction factor C that essentially depends on (i) tissue inhomogeneities along the beam central axis and (ii) the in-patient isocenter depth. The C factors, one for every gantry angle, are obtained by processing the patient's computed tomography scan. The method has been recently applied in some Italian centers to check the radiotherapy of pelvis, breast, head, and thorax treatments. In this work the dose reconstruction was carried out in five centers to check the Diso in the lung tumor during the 3D CRT, and the results have been used to detect the interfraction tumor anatomy variations that can require new CT imaging and an adaptive plan. In particular, in three centers a small ion chamber was positioned below the patient and used for the St measurement. In two centers, the St signal was obtained directly by 25 central pixels of an a-Si EPID, equipped with commercial software that enabled its use as a stable detector. A tolerance action level of +/- 6% for every checked beam was assumed. This means that when a difference greater than 6% between the predicted

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@uvic.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Schlosser, Jeffrey [SoniTrack Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Chen, Josephine [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Hristov, Dimitre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    X6-1 probe in vertical orientation caused the highest attenuation of the 6 and 15 MV beams, which at 10 cm depth accounted for 33% and 43% decrease compared to the respective (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} open fields. The C5-2 probe in horizontal orientation, on the other hand, caused a dose increase of 10% and 53% for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively, in the buildup region at 0.5 cm depth. For the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation, the dose at 5 cm depth for the 3-cm diameter 6 MV and 5-cm diameter 15 MV beams was attenuated compared to the corresponding open fields to a greater degree by 65% and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. Due to the high beam attenuation of the US probes, the authors generally recommend avoiding delivery of treatment beams that intersect the probe. However, the presented MC models can be effectively integrated into US-guided radiotherapy treatment planning in cases for which beam avoidance is not practical due to anatomy geometry.

  3. The potential role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Lin Nguyen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is a non-invasive technique to detect metabolites within the normal and tumoral tissues. The ability of MRS to diagnose areas of high metabolic activity linked to tumor cell proliferation is particularly useful for radiotherapy treatment planning because of better gross tumor volume (GTV delineation. The GTV may be targeted with higher radiation dose, potentially improving local control without excessive irradiation to the normal adjacent tissues. Prostate cancer and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are two tumor models that are associated with a heterogeneous tumor distribution. Preliminary studies suggest that the integration of MRS into radiotherapy planning for these tumors is feasible and safe. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT by virtue of daily tumor imaging and steep dose gradient may allow for tumor dose escalation with the simultaneous integrated boost technique (SIB and potentially decrease the complications rates in patients with GBM and prostate cancers.

  4. Deep architecture neural network-based real-time image processing for image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro

    2017-08-01

    To develop real-time image processing for image-guided radiotherapy, we evaluated several neural network models for use with different imaging modalities, including X-ray fluoroscopic image denoising. Setup images of prostate cancer patients were acquired with two oblique X-ray fluoroscopic units. Two types of residual network were designed: a convolutional autoencoder (rCAE) and a convolutional neural network (rCNN). We changed the convolutional kernel size and number of convolutional layers for both networks, and the number of pooling and upsampling layers for rCAE. The ground-truth image was applied to the contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) method of image processing. Network models were trained to keep the quality of the output image close to that of the ground-truth image from the input image without image processing. For image denoising evaluation, noisy input images were used for the training. More than 6 convolutional layers with convolutional kernels >5×5 improved image quality. However, this did not allow real-time imaging. After applying a pair of pooling and upsampling layers to both networks, rCAEs with >3 convolutions each and rCNNs with >12 convolutions with a pair of pooling and upsampling layers achieved real-time processing at 30 frames per second (fps) with acceptable image quality. Use of our suggested network achieved real-time image processing for contrast enhancement and image denoising by the use of a conventional modern personal computer. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Image-guided radiotherapy platform using single nodule conditional lung cancer mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Korideck, Houari; Christensen, Camilla L; Herter, Jan M; Rhee, Kevin; Berbeco, Ross I; Bennett, David G; Akbay, Esra A; Kozono, David; Mak, Raymond H; Mike Makrigiorgos, G; Kimmelman, Alec C; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-12-18

    Close resemblance of murine and human trials is essential to achieve the best predictive value of animal-based translational cancer research. Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of non-small-cell lung cancer faithfully predict the response of human lung cancers to systemic chemotherapy. Owing to development of multifocal disease, however, these models have not been usable in studies of outcomes following focal radiotherapy (RT). We report the development of a preclinical platform to deliver state-of-the-art image-guided RT in these models. Presence of a single tumour as usually diagnosed in patients is modelled by confined injection of adenoviral Cre recombinase. Furthermore, three-dimensional conformal planning and state-of-the-art image-guided dose delivery are performed as in humans. We evaluate treatment efficacies of two different radiation regimens and find that Kras-driven tumours can temporarily be stabilized upon RT, whereas additional loss of either Lkb1 or p53 renders these lesions less responsive to RT.

  6. Image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge because of the head and neck complex anatomy and the tumor invasion to the adjacent organs and/or metastases to the cervical nodes. Postoperative irradiation or concurrent chemoradiation may lead to damage of radiosensitive structures such as the salivary glands, mandible, cochlea, larynx, and pharyngeal muscles. Xerostomia, osteoradionecrosis, deafness, hoarseness of the voice, dysphagia, and aspiration remain serious complications of head and neck irradiation and impair patient quality of life. Intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy by virtue of steep dose gradient and daily imaging may allow for decreased radiation of the organs at risk for complication while preserving loco-regional control.

  7. SU-E-J-191: Motion Prediction Using Extreme Learning Machine in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, J; Cao, R; Pei, X; Wang, H; Hu, L [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Engineering Technology Research Center of Accurate Radiotherapy of Anhui Province, Hefei 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, SuZhou (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Real-time motion tracking is a critical issue in image guided radiotherapy due to the time latency caused by image processing and system response. It is of great necessity to fast and accurately predict the future position of the respiratory motion and the tumor location. Methods: The prediction of respiratory position was done based on the positioning and tracking module in ARTS-IGRT system which was developed by FDS Team (www.fds.org.cn). An approach involving with the extreme learning machine (ELM) was adopted to predict the future respiratory position as well as the tumor’s location by training the past trajectories. For the training process, a feed-forward neural network with one single hidden layer was used for the learning. First, the number of hidden nodes was figured out for the single layered feed forward network (SLFN). Then the input weights and hidden layer biases of the SLFN were randomly assigned to calculate the hidden neuron output matrix. Finally, the predicted movement were obtained by applying the output weights and compared with the actual movement. Breathing movement acquired from the external infrared markers was used to test the prediction accuracy. And the implanted marker movement for the prostate cancer was used to test the implementation of the tumor motion prediction. Results: The accuracy of the predicted motion and the actual motion was tested. Five volunteers with different breathing patterns were tested. The average prediction time was 0.281s. And the standard deviation of prediction accuracy was 0.002 for the respiratory motion and 0.001 for the tumor motion. Conclusion: The extreme learning machine method can provide an accurate and fast prediction of the respiratory motion and the tumor location and therefore can meet the requirements of real-time tumor-tracking in image guided radiotherapy.

  8. Toward four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally recurrent endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokdal, Lars; Ørtoft, Gitte; Hansen, Estrid S; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome and feasibility of a four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy concept in patients with locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Forty-three patients with locally recurrent endometrial cancer were included. Treatment consisted of conformal external beam radiotherapy followed by a boost using pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (BT). Large tumors were treated with MRI-guided interstitial BT. Small tumors were treated with CT-guided intracavitary BT. The planning aim (total external beam radiotherapy and BT) for high-risk clinical target volume was D90 > 80 Gy, whereas constraints for organs at risk were D2cc ≤ 90 Gy for bladder and D2cc ≤ 70 Gy for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel in terms of equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions. Median high-risk clinical target volume was 18 cm(3) (range, 0-91). D90 was 82 Gy (range, 77-88). D2cc to bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 67 Gy (range, 50-81), 67 Gy (range, 51-77), and 55 Gy (range, 44-68), respectively. Median followup was 30 months (6-88). Two-year local control rate was 92% (standard error [SE], 5). Disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate was 59% (SE, 8) and 78% (SE, 7), respectively. Patients with low- to intermediate-risk for recurrence had a 2-year disease-free survival rate of 72% (SE, 9) compared with 42% (SE, 12) in patients with high risk for recurrence (p = 0.04). Late morbidity Grade 3 was recorded in 5 (12%) patients. Four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is feasible in locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Local control rate is good. Systemic control remains a problem in patients with high risk for recurrence. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the tolerance of patients with small cell lung cancer undergoing chemoradiation with tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT.Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the toxicity profile for nine patients with small cell lung cancer of the limited stage who underwent chemoradiation delivered with helical tomotherapy (HT has been conducted.Results: Acute grade 3-4 hematologic and esophagitis toxicities developed in two and three patients respectively. One patient developed a pulmonary embolism during radiotherapy. Seven patients had weight loss ranging from 0 to 30 pounds (median: 4 pounds. Three patients had treatment breaks ranging from 2 to 12 days. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range: 2-24 months, no patients developed any radiation related toxicities such as grade 3-4 pneumonitis or other long-term complications. The median survival was estimated to be 15 months. There were 2 local recurrences, 3 mediastinal recurrences, and six distant metastases.Conclusion: Grade 3-4 toxicities remained significant during chemoradiation when radiation was delivered with tomotherapy-based IGRT. However, the absence of grade 3-4 pneumonitis is promising and the use of HT needs to be investigated in future prospective studies.

  10. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    Decision regret (DR) may occur when a patient believes their outcome would have been better if they had decided differently about their management. Although some studies investigate DR after treatment for localised prostate cancer, none report DR in patients undergoing surgery and post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. We evaluated DR in this group of patients overall, and for specific components of therapy. We surveyed 83 patients, with minimum 5 years follow-up, treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to 64-66 Gy following www.EviQ.org.au protocols. A validated questionnaire identified DR if men either indicated that they would have been better off had they chosen another treatment, or they wished they could change their mind about treatment. There was an 85.5% response rate, with median follow-up post-IMRT 78 months. Adjuvant IG-IMRT was used in 28% of patients, salvage in 72% and ADT in 48%. A total of 70% of patients remained disease-free. Overall, 16.9% of patients expressed DR for treatment, with fourfold more regret for the RP component of treatment compared to radiotherapy (16.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). DR for androgen deprivation was 14.3%. Patients were regretful of surgery due to toxicity, not being adequately informed about radiotherapy as an alternative, positive margins and surgery costs (83%, 33%, 25% and 8% of regretful patients respectively). Toxicity caused DR in the three radiotherapy-regretful and four ADT-regretful patients. Patients were twice as regretful overall, and of surgery, for salvage vs adjuvant approaches (both 19.6% vs 10.0%). Decision regret after RP and post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT is uncommon, although patients regret RP more than post-operative IG-IMRT. This should reassure urologists referring patients for post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT, particularly in the immediate adjuvant setting. Other implications include appropriate patient selection for RP (and

  11. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Methods Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. Results In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188. Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174. Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271. The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179 and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027, ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033 and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088 in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. Conclusions In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment

  12. Radioterapia guiada por imagen: Impacto clínico Clinical impact of image guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Romero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La radioterapia guiada por imagen (RTGI es un concepto que engloba la manera más moderna de administrar el tratamiento radioterápico El objetivo es maximizar la dosis depositada en el volumen a tratar (target, minimizando la dosis en los órganos sanos. Esto no sería posible sin el continuo desarrollo tecnológico y de los software, sobre todo en las siguientes áreas: registrar imágenes deformables, replanificar nuevos tratamientos, imagen en tiempo real y cálculo de dosis acumulada. El impacto clínico es evidente, pero poco se habla del impacto en la reorganización de los servicios de Oncología Radioterápica. La RTGI supone un entrenamiento de todo el equipo involucrado, con un periodo de aprendizaje y puesta en marcha. Con la experiencia adquirida, el tiempo dedicado a cada paciente (en todas las etapas de su tratamiento: simulación, planificación, puesta en marcha, sistemas de verificación de posicionamiento, correcciones on-line, off-line, replanificación, controles clínicos periódicos, es muy superior al que se precisa en la radioterapia convencional, motivo por el que aparecen nuevas responsabilidades y roles.Image guided radiotherapy (IGR is a concept that encompasses the most modern way of administering radiotherapy treatment. The aim is to maximise the dose deposited in the target volume, minimising the dose in healthy organs. This would not be possible without the continuous development of technology and software, above all in the following areas: deformable image registration, replanning new treatments, real time image and calculation of accumulated dose. While the clinical impact is evident, little is said about the impact on the reorganisation of the Radiotherapy Oncology services. IGR supposes training all team members involved, with a training and a starting period. With the experience acquired, the time dedicated to each patient (in all stages of treatment: simulation, planning, starting out, systems for verifying

  13. Incremental Learning With Selective Memory (ILSM): Towards Fast Prostate Localization for Image Guided Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaozong; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) requires fast and accurate localization of the prostate in 3-D treatment-guided radiotherapy, which is challenging due to low tissue contrast and large anatomical variation across patients. On the other hand, the IGRT workflow involves collecting a series of computed tomography (CT) images from the same patient under treatment. These images contain valuable patient-specific information yet are often neglected by previous works. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework, namely incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM), to effectively learn the patient-specific appearance characteristics from these patient-specific images. Specifically, starting with a population-based discriminative appearance model, ILSM aims to “personalize” the model to fit patient-specific appearance characteristics. The model is personalized with two steps: backward pruning that discards obsolete population-based knowledge and forward learning that incorporates patient-specific characteristics. By effectively combining the patient-specific characteristics with the general population statistics, the incrementally learned appearance model can localize the prostate of a specific patient much more accurately. This work has three contributions: 1) the proposed incremental learning framework can capture patient-specific characteristics more effectively, compared to traditional learning schemes, such as pure patient-specific learning, population-based learning, and mixture learning with patient-specific and population data; 2) this learning framework does not have any parametric model assumption, hence, allowing the adoption of any discriminative classifier; and 3) using ILSM, we can localize the prostate in treatment CTs accurately (DSC ∼0.89) and fast (∼4 s), which satisfies the real-world clinical requirements of IGRT. PMID:24495983

  14. Incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM): towards fast prostate localization for image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaozong; Zhan, Yiqiang; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-02-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) requires fast and accurate localization of the prostate in 3-D treatment-guided radiotherapy, which is challenging due to low tissue contrast and large anatomical variation across patients. On the other hand, the IGRT workflow involves collecting a series of computed tomography (CT) images from the same patient under treatment. These images contain valuable patient-specific information yet are often neglected by previous works. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework, namely incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM), to effectively learn the patient-specific appearance characteristics from these patient-specific images. Specifically, starting with a population-based discriminative appearance model, ILSM aims to "personalize" the model to fit patient-specific appearance characteristics. The model is personalized with two steps: backward pruning that discards obsolete population-based knowledge and forward learning that incorporates patient-specific characteristics. By effectively combining the patient-specific characteristics with the general population statistics, the incrementally learned appearance model can localize the prostate of a specific patient much more accurately. This work has three contributions: 1) the proposed incremental learning framework can capture patient-specific characteristics more effectively, compared to traditional learning schemes, such as pure patient-specific learning, population-based learning, and mixture learning with patient-specific and population data; 2) this learning framework does not have any parametric model assumption, hence, allowing the adoption of any discriminative classifier; and 3) using ILSM, we can localize the prostate in treatment CTs accurately (DSC  ∼ 0.89 ) and fast (  ∼ 4 s), which satisfies the real-world clinical requirements of IGRT.

  15. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade {>=} 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  16. From image-guided radiotherapy to dose-guided radiotherapy; De la radiotherapie guidee par l'image a la radiotherapie guidee par la dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazoulat, G.; Lesaunier, M.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; Acosta, O. [Inserm, U642, 35000 Rennes (France); LTSI, universite de Rennes-1, 35000 Rennes (France); Louvel, G.; Chajon, E.; Leseur, J. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, rue de La-Bataille-Flandres-Dunkerque, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Lafond, C.; De Crevoisier, R. [Inserm, U642, 35000 Rennes (France); LTSI, universite de Rennes-1, 35000 Rennes (France); Centre Eugene-Marquis, rue de La-Bataille-Flandres-Dunkerque, CS 44229, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose. - In case of tumour displacement, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) based on the use of cone beam CT (tomographie conique) allows replacing the tumour under the accelerator by rigid registration. Anatomical deformations require however re-planning, involving an estimation of the cumulative dose, session after session. This is the objective of this study. Patients and methods. - Two examples of arc-intensity modulated radiotherapy are presented: a case of prostate cancer (total dose = 80 Gy) with tomographie conique (daily prostate registration) and one head and neck cancer (70 Gy). For the head and neck cancer, the patient had a weekly scanner allowing a dose distribution calculation. The cumulative dose was calculated per voxel on the planning CT after deformation of the dose distribution (with trilinear interpolation) following the transformation given by a non-rigid registration step (Demons registration method) from: either the tomographie conique (prostate), or the weekly CT. The cumulative dose was eventually compared with the planned dose. Results. - In cases of prostate irradiation, the 'cumulative' dose corresponded to the planned dose to the prostate. At the last week of irradiation, it was above the planned dose for the rectum and bladder. The volume of rectal wall receiving more than 50 Gy (V50) was 20% at the planning and 26% at the end of treatment, increasing the risk of rectal toxicity (NTCP) of 14%. For the bladder wall, V50 were 73% and 82%, respectively. In head and neck, the 'cumulative' dose to the parotid exceeded the planned dose (mean dose increasing from 46 Gy to 54 Gy) from the 5. week of irradiation on, suggesting the need for re-planning within the first 5 weeks of radiotherapy. Conclusion. - The deformable registration estimates the cumulative dose delivered in the different anatomical structures. Validation on digital and physical phantoms is however required before clinical evaluation. (authors)

  17. Theoretical aspects of implementation of kilovoltage cone-beam CT onboard linear accelerator for image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cordón, Marta; Ferrer Albiach, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) equipment is to reduce and correct inherent errors in external radiotherapy processes. At the present time, there are different IGRT systems available, but here we will refer exclusively to the kilovoltage cone-beam CT onboard linear accelerator (CBkVCT) and the different aspects that, from a clinical point of view, should be taken into consideration before the implementation of this equipment.

  18. FEASIBILITY OF IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY FOR CARDIAC SPARING IN PATIENTS WITH LEFT-SIDED BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eLEMANSKI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with left-sided breast cancer are at risk of cardiac toxicity because of cardiac irradiation during radiotherapy with the conventional 3-dimensional conformal technique (3D-CRT. In addition, many patients may receive chemotherapy prior to radiation which may damage the myocardium and may increase the potential for late cardiac complications. New radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT may decrease the risk of cardiac toxicity because of the steep dose gradient limiting the volume of the heart irradiated to a high dose. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT is a new technique of IMRT delivery with daily imaging which may further reduce excessive cardiac irradiation. Preliminary results of IGRT for cardiac sparing in patients with left-sided breast cancer are promising and need to be investigated in future prospective clinical studies.

  19. Five-year follow-up using a prostate stent as fiducial in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Sander, Lotte

    2015-06-01

    To report results from the five-year follow-up on a previously reported study using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) and a removable prostate stent as fiducial. Patients with local or locally advanced PC were treated using five-field 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT). The clinical target volumes (CTV) were treated to 78 Gy in 39 fractions using daily on-line image guidance (IG). Late genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the radiotherapy oncology group (RTOG) score and the common toxicity score of adverse events (CTC) score. Urinary symptoms were also scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Median observation time was 5.4 year. Sixty-two of the 90 patients from the original study cohort were eligible for toxicity assessment. Overall survival, cancer-specific survival and biochemical freedom from failure were 85%, 96% and 80%, respectively at five years after radiotherapy. Late toxicity GU and GI RTOG scores≥2 were 5% and 0%. Comparing pre- and post-radiotherapy IPSS scores indicate that development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy may be complex. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy using a prostate stent demonstrated survival data comparable with recently published data. GU and GI toxicities at five-year follow-up were low and comparable to the lowest toxicity rates reported. These findings support that the precision of the prostate stent technique is at least as good as other techniques. IPSS revealed a complex development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy.

  20. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-06-17

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma. A clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, H.; Muellner, S.; Budach, V. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Departments for Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Wiener, E. [School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Institute for Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Local tumor control and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) were assessed. In all, 250 patients with VS were treated: 190 patients with tumors < 2 cm diameter underwent SRS and 60 patients with tumors >2 to 3.5 cm underwent FSRT. Dose prescription for all cases with SRS (n = 190, 76 %) was 13.5 Gy. For FSRT, mainly two hypofractionated schedules (n = 60, 24 %) with either 7 fractions of 5 Gy (total dose: 35 Gy; n = 35) or 11 fractions of 3.8 Gy (total dose: 41.8 Gy; n = 16) were used. The primary endpoint was local tumor control. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. The median follow-up was 33.8 months. The 3-year local tumor control was 88.9 %. Local control for SRS and FSRT was 88 and 92 %, respectively. For FSRT with 35 and 41.8 Gy, local control was 90 and 100 %, respectively. There were no acute reactions exceeding grade I. In 61 cases (24.4 % of the entire cohort), trigeminal neuralgia was reported prior to treatment. At last follow-up, 16.3 % (10/61) of those patients reported relief of pain. Regarding facial nerve dysfunction, 45 patients (18 %) presented with symptoms prior to RT. At the last follow-up, 13.3% (6/45) of those patients reported a relief of dysesthesia. Using SRS to treat small VS results in good local control rates. FSRT for larger lesions also seems effective. Severe treatment-related complications are not frequent. Therefore, image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy is an appropriate alternative to microsurgery for patients with VS. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die lokale Kontrolle und die funktionellen Verlaeufe bei Patienten mit einem Vestibularisschwannom (VS), die sich einer linacbasierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (FSRT) unterzogen. Zwischen 1998 und 2008 wurden 250 Patienten mit einem VS behandelt. In dieser Kohorte wurden 190

  2. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  3. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, J. A., E-mail: yosimoon13@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia (Costa Rica); Rojas, J. I., E-mail: isaac.rojas@siglo21.cr [Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XX1, La Uruca (Costa Rica); PROXTRONICS CR, Ltda, Heredia (Costa Rica)

    2016-07-07

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  4. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  5. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the

  6. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radiotherapy (RT in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC, even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT, modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68% women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77 were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0. Six patients (27% underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73% advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54 Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT, and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P=0.029; median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT, and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT; P=0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P=0.049. Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy.

  7. Spatially varying Riemannian elasticity regularization: Application to thoracic CT registration in image-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Aznar, M.;

    2012-01-01

    For deformable registration of computed tomography (CT) scans in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) we apply Riemannian elasticity regularization. We explore the use of spatially varying elasticity parameters to encourage bone rigidity and local tissue volume change only in the gross tumor......-model we achieved a total mean target registration error (TRE) of 0.92 ± 0.49 mm. Using spatially varying regularization for the HL case, deformation was limited to the GTV and lungs....

  8. Prostate displacement during transabdominal ultrasound image-guided radiotherapy assessed by real-time four-dimensional transperineal monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Mariwan; Behrens, Claus F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) imaging is currently available for localizing the prostate in daily image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The aim of this study was to determine the induced prostate displacement during such TAUS imaging. The prostate displacement was monitored using a novel...... transperineal four-dimensional (4D) US (TPUS) system. Material and methods. Ten prostate cancer patients, with a mean age of 68 years (58/76), were US scanned in the computed tomography (CT) room utilizing the Clarity 4D TPUS monitoring system. The patients were asked to comply with a moderate bladder fi lling...... a TAUS scan. The time dependent prostate displacements induced by the 2D probe pressure were recorded for the three orthogonal directions. In total 42 monitoring curves with applied 2D probe were recorded. Results. Data analysis of 42 US scans resulted in pressure induced prostate displacements with mean...

  9. Evaluation of Imaging Dose From Different Image Guided Systems During Head and Neck Radiotherapy: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun Shing; Jong, Wei Loong; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding

    2016-12-09

    This work evaluated and compared the absorbed doses to selected organs in the head and neck region from the three image guided radiotherapy systems: cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kilovoltage (kV) planar imaging using the On-board Imager(®) (OBI) as well as the ExacTrac(®) X-ray system, all available on the Varian Novalis TX linear accelerator. The head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate patients' head within the imaging field. Nanodots optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters were positioned at selected sites to measure the absorbed doses. CBCT was found to be delivering the highest dose to internal organs while OBI-2D gave the highest doses to the eye lenses. The setting of half-rotation in CBCT effectively reduces the dose to the eye lenses. Daily high-quality CBCT verification was found to increase the secondary cancer risk by 0.79%.

  10. Potential applications of image-guided radiotherapy for brain metastases and glioblastoma to improve patient quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and brain metastasis remains a challenge because of the poor survival and the potential for brain damage following radiation. Despite concurrent chemotherapy and radiation dose escalation, local recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure in GBM most likely secondary to repopulation of cancer stem cells. Even though radiotherapy is highly effective for local control of radio-resistant tumors such as melanoma and renal cell cancer, systemic disease progression is the cause of death in most patients with brain metastasis. Preservation of quality of life of cancer survivors is the main issue for patients with brain metastasis. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT by virtue of precise radiation dose delivery may reduce treatment time of patients with GBM without excessive toxicity and potentially improve neurocognitive function with preservation of local control in patients with brain metastasis. Future prospective trials for primary brain tumors or brain metastasis should include IGRT to assess its efficacy to improve patient quality of life.

  11. Image guided position verification for intensity modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederveen, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a practical framework for dose escalation in the prostate using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to find out if marker based on-line position verification is clinically feasible and effective. We present a class solution for dose escalation in the pros

  12. A study of image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer based on lipiodol injection in the bladder wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soendergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Elstroem, Ulrik Vindelev; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), E-mail: jimmsoen@rm.dk; Oerding Olsen, Kasper (Dept. of Urology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Purpose. We have tested a procedure of focal injection of the contrast medium Lipiodol as a fiducial marker for image-guided boost of the tumor in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we have evaluated the feasibility and the safety of the method as well as the inter- and intra-fraction shift of the bladder tumor. Materials and methods. Five patients with muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer were included in the study. Lipiodol was injected during flexible cystoscopy into the submucosa of the bladder wall at the periphery of the tumor or the post resection tumor-bed. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired daily throughout the course of RT. Results. Lipiodol demarcation of the bladder tumor was feasible and safe with only a minimum of side effects related to the procedure. The Lipiodol spots were visible on CT and CBCT scans for the duration of the RT course. More than half of all the treatment fractions required a geometric shift of 5 mm or more to match on the Lipiodol spots. The mean intra-fraction shift (3D) of the tumor was 3 mm, largest in the anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that Lipiodol can be injected into the bladder mucosa and subsequently visualized on CT and CBCT as a fiducial marker. The relatively large inter-fraction shifts in the positions of Lipiodol spots compared to the intra-fraction movement indicates that image-guided RT based on radio-opaque markers is important for RT of the bladder cancer tumor.

  13. Adjuvant therapy after resection of brain metastases. Frameless image-guided LINAC-based radiosurgery and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.; Aebersold, D.M.; Pica, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Abu-Isa, J.; Beck, J.; Raabe, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neurosurgery; Kottke, R.; Wiest, R. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neuroradiology; Malthaner, M.; Schmidhalter, D. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics

    2013-09-15

    Background: Tumor bed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after resection of brain metastases is a new strategy to delay or avoid whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) and its associated toxicities. This retrospective study analyzes results of frameless image-guided linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy (SHRT) as adjuvant treatment without WBRT. Materials and methods: Between March 2009 and February 2012, 44 resection cavities in 42 patients were treated with SRS (23 cavities) or SHRT (21 cavities). All treatments were delivered using a stereotactic LINAC. All cavities were expanded by {>=} 2 mm in all directions to create the clinical target volume (CTV). Results: The median planning target volume (PTV) for SRS was 11.1 cm{sup 3}. The median dose prescribed to the PTV margin for SRS was 17 Gy. Median PTV for SHRT was 22.3 cm{sup 3}. The fractionation schemes applied were: 4 fractions of 6 Gy (5 patients), 6 fractions of 4 Gy (6 patients) and 10 fractions of 4 Gy (10 patients). Median follow-up was 9.6 months. Local control (LC) rates after 6 and 12 months were 91 and 77 %, respectively. No statistically significant differences in LC rates between SRS and SHRT treatments were observed. Distant brain control (DBC) rates at 6 and 12 months were 61 and 33 %, respectively. Overall survival (OS) at 6 and 12 months was 87 and 63.5 %, respectively, with a median OS of 15.9 months. One patient treated by SRS showed symptoms of radionecrosis, which was confirmed histologically. Conclusion: Frameless image-guided LINAC-based adjuvant SRS and SHRT are effective and well tolerated local treatment strategies after resection of brain metastases in patients with oligometastatic disease. (orig.)

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy by in-room CT- linear accelerator combination; Radiotherapie guidee par tomodensitometrie associee a l'accelerateur lineaire dans la salle de traitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crevoisiera, R. de; Lefkopoulos, D. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Kuban, D. [Texas Univ., M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Target localization has become increasingly important in the advent of IMRT, as treatment margins are reduced and target doses are increased with high-dose gradients outside this target volume. The in-room CT on rails-LINAC system allows CT imaging while the patient remains immobilized in the treatment position just prior to treatment. The anatomic inter- and intra-fractional variations can be therefore quantified during a course of treatment. The position of the tumour can be checked and corrected before the fraction. In case of modification of tumour shape, a re-planning of the treatment is also feasible. However, several issues remain: the integration with routine clinical treatment due to a lack of software tools, the frequency of imaging, and the cost-efficiency ratio. The clinical experience is yet very limited but CT-image-guided radiotherapy appears promising for prostate, brain and spinal tumours. (authors)

  15. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  16. Geometric-model-based segmentation of the prostate and surrounding structures for image-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Jeong, Yongwon; Radke, Richard J.; Chen, George T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    We present a computer vision tool to improve the clinical outcome of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer by improving irradiation technique. While intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows one to irradiate a specific region in the body with high accuracy, it is still difficult to know exactly where to aim the radiation beam on every day of the 30~40 treatments that are necessary. This paper presents a geometric model-based technique to accurately segment the prostate and other surrounding structures in a daily serial CT image, compensating for daily motion and shape variation. We first acquire a collection of serial CT scans of patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy, and manual segmentation of the prostate and other nearby structures by radiation oncologists. Then we train shape and local appearance models for the structures of interest. When new images are available, an iterative algorithm is applied to locate the prostate and surrounding structures automatically. Our experimental results show that excellent matches can be given to the prostate and surrounding structure. Convergence is declared after 10 iterations. For 256 x 256 images, the mean distance between the hand-segmented contour and the automatically estimated contour is about 1.5 pixels (2.44 mm), with variance about 0.6 pixel (1.24 mm).

  17. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvina Barra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the toxicity of a hypofractionated schedule for primary radiotherapy (RT of prostate cancer as well as the value of the nadir PSA (nPSA and time to nadir PSA (tnPSA as surrogate efficacy of treatment. Material and Methods. Eighty patients underwent hypofractionated schedule by Helical Tomotherapy (HT. A dose of 70.2 Gy was administered in 27 daily fractions of 2.6 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were graded on the RTOG/EORTC scales. The nPSA and the tnPSA for patients treated with exclusive RT were compared to an equal cohort of 20 patients treated with conventional fractionation and standard conformal radiotherapy. Results. Most of patients (83% did not develop acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity and 50% did not present genitourinary (GU toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36 months only grade 1 of GU and GI was reported in 6 and 3 patients as late toxicity. Average tnPSA was 30 months. The median value of nPSA after exclusive RT with HT was 0.28 ng/mL and was significantly lower than the median nPSA (0.67 ng/mL of the conventionally treated cohort (P=0.02. Conclusions. Hypofractionated RT schedule with HT for prostate cancer treatment reports very low toxicity and reaches a low level of nPSA that might correlate with good outcomes.

  19. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Dose contribution to involved pelvic nodes in two cancer centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van den Bos (Willemien); S. Beriwal (Sushil); L. Velema (Laura); A.A.C. de Leeuw (Astrid A.); C.N. Nomden (Christel); I.-M. Jürgenliemk-Schulz (Ina-M.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The goal of this study was to determine the dose contributions from image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) to individual suspicious pelvic lymph nodes (pLNN) in cervical cancer patients. Data were collected in two cancer centers, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

  20. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja, E-mail: barbara.jereczek@ieo.it [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Beltramo, Giancarlo [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, Laura [Radiotherapy Unit, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy); Fodor, Cristiana [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Luigi [Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Gherardi, Federica [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Ascione, Carmen [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); De Cobelli, Ottavio [Department of Urology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  1. A study of X-ray volume imaging system in image guided radiotherapy with variable gantry rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NVN Madhusudhana Sresty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this work is to investigate the optimal usage of X-ray volume imaging (XVI system in image-guided radiotherapy with different gantry rotations in order to reduce scanning volume.Methods: A total of 60 scans of 16 individual patients with breast and head and neck cancer were used in this study. Full and partial gantry rotations were performed at the same time with same setup on the couch using XVI system by changing the preset information. The reference and localization images were matched with this system. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software.Results: Variation in translational errors with full and half gantry rotations in breast cases were <2 mm in 86.6% of measurements. Similarly, variations between full and partial gantry rotations in head and neck cases were <1 mm in 95.5% of measurements. Results showed almost similar translational and rotational shifts in both full and partial gantry rotations in the majority of the cases.Conclusion: Based on selected cases in this study, partial rotation of the gantry for acquiring 3D cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT is very useful option in reducing scanning volume and total treatment time in IGRT. However, the use of partial rotation of the gantry depends on patient thickness and area to be reconstructed to track anatomical changes near to the target.

  2. Prospective phase II trial of image-guided radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter M; Aznar, Marianne C; Berthelsen, Anne K;

    2015-01-01

    -PET/CT in free breathing (FB) and a planning CT in both FB and DIBH. For each patient an involved-node radiotherapy plan was done for both DIBH and FB, and the doses to the lungs, heart, and female breasts were recorded prospectively. Mean doses to the heart valves and coronary arteries were recorded...... retrospectively. Patients were treated with the technique yielding the lowest doses to normal structures. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were treated with DIBH and three with FB. DIBH reduced the mean estimated lung dose by 2.0 Gy (median: 8.5 Gy vs. 7.2 Gy) (p mean heart dose by 1.4 Gy (6.0 Gy vs. 3.......9 Gy) (p Mean doses to the female breasts were equal with FB and DIBH. CONCLUSION: DIBH can significantly decrease the estimated mean doses to the heart and lungs without lowering the dose to the target...

  3. Automatic transperineal ultrasound probe positioning based on CT scan for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, S. M.; Verhaegen, F.; Paiva Fonesca, G.; de With, P. H. N.; Fontanarosa, D.

    2017-03-01

    Image interpretation is crucial during ultrasound image acquisition. A skilled operator is typically needed to verify if the correct anatomical structures are all visualized and with sufficient quality. The need for this operator is one of the major reasons why presently ultrasound is not widely used in radiotherapy workflows. To solve this issue, we introduce an algorithm that uses anatomical information derived from a CT scan to automatically provide the operator with a patient-specific ultrasound probe setup. The first application we investigated, for its relevance to radiotherapy, is 4D transperineal ultrasound image acquisition for prostate cancer patients. As initial test, the algorithm was applied on a CIRS multi-modality pelvic phantom. Probe setups were calculated in order to allow visualization of the prostate and adjacent edges of bladder and rectum, as clinically required. Five of the proposed setups were reproduced using a precision robotic arm and ultrasound volumes were acquired. A gel-filled probe cover was used to ensure proper acoustic coupling, while taking into account possible tilted positions of the probe with respect to the flat phantom surface. Visual inspection of the acquired volumes revealed that clinical requirements were fulfilled. Preliminary quantitative evaluation was also performed. The mean absolute distance (MAD) was calculated between actual anatomical structure positions and positions predicted by the CT-based algorithm. This resulted in a MAD of (2.8±0.4) mm for prostate, (2.5±0.6) mm for bladder and (2.8±0.6) mm for rectum. These results show that no significant systematic errors due to e.g. probe misplacement were introduced.

  4. Performance characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimeter for kilovoltage X-rays used in image guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET dosimeter for kilovoltage (kV X-ray beams in order to perform the in vivo dosimetry during image guidance in radiotherapy. The performance characteristics of high sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters were investigated for 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, and 125 kV X-ray beams used for imaging in radiotherapy. This study was performed using Clinac 2100 C/D medical electron linear accelerator with on-board imaging and kV cone beam computed tomography system. The characteristics studied in this work include energy dependence, angular dependence, and linearity. The X-ray beam outputs were measured as per American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG 61 recommendations using PTW parallel plate (PP ionization chamber, which was calibrated in terms of air kerma (Nk by the National Standard Laboratory. The MOSFET dosimeters were calibrated against the PP ionization chamber for all the kV X-ray beams and the calibration coefficient was found to be 0.11 cGy/mV with a standard deviation of about ±1%. The response of MOSFET was found to be energy independent for the kV X-ray energies used in this study. The response of the MOSFET dosimeter was also found independent of angle of incidence for the gantry angles in the range of 0° to 360° in-air as well as at 3 cm depth in tissue equivalent phantom.

  5. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Greco, Carlo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Motzer, Robert [Solid Tumor Service, Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  6. An investigation into the use of CMOS active pixel technology in image-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmond, J P F; Holland, A D [School of Engineering and Design, Brunel University, Uxbridge, UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Harris, E J; Ott, R J; Evans, P M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Clark, A T [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.osmond@brunel.ac.uk

    2008-06-21

    The increased intelligence, read-out speed, radiation hardness and potential large size of CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) gives them a potential advantage over systems currently used for verification of complex treatments such as IMRT and the tracking of moving tumours. The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of using an APS-based system to image the megavoltage treatment beam produced by a linear accelerator (Linac), and to demonstrate the logic which may ultimately be incorporated into future sensor and FPGA design to evaluate treatment and track motion. A CMOS APS was developed by the MI{sup 3} consortium and incorporated into a megavoltage imaging system using the standard lens and mirror configuration employed in camera-based EPIDs. The ability to resolve anatomical structure was evaluated using an Alderson RANDO head phantom, resolution evaluated using a quality control (QC3) phantom and contrast using an in-house developed phantom. A complex intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment was imaged and two algorithms were used to determine the field-area and delivered dose, and the position of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves off-line. Results were compared with prediction from the prescription and found to agree within a single image frame time for dose delivery and 0.02-0.03 cm for the position of collimator leaves. Such a system therefore shows potential as the basis for an on-line verification system capable of treatment verification and monitoring patient motion.

  7. [Assessment of overall spatial accuracy in image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using a spine registration method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hayashi, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung and liver tumors is always performed under image guidance, a technique used to confirm the accuracy of setup positioning by fusing planning digitally reconstructed radiographs with X-ray, fluoroscopic, or computed tomography (CT) images, using bony structures, tumor shadows, or metallic markers as landmarks. The Japanese SBRT guidelines state that bony spinal structures should be used as the main landmarks for patient setup. In this study, we used the Novalis system as a linear accelerator for SBRT of lung and liver tumors. The current study compared the differences between spine registration and target registration and calculated total spatial accuracy including setup uncertainty derived from our image registration results and the geometric uncertainty of the Novalis system. We were able to evaluate clearly whether overall spatial accuracy is achieved within a setup margin (SM) for planning target volume (PTV) in treatment planning. After being granted approval by the Hospital and University Ethics Committee, we retrospectively analyzed eleven patients with lung tumor and seven patients with liver tumor. The results showed the total spatial accuracy to be within a tolerable range for SM of treatment planning. We therefore regard our method to be suitable for image fusion involving 2-dimensional X-ray images during the treatment planning stage of SBRT for lung and liver tumors.

  8. Seminal vesicle interfraction displacement and margins in image guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mak Daisy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze interfraction motion of seminal vesicles (SV, and its motion relative to rectal and bladder filling. Methods and Materials SV and prostate were contoured on 771 daily computed tomography “on rails” scans from 24 prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Random and systematic errors for SV centroid displacement were measured relative to the prostate centroid. Margins required for complete geometric coverage of SV were determined using isotropic expansion of reference contours. SV motion relative to rectum and bladder was determined. Results Systematic error for the SV was 1.9 mm left-right (LR, 2.9 mm anterior-posterior (AP and 3.6 mm superior-inferior (SI. Random error was 1.4 mm (LR, 2.7 mm (AP and 2.1 mm (SI. 10 mm margins covered the entire left SV and right SV on at least 90% of fractions in 50% and 33% of patients and 15 mm margins covered 88% and 79% respectively. SV AP movement correlated with movement of the most posterior point of the bladder (mean R2 = 0.46, SD = 0.24 and rectal area (mean R2 = 0.38, SD = 0.21. Conclusions Considerable interfraction displacement of SV was observed in this cohort of patients. Bladder and rectal parameters correlated with SV movement.

  9. SU-E-J-205: Monte Carlo Modeling of Ultrasound Probes for Real-Time Ultrasound Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristov, D; Schlosser, J; Bazalova, M [Stanford Universtiy, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, J [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, Lafayette, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of ultrasound (US) probe beam attenuation for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their CT images in the EGSnrc BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. Due to the metal parts, the probes were scanned in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2–8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the probes was measured in a solid water phantom for a 6 MV and 15 MV 15x15 cm{sup 2} beam delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The dose was measured with the PTW-729 ionization chamber array at two depths and compared to MC simulations. The extreme case beam attenuation expected in robotic US image guided radiotherapy for probes in upright position was quantified by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities were 4.6 and 4.2 g/cm{sup 3} in the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses revealed that over 98% of measurement points passed the 3%/3mm criteria for both probes and measurement depths. The extreme attenuation for probes in upright position was found to be 25% and 31% for the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively, for both 6 and 15 MV beams at 10 cm depth. Conclusion: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. As a Result, radiotherapy treatment planning with the imaging probes in place can now be performed. J Schlosser is an employee of SoniTrack Systems, Inc. D Hristov has financial interest in SoniTrack Systems, Inc.

  10. Migration of implanted markers for image-guided lung tumor stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Eclov, Neville C W; Yu, Yao; Rao, Aarti K; Dieterich, Sonja; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y; Loo, Billy W; Kothary, Nishita; Maxim, Peter G

    2013-03-04

    The purpose of this study was to quantify postimplantation migration of percutaneously implanted cylindrical gold seeds ("seeds") and platinum endovascular embolization coils ("coils") for tumor tracking in pulmonary stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). We retrospectively analyzed the migration of markers in 32 consecutive patients with computed tomography scans postimplantation and at simulation. We implanted 147 markers (59 seeds, 88 coils) in or around 34 pulmonary tumors over 32 procedures, with one lesion implanted twice. Marker coordinates were rigidly aligned by minimizing fiducial registration error (FRE), the root mean square of the differences in marker locations for each tumor between scans. To also evaluate whether single markers were responsible for most migration, we aligned with and without the outlier causing the largest FRE increase per tumor. We applied the resultant transformation to all markers. We evaluated migration of individual markers and FRE of each group. Median scan interval was 8 days. Median individual marker migration was 1.28 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 0.78-2.63 mm). Median lesion FRE was 1.56 mm (IQR 0.92-2.95 mm). Outlier identification yielded 1.03 mm median migration (IQR 0.52-2.21 mm) and 1.97 mm median FRE (IQR 1.44-4.32 mm). Outliers caused a mean and median shift in the centroid of 1.22 and 0.80 mm (95th percentile 2.52 mm). Seeds and coils had no statistically significant difference. Univariate analysis suggested no correlation of migration with the number of markers, contact with the chest wall, or time elapsed. Marker migration between implantation and simulation is limited and unlikely to cause geometric miss during tracking.

