WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive head motion

  1. Motion sickness adaptation to Coriolis-inducing head movements in a sustained G flight simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michael C; McCarthy, Geoffrey W; Glaser, Scott T; Bonato, Frederick; Bubka, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Technological advances have allowed centrifuges to become more than physiological testing and training devices; sustained G, fully interactive flight simulation is now possible. However, head movements under G can result in vestibular stimulation that can lead to motion sickness (MS) symptoms that are potentially distracting, nauseogenic, and unpleasant. In the current study an MS adaptation protocol was tested for head movements under +Gz. Experienced pilots made 14 predetermined head movements in a sustained G flight simulator (at 3 +Gz) on 5 consecutive days and 17 d after training. Symptoms were measured after each head turn using a subjective 0-10 MS scale. The Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was also administered before and after each daily training session. After five daily training sessions, normalized mean MS scores were 58% lower than on Day 1. Mean total, nausea, and disorientation SSQ scores were 55%, 52%, and 78% lower, respectively. During retesting 17 d after training, nearly all scores indicated 90-100% retention of training benefits. The reduction of unpleasant effects associated with sustained G flight simulation using an adaptation training protocol may enhance the effectiveness of simulation. Practical use of sustained G simulators is also likely to be interspersed with other types of ground and in-flight training. Hence, it would be undesirable and unpleasant for trainees to lose adaptation benefits after a short gap in centrifuge use. However, current results suggest that training gaps in excess of 2 wk may be permissible with almost no loss of adaptation training benefits.

  2. The impact of head movements on EEG and contact impedance: an adaptive filtering solution for motion artifact reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic, Vojkan; Patki, Shrishail; Grundlehner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Designing and developing a comfortable and convenient EEG system for daily usage that can provide reliable and robust EEG signal, encompasses a number of challenges. Among them, the most ambitious is the reduction of artifacts due to body movements. This paper studies the effect of head movement artifacts on the EEG signal and on the dry electrode-tissue impedance (ETI), monitored continuously using the imec's wireless EEG headset. We have shown that motion artifacts have huge impact on the EEG spectral content in the frequency range lower than 20 Hz. Coherence and spectral analysis revealed that ETI is not capable of describing disturbances at very low frequencies (below 2 Hz). Therefore, we devised a motion artifact reduction (MAR) method that uses a combination of a band-pass filtering and multi-channel adaptive filtering (AF), suitable for real-time MAR. This method was capable of substantially reducing artifacts produced by head movements.

  3. Principal component analysis-based anatomical motion models for use in adaptive radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.

    Purpose: To develop standard and regularized principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients, assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART), and to extract quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of H&N patients were artificially deformed to create "digital phantom" images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during Radiation Therapy (RT). Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients' actual deformations, and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms), and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific standard PCA (SPCA) and regularized PCA (RPCA) models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. Eigenvectors, or eigenDVFs (EDVFs), having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Modeled anatomies were used to assess the dose deviations with respect to the planned dose distribution. Results: PCA models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade SPCA's ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes, and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. For dose assessment it has been shown that the modeled dose distribution was different from the planned dose for the parotid glands due to their shrinkage and shift into

  4. Wheelchair control by head motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajkanović Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric wheelchairs are designed to aid paraplegics. Unfortunately, these can not be used by persons with higher degree of impairment, such as quadriplegics, i.e. persons that, due to age or illness, can not move any of the body parts, except of the head. Medical devices designed to help them are very complicated, rare and expensive. In this paper a microcontroller system that enables standard electric wheelchair control by head motion is presented. The system comprises electronic and mechanic components. A novel head motion recognition technique based on accelerometer data processing is designed. The wheelchair joystick is controlled by the system’s mechanical actuator. The system can be used with several different types of standard electric wheelchairs. It is tested and verified through an experiment performed within this paper.

  5. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  6. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Rodney D.; Wen, Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M.

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  7. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, Rodney D; Wen Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: rwiersma@uchicago.edu

    2010-01-21

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  8. Multi-Directional Motion Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Patrick McGovern

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The direction aftereffect (DAE is a phenomenon whereby prolonged exposure to a moving stimulus biases the perceived direction of subsequent stimuli. It is believed to arise through a selective suppression of directionally tuned neurons in the visual cortex, causing shifts in the population response away from the adapted direction. Whereas most studies consider only unidirectional adaptation, here we examine how concurrent adaptation to multiple directions affects the DAE. Observers were required to judge whether a random dot kinematogram (RDK moved clockwise or counter-clockwise relative to upwards. In different conditions, observers adapted to a stimulus comprised of directions drawn from a distribution or to bidirectional motion. Increasing the variance of normally distributed directions reduced the magnitude of the peak DAE and broadened its tuning profile. Asymmetric sampling of Gaussian and uniform distributions resulted in shifts of DAE tuning profiles consistent with changes in the perceived global direction of the adapting stimulus. Discrimination thresholds were elevated by an amount that related to the magnitude of the bias. For bidirectional adaptors, adding dots in directions away from the adapting motion led to a pronounced reduction in the DAE. This reduction was observed when dots were added in opposite or orthogonal directions to the adaptor suggesting that it may arise via inhibition from a broadly tuned normalisation pool. Preliminary simulations with a population coding model, where the gain of a direction-selective neuron is inversely proportional to its response to the adapting stimulus, suggest that it provides a parsimonious account of these adaptation effects.

  9. Motion-Adaptive Depth Superresolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilov, Ulugbek S; Boufounos, Petros T

    2017-04-01

    Multi-modal sensing is increasingly becoming important in a number of applications, providing new capabilities and processing challenges. In this paper, we explore the benefit of combining a low-resolution depth sensor with a high-resolution optical video sensor, in order to provide a high-resolution depth map of the scene. We propose a new formulation that is able to incorporate temporal information and exploit the motion of objects in the video to significantly improve the results over existing methods. In particular, our approach exploits the space-time redundancy in the depth and intensity using motion-adaptive low-rank regularization. We provide experiments to validate our approach and confirm that the quality of the estimated high-resolution depth is improved substantially. Our approach can be a first component in systems using vision techniques that rely on high-resolution depth information.

  10. Adaptive vehicle motion estimation and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Thorpe, Chuck E.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate motion estimation and reliable maneuver prediction enable an automated car to react quickly and correctly to the rapid maneuvers of the other vehicles, and so allow safe and efficient navigation. In this paper, we present a car tracking system which provides motion estimation, maneuver prediction and detection of the tracked car. The three strategies employed - adaptive motion modeling, adaptive data sampling, and adaptive model switching probabilities - result in an adaptive interacting multiple model algorithm (AIMM). The experimental results on simulated and real data demonstrate that our tracking system is reliable, flexible, and robust. The adaptive tracking makes the system intelligent and useful in various autonomous driving tasks.

  11. Head Tracking Using Shapes and Adaptive Color Histograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青山; 马颂德; 卢汉青

    2002-01-01

    A new method is presented for tracking a person's head in real-time. Thehead is shaped as an ellipse, and the adaptively modified RGB color histogram is used torepresent the tracked object (head). The method is composed of two parts. First, a robustnonparametric technique, called mean shift algorithm, is adopted for histogram matching toestimate the head's location in the current frame. Second, a local search is performed afterhistogram matching to maximize the normalized gradient magnitude around the boundary ofthe elliptical head, so that a more accurate location and the best scale size of the head can beobtained. The method is demonstrated to be a real-time tracker and robust to clutter, scalevariation, occlusion, rotation and camera motion, for several test sequences.

  12. Adaptive GOP structure based on motion coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanzhuo; Wan, Shuai; Chang, Yilin; Yang, Fuzheng; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2009-08-01

    Adaptive Group of Pictures (GOP) is helpful for increasing the efficiency of video encoding by taking account of characteristics of video content. This paper proposes a method for adaptive GOP structure selection for video encoding based on motion coherence, which extracts key frames according to motion acceleration, and assigns coding type for each key and non-key frame correspondingly. Motion deviation is then used instead of motion magnitude in the selection of the number of B frames. Experimental results show that the proposed method for adaptive GOP structure selection achieves performance gain of 0.2-1dB over the fixed GOP, and has the advantage of better transmission resilience. Moreover, this method can be used in real-time video coding due to its low complexity.