  11. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Radiotherapy Department, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Huis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  12. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Analysis of interfractional errors and acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, A.; Hammoud, M.; Alaradi, A.; Mohammed, A. [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of the study was to estimate interfractional deviations in patient and prostate position, the impact of the frequency of online verification on the treatment margins, and to assess acute radiation reactions of high-dose external beam image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) of localized prostate cancer. IG-IMRT was performed by daily online verification of implanted fiducial prostate markers using a megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A total of 1011 image-guided treatment fractions from 23 consecutive unselected prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The median total dose was 79.2 Gy (range 77.4-81.0 Gy). Acute radiation reactions were assessed weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.4.03. A relevant combined patient set-up and prostate motion population random error of 4-5 mm was observed. Compared to daily IGRT, image guidance every other day required an expansion of the CTV-PTV (clinical target volume-planning target volume) margin of 8.1, 6.6, and 4.1 mm in the longitudinal, vertical, and lateral directions, thereby, increasing the PTV by approximately 30-40 %. No grade 3 or 4 acute radiation reactions were observed with daily IG-IMRT. A high dose with surprisingly low acute toxicity can be applied with daily IG-IMRT using implanted fiducial prostate markers. Daily image guidance is clearly superior to image guidance every other fraction concerning adequate target coverage with minimal margins. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die interfraktionelle Variabilitaet der Patientenlagerung und Prostataposition, den Einfluss der Bildgebungsfrequenz und die akuten Strahlenreaktionen bei einer hochdosierten bildgesteuerten intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IG-IMRT) des Prostatakarzinoms zu untersuchen. IG-IMRT wurde durch taegliche Verifikation von implantierten roentgendichten Prostatamarkern mittels Megavolt-Bildgebung (''electronic portal imaging

  13. SU-D-9A-07: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, L [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Bai, S [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Zhang, Y [Beijing Cancer Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China); Ming, X [TianJin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin, Tianjin (China); Deng, J [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate the imaging doses and cancer risks associated with various imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation during image-guided radiotherapy of an increasingly large number of cancer patients. Methods: 141 patients (52 brain cases, 47 thoracic cases, 42 abdominal cases, aged 3 to 91 years old) treated between October 2009 and March 2010 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. During the whole radiotherapy course, each patient underwent at least one type of imaging procedures, i.e., kV portal, MV portal and kVCBCT, besides CT simulations. Based on Monte Carlo modeling and particle transport in human anatomy of various dimensions, the correlations between the radiation doses to the various organs-at-risk (OARs) at the head, the thoracic and the abdominal regions and one's weight, circumference, scan mAs and kVp have been obtained and used to estimate the radiation dose from a specific imaging procedure. The radiation-induced excess relative risk (ERR) was then estimated with BEIR VII formulism based on one's gender, age and radiation dose. 1+ ERR was reported in this study as relative cancer risk. Results: For the whole cohort of 141 patients, the mean imaging doses from various imaging procedures were 8.3 cGy to the brain, 10.5 cGy to the lungs and 19.2 cGy to the red bone marrow, respectively. Accordingly, the cancer risks were 1.140, 1.369 and 2.671, respectively. In comparison, MV portal deposited largest doses to the lungs while kVCBCT delivered the highest doses to the red bone marrow. Conclusion: The compiled imaging doses to a patient during his/her treatment course were patient-specific and site-dependent, varying from 1.2 to 263.5 cGy on average, which were clinically significant and should be included in the treatment planning and overall decision-making. Our results indicated the necessity of personalized imaging to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing the associated cancer risks

  14. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  15. [Comparison of vacuum bag fixation and Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation for image-guided cervical cancer radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y B; Wang, Y L; Zhuo, Y H

    2017-06-23

    suitable for the cone-beam CT image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer patients. However, the displacement in the left and right directions of the vacuum bag fixation is smaller than the Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation. During the period of treatment, the mean value of the difference of displacement in the anterior and posterior directions of the Orfit rack with thermoplastic membrane fixation is mild, which can be used individually by the patients with a flexible body and good tolerance.

  16. 图像引导放射治疗技术在宫颈癌放射治疗中的应用%Application of Image Guided Radiotherapy with Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林浩; 吴丽丽; 陈泓

    2014-01-01

    图像引导放疗( Image guided radiotherapy,IGRT)是继三维适形放疗和调强放疗之后,又一新的放疗技术,分析宫颈癌放疗中影响靶区精确性的主要因素、IGRT主要技术方式及其在宫颈癌放射治疗中的应用。%Image guided radiotherapy is a new radiotherapy technique to consider the extent and pat erns of organ motion. In this study, we analyze the factors those influence the target treatment accuracy, the IGRT technique and its application on cervix radiotherapy.

  17. The utility of positron emission tomography in the treatment planning of image-guided radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the thorax, the extent of tumor may be more accurately defined with the addition of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET to computed tomography (CT. This led to the increased utility of FDG-PET or PET/CT in the treatment planning of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The inclusion of FDG-PET information in target volume delineation not only improves tumor localization, but also decreases the amount of normal tissue included in the planning target volume (PTV in selected patients. Therefore, it has a critical role in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT for NSCLC. In this review, the impact of FDG-PET on target volume delineation in radiotherapy for NSCLC, which may increase the possibility of safe dose escalation with IGRT, the commonly used methods for tumor target volume delineation FDG-PET for NSCLC, and its impact on clinical outcome will be discussed.

  18. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY FOR RADIATION DOSE ESCALATION IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY STAGE HIGH-RISK PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with early stage high-risk prostate cancer (PSA >20, Gleason score >7 are at high risk of recurrence following prostate cancer irradiation. Radiation dose escalation to the prostate may improve biochemical free survival for these patients. However, high rectal and bladder dose with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT may lead to excessive gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT, by virtue of combining the steep dose gradient of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and daily pretreatment imaging, may allow for radiation dose escalation and decreased treatment morbidity. Reduced treatment time is feasible with hypofractionated IGRT and it may improve patient quality of life.

  19. Commissioning and quality assurance of the X-ray volume Imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An Image-Guided Radiotherapy-capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer′s specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality. These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy.

  20. Contribution of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy to pelvic nodes treatment in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacorro, Warren; Dumas, Isabelle; Levy, Antonin; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Canova, Charles-Henri; Felefly, Tony; Huertas, Andres; Marsolat, Fanny; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazeron, Renaud

    With the increasing use of simultaneous integrated boost in the treatment of cervical cancer, there is a need to anticipate the brachytherapy (BT) contribution at the level of the pathologic pelvic lymph nodes. This study aimed to report the dose delivered at their level during BT. Patients with pelvic nodal involvement and treated with a combination of chemoradiation followed by image-guided adaptive pulsed-dose-rate BT were selected. On per BT three-dimensional images, pelvic lymphadenopathies were delineated, without planning aim. For the purposes of the study, D100, D98, D90, and D50 were reviewed and converted in 2-Gy equivalent doses, using the linear quadratic model with an α/β of 10 Gy. Ninety-one patients were identified, allowing evaluation at the level of 226 lymphadenopathies. The majority of them were external iliac (48%), followed by common iliac (25%), and internal iliac (16%) regions. The 2-Gy equivalent doses D98 were 4.4 ± 1.9 Gy, 5.4 ± 3.1 Gy, and 4.3 ± 2.1 Gy for the obturator, internal iliac, and external iliac, respectively, and 2.8 ± 2.5 Gy for the common iliac. The contribution to the common iliac nodes was significantly lower than the one of external and internal iliac (p < 0.001). BT significantly contributes to the treatment of pelvic nodes at the level of approximately 5 Gy in the internal, external, and obturator areas and 2.5 Gy in the common iliac, allowing the anticipation of nodal boost with the simultaneous integrated boost technique. However, important individual variations have been observed, and evaluation of the genuine BT contribution should be recommended. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SU-E-J-10: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, L [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Bai, S [Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Y [Key laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research, Ministry of Ed, Beijing, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate imaging doses and cancer risks to organs-at-risk as a Result of cumulative doses from various radiological imaging procedures in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in a large cohort of cancer patients. Methods: With IRB approval, imaging procedures (computed tomography, kilo-voltage portal imaging, megavoltage portal imaging and kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography) of 4832 cancer patients treated during 4.5 years were collected with their gender, age and circumference. Correlations between patient’s circumference and Monte Carlo simulated-organ dose were applied to estimate organ doses while the cancer risks were reported as 1+ERR using BEIR VII models. Results: 80 cGy or more doses were deposited to brain, lungs and RBM in 273 patients (maximum 136, 278 and 267 cGy, respectively), due largely to repetitive imaging procedures and non-personalized imaging settings. Regardless of gender, relative cancer risk estimates for brain, lungs, and RBM were 3.4 (n = 55), 2.6 (n = 49), 1.8 (n = 25) for age group of 0–19; 1.2 (n = 87), 1.4 (n = 98), 1.3 (n = 51) for age group of 20–39; 1.0 (n = 457), 1.1 (n = 880), 1.8 (n=360) for age group of 40–59; 1.0 (n = 646), 1.1 (n = 1400), 2.3 (n = 716) for age group of 60–79 and 1.0 (n = 108),1.1 (n = 305),1.6 (n = 147) for age group of 80–99. Conclusion: The cumulative imaging doses and associated cancer risks from multi-imaging procedures were patient-specific and site-dependent, with up to 2.7 Gy imaging dose deposited to critical structures in some pediatric patients. The associated cancer risks in brain and lungs for children of age 0 to 19 were 2–3 times larger than those for adults. This study indicated a pressing need for personalized imaging protocol to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing associated cancer risks. Sichuan University Scholarship.

  2. Present status and future of high-precision image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Dimopoulos, Johannes C. A.; Berger, Daniel; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. (Dept. of Radiotherapy Medical Univ. of Vienna, General Hospital Vienna, Wien (Austria))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for cervical cancer, using mainly MRI, is an evolving method, increasingly replacing the 2D approach based on conventional radiography. During the complex 4D chain of this procedure image-assistance is provided for disease assessment, provisional treatment planning ('pre-planning'), applicator placement and reconstruction, as well as for contouring, definitive treatment planning and quality control of dose delivery. With IGABT changes of topography adjacent to the applicator, caused by tumour regression, oedema, organ changes and dilation are identified. Thus, the CTV for IGABT is primarily based on the tumour volume at the time of BT and takes into account both time and spatial domains. IGABT requires systematic concepts for target, OAR, biological modelling, DVH analysis, and dose-volume-adaptation. Methods and Results. This report focuses on the advantages and uncertainties, dose-effect relations and clinical results of the IGABT procedure addressing the current status and future perspectives. Uncertainties during the 4D chain of IGABT are mainly related to target contouring, applicator reconstruction, as well as to inter-fraction, intra-fraction and inter-application variability, as caused by tumour response and organ changes. Different from EBRT where set-up uncertainties are compensated by adding a margin to the CTV, no margins to the lateral and anterior-posterior directions can be used for IGABT. Discussion. By 3D treatment planning for IGABT significant improvement of the DVH parameters is achieved compared to 2D library plans. In small tumours the benefit is primarily obtained by a decrease of dose to nearby OAR while in large tumours the use of supplementary interstitial techniques and optimization may double the target volume that can be treated at a therapeutic dose level. The clinical impact of IGABT could recently be demonstrated by the establishment of some correlations between

  3. Time evaluation of image-guided radiotherapy in patients with spinal bone metastases. A single-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, H.; Habermehl, D.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Time is an important factor during immobilization for radiotherapy (RT) of painful spinal bone metastases. The different RT techniques currently in use have differing impacts on medical staff requirements, treatment planning and radiation delivery. This prospective analysis aimed to evaluate time management during RT of patients with spine metastases, focusing particularly on the impact of image-guided RT (IGRT). Between 21 March 2013 and 17 June 2013, we prospectively documented the time associated with the core work procedures involving the patient during the first day of RT at three different linear accelerators (LINACs). The study included 30 patients; 10 in each of three groups. Groups 1 and 2 were treated with a single photon field in the posterior-anterior direction; group 3 received a three-dimensional conformal treatment plan. The median overall durations of one treatment session were 24 and 25.5 min for the conventional RT groups and 15 min for IGRT group. The longest single procedure was patient immobilization in group 1 (median 9.5 min), whereas this was image registration and matching in groups 2 and 3 (median duration 9.5 and 5 min, respectively). Duration of irradiation (beam-on time) was similar for all groups at 4 or 5 min. The shortest immobilization procedure was observed in group 3 with a median of 3 min, compared to 4 min in group 2 and 9.5 min in group 1. With this analysis, we have shown for the first time that addition of modern IGRT does not extend the overall treatment time for patients with painful bone metastases and can be applied as part of clinical routine in a palliative setting. The choice of treatment technique should be based upon the patient's performance status, as well as the size of the target volume and location of the metastasis. (orig.) [German] Der Zeitfaktor ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil bei der Immobilisation waehrend der Radiotherapie (RT) bei schmerzhaften Knochenmetastasen der Wirbelsaeule. Unterschiedliche RT

  4. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicat......Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC...

  5. A Web application for the management of clinical workflow in image-guided and adaptive proton therapy for prostate cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Daniel; Boes, Peter; Ho, Meng Wei; Li, Zuofeng

    2015-05-08

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), based on radiopaque markers placed in the prostate gland, was used for proton therapy of prostate patients. Orthogonal X-rays and the IBA Digital Image Positioning System (DIPS) were used for setup correction prior to treatment and were repeated after treatment delivery. Following a rationale for margin estimates similar to that of van Herk,(1) the daily post-treatment DIPS data were analyzed to determine if an adaptive radiotherapy plan was necessary. A Web application using ASP.NET MVC5, Entity Framework, and an SQL database was designed to automate this process. The designed features included state-of-the-art Web technologies, a domain model closely matching the workflow, a database-supporting concurrency and data mining, access to the DIPS database, secured user access and roles management, and graphing and analysis tools. The Model-View-Controller (MVC) paradigm allowed clean domain logic, unit testing, and extensibility. Client-side technologies, such as jQuery, jQuery Plug-ins, and Ajax, were adopted to achieve a rich user environment and fast response. Data models included patients, staff, treatment fields and records, correction vectors, DIPS images, and association logics. Data entry, analysis, workflow logics, and notifications were implemented. The system effectively modeled the clinical workflow and IGRT process.

  6. Determination of parameters of image quality a system of image guided radiotherapy based on CBCT; Determinacion de los parametros de calidad de imagen de un sistema de imagen guiada en radioterapia basado en CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Ramos, S.; Luis Simon Florencio, J.; Rodriguez Alarcon, C.; Vicent Granado, D.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2013-07-01

    In modern radiotherapy image-guided treatments constitute one of the fundamental advances. Therefore the knowledge of the goodness of its operation is essential for the correct application of the treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the quality parameters of a system of image guided recently acquired by our Center, and compare them with those specified by the manufacturer and those published in the literature. (Author)

  7. Hypofractionated image-guided breath-hold SABR (Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy of liver metastases – clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boda-Heggemann Judit

    2012-06-01

    -reactive protein. Conclusions A trend to statistically significant correlation of local progression was observed for BED2 and PTV-size. Dose-levels BED2 > 78 Gy cannot be reached in large lesions constituting a significant fraction of this series. Image-guided SABR (igSABR is therefore an effective non-invasive treatment modality with low toxicity in patients with small inoperable liver metastases.

  8. Transperineal gold marker implantation for image-guided external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. A single institution, prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgo, Kliton; Agoston, Peter; Major, Tibor; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba [National Institute of Oncology, Centre of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-06-15

    To present the feasibility and complications of transperineal fiducial marker implantation in prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Between November 2011 and April 2016, three radiopaque, gold-plated markers were transperineally implanted into the prostate of 300 patients under transrectal ultrasound guidance and with local anaesthesia. A week after the procedure patients filled in a questionnaire regarding pain, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, rectal bleeding, hematuria, hematospermia or fever symptoms caused by the implantation. Pain was scored on a 1-10 scale, where score 1 meant very weak and score 10 meant unbearable pain. The implanted gold markers were used for daily verification and online correction of patients' setup during IGRT. Based on the questionnaires no patient experienced fever, infection, dysuria or rectal bleeding after implantation. Among the 300 patients, 12 (4%) had hematospermia, 43 (14%) hematuria, which lasted for an average of 3.4 and 1.8 days, respectively. The average pain score was 4.6 (range 0-9). Of 300 patients 87 (29%) felt any pain after the intervention, which took an average of 1.5 days. None of the patients needed analgesics after implantation. Overall, 105 patients (35%) reported less, 80 patients (27%) more, and 94 patients (31%) equal amount of pain during marker implantation compared to biopsy. The 21 patients who had a biopsy performed under general anesthesia did not answer this question. Transperineal gold marker implantation under local anesthesia was well tolerated. Complications were limited; rate and frequency of perioperative pain was comparable to the pain caused by biopsy. The method can be performed safely in clinical practice. (orig.) [German] Darstellung von Machbarkeit und Komplikationen der transperinealen Implantation von Goldmarkern bei mit perkutaner Strahlentherapie (IGRT) behandelten Prostatakarzinompatienten. Zwischen November 2011 und April 2016 bekamen 300

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the novalis image-guided system: preliminary results regarding efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Naoki; Kosaki, Katsura; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuzuya, Teiji; Utsunomiya, Setsuo

    2010-12-01

    www.tcrt.org The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the Novalis image-guided radiotherapy system. After preliminarily treating liver tumors using the Novalis system from July 2006, we started a protocol-based study in February 2008. Eighteen patients (6 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 with metastatic liver tumor) were treated with 55 or 50 Gy, depending upon their planned dose distribution and liver function, delivered in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Four non-coplanar and three coplanar static beams were used. Patient age ranged from 54 to 84 years (median: 72 years). The Child-Pugh classification was Grade A in 17 patients and Grade B in 1. Tumor diameter ranged from 12 to 35 mm (median: 23 mm). Toxicities were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 4.0, and radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was defined by Lawrence's criterion. The median follow-up period was 14.5 months. For all patients, the 1-year overall survival and local control rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. A Grade 1 liver enzyme change was observed in 5 patients, but no RILD or chronic liver dysfunction was observed. SBRT using the Novalis image-guided system is safe and effective for treating primary and metastatic liver tumors. Further investigation of SBRT for liver tumors is warranted. In view of the acceptable toxicity observed with this protocol, we have moved to a new protocol to shorten the overall treatment time and escalate the dose.

  10. Prospective phase II trial of image-guided radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma: Benefit of deep inspiration breath-hold

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petersen, Peter M; Aznar, Marianne C; Berthelsen, Anne K; Loft, Annika; Schut, Deborah A; Maraldo, Maja; Josipovic, Mirjana; Klausen, Thomas L; Andersen, Flemming L; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    .... In this prospective study we investigate whether radiotherapy with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce radiation doses to the lungs, heart, and cardiac structures without compromising the target dose...

  11. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian;

    2006-01-01

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  12. Reduced rectal toxicity with ultrasound-based image guided radiotherapy using BAT trademark (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrer, Markus; Schroeder, Peter; Welzel, Grit; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine Kathrin [University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate the effect of image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound BAT (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) on rectal toxicity in conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Patients and Methods 42 sequential patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy before and after the introduction of BAT were included. Planning computed tomography (CT) was performed with empty rectum and moderately filled bladder. The planning target volume (PTV) included the prostate and seminal vesicles with a safety margin of 1.5 cm in anterior and lateral direction. In posterior direction the anterior 1/3 of the rectum circumference were included. Total dose was 66 Gy and a boost of 4 Gy excluding the seminal vesicles. 22 patients (BAT group) were treated with daily stereotactic ultrasound positioning, for the other 20 patients (NoBAT group) an EPID (electronic portal imaging device) was performed once a week. Acute and late genito-urinary (GU) and rectal toxicity and PSA values were evaluated after 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The total median follow up of toxicity was 3 years in the BAT group and 4 years in the NoBAT group. Results In the NoBAT group significant more rectal toxicity occurred, while in GU toxicity no difference was seen. Two patients in the NoBAT group showed late rectal toxicity grade 3, no toxicity > grade 2 occurred in the BAT group. There was no significant difference in PSA reduction between the groups. Conclusion Without BAT significant more acute and a trend to more late rectal toxicity was found. With regard to dose escalation this aspect is currently evaluated with a larger number of patients using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). (orig.)

  13. [Clinical experience in image-guided ultra-conformal hypofractionated radiotherapy in case of metastatic diseases at the University of Pécs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, Zoltán; Boronkai, Árpád; Lõcsei, Zoltán; Kalincsák, Judit; Szappanos, Szabolcs; Farkas, Róbert; Al Farhat, Yousuf; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Sebestyén, Klára; Kovács, Péter; Csapó, László; Mangel, László

    2015-06-01

    With the development of radiation therapy technology, the utilization of more accurate patient fixation, inclusion of PET/CT image fusion into treatment planning, 3D image-guided radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated dynamic arc irradiation, the application of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be extended to specified extracranial target volumes, and so even to the treatment of various metastases. Between October 2012 and August 2014 in our institute we performed extracranial, hypofractionated, image-többguided radiotherapy with RapidArc system for six cases, and 3D conformal multifield technique for one patient with Novalis TX system in case of different few-numbered and slow-growing metastases. For the precise definition of the target volumes we employed PET/CT during the treatment planning procedure. Octreotid scan was applied in one carcinoid tumour patient. Considering the localisation of the metastases and the predictable motion of the organs, we applied 5 to 20 mm safety margin during the contouring procedure. The average treatment volume was 312 cm3. With 2.5-3 Gy fraction doses we delivered 39-45 Gy total dose, and the treatment duration was 2.5 to 3 weeks. The image guidance was carried out via ExacTrac, and kV-Cone Beam CT equipment based on an online protocol, therefore localisation differences were corrected before every single treatment. The patients tolerated the treatments well without major (Gr>2) side effects. Total or near total regression of the metastases was observed at subsequent control examinations in all cases (the median follow-up time was 5 months). According to our first experience, extracranial, imageguided hypofractionated radiotherapy is well-tolerated by patients and can be effectively applied in the treatment of slow-growing and few-numbered metastases.

  14. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities.

  15. Quality assurance in MR image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Final results of the EMBRACE study dummy run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirisits, Christian; Federico, Mario; Nkiwane, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    aspects of image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: EMBRACE is a prospective multicenter trial aiming to assess the impact of (MRI)-based IGABT in locally advanced cervical cancer. An EMBRACE dummy run was designed to identify sources and magnitude of uncertainties and errors...... considered important for the evaluation of clinical, and dosimetric parameters and their relation to outcome. Contouring, treatment planning and dose reporting was evaluated and scored with a categorical scale of 1-10. Active feedback to centers was provided to improve protocol compliance and reporting...... and BT. Centers with experience in IGABT (>30 cases) had better performance as compared to centers with limited experience. CONCLUSION: The comprehensive dummy run designed for the EMBRACE trial has been a feasible tool for QA in IGABT of cervix cancer. It should be considered for future IGABT trials...

  16. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV⩾85Gy EQD2) while reducing the dose to the surface of the vagina to vaginal loading (ovoid/ring) was reduced from 51% to 33% of the total loading with VDD, which significantly reduced the dose to the vaginal dose points (pvaginal point was reduced by a mean of 4±4Gy EQD2 (pvaginal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-07

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  18. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C;

    2016-01-01

    at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV ⩾ 85 Gy EQD2) while reducing...... the dose to the surface of the vagina to mean vaginal loading (ovoid/ring) was reduced from 51% to 33% of the total loading with VDD, which significantly reduced the dose to the vaginal dose points (p...... mean of 4 ± 4 Gy EQD2 (p

  19. Implementation of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) within the radiotherapy department of the Orleans regional hospital; Mise en place de la radiotherapie guidee par l'image (IGRT) dans le service de radiotherapie du centre hospitalier regional d'Orleans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champeaux-Orange, E.; Munier, O.; Bouscayrol, H.; Wachter, T. [CHR d' Orleans, 45 (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors describe the process followed for the implementation of an image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) in a radiotherapy department. Two Synergy linear accelerators have been selected to introduce this technique using the low-energy conical tomography and the intensity-induced conformational radiotherapy with arc therapy. This implementation comprised the presentation of the equipment to physicians and operators, education by the manufacturer, the development of procedures of determination of the number of volume acquisition per patient and per site, the choice of displacement vectors. Short communication

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials In total, 744 ...

  1. Initial application of a geometric QA tool for integrated MV and kV imaging systems on three image guided radiotherapy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Speiser, Michael; Medin, Paul; Papiez, Lech; Solberg, Timothy; Xing, Lei

    2011-05-01

    Several linacs with integrated kilovoltage (kV) imaging have been developed for delivery of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). High geometric accuracy and coincidence of kV imaging systems and megavoltage (MV) beam delivery are essential for successful image guidance. A geometric QA tool has been adapted for routine QA for evaluating and characterizing the geometric accuracy of kV and MV cone-beam imaging systems. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of methodology to routine QA across three IGRT-dedicated linac platforms. It has been applied to a Varian Trilogy (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), an Elekta SynergyS (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden), and a Brainlab Vero (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Both the Trilogy and SynergyS linacs are equipped with a retractable kV x-ray tube and a flat panel detector. The Vero utilizes a rotating, rigid ring structure integrating a MV x-ray head mounted on orthogonal gimbals, an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), two kV x-ray tubes, and two fixed flat panel detectors. This dual kV imaging system provides orthogonal radiographs, CBCT images, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring. Two QA phantoms were built to suit different field sizes. Projection images of a QA phantom were acquired using MV and kV imaging systems at a series of gantry angles. Software developed for this study was used to analyze the projection images and calculate nine geometric parameters for each projection. The Trilogy was characterized five times over one year, while the SynergyS was characterized four times and the Vero once. Over 6500 individual projections were acquired and analyzed. Quantitative geometric parameters of both MV and kV imaging systems, as well as the isocenter consistency of the imaging systems, were successfully evaluated. A geometric tool has been successfully implemented for calibration and QA of integrated kV and MV across a variety of radiotherapy platforms. X-ray source angle deviations up to

  2. Technical Note: DIRART- A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Deshan; Brame, Scott; El Naqa, Issam; Aditya, Apte; Wu Yu; Murty Goddu, S.; Mutic, Sasa; Deasy, Joseph O.; Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). Methods: DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. Results: DIRART provides a set of image processing/registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. Conclusions: By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research.

  3. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  4. Prospective assessment of the quality of life before, during and after image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveistrup, Joen; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Bjørner, Jakob B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy (RT) in combination with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) carries a risk of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary toxicity, which might affect the quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to assess the QoL in patients with PCa...... before, during and after radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the QoL 1 year after RT to a normal population. METHODS: The QoL was evaluated prospectively by the self-administered questionnaire SF-36 in 87 patients with PCa. The SF-36 was completed before RT (baseline), at start of RT, at end of RT and 1...... year after RT. A mixed model analysis was used to determine the changes in QoL at each time point compared to baseline. The patients' QoL 1 year after RT was compared to a normal population consisting of 462 reference subjects matched on age and education. RESULTS: One year after RT, patients reported...

  5. Improved Clinical Outcomes With High-Dose Image Guided Radiotherapy Compared With Non-IGRT for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Fidaleo, Anthony; Sperling, Dahlia; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Carver, Brett; Coleman, Jonathan [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lovelock, Michael; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with high-dose image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, 186 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IGRT to a dose of 86.4 Gy with daily correction of the target position based on kilovoltage imaging of implanted prostatic fiducial markers. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 190 patients who were treated between 2006 and 2007 with IMRT to the same prescription dose without, however, implanted fiducial markers in place (non-IGRT). The median follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 2-6 years). Results: A significant reduction in late urinary toxicity was observed for IGRT patients compared with the non-IGRT patients. The 3-year likelihood of grade 2 and higher urinary toxicity for the IGRT and non-IGRT cohorts were 10.4% and 20.0%, respectively (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis identifying predictors for grade 2 or higher late urinary toxicity demonstrated that, in addition to the baseline Internatinoal Prostate Symptom Score, IGRT was associated with significantly less late urinary toxicity compared with non-IGRT. The incidence of grade 2 and higher rectal toxicity was low for both treatment groups (1.0% and 1.6%, respectively; p = 0.81). No differences in prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcomes were observed for low- and intermediate-risk patients when treated with IGRT and non-IGRT. For high-risk patients, a significant improvement was observed at 3 years for patients treated with IGRT compared with non-IGRT. Conclusions: IGRT is associated with an improvement in biochemical tumor control among high-risk patients and a lower rate of late urinary toxicity compared with high-dose IMRT. These data suggest that, for definitive radiotherapy, the placement of fiducial markers

  6. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  7. Monte Carlo-Based Dose Calculation in Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Rankine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Step-and-shoot (S&S intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT using the XiO treatment planning system (TPS has been routinely used for patients receiving postprostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT. After installing the Monaco, a pilot study was undertaken with five patients to compare XiO with Monaco (V2.03 TPS for PPRT with respect to plan quality for S&S as well as volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT. Monaco S&S showed higher mean clinical target volume (CTV coverage (99.85% than both XiO S&S (97.98%, P = 0.04 and Monaco VMAT (99.44, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco S&S compared to XiO (46.36% versus 58.06%, P = 0.001 and Monaco VMAT (46.36% versus 54.66%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volume was lowest for Monaco S&S and superior to XiO (mean 19.89% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco VMAT compared to XiO (21.09% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Other organ-at-risk (OAR parameters were comparable between TPSs. Compared to XiO S&S, Monaco S&S plans had fewer segments (78.6 versus 116.8 segments, P = 0.02, lower total monitor units (MU (677.6 MU versus 770.7 MU, P = 0.01, and shorter beam-on times (5.7 min versus 7.6 min, P = 0.03. This pilot study suggests that Monaco S&S improves CTV coverage, OAR doses, and planning and treatment times for PPRT.

  8. Implementation of a new system of radiotherapy by image-guided based on structures light; Implantacion de un nuevo sistema de radioterapia guiada por la imagen basdo en luz estructurada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Granero Cabanero, D.; Gonzalez Sanchis, A.; Vicedo Gonzalez, A.; Garcia Hernandez, M. T.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Gordo Partearroyo, J. C.; Pastor Peidro, J. R.; Parreno Romeu, L.; Rosello Ferrando, J.

    2013-07-01

    It has acquired in our facility, a new system of image guided radiotherapy. This equipment is based on Imaging using visible light, a pattern that is known about the surface of the patient. For a particular case have been established as secondary objectives variations of volume control during treatment and its ability to allow the location of the tumor bed within the breast volume. Finally, discusses the possibilities of the system for monitoring the position of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  9. Adaptive Radiotherapy for an Uncommon Chloroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufya Majdoul

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcomas, also referred to as chloromas or myeloid sarcomas, are extramedullary neoplasms that are composed of immature myeloid cells. This uncommon disease is known to be radiosensitive. However, the total dose and dose per fraction are not standardized. In addition, during the course of radiation therapy, significant reduction of the tumor is usually obtained. Thus, target volume reduction may require an intermediate radiotherapy plan evaluation for an adaptive treatment. A second plan at mid-dose is highly recommended.

  10. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  11. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T-H [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec.1, Jianguo N.Rd, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan (China); Liang, C-H [Agfa Healthcare Systems Taiwan Co., Ltd., 6F, 237 Sung Chiang Road, Taipei, 104 Taiwan (China); Wu, J-K [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, No.7 Chung San South Road, Taipei, 104 Taiwan (China); Lien, C-Y [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei, 112 Taiwan (China); Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei, 112 Taiwan (China); Huang, Y-H [Department of Medical Imaing and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, No. 8, Yida Rd., Yanchao Township, Kaohsiung County 82445, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2009-07-15

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT

  12. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  13. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  14. CyberKnife robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastic cancer. A prospective evaluation of 95 patients/118 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Bossi-Zanetti, I.; Mauro, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Milan Univ. (Italy); Beltramo, G.; Bianchi, L.C. [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, L. [Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy). Radiotherapy Unit; Fodor, C. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fossati, P.; Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Milan Univ. (Italy); Baroni, G. [National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Bioengineering

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, USA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for oligometastic cancer patients. Patients and methods: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients with a total of 118 lesions underwent CBK-SRT (median dose 24 Gy in 3 fractions). Inclusion criteria: adult patients with limited volume cancer; suitability for SRT but not for other local therapies. Primary diagnoses included breast, lung, head and neck, gastrointestinal and other malignancies. Prostate cancer patients were excluded. Concomitant systemic therapy was given in 40 % of cases and median follow-up was 12 months. Toxicity and tumor response were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) Scale and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors RECIST. Results: Toxicity was rare and observed mainly in patients with comorbidities or uncontrolled cancer. Out of 87 evaluable lesions, complete radiological response, partial response, stabilization and progressive disease were observed in 15 (17 %), 25 (29 %), 34 (39 %) and 13 (15 %) lesions, respectively. Upon restricting the analysis to lesions treated with CBK-SRT alone (no concomitant therapy), response- and local control (LC) rates remained similar. Actuarial 3-year in-field progression-free survival- (i.e. LC), progression-free survival- (PFS) and overall-survival (OS) rates were 67.6, 18.4, and 31.2 %, respectively. LC was reduced in cases of early recurrence. OS- and cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were significantly lower in patients treated for visceral lesions. Failures were predominantly out-field. Conclusion: CBK-SRT is a feasible therapeutic approach for oligometastastic cancer patients that provides long-term in-field tumor control with a low toxicity profile. Further investigations should focus on dose escalation and optimization of the combination with systemic therapies. (orig.)

  15. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Linda J, E-mail: linda.bell1@health.nsw.gov.au; Cox, Jennifer [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching.

  16. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga S., E-mail: igrills@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  17. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: dose contribution to involved pelvic nodes in two cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bos, Willemien; Beriwal, Sushil; Velema, Laura; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Nomden, Christel N; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina-M

    2014-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the dose contributions from image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) to individual suspicious pelvic lymph nodes (pLNN) in cervical cancer patients. Data were collected in two cancer centers, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) and University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU). 27 and 15 patients with node positive cervical cancer treated with HDR (high dose rate) or PDR (pulsed dose rate)-IGABT were analyzed. HDR-IGABT (UPCI) was delivered with CT/MRI compatible tandem-ring applicators with 5.0-6.0 Gy × five fractions. PDR-IGABT (UMCU) dose was delivered with Utrecht tandem-ovoid applicators with 32 × 0.6 Gy × two fractions. Pelvic lymph nodes with short axis diameter of ≥ 5 mm on pre-treatment MRI or PET-CT were contoured for all BT-plans. Dose contributions to individual pLNN expressed as D90 (dose to 90% of the volume) were calculated from dose-volume histograms as absolute and relative physical dose (% of the reference dose) for each fraction. For each node, the total dose from all fractions was calculated, expressed in EQD2 (equivalent total dose in 2 Gy fractions). Fifty-seven (UPCI) and 40 (UMCU) individual pLNN were contoured. The mean D90 pLNN was 10.8% (range 5.7-25.1%) and 20.5% (range 6.8-93.3%), respectively, and therefore different in the two centers. These values translate into 2.7 Gy (1.3-6.6 Gy) EQD2 and 7.1 Gy (2.2-36.7 Gy) EQD2, respectively. Differences are caused by the location of the individual nodes in relation to the spatial dose distribution of IGABT, differences in total dose administered and radiobiology (HDR versus PDR). The IGABT dose contribution to individual pelvic nodes depends on patient and treatment related factors, and varies considerably.

  18. Scapula alata in early breast cancer patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of post-surgery short-course image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaenssens Nele

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scapula alata (SA is a known complication of breast surgery associated with palsy of the serratus anterior, but it is seldom mentioned. We evaluated the risk factors associated with SA and the relationship of SA with ipsilateral shoulder/arm morbidity in a series of patients enrolled in a trial of post-surgery radiotherapy (RT. Methods The trial randomized women with completely resected stage I-II breast cancer to short-course image-guided RT, versus conventional RT. SA, arm volume and shoulder-arm mobility were measured prior to RT and at one to three months post-RT. Shoulder/arm morbidities were computed as a post-RT percentage change relative to pre-RT measurements. Results Of 119 evaluable patients, 13 (= 10.9% had pre-RT SA. Age younger than 50 years old, a body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, and axillary lymph node dissection were significant risk factors, with odds ratios of 4.8 (P = 0.009, 6.1 (P = 0.016, and 6.1 (P = 0.005, respectively. Randomization group was not significant. At one to three months’ post-RT, mean arm volume increased by 4.1% (P = 0.036 and abduction decreased by 8.6% (P = 0.046 among SA patients, but not among non-SA patients. SA resolved in eight, persisted in five, and appeared in one patient. Conclusion The relationship of SA with lower body mass index suggests that SA might have been underestimated in overweight patients. Despite apparent resolution of SA in most patients, pre-RT SA portended an increased risk of shoulder/arm morbidity. We argue that SA warrants further investigation. Incidentally, the observation of SA occurring after RT in one patient represents the second case of post-RT SA reported in the literature.

  19. Benefit of intensity modulated and image-guided radiotherapy in prostate cancer; Apports de la radiotherapie avec modulation d'intensite guidee par l'image dans les cancers prostatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latorzeff, I.; Mazurier, J. [Service de radiotherapie, groupe Oncorad-Garonne, clinique Pasteur, -L' Atrium-, 31 - Toulouse (France); Boutry, C.; Dudouet, P. [Service d' oncologie, groupe Oncorad-Garonne, clinique du Pont-de-Chaume, 82 - Montauban (France); Richaud, P. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Crevoisier, R. de [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2010-10-15

    External beam radiotherapy (RT) is used to treat all stages of localized prostate cancer. Using a 3D conformal RT (3DCRT) without any androgen deprivation, a clear dose-effect relationship has been shown in terms of both biochemical control and also unfortunately of rectal and urinary toxicity. Compared to a 'standard' 3DCRT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT) improves the dose distribution by mainly providing concave dose distribution and tight dose gradients. Based on large clinical experiences for at least one decade, IMRT is widely used to increase the dose in the prostate and therefore local control, without increasing toxicity. Indeed, toxicity rates observed after high dose delivered in the prostate (80 Gy) with IMRT appear no different than those observed after a standard dose (70 Gy) delivered by a standard 3DCRT. Arc IMRT appears a new promising IMRT modality, decreasing dramatically treatment duration. However, this IMRT-based dosimetric benefit may not be translated into a full clinical benefit, if intra-pelvic prostate motion is not taken in account. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) should be therefore associated with IMRT for a maximal clinical benefit. This article is a literature review showing the interest of both combined approaches. (authors)

  20. Clinical application of image-guided radiotherapy, IGRT (on the Varian OBI platform); Applications cliniques de la radiotherapie guidee par l'image (RTGI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorcini, B.; Tilikidis, A. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) can be used to measure and correct positional errors for target and critical structures immediately prior to or during treatment delivery. Some of the most recent available methods applied for target localization are: trans-abdominal ultrasound, implanted markers with in room MV or kV X-rays, optical surface tracking systems, implantable electromagnetic markers, in room CT such as kVCT on rail, kilo-voltage or mega-voltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) and helical megavoltage CT. The verification of the accurate treatment position in conjunction with detailed anatomical information before every fraction can be essential for the outcome of the treatment. In this paper we present the on-board imager (OBI, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) that has been in routine clinical use at the Karolinska University Hospital since June 2004. The OBI has been used for on-line set-up correction of prostate patients using internal gold markers. Displacements of these markers can be monitored radiographically during the treatment course and the registered marker shifts act as a surrogate for prostate motion. For this purpose, on-board kV-kV seems to be an ideal system in terms of image quality. The CBCT function of OBI was installed in March 2005 at our department. It focuses on localizing tumors based on internal anatomy, not just on the conventional external marks or tattoos. The CBCT system provides the capacity for soft tissue imaging in the treatment position and real-time radiographic monitoring during treatment delivery. (authors)

  1. Treatment outcomes and patterns of radiologic appearance after hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy delivered with helical tomotherapy (HHT) for lung tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Bracci, Stefano; Greco, Alessandro; Monaco, Alessia; Dognini, Jessica; Chiostrini, Cinzia; Bellavita, Rita; Aristei, Cynthia; Donato, Vittorio

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and patterns of CT lung injury after hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy delivered with helical tomotherapy (HHT) in a series of inoperable lung lesions. 68 patients who were medically inoperable (69 lesions) without evidence of viable extrathoracic disease were included. Dose prescription was driven by tumour location (hilar/pericentral vs peripheral) and/or target volume. 52% of the lesions received a biological equivalent dose (BED10) ≥100 Gy. Assessment of tumour response was based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours 1.1 criteria coupled with fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography-CT. Toxicity monitoring was focused on treatment-related pulmonary adverse events according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.0. Acute and late events were classified as radiation pneumonitis (RP) and radiation fibrosis (RF), respectively. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses of survival were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 3-31 months), no instances of ≥Grade 4 RP was documented, and clinically severe (Grade 3) RP occurred in 5.8% of the patients. 2 (3%) patients developed a late severe (≥Grade 3) symptomatic RF. No specific pattern of CT lung injury was demonstrated, in both acute and late settings. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for the entire population were 30.8 and 14.1 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis (MVA), BED10 ≥ 100 Gy and KPS ≥ 90 emerged as significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), and BED10 ≥ 100 Gy for PFS (p = 0.02). Our findings show that HHT adjusted for tumour location and/or target volume is an effective treatment with an acceptable toxicity profile in patients who are medically inoperable with lung tumours and is not

  2. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  3. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  4. Impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer. A study of 2940 setup deviations in 980 MVCTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, Kilian; Specht, Hanno; Kampfer, Severin; Duma, Marciana Nona [Technische Universitaet Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Petrucci, Alessia [University of Florence, Department of Radiation Oncology, Florence (Italy); Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern Linz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Linz (Austria); Schuster, Tibor [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this study was to assess the impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) of the prostatic gland. In all, 28 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. After the placement of an endorectal balloon, the planning target volume (PTV) was treated to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. A simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction and per day) was delivered to a smaller target volume. All patients underwent daily prostate-aligned IGRT by megavoltage CT (MVCT). Retrospectively, three different setup approaches were evaluated by comparison to the prostate alignment: setup by skin alignment, endorectal balloon alignment, and automatic registration by bones. A total of 2,940 setup deviations were analyzed in 980 fractions. Compared to prostate alignment, skin mark alignment was associated with substantial displacements, which were ≥ 8 mm in 13 %, 5 %, and 44 % of all fractions in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions, respectively. Endorectal balloon alignment yielded displacements ≥ 8 mm in 3 %, 19 %, and 1 % of all setups; and ≥ 3 mm in 27 %, 58 %, and 18 % of all fractions, respectively. For bone matching, the values were 1 %, 1 %, and 2 % and 3 %, 11 %, and 34 %, respectively. For prostate radiotherapy, setup by skin marks alone is inappropriate for patient positioning due to the fact that, during almost half of the fractions, parts of the prostate would not be targeted successfully with an 8-mm safety margin. Bone matching performs better but not sufficiently for safety margins ≤ 3 mm. Endorectal balloon matching can be combined with bone alignment to increase accuracy in the vertical direction when prostate-based setup is not available. Daily prostate alignment remains the gold standard for high-precision radiotherapy with small safety margins. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie bestand darin, den Einfluss verschiedener Herangehensweisen bei der Einstellung einer

  5. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  6. Setup deviations for whole-breast radiotherapy with TomoDirect: A comparison of weekly and biweekly image-guided protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Jung, Joo-Young; Bae, Sun Hyun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient setup deviations for different image-guided protocols (weekly vs. biweekly) that are used in TomoDirect three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (TD-3DCRT) for whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). A total of 138 defined megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image sets from 46 breast cancer cases were divided into two groups based on the imaging acquisition times: weekly or biweekly. The mean error, three-dimensional setup displacement error (3D-error), systematic error (Σ), and random error (σ) were calculated for each group. The 3D-errors were 4.29 ± 1.11 mm and 5.02 ± 1.85 mm for the weekly and biweekly groups, respectively; the biweekly error was 14.6% higher than the weekly error. The systematic errors in the roll angle and the x, y, and z directions were 0.48°, 1.72 mm, 2.18 mm, and 1.85 mm for the weekly protocol and 0.21°, 1.24 mm, 1.39 mm, and 1.85 mm for the biweekly protocol. Random errors in the roll angle and the x, y, and z directions were 25.7%, 40.6%, 40.0%, and 40.8% higher in the biweekly group than in the weekly group. For the x, y, and z directions, the distributions of the treatment frequency at less than 5 mm were 98.6%, 91.3%, and 94.2% in the weekly group and 94.2%, 89.9%, and 82.6% in the biweekly group. Moreover, the roll angles with 0 - 1° were 79.7% and 89.9% in the weekly and the biweekly groups, respectively. Overall, the evaluation of setup deviations for the two protocols revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Reducing the frequency of MVCT imaging could have promising effects on imaging doses and machine times during treatment. However, the biweekly protocol was associated with increased random setup deviations in the treatment. We have demonstrated a biweekly protocol of TD-3DCRT for WBRT, and we anticipate that our method may provide an alternative approach for considering the uncertainties in the patient setup.

  7. Combining transrectal ultrasound and CT for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Schmid, Maximilian P; Pötter, Richard; Kronreif, Gernot; Kirisits, Christian

    To investigate the feasibility of a treatment planning workflow for three-dimensional image-guided cervix cancer brachytherapy, combining volumetric transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for target definition with CT for dose optimization to organs at risk (OARs), for settings with no access to MRI. A workflow for TRUS/CT-based volumetric treatment planning was developed, based on a customized system including ultrasound probe, stepper unit, and software for image volume acquisition. A full TRUS/CT-based workflow was simulated in a clinical case and compared with MR- or CT-only delineation. High-risk clinical target volume was delineated on TRUS, and OARs were delineated on CT. Manually defined tandem/ring applicator positions on TRUS and CT were used as a reference for rigid registration of the image volumes. Treatment plan optimization for TRUS target and CT organ volumes was performed and compared to MRI and CT target contours. TRUS/CT-based contouring, applicator reconstruction, image fusion, and treatment planning were feasible, and the full workflow could be successfully demonstrated. The TRUS/CT plan fulfilled all clinical planning aims. Dose-volume histogram evaluation of the TRUS/CT-optimized plan (high-risk clinical target volume D90, OARs D2cm³ for) on different image modalities showed good agreement between dose values reported for TRUS/CT and MRI-only reference contours and large deviations for CT-only target parameters. A TRUS/CT-based workflow for full three-dimensional image-guided cervix brachytherapy treatment planning seems feasible and may be clinically comparable to MRI-based treatment planning. Further development to solve challenges with applicator definition in the TRUS volume is required before systematic applicability of this workflow. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Commissioning and quality assurance of the X-ray volume Imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, P. Narayana; Kumar, Rajneesh

    2008-01-01

    An Image-Guided Radiotherapy–capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI) system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT). The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer's specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy. PMID:19893694

  9. 实现图像引导放射治疗的设备保证%Equipment guarantee of the realization of image-guided radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈轩

    2012-01-01

    图像引导放射治疗的发展(Image-guided radiation therapy,IGRT)是以图像引导设备的发展为基础的.随着放射物理学、医学影像学及计算机科学的快速发展,IGRT必将开创精确放疗的新时代.本文将对IGRT的设备和技术进行论述,并展望未来发展趋势.%The development of images - guided radiation thcrapyv IGRT)is based on that of images guielesel equipment. With the rapid development of radiation physics, medical imaging and computer science, IGRT will eresate a new era of preseise radiothesrapy. This papesr will discuss eseruipmesnt and technology of IGRT and prospeset the futures tresnd of development.