  13. Quantification and clinical relevance of head motion during computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Arne; Schicho, Kurt; Kainberger, Franz; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Grampp, Stephan; Ewers, Rolf

    2003-11-01

    To quantify the 3-dimensional translation and rotation components of head motion during computed tomography and to analyze the influence of such motion on perceptible artifacts and distortion of volume image data sets. Using high-precision optoelectronic motion-capture technology, changes in patient head position during axial CT scanning were registered in 20 cases and 2 phantoms with a spatial relative resolution better than 0.003 cm. Statistical analysis was performed on a base of 6-dimensional measurement-vectors, each with 3 translation and 3 rotation values. Because of the recording frequency of the tracking system, more than 80000 values were included in a statistical analysis. All 20 patients had head motion during the CT scanning, with only 4 of 20 patients showing perceptible motion artifacts. The frequency, the extent, and the direction of the movements did not correlate with either the observations made by the radiologic staff or with the patient's subjective estimation of comfort. Translation movements of the head during CT accounted for a maximum of 0.5 cm and rotations of more than 2 degrees without perceptible motion artifacts. The extent of positional changes of the head was found to correlate with the duration of scanning (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.647 for translation shifts, 0.453 for rotation shifts). The mean direction of head motion could be characterized predominantly as a rotation around the longitudinal axis of the body (xy plane) at a significance level of 0.01. Computed tomography evaluations of the head performed without rigid fixation suffer a spatial distortion of the volume image data sets, caused by interimage motion. The absence of motion artifacts is not correlated with the absence of motion.

  14. Vision based motion control for a humanoid head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.C.; Carloni, R.; Stramigioli, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a motion control algorithm for a humanoid robotic head, which consists of a neck with four degrees of freedom and two eyes (a stereo pair system) that tilt on a common axis and rotate sideways freely. The kinematic and dynamic properties of the head are analyzed an

  15. Public Library Subject Headings for 16mm Motion Pictures. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Library Association, Sacramento.

    Suggested subject headings for 16mm motion pictures are listed. The intent of the list is to provide audiovisual librarians with a tool which will aid them in making subject indexes for their printed catalogs. It is also intended as an authority for professional catalogers who may be called upon to catalog 16mm motion pictures. (Author/KKC)

  16. Head motions while riding roller coasters: implications for brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Bryan J; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-12-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three-dimensional head motions were measured during 3 different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared with published data, using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05 m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure of 28.1 and head impact power of 3.41, over 6 times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides.

  17. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  18. Motion Tracking with Fast Adaptive Background Subtraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao; De-Gui; Yu; Sheng-sheng; 等

    2003-01-01

    To extract and track moving objects is usually one of the most important tasks of intelligent video surveillance systems. This paper presents a fast and adaptive background subtraction algorithm and the motion tracking process using this algorithm. The algorithm uses only luminance components of sampled image sequence pixels and models every pixel in a statistical model.The algorithm is characterized by its ability of real time detecting sudden lighting changes, and extracting and tracking motion objects faster. It is shown that our algorithm can be realized with lower time and space complexity and adjustable object detection error rate with comparison to other background subtraction algorithms. Making use of the algorithm, an indoor monitoring system is also worked out and the motion tracking process is presented in this paper.Experimental results testify the algorithms' good performances when used in an indoor monitoring system.

  19. Active Head Motion Compensation of TMS Robotic System Using Neuro-Fuzzy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zakaria W.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS allows neuroscientist to study human brain behaviour and also become an important technique for changing the activity of brain neurons and the functions they sub serve. However, conventional manual procedure and robotized TMS are currently unable to precisely position the TMS coil because of unconstrained subject’s head movement and excessive contact force between the coil and subject’s head. This paper addressed this challenge by proposing an adaptive neuro-fuzzy force control to enable low contact force with a moving target surface. A learning and adaption mechanism is included in the control scheme to improve position disturbance estimation. The results show the ability of the proposed force control scheme to compensate subject’s head motions while maintaining desired contact force, thus allowing for more accurate and repeatable TMS procedures.