  10. 用图像引导技术提高胸腹部肿瘤大分割放疗的治疗精度%Image-guided radiotherapy improves the precision of hypofractionated radiotherapy for thoracic and abdominal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张寅; 张连胜; 肖建平; 翟万聪; 李明辉; 戴建荣; 李晔雄

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy for thoracic and abdominal tumors,and to determine the margins extended from internal target volume(ITV) to planning target volume(PTV). Methods Twenty-four patients who received image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy for thoracic and abdominal tumors were included in this study. X-ray cone beam CT was regularly performed before the treatment. The shift and Rotation in right-left ( R-L), superior-inferior(S-I) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions were recorded and analyzed. The shift margin from ITV to PTV was calculated with the equation,margin =2'mean+0.7'standard deviation. Results Before online correction,the shift errors in R-L,S-I and A-P directions were [2.1±2.0] mm, [3.9±3.2] mm and [2.9±2.8] mm,and the corresponding margins were 5.6 mm, 10.2 mm and 7.7 mm. After the correction the shift errors were [0.8±0.7] mm, [0.9±0.7] mm and [0.9±0.7] mm, and the margins were 2.1 mm,2.3 mm and 2.3 mm. The set-up error was markedly decreased after the correction. There was no change in rotation after the correction. Conclusions The positioning error decreases after the correction in IGRT,and the precision of radiotherapy is improved. Measuring set-up error in radiotherapy can provide institution-specific margins for PTV designing.%目的 探讨图像引导放疗技术应用于胸腹部肿瘤大分割放疗以提高治疗精度,测最其摆位误差并确定由内靶体积(ITV)外放产生计划靶体积(PTV)的间距.方法 入组24例胸腹部肿瘤病例,采用大分割放疗,每次治疗前行锥形束CT扫描,在线校正摆位误差并记录误差值.统计校正前后的误差数据,采用二参数法计算由ITV外扩产生PTV间距.结果 校正前摆位平移误差在左右(x)、头脚(y)和腹背(z)方向I:分别为(2.1±2.0)、(3.9±3.2)、(2.9±2.8)mm,校正后分别为(0.8±0.7)、(0.9±0.7)、(0.9±0.7)mm;外扩间距校正前分别为5.6、10.2、7.7 mm,校正后分别为2.1、2.3

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Shaista; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly; Harris, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent; Thomas, Karen; Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2017-05-01

    We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A "plan of the day" radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. 面颈部肿瘤影像引导精确放射治疗摆位误差的研究%Positioning errors of neck tumor accurate radiotherapy basic on image-guiding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑祖安; 付秀根; 钟伟伟; 李定宇

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the positioning errors of neck tumor accurate radiotherapy basic on itnage-guiding. METHODS : To compare the three-dimensional images between the CT images of TPS and the reconstructed images of the XVI system which dealt with the images from the cone-beam CT of the linear accelerator after scarring before the first-three radiations of the accurate radiotherapy, while the patients were positioned with the thermoplastic masks. The space errors between the two images were corrected by the accelerator. The image-guiding were repeated weekly. The data were analyzed hy the SAS statistical software. RESULTS; 91.14% of the patients with cervicaljugular tumours were involved in the correction of the space errors of the target area affter the image-guiding before the first-three radiatons of accurate radiotherapy. The space errors in the Si-orientation and fore-and-aft-orientation in the images of the the patients with cervicaljugular tumours were (-0, 91±1. 08) mm and (-0. 41±l. 43) mm,which was largger slightly than that in the right-and-left-orientation [(0. 15± 1. 09) mm], CONCLUSIONS: The image guiding avails the alevation of the space precision of the target area in the neck accurate radiotherapy. The retroversion-adduction of head and fixation of cervix should be paid great attenttions when the patients with cervicaljugular tumours are positioned.%目的:分析基于影像引导技术的面颈部肿瘤精确放疗摆位误差.方法:对79例面颈部肿瘤放疗患者行热塑网罩体位固定,前3次放疗前利用加速器机载锥形束CT行靶区部位扫描重建三维影像,与计划CT影像比对,获得两影像空间位置偏差,经影像确认后,偏差>1 mm者,予以校正,以后每周1次影像引导复核.用SAS 8.1统计软件系统处理数据.结果:91.14%的患者影像引导后需要校正,影像引导复核显示头脚方向和前后方向分别为(-0.91±1.08)mm和(-0.41士1.43)mm,左右方向为(0.15±1.09) mm.

  13. Calibration and start-up of the system of radiotherapy extract image-guided; Calibracion y puesta en marcha del sistema de radioterpia guiada por la imagen exactrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente Gutierrez, I.; Perez Vara, C.; Prieto Villacorta, M.

    2013-07-01

    The accuracy in the administration of external radiotherapy treatments may be increased through the use of guidance systems by image. Constitute a particular case x-rays teams independent of the treatment unit. Among them is the ExacTrac (Brainlab) system. The objective of this work is to briefly introduce the procedure followed in the calibration and implementation of such a system. (Author)

  14. Adaptive radiotherapy: what to do and to get from it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy individualizes patient treatment by systematically including treatment image feedback in the treatment planning and dose delivering control process. Treatment image feedback can provide information of daily patient treatment position, volume and delivered dose in organs of interest, as well as dose-response-induced bio-activity in tumor and normal tissues. (Author)

  15. Concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery: adaptive optics and optical coherence tomography for laser beam shaping and positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Ben; Brockmann, Dorothee; Hansen, Anja; Horke, Konstanze; Knoop, Gesche; Gewohn, Timo; Zabic, Miroslav; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Fs-lasers are well established in ophthalmic surgery as high precision tools for corneal flap cutting during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and increasingly utilized for cutting the crystalline lens, e.g. in assisting cataract surgery. For addressing eye structures beyond the cornea, an intraoperative depth resolved imaging is crucial to the safety and success of the surgical procedure due to interindividual anatomical disparities. Extending the field of application even deeper to the posterior eye segment, individual eye aberrations cannot be neglected anymore and surgery with fs-laser is impaired by focus degradation. Our demonstrated concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery combines adaptive optics (AO) for spatial beam shaping and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for focus positioning guidance. The laboratory setup comprises an adaptive optics assisted 800 nm fs-laser system and is extended by a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system. Phantom structures are targeted, which mimic tractional epiretinal membranes in front of excised porcine retina within an eye model. AO and OCT are set up to share the same scanning and focusing optics. A Hartmann-Shack sensor is employed for aberration measurement and a deformable mirror for aberration correction. By means of adaptive optics the threshold energy for laser induced optical breakdown is lowered and cutting precision is increased. 3D OCT imaging of typical ocular tissue structures is achieved with sufficient resolution and the images can be used for orientation of the fs-laser beam. We present targeted dissection of the phantom structures and its evaluation regarding retinal damage.

  16. Geant4 simulation of the Elekta XVI kV CBCT unit for accurate description of potential late toxicity effects of image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, F M; Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Plaistow, R; Parker, M A; Thomas, S J

    2014-12-21

    This paper describes the modelisation of the Elekta XVI Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) machine components with Geant4 and its validation against calibration data taken for two commonly used machine setups. Preliminary dose maps of simulated CBCTs coming from this modelisation work are presented. This study is the first step of a research project, GHOST, aiming to improve the understanding of late toxicity risk in external beam radiotherapy patients by simulating dose depositions integrated from different sources (imaging, treatment beam) over the entire treatment plan. The second cancer risk will then be derived from different models relating irradiation dose and second cancer risk.

  17. Interfractional Seminal Vesicle Motion Relative to the Prostate Gland for Image-guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer with/without Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Takahiro; Katsui, Kuniaki; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Ogata, Takeshi; Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2017-02-01

    We investigated differences in seminal vesicle (SV) length and interfractional SV motion relative to the prostate gland in prostate cancer patients. We compared 32 patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy with 12 patients receiving radiotherapy alone at Okayama University Hospital in August 2008-July 2011. We examined the right and left SVs' length and motion by computed tomography (CT) to determine the ADT's effects and analyzed 347 CT scans in a multiple linear regression model. The ADT patients' SV length was significantly shorter than the non-ADT patients'. The differences in right and left SV lengths between the ADT and non-ADT patients were 6.8 mm (95% CI 2.0-11.7 mm) and 7.2 mm (95% CI 3.1- 11.3 mm) respectively in an adjusted regression model. SV motion did not differ between the ADT and non- ADT patients in terms of interfractional motion of the SV tips and the SVs' center relative to the prostate gland. The ADT patients had significantly shorter SVs compared to the non-ADT patients, but no difference in SV motion was observed. SV interfractional motion should thus be compensated using the same planning margins, regardless of whether ADT is used.

  18. Nanomedicines for image-guided cancer therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinzi

    2016-09-01

    Imaging technologies are being increasingly employed to guide the delivery of cancer therapies with the intent to increase their performance and efficacy. To date, many patients have benefited from image-guided treatments through prolonged survival and improvements in quality of life. Advances in nanomedicine have enabled the development of multifunctional imaging agents that can further increase the performance of image-guided cancer therapy. Specifically, this talk will focus on examples that demonstrate the benefits and application of nanomedicine in the context of image-guide surgery, personalized drug delivery, tracking of cell therapies and high precision radiotherapy delivery.

  19. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  20. TU-AB-303-08: GPU-Based Software Platform for Efficient Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Robinson, A; McNutt, T; Wong, J; Lee, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Plishker, W; Zaki, G [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, R [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we develop an integrated software platform for adaptive radiation therapy (ART) that combines fast and accurate image registration, segmentation, and dose computation/accumulation methods. Methods: The proposed system consists of three key components; 1) deformable image registration (DIR), 2) automatic segmentation, and 3) dose computation/accumulation. The computationally intensive modules including DIR and dose computation have been implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). All required patient-specific data including the planning CT (pCT) with contours, daily cone-beam CTs, and treatment plan are automatically queried and retrieved from their own databases. To improve the accuracy of DIR between pCT and CBCTs, we use the double force demons DIR algorithm in combination with iterative CBCT intensity correction by local intensity histogram matching. Segmentation of daily CBCT is then obtained by propagating contours from the pCT. Daily dose delivered to the patient is computed on the registered pCT by a GPU-accelerated superposition/convolution algorithm. Finally, computed daily doses are accumulated to show the total delivered dose to date. Results: Since the accuracy of DIR critically affects the quality of the other processes, we first evaluated our DIR method on eight head-and-neck cancer cases and compared its performance. Normalized mutual-information (NMI) and normalized cross-correlation (NCC) computed as similarity measures, and our method produced overall NMI of 0.663 and NCC of 0.987, outperforming conventional methods by 3.8% and 1.9%, respectively. Experimental results show that our registration method is more consistent and roust than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient. Computation time at each fraction took around one minute (30–50 seconds for registration and 15–25 seconds for dose computation). Conclusion: We developed an integrated GPU-accelerated software platform that enables accurate and

  1. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers.

  2. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen, E-mail: Qiuwen.Wu@Duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2011-08-07

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  3. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Wu, Qiuwen

    2011-08-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  4. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Trial of Concomitant Boost Using Indium-111-Capromab Pendetide (ProstaScint) Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, William W., E-mail: wong.william@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Schild, Steven E.; Vora, Sujay A.; Ezzell, Gary A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Nguyen, Ba D.; Ram, Panol C.; Roarke, Michael C. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a prospective study, the use of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan to guide the delivery of a concomitant boost to intraprostatic region showing increased uptake while treating the entire gland with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From September 2002 to November 2005, 71 patients were enrolled. Planning pelvic CT and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan images were coregistered. The entire prostate gland received 75.6 Gy/42 fractions, whereas areas of increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan received 82 Gy. For patients with T3/T4 disease, or Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, 12 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given. In January 2005 the protocol was modified to give 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy to patients with a prostate-specific antigen level of 10-20 ng/mL or Gleason 7 disease. Results: Thirty-one patients had low-risk, 30 had intermediate-risk, and 10 had high-risk disease. With a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year biochemical control rates were 94% for the entire cohort and 97%, 93%, and 90% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Maximum acute and late urinary toxicities were Grade 2 for 38 patients (54%) and 28 patients (39%) and Grade 3 for 1 and 3 patients (4%), respectively. One patient had Grade 4 hematuria. Maximum acute and late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 for 32 patients (45%) and 15 patients (21%), respectively. Most of the side effects improved with longer follow-up. Conclusion: Concomitant boost to areas showing increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan to 82 Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy while the entire prostate received 75.6 Gy was feasible and tolerable, with 94% biochemical control rate at 5 years.

  5. SU-C-18A-04: 3D Markerless Registration of Lung Based On Coherent Point Drift: Application in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Guo, X [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Yang, Y [The University of New Mexico, New Mexico, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated a new probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift for real time 3D markerless registration of the lung motion during radiotherapy. Method: 4DCT image datasets Dir-lab (www.dir-lab.com) have been used for creating 3D boundary element model of the lungs. For the first step, the 3D surface of the lungs in respiration phases T0 and T50 were segmented and divided into a finite number of linear triangular elements. Each triangle is a two dimensional object which has three vertices (each vertex has three degree of freedom). One of the main features of the lungs motion is velocity coherence so the vertices that creating the mesh of the lungs should also have features and degree of freedom of lung structure. This means that the vertices close to each other tend to move coherently. In the next step, we implemented a probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift to calculate nonlinear displacement of vertices between different expiratory phases. Results: The method has been applied to images of 10-patients in Dir-lab dataset. The normal distribution of vertices to the origin for each expiratory stage were calculated. The results shows that the maximum error of registration between different expiratory phases is less than 0.4 mm (0.38 SI, 0.33 mm AP, 0.29 mm RL direction). This method is a reliable method for calculating the vector of displacement, and the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of lung structure in radiotherapy. Conclusions: We evaluated a new 3D registration method for distribution set of vertices inside lungs mesh. In this technique, lungs motion considering velocity coherence are inserted as a penalty in regularization function. The results indicate that high registration accuracy is achievable with CPD. This method is helpful for calculating of displacement vector and analyzing possible physiological and anatomical changes during treatment.

  6. Minimal Inter-Fractional Fiducial Migration during Image-Guided Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using SuperLock Nitinol Coil Fiducial Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rong

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is being increasingly used for the treatment of patients with lung cancer or lung metastasis who are medically unfit to undergo resection. In order to improve accuracy and confidence in targeting tumors, many centers rely on fiducial implantation. We evaluated the migration of a novel fiducial marker specifically designed for lung tissue implanted via electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB.We retrospectively quantified the individual and group migrations of SuperLock nitinol coil fiducials for 15 patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, in order to evaluate the reliability of using these fiducials as a target surrogate for cases where tumors cannot be clearly delineated on cone beam CTs (CBCTs. For each fraction, we compared the individual and group migrations of the fiducials between the planning CT and the acquired CBCT. The group migration was defined as the distance between the centroids of the fiducial group and GTV.A total of 16 lung targets were included in our study for these 15 patients (one patient with two targets. Of 55 fiducials placed, we observed a 100% retention rate. The mean individual migration was 1.87 mm (range, 0.63-5.25 mm with a standard deviation of 1.26 mm. The mean group migration was 1.94 mm (range, 0.03-6.19 mm with a standard deviation of 1.45 mm. Overall, there was minimal change in the relative locations of the markers with respect to each other, as well as to the target.We found that the SuperLock nitinol coil fiducial marker positions are stable throughout the radiation treatment, and can be used as a reliable surrogate to target, and to avoid geometric misses during gated treatments.

  7. Functional imaging equivalence and proof of concept for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy with fixed gantry and rotating couch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Feain, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We have demonstrated imaging equivalence in cone beam CT reconstructions between rigid phantom images acquired with a conventional rotating gantry and with a fixed-gantry and rotating phantom. We have presented a method for image reconstruction under a fixed-beam imaging geometry using a deformable phantom.

  8. Development of image quality assurance measures of the ExacTrac localization system using commercially available image evaluation software and hardware for image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dennis N; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Gutiérrez, Alonso N

    2014-11-08

    Quality assurance (QA) of the image quality for image-guided localization systems is crucial to ensure accurate visualization and localization of target volumes. In this study, a methodology was developed to assess and evaluate the constancy of the high-contrast spatial resolution, dose, energy, contrast, and geometrical accuracy of the BrainLAB ExacTrac system. An in-house fixation device was constructed to hold the QCkV-1 phantom firmly and reproducibly against the face of the flat panel detectors. Two image sets per detector were acquired using ExacTrac preset console settings over a period of three months. The image sets were analyzed in PIPSpro and the following metrics were recorded: high-contrast spatial resolution (f30, f40, f50 (lp/mm)), noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. Geometrical image accu- racy was evaluated by assessing the length between to predetermined points of the QCkV-1 phantom. Dose and kVp were recorded using the Unfors RaySafe Xi R/F Detector. The kVp and dose were evaluated for the following: Cranial Standard (CS) (80 kV,80 mA,80 ms), Thorax Standard (TS) (120 kV,160 mA,160 ms), Abdomen Standard (AS) (120 kV,160 mA,130 ms), and Pelvis Standard (PS) (120 kV,160 mA,160 ms). With regard to high-contrast spatial resolution, the mean values of the f30 (lp/mm), f40 (lp/mm) and f50 (lp/mm) for the left detector were 1.39 ± 0.04, 1.24 ± 0.05, and 1.09 ± 0.04, respectively, while for the right detector they were 1.38 ± 0.04, 1.22 ± 0.05, and 1.09 ± 0.05, respectively. Mean CNRs for the left and right detectors were 148 ± 3 and 143 ± 4, respectively. For geometrical accuracy, both detectors had a measured image length of the QCkV-1 of 57.9 ± 0.5 mm. The left detector showed dose measurements of 20.4 ± 0.2 μGy (CS), 191.8 ± 0.7 μGy (TS), 154.2 ± 0.7 μGy (AS), and 192.2 ± 0.6 μGy (PS), while the right detector showed 20.3 ± 0.3 μGy (CS), 189.7 ± 0.8 μGy (TS), 151.0 ± 0.7 μGy (AS), and 189.7 ± 0.8 μGy (PS), respectively. For X

  9. Dose Effect Relationship for Late Side Effects of the Rectum and Urinary Bladder in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Cervix Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Petra, E-mail: petra.georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Sturdza, Alina E.; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Doerr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, University of Technology Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To establish dose-response relationships for late side effects of the rectum and bladder in cervix cancer patients after magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 141 patients was treated with 45 to 50.4 Gy with or without cisplatin plus 4 fractions of 7 Gy IGABT. Doses for the most exposed 2, 1, and 0.1-cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cc}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 0.1cc}) volumes of the rectum and bladder were converted into the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2), using a linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Late side effects were prospectively assessed (using late effects in normal tissues subjective, objective, management and analytic [LENT SOMA]) scales. Dose-response relationships were determined by logit analyses. Results: Eleven patients developed rectal side effects, and 23 patients had urinary side effects. A significant dose effect was found for all rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for patients with side effect grades of 1 to 4 but was only significant for D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} for grades {>=}2. The ED10 values for D{sub 2cc} were 73 Gy for grades 1 to 4 and 78 Gy for grades 2 to 4 rectal morbidity. For bladder side effects, a significant dose effect was shown for all DVH parameters for complication grades {>=}2; the respective ED10 was 101 Gy. Conclusions: Well-defined dose-response curves could be established for D{sub 2cc} in the rectum and the urinary bladder.

  10. A Phase II prospective nonrandomized trial of magnetic resonance imaging-guided hematopoietic bone marrow-sparing radiotherapy for gastric cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jianyang Wang, Yuan Tian, Yuan Tangm, Xin Wang, Ning Li, Hua Ren, Hui Fang, Yanru Feng, Shulian Wang, Yongwen Song, Yueping Liu, Weihu Wang, Yexiong Li, Jing Jin Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: This study aimed to spare hematopoietical bone marrow (BM identified by magnetic resonance (MR radiation in order to alleviate acute hematologic toxicity (HT for gastric cancer patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT.Methods: A prospective, open-label, single-arm Phase II study (Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT 01863420 was conducted in 25 patients with gastric cancer who were eligible for postoperative concurrent CRT. The MR images of vertebral body T8-L4 were fused with images of simulating computed tomography. Hematopoietical BM was contoured according to the MR and spared in radiotherapy plan. The CRT regimen consisted of daily capecitabine (1600 mg/m2/d and 45 Gy of radiation at 1.8 Gy per day. Primary endpoints were grade ≥3 HT that occurred within 2 months of initiation of CRT. The relationship between HT and dose–volume of BM was estimated by multivariable linear regression model.Results: Twenty four patients (96% had T3–4 disease and 22 (88% had disease with node positive. The median age was 53 years (range, 28–73 years. Before concurrent CRT, adjuvant chemotherapy was administered with a mean cycle of 4.3±0.5. Only five patients (20% developed grade 3–4 HT during treatment, among whom two (8.0% patients experienced grade 3–4 leucopenia, two (8.0% experienced neutropenia, and two (8.0% experienced thrombocytopenia, respectively. None of the patients showed grade 3–4 anemia. Multivariable linear regression revealed increased BM-V5 (P=0.03 and BM-V20 (P=0.002 were found to be significantly associated with decreased white blood cells nadirs in multivariable regression

  11. Modeling of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Volume Changes during CT-Based Image Guided Radiotherapy: Patterns Observed and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram A. Gay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To characterize the lung tumor volume response during conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT based on diagnostic quality CT images prior to each treatment fraction. Methods. Out of 26 consecutive patients who had received CT-on-rails IGRT to the lung from 2004 to 2008, 18 were selected because they had lung lesions that could be easily distinguished. The time course of the tumor volume for each patient was individually analyzed using a computer program. Results. The model fits of group L (conventional fractionation patients were very close to experimental data, with a median Δ% (average percent difference between data and fit of 5.1% (range 3.5–10.2%. The fits obtained in group S (hypofractionation patients were generally good, with a median Δ% of 7.2% (range 3.7–23.9% for the best fitting model. Four types of tumor responses were observed—Type A: “high” kill and “slow” dying rate; Type B: “high” kill and “fast” dying rate; Type C: “low” kill and “slow” dying rate; and Type D: “low” kill and “fast” dying rate. Conclusions. The models used in this study performed well in fitting the available dataset. The models provided useful insights into the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for the RT tumor volume response.

  12. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  13. Feasibility report of image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (IG-SBRT) with tomotherapy for early stage medically inoperable lung cancer using extreme hypofractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Wes; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Jaradat, Hazim A.; Orton, Nigel P.; Khuntia, Deepak; Mehta, Minesh P. [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Human Oncology; Traynor, Anne [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Weigel, Tracey [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Surgery

    2006-09-15

    We report on the technical feasibility, dosimetric aspects, and daily image-guidance capability with megavoltage CT (MVCT) of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using helical tomotherapy for medically inoperable T1/2 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer. Nine patients underwent treatment planning with 4D-CT in a double vacuum based immobilization system to minimize tumor motion and to define a lesion-specific 4D-motion envelope. Patients received 60 Gy in 5 fractions within 10 days to a PTV defined by a motion envelope plus a 6 mm expansion for microscopic extension and setup error using tomotherapy, with daily pretreatment MVCT image guidance. The primary endpoint was technical feasibility. Secondary endpoints were defining the acute and sub-acute toxicities and tumor response. Forty three of 45 fractions were successfully delivered, with an average delivery time of 22 minutes. MVCT provided excellent tumor visualization for daily image guidance. No significant tumor regression was observed on MVCT in any patient during therapy. Median mean normalized total doses were: tumor 117 Gy{sub 10}; residual lung 9 Gy{sub 3}. Maximum fraction-size equivalent dose values were: esophagus 5 Gy{sub 3}{sup 9}; cord 7 Gy{sub 3}{sup 6}. No patient experienced = grade 2 pulmonary toxicity. 3 complete, 4 partial and 2 stable responses were observed, with <3 months median follow-up. The mean tumor regression is 72%. SBRT using tomotherapy proved to be feasible, safe and free of major technical limitations or acute toxicities. Daily pretreatment MVCT imaging allows for precise daily tumor targeting with the patient in the actual treatment position, and therefore provides for precise image guidance.

  14. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksomaa, Marko, E-mail: marko.laaksomaa@pshp.fi [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland); Kapanen, Mika [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland); Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland); Tulijoki, Tapio [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland); Peltola, Seppo; Hyödynmaa, Simo [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland); Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland); Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Tampere (Finland)

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ≤ 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ≤ 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients.

  15. FIRE: an open-software suite for real-time 2D/3D image registration for image guided radiotherapy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, H.; Gendrin, C.; Spoerk, J.; Steiner, E.; Underwood, T.; Kuenzler, T.; Georg, D.; Birkfellner, W.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatments have changed at a tremendously rapid pace. Dose delivered to the tumor has escalated while organs at risk (OARs) are better spared. The impact of moving tumors during dose delivery has become higher due to very steep dose gradients. Intra-fractional tumor motion has to be managed adequately to reduce errors in dose delivery. For tumors with large motion such as tumors in the lung, tracking is an approach that can reduce position uncertainty. Tumor tracking approaches range from purely image intensity based techniques to motion estimation based on surrogate tracking. Research efforts are often based on custom designed software platforms which take too much time and effort to develop. To address this challenge we have developed an open software platform especially focusing on tumor motion management. FLIRT is a freely available open-source software platform. The core method for tumor tracking is purely intensity based 2D/3D registration. The platform is written in C++ using the Qt framework for the user interface. The performance critical methods are implemented on the graphics processor using the CUDA extension. One registration can be as fast as 90ms (11Hz). This is suitable to track tumors moving due to respiration (~0.3Hz) or heartbeat (~1Hz). Apart from focusing on high performance, the platform is designed to be flexible and easy to use. Current use cases range from tracking feasibility studies, patient positioning and method validation. Such a framework has the potential of enabling the research community to rapidly perform patient studies or try new methods.

  16. Automated Image-Based Procedures for Adaptive Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels

    -tissue complication probability (NTCP), margins used to account for interfraction and intrafraction anatomical changes and motion need to be reduced. This can only be achieved through proper treatment plan adaptations and intrafraction motion management. This thesis describes methods in support of image...... to encourage bone rigidity and local tissue volume change only in the gross tumour volume and the lungs. This is highly relevant in adaptive radiotherapy when modelling significant tumour volume changes. - It is described how cone beam CT reconstruction can be modelled as a deformation of a planning CT scan...

  17. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  18. Comparison of difference registration landmarks for image - guided radiotherapy for lung cancer%肺癌图像引导IMRT配准标志的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦新; 惠周光; 李明辉; 章众; 符贵山; 戴建荣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of anatomical landmarks on registration in image⁃guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for central and peripheral lung cancer. Methods Twenty⁃five patients with central or peripheral lung cancer for IGRT were enrolled in this study. Kilo⁃voltage cone⁃beam CT ( kV⁃CBCT) scanning was acquired before irradiotion. Tumor coverage on CBCT was assessed using gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), and planning target volume (PTV) contours according to tumor alignment, carina registration, and spine registration, respectively. The grading analysiswas based on visual tumor assessment as follows:grade 0, tumor within GTV;grade 1, tumor outside GTV but inside CTV;grade 2, tumor outside CTV but inside PTV;and grade 3, tumor outside PTV. Results Totally 177 sets of kV⁃CBCT of 25 patients was collected. According to the registration landmarks of the tumor, carina and spine for central lung cancer, the percentages were 57�55%, 53�77% and 16�04% in grade 0, 39�62%, 45�28%and 58�49% in grade 1, and 1�89%, 0�94% and 25�47% in grade 2, respectively. For peripheral lung cancer, the percentages were 47�89%, 14�08% and 2�82% in grade 0, 43�66%, 29�58% and 45�07% in grade 1, and 8�45%, 40�85% and 35�21% in grade 2, respectively. Conclusions For central lung cancer,the tumor was recommended as the best registration landmark, and the carina was recommended as well, while the spine was not recommended. For peripheral lung cancer, the tumor was recommended as the best registration landmark, while the spine and the carina were not recommended.%目的:研究肺癌患者图像引导IMRT中采用不同配准标志的靶区符合度差异,确定合理的图像配准方法。方法回顾性收集和分析25例肺癌患者CBCT影像,按原发肿瘤位置分为中央型和周围型两组,每组分别采用肿瘤、隆突、脊柱为标志的配准方法。根据肿瘤组织靶区符合度分为4

  19. Real-time fast inverse dose optimization for image guided adaptive radiation therapy-Enhancements to fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. P.; Turnbull, D.; Johnson, C.; Chen, J. Z.; Battista, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    A fast, accurate and stable optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for implementing dose-adaptive radiotherapy in the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms with positive beam weight constraints generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima regions of the objective function landscape. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but it will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We review here a direct solution of the inverse problem that is efficient and does not yield unphysical negative beam weights. In fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO) method the objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reducible to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is then found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad hoc conditions. In its original version [S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, in Proceedings of the XIVth International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, 2004, pp. 112-115; S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, Med. Phys. 32, 3007 (2005)], FIDO was tested on single two-dimensional computed tomography (CT) slices with sharp KERMA beams without scatter, in order to establish a proof of concept which demonstrated that FIDO could be a viable method for the optimization of cancer treatment plans. In this paper we introduce the latest advancements in FIDO that now include not only its application to three-dimensional volumes irradiated by beams with full scatter but include as well a complete implementation of clinical dose-volume constraints including maximum and minimum dose as well as equivalent uniform dose

  20. SU-E-J-206: Adaptive Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies with MRIGuided Cobolt-60 Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Kamrava, M; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Even in the IMRT era, bowel toxicity and bone marrow irradiation remain concerns with pelvic irradiation. We examine the potential gain from an adaptive radiotherapy workflow for post-operative gynecological patients treated to pelvic targets including lymph nodes using MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy. Methods: An adaptive workflow was developed with the intent of minimizing time overhead of adaptive planning. A pilot study was performed using retrospectively analyzed images from one patient’s treatment. The patient’s treated plan was created using conventional PTV margins. Adaptive treatment was simulated on the patient’s first three fractions. The daily PTV was created by removing non-target tissue, including bone, muscle and bowel, from the initial PTV based on the daily MRI. The number of beams, beam angles, and optimization parameters were kept constant, and the plan was re-optimized. Normal tissue contours were not adjusted for the re-optimization, but were adjusted for evaluation of plan quality. Plan quality was evaluated based on PTV coverage and normal tissue DVH points per treatment protocol. Bowel was contoured as the entire bowel bag per protocol at our institution. Pelvic bone marrow was contoured per RTOG protocol 1203. Results: For the clinically treated plan, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 380 cc, 53% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 35% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 28% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. For the adaptive plans, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 175–201 cc, 55–62% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 21– 27% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 13–17% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. Conclusion: Adaptive planning led to a large reduction of bowel and bone marrow dose in this pilot study. Further study of on-line adaptive techniques for the radiotherapy of pelvic lymph nodes is warranted. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.

  1. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of lung cancer radiotherapy are intra/inter-fraction tumor/organ anatomy/motion changes and the need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D) image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed. PMID:20814539

  2. Image-guided radiation therapy; Bildgefuehrte Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boda-Heggemann, J.; Wertz, H.; Blessing, M.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Guckenberger, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Ganswindt, U.; Belka, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Fuss, M. [Oregon Health and Science University, Program in Image-guided Radiation Therapy, Department of Radiation Medicine, Portland, OR (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Radiotherapy technology has improved rapidly over the past two decades. New imaging modalities, such as positron emission (computed) tomography (PET, PET-CT) and high-resolution morphological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been introduced into the treatment planning process. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with 3D soft tissue depiction directly imaging target and normal structures, is currently replacing patient positioning based on patient surface markers, frame-based intracranial and extracranial stereotactic treatment and partially also 2D field verification methods. On-line 3D soft tissue-based position correction unlocked the full potential of new delivery techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, by safely delivering highly conformal dose distributions that facilitate dose escalation and hypofractionation. These strategies have already resulted in better clinical outcomes, e.g. in prostate and lung cancer and are expected to further improve radiotherapy results. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlentherapie hat in den vergangenen 2 Dekaden von zahlreichen technischen Entwicklungen profitiert. Neue Bildgebungsmodalitaeten wie Positronenemissionstomographie (PET, PET/CT) und hochaufloesende morphologische und funktionelle MR-Sequenzen wurden in den Bestrahlungsplanungsprozess integriert. Die bildgesteuerte Strahlentherapie (''image-guided radiation therapy'', IGRT) ermoeglicht mittlerweile unmittelbar am Beschleuniger auch die 3-D-Darstellung von Weichgewebetumoren und ersetzt die Patientenpositionierung mittels Hautmarkern, rahmenbasierten stereotaktischen Verfahren im Kopf- und Koerperstamm und teilweise auch die 2-D-Verifikation der Bestrahlungsfelder. IGRT gestattet die Realisierung des vollen Potenzials fortgeschrittener Bestrahlungstechniken wie der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie, mit deren Hilfe hochkonformale Dosisverteilungen realisiert werden koennen. Diese Strategien haben zu verbesserten

  3. A theoretical stochastic control framework for adapting radiotherapy to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberian, Fatemeh; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia, that is, insufficient oxygen partial pressure, is a known cause of reduced radiosensitivity in solid tumors, and especially in head-and-neck tumors. It is thus believed to adversely affect the outcome of fractionated radiotherapy. Oxygen partial pressure varies spatially and temporally over the treatment course and exhibits inter-patient and intra-tumor variation. Emerging advances in non-invasive functional imaging offer the future possibility of adapting radiotherapy plans to this uncertain spatiotemporal evolution of hypoxia over the treatment course. We study the potential benefits of such adaptive planning via a theoretical stochastic control framework using computer-simulated evolution of hypoxia on computer-generated test cases in head-and-neck cancer. The exact solution of the resulting control problem is computationally intractable. We develop an approximation algorithm, called certainty equivalent control, that calls for the solution of a sequence of convex programs over the treatment course; dose-volume constraints are handled using a simple constraint generation method. These convex programs are solved using an interior point algorithm with a logarithmic barrier via Newton’s method and backtracking line search. Convexity of various formulations in this paper is guaranteed by a sufficient condition on radiobiological tumor-response parameters. This condition is expected to hold for head-and-neck tumors and for other similarly responding tumors where the linear dose-response parameter is larger than the quadratic dose-response parameter. We perform numerical experiments on four test cases by using a first-order vector autoregressive process with exponential and rational-quadratic covariance functions from the spatiotemporal statistics literature to simulate the evolution of hypoxia. Our results suggest that dynamic planning could lead to a considerable improvement in the number of tumor cells remaining at the end of the treatment course

  4. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...... involvement. The patients received whole pelvis intensity-modulated radiation therapy (45-50 Gy/25-30 fx) to whole pelvis and two fractions of MRI pulsed-dose-rate BT. The delineated LN groups were para-aortic, inguinal, common iliac (CI), external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral. For each LN...... group, D98%, D50%, and D2% (the dose that covers 98%, 50%, and 2% of the volume, respectively) were evaluated for optimized and standard BT plans. The correlation between total reference air kerma (TRAK) and D50% of the LN groups was evaluated. RESULTS: BT contributed considerable dose (mean D50% was 3...

  5. WE-G-BRF-01: Adaptation to Intrafraction Tumor Deformation During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: First Proof-Of-Principle Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y; OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Booth, J; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    image-guided radiotherapy system to treat deforming tumors in real-time. The authors acknowledge funding support from the Australian NHMRC Australia Fellowship, Cure Cancer Australia Foundation, NHMRC Project Grant APP1042375 and US NIH/NCI R01CA93626.

  6. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Wu, Qiuwen

    2010-04-01

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  7. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Yu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, 4100 John R, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Wu Qiuwen [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States)], E-mail: Qiuwen.Wu@Duke.edu

    2010-04-21

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  8. Intra-patient semi-automated segmentation of the cervix-uterus in CT-images for adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiza Bondar, M.; Hoogeman, Mischa; Schillemans, Wilco; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-08-01

    For online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer, fast and accurate image segmentation is required to facilitate daily treatment adaptation. Our aim was twofold: (1) to test and compare three intra-patient automated segmentation methods for the cervix-uterus structure in CT-images and (2) to improve the segmentation accuracy by including prior knowledge on the daily bladder volume or on the daily coordinates of implanted fiducial markers. The tested methods were: shape deformation (SD) and atlas-based segmentation (ABAS) using two non-rigid registration methods: demons and a hierarchical algorithm. Tests on 102 CT-scans of 13 patients demonstrated that the segmentation accuracy significantly increased by including the bladder volume predicted with a simple 1D model based on a manually defined bladder top. Moreover, manually identified implanted fiducial markers significantly improved the accuracy of the SD method. For patients with large cervix-uterus volume regression, the use of CT-data acquired toward the end of the treatment was required to improve segmentation accuracy. Including prior knowledge, the segmentation results of SD (Dice similarity coefficient 85 ± 6%, error margin 2.2 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 1 min) and of ABAS using hierarchical non-rigid registration (Dice 82 ± 10%, error margin 3.1 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 30 s) support their use for image guided online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  9. MRI assessment of cervical cancer for adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schirl, Gertrude; Baldinger, Anja; Poetter, Richard [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Helbich, Thomas H. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept of Radiology

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the importance of the information obtained from MRI for adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 49 patients with cervix cancer, treated by external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and MRI-assisted high-dose-rate brachytherapy {+-} concomitant cisplatin, underwent MRI at diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy fractions. 190 MRI examinations were performed. Pretreatment scans were correlated with clinical examination (CE) findings. Measurements in 3-D of the tumor extension and also of the distance from the tumor to the pelvic side wall were performed using both MRI and CE. The tumor volume regression induced initially by EBRT and the subsequent regression after each brachytherapy fraction were assessed. Results: MRI and CE showed 92% agreement in overall parametrial staging and 73% agreement in terms of vaginal involvement. There was, however, disagreement in parametrial side (right/left) classification in 25% of the parametria examined. These were patients with unilateral displacement of the cervix and contralateral invasion of the parametrium. The mean tumor volume on the pretreatment MRI scan (GTVD) was 61 cm{sup 3}. At the time of the four brachytherapy fractions the mean was 16 cm{sup 3}, 10 cm{sup 3}, 9 cm{sup 3}, and 8 cm{sup 3}, defined as the GTVBT plus the gray zones in the parametria. Conclusion: CE and MRI findings agree well in terms of overall staging. The clinical assessment of side-specific parametrial invasion improved when having access to the additional knowledge obtained from MRI. The greatest decrease in tumor volume occurs during EBRT, whereas tumor regression between the first and subsequent brachytherapy fractions is minor. (orig.)

  10. Injectable Colloidal Gold for Use in Intrafractional 2D Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Rydhog, Jonas S.; Christensen, Anders Nymark

    2015-01-01

    In the western world, approximately 50% of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy alone or in combination with surgery or chemotherapy. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has in recent years been introduced to enhance precision of the delivery of radiation dose to tumor tissue. Fiducial markers a...

  11. Image guided percutaneous splenic interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Mandeep [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India)], E-mail: mandykang2005@yahoo.com; Kalra, Naveen; Gulati, Madhu; Lal, Anupam; Kochhar, Rohit [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Rajwanshi, Arvind [Department of Cytology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2007-10-15

    Aim: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions as diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective review of our interventional records from July 2001 to June 2006. Ninety-five image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions were performed after informed consent in 89 patients: 64 men and 25 women who ranged in age from 5 months to 71 years (mean, 38.4 years) under ultrasound (n = 93) or CT (n = 2) guidance. The procedures performed were fine needle aspiration biopsy of focal splenic lesions (n = 78) and aspiration (n = 10) or percutaneous catheter drainage of a splenic abscess (n = 7). Results: Splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy was successful in 62 (83.78%) of 74 patients with benign lesions diagnosed in 43 (58.1%) and malignancy in 19 (25.67%) patients. The most common pathologies included tuberculosis (26 patients, 35.13%) and lymphoma (14 patients, 18.91%). Therapeutic aspiration or pigtail catheter drainage was successful in all (100%) patients. There were no major complications. Conclusions: Image-guided splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe and accurate technique that can provide a definitive diagnosis in most patients with focal lesions in the spleen. This study also suggests that image-guided percutaneous aspiration or catheter drainage of splenic abscesses is a safe and effective alternative to surgery.

  12. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  13. Quantification of the volumetric benefit of image-guided radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) in prostate cancer: Margins and presence probability map; Benefice volumetrique de la radiotherapie guidee par l'image dans les cancers prostatiques: marges et cartographies de probabilite de presence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazoulat, G.; Crevoisier, R. de; Simon, A.; Louvel, G.; Manens, J.P.; Haigron, P. [Inserm, U642, 35 - Rennes (France); Rennes-1 Univ., 35 (France); Crevoisier, R. de; Louvel, G.; Manens, J.P.; Lafond, C. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To quantify the prostate and seminal vesicles (S.V.) anatomic variations in order to choose appropriate margins including intrapelvic anatomic variations. To quantify volumetric benefit of image-guided radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.). Patients and methods: Twenty patients, receiving a total dose of 70 Gy in the prostate, had a planning CT scan and eight weekly CT scans during treatment. Prostate and S.V. were manually contoured. Each weekly CT scan was registered to the planning CT scan according to three modalities: radiopaque skin marks, pelvis bone or prostate. For each patient, prostate and S.V. displacements were quantified. 3-dimensional maps of prostate and S.V. presence probability were established. Volumes including minimal presence probabilities were compared between the three modalities of registration. Result: For the prostate intrapelvic displacements, systematic and random variations and maximal displacements for the entire population were: 5 mm, 2.7 mm and 16.5 mm in anteroposterior axis; 2.7 mm, 2.4 mm and 11.4 mm in supero-inferior axis and 0.5 mm, 0.8 mm and 3.3 mm laterally. Margins according to van Herk recipe (to cover the prostate for 90% of the patients with the 95% isodose) were: 8 mm, 8.3 mm and 1.9 mm, respectively. The 100% prostate presence probability volumes correspond to 37%, 50% and 61% according to the registration modality. For the S.V., these volumes correspond to 8%, 14% and 18% of the S.V. volume. Conclusions: Without I.G.R.T., 5 mm prostate posterior margins are insufficient and should be at least 8 mm, to account for intrapelvic anatomic variations. Prostate registration almost doubles the 100% presence probability volume compared to skin registration. Deformation of S.V. will require either to increase dramatically margins (simple) or new planning (not realistic). (authors)

  14. Implementation and evaluation of the quality control program of a system for image guided radiotherapy by megavoltage cone beam; Puesta en marcha y evaluacion del programa de control de calidad de un sistema de haz conico de megavoltaje para radioterapia guiada por la imagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Tejero, P.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.

    2009-07-01

    The use of image guided radiotherapy is essential in order to ensure the correct positioning of the patient prior to the delivery of the treatment. The most common procedure is the acquisition of two-dimensional orthogonal images that are compared with the corresponding digital images reconstructed by the treatment planning system. A recent technique, known as cone beam computed tomography, consists of three-dimensional image CT acquisition in the accelerator room by cone beam. This set of images is compared with the images used for the treatment planning. In our centre, the implementation of the M Vision system, including both techniques, has been carried out in two accelerators Siemens Oncor Expression. The quality control program associated with the M Vision system is presented in this work. The results obtained over a year since its implantation is also presented. (Author) 12 refs.

  15. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  16. Biomedical nanomaterials for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuran; He, Sha; Cao, Weipeng; Cai, Kaiyong; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-09-01

    To date, even though various kinds of nanomaterials have been evaluated over the years in order to develop effective cancer therapy, there is still significant challenges in the improvement of the capabilities of nano-carriers. Developing a new theranostic nanomedicine platform for imaging-guided, visualized cancer therapy is currently a promising way to enhance therapeutic efficiency and reduce side effects. Firstly, conventional imaging technologies are reviewed with their advantages and disadvantages, respectively. Then, advanced biomedical materials for multimodal imaging are illustrated in detail, including representative examples for various dual-modalities and triple-modalities. Besides conventional cancer treatment (chemotherapy, radiotherapy), current biomaterials are also summarized for novel cancer therapy based on hyperthermia, photothermal, photodynamic effects, and clinical imaging-guided surgery. In conclusion, biomedical materials for imaging-guided therapy are becoming one of the mainstream treatments for cancer in the future. It is hoped that this review might provide new impetus to understand nanotechnology and nanomaterials employed for imaging-guided cancer therapy.

  17. Prospective Study Delivering Simultaneous Integrated High-dose Tumor Boost (≤70 Gy) With Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Radical Treatment of Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Shaista; Warren-Oseni, Karole; McNair, Helen A; Hansen, Vibeke N; Jones, Kelly; Tan, Melissa; Khan, Attia; Harris, Victoria; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; Mohammed, Kabir; Thomas, Karen; Thompson, Alan; Kumar, Pardeep; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Image guided adaptive radiation therapy offers individualized solutions to improve target coverage and reduce normal tissue irradiation, allowing the opportunity to increase the radiation tumor dose and spare normal bladder tissue. A library of 3 intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created (small, medium, and large) from planning computed tomography (CT) scans performed at 30 and 60 minutes; treating the whole bladder to 52 Gy and the tumor to 70 Gy in 32 fractions. A "plan of the day" approach was used for treatment delivery. A post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired weekly to assess intrafraction filling and coverage. A total of 18 patients completed treatment to 70 Gy. The plan and treatment for 1 patient was to 68 Gy. Also, 1 patient's plan was to 70 Gy but the patient was treated to a total dose of 65.6 Gy because dose-limiting toxicity occurred before dose escalation. A total of 734 CBCT scans were evaluated. Small, medium, and large plans were used in 36%, 48%, and 16% of cases, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation rate of intrafraction filling at the start of treatment (ie, week 1) was 4.0 ± 4.8 mL/min (range 0.1-19.4) and at end of radiation therapy (ie, week 5 or 6) was 1.1 ± 1.6 mL/min (range 0.01-7.5; P=.002). The mean D98 (dose received by 98% volume) of the tumor boost and bladder as assessed on the post-treatment CBCT scan was 97.07% ± 2.10% (range 89.0%-104%) and 99.97% ± 2.62% (range 96.4%-112.0%). At a median follow-up period of 19 months (range 4-33), no muscle-invasive recurrences had developed. Two patients experienced late toxicity (both grade 3 cystitis) at 5.3 months (now resolved) and 18 months after radiation therapy. Image guided adaptive radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy to deliver a simultaneous integrated tumor boost to 70 Gy is feasible, with acceptable toxicity, and will be evaluated in a randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Practical recommendations for breathing-adapted radiotherapy; Bonnes pratiques pour la radiotherapie asservie a la respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C. [Institut Curie, Dept. d' Oncologie-radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Dumas, J.L.; Lorchel, F. [CHU de Besancon, Hopital Jean-Minjoz, Service Radiotherapie, 25 - Besancon (France); Marre, D. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, Dept. des Radiations, 31 - Toulouse (France); Dupont, S. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' Oncoradiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Varmenot, N. [Centre Henri-Becquerel, UnitE de Physique Medicale, 76 - Rouen (France); Ginestet, C. [Centre Leon-Berard, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 69 - Lyon (France); Caron, J. [Institut Bergonie, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Marchesi, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Ferreira, I. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Dept. d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Service de Radiotherapie, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2007-06-15

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath-hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active techniques, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily holds his/her breath. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. This work summarizes the different experiences of the centers of the STIC 2003 project. It describes the different techniques, gives an overview of the literature and proposes a practice based on our experience. (authors)

  19. Manifestation pattern of early-late vaginal morbidity after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: an analysis from the EMBRACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study (www.embracestudy.dk) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity is still pronounced with currently applied IGABT, and it needs further attention

  20. WE-AB-BRA-09: Sensitivity of Plan Re-Optimization to Errors in Deformable Image Registration in Online Adaptive Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClain, B; Olsen, J; Green, O; Yang, D; Santanam, L; Olsen, L; Zhao, T; Rodriguez, V; Wooten, H; Mutic, S; Kashani, R [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Online adaptive therapy (ART) relies on auto-contouring using deformable image registration (DIR). DIR’s inherent uncertainties require user intervention and manual edits while the patient is on the table. We investigated the dosimetric impact of DIR errors on the quality of re-optimized plans, and used the findings to establish regions for focusing manual edits to where DIR errors can Result in clinically relevant dose differences. Methods: Our clinical implementation of online adaptive MR-IGRT involves using DIR to transfer contours from CT to daily MR, followed by a physicians’ edits. The plan is then re-optimized to meet the organs at risk (OARs) constraints. Re-optimized abdomen and pelvis plans generated based on physician edited OARs were selected as the baseline for evaluation. Plans were then re-optimized on auto-deformed contours with manual edits limited to pre-defined uniform rings (0 to 5cm) around the PTV. A 0cm ring indicates that the auto-deformed OARs were used without editing. The magnitude of the variations caused by the non-deterministic optimizer was quantified by repeat re-optimizations on the same geometry to determine the mean and standard deviation (STD). For each re-optimized plan, various volumetric parameters for the PTV, the OARs were extracted along with DVH and isodose evaluation. A plan was deemed acceptable if the variation from the baseline plan was within one STD. Results: Initial results show that for abdomen and pancreas cases, a minimum of 5cm margin around the PTV is required for contour corrections, while for pelvic and liver cases a 2–3 cm margin is sufficient. Conclusion: Focusing manual contour edits to regions of dosimetric relevance can reduce contouring time in the online ART process while maintaining a clinically comparable plan. Future work will further refine the contouring region by evaluating the path along the beams, dose gradients near the target and OAR dose metrics.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of parametrial tumour spread and regression patterns in adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at; Poetter, Richard [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-morphologic differences in parametrial infiltration on tumour response during primary radio chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Material and methods: Eighty-five consecutive cervical cancer patients with FIGO stages IIB (n = 59) and IIIB (n = 26), treated by external beam radiotherapy ({+-}chemotherapy) and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, underwent T2-weighted MRI at the time of diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy. MRI patterns of parametrial tumour infiltration at the time of diagnosis were assessed with regard to predominant morphology and maximum extent of parametrial tumour infiltration and were stratified into five tumour groups (TG): 1) expansive with spiculae; 2) expansive with spiculae and infiltrating parts; 3) infiltrative into the inner third of the parametrial space (PM); 4) infiltrative into the middle third of the PM; and 5) infiltrative into the outer third of the PM. MRI at the time of brachytherapy was used for identifying presence (residual vs. no residual disease) and signal intensity (high vs. intermediate) of residual disease within the PM. Left and right PM of each patient were evaluated separately at both time points. The impact of the TG on tumour remission status within the PM was analysed using {chi}2-test and logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 170 PM were analysed. The TG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 were present in 12%, 11%, 35%, 25% and 12% of the cases, respectively. Five percent of the PM were tumour-free. Residual tumour in the PM was identified in 19%, 68%, 88%, 90% and 85% of the PM for the TG 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The TG 3 - 5 had significantly higher rates of residual tumour in the PM in comparison to TG 1 + 2 (88% vs. 43%, p < 0.01). Conclusion: MRI-morphologic features of PM infiltration appear to allow for prediction of tumour response during external beam radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A predominantly infiltrative tumour spread at the

  2. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  3. [Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer.

  4. Intra-fractional bladder motion and margins in adaptive radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Caroline; Vestergaard, Anne; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bladder is a tumour site well suited for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional changes, but it also displays considerable intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to assess target coverage with a clinically applied method for plan selection ART and to...

  5. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Westerveld, Henrike [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiotherapy, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  6. Adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer using deformable image registration of empty and full bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Caine, H.; Hunt, P.;

    2015-01-01

    A common objective of various adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies for bladder cancer is to reduce irradiation of normal tissue, thereby reduce the risk of radiation induced toxicity, and maintain or improve the target coverage. Bladder radiotherapy, typically involves generous margins (up to 20...... that incorporates the extreme deformations of the bladder, and is applicable from the first day of treatment. Deformation vector fields (DVFs), measured from the deformable image registration between empty and full bladder CTs, were scaled and constrained to construct the a-PTVs. For each patient, four a-PTVs were...

  7. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  8. Adaptive radiotherapy strategies for pelvic tumors - a systematic review of clinical implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thörnqvist, Sara; Hysing, Liv B; Tuomikoski, Laura

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Variation in shape, position and treatment response of both tumor and organs at risk are major challenges for accurate dose delivery in radiotherapy. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been proposed to customize the treatment to these motion/response patterns of the individual patients......Med. For each tumor site, the identified papers were screened independently by two researches for selection of studies describing all processes of an ART workflow: treatment monitoring and evaluation, decision and execution of adaptations. Both brachytherapy and external beam studies were eligible for review....... RESULTS: The review consisted of 43 clinical studies and 51 in silico studies. For prostate, 1219 patients were treated with offline re-planning, mainly to adapt prostate motion relative to bony anatomy. For gyne 1155 patients were treated with online brachytherapy re-planning while 25 ano-rectal cancer...

  9. A Contour-Guided Deformable Image Registration Algorithm for Adaptive Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xuejun; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Mell, Loren; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-01-01

    In adaptive radiotherapy, deformable image registration is often conducted between the planning CT and treatment CT (or cone beam CT) to generate a deformation vector field (DVF) for dose accumulation and contour propagation. The auto propagated contours on the treatment CT may contain relatively large errors, especially in low contrast regions. A clinician inspection and editing of the propagated contours are frequently needed. The edited contours are able to meet the clinical requirement for adaptive therapy; however, the DVF is still inaccurate and inconsistent with the edited contours. The purpose of this work is to develop a contour-guided deformable image registration (CG-DIR) algorithm to improve the accuracy and consistency of the DVF for adaptive radiotherapy. Incorporation of the edited contours into the registration algorithm is realized by regularizing the objective function of the original demons algorithm with a term of intensity matching between the delineated structures set pairs. The CG-DIR a...

  10. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeben, Bianca A. W.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], e-mail: b.hoeben@rther.umcn.nl; Oyen, Wim J. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G. C. [Maastro Clinic, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer 18F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  11. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  12. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  13. From clinical imaging and computational models to personalised medicine and image guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, David J

    2016-10-01

    This short paper describes the development of the UCL Centre for Medical Image Computing (CMIC) from 2006 to 2016, together with reference to historical developments of the Computational Imaging sciences Group (CISG) at Guy's Hospital. Key early work in automated image registration led to developments in image guided surgery and improved cancer diagnosis and therapy. The work is illustrated with examples from neurosurgery, laparoscopic liver and gastric surgery, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer and breast cancer, and image guided radiotherapy for lung cancer.

  14. Detection of respiratory motion in fluoroscopic images for adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, T; Nill, S; Remmert, G; Bendl, R [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, J [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: T.Moser@dkfz-heidelberg.de

    2008-06-21

    Respiratory motion limits the potential of modern high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and particle therapy. Due to the uncertainty of tumour localization, the ability of achieving dose conformation often cannot be exploited sufficiently, especially in the case of lung tumours. Various methods have been proposed to track the position of tumours using external signals, e.g. with the help of a respiratory belt or by observing external markers. Retrospectively gated time-resolved x-ray computed tomography (4D CT) studies prior to therapy can be used to register the external signals with the tumour motion. However, during treatment the actual motion of internal structures may be different. Direct control of tissue motion by online imaging during treatment promises more precise information. On the other hand, it is more complex, since a larger amount of data must be processed in order to determine the motion. Three major questions arise from this issue. Firstly, can the motion that has occurred be precisely determined in the images? Secondly, how large must, respectively how small can, the observed region be chosen to get a reliable signal? Finally, is it possible to predict the proximate tumour location within sufficiently short acquisition times to make this information available for gating irradiation? Based on multiple studies on a porcine lung phantom, we have tried to examine these questions carefully. We found a basic characteristic of the breathing cycle in images using the image similarity method normalized mutual information. Moreover, we examined the performance of the calculations and proposed an image-based gating technique. In this paper, we present the results and validation performed with a real patient data set. This allows for the conclusion that it is possible to build up a gating system based on image data, solely, or (at least in avoidance of an exceeding exposure dose) to verify gates proposed by the various external systems.

  15. 图像引导大分割调强放疗同步化疗治疗局部晚期非小细胞肺癌的临床研究∗%An Analysis of Local Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Image-guided Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy combined with Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕家华; 李涛; 李昉; 王奇峰; 刘丽; 李厨荣; 宋宴琼

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the efficacy and the toxicity of the image-guided intensity modulated hypofrac-tionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for the treatment of local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: From August 2011 to April 2013, 44 patients with local advanced non-small cell lung cancer(Stage IIIA:20 pts,Stage IIIB:24 pts) were treated with image-guided intensity modulated hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. A total dose of 60Gy ~ 72Gy was given to the planning target volume (PTV) of thoracic primary tumor. Hypofractionated radiotherapy scheme was 3Gy ~ 8Gy/ f/ d,3 ~ 5f/ w. All patients received at least 2 cycles of concurrent platinum-based double medicine combination chemotherapy. Results: The response rate was 81. 8% . A complete response was achieved in 7 patients (15. 9% ), and 29 patients (65. 9% ) achieved a partial response. The 1-, 2-year overall sur-vival rate (OS) and median survival time (MST) were 79. 5% , 51. 3% and 25 months, respectively. The 1-, 2-year local control rates (LCR) were 86. 4% and 59. 1% . The 1-, 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and median progression-free survival were 61. 2% , 38. 7% and 18 months, respectively. The incidence rates of grade 3 + acute radiation pneumo-nitis and radiation esophagitis were 6. 8% and 9. 1% . The main chemotherapy-induced acute toxic reactions were bone marrow depression ( grade 3 + ) included 17 patients ( 38. 6% ) with leukopenia, 3 patients ( 6. 8% ) with anemia, 6 patients (13. 6% ) with thrombocytopenia. Con-clusion: Image-guided intensity modulated hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy is safe and results in excellent local control and survival for local advanced NSCLC with tolerable toxicity.%目的::探讨图像引导大分割调强放疗同步化疗治疗局部晚期非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)的疗效和毒副反应。方法:2011年8月至2013年4月,44例局部晚期 NSCLC 患者(ⅢA 期20例,ⅢB 期24例)

  16. The first patient treatment of electromagnetic-guided real time adaptive radiotherapy using MLC tracking for lung SABR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Jeremy T; Caillet, Vincent; Hardcastle, Nicholas; O'Brien, Ricky; Szymura, Kathryn; Crasta, Charlene; Harris, Benjamin; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Keall, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Real time adaptive radiotherapy that enables smaller irradiated volumes may reduce pulmonary toxicity. We report on the first patient treatment of electromagnetic-guided real time adaptive radiotherapy delivered with MLC tracking for lung stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy. A clinical trial was developed to investigate the safety and feasibility of MLC tracking in lung. The first patient was an 80-year old man with a single left lower lobe lung metastasis to be treated with SABR to 48Gy in 4 fractions. In-house software was integrated with a standard linear accelerator to adapt the treatment beam shape and position based on electromagnetic transponders implanted in the lung. MLC tracking plans were compared against standard ITV-based treatment planning. MLC tracking plan delivery was reconstructed in the patient to confirm safe delivery. Real time adaptive radiotherapy delivered with MLC tracking compared to standard ITV-based planning reduced the PTV by 41% (18.7-11cm(3)) and the mean lung dose by 30% (202-140cGy), V20 by 35% (2.6-1.5%) and V5 by 9% (8.9-8%). An emerging technology, MLC tracking, has been translated into the clinic and used to treat lung SABR patients for the first time. This milestone represents an important first step for clinical real-time adaptive radiotherapy that could reduce pulmonary toxicity in lung radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Liang, Yueqiang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-04-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a ‘bi-directional’ force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software.

  18. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  19. Translation and adaptation of the Radiotherapy Edema Rating Scale to Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queija, Débora Dos Santos; Arakawa-Sugueno, Lica; Chamma, Bruna Mello; Kulcsar, Marco Aurélio Vamondes; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido

    2017-05-09

    Internal lymphedema is one of the sequelae of head and neck cancer treatment that can lead to varying degrees of swallowing, speech, and respiration alterations. The Radiotherapy Edema Rating Scale, developed by Patterson et al., is a tool used to evaluate pharyngeal and laryngeal edema. To translate into Brazilian Portuguese, to culturally adapt and test this scale in patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer. The process followed the international guidelines and translation steps by two head and neck surgeons and back-translation performed independently by two North-American natives. The final version of the test was evaluated based on the assessment of 18 patients by two head and neck surgeons and two speech therapists using the scales in Brazilian Portuguese. The translation and cultural adaptation were satisfactorily performed by the members of the committee in charge. The translation and adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Radiotherapy Edema Rating Scale was successfully performed and showed to be easy to apply. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer using wide tangential photon fields implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This CT-study evaluates the detailed potential dosimetric consequences of applying breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART), and the feasibility......%. CONCLUSIONS: Irradiated cardiac volumes can consistently be reduced for left-sided breast cancers using DIBH for wide tangential treatment fields. Additionally, substantial dose reductions in the lung are observed for both right- and left-sided tumours....

  1. A risk-adapted strategy of radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy in stage II seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domont, Julien; Massard, Christophe; Patrikidou, Anna; Bossi, Alberto; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Rose, Mathieu; Wibault, Pierre; Fizazi, Karim

    2013-07-01

    Indications for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage II seminoma are currently debated. Since 1980, the policy at Institut Gustave Roussy was to treat patients with stage IIA-B disease with external radiotherapy and patients with stage IIB-C with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In stage IIB disease, 3 cm was the usual tumor size threshold above which individual patients were considered for chemotherapy. During the period 1980-2001, 67 patients with stage II seminoma were treated: stage IIA (n = 5), stage IIB (n = 31), and stage IIC (n = 31). The median age was 40 years (range: 23-64). Among 37 patients who received radiotherapy, 5, 28, and 4 had a stage IIA, IIB, and IIC, respectively. Among 30 patients who received chemotherapy, 27 had a stage IIC. With a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 19 relapses (28%) occurred, including 11 and 8 cases treated with radiotherapy (30%) and chemotherapy (27%), respectively. The 5-year relapse-free survival was 71% (95% CI: 59-80). All but three relapses were salvaged with chemotherapy followed in selected cases by surgical resection of residual masses. Only 3 patients died of seminoma. The 5-year overall survival rate is 97% (95% CI: 89-99). Five patients subsequently developed a non-germ-cell second cancer, which occurred within the radiation field in 3 cases. With an overall survival rate of 97%, the overall outcome of patients with stage II seminoma managed according to this risk-adapted strategy is good. The possibility of extending the indications for chemotherapy to selected stage IIB seminoma patients needs to be further evaluated as potentially beneficial in terms of relapse risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  3. Extreme Hypofractionated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Greco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An emerging body of data suggests that hypofractionated radiation schedules, where a higher dose per fraction is delivered in a smaller number of sessions, may be superior to conventional fractionation schemes in terms of both tumour control and toxicity profile in the management of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. However, the optimal hypofractionation scheme is still the subject of scientific debate. Modern computer-driven technology enables the safe implementation of extreme hypo fractionation (often referred to as stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT]. Several studies are currently being conducted to clarify the yet unresolved issues regarding treatment techniques and fractionation regimens. Recently, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO issued a model policy indicating that data supporting the use of SBRT for prostate cancer have matured to a point where SBRT could be considered an appropriate alternative for select patients with low-to-intermediate risk disease. The present article reviews some of the currently available data and examines the impact of tracking technology to mitigate intra-fraction target motion, thus, potentially further improving the clinical outcomes of extreme hypofractionated radiation therapy in appropriately selected prostate cancer patients. The Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU’s currently ongoing Phase I feasibility study is described; it delivers 45 Gy in five fractions using prostate fixation via a rectal balloon, and urethral sparing via catheter placement with on-line intra-fractional motion tracking through beacon transponder technology.

  4. SU-E-J-81: Adaptive Radiotherapy for IMRT Head & Neck Patient in AKUH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousuf, A; Qureshi, B; Qadir, A; Abbasi, N [Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Sindh (Pakistan); Hussain, A [Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study we proposed Adaptive radiotherapy for IMRT patients which will brought an additional dimension to the management of patients with H&N cancer in Aga Khan University Hospital. Methods: In this study 5 Head and Neck (H&N) patients plan where selected, who’s Re-CT were done during the course of their treatment, they were simulated with IMRT technique to learn the consequence of anatomical changes that may occur during the treatment, as they are more dramatic changes can occur as compare to conventional treatment. All the organ at risk were drawn according RTOG guidelines and doses were checked as per NCCN guidelines. Results: The reduction in size of Planning target volume (PTV) is more than 20% in all the cases which leads to 3 to 5 % overdose to normal tissues and Organ at Risk. Conclusion: Through this study we would like to emphasis the importance of Adaptive Radiotherapy practice in all IMRT (H&N) patients, although prospective studies are required with larger sample sizes to address the safety and the clinical effect of such approaches on patient outcome, also one need to develop protocols before implementation of this technique in practice.

  5. Demons Registration of CT Volume and CBCT Projections for Adaptive Radiotherapy: Avoiding CBCT Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Aznar, M.; Munck af Rosenschöld, P.

    2012-01-01

    . CBCT scans, are typically reconstructed using the filtered back-projection algorithm, which introduces significant artefacts, causing deteriorated image quality and registration results. We study the feasibility of performing demons registration without tomographic reconstruction of the CBCT...... and registered image was 1.4·10-3 HU2. The mean absolute difference between the Jacobian determinant of the true and estimated deformation field was 4.0·10- 4. Time consumption was 11 min. using 8 2.3 GHz AMD Opteron cores. Conclusions: In this feasibility study, using a known deformation and synthetic noise......Purpose/Objective: In adaptive radiotherapy, the dose plan is adapted throughout the fractionation schedule to accommodate for anatomical changes. This can be achieved by deformable image registration of the planning PET-CT scan with segmented tumor and organs to daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scans...

  6. Frameless image-guided neurosurgery in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdeman, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was the enhancement of image-guidance system use by optimizing “man-machine” interaction in frameless image-guided neurosurgery. Part I. The application of frameless stereotaxy in the neurosurgical practice We aimed to compare three patient-to-image registration

  7. Image guided respiratory gated hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (H-SBRT) for liver and lung tumors: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurm, R.E.; Gum, F.; Erbel, S. [Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    To evaluate our initial experience with image guided respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors. The system combines a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system (ExacTrac{sup R} X-Ray 6D) with a dedicated conformal stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy linear accelerator (Novalis) and ExacTrac{sup R} Adaptive Gating for dynamic adaptive treatment. Moving targets are located and tracked by x-ray imaging of implanted fiducial markers defined in the treatment planning computed tomography (CT). The marker position is compared with the position in verification stereoscopic x-ray images, using fully automated marker detection software. The required shift for a correct, gated set-up is calculated and automatically applied. We present our acceptance testing and initial experience in patients with liver and lung tumors. For treatment planning CT and Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken at free breathing and expiration breath hold with internal and external fiducials present were used. Patients were treated with 8-11 consecutive fractions to a dose of 74.8-79.2 Gy. Phantom tests demonstrated targeting accuracy with a moving target to within {+-}1 mm. Inter- and intrafractional patient set-up displacements, as corrected by the gated set-up and not detectable by a conventional set-up, were up to 30 mm. Verification imaging to determine target location during treatment showed an average marker position deviation from the expected position of up to 4 mm on real patients. This initial evaluation shows the accuracy of the system and feasibility of image guided real-time respiratory gated H-SBRT for liver and lung tumors.

  8. Method for automatic re contouring straight adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer; Metodo para el recontorneo automatico del recto en radioterapia adaptativa en cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Vila, B.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Aguilera, E. J.

    2011-07-01

    Outline of quickly and accurately the rectal wall is important in Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT in the acronym) as an organ of greatest influence in limiting the dose in the planning of radiation therapy in prostate cancer. Deformabies registration methods based on image intensity can not create a correct spatial transformation if there is no correspondence between the image and image planning session. The rectal content variation creates a non-correspondence in the image intensity becomes a major obstacle to the deformable registration based on image intensity.

  9. The evaluation of composite dose using deformable image registration in adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chul Hwan; Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seok Yoon; Ye, Soo Young; Kang, Se Sik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    In adaptive radiotherapy(ART), generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue on overall treatment course which is using deformable image registration from multistage images. Also, compared with doses summed by each treatment plan and clinical significance is considered. From the first of May, 2011 to the last of July, 2012. Patients who were given treatment and had the head and neck cancer with 3-dimension conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy, those who were carried out adaptive radiotherapy cause of tumor shrinkage and weight loss. Generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue using deformable image registration was been possible, statistically significant difference was showed to mandible(48.95±3.89 vs 49.10±3.55 Gy), oral cavity(36.93±4.03 vs 38.97±5.08 Gy), parotid gland(35.71±6.22 vs 36.12±6.70 Gy) and temporomandibular joint(18.41±9.60 vs 20.13±10.42 Gy) compared with doses summed by each treatment plan. The results of this study show significant difference between composite dose by deformable image registration and doses summed by each treatment plan, composite dose by deformable image registration may generate more exact evaluation to surrounding normal tissue in adaptive radiotherapy.

  10. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon;

    2016-01-01

    AND MATERIALS: Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without...... accounted for realistic tumor motion accurately and performed to a similar high standard, with real-time adaptation significantly outperforming non-adaptive delivery methods....

  11. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  12. Toward integrated image guided liver surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnagin, W. R.; Simpson, Amber L.; Miga, M. I.

    2017-03-01

    While clinical neurosurgery has benefited from the advent of frameless image guidance for over three decades, the translation of image guided technologies to abdominal surgery, and more specifically liver resection, has been far more limited. Fundamentally, the workflow, complexity, and presentation have confounded development. With the first real efforts in translation beginning at the turn of the millennia, the work in developing novel augmented technologies to enhance screening, planning, and surgery has come to realization for the field. In this paper, we will review several examples from our own work that demonstrate the impact of image-guided procedure methods in eight clinical studies that speak to: (1) the accuracy in planning for liver resection, (2) enhanced surgical planning with portal vein embolization impact, (3) linking splenic volume changes to post-hepatectomy complications, (4) enhanced intraoperative localization in surgically occult lesions, (5) validation of deformation correction, and a (6) a novel blinded study focused at the value of deformation correction. All six of these studies were achieved in human systems and show the potential impact image guided methodologies could make on liver tissue resection procedures.

  13. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  14. An automatic dose verification system for adaptive radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaohu; Chen, Mingli; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: During a typical 5-7 week treatment of external beam radiotherapy, there are potential differences between planned patient's anatomy and positioning, such as patient weight loss, or treatment setup. The discrepancies between planned and delivered doses resulting from these differences could be significant, especially in IMRT where dose distributions tightly conforms to target volumes while avoiding organs-at-risk. We developed an automatic system to monitor delivered dose using daily imaging. Methods: For each treatment, a merged image is generated by registering the daily pre-treatment setup image and planning CT using treatment position information extracted from the Tomotherapy archive. The treatment dose is then computed on this merged image using our in-house convolution-superposition based dose calculator implemented on GPU. The deformation field between merged and planning CT is computed using the Morphon algorithm. The planning structures and treatment doses are subsequently warped for analysis and dose accumulation. All results are saved in DICOM format with private tags and organized in a database. Due to the overwhelming amount of information generated, a customizable tolerance system is used to flag potential treatment errors or significant anatomical changes. A web-based system and a DICOM-RT viewer were developed for reporting and reviewing the results. Results: More than 30 patients were analysed retrospectively. Our in-house dose calculator passed 97% gamma test evaluated with 2% dose difference and 2mm distance-to-agreement compared with Tomotherapy calculated dose, which is considered sufficient for adaptive radiotherapy purposes. Evaluation of the deformable registration through visual inspection showed acceptable and consistent results, except for cases with large or unrealistic deformation. Our automatic flagging system was able to catch significant patient setup errors or anatomical changes. Conclusions: We developed an automatic dose

  15. Adaptive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients: utilizing the principle of energy conservation to evaluate dose mapping operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2017-06-01

    Tumor regression during the course of fractionated radiotherapy confounds the ability to accurately estimate the total dose delivered to tumor targets. Here we present a new criterion to improve the accuracy of image intensity-based dose mapping operations for adaptive radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Six NSCLC patients were retrospectively investigated in this study. An image intensity-based B-spline registration algorithm was used for deformable image registration (DIR) of weekly CBCT images to a reference image. The resultant displacement vector fields were employed to map the doses calculated on weekly images to the reference image. The concept of energy conservation was introduced as a criterion to evaluate the accuracy of the dose mapping operations. A finite element method (FEM)-based mechanical model was implemented to improve the performance of the B-Spline-based registration algorithm in regions involving tumor regression. For the six patients, deformed tumor volumes changed by 21.2  ±  15.0% and 4.1  ±  3.7% on average for the B-Spline and the FEM-based registrations performed from fraction 1 to fraction 21, respectively. The energy deposited in the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 0.66 Joules (J) per fraction on average. The energy derived from the fractional dose reconstructed by the B-spline and FEM-based DIR algorithms in the deformed GTV’s was 0.51 J and 0.64 J, respectively. Based on landmark comparisons for the 6 patients, mean error for the FEM-based DIR algorithm was 2.5  ±  1.9 mm. The cross-correlation coefficient between the landmark-measured displacement error and the loss of radiation energy was  -0.16 for the FEM-based algorithm. To avoid uncertainties in measuring distorted landmarks, the B-Spline-based registrations were compared to the FEM registrations, and their displacement differences equal 4.2  ±  4.7 mm on average. The displacement differences were

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of a three-phase adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Winky Wing Ki, E-mail: winky.fung@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital (Hong Kong); Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Teo, Peter Man Lung [Central Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Central (Hong Kong)

    2012-04-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been introduced to correct the radiation-induced anatomic changes in head and neck cases during a treatment course. This study evaluated the potential dosimetric benefits of applying a 3-phase adaptive radiotherapy protocol in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients compared with the nonadaptive single-phase treatment protocol. Ten NPC patients previously treated with this 3-phase radiation protocol using Hi-Art Tomotherapy were recruited. Two new plans, PII-ART and PIII-ART, were generated based on the up-to-date computed tomography (CT) images and contours and were used for treatment in phase two (PII; after 25th fraction) and phase three (PIII; after 35th fraction), respectively. To simulate the situation of no replanning, 2 hybrid plans denoted as PII-NART and PIII-NART were generated using the original contours pasted on the PII- and PIII-CT sets by CT-CT fusion. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the NART plans and the corresponding ART plans. In both PII- and PIII-NART plans, the doses to 95% of all the target volumes (D{sub 95}) were increased with better dose uniformity, whereas the organs at risk (OARs) received higher doses compared with the corresponding ART plans. Without replanning, the total dose to 1% of brainstem and spinal cord (D{sub 1}) significantly increased 7.87 {+-} 7.26% and 10.69 {+-} 6.72%, respectively (P = 0.011 and 0.001, respectively), in which 3 patients would have these structures overdosed when compared with those with two replannings. The total maximum doses to the optic chiasm and pituitary gland and the mean doses to the left and right parotid glands were increased by 10.50 {+-} 10.51%, 8.59 {+-} 6.10%, 3.03 {+-} 4.48%, and 2.24 {+-} 3.11%, respectively (P = 0.014, 0.003, 0.053, and 0.046, respectively). The 3-phase radiotherapy protocol showed improved dosimetric results to the critical structures while keeping satisfactory target dose coverage, which demonstrated the advantages of ART in

  17. Practical Method of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Noel, Camille E.; Baker, Kenneth; Santanam, Lakshmi; Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have created an automated process using real-time tracking data to evaluate the adequacy of planning target volume (PTV) margins in prostate cancer, allowing a process of adaptive radiotherapy with minimal physician workload. We present an analysis of PTV adequacy and a proposed adaptive process. Methods and Materials: Tracking data were analyzed for 15 patients who underwent step-and-shoot multi-leaf collimation (SMLC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with uniform 5-mm PTV margins for prostate cancer using the Calypso Registered-Sign Localization System. Additional plans were generated with 0- and 3-mm margins. A custom software application using the planned dose distribution and structure location from computed tomography (CT) simulation was developed to evaluate the dosimetric impact to the target due to motion. The dose delivered to the prostate was calculated for the initial three, five, and 10 fractions, and for the entire treatment. Treatment was accepted as adequate if the minimum delivered prostate dose (D{sub min}) was at least 98% of the planned D{sub min}. Results: For 0-, 3-, and 5-mm PTV margins, adequate treatment was obtained in 3 of 15, 12 of 15, and 15 of 15 patients, and the delivered D{sub min} ranged from 78% to 99%, 96% to 100%, and 99% to 100% of the planned D{sub min}. Changes in D{sub min} did not correlate with magnitude of prostate motion. Treatment adequacy during the first 10 fractions predicted sufficient dose delivery for the entire treatment for all patients and margins. Conclusions: Our adaptive process successfully used real-time tracking data to predict the need for PTV modifications, without the added burden of physician contouring and image analysis. Our methods are applicable to other uses of real-time tracking, including hypofractionated treatment.

  18. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  19. SU-E-I-39: Molecular Image Guided Cancer Stem Cells Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells resistance to radiation is a problematic issue that has caused a big fail in cancer treatment. Methods: As a primary work, molecular imaging can indicate the main mechanisms of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. By developing and commissioning new probes and nanomolecules and biomarkers, radiation scientist will able to identify the essential pathways of radiation resistance of cancer stem cells. As the second solution, molecular imaging is a best way to find biological target volume and delineate cancer stem cell tissues. In the other hand, by molecular imaging techniques one can image the treatment response in tumor and also in normal tissue. In this issue, the response of cancer stem cells to radiation during therapy course can be imaged, also the main mechanisms of radiation resistance and finding the best radiation modifiers (sensitizers) can be achieved by molecular imaging modalities. In adaptive radiotherapy the molecular imaging plays a vital role to have higher tumor control probability by delivering high radiation doses to cancer stem cells in any time of treatment. The outcome of a feasible treatment is dependent to high cancer stem cells response to radiation and removing all of which, so a good imaging modality can show this issue and preventing of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Results: Our results are dependent to use of molecular imaging as a new modality in the clinic. We propose molecular imaging as a new radiobiological technique to solve radiation therapy problems due to cancer stem cells. Conclusion: Molecular imaging guided cancer stem cell diagnosis and therapy is a new approach in the field of cancer treatment. This new radiobiological imaging technique should be developed in all clinics as a feasible tool that is more biological than physical imaging.

  20. Evolution of motion uncertainty in rectal cancer: implications for adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jean-Paul J. E.; van Asselen, Bram; Burbach, Johannes P. M.; Intven, Martijn; Philippens, Marielle E. P.; Reerink, Onne; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of motion uncertainty by applying adaptive radiotherapy strategies depends largely on the temporal behavior of this motion. To fully optimize adaptive strategies, insight into target motion is needed. The purpose of this study was to analyze stability and evolution in time of motion uncertainty of both the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for patients with rectal cancer. We scanned 16 patients daily during one week, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner in treatment position, prior to each radiotherapy fraction. Single slice sagittal cine MRIs were made at the beginning, middle, and end of each scan session, for one minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. GTV and CTV motion were determined by registering a delineated reference frame to time-points later in time. The 95th percentile of observed motion (dist95%) was taken as a measure of motion. The stability of motion in time was evaluated within each cine-MRI separately. The evolution of motion was investigated between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of a single scan session and between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of several days later in the course of treatment. This observed motion was then converted into a PTV-margin estimate. Within a one minute cine-MRI scan, motion was found to be stable and small. Independent of the time-point within the scan session, the average dist95% remains below 3.6 mm and 2.3 mm for CTV and GTV, respectively 90% of the time. We found similar motion over time intervals from 18 min to 4 days. When reducing the time interval from 18 min to 1 min, a large reduction in motion uncertainty is observed. A reduction in motion uncertainty, and thus the PTV-margin estimate, of 71% and 75% for CTV and tumor was observed, respectively. Time intervals of 15 and 30 s yield no further reduction in motion uncertainty compared to a 1 min time interval.

  1. Image-guided radiation therapy. Paradigm change in radiation therapy; Bildgestuetzte Strahlentherapie. Paradigmenwechsel in der Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, F. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Belka, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Reiser, M. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The introduction of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has changed the workflow in radiation oncology more dramatically than any other innovation in the last decades. Imaging for treatment planning before the initiation of the radiotherapy series does not take alterations in patient anatomy and organ movement into account. The principle of IGRT is the temporal and spatial connection of imaging in the treatment position immediately before radiation treatment. The actual position and the target position are compared using cone-beam computed tomography (CT) or stereotactic ultrasound. The IGRT procedure allows a reduction of the safety margins and dose to normal tissue without an increase in risk of local recurrence. In the future the linear treatment chain in radiation oncology will be developed based on the closed-loop feedback principle. The IGRT procedure is increasingly being used especially for high precision radiotherapy, e.g. for prostate or brain tumors. (orig.) [German] Die Einfuehrung der bildgestuetzten Radiotherapie (IGRT - ''image-guided radiotherapy'') hat wie kaum eine andere Innovation die Behandlungsablaeufe in der Radioonkologie veraendert. Eine einmalige Bildgebung zur Bestrahlungsplanung vor der Behandlungsserie beruecksichtigt nicht die Aenderung der Patientengeometrie und die Organbeweglichkeit. Das Prinzip der IGRT besteht in der raeumlichen und zeitlichen Zusammenfuehrung von Bildgebung in der Bestrahlungsposition unmittelbar vor der eigentlichen Bestrahlung. Mittels Cone-beam-CT oder stereotaktischem Ultraschall wird die Ist- mit der Sollposition verglichen. Die IGRT erlaubt die Reduktion der Sicherheitssaeume und damit die Schonung des Normalgewebes, ohne das Rezidivrisiko zu erhoehen. Zukuenftig wird die lineare Behandlungskette in der Radioonkologie durch eine geschlossene, multipel rueckgekoppelte Therapieschleife ersetzt werden. Speziell bei Praezisionsbestrahlungen wie z. B. Prostata- oder Hirntumoren kommt die IGRT

  2. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  3. High performance computing for deformable image registration: towards a new paradigm in adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Xia, Junyi; Muyan-Ozcelik, Pinar; Owens, John D

    2008-08-01

    The advent of readily available temporal imaging or time series volumetric (4D) imaging has become an indispensable component of treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) at many radiotherapy centers. Deformable image registration (DIR) is also used in other areas of medical imaging, including motion corrected image reconstruction. Due to long computation time, clinical applications of DIR in radiation therapy and elsewhere have been limited and consequently relegated to offline analysis. With the recent advances in hardware and software, graphics processing unit (GPU) based computing is an emerging technology for general purpose computation, including DIR, and is suitable for highly parallelized computing. However, traditional general purpose computation on the GPU is limited because the constraints of the available programming platforms. As well, compared to CPU programming, the GPU currently has reduced dedicated processor memory, which can limit the useful working data set for parallelized processing. We present an implementation of the demons algorithm using the NVIDIA 8800 GTX GPU and the new CUDA programming language. The GPU performance will be compared with single threading and multithreading CPU implementations on an Intel dual core 2.4 GHz CPU using the C programming language. CUDA provides a C-like language programming interface, and allows for direct access to the highly parallel compute units in the GPU. Comparisons for volumetric clinical lung images acquired using 4DCT were carried out. Computation time for 100 iterations in the range of 1.8-13.5 s was observed for the GPU with image size ranging from 2.0 x 10(6) to 14.2 x 10(6) pixels. The GPU registration was 55-61 times faster than the CPU for the single threading implementation, and 34-39 times faster for the multithreading implementation. For CPU based computing, the computational time generally has a linear dependence on image size for medical imaging data. Computational efficiency is

  4. COR, a new adaptive radiotherapy technique using conical tomography and offline re-planning; COR, une nouvelle technique de radiotherapie adaptative utilisant la tomographie conique et la replannification offline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Octave, N.; Beaulieu, L. [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, universite Laval, Quebec (Canada); Boutry, C.; Dudouet, P. [Groupe Oncorad Garonne, service de radiotherapie, clinique du Pont-de-Chaume, 82 - Montauban (France); Octave, N.; Gingras, L.; Beaulieu, L. [Departement de radio-oncologie, centre de recherche en cancerologie, CHU de Quebec (Canada); Berry, I. [Biophysique et medecine nucleaire, CHU de Toulouse Rangueil, 31 - Toulouse (France); Octave, N.; Berry, I. [Universite Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse 3, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors present a new adaptive radiotherapy technique which uses daily conical (or dual-axis) tomographies. For each fraction of prostatic intensity modulated and conformational radiotherapy (RCMI), conical tomographies are acquired and used to reposition the patient and to generate a new optimized RCMI plan. Three therapeutic strategies are then elaborated and studied: a conventional strategy (the patient is totally treated with a dosimetry based of the initial scanography), an optimal strategy (the patient is treated on a daily basis with the optimized RCMI plan based on the conical tomography), and a Continuous Offline Re-planning (COR) strategy which uses the whole set of plans computed on the conical tomographies performed on the day before the treatment. The obtained results show that the COR strategy leads to a better dosimetric coverage and to less severe technical and human constraints. Short communication

  5. Electromagnetic Detection and Real-Time DMLC Adaptation to Target Rotation During Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Junqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Cho, Byungchul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sawant, Amit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J. [Calypso Medical Technologies, Seattle, WA (United States); Cattell, Herbert [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: radphyslab@sydney.edu.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Intrafraction rotation of more than 45 Degree-Sign and 25 Degree-Sign has been observed for lung and prostate tumors, respectively. Such rotation is not routinely adapted to during current radiotherapy, which may compromise tumor dose coverage. The aim of the study was to investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance of an electromagnetically guided real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to adapt to intrafractional tumor rotation. Materials/Methods: Target rotation was provided by changing the treatment couch angle. The target rotation was measured by a research Calypso system integrated with a real-time DMLC tracking system employed on a Varian linac. The geometric beam-target rotational alignment difference was measured using electronic portal images. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified using a two-dimensional ion chamber array. For each beam, the following five delivery modes were tested: 1) nonrotated target (reference); 2) fixed rotated target with tracking; 3) fixed rotated target without tracking; 4) actively rotating target with tracking; and 5) actively rotating target without tracking. Dosimetric performance of the latter four modes was measured and compared to the reference dose distribution using a 3 mm/3% {gamma}-test. Results: Geometrically, the beam-target rotational alignment difference was 0.3 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.6 Degree-Sign for fixed rotation and 0.3 Degree-Sign {+-} 1.3 Degree-Sign for active rotation. Dosimetrically, the average failure rate for the {gamma}-test for a fixed rotated target was 11% with tracking and 36% without tracking. The average failure rate for an actively rotating target was 9% with tracking and 35% without tracking. Conclusions: For the first time, real-time target rotation has been accurately detected and adapted to during radiation delivery via DMLC tracking. The beam-target rotational alignment difference was mostly within 1 Degree-Sign . Dose distributions to fixed and actively

  6. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy. Clini

  7. Image-guided drug delivery : Preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, G; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy. Clini

  8. Breathing adapted radiotherapy: a 4D gating software for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Habib

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Physiological respiratory motion of tumors growing in the lung can be corrected with respiratory gating when treated with radiotherapy (RT. The optimal respiratory phase for beam-on may be assessed with a respiratory phase optimizer (RPO, a 4D image processing software developed with this purpose. Methods and Materials Fourteen patients with lung cancer were included in the study. Every patient underwent a 4D-CT providing ten datasets of ten phases of the respiratory cycle (0-100% of the cycle. We defined two morphological parameters for comparison of 4D-CT images in different respiratory phases: tumor-volume to lung-volume ratio and tumor-to-spinal cord distance. The RPO automatized the calculations (200 per patient of these parameters for each phase of the respiratory cycle allowing to determine the optimal interval for RT. Results Lower lobe lung tumors not attached to the diaphragm presented with the largest motion with breathing. Maximum inspiration was considered the optimal phase for treatment in 4 patients (28.6%. In 7 patients (50%, however, the RPO showed a most favorable volumetric and spatial configuration in phases other than maximum inspiration. In 2 cases (14.4% the RPO showed no benefit from gating. This tool was not conclusive in only one case. Conclusions The RPO software presented in this study can help to determine the optimal respiratory phase for gated RT based on a few simple morphological parameters. Easy to apply in daily routine, it may be a useful tool for selecting patients who might benefit from breathing adapted RT.

  9. Real-time auto-adaptive margin generation for MLC-tracked radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glitzner, M.; Fast, M. F.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2017-01-01

    In radiotherapy, abdominal and thoracic sites are candidates for performing motion tracking. With real-time control it is possible to adjust the multileaf collimator (MLC) position to the target position. However, positions are not perfectly matched and position errors arise from system delays and complicated response of the electromechanic MLC system. Although, it is possible to compensate parts of these errors by using predictors, residual errors remain and need to be compensated to retain target coverage. This work presents a method to statistically describe tracking errors and to automatically derive a patient-specific, per-segment margin to compensate the arising underdosage on-line, i.e. during plan delivery. The statistics of the geometric error between intended and actual machine position are derived using kernel density estimators. Subsequently a margin is calculated on-line according to a selected coverage parameter, which determines the amount of accepted underdosage. The margin is then applied onto the actual segment to accommodate the positioning errors in the enlarged segment. The proof-of-concept was tested in an on-line tracking experiment and showed the ability to recover underdosages for two test cases, increasing {{V}90 %} in the underdosed area about 47 % and 41 % , respectively. The used dose model was able to predict the loss of dose due to tracking errors and could be used to infer the necessary margins. The implementation had a running time of 23 ms which is compatible with real-time requirements of MLC tracking systems. The auto-adaptivity to machine and patient characteristics makes the technique a generic yet intuitive candidate to avoid underdosages due to MLC tracking errors.