  20. Three-Axis Motion Compensated Crane Head Control

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksen, Vegard Wie; Røine, Audun Gerhardsen

    2016-01-01

    Offshore operations can be harsh and demanding and set personnel and equipment at risk. Ships will be exposed to the environmental forces of wind, waves and current, which will influence offshore crane operations considerably. This thesis addresses the use of a crane head, a Three Axis Compensator (TAC), constructed as a Delta parallel robot, to compensate for the motions of the ship in three axes. This type of robot has a rigid and accurate structure, and because of its highly nonlinear natu...

  1. A new adaptive fast motion estimation algorithm based on local motion similarity degree (LMSD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Long; HAN Chongzhao; BAI Yan

    2005-01-01

    In the motion vector field adaptive search technique (MVFAST) and the predictive motion vector field adaptive search technique (PMVFAST), the size of the largest motion vector from the three adjacent blocks (left, top, top-right) is compared with the threshold to select different search scheme. But a suitable search center and search pattern will not be selected in the adaptive search technique when the adjacent motion vectors are not coherent in local region. This paper presents an efficient adaptive search algorithm. The motion vector variation degree (MVVD) is considered a reasonable factor for adaptive search selection. By the relationship between local motion similarity degree (LMSD) and the variation degree of motion vector (MVVD), the motion vectors are classified as three categories according to corresponding LMSD; then different proposed search schemes are adopted for motion estimation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has a significant computational speedup compared with MVFAST and PMVFAST algorithms, and offers a similar, even better performance.

  2. Differential effect of visual motion adaption upon visual cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeck, Astrid J A; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Ahmad, Hena; Bos, Jelte E; Wuyts, Floris L; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Arshad, Qadeer

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to probe the effects of visual motion adaptation on early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability and 2) to investigate whether changes in cortical excitability following visual motion adaptation are related to the degree of visual dependency, i.e., an overreliance on visual cues compared with vestibular or proprioceptive cues. Participants were exposed to a roll motion visual stimulus before, during, and after visual motion adaptation. At these stages, 20 transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses at phosphene threshold values were applied over early visual and V5/MT cortical areas from which the probability of eliciting a phosphene was calculated. Before and after adaptation, participants aligned the subjective visual vertical in front of the roll motion stimulus as a marker of visual dependency. During adaptation, early visual cortex excitability decreased whereas V5/MT excitability increased. After adaptation, both early visual and V5/MT excitability were increased. The roll motion-induced tilt of the subjective visual vertical (visual dependence) was not influenced by visual motion adaptation and did not correlate with phosphene threshold or visual cortex excitability. We conclude that early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability is differentially affected by visual motion adaptation. Furthermore, excitability in the early or late visual cortex is not associated with an increase in visual reliance during spatial orientation. Our findings complement earlier studies that have probed visual cortical excitability following motion adaptation and highlight the differential role of the early visual cortex and V5/MT in visual motion processing.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We examined the influence of visual motion adaptation on visual cortex excitability and found a differential effect in V1/V2 compared with V5/MT. Changes in visual excitability following motion adaptation were not related to the degree of an individual's visual dependency.

  3. Adaptation to real motion reveals direction-selective interactions between real and implied motion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorteije, Jeannette A M; Kenemans, J Leon; Jellema, Tjeerd; van der Lubbe, Rob H J; Lommers, Marjolein W; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2007-08-01

    Viewing static pictures of running humans evokes neural activity in the dorsal motion-sensitive cortex. To establish whether this response arises from direction-selective neurons that are also involved in real motion processing, we measured the visually evoked potential to implied motion following adaptation to static or moving random dot patterns. The implied motion response was defined as the difference between evoked potentials to pictures with and without implied motion. Interaction between real and implied motion was found as a modulation of this difference response by the preceding motion adaptation. The amplitude of the implied motion response was significantly reduced after adaptation to motion in the same direction as the implied motion, compared to motion in the opposite direction. At 280 msec after stimulus onset, the average difference in amplitude reduction between opposite and same adapted direction was 0.5 muV on an average implied motion amplitude of 2.0 muV. These results indicate that the response to implied motion arises from direction-selective motion-sensitive neurons. This is consistent with interactions between real and implied motion processing at a neuronal level.