  10. Evaluating repetitive 18F-fluoroazomycin-arabinoside (18FAZA) PET in the setting of MRI guided adaptive radiotherapy in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Matthias; Kommata, Spyridoula; Lukic, Dobrica; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt; Karanikas, Georgios (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Vienna/AKH Wien (Austria)), E-mail: barbara.bachtiary@meduniwien.ac.at; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Poetter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Bachtiary, Barbara (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Univ. of Vienna/AKH Wien (Austria))

    2010-10-15

    Background. The aim of this pilot study was to assess tumour hypoxia in patients with cervical cancer before, during and after combined radio-chemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided brachytherapy (BT) by use of the hypoxia Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracer 18F-fluoroazomycin-arabinoside (18FAZA ). Material and methods. Fifteen consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical cancer referred for definitive radiotherapy (RT) were included in an approved clinical protocol. Stage distribution was 3 IB1, 1 IB2, 10 IIB, 1 IIIB, tumour volume was 55 cm3 (+/- 67, SD). Dynamic and static 18FAZA -PET scans were performed before, during and after external beam therapy (EBRT) and image guided BT +/- concomitant cisplatin. Dose was prescribed to the individual High Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR CTV) taking into account the dose volume constraints for adjacent organs at risk. Results. Five patients had visually identifiable tumours on 18FAZA -PET scans performed prior to radio-chemotherapy and four patients before brachytherapy. One of five 18FAZA PET positive patients had incomplete remission three months after RT, one had regional recurrence. Four of ten 18FAZA-PET negative patients developed distant metastases. The one patient with incomplete remission received 69 Gy (D90) in the HR CTV, whereas all other patients received mean 99 Gy (+/-12, SD). Conclusion. PET imaging with 18FAZA is feasible in patients with cancer of the uterine cervix. However, its predictive and prognostic value remains to be clarified. This applies in particular for the additional value of 18FAZA-PET compared to morphologic repetitive MRI within the setting of image guided high dose radiotherapy which may contribute to overcome hypoxia related radioresistance.

  11. The concept of image-guided therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburgh, Kirby G; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2003-02-01

    Parallel with current applications in minimally invasive surgery, the introduction of new imaging modalities, and the availability of high-performance computing, new image-guided therapies are being developed at an impressive rate. Indeed, across a broad front of imaging technologies, rapid advances are being realized. Vastly refined technology for processing and using images, as well as improved therapeutic end-effectors, have no doubt hastened this remarkable progress. At the same time, advances in clinical evaluation and complementary technologies will provide the necessary infrastructure through which IGT can be applied in diverse therapeutic settings--from the already well-established neurosurgical applications to the thermal ablation of tumors in organs other than the brain. That IGT is more efficient and effective and less expensive than conventional surgery has been confirmed both in extensive, long-term studies and in ongoing, revolutionary applications in the operating room. We have laid critical groundwork with this extraordinary technology and have now begun to realize quantifiable benefits in terms of improved surgical and patient outcomes.

  12. Intra-patient semi-automated segmentation of the cervix-uterus in CT-images for adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bondar (Luiza); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); W. Schillemans; B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFor online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer, fast and accurate image segmentation is required to facilitate daily treatment adaptation. Our aim was twofold: (1) to test and compare three intra-patient automated segmentation methods for the cervix-uterus structure in CT-images and

  13. Breathing adapted radiotherapy: final clinic results of the program for the support to costly innovating techniques (Stic) of 2003; La radiotherapie asservie a la respiration: resultats cliniques finaux du programme de Soutien aux techniques innovantes couteuses (Stic) de 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, P. [Universite Paris Descartes, 75 - Paris (France); Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Giraud, P.; Morvan, E.; Djadi-Prat, J.; Rosenwald, J.C. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Carrere, M.O. [GATE UMR CNRS 5824, 69 - Lyon (France); Centre Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the comparison, from a clinic point of view, between breathing adapted conformational radiotherapy (BART) and conventional conformational radiotherapy, in the case of lung and breast cancers. The assessment comprised a clinic examination, a thoracic radiography, breathing functional tests, a thoracic scanography at different moments (3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months), and dosimetric criteria for tumour target volumes and the different thoracic organs at risk. Data have been collected among more than six hundred patients. Breathing adapted techniques allow acute and late toxicity to be reduced, notably for the lung, heart and oesophagus during a lung irradiation. They are less interesting for mammary irradiation, but could be important for a radiotherapy of the left breast. Short communication

  14. Development of a deformable dosimetric phantom to verify dose accumulation algorithms for adaptive radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualiang Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive radiotherapy may improve treatment outcomes for lung cancer patients. Because of the lack of an effective tool for quality assurance, this therapeutic modality is not yet accepted in clinic. The purpose of this study is to develop a deformable physical phantom for validation of dose accumulation algorithms in regions with heterogeneous mass. A three-dimensional (3D deformable phantom was developed containing a tissue-equivalent tumor and heterogeneous sponge inserts. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs were placed at multiple locations in the phantom each time before dose measurement. Doses were measured with the phantom in both the static and deformed cases. The deformation of the phantom was actuated by a motor driven piston. 4D computed tomography images were acquired to calculate 3D doses at each phase using Pinnacle and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. These images were registered using two registration software packages: VelocityAI and Elastix. With the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs, the calculated 3D doses were accumulated using a mass-and energy congruent mapping method and compared to those measured by the TLDs at four typical locations. In the static case, TLD measurements agreed with all the algorithms by 1.8% at the center of the tumor volume and by 4.0% in the penumbra. In the deformable case, the phantom's deformation was reproduced within 1.1 mm. For the 3D dose calculated by Pinnacle, the total dose accumulated with the Elastix DVF agreed well to the TLD measurements with their differences <2.5% at four measured locations. When the VelocityAI DVF was used, their difference increased up to 11.8%. For the 3D dose calculated by EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, the total doses accumulated with the two DVFs were within 5.7% of the TLD measurements which are slightly over the rate of 5% for clinical acceptance. The detector-embedded deformable phantom allows radiation dose to be measured in a dynamic environment, similar to deforming lung

  15. Development of a deformable dosimetric phantom to verify dose accumulation algorithms for adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Adams, Jeffrey; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Zhang, Hualin; Li, Haisen; Chetty, Indrin J

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy may improve treatment outcomes for lung cancer patients. Because of the lack of an effective tool for quality assurance, this therapeutic modality is not yet accepted in clinic. The purpose of this study is to develop a deformable physical phantom for validation of dose accumulation algorithms in regions with heterogeneous mass. A three-dimensional (3D) deformable phantom was developed containing a tissue-equivalent tumor and heterogeneous sponge inserts. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at multiple locations in the phantom each time before dose measurement. Doses were measured with the phantom in both the static and deformed cases. The deformation of the phantom was actuated by a motor driven piston. 4D computed tomography images were acquired to calculate 3D doses at each phase using Pinnacle and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. These images were registered using two registration software packages: VelocityAI and Elastix. With the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs), the calculated 3D doses were accumulated using a mass-and energy congruent mapping method and compared to those measured by the TLDs at four typical locations. In the static case, TLD measurements agreed with all the algorithms by 1.8% at the center of the tumor volume and by 4.0% in the penumbra. In the deformable case, the phantom's deformation was reproduced within 1.1 mm. For the 3D dose calculated by Pinnacle, the total dose accumulated with the Elastix DVF agreed well to the TLD measurements with their differences <2.5% at four measured locations. When the VelocityAI DVF was used, their difference increased up to 11.8%. For the 3D dose calculated by EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, the total doses accumulated with the two DVFs were within 5.7% of the TLD measurements which are slightly over the rate of 5% for clinical acceptance. The detector-embedded deformable phantom allows radiation dose to be measured in a dynamic environment, similar to deforming lung tissues, supporting

  16. The impact of image-guided radiation therapy on the dose distribution in prostate cancer using deformable registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaly, Bryan

    Dosimetric uncertainties due to variable anatomy and beam setup variability pose a significant limitation in modern precision radiotherapy. These uncertainties may lead to discrepancies between the planned and actual dose distribution delivered to the patient. This may have an adverse impact on the treatment outcome in terms of recurrent tumour growth and/or causing complications in normal tissues. This work investigates the hypothesis that image-guided radiation therapy is needed to reduce the detrimental effects of changes in anatomy on the delivered dose distribution in cancer patients. To test this hypothesis, a deformable model is developed to enable the quantification of dose differences due to patient repositioning and variable anatomy. The deformable model is based on contour-driven thin-plate splines to track the position of tissue elements within the patient. This is combined with recalculation of the treatment plan using frequent computed tomography (CT) image data acquired at different times during treatment. It is demonstrated using a clinical prostate case that dose differences in the rectum and bladder are significant (˜25%) after a multiple fraction treatment. The deformable model is validated using phantom and clinical prostate CT data. A mathematical phantom is used to demonstrate that the accuracy in tracking the dose delivered to a tissue element is 3--4% in high dose gradient regions. Ten prostate cancer patients with radio-opaque markers implanted in the prostate and seminal vesicles are used to demonstrate that the deformable model is accurate (˜2.5 mm) to within the intra-observer contouring variability. The impact of correcting for setup uncertainty and inter-fraction tumour motion is explored by comparing treatment scenarios that would employ current image guidance technology to conventional treatment (i.e., alignment to external markers). This work demonstrates that geographic tumour miss is remedied using image-guided treatment and day

  17. [New techniques and potential benefits for radiotherapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, L; Doré, M; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy is used for inoperable lung cancers, sometimes in association with chemotherapy. Outcomes of conventional radiotherapy are disappointing. New techniques improve adaptation to tumour volume, decrease normal tissue irradiation and lead to increasing tumour dose with the opportunity for improved survival. With intensity-modulated radiation therapy, isodoses can conform to complex volumes. It is widely used and seems to be indicated in locally advanced stages. Its dosimetric improvements have been demonstrated but outcomes are still heterogeneous. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows treatment of small volumes with many narrow beams. Dedicated devices or appropriate equipment on classical devices are needed. In early stages, its efficacy is comparable to surgery with an acceptable toxicity. Endobronchial brachytherapy could be used for early stages with specific criteria. Hadrontherapy is still experimental regarding lung cancer. Hadrons have physical properties leading to very accurate dose distribution. In the rare published studies, toxicities are roughly lower than others techniques but for early stages its effectiveness is not better than stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques are optimized by metabolic imaging which precisely defines the target volume and assesses the therapeutic response; image-guided radiation therapy which allows a more accurate patient set up and by respiratory tracking or gating which takes account of tumour respiratory motions.

  18. Image guided robotic surgery: Current evidence for effectiveness in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Pervez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Discussion of the evolution of image guided surgery (IGS and its fundamental components and current evidence for effectiveness of IGS in clinical urology. Methods: Literature search for image-guided robotic urology. Results: Current literature in image-guided robotic urology with its use in robot assisted radical prostatectomy and robot assisted partial nephrectomy are shown. Conclusions: Image guided surgery can be a useful aid to improve visualisation of anatomy and subsurface structures during minimally invasive surgery. Soft-tissue deformation makes it difficult to implement IGS in urology but current studies have shown an attempt to address this issue. The feasibility of IGS requires randomised control trials assessing in particular its accuracy and affect on clinical outcome.

  19. Clinical Introduction of a Novel Liquid Fiducial Marker for Breathing Adapted Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman

    .g. the heart and the lungs. Breathing adaptation and fiducial markers are tools which can increase precision in lung cancer radiotherapy. The primary aim of this thesis was to evaluate a novel liquid fiducial marker in both a pre-clinical and a clinical setting. The marker was tested rigorously for visibility...... delivery, e.g. breathing related tumour motion and anatomical changes during treatment. To ensure dose delivery to the target, a safety margin is added to the tumour. A large treatment volume, however, can be problematic due to the proximity of vital anatomical structures in the chest region, e...... for the tumour position in lung cancer patients. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential benefit of a breathing adaptation technique, where patients hold their breath during treatment delivery. We found that this technique reduced both tumour motion and doses to risk organs. Finally, we investigated...

  20. WE-G-BRD-08: Motion Analysis for Rectal Cancer: Implications for Adaptive Radiotherapy On the MR-Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B van; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Philippens, M; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this study is to find the optimal trade-off between adaptation interval and margin reduction and to define the implications of motion for rectal cancer boost radiotherapy on a MR-linac. Methods: Daily MRI scans were acquired of 16 patients, diagnosed with rectal cancer, prior to each radiotherapy fraction in one week (N=76). Each scan session consisted of T2-weighted and three 2D sagittal cine-MRI, at begin (t=0 min), middle (t=9:30 min) and end (t=18:00 min) of scan session, for 1 minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. Tumor and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated on each T2-weighted scan and transferred to each cine-MRI. The start frame of the begin scan was used as reference and registered to frames at time-points 15, 30 and 60 seconds, 9:30 and 18:00 minutes and 1, 2, 3 and 4 days later. Per time-point, motion of delineated voxels was evaluated using the deformation vector fields of the registrations and the 95th percentile distance (dist95%) was calculated as measure of motion. Per time-point, the distance that includes 90% of all cases was taken as estimate of required planning target volume (PTV)-margin. Results: Highest motion reduction is observed going from 9:30 minutes to 60 seconds. We observe a reduction in margin estimates from 10.6 to 2.7 mm and 16.1 to 4.6 mm for tumor and CTV, respectively, when adapting every 60 seconds compared to not adapting treatment. A 75% and 71% reduction, respectively. Further reduction in adaptation time-interval yields only marginal motion reduction. For adaptation intervals longer than 18:00 minutes only small motion reductions are observed. Conclusion: The optimal adaptation interval for adaptive rectal cancer (boost) treatments on a MR-linac is 60 seconds. This results in substantial smaller PTV-margin estimates. Adaptation intervals of 18:00 minutes and higher, show little improvement in motion reduction.

  1. Guidelines for target volume definition in post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, on behalf of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortmans, Philip; Bossi, Alberto; Vandeputte, Katia; Bosset, Mathieu; Miralbell, Raymond; Maingon, Philippe; Boehmer, Dirk; Budiharto, Tom; Symon, Zvi; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Scrase, Christopher; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Bolla, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation as well as stanclardisation of t

  2. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  3. Impact of dose escalation and adaptive radiotherapy for cervical cancers on tumour shrinkage—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røthe Arnesen, Marius; Paulsen Hellebust, Taran; Malinen, Eirik

    2017-03-01

    Tumour shrinkage occurs during fractionated radiotherapy and is regulated by radiation induced cellular damage, repopulation of viable cells and clearance of dead cells. In some cases additional tumour shrinkage during external beam therapy may be beneficial, particularly for locally advanced cervical cancer where a small tumour volume may simplify and improve brachytherapy. In the current work, a mathematical tumour model is utilized to investigate how local dose escalation affects tumour shrinkage, focusing on implications for brachytherapy. The iterative two-compartment model is based upon linear-quadratic radiation response, a doubling time for viable cells and a half-time for clearance of dead cells. The model was individually fitted to clinical tumour volume data from fractionated radiotherapy of 25 cervical cancer patients. Three different fractionation patterns for dose escalation, all with an additional dose of 12.2 Gy, were simulated and compared to standard fractionation in terms of tumour shrinkage. An adaptive strategy where dose escalation was initiated after one week of treatment was also considered. For 22 out of 25 patients, a good model fit was achieved to the observed tumour shrinkage. A large degree of inter-patient variation was seen in predicted volume reduction following dose escalation. For the 10 best responding patients, a mean tumour volume reduction of 34  ±  3% (relative to standard treatment) was estimated at the time of brachytherapy. Timing of initiating dose escalation had a larger impact than the number of fractions applied. In conclusion, the model was found useful in evaluating the impact from dose escalation on tumour shrinkage. The results indicate that dose escalation could be conducted from the start of external beam radiotherapy in order to obtain additional tumour shrinkage before brachytherapy.

  4. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Linz Univ. (Austria). Medical Faculty; Roach, Mack III [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Van As, Nicholas (ed.) [The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Clinical practice of image-guided spine radiosurgery - results from an international research consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal radiosurgery is a quickly evolving technique in the radiotherapy and neurosurgical communities. However, the methods of spine radiosurgery have not been standardized. This article describes the results of a survey about the methods of spine radiosurgery at five international institutions. Methods All institutions are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided radiosurgery. The questionnaire consisted of 75 items covering all major steps of spine radiosurgery. Results Strong agreement in the methods of spine radiosurgery was observed. In particular, similarities were observed with safety and quality assurance playing an important role in the methods of all institutions, cooperation between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists in case selection, dedicated imaging for target- and organ-at-risk delineation, application of proper safety margins for the target volume and organs-at-risk, conformal planning and precise image-guided treatment delivery, and close clinical and radiological follow-up. In contrast, three major areas of uncertainty and disagreement were identified: 1 Indications and contra-indications for spine radiosurgery; 2 treatment dose and fractionation and 3 tolerance dose of the spinal cord. Conclusions Results of this study reflect the current practice of spine radiosurgery in large academic centers. Despite close agreement was observed in many steps of spine radiosurgery, further research in form of retrospective and especially prospective studies is required to refine the details of spinal radiosurgery in terms of safety and efficacy.

  6. Automatic image segmentation for treatment planning in radiotherapy; Segmentation automatique des images pour la planifi cation dosimetrique en radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquiera, D. [Centre Galilee, polyclinique de la Louviere, 59 - Lille (France); Peyrodie, L. [Ecole des hautes etudes d' ingenieur, 59 - Lille (France); Laboratoire d' automatique, genie informatique et signal (LAGIS), Cite scientifi que, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France); Pointreau, Y.; Bera, G. [Clinique d' oncologie radiotherapie, Centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Lartigau, E. [Departement universitaire de radiotherapie, Centre O. Lambret, Universite Lille 2, 59 - Lille (France)

    2010-07-01

    One drawback of the growth in conformal radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy is the increased time needed to define the volumes of interest. This also results in inter- and intra-observer variability. However, developments in computing and image processing have enabled these tasks to be partially or totally automated. This article will provide a detailed description of the main principles of image segmentation in radiotherapy, its applications and the most recent results in a clinical context. (authors)

  7. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of the use of deformable image registration in adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiland, R B; Maare, Christian; Sjöström, D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out geometric and dosimetric evaluation of the usefulness of a deformable image registration algorithm utilized for adaptive head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Data consisted of seven patients, each with a planning CT (pCT), a rescanning CT (Re...

  8. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological...... tomography studies showed that both voluntary DIBH and IG provided reduction of the lung V50 (relative volume receiving more than 50% of prescription dose) on the order of 30-40%, and a 80-90% reduction of the heart V50 for left-sided cancers. Corresponding pneumonitis probability of 28.1% (range, 0...

  9. Image-guided therapy: evolution and breakthrough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigron, Pascal; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Beyond the advances made in computer-assisted interventions and robotic systems, the demand for more efficient and safer therapies remains challenging. Thus, if it is possible to improve the instrument tracking, steering, and target localization, to miniaturize the sensors and actuators, and to conduct preoperatively planned minimally invasive therapies, we still need new resources to achieve permanent destruction of abnormal tissues or suppression of pathological processes. Most of the physics-based (or energy-based) therapeutic principles at our disposal have been established a long time ago, but their actions on basic cellular and molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. They all have a wide spectrum of clinical targets in terms of organs and pathologies, modes of application (external, interstitial, intraluminal, etc.) with advantages and side-effect drawbacks, proven indications, and contraindications. Some of them may still face controversies regarding their outcomes. This short article, mainly focused on tumor destruction, briefly reviews in its first part some of these techniques and sketches the next generation under investigation. The former include radio frequency (RF), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HiFU), microwaves, and cryotherapy, of which all are temperature based. Laser-based approaches [e.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT) at large] are also discussed. Radiotherapy and its variants (hadrontherapy, brachytherapy, Gamma Knife, and CyberKnife) remain, of course, as the reference technique in cancer treatment. The next breakthroughs are examined in the second part of the article. They are based on the close association between imaging agents, drugs, and some stimulation techniques. The ongoing research efforts in that direction show that, if they are still far from clinical applications, strong expectations are made. From the point of view of interventional planning and image guidance, all of them share a lot of concerns.

  10. An augmented parametric response map with consideration of image registration error: towards guidance of locally adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, Anthony; Chen, Jeff; Ward, Aaron D.; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Parametric response map (PRM) analysis is a voxel-wise technique for predicting overall treatment outcome, which shows promise as a tool for guiding personalized locally adaptive radiotherapy (RT). However, image registration error (IRE) introduces uncertainty into this analysis which may limit its use for guiding RT. Here we extend the PRM method to include an IRE-related PRM analysis confidence interval and also incorporate multiple graded classification thresholds to facilitate visualization. A Gaussian IRE model was used to compute an expected value and confidence interval for PRM analysis. The augmented PRM (A-PRM) was evaluated using CT-perfusion functional image data from patients treated with RT for glioma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Known rigid IREs were simulated by applying one thousand different rigid transformations to each image set. PRM and A-PRM analyses of the transformed images were then compared to analyses of the original images (ground truth) in order to investigate the two methods in the presence of controlled IRE. The A-PRM was shown to help visualize and quantify IRE-related analysis uncertainty. The use of multiple graded classification thresholds also provided additional contextual information which could be useful for visually identifying adaptive RT targets (e.g. sub-volume boosts). The A-PRM should facilitate reliable PRM guided adaptive RT by allowing the user to identify if a patient’s unique IRE-related PRM analysis uncertainty has the potential to influence target delineation.

  11. Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan J Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

  12. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy.

  13. The utility of e-Learning to support training for a multicentre bladder online adaptive radiotherapy trial (TROG 10.01-BOLART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Bressel, Mathias; Tongs, David; Rolfo, Aldo; Styles, Colin; Gill, Suki; Kron, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    An e-Learning programme appeared useful for providing training and information regarding a multi-centre image guided radiotherapy trial. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the utility of this e-Learning programme. Modules were created on relevant pelvic anatomy, Cone Beam CT soft tissue recognition and trial details. Radiation therapist participants' knowledge and confidence were evaluated before, at the end of, and after at least 6 weeks of e-Learning (long term). One hundred and eighty-five participants were recruited from 12 centres, with 118 in the first, and 67 in the second cohort. One hundred and forty-six participants had two tests (pre and post e-Learning) and 39 of these had three tests (pre, post, and long term). There was an increase confidence after completion of modules (pdifferent questions' score was 77 ± 13 (p=0.014). In the second cohort, pre-test scores were 64 ± 10, post-test same question score 78 ± 9 (pdifferent questions' score 81 ± 11 (pLearning for a multi-centre clinical trial was feasible and improved confidence and knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intraoperative 3D Ultrasonography for Image-Guided Neurosurgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letteboer, Marloes Maria Johanna

    2004-01-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery has evolved dramatically in recent years from the original rigid frame-based systems to the current frameless image-guided systems, which allow greater flexibility while maintaining sufficient accuracy. As these systems continue to evolve, more applications are found, and i

  15. Imaging guided differentiation of parotid tumors; Bildgebende Differenzierung von Parotistumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, C.; Horger, M.; Haap, M.; Ioanoviciu, S.D.; Boesmueller, H.

    2015-09-15

    Imaging guided differentiation of parotid tumors is helping diagnosis and therapy decision making. It is necessary to consider seldom tumor forms and their characteristic appearance. Modern techniques as diffusion supported NMR imaging sequences and correlated contrast agent kinetics may be helpful besides computer tomography and PET techniques.

  16. Image-guided endoscopic transnasal removal of recurrent pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasio, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo; Felisati, Giovanni; Broggi, Giovanni

    2002-07-01

    To assess the role that neuronavigation plays in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal reoperations for recurrent pituitary adenomas. During a 45-month period, 19 endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations were performed for recurrent pituitary adenomas. In 11 of 19 patients, the procedure was performed with the aid of an optically guided system. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively, with attention to the following: comparison of baseline clinical data, the duration of surgery, and the postoperative course and complications of both image-guided and non-image-guided endoscopic reoperations. In addition, to test the reliability of the neuronavigation system, we made measurements of intraoperative accuracy in five additional transnasal endoscopic procedures in "virgin" noses and sphenoidal sinuses. In both groups studied, we found no difference with regard to either morbidity or mortality, which were null. The mean setup time was 13 minutes shorter in non-image-guided procedures (P = 0.021), and the operative time was 36 minutes shorter in image-guided procedures (P = 0.038). No other statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. In all cases, we found that the system performed without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of the intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes indicated a mean intraoperatively verified system error of 1.6 +/- 0.6 mm. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and probably safer.

  17. Clinical contribution of the radiotherapy guided by cone-shaped beam tomodensitometry; Apports cliniques de la radiotherapie guidee par tomodensitometrie a faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notter, M.; Yanes, B.; Germond, J.F. [Hopital Neuchatelois, Service de Radiotherapie, La Chaux-de-Fonds (France)

    2006-11-15

    The tomodensitometry with a cone-shaped beam gives a correct position of the rectum and bladder during prostate or pelvis irradiation and allows to follow the evolution of the tumor regression. Combined to the three dimensional conformational irradiation, the image guided radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) aims to increase the efficiency of the radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  18. The role of regularization in deformable image registration for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardo, D; Peroni, M; Riboldi, M; Alterio, D; Baroni, G; Orecchia, R

    2013-08-01

    Deformable image registration provides a robust mathematical framework to quantify morphological changes that occur along the course of external beam radiotherapy treatments. As clinical reliability of deformable image registration is not always guaranteed, algorithm regularization is commonly introduced to prevent sharp discontinuities in the quantified deformation and achieve anatomically consistent results. In this work we analyzed the influence of regularization on two different registration methods, i.e. B-Splines and Log Domain Diffeomorphic Demons, implemented in an open-source platform. We retrospectively analyzed the simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and the corresponding re-planning computed tomography (CTrepl) scans in 30 head and neck cancer patients. First, we investigated the influence of regularization levels on hounsfield units (HU) information in 10 test patients for each considered method. Then, we compared the registration results of the open-source implementation at selected best performing regularization levels with a clinical commercial software on the remaining 20 patients in terms of mean volume overlap, surface and center of mass distances between manual outlines and propagated structures. The regularized B-Splines method was not statistically different from the commercial software. The tuning of the regularization parameters allowed open-source algorithms to achieve better results in deformable image registration for head and neck patients, with the additional benefit of a framework where regularization can be tuned on a patient specific basis.

  19. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [German] Das Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Schweden) ermoeglicht die stereotaktische Behandlung von Patienten mittels Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  20. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Myronenko, A; Jordan, P [Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, United States. (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  1. SU-E-J-20: Adaptive Aperture Morphing for Online Correction for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Online adaptive aperture morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate not only the target position variation but also anatomic changes (rotation, deformation, and relation of target to organ-atrisks). We proposed quick and reliable method for adapting segment aperture leaves for IMRT treatment of prostate. Methods: The proposed method consists of following steps: (1) delineate the contours of prostate, SV, bladder and rectum on kV-CBCT; (2) determine prostate displacement from the rigid body registration of the contoured prostate manifested on the reference CT and the CBCT; (3) adapt the MLC segment apertures obtained from the pre-treatment IMRT planning to accommodate the shifts as well as anatomic changes. The MLC aperture adaptive algorithm involves two steps; first move the whole aperture according to prostate translational/rotational shifts, and secondly fine-tune the aperture shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning target contour and the MLC aperture to the daily target contour. Feasibility of this method was evaluated retrospectively on a seven-field IMRT treatment of prostate cancer patient by comparing dose volume histograms of the original plan and the aperture-adjusted plan, with/without additional segments weight optimization (SWO), on two daily treatment CBCTs selected with relative large motion and rotation. Results: For first daily treatment, the prostate rotation was significant (12degree around lateral-axis). With apertureadjusted plan, the D95 to the target was improved 25% and rectum dose (D30, D40) was reduced 20% relative to original plan on daily volumes. For second treatment-fraction, (lateral shift = 6.7mm), after adjustment target D95 improved by 3% and bladder dose (D30, maximum dose) was reduced by 1%. For both cases, extra SWO did not provide significant improvement. Conclusion: The proposed method of adapting segment apertures is promising in treatment position correction

  2. An image-guided precision proton radiation platform for preclinical in vivo research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, E.; Emery, R.; Huff, D.; Narayanan, M.; Schwartz, J.; Cao, N.; Meyer, J.; Rengan, R.; Zeng, J.; Sandison, G.; Laramore, G.; Mayr, N.

    2017-01-01

    There are many unknowns in the radiobiology of proton beams and other particle beams. We describe the development and testing of an image-guided low-energy proton system optimized for radiobiological research applications. A 50 MeV proton beam from an existing cyclotron was modified to produce collimated beams (as small as 2 mm in diameter). Ionization chamber and radiochromic film measurements were performed and benchmarked with Monte Carlo simulations (TOPAS). The proton beam was aligned with a commercially-available CT image-guided x-ray irradiator device (SARRP, Xstrahl Inc.). To examine the alternative possibility of adapting a clinical proton therapy system, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of a range-shifted 100 MeV clinical beam. The proton beam exhibits a pristine Bragg Peak at a depth of 21 mm in water with a dose rate of 8.4 Gy min‑1 (3 mm depth). The energy of the incident beam can be modulated to lower energies while preserving the Bragg peak. The LET was: 2.0 keV µm‑1 (water surface), 16 keV µm‑1 (Bragg peak), 27 keV µm‑1 (10% peak dose). Alignment of the proton beam with the SARRP system isocenter was measured at 0.24 mm agreement. The width of the beam changes very little with depth. Monte Carlo-based calculations of dose using the CT image data set as input demonstrate in vivo use. Monte Carlo simulations of the modulated 100 MeV clinical proton beam show a significantly reduced Bragg peak. We demonstrate the feasibility of a proton beam integrated with a commercial x-ray image-guidance system for preclinical in vivo studies. To our knowledge this is the first description of an experimental image-guided proton beam for preclinical radiobiology research. It will enable in vivo investigations of radiobiological effects in proton beams.

  3. Robotic image-guided reirradiation of lateral pelvic recurrences: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelain Bernard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first-line treatment of a pelvic recurrence in a previously irradiated area is surgery. Unfortunately, few patients are deemed operable, often due to the location of the recurrence, usually too close to the iliac vessels, or the associated surgical morbidity. The objective of this study is to test the viability of robotic image-guided radiotherapy as an alternative treatment in inoperable cases. Methods Sixteen patients previously treated with radiotherapy were reirradiated with CyberKnife® for lateral pelvic lesions. Recurrences of primary rectal cancer (4 patients, anal canal (6, uterine cervix cancer (4, endometrial cancer (1, and bladder carcinoma (1 were treated. The median dose of the previous treatment was 45 Gy (EqD2 range: 20 to 96 Gy. A total dose of 36 Gy in six fractions was delivered with the CyberKnife over three weeks. The responses were evaluated according to RECIST criteria. Results Median follow-up was 10.6 months (1.9 to 20.5 months. The actuarial local control rate was 51.4% at one year. Median disease-free survival was 8.3 months after CyberKnife treatment. The actuarial one-year survival rate was 46%. Acute tolerance was limited to digestive grade 1 and 2 toxicities. Conclusions Robotic stereotactic radiotherapy can offer a short and well-tolerated treatment for lateral pelvic recurrences in previously irradiated areas in patients otherwise not treatable. Efficacy and toxicity need to be evaluated over the long term, but initial results are encouraging.

  4. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    was less than 20 s. We present image quality assurance recommendations for image-guided small animal radiotherapy systems that can aid researchers in maintaining high image quality, allowing for spatially precise conformal dose delivery to small animals.

  5. SU-E-J-254: Utility of Pinnacle Dynamic Planning Module Utilizing Deformable Image Registration in Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, S [Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose For certain highly conformal treatment techniques, changes in patient anatomy due to weight loss and/or tumor shrinkage can result in significant changes in dose distribution. Recently, the Pinnacle treatment planning system added a Dynamic Planning module utilizing Deformable Image Registration (DIR). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this software in adapting to altered anatomy and adjusting treatment plans to account for it. Methods We simulated significant tumor response by changing patient thickness and altered chin positions using a commercially-available head and neck (H and N) phantom. In addition, we studied 23 CT image sets of fifteen (15) patients with H and N tumors and eight (8) patients with prostate cancer. In each case, we applied deformable image registration through Dynamic Planning module of our Pinnacle Treatment Planning System. The dose distribution of the original CT image set was compared to the newly computed dose without altering any treatment parameter. Result was a dose if we did not adjust the plan to reflect anatomical changes. Results For the H and N phantom, a tumor response of up to 3.5 cm was correctly deformed by the Pinnacle Dynamic module. Recomputed isodose contours on new anatomies were within 1 mm of the expected distribution. The Pinnacle system configuration allowed dose computations resulting from original plans on new anatomies without leaving the planning system. Original and new doses were available side-by-side with both CT image sets. Based on DIR, about 75% of H and N patients (11/15) required a re-plan using new anatomy. Among prostate patients, the DIR predicted near-correct bladder volume in 62% of the patients (5/8). Conclusions The Dynamic Planning module of the Pinnacle system proved to be an accurate and useful tool in our ability to adapt to changes in patient anatomy during a course of radiotherapy.

  6. Challenges and opportunities in image guided particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, M; Baroni, G

    2015-01-01

    The application of biomedical imaging and image processing to radiation therapy with accelerated particles has unique challenges. The potential of particle therapy to precisely tailor the dose distribution around the target volume needs to account for the intrinsic sensitivity to uncertainties in dose deposition. These peculiar features motivate the use of image guided methods to consistently verify the accuracy in dose delivery. Dedicated imaging and image processing methods are required, from treatment planning to treatment verification phases, in order to reduce the effects of uncertainties. The scenario is also complicated by the lack of standardized layouts of treatment bunkers, which implies the relatively increased use of custom solutions. Conversely, imaging can be applied to verify the actual delivered dose, representing a valuable opportunity to validate specific protocols and visualize the efficacy of the intended treatment. In this contribution, challenges and opportunities in image guided particle therapy are overviewed, with a clear focus on research perspectives in biomedical imaging and image processing.

  7. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  8. Determination of tolerances in the positioning of the treatment table from an image-guided system; Determinacion de tolerancias en el posicionamiento de la mesa de tratamiento a partir de un sistema de imagen guiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Fernandez leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minanbres Moro, A.

    2011-07-01

    The use of techniques of image-guided radiotherapy (TGRT) aims to reduce the uncertainties associated with patient positioning. One of the techniques more recent development is the cone beam CT (CBCT), consisting of the acquisition of volumetric images of the patient by a detector integrated into the linear accelerator. By analyzing the results of all sessions of treatment to all patients in which the positioning has been carried out with image-guided system MV CBCT have been determined tolerance tables for translational coordinates of the table treatment based on pathology and immobilization system used. (Author)

  9. Assessing image-guided implant surgery in today's clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Frederic J; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Zfaz, Samuel; Modares, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    As implant dentistry has progressed, greater emphasis has been placed on natural-looking tooth replacement, minimally invasive techniques, and better cost efficiencies, with implant positioning being guided by the desired prosthetic outcome. Image-guided surgery is a technique that merges preoperative diagnostic imaging with computer-based planning tools to facilitate surgical and restorative plans and procedures. This article discusses the intricacies of guided implant surgery, including 3-dimensional presurgical planning and the challenges of maintaining guide stability during surgical execution.

  10. Image Guided Biodistribution of Drugs and Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hong; Wu, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Image guided technique is playing an increasingly important role in the investigation of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of drugs or drug delivery systems. The application of these new materials and techniques with combined properties of diagnosis and therapy can benefit the development of targeted drug delivery system and modern personalized medicine This special issue provides an up-to-date collection of original research articles and review on the development of novel targeted dru...

  11. Image-guided drainage of cystic vestibular schwannomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Chris; Prasad, K S Manjunath; Hill, John; Johnson, Ian; Heaton, Judith M; Crossman, John E; Mendelow, Alexander D

    2010-01-01

    The management of vestibular schwannomata is controversial. Surveillance remains an acceptable option for elderly patients or those with small lesions. Stereoradiosurgery is also an option, while surgery is often preferred in younger patients with larger lesions. In elderly patients with lesions causing brainstem compression, craniotomy is a major undertaking. We report two cases of cystic cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients with co-morbidity, who were managed successfully with image-guided insertion of a cystoperitoneal shunt.

  12. Image-guided resection of cerebral cavernous malformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛颖; 周良辅; 杜固宏; 陈亮

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate retrospectively the effectiveness of image-guided navigation techniques in the management of cerebral CMs.Methods Between July 1997 and January 2001, 44 patients underwent image-guided resection of cerebral CMs. To counteract brain shift, a small silicon catheter was implanted as a guide in the case of deep-seated lesions (except in the case of brain stem CMs) and before excision of multiple lesions. Results A total of 27 men and 17 women with a mean age of 35 years underwent surgical procedures (5 patients had multiple lesions). The lesions were located in the frontal (n=14), lobe temporal lobe (n=12), parietal lobe (n=6), cerebellum (n=6), thalamus (n=5), pons (n=5), and orbital region (n=1). Under the guidance of a StealthStation navigator, total removal of the lesions was achieved in all patients. Follow-up revealed marked improvement of preoperative symptoms in 26 patients and no additional deficits in 13 patients. Five patients suffered from additional neurological deficits, but two of them gradually improved during the follow-up period. Conclusions With the assistance of an image-guided surgical system, functional areas can be effectively avoided and surgical injury can be decreased. This system is well suited for accurate localization and safe resection of small, deep-seated CMs.

  13. Recent advances in different modal imaging-guided photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwen; Wen, Jia; Li, Hongjuan; Xu, Yongqian; Liu, Fengyu; Sun, Shiguo

    2016-11-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has recently attracted considerable attention owing to its controllable treatment process, high tumour eradication efficiency and minimal side effects on non-cancer cells. PTT can melt cancerous cells by localising tissue hyperthermia induced by internalised therapeutic agents with a high photothermal conversion efficiency under external laser irradiation. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the significant potential of PTT to treat tumours in future practical applications. Unfortunately, the lack of visualisation towards agent delivery and internalisation, as well as imaging-guided comprehensive evaluation of therapeutic outcome, limits its further application. Developments in combined photothermal therapeutic nanoplatforms guided by different imaging modalities have compensated for the major drawback of PTT alone, proving PTT to be a promising technique in biomedical applications. In this review, we introduce recent developments in different imaging modalities including single-modal, dual-modal, triple-modal and even multi-modal imaging-guided PTT, together with imaging-guided multi-functional theranostic nanoplatforms.

  14. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieler, F; Wenz, F; Abo-Madyan, Y; Schweizer, B; Polednik, M; Herskind, C; Giordano, F A; Mai, S

    2016-11-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49°/0.18 ± 0.20°/0.05 ± 0.36° and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT.

  15. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  16. Protocol-based image-guided salvage brachytherapy. Early results in patients with local failure of prostate cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmer, G.; Lotter, M.; Kreppner, S.; Fietkau, R.; Strnad, V. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the overall clinical outcome of protocol-based image-guided salvage pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure particularly regarding feasibility and side effects. Patients and methods: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer (median age, 69 years) were treated during 2005-2011 with interstitial PDR brachytherapy (PDR-BT) as salvage brachytherapy after radiotherapy failure. The treatment schedule was PDR-BT two times with 30 Gy (pulse dose 0.6 Gy/h, 24 h per day) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of optimal coverage of the whole prostate (V{sub 100} > 95 %) simultaneously respecting the protocol-based dose volume constraints for the urethra (D{sub 0.1} {sub cc} < 130 %) and the rectum (D{sub 2} {sub cc} < 50-60 %) taking into account the previous radiation therapy. Local relapse after radiotherapy (external beam irradiation, brachytherapy with J-125 seeds or combination) was confirmed mostly via choline-PET and increased PSA levels. The primary endpoint was treatment-related late toxicities - particularly proctitis, anal incontinence, cystitis, urinary incontinence, urinary frequency/urgency, and urinary retention according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. The secondary endpoint was PSA-recurrence-free survival. Results: We registered urinary toxicities only. Grade 2 and grade 3 toxicities were observed in up to 11.1 % (2/18) and 16.7 % (3/18) of patients, respectively. The most frequent late-event grade 3 toxicity was urinary retention in 17 % (3/18) of patients. No late gastrointestinal side effects occurred. The biochemical PSA-recurrence-free survival probability at 3 years was 57.1 %. The overall survival at 3 years was 88.9 %; 22 % (4/18) of patients developed metastases. The median follow-up time for all patients after salvage BT was 21 months (range, 8-77 months). Conclusion: Salvage PDR

  17. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  18. Quality Assurance of Multiport Image-Guided Minimally Invasive Surgery at the Lateral Skull Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nau-Hermes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base a quality management is necessary to avoid the damage of closely spaced critical neurovascular structures. So far there is no standardized method applicable independently from the surgery. Therefore, we adapt a quality management method, the quality gates (QG, which is well established in, for example, the automotive industry and apply it to multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery. QG divide a process into different sections. Passing between sections can only be achieved if previously defined requirements are fulfilled which secures the process chain. An interdisciplinary team of otosurgeons, computer scientists, and engineers has worked together to define the quality gates and the corresponding criteria that need to be fulfilled before passing each quality gate. In order to evaluate the defined QG and their criteria, the new surgery method was applied with a first prototype at a human skull cadaver model. We show that the QG method can ensure a safe multiport minimally invasive surgical process at the lateral skull base. Therewith, we present an approach towards the standardization of quality assurance of surgical processes.

  19. An integrated multimodality image-guided robot system for small-animal imaging research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin [Department of Radiology, Tzu-Chi University and Radiation Oncology, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital Hualien, Taiwan (China); Hsin Wu, Tung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Ming [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Lin [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Hui, E-mail: yhhuang@isu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    We design and construct an image-guided robot system for use in small-animal imaging research. This device allows the use of co-registered small-animal PET-MRI images to guide the movements of robotic controllers, which will accurately place a needle probe at any predetermined location inside, for example, a mouse tumor, for biological readouts without sacrificing the animal. This system is composed of three major components: an automated robot device, a CCD monitoring mechanism, and a multimodality registration implementation. Specifically, the CCD monitoring mechanism was used for correction and validation of the robot device. To demonstrate the value of the proposed system, we performed a tumor hypoxia study that involved FMISO small-animal PET imaging and the delivering of a pO{sub 2} probe into the mouse tumor using the image-guided robot system. During our evaluation, the needle positioning error was found to be within 0.153{+-}0.042 mm of desired placement; the phantom simulation errors were within 0.693{+-}0.128 mm. In small-animal studies, the pO{sub 2} probe measurements in the corresponding hypoxia areas showed good correlation with significant, low tissue oxygen tensions (less than 6 mmHg). We have confirmed the feasibility of the system and successfully applied it to small-animal investigations. The system could be easily adapted to extend to other biomedical investigations in the future.

  20. An adaptive MR-CT registration method for MRI-guided prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Wen, Ning; Gordon, James J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance images (MRI) have superior soft tissue contrast compared with CT images. Therefore, MRI might be a better imaging modality to differentiate the prostate from surrounding normal organs. Methods to accurately register MRI to simulation CT images are essential, as we transition the use of MRI into the routine clinic setting. In this study, we present a finite element method (FEM) to improve the performance of a commercially available, B-spline-based registration algorithm in the prostate region. Specifically, prostate contours were delineated independently on ten MRI and CT images using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each pair of MRI and CT images was registered with the B-spline-based algorithm implemented in the VelocityAI system. A bounding box that contains the prostate volume in the CT image was selected and partitioned into a tetrahedral mesh. An adaptive finite element method was then developed to adjust the displacement vector fields (DVFs) of the B-spline-based registrations within the box. The B-spline and FEM-based registrations were evaluated based on the variations of prostate volume and tumor centroid, the unbalanced energy of the generated DVFs, and the clarity of the reconstructed anatomical structures. The results showed that the volumes of the prostate contours warped with the B-spline-based DVFs changed 10.2% on average, relative to the volumes of the prostate contours on the original MR images. This discrepancy was reduced to 1.5% for the FEM-based DVFs. The average unbalanced energy was 2.65 and 0.38 mJ cm-3, and the prostate centroid deviation was 0.37 and 0.28 cm, for the B-spline and FEM-based registrations, respectively. Different from the B-spline-warped MR images, the FEM-warped MR images have clear boundaries between prostates and bladders, and their internal prostatic structures are consistent with those of the original MR images. In summary, the developed adaptive FEM method preserves the prostate volume

  1. Solid Mesh Registration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for solid organ registration of pre-segmented data represented as tetrahedral meshes. Registration of the organ surface is driven by force terms based on a distance field representation of the source and reference shapes. Registration of internal morphology is achieved usi...... to complete. The proposed method has many potential uses in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) which relies on registration to account for organ deformation between treatment sessions....

  2. Robotic image-guided needle interventions of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors' group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image.

  3. [Image-guided stereotaxic biopsy of central nervous system lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    In a series of 44 image guided stereotactic biopsy from August 1995 until March 1997, findings were as follows (frequency order). Tumors, glioblastoma was the most frequent. Primary lymphoma and other conditions associated to AIDS. Metastasis, three cases, Vasculites, two cases, Arachnoid cyst, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, cortical degeneration, inespecific calcification (one case each). The age varied from 1 to 83 years. Forty one lesions were supratentorial, two infratentorial, and one was outside the brain (dura and skull) and we used stereotaxy to localize it. There was no mortality and morbidity was 2.3%. The literature is reviewed. We conclude that this procedure is safe and highly diagnostic.

  4. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Flynn, E.A.M., E-mail: lizoflynn@doctors.org.u [South East London Breast Screening Programme and National Breast Screening Training Centre, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Wilson, A.R.M.; Michell, M.J. [South East London Breast Screening Programme and National Breast Screening Training Centre, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues.

  5. A Survivin-Associated Adaptive Response in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdina, David J.; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Miller, Richard C.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Sutton, Harold G.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive responses can be induced in cells by very low doses of ionizing radiation resulting in an enhanced resistance to much larger exposures. The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein, survivin, has been implicated in many adaptive responses to cellular stress. Computerized axial tomography (CAT) used in image guided radiotherapy to position and monitor tumor response utilizes very low radiation doses ranging from 0.5 to 100 mGy. We investigated the ability of these very low radiation doses administered along with two 2 Gy doses separated by 24 h, a standard conventional radiotherapy dosing schedule, to initiate adaptive responses resulting in the elevation of radiation resistance in exposed cells. Human colon carcinoma (RKO36), mouse sarcoma (SA-NH), along with transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), wild type (WT) or cells lacking functional tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1−R2−) were used to assess their relative ability to express an adaptive response when grown either to confluence in vitro or as tumors in the flank of C57BL/6 mice. The survival of each of these cells was elevated from 5 to 20% (P ≤ 0.05) as compared to cells not receiving a 100 mGy or lesser dose. Additionally, the cells exposed to 100 mGy exhibited elevations in survivin levels, reductions in apoptosis frequencies, and loss of an adaptive response if transfected with survivin siRNA. This survivin-mediated adaptive response has the potential for affecting outcomes if regularly induced throughout a course of image guided radiation therapy. PMID:23651635

  6. A survivin-associated adaptive response in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdina, David J; Murley, Jeffrey S; Miller, Richard C; Mauceri, Helena J; Sutton, Harold G; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle E; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2013-07-15

    Adaptive responses can be induced in cells by very low doses of ionizing radiation resulting in an enhanced resistance to much larger exposures. The inhibitor of apoptosis protein, survivin, has been implicated in many adaptive responses to cellular stress. Computerized axial tomography used in image-guided radiotherapy to position and monitor tumor response uses very low radiation doses ranging from 0.5 to 100 mGy. We investigated the ability of these very low radiation doses administered along with two 2 Gy doses separated by 24 hours, a standard conventional radiotherapy dosing schedule, to initiate adaptive responses resulting in the elevation of radiation resistance in exposed cells. Human colon carcinoma (RKO36), mouse sarcoma (SA-NH), along with transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, wild type or cells lacking functional tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 were used to assess their relative ability to express an adaptive response when grown either to confluence in vitro or as tumors in the flank of C57BL/6 mice. The survival of each of these cells was elevated from 5% to 20% (P ≤ 0.05) as compared to cells not receiving a 100 mGy or lesser dose. In addition, the cells exposed to 100 mGy exhibited elevations in survivin levels, reductions in apoptosis frequencies, and loss of an adaptive response if transfected with survivin siRNA. This survivin-mediated adaptive response has the potential for affecting outcomes if regularly induced throughout a course of image guided radiation therapy. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Technical note: rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M; Guenther, Bob D; Pitsianis, Nikos P; Pearlstein, Robert D

    2008-12-01

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6 x 0.6 x 0.625 mm3 resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  8. MagicPlate-512: A 2D silicon detector array for quality assurance of stereotactic motion adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petasecca, M., E-mail: marcop@uow.edu.au; Newall, M. K.; Aldosari, A. H.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A. A.; Porumb, C. S.; Guatelli, S.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Illawarra Health Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Booth, J. T.; Colvill, E. [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Duncan, M.; Cammarano, D. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carolan, M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Health Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Oborn, B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Perevertaylo, V. [SPA-BIT, Kiev 02232 (Ukraine); Keall, P. J. [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial and temporal resolutions are two of the most important features for quality assurance instrumentation of motion adaptive radiotherapy modalities. The goal of this work is to characterize the performance of the 2D high spatial resolution monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” for quality assurance of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking technique for motion compensation. Methods: MagicPlate-512 is used in combination with the movable platform HexaMotion and a research version of radiofrequency tracking system Calypso driving MLC tracking software. The authors reconstruct 2D dose distributions of small field square beams in three modalities: in static conditions, mimicking the temporal movement pattern of a lung tumor and tracking the moving target while the MLC compensates almost instantaneously for the tumor displacement. Use of Calypso in combination with MagicPlate-512 requires a proper radiofrequency interference shielding. Impact of the shielding on dosimetry has been simulated by GEANT4 and verified experimentally. Temporal and spatial resolutions of the dosimetry system allow also for accurate verification of segments of complex stereotactic radiotherapy plans with identification of the instant and location where a certain dose is delivered. This feature allows for retrospective temporal reconstruction of the delivery process and easy identification of error in the tracking or the multileaf collimator driving systems. A sliding MLC wedge combined with the lung motion pattern has been measured. The ability of the MagicPlate-512 (MP512) in 2D dose mapping in all three modes of operation was benchmarked by EBT3 film. Results: Full width at half maximum and penumbra of the moving and stationary dose profiles measured by EBT3 film and MagicPlate-512 confirm that motion has a significant impact on the dose distribution. Motion

  9. An ultrasound image-guided surgical workflow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bing; Lemke, Heinz; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.; Grant, Edward G.

    2006-03-01

    A 2003 report in the Journal of Annual Surgery predicted an increase in demand for surgical services to be as high as 14 to 47% in the workload of all surgical fields by 2020. Medical difficulties which are already now apparent in the surgical OR (Operation Room) will be amplified in the near future and it is necessary to address this problem and develop strategies to handle the workload. Workflow issues are central to the efficiency of the OR and in response to today's continuing workforce shortages and escalating costs. Among them include: Inefficient and redundant processes, System Inflexibility, Ergonomic deficiencies, Scattered Data, Lack of Guidelines, Standards, and Organization. The objective of this research is to validate the hypothesis that a workflow model does improve the efficiency and quality of surgical procedure. We chose to study the image-guided surgical workflow for US as a first proof of concept by minimizing the OR workflow issues. We developed, and implemented deformable workflow models using existing and projected future clinical environment data as well as a customized ICT system with seamless integration and real-time availability. An ultrasound (US) image-guided surgical workflow (IG SWF) for a specific surgical procedure, the US IG Liver Biopsy, was researched to find out the inefficient and redundant processes, scattered data in clinical systems, and improve the overall quality of surgical procedures to the patient.

  10. Image-guided plasma therapy of cutaneous wound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Zhang, Shiwu; Yue, Ting; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Despite the clinical significance in chronic wound management, no effective methods have been developed for quantitative image-guided treatment. We integrated a multimodal imaging system with a cold atmospheric plasma probe for image-guided treatment of chronic wound. Multimodal imaging system offers a non-invasive, painless, simultaneous and quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing. Cold atmospheric plasma accelerates the wound healing process through many mechanisms including decontamination, coagulation and stimulation of the wound healing. The therapeutic effect of cold atmospheric plasma is studied in vivo under the guidance of a multimodal imaging system. Cutaneous wounds are created on the dorsal skin of the nude mice. During the healing process, the sample wound is treated by cold atmospheric plasma at different controlled dosage, while the control wound is healed naturally. The multimodal imaging system integrating a multispectral imaging module and a laser speckle imaging module is used to collect the information of cutaneous tissue oxygenation (i.e. oxygen saturation, StO2) and blood perfusion simultaneously to assess and guide the plasma therapy. Our preliminary tests show that cold atmospheric plasma in combination with multimodal imaging guidance has the potential to facilitate the healing of chronic wounds.

  11. Fluorescence and image guided resection in high grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Fontanella, Marco; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Garbossa, Diego; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The extent of resection in high grade glioma is increasingly been shown to positively effect survival. Nevertheless, heterogeneity and migratory behavior of glioma cells make gross total resection very challenging. Several techniques were used in order to improve the detection of residual tumor. Aim of this study was to analyze advantages and limitations of fluorescence and image guided resection. A multicentric prospective study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of each method. Furthermore, the role of 5-aminolevulinc acid and neuronavigation were reviewed. Twenty-three patients harboring suspected high grade glioma, amenable to complete resection, were enrolled. Fluorescence and image guides were used to perform surgery. Multiple samples were obtained from the resection cavity of each lesion according to 5-ALA staining positivity and boundaries as delineated by neuronavigation. All samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to the intra-operative labeling. Decision-making based on fluorescence showed a sensitivity of 91.1% and a specificity of 89.4% (pimage-guided resection accuracy was low (sensitivity: 57.8%; specificity: 57.4%; p=0.346). We observed that the sensitivity of 5-ALA can be improved by the combined use of neuronavigation, but this leads to a significant reduction in specificity. Thus, the use of auxiliary techniques should always be subject to critical skills of the surgeon. We advocate a large-scale study to further improve the assessment of multimodal approaches.

  12. WE-EF-BRD-01: Past, Present and Future: MRI-Guided Radiotherapy From 2005 to 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagendijk, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  13. Dose measurements on cone beam computed tomography for trilogy and truebeam STx for image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Ye, Sung Joon [Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuck Jun; Sung, Won Mo [Interdisciplinary program in Radiation applied Life Science, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital,Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The number of use of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the kV cone beam CT for the image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has increased. With the increased frequency in use of IGRT, the patient absorbed radiation dose during the treatment procedure has increased and become the major concern that there have been studies about these issue. The purpose of this study is to confirm the patient dose from the daily CBCT scan during the IGRT using the On-Board Imager(OBI) of Trilogy and Truebeam STx (Varian Medical Systems, CA, USA). These two linear accelerators are newly set up in SNUH that the patient dose from CBCT scan is needed to be verified before the start of IGRT. Daily CBCT scans can provide better patient localizing but increase the patient absorbed dose slightly. Considering the beneficial advantage on the localizing patient, CT dose during IGRT would be a reasonable cost.

  14. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menten, Martin J., E-mail: martin.menten@icr.ac.uk; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oelfke@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  15. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lourenço, Ana Mónica [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Acoustics and Ionizing Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Mouinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; McClelland, Jamie R. [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used to propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of

  16. Image-guided neurosurgery--state of the art and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samii, M; Brinker, T; Samii, A

    1999-09-03

    The surgical possibilities of image guided neurosurgery are presented and critically reviewed. Image guided neurosurgery may enable neurosurgeons to work more precisely than before, and thus reduce mortality and morbidity. However, before the technology achieves widespread acceptance, technical standards must be developed, the intraoperative localisation technology improved, and clinical indications and the cost/benefit ratio clarified. Nevertheless, image guided neurosurgery appears to herald an exciting future in which virtual reality and robotic surgery will emerge as modern techniques.

  17. Clinical impact of computed tomography-based image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer using the tandem-ring applicator - the Addenbrooke's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L T; Coles, C E; Hart, C; Tait, E

    2009-04-01

    We report our initial 3-year experience of chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer with computed tomography-based image-guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using the tandem-ring applicator. Twenty-eight patients were treated between February 2005 and December 2007. All patients received initial external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by HDR brachytherapy (planned dose 21 Gy to point A in three fractions over 8 days). For each insertion, a computed tomography scan was obtained with the brachytherapy applicator in situ. The cervix, uterus and organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on the computed tomography images to create an individualised dosimetry plan. The D(90) (the dose delivered to 90% of the tumour target), V(100) (the percentage of tumour target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and the minimum dose in the most exposed 2 cm(3) volume (D(2 cc)) of rectum, bladder and bowel were recorded. The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions delivered by EBRT and brachytherapy was calculated. The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 81%, with a pelvic control rate of 96%. In 24 patients, a D(90)>or=74 Gy (alpha/beta10) was achieved. The only patient with local recurrence had a D(90) of 63.8 Gy(alpha/beta10). The overall actuarial risk of serious late morbidity was 14%. Seventeen patients had satisfactory OAR doses using the standard loading pattern. Seven patients had modifications to reduce the risk of toxicity, whereas two had modifications to improve the tumour dose. Comparison with a previous cohort of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and a conventionally planned low dose rate triple source brachytherapy technique showed an improvement in local pelvic control of 20% (P=0.04). The implementation of a computed tomography-based tandem-ring HDR brachytherapy technique in conjunction with individual dose adaptation has resulted in a significant improvement in local control at Addenbrooke's without increasing the risk of serious toxicity, and with little

  18. Digital reconstructed radiography with multiple color image overlay for image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Shinichi; Miki, Kentaro; Sakata, Kozo; Nakayama, Yuko; Shibayama, Kouichi; Mori, Shinichiro

    2015-05-01

    Registration of patient anatomical structures to the reference position is a basic part of the patient set-up procedure. Registration of anatomical structures between the site of beam entrance on the patient surface and the distal target position is particularly important. Here, to improve patient positional accuracy during set-up for particle beam treatment, we propose a new visualization methodology using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs), overlaid DRRs, and evaluation of overlaid DRR images in clinical cases. The overlaid method overlays two DRR images in different colors by dividing the CT image into two CT sections at the distal edge of the target along the treatment beam direction. Since our hospital uses fixed beam ports, the treatment beam angles for this study were set at 0 and 90 degrees. The DRR calculation direction was from the X-ray tube to the imaging device, and set to 180/270 degrees and 135/225 degrees, based on the installation of our X-ray imaging system. Original and overlaid DRRs were calculated using CT data for two patients, one with a parotid gland tumor and the other with prostate cancer. The original and overlaid DRR images were compared. Since the overlaid DRR image was completely separated into two regions when the DRR calculation angle was the same as the treatment beam angle, the overlaid DRR visualization technique was able to provide rich information for aiding recognition of the relationship between anatomical structures and the target position. This method will also be useful in patient set-up procedures for fixed irradiation ports.

  19. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Single Vocal Cord Irradiation in Early Glottic Cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.O.S. Osman (Sarah)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe larynx anatomy is graphically presented in figure 1.1 . The vocal cords in the center of the larynx are muscular bands covered by thin mucosa layers. Together, the right and left vocal cords have a V-shape, when viewed from cranial. The vocal cords play key roles in the control of th

  20. Correction: Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosevic Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We regret to report that a proofreading error caused an incorrect legend and description of the contents of table 6 to appear in our original publication of this work. The correct description of table 6 is: Univariate analysis of prognostic factors for 5-year nadir + 2 biochemical outcome for men presenting with intermediate risk factors.

  1. A dual cone-beam CT system for image guided radiotherapy: Initial performance characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Giles, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a recently developed benchtop dual cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system with two orthogonally placed tube/detector sets. Methods: The benchtop dual CBCT system consists of two orthogonally placed 40 Multiplication-Sign 30 cm flat-panel detectors and two conventional x-ray tubes with two individual high-voltage generators sharing the same rotational axis. The x-ray source to detector distance is 150 cm and x-ray source to rotational axis distance is 100 cm for both subsystems. The objects are scanned through 200 Degree-Sign of rotation. The dual CBCT system utilized 110 Degree-Sign of projection data from one detector and 90 Degree-Sign from the other while the two individual single CBCTs utilized 200 Degree-Sign data from each detector. The system performance was characterized in terms of uniformity, contrast, spatial resolution, noise power spectrum, and CT number linearity. The uniformities, within the axial slice and along the longitudinal direction, and noise power spectrum were assessed by scanning a water bucket; the contrast and CT number linearity were measured using the Catphan phantom; and the spatial resolution was evaluated using a tungsten wire phantom. A skull phantom and a ham were also scanned to provide qualitative evaluation of high- and low-contrast resolution. Each measurement was compared between dual and single CBCT systems. Results: Compared to single CBCT, the dual CBCT presented: (1) a decrease in uniformity by 1.9% in axial view and 1.1% in the longitudinal view, as averaged for four energies (80, 100, 125, and 150 kVp); (2) comparable or slightly better contrast (0{approx}25 HU) for low-contrast objects and comparable contrast for high-contrast objects; (3) comparable spatial resolution; (4) comparable CT number linearity with R{sup 2}{>=} 0.99 for all four tested energies; (5) lower noise power spectrum in magnitude. Dual CBCT images of the skull phantom and the ham demonstrated both high-contrast resolution and good soft-tissue contrast. Conclusions: The performance of a benchtop dual CBCT imaging system has been characterized and is comparable to that of a single CBCT.

  2. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...... ≤2 mm did not affect the CBCT image quality considerably. CONCLUSION: DIBH CBCT improved image quality and reduced registration uncertainty in the craniocaudal direction in image-guided RT of locally advanced lung cancer. Baseline shifts ≤2 mm in DIBH during CBCT acquisition did not affect image...

  3. Clinical Introduction of a Novel Liquid Fiducial Marker for Breathing Adapted Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman

    , possible dose perturbation and volumetric changes. We found that the liquid fiducial marker was an excellent alternative to solid fiducial markers. It showed small dose perturbations in proton therapy, was volumetrically stable during several weeks of radiotherapy and functioned well as a surrogate...

  4. MRI-guided prostate adaptive radiotherapy – A systematic reviewMRI-linac and prostate motion review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McPartlin, A. J.; Li, X. A.; Kershaw, L. E.; Heide, U.; Kerkmeijer, L.; Lawton, C.; Mahmood, U.; Pos, F.; van As, N.; van Herk, M.; Vesprini, D.; van der Voort van Zyp, J.; Tree, A.; Choudhury, A.

    2016-01-01

    Dose escalated radiotherapy improves outcomes for men with prostate cancer. A plateau for benefit from dose escalation using EBRT may not have been reached for some patients with higher risk disease. The use of increasingly conformal techniques, such as step and shoot IMRT or more recently VMAT, has

  5. Image-guided ablation therapy of bone tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Tarun; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Buy, Xavier; Gangi, Afshin

    2009-04-01

    A wide range of thermal and cryoablation methods is currently available for the curative eradication or palliative treatment of a variety of bone and soft-tissue tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been developed as a multipurpose tool for the skeletal system. Cryoablation has the added advantages of direct computed tomography or magnetic resonance visualization and monitoring of treatment outcome with less peri- and postoperative pain. Use of appropriate thermo-sensors and insulation techniques, like carbon dioxide insufflation, results in enhanced safety and efficacy. Ablation of weight-bearing bones has to be supplemented with cement consolidation. The authors present an overview of the current status of percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy of bone and soft-tissue tumors, analyze the merits and limitations of the various systems available, and discuss possible new applications for the future.

  6. 3D ultrasound imaging in image-guided intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Aaron; Bax, Jeff; Neshat, Hamid; Cool, Derek; Kakani, Nirmal; Romagnoli, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used extensively in diagnosis and image-guidance for interventions of human diseases. However, conventional 2D ultrasound suffers from limitations since it can only provide 2D images of 3-dimensional structures in the body. Thus, measurement of organ size is variable, and guidance of interventions is limited, as the physician is required to mentally reconstruct the 3-dimensional anatomy using 2D views. Over the past 20 years, a number of 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging approaches have been developed. We have developed an approach that is based on a mechanical mechanism to move any conventional ultrasound transducer while 2D images are collected rapidly and reconstructed into a 3D image. In this presentation, 3D ultrasound imaging approaches will be described for use in image-guided interventions.

  7. [Image-guided endoscopic transsphenoidal removal of pituitary adenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qui-Hang; Liu, Hai-Sheng; Yang, Da-Zhang; Cheng, Jing-Yu

    2005-01-01

    To assess the role of neuronavigation in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas. Ten endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations for pituitary adenomas were selected. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Five of 10 patients had gigantic adenoma, 3 microadenoma, 2 large adenoma. The mean setup time was 5 minutes, and the operative time was 50 minutes in image-guided procedures. In all cases, the system worked well without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and.sagittal planes indicated a mean verified system error of 1.5 mm. for pituitary adenomas. After operation, the symptoms relieved in all patients. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and safer.

  8. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurosurgery and Medical Augmented Reality Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, No. 199, Tunghwa Rd., Taipei 105, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  9. Study of inter-fractional variations and adaptive radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer%胰腺癌放疗分次间解剖变化及自适应放疗研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成梁; X.Allen Li; 王建华; 李定杰; 毛荣虎

    2012-01-01

    目的 定量描述胰腺癌放疗分次间解剖位置变化及自适应放疗剂量优势.方法 回顾分析图像引导放疗的10例胰腺癌患者的226套治疗当天CT图像,自动勾画软件勾画靶器官和危及器官轮廓后由经验丰富的医师修改.应用质心距离、最大重叠率和Dice系数定量分析分次间器官移位和变形.应用自适应放疗技术处理治疗当天CT图像,比较自适应治疗计划和校位治疗计划的剂量参数.结果 胰腺癌放疗过程中胰头分次间解剖变化显著,经骨性或软组织对齐配准后胰头质心距离、最大重叠率和Dice系数分别为(7.8±1.3)mm、(87.2±8.4)%和(77.2±7.9)%.自适应治疗计划靶体积(PTy)包绕和危及器官保护方面均优于校位治疗计划,自适应治疗计划将校位治疗计划PTV的V100从(93.32 ±2.89)%提高至(96.03±1.42)%(t=2.79,P=0.008),同时将校位治疗计划的十二指肠V50.4从(43.4±12.71)%降至(15.6±6.25)%(t =3.52,P=0.000).结论 自适应放疗能有效应对胰腺癌放疗中分次间的解剖变化,可提高胰腺癌放疗剂量,这为提高胰腺癌局部控制率带来了希望.%Objective To quantitatively characterize the inter-fractional anatomy variations and advantages of dosimetry for the adaptive radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer.Methods A total of 226 daily CT images acquired from 10 patients with pancreatic cancer treated with image-guided radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively.Targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated by the atlas-based automatic segmentation and modified by the skilled physician.Various parameters,including the center of mass (COM) distance,the maximal overlap ratio (MOR) and the Dice coefficient (DC),were used to quantify the inter-fractional organ displacement and deformation.The adaptive radiation therapy (ART) was applied to handle the daily GT images.The dose distributions parameters from the ART plan were compared with those from the repositioning plan

  10. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  11. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance image-guided photothermal therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiu-Li; Ma, Fang; Dai, Zhi-Fei

    2014-04-01

    Key advances in multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided photothermal therapy of cancer are reviewed. We briefly outline the design and fabrication of such multifunctional MNPs. Bimodal image-guided photothermal therapies (MR/fluorescence and MR/ultrasound) are also discussed.

  12. Versatility of the Novalis system to deliver image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for various anatomical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Bin S; Paulino, Arnold C; Lu, Hsin H; Chiu, J Kam; Richardson, Susan; Chiang, Stephen; Amato, Robert; Butler, E Brian; Bloch, Charles

    2007-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) programs to treat brain tumors were implemented when we first acquired the Brainlab Novalis system in 2003. Two years later, we started an extra-cranial stereotactic radio-ablation or more appropriately a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program using the Brainlab Novalis image-guided system at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. We hereby summarize our initial experience with this system in delivering image-guided SBRT to a total of 80 patients during our first year of clinical implementation, from February 2005 to January 2006. Over 100 lesions in more than 20 distinct anatomical sites were treated. These include all levels of spine from cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral lesions. Spinal lesions encompass intramedullary, intradural, extradural, or osseous compartments. Also treated were lesions in other bony sites including orbit, clavicle, scapula, humerus, sternum, rib, femur, and pelvis (ilium, ischium, and pubis). Primary or metastatic lesions located in the head and neck, supraclavicular region, axilla, mediastinum, lung (both central and peripheral), abdominal wall, liver, kidney, para-aortic lymph nodes, prostate, and pelvis were also treated. In addition to primary radiotherapy, SBRT program using the Brainlab Novalis system allows re-irradiation for recurrence and "boost" after conventional treatment to various anatomical sites. Treating these sites safely and efficaciously requires knowledge in radiation tolerance, fraction size, total dose, biologically equivalent dose (BED), prior radiotherapy, detailed dose volume histograms (DVH) of normal tissues, and the radiosensitive/radioresistant nature of the tumor. Placement of radio-opaque markers (Visicoil, Radiomed) in anatomical sites not in close proximity to bony landmarks (e.g., kidney and liver) helps in measuring motion and providing image guidance during each treatment fraction. Tumor/organ motion

  13. Determination of effective doses in image-guided radiation therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyone, Y. Y.; Suriyapee, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, S.; Tawonwong, T.

    2016-03-01

    The organ and effective doses in image-guided radiotherapy system are determined in this study. For 2D imaging, incident air kerma (Ki) was measured by 6cc ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated by multiplying Ki with backscatter factor. The effective dose was calculated by multiplying ESAK with conversion coefficient. For 3D imaging, computed tomography/cone-beam dose index (CTDI/CBDI) measurements were performed by using 100mm pencil ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The dose index in air and in CTDI phantom from planning CT and cone- beam CT were measured. Then, effective dose was calculated by ImPACT software. The effective doses from 2D conventional simulator for anteroposterior and lateral projections were 01 and 0.02mSv for head, 0.15 and 0.16mSv for thorax, 0.22 and 0.21mSv for pelvis, respectively. The effective doses from 3D, planning CT and CBCT, were 3.3 and 0.1mSv for head, 13 and 2.4mSv for thorax and 7.2 and 4.9mSv for pelvis, respectively. Based on 30 fractions of treatment course, total effective dose (3D CT, 2D setup verification and 6 times CBCT) of head, thorax and pelvis were 3.93, 27.71 and 37.03mSv, respectively. Therefore, IGRT should be administered with significant parameters to reduce the dose.

  14. Photoacoustic image-guided drug delivery in the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Image guided drug delivery is a novel strategy that combines the effect of therapy and visibility into one system. Here we apply photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the drug delivery process, and perform a simulation study on monitoring the photosensitizer concentration in a prostate tumor during photodynamic therapy (PDT). A 3D optical model of the human prostate is developed, and the light absorption distribution in the prostate is estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct PA images. PA images of transurethral laser/transrectal ultrasound are compared to those of transrectal laser/ultrasound. Results show that the transurethral laser has a better penetration depth in the prostate compared with transrectal one. Urethral thermal safety is investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, and the results show that the proposed pulsed transurethral laser will cause no thermal damage on the urethral surface. Regression analysis for PA signal amplitude and drug concentration demonstrates that the PA technique has the potential to monitor drug distributions in PDT, as well as in other laser-based prostate therapy modalities.

  15. Fluoroscopic image-guided intervention system for transbronchial localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Lav; Keast, Thomas M.; Wibowo, Henky; Yu, Kun-Chang; Draper, Jeffrey W.; Gibbs, Jason D.

    2012-02-01

    Reliable transbronchial access of peripheral lung lesions is desirable for the diagnosis and potential treatment of lung cancer. This procedure can be difficult, however, because accessory devices (e.g., needle or forceps) cannot be reliably localized while deployed. We present a fluoroscopic image-guided intervention (IGI) system for tracking such bronchoscopic accessories. Fluoroscopy, an imaging technology currently utilized by many bronchoscopists, has a fundamental shortcoming - many lung lesions are invisible in its images. Our IGI system aligns a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) defined from a pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scan with live fluoroscopic images. Radiopaque accessory devices are readily apparent in fluoroscopic video, while lesions lacking a fluoroscopic signature but identifiable in the CT scan are superimposed in the scene. The IGI system processing steps consist of: (1) calibrating the fluoroscopic imaging system; (2) registering the CT anatomy with its depiction in the fluoroscopic scene; (3) optical tracking to continually update the DRR and target positions as the fluoroscope is moved about the patient. The end result is a continuous correlation of the DRR and projected targets with the anatomy depicted in the live fluoroscopic video feed. Because both targets and bronchoscopic devices are readily apparent in arbitrary fluoroscopic orientations, multiplane guidance is straightforward. The system tracks in real-time with no computational lag. We have measured a mean projected tracking accuracy of 1.0 mm in a phantom and present results from an in vivo animal study.

  16. Image-guided interventional therapy for cancer with radiotherapeutic nanoparticles✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, William T.; Bao, Ande; Brenner, Andrew J.; Goins, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major limitations of current cancer therapy is the inability to deliver tumoricidal agents throughout the entire tumor mass using traditional intravenous administration. Nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting therapeutic radionuclides that are delivered using advanced image-guidance have significant potential to improve solid tumor therapy. The use of image-guidance in combination with nanoparticle carriers can improve the delivery of localized radiation to tumors. Nanoparticles labeled with certain beta-emitting radionuclides are intrinsically theranostic agents that can provide information regarding distribution and regional dosimetry within the tumor and the body. Image-guided thermal therapy results in increased uptake of intravenous nanoparticles within tumors, improving therapy. In addition, nanoparticles are ideal carriers for direct intratumoral infusion of beta-emitting radionuclides by convection enhanced delivery, permitting the delivery of localized therapeutic radiation without the requirement of the radionuclide exiting from the nanoparticle. With this approach, very high doses of radiation can be delivered to solid tumors while sparing normal organs. Recent technological developments in image-guidance, convection enhanced delivery and newly developed nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting radionuclides will be reviewed. Examples will be shown describing how this new approach has promise for the treatment of brain, head and neck, and other types of solid tumors. PMID:25016083

  17. Image-guided conservative management of right colonic diverticulitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jin Park; Sung Il Choi; Suk Hwan Lee; Kil Yeon Lee

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical outcomes of medical therapy in patients with right colonic diverticulitis. METHODS: The records of 189 patients with right colonic diverticulitis which was finally diagnosed by computed tomography, ultrasonography, or operative findings were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 189 patients hospitalized for right colonic diverticulitis, the stages of diverticulitis by a modified Hinchey classification were 26 patients (13.8%) in stage 0, 139 patients (73.5%) in stage Ⅰ a, 23 patients (12.2%) in stage Ⅰb, and 1 patient (0.5%) in stage Ⅲ. Medical therapy was undertaken in 185 of 189 patients (97.9%). One hundred and eighty three of 185 patients were successfully treated with bowel rest and antibiotics. Two patients in stage Ⅰb required a resection or surgical drainage because of an inadequate response to conservative treatment. Recurrent diverticulitis developed in 15 of 183 patients (8.2%) who responded to medicaltherapy. All 15 patients who suffered a second attack had uncomplicated diverticulitis, and were successfully treated with medical therapy. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that right colonic diverticulitis is essentially benign and image-guided conservative treatment is primarily required.

  18. Photoacoustic image-guided navigation system for surgery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sara; Jang, Jongseong; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Young Soo; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Identifying and delineating invisible anatomical and pathological details during surgery guides surgical procedures in real time. Various intraoperative imaging modalities have been increasingly employed to minimize such surgical risks as anatomical changes, damage to normal tissues, and human error. However, current methods provide only structural information, which cannot identify critical structures such as blood vessels. The logical next step is an intraoperative imaging modality that can provide functional information. Here, we have successfully developed a photoacoustic (PA) image-guided navigation system for surgery by integrating a position tracking system and a real-time clinical photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging system. PA/US images were acquired in real time and overlaid on pre-acquired cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images. In the overlaid images, PA images represent the optical absorption characteristics of the surgical field, while US and MR images represent the morphological structure of surrounding tissues. To test the feasibility of the system, we prepared a tissue mimicking phantom which contained two samples, methylene blue as a contrast agent and water as a control. We acquired real-time overlaid PA/US/MR images of the phantom, which were well-matched with the optical and morphological properties of the samples. The developed system is the first approach to a novel intraoperative imaging technology based on PA imaging, and we believe that the system can be utilized in various surgical environments in the near future, improving the efficacy of surgical guidance.

  19. Frameless image-guided radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lisa B. E.; Shanks, Todd S.; Shearer, Andrew J.; Shelton, Lauren A.; Shelton, Brent J.; Howe, Jonathan; Coons, James M.; Plato, Brian; Spalding, Aaron C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Frameless image-guided radiosurgery (IGRS) is a safe and effective noninvasive treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This study evaluates the use of frameless IGRS to treat patients with refractory TN. Methods: We reviewed the records of 20 patients diagnosed with TN who underwent frameless IGRS treatments between March 2012 and December 2013. Facial pain was graded using the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) scoring system. The initial setup uncertainty from simulation to treatment and the patient intrafraction uncertainty were measured. The median follow-up was 32 months. Results: All patients’ pain was BNI Grade IV or V before the frameless IGRS treatment. The mean intrafraction shift was 0.43 mm (0.28–0.76 mm), and the maximum intrafraction shift was 0.95 mm (0.53–1.99 mm). At last follow-up, 8 (40%) patients no longer required medications (BNI 1 or 2), 11 (55%) patients were pain free but required medication (BNI 3), and 1 (5%) patient had no pain relief (BNI 5). Patients who did not have prior surgery had a higher odds ratio for pain relief compared to patients who had prior surgery (14.9, P = 0.0408). Conclusions: Frameless IGRS provides comparable dosimetric and clinical outcomes to frame-based SRS in a noninvasive fashion for patients with medically refractory TN. PMID:28607821

  20. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Periodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Orthodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  1. Frequency of complications in image guided percutaneous nephrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Mubarak; Mehmood, Khalid; Faiq, Syed Muhammed; Ali, Bux; Naqvi, Syed Ali Anwar; Rizvi, Adib-ul-Hasan

    2013-07-01

    To assess the frequency of complications in image-guided percutaneous nephrostomy and to identify common sources of error. The study was carried out at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, between November 2006 and May 2007. Patients of all age groups between 1 and 80 years were included using nonprobability convenience sampling technique. Those suffering from obstructive uropathy due to various causes were diagnosed by imaging modalities like ultrasound, computed tomography scan, conventional X-ray and contrast studies. It also included cases where percutaneous nephrostomy was used to temporarily divert urine in the presence of urinary tract leaks and fistula so that healing may occur. Patients with uncorrectable bleeding diathesis were excluded. Nephrostomies performed for supplementary procedures were also excluded. One-month follow-up was performed by means of direct communications and using various imaging modalities. SPSS 12 was used for statistical analysis. Three hundred patients enrolled in the study. The procedure was successful in all encounters. The complications were categorised as early and late complications. Early complications were sepsis in 6 (2%) patients, retroperitoneal haematoma in 5 (1.6%) patients, bleeding in 2 (0.6%), and urinoma in 1 (0.3%). Late complications included catheter blockage in 15 (5%) patients, and dislodgement of catheter in 7 (2.3%). Total early complications were noted in 14 (4.66%) patients, and there were 22 (7.33%) late complications. Percutaneous nephrostomy is a safe, simple and cost-effective technique with low morbidity and no major life-threatening complications.

  2. A novel multiwavelength fluorescence image-guided surgery imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, D.; Tullis, I. D. C.; Laios, A.; Pathiraja, P. N. J.; Haldar, K.; Ahmed, A. A.; Vojnovic, B.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the development and performance analysis of two clinical near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) devices that aim to overcome some of the limitations of current FIGS systems. The devices operate in a widefield-imaging mode and can work (1) in conjunction with a laparoscope, during minimally invasive surgery, and (2) as a hand-held, open surgery imaging system. In both cases, narrow-band excitation light, delivered at multiple wavelengths, is efficiently combined with white reflectance light. Light is delivered to ~100 cm2 surgical field at 1-2 mW/cm2 for white light and 3-7 mW/cm2 (depending on wavelength) of red - near infrared excitation, at a typical working distance of 350 mm for the hand-held device and 100 mm for the laparoscope. A single, sensitive, miniaturized color camera collects both fluorescence and white reflectance light. The use of a single imager eliminates image alignment and software overlay complexity. A novel filtering and illumination arrangement allows simultaneous detection of white reflectance and fluorescence emission from multiple dyes in real-time. We will present both fluorescence detection sensitivity modeling and practical performance data. We have demonstrated the efficiency and the advantages of the devices both pre-clinically and during live surgery on humans. Both the hand-held and the laparoscopic systems have proved to be reliable and beneficial in an ongoing clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node detection in gynecological cancers. We will show preliminary results using two clinically approved dyes, Methylene blue and indocyanine green. We anticipate that this technology can be integrated and routinely used in a larger variety of surgical procedures.

  3. Navigation concepts for magnetic resonance imaging-guided musculoskeletal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Image-guided musculoskeletal (MSK) interventions are a widely used alternative to open surgical procedures for various pathological findings in different body regions. They traditionally involve one of the established x-ray imaging techniques (radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography) or ultrasound scanning. Over the last decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into one of the most powerful diagnostic tools for nearly the whole body and has therefore been increasingly considered for interventional guidance as well.The strength of MRI for MSK applications is a combination of well-known general advantages, such as multiplanar and functional imaging capabilities, wide choice of tissue contrasts, and absence of ionizing radiation, as well as a number of MSK-specific factors, for example, the excellent depiction of soft-tissue tumors, nonosteolytic bone changes, and bone marrow lesions. On the downside, the magnetic resonance-compatible equipment needed, restricted space in the magnet, longer imaging times, and the more complex workflow have so far limited the number of MSK procedures under MRI guidance.Navigation solutions are generally a natural extension of any interventional imaging system, in particular, because powerful hardware and software for image processing have become routinely available. They help to identify proper access paths, provide accurate feedback on the instrument positions, facilitate the workflow in an MRI environment, and ultimately contribute to procedural safety and success.The purposes of this work were to describe some basic concepts and devices for MRI guidance of MSK procedures and to discuss technical and clinical achievements and challenges for some selected implementations.

  4. Augmented reality with Microsoft HoloLens holograms for near infrared fluorescence based image guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Nan; Kharel, Pradosh; Gruev, Viktor

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) based image guided surgery aims to provide vital information to the surgeon in the operating room, such as locations of cancerous tissue that should be resected and healthy tissue that should to be preserved. Targeted molecular markers, such as tumor or nerve specific probes, are used in conjunctions with NIRF imaging and display systems to provide key information to the operator in real-time. One of the major hurdles for the wide adaptation of these imaging systems is the high cost to operate the instruments, large footprint and complexity of operating the systems. The emergence of wearable NIRF systems has addressed these shortcomings by minimizing the imaging and display systems' footprint and reducing the operational cost. However, one of the major shortcomings for this technology is the replacement of the surgeon's natural vision with an augmented reality view of the operating room. In this paper, we have addressed this major shortcoming by exploiting hologram technology from Microsoft HoloLens to present NIR information on a color image captured by the surgeon's natural vision. NIR information is captured with a CMOS sensor with high quantum efficiency in the 800 nm wavelength together with a laser light illumination light source. The NIR image is converted to a hologram that is displayed on Microsoft HoloLens and is correctly co-registered with the operator's natural eyesight.

  5. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Hari

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates.

  6. Endoscopic image-guided thermal therapy using targeted near infrared fluorescent gold nanorods (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-09-01

    We present an in vivo study of endoscopic fluorescence image-guided photothermal therapy of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma in a murine xenograft model, using intratumoural or intravenous gold nanorods functionalised with Cy5.5 and EGFR.

  7. Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0024 TITLE: Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard...light sources to yield multi-spectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging data in excised prostate tissue. Two types of interstitial sources – a directional...ANSI Std. Z39.18 Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate 34 Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction

  8. Automated delineation of radiotherapy volumes: are we going in the right direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, G A; Price, P; Price, G J; Moore, C J

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate delineation of target volumes and multiple organs at risk, within the enduring International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement framework, is now hugely important in radiotherapy, owing to the rapid proliferation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and the advent of four-dimensional image-guided adaption. Nevertheless, delineation is still generally clinically performed with little if any machine assistance, even though it is both time-consuming and prone to interobserver variation. Currently available segmentation tools include those based on image greyscale interrogation, statistical shape modelling and body atlas-based methods. However, all too often these are not able to match the accuracy of the expert clinician, which remains the universally acknowledged gold standard. In this article we suggest that current methods are fundamentally limited by their lack of ability to incorporate essential human clinical decision-making into the underlying models. Hybrid techniques that utilise prior knowledge, make sophisticated use of greyscale information and allow clinical expertise to be integrated are needed. This may require a change in focus from automated segmentation to machine-assisted delineation. Similarly, new metrics of image quality reflecting fitness for purpose would be extremely valuable. We conclude that methods need to be developed to take account of the clinician's expertise and honed visual processing capabilities as much as the underlying, clinically meaningful information content of the image data being interrogated. We illustrate our observations and suggestions through our own experiences with two software tools developed as part of research council-funded projects.

  9. Biomarkers for DNA DSB inhibitors and radiotherapy clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stanley K; Olive, Peggy L; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Major technical advances in radiotherapy, including IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy, have allowed for improved physical precision and increased dose delivery to the tumor, with better sparing of surrounding normal tissue. The development of inhibitors of the sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is exciting and could be combined with precise radiotherapy targeting to improve local control following radiotherapy. However, caution must be exercised in order that DSB inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy in such a manner as to preserve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting repair deficiencies in malignant cells over that of normal cells. In this review, we discuss the rationale and current approaches to targeting DSB sensing and repair pathways in combined modality with radiotherapy. We also describe potential biomarkers that could be useful in detecting functional inhibition of DSB repair in a patient's tissues during clinical radiotherapy trials. Finally, we examine a number of issues relating to the use of DSB-inhibiting molecular agents and radiotherapy in the context of the tumor microenvironment, effects on normal tissues and the optimal timing and duration of the agent in relation to fractionated radiotherapy.

  10. Calibration of three-dimensional ultrasound images for image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, Lionel G. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). E-mail: bouchet at neurosurgery.ufl.edu; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Goodchild, Gordon [Medtronic Surgical Navigation Technologies, Broomfield, CO (United States)

    2001-02-01

    overall tracking accuracy of our 3D ultrasound image-guided positioning system was measured to be on average 0.2 mm, 0.9 mm and 0.6 mm for the AP, lateral and axial directions respectively. (author)

  11. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Adaptive MLC Morphing for Online Correction of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Online adaptive MLC morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate target position as well as anatomic changes. A reliable method of adaptive MLC segment to target during prostate cancer IMRT treatment is proposed and evaluated by comparison with daily online-image guidance (IGRT) correction and online-IMRT planning. Methods: The MLC adaptive algorithm involves following steps; move the MLC segments according to target translational shifts, and then morph the segment shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning-target contour and MLC segment. Efficacy of this method was evaluated retrospectively using daily-CBCT images on seven prostate patients treated with seven-beam IMRT treatment to deliver 64Gy in 20 fractions. Daily modification was simulated with three approaches; daily-IGRT correction based on implanted radio-markers, adaptive MLC morphing, and online-IMRT planning, with no-residual variation. The selected dosimetric endpoints and nEUD (normalized equivalent uniform dose to online-IMRT planning) of each organ of interest were determined for evaluation and comparison. Results: For target(prostate), bladder and rectal-wall, the mean±sd of nEUD were 97.6%+3.2%, 103.9%±4.9% and 97.4%±1.1% for daily-IGRT correction; and 100.2%+0.2%, 108.9%±5.1% and 99.8%±1.2% for adaptive MLC morphing, respectively. For daily-IGRT correction, adaptive MLC morphing and online-IMRT planning, target D99 was <95% of the prescription dose in 30%, 0% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the rectal-wall, D5 exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 11.4% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. For the bladder, Dmax exceeded 105% of the planned-D5 in 2.8%, 5.6% and 0% of 140 fractions, respectively. D30 of bladder and rectal-wall were well within the planned-D30 for all three approaches. Conclusion: The proposed method of adaptive MLC morphing can be beneficial for the prostate patient population with large deformation and

  12. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, M.L., E-mail: m.bondar@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ahmad, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Programme of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia); Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus-MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    bladder and rectum inside the PTV (0% to 10% and -1% to 9%; p < 0.004) and the CTV-to-PTV volume (4-96 ml). Conclusions: Compared with population-based margins, an individualized PTV results in better organ-at-risk sparing. Online-adaptive radiotherapy further improves organ-at-risk sparing.

  13. MO-C-17A-06: Online Adaptive Re-Planning to Account for Independent Motions Between Multiple Targets During Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, F; Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional independent motions between multiple targets in radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer, and to study the dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning method to account for these variations. Methods: Ninety five diagnostic-quality daily CTs acquired for 9 lung cancer patients treated with IGRT using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. On each daily CT set, contours of the targets (GTV, CTV, or involved nodes) and organs at risk were generated by populating the planning contours using an auto-segmentation tool (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing. For each patient, an IMRT plan was generated based on the planning CT with a prescription dose of 60 Gy in 2Gy fractions. Three plans were generated and compared for each daily CT set: an IGRT (repositioning) plan by copying the original plan with the required shifts, an online adaptive plan by rapidly modifying the aperture shapes and segment weights of the original plan to conform to the daily anatomy, and a new fully re-optimized plan based on the daily CT using a planning system (Panther, Prowess). Results: The daily deviations of the distance between centers of masses of the targets from the plans varied daily from -10 to 8 mm with an average −0.9±4.1 mm (one standard deviation). The average CTV V100 are 99.0±0.7%, 97.9±2.8%, 99.0±0.6%, and 99.1±0.6%, and the lung V20 Gy 928±332 cc, 944±315 cc, 917±300 cc, and 891±295 cc for the original, repositioning, adaptive, and re-optimized plans, respectively. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests show that the adaptive plans are statistically significantly better than the repositioning plans and comparable with the reoptimized plans. Conclusion: There exist unpredictable, interfractional, relative volume changes and independent motions between multiple targets during lung cancer RT which cannot be accounted for by the current IGRT repositioning but can be corrected by the online adaptive replanning method.