  4. Induction and separation of motion artifacts in EEG data using a mobile phantom head device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson S.; Schlink, Bryan R.; Hairston, W. David; König, Peter; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Electroencephalography (EEG) can assess brain activity during whole-body motion in humans but head motion can induce artifacts that obfuscate electrocortical signals. Definitive solutions for removing motion artifact from EEG have yet to be found, so creating methods to assess signal processing routines for removing motion artifact are needed. We present a novel method for investigating the influence of head motion on EEG recordings as well as for assessing the efficacy of signal processing approaches intended to remove motion artifact. Approach. We used a phantom head device to mimic electrical properties of the human head with three controlled dipolar sources of electrical activity embedded in the phantom. We induced sinusoidal vertical motions on the phantom head using a custom-built platform and recorded EEG signals with three different acquisition systems while the head was both stationary and in varied motion conditions. Main results. Recordings showed up to 80% reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and up to 3600% increases in the power spectrum as a function of motion amplitude and frequency. Independent component analysis (ICA) successfully isolated the three dipolar sources across all conditions and systems. There was a high correlation (r > 0.85) and marginal increase in the independent components’ (ICs) power spectrum (˜15%) when comparing stationary and motion parameters. The SNR of the IC activation was 400%-700% higher in comparison to the channel data SNR, attenuating the effects of motion on SNR. Significance. Our results suggest that the phantom head and motion platform can be used to assess motion artifact removal algorithms and compare different EEG systems for motion artifact sensitivity. In addition, ICA is effective in isolating target electrocortical events and marginally improving SNR in relation to stationary recordings.

  5. A Hypothetical Perspective on the Relative Contributions of Strategic and Adaptive Control Mechanisms in Plastic Recalibration of Locomotor Heading Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Ruttley, T.; Peters, B. T.; Warren, L. E.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that viewing simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill locomotion causes adaptive modification of the control of position and trajectory during over-ground locomotion, which functionally reflects adaptive changes in the sensorimotor integration of visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive cues (Mulavara et al., 2005). The objective of this study was to investigate how strategic changes in torso control during exposure to simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill walking influences adaptive modification of locomotor heading direction during over-ground stepping.

  6. Adaptive motion mapping in pancreatic SBRT patients using Fourier transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Bernard L; Miften, Moyed

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that 4DCT is unable to accurately measure respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion. In this work, we assessed the daily motion of pancreatic tumors treated with SBRT, and developed adaptive strategies to predict and account for this motion. The daily motion trajectory of pancreatic tumors during CBCT acquisition was calculated using a model which reconstructs the instantaneous 3D position in each 2D CBCT projection image. We developed a metric (termed "Spectral Coherence," SC) based on the Fourier frequency spectrum of motion in the SI direction, and analyzed the ability of SC to predict motion-based errors and classify patients according to motion characteristics. The amplitude of daily motion exceeded the predictions of pre-treatment 4DCT imaging by an average of 3.0 mm, 2.3 mm, and 3.5 mm in the AP, LR, and SI directions. SC was correlated with daily motion differences and tumor dose coverage. In a simulated adaptive protocol, target margins were adjusted based on SC, resulting in...

  7. Motion-related artifacts in structural brain images revealed with independent estimates of in-scanner head motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalia, Neil K; Agres, Phillip F; Chan, Micaela Y; Feczko, Eric J; Kennedy, Kristen M; Wig, Gagan S