  14. Image-guided pain therapy. Sympathicolysis; Bildgestuetzte Schmerztherapie. Sympathikolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbelko, M.; Wagner, H.J. [Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain, Institut fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Therapie, Berlin (Germany); Gutberlet, M.; Grothoff, M. [Universitaet Leipzig - Herzzentrum, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In the autonomic nerve system most sympathetic neurons synapse peripherally in the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk. A reduction in sympathicotonia by partial elimination of these ganglia is a therapeutic approach that has been used for more than 100 years. In the early 1920s the first attempts at percutaneous sympathicolysis (SL) were carried out. Nowadays, minimally invasive image-guided SL has become an integral part of interventional radiology. Established indications for SL are hyperhidrosis, critical limb ischemia and the complex regional pain syndrome. The standard imaging guidance modality in SL is computed tomography (CT) which allows the exact placement of the puncture needle in the target area under visualization of the surrounding structures. Ethanol is normally used for chemical lysis, which predominantly eliminates the unmyelinated autonomic axons. In order to visualize the distribution of the ethanol during application, iodine-containing contrast medium is added. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) controls sweat secretion via the efferent neurons; therefore, effective therapy of idiopathic palmar, axillary and plantar hyperhidrosis can be achieved when SL is performed at the corresponding level of the sympathetic trunk. Furthermore, due to the vasomotor innervation of most blood vessels, by reduction of the sympathicotonus an atony of the smooth muscles and therefore vasodilatation occurs, which is used as a palliative therapeutic option in patients with critical limb ischemia. By elimination of the afferent sensory fibers this also results in pain relief. This principle is also used in the SL therapy of the complex regional pain syndrome. After the introduction of CT guidance, major complications have become rare events. In addition to the usual risks of percutaneous interventions there are, however, a number of specific complications, such as syncope caused by irritation of cardiac sympathetic nerves in thoracic SL and ureteral injury in lumbar

  15. A review of treatment planning for precision image-guided photon beam pre-clinical animal radiation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Hoof, Stefan van; Granton, Patrick V.; Trani, Daniela [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO)

    2014-07-01

    Recently, precision irradiators integrated with a high-resolution CT imaging device became available for pre-clinical studies. These research platforms offer significant advantages over older generations of animal irradiators in terms of precision and accuracy of image-guided radiation targeting. These platforms are expected to play a significant role in defining experiments that will allow translation of research findings to the human clinical setting. In the field of radiotherapy, but also others such as neurology, the platforms create unique opportunities to explore e.g. the synergy between radiation and drugs or other agents. To fully exploit the advantages of this new technology, accurate methods are needed to plan the irradiation and to calculate the three-dimensional radiation dose distribution in the specimen. To this end, dedicated treatment planning systems are needed. In this review we will discuss specific issues for precision irradiation of small animals, we will describe the workflow of animal treatment planning, and we will examine several dose calculation algorithms (factorization, superposition-convolution, Monte Carlo simulation) used for animal irradiation with kilovolt photon beams. Issues such as dose reporting methods, photon scatter, tissue segmentation and motion will also be discussed briefly.

  16. Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua [Task Group 179, Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero St., Suite H 1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

  17. A review of treatment planning for precision image-guided photon beam pre-clinical animal radiation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Frank; van Hoof, Stefan; Granton, Patrick V; Trani, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Recently, precision irradiators integrated with a high-resolution CT imaging device became available for pre-clinical studies. These research platforms offer significant advantages over older generations of animal irradiators in terms of precision and accuracy of image-guided radiation targeting. These platforms are expected to play a significant role in defining experiments that will allow translation of research findings to the human clinical setting. In the field of radiotherapy, but also others such as neurology, the platforms create unique opportunities to explore e.g. the synergy between radiation and drugs or other agents. To fully exploit the advantages of this new technology, accurate methods are needed to plan the irradiation and to calculate the three-dimensional radiation dose distribution in the specimen. To this end, dedicated treatment planning systems are needed. In this review we will discuss specific issues for precision irradiation of small animals, we will describe the workflow of animal treatment planning, and we will examine several dose calculation algorithms (factorization, superposition-convolution, Monte Carlo simulation) used for animal irradiation with kilovolt photon beams. Issues such as dose reporting methods, photon scatter, tissue segmentation and motion will also be discussed briefly. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. The chose and apply of radiotherapy technologies in esophageal cancer%食管癌放射治疗技术的选择与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛秀红; 李前文

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the radical treatments of EC. We review the chose and apply of radiotherapy in e-sophageal cancer,include conventional radiotherapy,X knife,γ knife,three - dementional conformal radiation therapy (3D - CRT),idensity modulated radiation therapy( IMRT),imaging guided radiation therapy( IGRT);volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT),adaptive radiation therapy(ART)and internal exposure after - loading therapy.%放射治疗是食管癌的根治性手段之一。随着医学影像学、计算机技术及放射物理学的快速发展,放疗技术取得了革命性的进步,从常规放疗迈进精确放疗时代。现综述放射治疗技术在食管癌放疗中的选择和应用,主要包括常规放射治疗、X 刀、γ刀、三维适形放疗、调强适形放疗、图像引导调强放疗、容积弧形调强放射治疗、自适应放疗及内照射后装治疗等。

  19. Individualized image guided iso-NTCP based liver cancer SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Eccles, Cynthia; Craig, Tim [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada). Radiation Medicine Program

    2006-09-15

    A highly individualized stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) strategy was developed to allow a wide spectrum of patients with liver cancer to be treated. This phase I/II study encompasses individualization of immobilization, radiation planning, PTV margin determination, image guidance strategy and prescription dose. Active breathing control breath hold is used to immobilize the liver when feasible. Image guidance strategies include orthogonal MV images and orthogonal kV fluoroscopy using the diaphragm for a surrogate for the liver, and kV cone beam CT using the liver or tumour for guidance. The prescription dose is individualized to maintain the same estimated risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), based on a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model, with a maximum permitted dose of 60 Gy in 6 fractions. Since August 2003, 79 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (33), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (12) and liver metastases (34) were treated. The median tumour volume was 293 cm{sup 3} (2.9-3088 cm{sup 3}). The median prescribed dose was 36.6 Gy (24.0 Gy-57.0 Gy) in 6 fractions. The median effective liver volume irradiated was 45% (9-80%). Sixty percent of patients were treated with breath hold to immobilize their liver. Intra-fraction reproducibility (s) of the liver with repeat breath holds was excellent (1.5?mm); however inter-fraction reproducibility (s) was worse (3.4 mm). Image guidance reduced the residual systematic and random setup errors significantly.

  20. Designing Tracking Software for Image-Guided Surgery Applications: IGSTK Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Gobbi, David; Turek, Matt; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Lindseth, Frank; Cleary, Kevin

    2008-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many image-guided surgery applications require tracking devices as part of their core functionality. The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) was designed and developed to interface tracking devices with software applications incorporating medical images. METHODS: IGSTK was designed as an open source C++ library that provides the basic components needed for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. This library follows a component-based architecture with several components designed for specific sets of image-guided surgery functions. At the core of the toolkit is the tracker component that handles communication between a control computer and navigation device to gather pose measurements of surgical instruments present in the surgical scene. The representations of the tracked instruments are superimposed on anatomical images to provide visual feedback to the clinician during surgical procedures. RESULTS: The initial version of the IGSTK toolkit has been released in the public domain and several trackers are supported. The toolkit and related information are available at www.igstk.org. CONCLUSION: With the increased popularity of minimally invasive procedures in health care, several tracking devices have been developed for medical applications. Designing and implementing high-quality and safe software to handle these different types of trackers in a common framework is a challenging task. It requires establishing key software design principles that emphasize abstraction, extensibility, reusability, fault-tolerance, and portability. IGSTK is an open source library that satisfies these needs for the image-guided surgery community.

  1. Influence of reconstruction settings on the performance of adaptive thresholding algorithms for FDG-PET image segmentation in radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, Roberta; Della Monica, Patrizia; Loi, Gianfranco; Vigna, Luca; Krengli, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Brambilla, Marco

    2011-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the behavior of a contouring algorithm for PET images based on adaptive thresholding depending on lesions size and target-to-background (TB) ratio under different conditions of image reconstruction parameters. Based on this analysis, the image reconstruction scheme able to maximize the goodness of fit of the thresholding algorithm has been selected. A phantom study employing spherical targets was designed to determine slice-specific threshold (TS) levels which produce accurate cross-sectional areas. A wide range of TB ratio was investigated. Multiple regression methods were used to fit the data and to construct algorithms depending both on target cross-sectional area and TB ratio, using various reconstruction schemes employing a wide range of iteration number and amount of postfiltering Gaussian smoothing. Analysis of covariance was used to test the influence of iteration number and smoothing on threshold determination. The degree of convergence of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithms does not influence TS determination. Among these approaches, the OSEM at two iterations and eight subsets with a 6-8 mm post-reconstruction Gaussian three-dimensional filter provided the best fit with a coefficient of determination R² = 0.90 for cross-sectional areas ≤ 133 mm² and R² = 0.95 for cross-sectional areas > 133 mm². The amount of post-reconstruction smoothing has been directly incorporated in the adaptive thresholding algorithms. The feasibility of the method was tested in two patients with lymph node FDG accumulation and in five patients using the bladder to mimic an anatomical structure of large size and uniform uptake, with satisfactory results. Slice-specific adaptive thresholding algorithms look promising as a reproducible method for delineating PET target volumes with good accuracy.

  2. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hand, T; Victoria, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States); Steele, C [Barnes Jewish Hospital, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will

  3. Depletion of new neurons by image guided irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Fang eTan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation continues to be a relevant tool in both imaging and the treatment of cancer. Experimental uses of focal irradiation have recently been expanded to studies of new neurons in the adult brain. Such studies have shown cognitive deficits following radiation treatment and raised caution as to possible unintentional effects that may occur in humans. Conflicting outcomes of the effects of irradiation on adult neurogenesis suggest that the effects are either transient or permanent. In this study, we used an irradiation apparatus employed in the treatment of human tumors to assess radiation effects on rat neurogenesis. For subjects we used adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley under anesthesia. The irradiation beam was directed at the hippocampus, a center for learning and memory and the site of neurogenic activity in adult brain. The irradiation was applied at a dose-rate 0.6 Gy/min for total single-fraction, doses ranging from 0.5-10.0 Gy. The animals were returned to home cages and recovered with no sign of any side effects. The neurogenesis was measured either 1 week or 6 weeks after the irradiation. At 1 week, the number of neuronal progenitors was reduced in a dose-dependent manner with the 50% reduction at 0.78 Gy. The dose-response curve was well fitted by a double exponential suggesting two processes. Examination of the tissue with quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed a dominant low-dose effect on neuronal progenitors resulting in 80% suppression of neurogenesis. This effect was partially reversible, possibly due to compensatory proliferation of the remaining precursors. At higher doses (> 5Gy there was additional, nearly complete block of neurogenesis without compensatory proliferation. We conclude that notwithstanding the usefulness of irradiation for experimental purposes, the exposure of human subjects to doses often used in radiotherapy treatment could be damaging and cause cognitive impairments.

  4. An event-driven distributed processing architecture for image-guided cardiac ablation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettmann, M E; Holmes, D R; Cameron, B M; Robb, R A

    2009-08-01

    Medical imaging data is becoming increasing valuable in interventional medicine, not only for preoperative planning, but also for real-time guidance during clinical procedures. Three key components necessary for image-guided intervention are real-time tracking of the surgical instrument, aligning the real-world patient space with image-space, and creating a meaningful display that integrates the tracked instrument and patient data. Issues to consider when developing image-guided intervention systems include the communication scheme, the ability to distribute CPU intensive tasks, and flexibility to allow for new technologies. In this work, we have designed a communication architecture for use in image-guided catheter ablation therapy. Communication between the system components is through a database which contains an event queue and auxiliary data tables. The communication scheme is unique in that each system component is responsible for querying and responding to relevant events from the centralized database queue. An advantage of the architecture is the flexibility to add new system components without affecting existing software code. In addition, the architecture is intrinsically distributed, in that components can run on different CPU boxes, and even different operating systems. We refer to this Framework for Image-Guided Navigation using a Distributed Event-Driven Database in Real-Time as the FINDER architecture. This architecture has been implemented for the specific application of image-guided cardiac ablation therapy. We describe our prototype image-guidance system and demonstrate its functionality by emulating a cardiac ablation procedure with a patient-specific phantom. The proposed architecture, designed to be modular, flexible, and intuitive, is a key step towards our goal of developing a complete system for visualization and targeting in image-guided cardiac ablation procedures.

  5. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Post-Prostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, H; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso® 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in post-prostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for post-prostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Results Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: − 0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5 degrees, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion Target rotational motion could cause under-dosage to partial volume of the post-prostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. PMID:23021439

  6. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  7. Image-Guided Endoscopic Endonasal Transmaxillary Transpterygoid Approach to Meckel's Cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejian; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Gu, Ye; Xie, Tao; Ge, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report was to summarize our preliminary experience on the resection of tumors located in Meckel's cave via the endoscopic endonasal transmaxillary transpterygoid approach with image-guided system and to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. Two patients who had tumors in left Meckel's cave underwent surgical treatment using the image-guided endoscopic endonasal transmaxillary transpterygoid approach. This particular technique has advantages of no brain retraction, direct vision of tumor resection and protection of surrounding neurovascular structures. Neuronavigation increases the safety of the endoscopic approach.

  8. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric....... Overall results are encouraging, as toxicity levels - although varying across reports - appear lower than for 3D conformal radiotherapy. Innovative treatment techniques and strategies which may be facilitated by the use of IMRT/VMAT include simultaneously integrated tumour boost, adaptive treatment...

  9. Microencapsulation of indocyanine green for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-02-07

    We present a novel process to encapsulate indocyanine green (ICG) in liposomal droplets at high concentration for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery. The microencapsulation process follows two consecutive steps of droplet formation by liquid-driven coaxial flow focusing (LDCFF) and solvent removal by oil phase dewetting. These biocompatible lipid vesicles may have important applications in drug delivery and fluorescence imaging.

  10. Image fusion and navigation platforms for percutaneous image-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Manoj; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2016-04-01

    Image-guided interventional procedures, particularly image guided biopsy and ablation, serve an important role in the care of the oncology patient. The need for tumor genomic and proteomic profiling, early tumor response assessment and confirmation of early recurrence are common scenarios that may necessitate successful biopsies of targets, including those that are small, anatomically unfavorable or inconspicuous. As image-guided ablation is increasingly incorporated into interventional oncology practice, similar obstacles are posed for the ablation of technically challenging tumor targets. Navigation tools, including image fusion and device tracking, can enable abdominal interventionalists to more accurately target challenging biopsy and ablation targets. Image fusion technologies enable multimodality fusion and real-time co-displays of US, CT, MRI, and PET/CT data, with navigational technologies including electromagnetic tracking, robotic, cone beam CT, optical, and laser guidance of interventional devices. Image fusion and navigational platform technology is reviewed in this article, including the results of studies implementing their use for interventional procedures. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences to date suggest these technologies have the potential to reduce procedure risk, time, and radiation dose to both the patient and the operator, with a valuable role to play for complex image-guided interventions.

  11. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  12. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  13. Occipital condyle screw placement and occipitocervical instrumentation using three-dimensional image-guided navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien V; Burkett, Clint; Ramos, Edwin; Uribe, Juan S

    2012-05-01

    Occipital condyle (OC) screws are an alternative cephalad fixation point in occipitocervical fusion. Safe placement of occipital, C1 lateral mass, and C2 pars screws have been described previously, but not OC screws. The craniocervical junction is complex, and a thorough understanding of the anatomy is needed. Three-dimensional (3D) image-guided navigation was used in six patients. There were no complications related to image-guided navigation during the placement of 12 OC screws and we found that this navigation can serve as a useful adjunct when placing an OC screw. Technical considerations of placing OC and C1 lateral mass screws are discussed with particular reference to patient positioning and the StealthStation® S7™ image-guided navigational platform (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA). The reference arc is attached to the head-clamp and faces forward. The optical camera and monitor are positioned at the head of the table for a direct, non-obstructed line-of-sight. To minimize intersegmental movement, the OC should not be drilled until all other screws have been placed. We conclude that 3D image-guided navigation is a useful adjunct that can be safely and effectively used for placement of instrumentation of the upper cervical spine including the OC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MO-C-17A-13: Uncertainty Evaluation of CT Image Deformable Registration for H and N Cancer Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, A; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of organ specific Deformable Image Registration (DIR) for H and N cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART). Methods: A commercial DIR evaluation tool, which includes a digital phantom library of 8 patients, and the corresponding “Ground truth Deformable Vector Field” (GT-DVF), was used in the study. Each patient in the phantom library includes the GT-DVF created from a pair of CT images acquired prior to and at the end of the treatment course. Five DIR tools, including 2 commercial tools (CMT1, CMT2), 2 in-house (IH-FFD1, IH-FFD2), and a classic DEMON algorithms, were applied on the patient images. The resulting DVF was compared to the GT-DVF voxel by voxel. Organ specific DVF uncertainty was calculated for 10 ROIs: Whole Body, Brain, Brain Stem, Cord, Lips, Mandible, Parotid, Esophagus and Submandibular Gland. Registration error-volume histogram was constructed for comparison. Results: The uncertainty is relatively small for brain stem, cord and lips, while large in parotid and submandibular gland. CMT1 achieved best overall accuracy (on whole body, mean vector error of 8 patients: 0.98±0.29 mm). For brain, mandible, parotid right, parotid left and submandibular glad, the classic Demon algorithm got the lowest uncertainty (0.49±0.09, 0.51±0.16, 0.46±0.11, 0.50±0.11 and 0.69±0.47 mm respectively). For brain stem, cord and lips, the DVF from CMT1 has the best accuracy (0.28±0.07, 0.22±0.08 and 0.27±0.12 mm respectively). All algorithms have largest right parotid uncertainty on patient #7, which has image artifact caused by tooth implantation. Conclusion: Uncertainty of deformable CT image registration highly depends on the registration algorithm, and organ specific. Large uncertainty most likely appears at the location of soft-tissue organs far from the bony structures. Among all 5 DIR methods, the classic DEMON and CMT1 seem to be the best to limit the uncertainty within 2mm for all OARs. Partially supported by

  15. Recent Advances in Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pinkawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiation therapy is a well-recognised curative treatment option for localised prostate cancer. A suitable technique, dose, target volume, and the option of a combination with androgen deprivation therapy needs to be considered. An optimal standard external beam radiotherapy includes currently the intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy techniques with total doses of ≥76-78 Gy in conventional fractionation. Data from several randomised studies increasingly support the rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy. A simultaneous integrated boost with dose escalation focused on a computed tomography/positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance spectroscopy detected malignant lesion is an option to increase tumour control with potentially no additional toxicity. The application of a spacer is a promising concept for optimal protection of the rectal wall.

  16. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  17. Long-term follow-up after modern radical prostate cancer radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lotte

    A significant increase in the prostate cancer incidence has made prostate cancer a major health problem in recent years. Because of the often but unfortunately not always indolent nature of the disease, over-diagnosis and over-treatment are relevant clinical and ethic dilemmas. External beam...... radiotherapy is a well established treatment modality for prostate cancer. Accuracy and precision are key words with regard to optimal survival and minimal toxicity in modern radiotherapy and are fundamentals in modern radiotherapy. Modern imaging has improved the ability to define radiotherapy target volumes....... Especially treatment margins have been reduced through the use of more accurate treatment planning and image-guided technology. Increasing doses have lead to increased disease control. Aiming for minimal toxicity after radiotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging delineation could be a possible tool, knowing...

  18. Subject-specific models for image-guided cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Moore, John; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional visualization for planning and guidance is still not routinely available for minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). This can be addressed by providing the surgeon with subject-specific geometric models derived from 3D preoperative images for planning of port locations or to rehearse the procedure. For guidance purposes, these models can also be registered to the subject using intraoperative images. In this paper, we present a method for extracting subject-specific heart geometry from preoperative MR images. The main obstacle we face is the low quality of clinical data in terms of resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and presence of artefacts. Instead of using these images directly, we approach the problem in three steps: (1) generate a high quality template model, (2) register the template with the preoperative data, and (3) animate the result over the cardiac cycle. Validation of this approach showed that dynamic subject-specific models can be generated with a mean error of 3.6 ± 1.1 mm from low resolution target images (6 mm slices). Thus, the models are sufficiently accurate for MICS training and procedure planning. In terms of guidance, we also demonstrate how the resulting models may be adapted to the operating room using intraoperative ultrasound imaging.

  19. Risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy in a pooled series of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. High local control and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted single-fraction (SRS) or fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with nonsecretory pituitary adenomas (NSA). A total of 73 NSA patients (39 men/34 women) with a median age of 62 years were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk) in two Novalis registered centers. Mean tumor volume was 7.02 ccm (range 0.58-57.29 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 5 patients were treated with SRS and 68 patients with SRT. Median follow-up (FU) reached 5 years with 5-year overall survival (OS) of 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %) and 5-year local control and progression-free survival rates of 100 % (CI 93.3-100 %) and 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %), respectively. A post-SRS/SRT new visual disorder occurred in 2 patients (2.7 %), a new oculomotor nerve palsy in one pre-irradiated patient, in 3 patients (4.1 %) a pre-existing visual disorder improved. New complete hypopituitarism occurred in 4 patients (13.8 %) and in 3 patients (25 %) with pre-existing partial hypopituitarism. Pituitary function in 26 % of patients retained normal. Patients with tumor shrinkage (65.75 %) had a significantly longer FU (p = 0.0093). Multivariate analysis confirmed correlation of new hypopituitarism with duration of FU (p = 0.008) and correlation of new hypopituitarism and tumor volume (p = 0.023). No significant influence factors for occurrence of visual disorders were found. Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system, especially for large tumors located close to optic pathways. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit hormoninaktiven Hypophysenadenomen

  20. Treatment of acromegaly patients with risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy. High local control and low toxicity in a pooled series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Kinfe, Thomas; Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with acromegaly. In total 35 patients (16 men/19 women, mean age 54 years) were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk). The mean tumor volume was 3.71 ccm (range: 0.11-22.10 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 21 patients were treated with SRS and 12 patients with SRT, 2 patients received both consecutively. The median follow-up (FU) reached 8 years with a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 87.3 % [confidence interval (CI): 70.8-95.6 %] and 5-year local control rate of 97.1 % (CI: 83.4-99.8 %). Almost 80 % (28/35) presented tumor shrinkage during FU. Endocrinological cure was achieved in 23 % and IGF-1 normalization with reduced medication was achieved in 40 % of all patients. An endocrinological response was generally achieved within the first 3 years, but endocrinological cure can require more than 8 years. A new adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism occurred in 13 patients (46.4 %). A new visual field disorder and a new oculomotor palsy occurred in 1 patient, respectively. Patients with occurrence of visual/neurological impairments had a longer FU (p = 0.049). Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system. The timing and rate of endocrine improvements are difficult to predict. One has to accept an unavoidable rate of additional adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism in the long term. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung dieser Arbeit ist die Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit Akromegalie aus 2 Zentren. Insgesamt 35 Patienten (16

  1. Objected constrained registration and manifold learning: A new patient setup approach in image guided radiation therapy of thoracic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 (United States); Qin Songbing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The management of thoracic malignancies with radiation therapy is complicated by continuous target motion. In this study, a real time motion analysis approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of patient setup. Methods: For 11 lung cancer patients a long training fluoroscopy was acquired before the first treatment, and multiple short testing fluoroscopies were acquired weekly at the pretreatment patient setup of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The data analysis consisted of three steps: first a 4D target motion model was constructed from 4DCT and projected to the training fluoroscopy through deformable registration. Then the manifold learning method was used to construct a 2D subspace based on the target motion (kinetic) and location (static) information in the training fluoroscopy. Thereafter the respiratory phase in the testing fluoroscopy was determined by finding its location in the subspace. Finally, the phase determined testing fluoroscopy was registered to the corresponding 4DCT to derive the pretreatment patient position adjustment for the IGRT. The method was tested on clinical image sets and numerical phantoms. Results: The registration successfully reconstructed the 4D motion model with over 98% volume similarity in 4DCT, and over 95% area similarity in the training fluoroscopy. The machine learning method derived the phase values in over 98% and 93% test images of the phantom and patient images, respectively, with less than 3% phase error. The setup approach achieved an average accumulated setup error less than 1.7 mm in the cranial-caudal direction and less than 1 mm in the transverse plane. All results were validated against the ground truth of manual delineations by an experienced radiation oncologist. The expected total time for the pretreatment setup analysis was less than 10 s. Conclusions: By combining the registration and machine learning, the proposed approach has the potential to improve the accuracy of pretreatment setup for

  2. Dose-volume histogram parameters and local tumor control in magnetic resonance image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C A; Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model (alpha/beta = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 +/- 16 and 65 +/- 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  3. Phase I Study of IMRT and Molecular-Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Advanced HNSCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  4. Simultaneous deblurring and iterative reconstruction of CBCT for image guided brain radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Song, William Y.; Sahgal, Arjun; Lee, Young; Huynh, Christopher; Grouza, Vladimir; Nordström, Håkan; Eriksson, Markus; Dorenlot, Antoine; Régis, Jean Marie; Mainprize, James G.; Ruschin, Mark

    2017-04-01

    One of the limiting factors in cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality is system blur, caused by detector response, x-ray source focal spot size, azimuthal blurring, and reconstruction algorithm. In this work, we develop a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm that improves spatial resolution by explicitly accounting for image unsharpness caused by different factors in the reconstruction formulation. While the model-based iterative reconstruction techniques use prior information about the detector response and x-ray source, our proposed technique uses a simple measurable blurring model. In our reconstruction algorithm, denoted as simultaneous deblurring and iterative reconstruction (SDIR), the blur kernel can be estimated using the modulation transfer function (MTF) slice of the CatPhan phantom or any other MTF phantom, such as wire phantoms. The proposed image reconstruction formulation includes two regularization terms: (1) total variation (TV) and (2) nonlocal regularization, solved with a split Bregman augmented Lagrangian iterative method. The SDIR formulation preserves edges, eases the parameter adjustments to achieve both high spatial resolution and low noise variances, and reduces the staircase effect caused by regular TV-penalized iterative algorithms. The proposed algorithm is optimized for a point-of-care head CBCT unit for image-guided radiosurgery and is tested with CatPhan phantom, an anthropomorphic head phantom, and 6 clinical brain stereotactic radiosurgery cases. Our experiments indicate that SDIR outperforms the conventional filtered back projection and TV penalized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique methods (represented by adaptive steepest-descent POCS algorithm, ASD-POCS) in terms of MTF and line pair resolution, and retains the favorable properties of the standard TV-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in improving the contrast and reducing the reconstruction artifacts. It improves the visibility of the high contrast details

  5. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0 for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Marçon Barroso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. METHODS: A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. CONCLUSION: The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation.

  6. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, Akila, E-mail: akumara1@hfhs.org; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  7. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Ten H&N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3-4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm(3). Organs with volumes <3 cm(3) and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼ 0.5-0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm(3)), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was "clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours." Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine

  8. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C; Lee, C [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.

  9. SU-E-J-220: Evaluation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation (ABAS) in Head-And-Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the accuracy of atlas-based auto segmentation of organs at risk (OARs) on both helical CT (HCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images in head and neck (HN) cancer adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Six HN patients treated in the ART process were included in this study. For each patient, three images were selected: pretreatment planning CT (PreTx-HCT), in treatment CT for replanning (InTx-HCT) and a CBCT acquired in the same day of the InTx-HCT. Three clinical procedures of auto segmentation and deformable registration performed in the ART process were evaluated: a) auto segmentation on PreTx-HCT using multi-subject atlases, b) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to InTx-HCT using deformable HCT-to-HCT image registration, and c) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to CBCT using deformable CBCT-to-HCT image registration. Seven OARs (brainstem, cord, L/R parotid, L/R submandibular gland and mandible) were manually contoured on PreTx-HCT and InTx-HCT for comparison. In addition, manual contours on InTx-CT were copied on the same day CBCT, and a local region rigid body registration was performed accordingly for each individual OAR. For procedures a) and b), auto contours were compared to manual contours, and for c) auto contours were compared to those rigidly transferred contours on CBCT. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean surface distances of agreement (MSDA) were calculated for evaluation. Results: For procedure a), the mean DSC/MSDA of most OARs are >80%/±2mm. For intra-patient HCT-to-HCT propagation, the Resultimproved to >85%/±1.5mm. Compared to HCT-to-HCT, the mean DSC for HCT-to-CBCT propagation drops ∼2–3% and MSDA increases ∼0.2mm. This Resultindicates that the inferior imaging quality of CBCT seems only degrade auto propagation performance slightly. Conclusion: Auto segmentation and deformable propagation can generate OAR structures on HCT and CBCT images with clinically acceptable accuracy. Therefore

  10. Comparative evaluation of a novel 3D segmentation algorithm on in-treatment radiotherapy cone beam CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gareth; Moore, Chris

    2007-03-01

    Image segmentation and delineation is at the heart of modern radiotherapy, where the aim is to deliver as high a radiation dose as possible to a cancerous target whilst sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. This, of course, requires that a radiation oncologist dictates both where the tumour and any nearby critical organs are located. As well as in treatment planning, delineation is of vital importance in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT): organ motion studies demand that features across image databases are accurately segmented, whilst if on-line adaptive IGRT is to become a reality, speedy and correct target identification is a necessity. Recently, much work has been put into the development of automatic and semi-automatic segmentation tools, often using prior knowledge to constrain some grey level, or derivative thereof, interrogation algorithm. It is hoped that such techniques can be applied to organ at risk and tumour segmentation in radiotherapy. In this work, however, we make the assumption that grey levels do not necessarily determine a tumour's extent, especially in CT where the attenuation coefficient can often vary little between cancerous and normal tissue. In this context we present an algorithm that generates a discontinuity free delineation surface driven by user placed, evidence based support points. In regions of sparse user supplied information, prior knowledge, in the form of a statistical shape model, provides guidance. A small case study is used to illustrate the method. Multiple observers (between 3 and 7) used both the presented tool and a commercial manual contouring package to delineate the bladder on a serially imaged (10 cone beam CT volumes ) prostate patient. A previously presented shape analysis technique is used to quantitatively compare the observer variability.

  11. Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma: the Past, the Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzell, C; Back, M; Wheeler, H; Bailey, D; Foote, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the changing utility of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma over the past 60 years. Together with surgery, radiotherapy has always been the cornerstone of treatment of glioblastoma, but techniques have significantly advanced over this time. The exploration of early two-dimensional techniques, investigation of dose escalation, concomitant chemotherapy and modern techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy will be covered. In addition, current controversies including decreasing margin size, re-irradiation, treatment of elderly patients, and novel imaging tracers will be discussed. Future directions including immunotherapy and tumour treating fields are examined. Radiotherapy-based treatments cannot rely solely on advances in chemotherapy or immunotherapy to improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Radiation oncology needs to continue to develop and improve the delivery, target definition, and dose of radiotherapy to these patients to improve their survival and the toxicity associated with treatment.

  12. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldebawy, Eman [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@mcgill.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abdel Rahman, Wamied [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  13. Interrupting Rivaling Access-flow with Nonsurgical Image-guided ligation: the "IRANI" Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Freed, Robert; Liu, Fengyong; Irani, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    The presence of collateral veins is one of the most common causes of fistula failure to mature. The traditional approach to eliminate collateral vessel flow is coil embolization under fluoroscopy or surgical cut down and branch vessel ligation. However, both approaches are expensive and time consuming. Here, we described an image-guided nonsurgical method to ligate collateral veins. The collateral veins were ligated using Hawkins-Akins needle under ultrasound guidance. The average time for one ligation procedure was 17 minutes. There was a significant increase of blood flow in the venous outflow postligation procedure. Four weeks postprocedure ultrasound demonstrated occlusion of the target vessels. This procedure was well tolerated without major complications. In summary, the novel procedure described here offers an image-guided nonsurgical approach for collateral vein occlusion.

  14. Hard and soft nanoparticles for image-guided surgery in nanomedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locatelli, Erica; Monaco, Ilaria; Comes Franchini, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.comesfranchini@unibo.it [University of Bologn, Department of Industrial Chemistry, “Toso Montanari” (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The use of hard and/or soft nanoparticles for therapy, collectively called nanomedicine, has great potential in the battle against cancer. Major research efforts are underway in this area leading to development of new drug delivery approaches and imaging techniques. Despite this progress, the vast majority of patients who are affected by cancer today sadly still need surgical intervention, especially in the case of solid tumors. An important perspective for researchers is therefore to provide even more powerful tools to the surgeon for pre- and post-operative approaches. In this context, image-guided surgery, in combination with nanotechnology, opens a new strategy to win this battle. In this perspective, we will analyze and discuss the recent progress with nanoparticles of both metallic and biomaterial composition, and their use to develop powerful systems to be applied in image-guided surgery.

  15. 6DOF optical tracking system using afocal optics for image guided surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae You Seong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image guided surgery using medical robots is becoming popular these days. For image guided surgery, a tracking system is required to provide 6DOF information of patient coordinate, surgical instruments and medical robots used in surgery. To provide 6DOF information, a marker has to be attached to the target. However, it is hard to use many markers all together because the markers will take too much space in the surgical area. The tracking system proposed in this study utilizes down sized markers compared to traditional markers by using micro-engraved data-coded pattern with a lens instead of using geometrically specified marker spheres as a tracking target. A tracking system is developed that has a measurement area of 1m to 2.5m from the tracking system. Experiment has been done for surgical navigation using the proposed tracking system and a medical robot.

  16. The Image-Guided Surgery ToolKit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peng; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Gary, Kevin; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Zhang, Hui; Kim, Hee-su; Blake, M. Brian; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. The focus of the toolkit is on robustness using a state machine architecture. This paper presents an overview of the project based on a recent book which can be downloaded from igstk.org. The paper includes an introduction to open source projects, a discussion of our software development process and the best practices that were developed, and an overview of requirements. The paper also presents the architecture framework and main components. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the state machine model that was incorporated and the associated rationale. The paper concludes with an example application.

  17. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  18. Comparison of Safety Margin Generation Concepts in Image Guided Radiotherapy to Account for Daily Head and Neck Pose Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Eva Maria; Grimm, Sarah; Debus, Jürgen; Bendl, Rolf; Giske, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors allows a precise conformation of the high-dose region to clinical target volumes (CTVs) while respecting dose limits to organs a risk (OARs). Accurate patient setup reduces translational and rotational deviations between therapy planning and therapy delivery days. However, uncertainties in the shape of the CTV and OARs due to e.g. small pose variations in the highly deformable anatomy of the head and neck region can still compromise the dose conformation. Routinely applied safety margins around the CTV cause higher dose deposition in adjacent healthy tissue and should be kept as small as possible. Materials and Methods In this work we evaluate and compare three approaches for margin generation 1) a clinically used approach with a constant isotropic 3 mm margin, 2) a previously proposed approach adopting a spatial model of the patient and 3) a newly developed approach adopting a biomechanical model of the patient. All approaches are retrospectively evaluated using a large patient cohort of over 500 fraction control CT images with heterogeneous pose changes. Automatic methods for finding landmark positions in the control CT images are combined with a patient specific biomechanical finite element model to evaluate the CTV deformation. Results The applied methods for deformation modeling show that the pose changes cause deformations in the target region with a mean motion magnitude of 1.80 mm. We found that the CTV size can be reduced by both variable margin approaches by 15.6% and 13.3% respectively, while maintaining the CTV coverage. With approach 3 an increase of target coverage was obtained. Conclusion Variable margins increase target coverage, reduce risk to OARs and improve healthy tissue sparing at the same time. PMID:28033416

  19. SU-E-J-38: Improved DRR Image Quality Using Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Fiducial in Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, S; Jacob, R; Popple, R; Duan, J; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Fiducial-based imaging is often used in IGRT. Traditional gold fiducial marker often has substantial reconstruction artifacts. These artifacts Result in poor image quality of DRR for online kV-to-DRR matching. This study evaluated the image quality of PEEK in DRR in static and moving phantom. Methods CT scan of the Gold and PEEK fiducial (both 1×3 mm) was acquired in a 22 cm cylindrical phantom filled with water. Image artifacts was evaluated with maximum CT value deviated from water due to artifacts; volume of artifacts in 10×10 cm in the center slice; maximum length of streak artifacts from the fiducial. DRR resolution were measured using FWHM and FWTM. 4DCT of PEEK fiducial was acquired with the phantom moving sinusoidally in superior-inferior direction. Motion artifacts were assessed for various 4D phase angles. Results The maximum CT value deviation was −174 for Gold and −24 for PEEK. The volume of artifacts in a 10x10 cm 3 mm slice was 0.369 for Gold and 0.074 cm3 for PEEK. The maximum length of streak artifact was 80mm for Gold and 7 mm for PEEK. PEEK in DRR, FWHM was close to actual (1.0 mm for Gold and 1.1 mm for PEEK). FWTM was 1.8 mm for Gold and 1.3 mm for PEEK in DRR. Barrel motion artifact of PEEK fiducial was noticeable for free-breathing scan. The apparent PEEK length due to residual motion was in close agreement with the calculated length (13 mm for 30–70 phase, 10 mm in 40–60 phase). Conclusion Streak artifacts on planning CT associated with use of gold fiducial can be significantly reduced by PEEK fiducial, while having adequate kV image contrast. DRR image resolution at FWTM was improved from 1.8 mm to 1.3 mm. Because of this improvement, we have been routinely use PEEK for liver IGRT.

  20. Inter-fractional Target Displacement in the Prostate Image-Guided Radiotherapy using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Kap Sang; Back, Chang Wook; Jeong, Yun Jeong; Bae, Jae Beom; Choi, Young Eun; Sung, Ki Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To quantify the inter-fractional variation in prostate displacement and their dosimetric effects for prostate cancer treatment. A total of 176 daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) sets acquired for 6 prostate cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were retrospectively reviewed. For each patient, the planning CT (pCT) was registered to each daily CBCT by aligning the bony anatomy. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on daily CBCT, and the contours of these organs in the pCT were copied to the daily CBCT. The concordance of prostate displacement, deformation, and size variation between pCT and daily CBCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The mean volume of prostate was 37.2 cm3 in the initial pCT, and the variation was around ±5% during the entire course of treatment for all patients. The mean DSC was 89.9%, ranging from 70% to 100% for prostate displacement. Although the volume change of bladder and rectum per treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the value of DSC (r=-0.084, p=0.268 and r=-0.162, p=0.032, respectively), a decrease in the DSC value was observed with increasing volume change of the bladder and rectum (r=-0.230,p=0.049 and r=-0.240,p=0.020, respectively). Consistency of the volume of the bladder and rectum cannot guarantee the accuracy of the treatment. Our results suggest that patient setup with the registration between the pCT and daily CBCT should be considered aligning soft tissue.

  1. Optimal usage of cone beam computed tomography system with different field of views in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Venkata Naga Madhusudhana Sresty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find methods for optimal usage of XVI (X-ray volume imaging system in Elekta synergy linear accelerator with different field of views for same lesion in order to minimize patient dose due to imaging.Methods: 20 scans of 2 individual patients with ca sigmoid colon and ca lung were used in this study. Kilo voltage collimators with medium field of view were used as per the preset information. Images were reconstructed for another collimator with small field of view. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software. Shift results of both methods were compared. Results: Variation in treatment set up errors with M20 and S20 collimators were ≤ 0.2 mm in translational and 0.30 in rotational shifts. Results showed almost equal translational and rotational shifts in both medium and small field of views with different collimators in all the scans. Visualization of target and surrounding structures were good enough and sufficient for XVI auto matching.Conclusion: Imaging with small field of view results less patient dose compared with medium or large field of views. It is Suggestible to use collimators with small field of view wherever possible. In this study, collimators with small field of view were sufficient for both patients though the preset information indicated medium field of view. But, it always depends on the area required for matching purpose. So, individual selection is important than preset information in the XVI system.

  2. Accuracy of image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the BeamCath urethral catheter technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fokdal, Lars; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.;

    2007-01-01

    was 0.6 mm (LR), 2.4 mm (CC), and 2.8 mm (AP), while the prostate movement relative to external skin markers was considerably larger. Removal of the catheter resulted in a mean cranial prostate movement of 1.5mm relative to the pelvic bone. Caudal catheter displacements of 7-30 mm were observed in 5...

  3. Fast kilovoltage/megavoltage (kVMV) breathhold cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Blessing, Manuel; Rossi, Michael; Knox, Chris; Brown, Kevin; Gros, Uwe; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Walter, Cornelia; Hesser, Juergen; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-08-01

    Long image acquisition times of 60-120 s for cone-beam CT (CBCT) limit the number of patients with lung cancer who can undergo volume image guidance under breathhold. We developed a low-dose dual-energy kilovoltage-megavoltage-cone-beam CT (kVMV-CBCT) based on a clinical treatment unit reducing imaging time to dose. Single MV-projections, reconstructed MV-CBCT images and images of simultaneous 90° kV- and 90° MV-CBCT (180° kVMV-CBCT) were acquired with different parameters. Image quality and imaging dose were evaluated and compared to kV-imaging. Hardware-based kVMV synchronization resulted in artifact-free projections. A combined 180° kVMV-CBCT scan with a total MV-dose of 5 monitor units was acquired in 15 s and with sufficient image quality. The resolution was 5-6 line pairs cm-1 (Catphan phantom). The combined kVMV-scan dose was equivalent to a kV-radiation scan dose of ~33 mGy. kVMV-CBCT based on a standard linac is promising and can provide ultra-fast online volume image guidance with low imaging dose and sufficient image quality for fast and accurate patient positioning for patients with lung cancer under breathhold.

  4. Fast kilovoltage/megavoltage (kVMV) breathhold cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Blessing, Manuel; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hesser, Juergen; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Rossi, Michael; Gros, Uwe [Elekta Ltd, Hamburg (Germany); Knox, Chris; Brown, Kevin [Elekta Ltd, Crawley (United Kingdom); Walter, Cornelia, E-mail: hansjoerg.wertz@umm.d [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marienhospital Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-08-07

    Long image acquisition times of 60-120 s for cone-beam CT (CBCT) limit the number of patients with lung cancer who can undergo volume image guidance under breathhold. We developed a low-dose dual-energy kilovoltage-megavoltage-cone-beam CT (kVMV-CBCT) based on a clinical treatment unit reducing imaging time to {<=}15 s. Simultaneous kVMV-imaging was achieved by dedicated synchronization hardware controlling the output of the linear accelerator (linac) based on detector panel readout signals, preventing imaging artifacts from interference of the linac's MV-irradiation and panel readouts. Optimization was performed to minimize the imaging dose. Single MV-projections, reconstructed MV-CBCT images and images of simultaneous 90{sup 0} kV- and 90{sup 0} MV-CBCT (180{sup 0} kVMV-CBCT) were acquired with different parameters. Image quality and imaging dose were evaluated and compared to kV-imaging. Hardware-based kVMV synchronization resulted in artifact-free projections. A combined 180{sup 0} kVMV-CBCT scan with a total MV-dose of 5 monitor units was acquired in 15 s and with sufficient image quality. The resolution was 5-6 line pairs cm{sup -1} (Catphan phantom). The combined kVMV-scan dose was equivalent to a kV-radiation scan dose of {approx}33 mGy. kVMV-CBCT based on a standard linac is promising and can provide ultra-fast online volume image guidance with low imaging dose and sufficient image quality for fast and accurate patient positioning for patients with lung cancer under breathhold.

  5. Sucrose acetate isobutyrate-based nanogels as liquid fiducial tissue markers with potential use in image guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Linda Maria; Schaarup-Jensen, Henrik; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    The poster presents the development of a liquid fiducial tissue marker based on sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) and uniform, coated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The PNIPAM-coated AuNP-SAIB gel provided high CT contrast and high in vivo stability and was assessed to be a suitable tissue marker f...

  6. Technical feasibility of integrating 7 T anatomical MRI in image-guided radiotherapy of glioblastoma : a preparatory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compter, Inge; Peerlings, Jurgen; Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Postma, Alida A.; Ivanov, Dimo; Wiggins, Christopher J.; Kubben, Pieter; Küsters, Benno; Wesseling, Pieter; Ackermans, Linda; Schijns, Olaf E M G; Lambin, Philippe; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The use of 7 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently shown great potential for high-resolution soft-tissue neuroimaging and visualization of microvascularization in glioblastoma (GBM). We have designed a clinical trial to explore the value of 7 T MRI in radiation treatmen

  7. Technical feasibility of integrating 7 T anatomical MRI in image-guided radiotherapy of glioblastoma: a preparatory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compter, I.; Peerlings, J.; Eekers, D.B.; Postma, A.A.; Ivanov, D.; Wiggins, C.J.; Kubben, P.; Kusters, B.; Wesseling, P.; Ackermans, L.; Schijns, O.E.; Lambin, P.; Hoffmann, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The use of 7 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently shown great potential for high-resolution soft-tissue neuroimaging and visualization of microvascularization in glioblastoma (GBM). We have designed a clinical trial to explore the value of 7 T MRI in radiation treatmen

  8. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  9. Local recurrences in cervical cancer patients in the setting of image-guided brachytherapy: a comparison of spatial dose distribution within a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Maximilian P; Kirisits, Christian; Nesvacil, Nicole; Dimopoulos, Johannes C A; Berger, Daniel; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    It has been shown that a cumulative dose of ≥87 Gy (EQD2) of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) to the high risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) confer a local control rate >95% in locally advanced cervical cancer. This study examines the dose distribution within the HR CTV and intermediate (IR) CTV in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive EBRT +/- concomitant chemotherapy and MRI-based IGABT between patients with local recurrence (LR) and patients in continuous complete local remission (CCLR). From 1998 to 2010, 265 patients were treated with definitive EBRT +/- concomitant chemotherapy and IGABT. Twenty-four LRs were documented. For the statistical analysis all patients with LR were matched to patients in CCLR from our database according to the following criteria: FIGO stage, histology, lymph node status, tumour size and chemotherapy. DVH parameters (D50, D90, D98, D100) were reported for HR CTV and IR CTV. In order to report the minimum dose in the region where the recurrence occurred, the HR CTV/IR CTV were divided into four quadrants on transversal planes. The minimum dose at the HR CTV/IR CTV contour was measured (within the corresponding quadrant closest to the LR) in the treatment planning system. A mean minimum point dose (MPD) was calculated by averaging these measurements on four consecutive slices at the level of the recurrence for each of the 4 brachytherapy fractions. EQD2 doses were calculated by summation of all BT and external beam therapy fractions. For each matched patient in the control group the measurements were performed on the same quadrant and at the same level. Sufficient image data were available for 21 LRs. Eight central failures and 13 non-central failures were observed. The mean D90 and D100 for HR CTV were 77 Gy and 61 Gy for patients with LR and 95 Gy and 71 Gy for patients in CCLR, respectively (p<0.01). The MPD for HR CTV was 72 Gy for patients in the LR arm and 99 Gy

  10. [Image guided and robotic treatment--the advance of cybernetics in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, E; Elle, O J; Samset, E; Johansen, M; Røtnes, J S; Tønnessen, T I; Edwin, B

    2000-01-10

    The introduction of advanced technology in hospitals has changed the treatment practice towards more image guided and minimal invasive procedures. Modern computer and communication technology opens up for robot aided and pre-programmed intervention. Several robotic systems are in clinical use today both in microsurgery and in major cardiac and orthopedic operations. As this trend develops, professions which are new in this context such as physicists, mathematicians and cybernetic engineers will be increasingly important in the treatment of patients.

  11. A novel augmented reality system of image projection for image-guided neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, Mehran; Besharati Tabrizi, Leila

    2013-05-01

    Augmented reality systems combine virtual images with a real environment. To design and develop an augmented reality system for image-guided surgery of brain tumors using image projection. A virtual image was created in two ways: (1) MRI-based 3D model of the head matched with the segmented lesion of a patient using MRIcro software (version 1.4, freeware, Chris Rorden) and (2) Digital photograph based model in which the tumor region was drawn using image-editing software. The real environment was simulated with a head phantom. For direct projection of the virtual image to the head phantom, a commercially available video projector (PicoPix 1020, Philips) was used. The position and size of the virtual image was adjusted manually for registration, which was performed using anatomical landmarks and fiducial markers position. An augmented reality system for image-guided neurosurgery using direct image projection has been designed successfully and implemented in first evaluation with promising results. The virtual image could be projected to the head phantom and was registered manually. Accurate registration (mean projection error: 0.3 mm) was performed using anatomical landmarks and fiducial markers position. The direct projection of a virtual image to the patients head, skull, or brain surface in real time is an augmented reality system that can be used for image-guided neurosurgery. In this paper, the first evaluation of the system is presented. The encouraging first visualization results indicate that the presented augmented reality system might be an important enhancement of image-guided neurosurgery.

  12. Image-guided therapies in the treatment of hepatocellularcarcinoma: A multidisciplinary perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathon Willatt; Kevin K Hannawa; Julie A Ruma; Timothy L Frankel; Dawn Owen; Pranab M Barman

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment ofpatients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) has led to improvements in screening, detection,and treatments. Interventional techniques includethermal ablation, transarterial chemoembolization, andradioembolization whilst stereotactic body radiationtherapy also uses imaging to target the radiation. Bothsurvival rates and cure rates have improved markedlysince the introduction of these techniques. This reviewarticle describes the image guided techniques used forthe treatment of HCC.

  13. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    OpenAIRE

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluo...

  14. Image-guided therapies in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: A multidisciplinary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willatt, Jonathon; Hannawa, Kevin K; Ruma, Julie A; Frankel, Timothy L; Owen, Dawn; Barman, Pranab M

    2015-02-27

    A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has led to improvements in screening, detection, and treatments. Interventional techniques include thermal ablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and radioembolization whilst stereotactic body radiation therapy also uses imaging to target the radiation. Both survival rates and cure rates have improved markedly since the introduction of these techniques. This review article describes the image guided techniques used for the treatment of HCC.

  15. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a ...

  16. Fabrication of multifaceted, micropatterned surfaces and image-guided patterning using laser scanning lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John H; West, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes the implementation of laser scanning lithography (LSL) for the fabrication of multifaceted, patterned surfaces and for image-guided patterning. This photothermal-based patterning technique allows for selective removal of desired regions of an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer on a metal film through raster scanning a focused 532 nm laser using a commercially available laser scanning confocal microscope. Unlike traditional photolithography methods, this technique does not require the use of a physical master and instead utilizes digital "virtual masks" that can be modified "on the fly" allowing for quick pattern modifications. The process to create multifaceted, micropatterned surfaces, surfaces that display pattern arrays of multiple biomolecules with each molecule confined to its own array, is described in detail. The generation of pattern configurations from user-chosen images, image-guided LSL is also described. This protocol outlines LSL in four basic sections. The first section details substrate preparation and includes cleaning of glass coverslips, metal deposition, and alkanethiol functionalization. The second section describes two ways to define pattern configurations, the first through manual input of pattern coordinates and dimensions using Zeiss AIM software and the second via image-guided pattern generation using a custom-written MATLAB script. The third section describes the details of the patterning procedure and postpatterning functionalization with an alkanethiol, protein, and both, and the fourth section covers cell seeding and culture. We end with a general discussion concerning the pitfalls of LSL and present potential improvements that can be made to the technique.

  17. New real-time MR image-guided surgical robotic system for minimally invasive precision surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, M.; Yasunaga, T.; Konishi, K. [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanoue, K.; Ieiri, S. [Kyushu University Hospital, Department of Advanced Medicine and Innovative Technology, Fukuoka (Japan); Kishi, K. [Hitachi Ltd, Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachinaka-Shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakamoto, H. [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Application Development Office, Kashiwa-Shi, Chiba (Japan); Ikeda, D. [Mizuho Ikakogyo Co. Ltd, Tokyo (Japan); Sakuma, I. [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Engineering, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Fujie, M. [Waseda University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, T. [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    To investigate the usefulness of a newly developed magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided surgical robotic system for minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. The system consists of MR image guidance [interactive scan control (ISC) imaging, three-dimensional (3-D) navigation, and preoperative planning], an MR-compatible operating table, and an MR-compatible master-slave surgical manipulator that can enter the MR gantry. Using this system, we performed in vivo experiments with MR image-guided laparoscopic puncture on three pigs. We used a mimic tumor made of agarose gel and with a diameter of approximately 2 cm. All procedures were successfully performed. The operator only advanced the probe along the guidance device of the manipulator, which was adjusted on the basis of the preoperative plan, and punctured the target while maintaining the operative field using robotic forceps. The position of the probe was monitored continuously with 3-D navigation and 2-D ISC images, as well as the MR-compatible laparoscope. The ISC image was updated every 4 s; no artifact was detected. A newly developed MR image-guided surgical robotic system is feasible for an operator to perform safe and precise minimally invasive procedures. (orig.)

  18. Advantages of using an image-guided system for transnasal endoscopic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩德民; 周兵; 葛文彤; 张罗; 张永杰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the advantages of image-guided system in transnasal endoscopic surgery.Methods Transnasal endoscopic surgery was performed with the aid of an image-guided system in 28 patients, supported with histopathologic diagnoses of chronic sinusitis with/without nasal polyps (10 cases), juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (4 cases), pituitary adenoma (6 cases), ethmoidal ossifying fibroma (3 cases), nasopharyngeal mixed tumor (2 cases), nasal leiomyoma (1 case), fungal sinusitis (1 case) and inverted nasal papilloma (1 case).Results For all the patients, the time periods from initialization to surgery ranged from 15 to 30 minutes (a mean of 26 minutes). The calibration coefficient ranged from 1.3 to 2.0. Accuracy of localization fell within 1 mm. Compared with traditional endoscopic surgery, operation times were not noticeably different. No complications occurred.Conclusions The image-guided system was able to identify borders and critical anatomical structures in real-time, especially of those with distorted anatomical markers. It provided a powerful means for a safer and less invasive endoscopic sinus surgery.

  19. Parameters Affecting Image-guided, Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery to Swine Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenya Kamimura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of a safe and effective method for gene delivery to hepatocytes is a critical step toward gene therapy for liver diseases. Here, we assessed the parameters for gene delivery to the livers of large animals (pigs, 40–65 kg using an image-guided hydrodynamics-based procedure that involves image-guided catheter insertion into the lobular hepatic vein and hydrodynamic injection of reporter plasmids using a computer-controlled injector. We demonstrated that injection parameters (relative position of the catheter in the hepatic vasculature, intravascular pressure upon injection, and injection volume are directly related to the safety and efficiency of the procedure. By optimizing these parameters, we explored for the first time, the advantage of the procedure for sequential injections to multiple lobes in human-sized pigs. The optimized procedure resulted in sustained expression of the human α-1 antitrypsin gene in livers for more than 2 months after gene delivery. In addition, repeated hydrodynamic gene delivery was safely conducted and no adverse events were seen in the entire period of the study. Our results support the clinical applicability of the image-guided hydrodynamic gene delivery method for the treatment of liver diseases.

  20. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn(2+) ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics.

  1. MR-compatible laparoscope with a distally mounted CCD for MR image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasunaga, Takefumi; Konishi, Kozo; Yamaguchi, Shohei; Okazaki, Ken; Hong, Jae-sung; Nakashima, Hideaki [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Ieiri, Satoshi; Tanoue, Kazuo [Kyushu University Hospital, Department of Advanced Medicine and Innovative Technology, Fukuoka (Japan); Fukuyo, Tsuneo [Shinko Optical Co. Ltd, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Hashizume, Makoto [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kyushu University Hospital, Department of Advanced Medicine and Innovative Technology, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Objects We have developed a new MR-compatible laparoscope that incorporates a distally mounted charge-coupled device (CCD). The MR-compatibility and feasibility of laparoscopy using the new laparoscope were evaluated during MR image-guided laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation therapy (RFA). Materials and methods MR compatibility of the laparoscope was investigated in terms of MR image artifact caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI) and susceptibility. MR images were obtained using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences with a 0.3 T open MRI unit. We performed an in vivo experiment with MR image-guided laparoscopic RFA on three pigs; near real-time MR images and 3-D navigation were possible using intraoperative MR images. Agarose gel was injected into the pigs' livers as puncture targets; the diameter of each target was approximately 20 mm. Results Artifacts resulting from EMI were not found in phantom experiments. MR image-guided laparoscopic RFA was successfully performed in all procedures. Both the laparoscopic vision and near real-time MR images were clear. No artifact was detected on the MR images and the surgeon was able to confirm the true position of the probe and target during treatment using the near real-time MR images. Conclusion Laparoscopic surgery is feasible under intraoperative MR image-guidance using a newly developed MR-compatible laparoscope with a distally mounted CCD. (orig.)

  2. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...

  3. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy of lung cancer patients is subject to uncertainties related to heterogeneities, anatomical changes and breathing motion. Use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce the treated volume, potentially enabling dose-escalated (DE) treatments. This study was designed...

  4. Technical feasibility and safety of image-guided parieto-occipital ventricular catheter placement with the assistance of a wearable head-up display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jang W; Chen, Robert E; ReFaey, Karim; Diaz, Roberto J; Reimer, Ronald; Komotar, Ricardo J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Brown, Benjamin L; Wharen, Robert E

    2017-05-19

    Wearable technology is growing in popularity as a result of its ability to interface with normal human movement and function. Using proprietary hardware and software, neuronavigation images were captured and transferred wirelessly via a password-encrypted network to the head-up display. The operating surgeon wore a loupe-mounted wearable head-up display during image-guided parieto-occipital ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement in two patients. The shunt placement was completed successfully without complications. The tip of the catheter ended well within the ventricles away from the ventricular wall. The wearable device allowed for continuous monitoring of neuronavigation images in the right upper corner of the surgeon's visual field without the need for the surgeon to turn his head to view the monitors. The adaptable nature of this proposed system permits the display of video data to the operating surgeon without diverting attention away from the operative task. This technology has the potential to enhance image-guided procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y. [Mayo Clinic Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  6. Analysis of the Setup Uncertainty and Margin of the Daily ExacTrac 6D Image Guide System for Patients with Brain Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se An Oh

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the setup uncertainties for brain sites when using BrainLAB's ExacTrac X-ray 6D system for daily pretreatment to determine the optimal planning target volume (PTV margin. Between August 2012 and April 2015, 28 patients with brain tumors were treated by daily image-guided radiotherapy using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guidance system of the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator. DUONTM (Orfit Industries, Wijnegem, Belgium masks were used to fix the head. The radiotherapy was fractionated into 27-33 treatments. In total, 844 image verifications were performed for 28 patients and used for the analysis. The setup corrections along with the systematic and random errors were analyzed for six degrees of freedom in the translational (lateral, longitudinal, and vertical and rotational (pitch, roll, and yaw dimensions. Optimal PTV margins were calculated based on van Herk et al.'s [margin recipe = 2.5∑ + 0.7σ - 3 mm] and Stroom et al.'s [margin recipe = 2∑ + 0.7σ] formulas. The systematic errors (∑ were 0.72, 1.57, and 0.97 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical translational dimensions, respectively, and 0.72°, 0.87°, and 0.83° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. The random errors (σ were 0.31, 0.46, and 0.54 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical rotational dimensions, respectively, and 0.28°, 0.24°, and 0.31° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. According to van Herk et al.'s and Stroom et al.'s recipes, the recommended lateral PTV margins were 0.97 and 1.66 mm, respectively; the longitudinal margins were 1.26 and 3.47 mm, respectively; and the vertical margins were 0.21 and 2.31 mm, respectively. Therefore, daily setup verifications using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guide system are very useful for evaluating the setup uncertainties and determining the setup margin.

  7. Analysis of the Setup Uncertainty and Margin of the Daily ExacTrac 6D Image Guide System for Patients with Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon; Kang, Min Kyu; Park, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the setup uncertainties for brain sites when using BrainLAB's ExacTrac X-ray 6D system for daily pretreatment to determine the optimal planning target volume (PTV) margin. Between August 2012 and April 2015, 28 patients with brain tumors were treated by daily image-guided radiotherapy using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guidance system of the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator. DUONTM (Orfit Industries, Wijnegem, Belgium) masks were used to fix the head. The radiotherapy was fractionated into 27-33 treatments. In total, 844 image verifications were performed for 28 patients and used for the analysis. The setup corrections along with the systematic and random errors were analyzed for six degrees of freedom in the translational (lateral, longitudinal, and vertical) and rotational (pitch, roll, and yaw) dimensions. Optimal PTV margins were calculated based on van Herk et al.'s [margin recipe = 2.5∑ + 0.7σ - 3 mm] and Stroom et al.'s [margin recipe = 2∑ + 0.7σ] formulas. The systematic errors (∑) were 0.72, 1.57, and 0.97 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical translational dimensions, respectively, and 0.72°, 0.87°, and 0.83° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. The random errors (σ) were 0.31, 0.46, and 0.54 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical rotational dimensions, respectively, and 0.28°, 0.24°, and 0.31° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. According to van Herk et al.'s and Stroom et al.'s recipes, the recommended lateral PTV margins were 0.97 and 1.66 mm, respectively; the longitudinal margins were 1.26 and 3.47 mm, respectively; and the vertical margins were 0.21 and 2.31 mm, respectively. Therefore, daily setup verifications using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guide system are very useful for evaluating the setup uncertainties and determining the setup margin.

  8. Individualized radiotherapy by combining high-end irradiation and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Wilkens, Jan J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Neuherberg (Germany); Nuesslin, Fridtjof [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has been integrated into daily clinical routine and can today be considered the standard especially with high-dose radiotherapy. Currently imaging is based on MV- or kV-CT, which has clear limitations especially in soft-tissue contrast. Thus, combination of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and high-end radiotherapy opens a new horizon. The intricate technical properties of MR imagers pose a challenge to technology when combined with radiation technology. Several solutions that are almost ready for routine clinical application have been developed. The clinical questions include dose-escalation strategies, monitoring of changes during treatment as well as imaging without additional radiation exposure during treatment. (orig.) [German] Die bildgestuetzte Radiotherapie (''image guided radiotherapy'', IGRT) ist in die taegliche klinische Routine integriert und kann heute als Therapiestandard angesehen werden, insbesondere bei dosiseskalierten Strahlentherapiekonzepten. Die derzeitige Bildgebung basiert auf der MV- oder kV-CT, welche beide besonders in Bezug auf die Darstellung von Weichteilen Limitationen aufweisen. Aus diesem Grund ist die Kombination von Magnetresonanz-(MR-)Bildgebung und moderner Strahlentherapietechnik eine zukunftsweisende Entwicklung. Die speziellen technischen Eigenschaften von MR-Scannern bringen eine grosse Herausforderung mit sich, wenn sie mit hochmodernen Strahlentherapiegeraeten kombiniert werden sollen. Eine Reihe technischer Loesungen sind entwickelt worden, die kurz vor dem klinischen Einsatz stehen. Die klinischen Fragestellungen umfassen unter anderem Strategien zur Dosiseskalation, Ueberwachung von Gewebeveraenderungen waehrend einer Strahlentherapie sowie Bildgebung unter Therapie ohne zusaetzliche Dosisapplikation. (orig.)

  9. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Moinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); D’Souza, Derek [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    a replan CT. The DD is smaller than 2% of the prescribed dose on 90% of the body's voxels and it passes a 2% and 2 mm gamma-test on over 95% of the voxels. Target coverage similarity was assessed in terms of the 95%-isodose volumes. A mean value of 0.962 was obtained for the DSC, while the distance between surfaces is less than 2 mm in 95.4% of the pixels. The method proposed provided adequate dose estimation, closer to the gold standard than the other two approaches. Differences in DVH curves were mainly due to differences in the OARs definition (manual vs warped) and not due to differences in dose estimation (dose calculated in replan CT vs dose calculated in deformed CT). Conclusions: Deforming a planning CT to match a daily CBCT provides the tools needed for the calculation of the “dose of the day” without the need to acquire a new CT. The initial clinical application of our method will be weekly offline calculations of the “dose of the day,” and use this information to inform adaptive radiotherapy (ART). The work here presented is a first step into a full implementation of a “dose-driven” online ART.

  10. Value of MR contrast media in image-guided body interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Maythem; Wilson, Mark

    2012-01-28

    In the past few years, there have been multiple advances in magnetic resonance (MR) instrumentation, in vivo devices, real-time imaging sequences and interventional procedures with new therapies. More recently, interventionists have started to use minimally invasive image-guided procedures and local therapies, which reduce the pain from conventional surgery and increase drug effectiveness, respectively. Local therapy also reduces the systemic dose and eliminates the toxic side effects of some drugs to other organs. The success of MR-guided procedures depends on visualization of the targets in 3D and precise deployment of ablation catheters, local therapies and devices. MR contrast media provide a wealth of tissue contrast and allows 3D and 4D image acquisitions. After the development of fast imaging sequences, the clinical applications of MR contrast media have been substantially expanded to include pre- during- and post-interventions. Prior to intervention, MR contrast media have the potential to localize and delineate pathologic tissues of vital organs, such as the brain, heart, breast, kidney, prostate, liver and uterus. They also offer other options such as labeling therapeutic agents or cells. During intervention, these agents have the capability to map blood vessels and enhance the contrast between the endovascular guidewire/catheters/devices, blood and tissues as well as direct therapies to the target. Furthermore, labeling therapeutic agents or cells aids in visualizing their delivery sites and tracking their tissue distribution. After intervention, MR contrast media have been used for assessing the efficacy of ablation and therapies. It should be noted that most image-guided procedures are under preclinical research and development. It can be concluded that MR contrast media have great value in preclinical and some clinical interventional procedures. Future applications of MR contrast media in image-guided procedures depend on their safety, tolerability

  11. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    Full Text Available The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  12. Safety of an intercostal approach for imaging-guided percutaneous drainage of subdiaphragmatic abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Stephen R; Nelson, Rendon C; Bashir, Mustafa R; Jaffe, Tracy A; Kim, Charles Y; Haystead, Clare M

    2014-06-01

    The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that an intercostal approach to imaging-guided percutaneous subdiaphragmatic abscess drainage is as safe as a subcostal approach. A cohort of 258 consecutive patients with one or more subdiaphragmatic abscesses referred for imaging-guided (CT or ultrasound) percutaneous drainage was identified. Demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between patients who underwent drainage catheter placement via an intercostal approach versus those who underwent drainage catheter placement via a subcostal approach. Percutaneous drainage was performed for 441 abscesses in 258 patients in 409 separate procedures (214 via an intercostal approach, 186 by a subcostal approach, and nine by a combined approach). The total number of pleural complications was significantly higher in the intercostal group (56/214 [26.2%]) than the subcostal group (15/186 [8.1%]; p intercostal group than the subcostal group (15/214 [7.0%] vs 0/186 [0%], respectively; p intercostal vs subcostal, 3/214 [1.4%] vs 1/186 [0.5%]; p = 0.63). A few of the complications in the patients who underwent an intercostal-approach drainage were clinically significant. Four of the 15 pneumothoraces required thoracostomy tubes and eight of 38 (21.1%) pleural effusions required thoracentesis, none of which was considered infected. An intercostal approach for imaging-guided percutaneous drainage is associated with a higher risk of pleural complications; however, most of these complications are minor and should not preclude use of the intercostal approach.

  13. Five Fraction Image-Guided Radiosurgery for Primary and Recurrent Meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Karl Oermann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Benign tumors that arise from the meninges can be difficult to treat due to their potentially large size and proximity to critical structures such as cranial nerves and sinuses. Single fraction radiosurgery may increase the risk of symptomatic peritumoral edema. In this study, we report our results on the efficacy and safety of five fraction image-guided radiosurgery for benign meningiomas. Materials/Methods: Clinical and radiographic data from 38 patients treated with five fraction radiosurgery were reviewed retrospectively. Mean tumor volume was 3.83mm3 (range, 1.08-20.79 mm3. Radiation was delivered using the CyberKnife, a frameless robotic image-guided radiosurgery system with a median total dose of 25 Gy (range, 25 Gy-35 Gy. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months. Acute toxicity was minimal with eight patients (21% requiring a short course of steroids for headache at the end of treatment. Pre-treatment neurological symptoms were present in 24 patients (63.2%. Post treatment, neurological symptoms resolved completely in 14 patients (58.3%, and were persistent in eight patients (33.3%. There were no local failures, 24 tumors remained stable (64% and 14 regressed (36%. Pre-treatment peritumoral edema was observed in five patients (13.2%. Post-treatment asymptomatic peritumoral edema developed in five additional patients (13.2%. On multivariate analysis, pre-treatment peritumoral edema and location adjacent to a large vein were significant risk factors for radiographic post-treatment edema (p = 0.001 and p = 0.026 respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that five fraction image-guided radiosurgery is well tolerated with a response rate for neurologic symptoms that is similar to other standard treatment options. Rates of peritumoral edema and new cranial nerve deficits following five fraction radiosurgery were low. Longer follow-up is required to validate the safety and long-term effectiveness of this treatment approach.

  14. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Gao-Feng Li; Xiu-Yu Hou; Hong Gao; Yong-Gang Xu; Ting Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Background:Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer,which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction.IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate.The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field,step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods:We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n =12) or VMAT (n =12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015.Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator.Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images.A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study.Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner.Results:Compared with 7-field,step-and-shoot IMRT,VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs.7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy,P < 0.001).VMAT reduced the rectal D25 (P < 0.001),D35 (P < 0.001),and D50 (P < 0.001),bladder V50 (P < 0.001),D25 (P =0.002),D35 (P =0.028),and D50 (P =0.029).However,VMAT did not statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50,compared with 7-field,step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs.27.43 ± 8.79%,P =0.087).Conclusions:To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer,VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent

  15. SU-E-T-335: Dosimetric Investigation of An Advanced Rotating Gamma Ray System for Imaged Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Eldib, A; Chibani, O; Li, J; Chen, L [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, C [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Co-60 beams have unique dosimetric properties for cranial treatments and thoracic cancers. The conventional concern about the high surface dose is overcome by modern system designs with rotational treatment techniques. This work investigates a novel rotational Gamma ray system for image-guided, external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The CybeRT system (Cyber Medical Corp., China) consists of a ring gantry with either one or two treatment heads containing a Gamma source and a multileaf collimator (MLC). The MLC has 60 paired leaves, and the maximum field size is either 40cmx40cm (40 pairs of 0.5cm central leaves, 20 pairs of 1cm outer leaves), or 22cmx40cm (32 pairs of 0.25cm central leaves, 28 pairs of 0.5cm outer leaves). The treatment head(s) can swing 35° superiorly and 8° inferiorly, allowing a total of 43° non-coplanar beam incident. The treatment couch provides 6-degrees-of-freedom motion compensation and the kV cone-beam CT system has a spatial resolution of 0.4mm. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose distributions and compare with measurements. A retrospective study of 98 previously treated patients was performed to compare CybeRT with existing RT systems. Results: Monte Carlo results confirmed the CybeRT design parameters including output factors and 3D dose distributions. Its beam penumbra/dose gradient was similar to or better than that of 6MV photon beams and its isocenter accuracy is 0.3mm. Co-60 beams produce lower-energy secondary electrons that exhibit better dose properties in low-density lung tissues. Because of their rapid depth dose falloff, Co-60 beams are favorable for peripheral lung tumors with half-arc arrangements to spare the opposite lung and critical structures. Superior dose distributions were obtained for head and neck, breast, spine and lung tumors. Conclusion: Because of its accurate dose delivery and unique dosimetric properties of C-60 sources, CybeRT is ideally suited for advanced SBRT as well as

  16. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Gao-Feng; Hou, Xiu-Yu; Gao, Hong; Xu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer, which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction. IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field, step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n = 12) or VMAT (n = 12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015. Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator. Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study. Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner. Results: Compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs. 7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy, P V50 (P statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50, compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs. 27.43 ± 8.79%, P = 0.087). Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation delivered to adjacent normal tissues comparing to 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT. Daily online image-guidance and better management of bladder and rectum could make a more precise

  17. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianliang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT combined with high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. Material and methods: For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV, intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D 90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D 2cc < 75 Gy and D 2cc < 90 Gy for bladder in terms of an equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2 for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and brachytherapy boost. The IGRT plan was optimized on top of the ICBT dose distribution. A dosimetric comparison was made between B + I and optimized ICBT (O-ICBT only. Results: The mean D 90% of HRCTV was comparable for B + I and O-ICBT (p = 0.82. For B + I plan, HRCTV D100%, IRCTV D 100% , and IRCTV D 90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The D 2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. Conclusions : B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow

  18. Anaphylaxis at image-guided epidural pain block secondary to corticosteroid compound.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Deirdre E

    2012-09-01

    Anaphylaxis during image-guided interventional procedures is a rare but potentially fatal event. Anaphylaxis to iodinated contrast is an established and well-recognized adverse effect. However, anaphylaxis to some of the other frequently administered medications given during interventional procedures, such as corticosteroids, is not common knowledge. During caudal epidural injection, iodinated contrast is used to confirm needle placement in the epidural space at the level of the sacral hiatus. A combination of corticosteroid, local anesthetic, and saline is subsequently injected. We describe a very rare case of anaphylaxis to a component of the steroid medication instilled in the caudal epidural space.

  19. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenya Kamimura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application.

  20. Extensive endoscopic image-guided sinus surgery decreases BPI-ANCA in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, K; Rasmussen, N; Pressler, T

    2012-01-01

    of BPI-ANCA may be due to the costimulation of BPI when mounting an immune response against P. aeruginosa. The effect of surgery aiming to eradicate bacteria and infected tissue on BPI-ANCA levels is sparsely described. A cohort of patients with CF were included: 53 patients having extensive image......-guided sinus surgery (EIGSS) with topical postoperative antibiotic treatment, 131 non-operated controls and 36 who had double lung transplantation (LTX). In all 219 patients, serum samples before and after surgery or at similar intervals were analysed for IgG and IgA BPI-ANCA. The EIGSS group showed a highly...

  1. [The processing of point clouds for brain deformation existing in image guided neurosurgery system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xufeng; Lin, Yixun; Song, Zhijian

    2008-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) plays an important role in solving the brain deformation problem in the image guided neurosurgery system. The position of the brain cortex during the surgery provides the boundary condition for the FEM model. In this paper, the information of brain cortex is represented by the unstructured points and the boundary condition is achieved by the processing of unstructured points. The processing includes the mapping of texture, segmentation, simplification and denoising. The method of k-nearest clustering based on local surface properties is used to simplify and denoise the unstructured point clouds. The results of experiment prove the efficiency of point clouds processing.

  2. Development of a Meso-Scale SMA-Based Torsion Actuator for Image-Guided Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jun; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Gullapalli, Rao; Simard, J Marc; Desai, Jaydev P

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, and control of a meso-scale torsion actuator based on shape memory alloy (SMA) for image-guided surgical procedures. Developing a miniature torsion actuator is challenging, but it opens the possibility of significantly enhancing the robot agility and maneuverability. The proposed torsion actuator is bi-directionally actuated by a pair of antagonistic SMA torsion springs through alternate Joule heating and natural cooling. The torsion actuator is integrated into a surgical robot prototype to demonstrate its working performance in the humid environment under C-Arm CT image guidance.

  3. Image-guided endoscopic spine surgery: Part I. A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaker, R; Cinquin, P; Cotten, A; Lejeune, J P

    2001-08-01

    A feasibility study was performed to determine the efficacy of computer assistance in endoscopic spine surgery. To assess a new method for computer assistance based on image guidance during thoracoscopic or any endoscopic spine procedure. To evaluate the reproducibility, the sensitivity and the reliability of the technique first in vitro and second in clinical use. The computer-based, image-guided surgery is now a routine tool used in open spine surgery. Exposure of the anatomy of the vertebra is needed for registration. This methodology is inapplicable in endoscopic approach. Fluoroscopic-based navigation combines the technology of image-guided surgery and C-arm fluoroscopy. The navigation is based on the fluoroscopic images acquired before surgery. This technology is applicable to endoscopic surgery but the navigation is based on fluoroscopic image. The computed tomography images are not exploited. There are no published data on a technique that allows image-guided surgery based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. A laboratory study was performed on a thoracic human spine. One vertebra was marked on the right lateral side of the body with five titanium marks. A percutaneous reference frame was specifically designed to be placed in the pedicle of the same marked vertebrae. The reference frame acted as a 3D localizer and a registration tool. The spine model was scanned including the reference frame. A standard Stealth station treatment guidance platform (Medtronic, Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) was used for simulation. The registration was obtained using the reference frame. Twenty navigation procedure trials were done and the error was recorded based on the distance between the anatomical point and the corresponding virtual one. Registration was always possible using the stealth station and a standard spine navigational software (spine 3, Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN). The mean error after registration given by the computer was 0.96 mm

  4. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecchi, Michela; Elisei, Federica; Lucignani, Giovanni [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); San Paolo Hospital, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Fossati, Piero [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); CNAO Foundation, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); CNAO Foundation, Milan (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecchi, Michela; Fossati, Piero; Elisei, Federica; Orecchia, Roberto; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy.

  6. Intracranial depth electrodes implantation in the era of image-guided surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Silva Centeno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The advent of modern image-guided surgery has revolutionized depth electrode implantation techniques. Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG, introduced by Talairach in the 1950s, is an invasive method for three-dimensional analysis on the epileptogenic zone based on the technique of intracranial implantation of depth electrodes. The aim of this article is to discuss the principles of SEEG and their evolution from the Talairach era to the image-guided surgery of today, along with future prospects. Although the general principles of SEEG have remained intact over the years, the implantation of depth electrodes, i.e. the surgical technique that enables this method, has undergone tremendous evolution over the last three decades, due the advent of modern imaging techniques, computer systems and new stereotactic techniques. The use of robotic systems, the constant evolution of imaging and computing techniques and the use of depth electrodes together with microdialysis probes will open up enormous prospects for applying depth electrodes and SEEG both for investigative use and for therapeutic use. Brain stimulation of deep targets and the construction of "smart" electrodes may, in the near future, increase the need to use this method.

  7. Clinical outcomes following 3D image-guided brachytherapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Larissa J; Damato, Antonio L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes for women with recurrent endometrial cancer treated with 3D image-guided brachytherapy 44 women, of whom 13 had received prior RT, received salvage RT for vaginal recurrence from 9/03 to 8/11. HDR or LDR interstitial brachytherapy was performed under MR or CT guidance in 35 patients (80%); 9 (20%) had CT-guided HDR cylinder brachytherapy. The median cumulative dose in EQD2 was 75.5 Gy. Actuarial estimates of local failure (LF), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier. Histologic subtypes were endometrioid (EAC, 33), papillary serous/clear cell (UPSC/CC, 5) and carcinosarcoma (CS, 6). The 2-year DFS/OS rates were 75%/89% for EAC and 11%/24% for UPSC/CC/CS (both pradiotherapy. 3D image-guided brachytherapy results in excellent local control for women with recurrent endometrial cancer, particularly with cumulative EQD2 doses greater than 70 Gy. Successful salvage of vaginal recurrence is related to tumor grade and histologic subtype. © 2013.

  8. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel-loaded microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xu; Guo, Jun; He, Cancan; Geng, Huaxiao; Yu, Gengsheng; Li, Jinqing; Zheng, Hairong; Ji, Xiaojuan; Yan, Fei

    2016-02-22

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has been recognized as a promising drug for intervention of vascular reconstructions. However, it is still difficult to achieve local drug delivery in a spatio-temporally controllable manner under real-time image guidance. Here, we introduce an ultrasound (US) triggered image-guided drug delivery approach to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microbubbles (PLM) in a rabbit iliac balloon injury model. PLM was prepared through encapsulating PTX in the shell of lipid microbubbles via film hydration and mechanical vibration technique. Our results showed PLM could effectively deliver PTX when exposed to US irradiation and result in significantly lower viability of vascular smooth muscle cells. Ultrasonographic examinations revealed the US signals from PLM in the iliac artery were greatly increased after intravenous administration of PLM, making it possible to identify the restenosis regions of iliac artery. The in vivo anti-restenosis experiments with PLM and US greatly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia at the injured site, showing an increased lumen area and reduced the ratio of intima area and the media area (I/M ratio). No obvious functional damages to liver and kidney were observed for those animals. Our study provided a promising approach to realize US triggered image-guided PTX delivery for therapeutic applications against iliac restenosis.

  9. An integrated orthognathic surgery system for virtual planning and image-guided transfer without intermediate splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Seung; Woo, Sang-Yoon; Yang, Hoon Joo; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Hwang, Soon Jung; Yi, Won-Jin

    2014-12-01

    Accurate surgical planning and transfer of the planning in orthognathic surgery are very important in achieving a successful surgical outcome with appropriate improvement. Conventionally, the paper surgery is performed based on a 2D cephalometric radiograph, and the results are expressed using cast models and an articulator. We developed an integrated orthognathic surgery system with 3D virtual planning and image-guided transfer. The maxillary surgery of orthognathic patients was planned virtually, and the planning results were transferred to the cast model by image guidance. During virtual planning, the displacement of the reference points was confirmed by the displacement from conventional paper surgery at each procedure. The results of virtual surgery were transferred to the physical cast models directly through image guidance. The root mean square (RMS) difference between virtual surgery and conventional model surgery was 0.75 ± 0.51 mm for 12 patients. The RMS difference between virtual surgery and image-guidance results was 0.78 ± 0.52 mm, which showed no significant difference from the difference of conventional model surgery. The image-guided orthognathic surgery system integrated with virtual planning will replace physical model surgical planning and enable transfer of the virtual planning directly without the need for an intermediate splint.

  10. Anser EMT: the first open-source electromagnetic tracking platform for image-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Herman Alexander; Franz, Alfred Michael; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Seitel, Alexander; Trauzettel, Fabian; Maier-Hein, Lena; Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic tracking is the gold standard for instrument tracking and navigation in the clinical setting without line of sight. Whilst clinical platforms exist for interventional bronchoscopy and neurosurgical navigation, the limited flexibility and high costs of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) systems for research investigations mitigate against a better understanding of the technology's characterisation and limitations. The Anser project provides an open-source implementation for EMT with particular application to image-guided interventions. This work provides implementation schematics for our previously reported EMT system which relies on low-cost acquisition and demodulation techniques using both National Instruments and Arduino hardware alongside MATLAB support code. The system performance is objectively compared to other commercial tracking platforms using the Hummel assessment protocol. Positional accuracy of 1.14 mm and angular rotation accuracy of [Formula: see text] are reported. Like other EMT platforms, Anser is susceptible to tracking errors due to eddy current and ferromagnetic distortion. The system is compatible with commercially available EMT sensors as well as the Open Network Interface for image-guided therapy (OpenIGTLink) for easy communication with visualisation and medical imaging toolkits such as MITK and 3D Slicer. By providing an open-source platform for research investigations, we believe that novel and collaborative approaches can overcome the limitations of current EMT technology.

  11. MoO3-x quantum dots for photoacoustic imaging guided photothermal/photodynamic cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dandan; Guo, Wei; Guo, Chongshen; Sun, Jianzhe; Zheng, Nannan; Wang, Fei; Yan, Mei; Liu, Shaoqin

    2017-02-02

    A theranostic system of image-guided phototherapy is considered as a potential technique for cancer treatment because of the ability to integrate diagnostics and therapies together, thus enhancing accuracy and visualization during the treatment. In this work, we realized photoacoustic (PA) imaging-guided photothermal (PT)/photodynamic (PD) combined cancer treatment just via a single material, MoO3-x quantum dots (QDs). Due to their strong NIR harvesting ability, MoO3-x QDs can convert incident light into hyperthermia and sensitize the formation of singlet oxygen synchronously as evidenced by in vitro assay, hence, they can behave as both PT and PD agents effectively and act as a "dual-punch" to cancer cells. In a further study, elimination of solid tumors from HeLa-tumor bearing mice could be achieved in a MoO3-x QD mediated phototherapeutic group without obvious lesions to the major organs. In addition, the desired PT effect also makes MoO3-x QDs an exogenous PA contrast agent for in vivo live-imaging to depict tumors. Compared with previously reported theranostic systems that put several components into one system, our multifunctional agent of MoO3-x QDs is exempt from unpredictable mutual interference between components and ease of leakage of virtual components from the composited system.

  12. Imaging guided interventional procedures in paediatric uroradiology--a case based overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, M. E-mail: michael.riccabona@kfunigraz.ac.at; Sorantin, E.; Hausegger, K

    2002-08-01

    Objective: To describe the potential and application of interventional image guided procedures in the paediatric urinary tract. Patients and methods: The different techniques are illustrated using case reports. The examples comprise established indications such as percutaneous nephrostomy for compromised kidneys in obstructive uropathy and infection, sonographic guided renal biopsy including monitoring or treatment of complications after biopsy, and evaluation and balloon dilatation of childhood renal artery stenosis. There are new applications such as treatment of stenosis in cutaneous ureterostomy or sonographically guided catheterism for deployment of therapeutic agents. Results: Generally, the procedures are safe and successful. However, complications may occur, and peri-/post-interventional monitoring is mandatory to insure early detection and adequate management. Sometimes additional treatment such as percutaneous embolisation of a symptomatic post biopsy arterio-venous fistula, or a second biopsy for recurrent disease may become necessary. Conclusion: Imaging guided interventional procedures are performed successfully in a variety of diseases of the paediatric urinary tract. They can be considered a valuable additional modality throughout infancy and childhood.

  13. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  14. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  15. microMS: A Python Platform for Image-Guided Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comi, Troy J.; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Do, Thanh D.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2017-09-01

    Image-guided mass spectrometry (MS) profiling provides a facile framework for analyzing samples ranging from single cells to tissue sections. The fundamental workflow utilizes a whole-slide microscopy image to select targets of interest, determine their spatial locations, and subsequently perform MS analysis at those locations. Improving upon prior reported methodology, a software package was developed for working with microscopy images. microMS, for microscopy-guided mass spectrometry, allows the user to select and profile diverse samples using a variety of target patterns and mass analyzers. Written in Python, the program provides an intuitive graphical user interface to simplify image-guided MS for novice users. The class hierarchy of instrument interactions permits integration of new MS systems while retaining the feature-rich image analysis framework. microMS is a versatile platform for performing targeted profiling experiments using a series of mass spectrometers. The flexibility in mass analyzers greatly simplifies serial analyses of the same targets by different instruments. The current capabilities of microMS are presented, and its application for off-line analysis of single cells on three distinct instruments is demonstrated. The software has been made freely available for research purposes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Endoscopic laser speckle contrast imaging system using a fibre image guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lipei; Elson, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    There are several challenges when fibre image guides (FIG) are used for endoscopic speckle acquisition: cross talk between fibre cores, FIG fixed pattern noise, the small probe diameter and low sensitivity and resolution due to the decreased number of speckles and their low transmission through the FIG. In this paper, an endoscopic laser speckle contrast analysis system (ELASCA) based on a leached fibre image guide (LFIG) is presented. Different methods of acquiring LASCA images through LFIGs were investigated including the effect of changing the number of speckles per fibre, defocusing the FIG image onto the CCD and processing speckle images with masks and Butterworth filters to deal with the LFIG fixed pattern and noise from the cladding. The experimental results based on a phantom consisting of intralipid suspension pumped at varying speed showed that this system could detect speed changes and that in the case of multiple speckles per fibre the Nyquist frequency criterion need not be applied since the speckle may be transferred through the fibres to some extent. In contrast to the previously reported ELASCA results, this system can both give a map of the observed area and the temporal change in flow. An additional benefit is the small size of the LFIG, which is compatible with current endoscopic instrument channels and may allow additional surgical applications.

  17. microMS: A Python Platform for Image-Guided Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comi, Troy J.; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Do, Thanh D.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2017-06-01

    Image-guided mass spectrometry (MS) profiling provides a facile framework for analyzing samples ranging from single cells to tissue sections. The fundamental workflow utilizes a whole-slide microscopy image to select targets of interest, determine their spatial locations, and subsequently perform MS analysis at those locations. Improving upon prior reported methodology, a software package was developed for working with microscopy images. microMS, for microscopy-guided mass spectrometry, allows the user to select and profile diverse samples using a variety of target patterns and mass analyzers. Written in Python, the program provides an intuitive graphical user interface to simplify image-guided MS for novice users. The class hierarchy of instrument interactions permits integration of new MS systems while retaining the feature-rich image analysis framework. microMS is a versatile platform for performing targeted profiling experiments using a series of mass spectrometers. The flexibility in mass analyzers greatly simplifies serial analyses of the same targets by different instruments. The current capabilities of microMS are presented, and its application for off-line analysis of single cells on three distinct instruments is demonstrated. The software has been made freely available for research purposes.

  18. Image guided surgery innovation with graduate students - a new lecture format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friebe Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Image Guided Surgeries (IGS, incremental innovation is normally not a technology push (technology delivered but rather a pull (by learning and working with the clinical users from understanding how these surgeries are performed. Engineers need to understand that only through proper observation, procedure know-how and subsequent analysis and evaluation, clinically relevant innovation can be generated. And, it is also essential to understand the associated health economics that could potentially come with new technological approaches. We created a new lecture format (6 ECTS for graduate students that combined the basics of image guided procedures with innovation tools (Design Thinking, Lean Engineering, Value Proposition Canvas, Innovation Games and actual visits of a surgical procedure. The students had to attend these procedures in small groups and had to identify and work on one or more innovation projects based on their observations and based on a prioritisation of medical need, pains and gains of the stakeholders, and ease of implementation. Almost 200 graduate students completed this training in the past 5 years with excellent results for the participating clinicians, and for the future engineers. This paper presents the lecture content, the setup, some statistics and results with the hope that other institutions will follow to offer similar programs that not only help the engineering students identify what clinically relevant innovation is (invention x clinical implementation, but that also pave the path for future interdisciplinary teams that will lead to incremental and disruptive innovation.

  19. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.