    2017-01-01

    Motion-contaminated T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results in misestimates of brain structure. Because conventional T1w scans are not collected with direct measures of head motion, a practical alternative is needed to identify potential motion-induced bias in measures of brain anatomy. Head movements during functional MRI (fMRI) scanning of 266 healthy adults (20-89 years) were analyzed to reveal stable features of in-scanner head motion. The magnitude of head motion increased with age and exhibited within-participant stability across different fMRI scans. fMRI head motion was then related to measurements of both quality control (QC) and brain anatomy derived from a T1w structural image from the same scan session. A procedure was adopted to "flag" individuals exhibiting excessive head movement during fMRI or poor T1w quality rating. The flagging procedure reliably reduced the influence of head motion on estimates of gray matter thickness across the cortical surface. Moreover, T1w images from flagged participants exhibited reduced estimates of gray matter thickness and volume in comparison to age- and gender-matched samples, resulting in inflated effect sizes in the relationships between regional anatomical measures and age. Gray matter thickness differences were noted in numerous regions previously reported to undergo prominent atrophy with age. Recommendations are provided for mitigating this potential confound, and highlight how the procedure may lead to more accurate measurement and comparison of anatomical features. Hum Brain Mapp 38:472-492, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Unbiased measures of interocular transfer of motion adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilidaité, Greta; Baker, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have measured the extent to which motion aftereffects transfer interocularly. However, many have done so using bias-prone methods, and studies rarely compare different types of motion directly. Here, we use a technique designed to reduce bias (Morgan, 2013, Journal of Vision, 13(8):26, 1-11) to estimate interocular transfer (IOT) for five types of motion: simple translational motion, expansion/contraction, rotation, spiral, and complex translational motion. We used both static and dynamic targets with subjects making binary judgments of perceived speed. Overall, the average IOT was 65%, consistent with previous studies (mean over 17 studies of 67% transfer). There was a main effect of motion type, with translational motion producing stronger IOT (mean: 86%) overall than any of the more complex varieties of motion (mean: 51%). This is inconsistent with the notion that IOT should be strongest for motion processed in extrastriate regions that are fully binocular. We conclude that adaptation is a complex phenomenon too poorly understood to make firm inferences about the binocular structure of motion systems.

  9. A Motion-Adaptive Deinterlacer via Hybrid Motion Detection and Edge-Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hsin-Te

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel motion-adaptive deinterlacing algorithm with edge-pattern recognition and hybrid motion detection is introduced. The great variety of video contents makes the processing of assorted motion, edges, textures, and the combination of them very difficult with a single algorithm. The edge-pattern recognition algorithm introduced in this paper exhibits the flexibility in processing both textures and edges which need to be separately accomplished by line average and edge-based line average before. Moreover, predicting the neighboring pixels for pattern analysis and interpolation further enhances the adaptability of the edge-pattern recognition unit when motion detection is incorporated. Our hybrid motion detection features accurate detection of fast and slow motion in interlaced video and also the motion with edges. Using only three fields for detection also renders higher temporal correlation for interpolation. The better performance of our deinterlacing algorithm with higher content-adaptability and less memory cost than the state-of-the-art 4-field motion detection algorithms can be seen from the subjective and objective experimental results of the CIF and PAL video sequences.

  10. A Motion-Adaptive Deinterlacer via Hybrid Motion Detection and Edge-Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He-Yuan Lin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel motion-adaptive deinterlacing algorithm with edge-pattern recognition and hybrid motion detection is introduced. The great variety of video contents makes the processing of assorted motion, edges, textures, and the combination of them very difficult with a single algorithm. The edge-pattern recognition algorithm introduced in this paper exhibits the flexibility in processing both textures and edges which need to be separately accomplished by line average and edge-based line average before. Moreover, predicting the neighboring pixels for pattern analysis and interpolation further enhances the adaptability of the edge-pattern recognition unit when motion detection is incorporated. Our hybrid motion detection features accurate detection of fast and slow motion in interlaced video and also the motion with edges. Using only three fields for detection also renders higher temporal correlation for interpolation. The better performance of our deinterlacing algorithm with higher content-adaptability and less memory cost than the state-of-the-art 4-field motion detection algorithms can be seen from the subjective and objective experimental results of the CIF and PAL video sequences.

  11. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C

    2016-03-22

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing.

  12. Something in the Way We Move: Motion Dynamics, Not Perceived Sex, Influence Head Movements in Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boker, Steven M.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Ambadar, Zara; Brick, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    During conversation, women tend to nod their heads more frequently and more vigorously than men. An individual speaking with a woman tends to nod his or her head more than when speaking with a man. Is this due to social expectation or due to coupled motion dynamics between the speakers? We present a novel methodology that allows us to randomly…

  13. Using EMG to anticipate head motion for virtual-environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniv, Yair; Aguilar, Mario; Hasanbelliu, Erion

    2005-01-01

    In virtual environment (VE) applications, where virtual objects are presented in a see-through head-mounted display, virtual images must be continuously stabilized in space in response to user's head motion. Time delays in head-motion compensation cause virtual objects to "swim" around instead of being stable in space which results in misalignment errors when overlaying virtual and real objects. Visual update delays are a critical technical obstacle for implementing head-mounted displays in applications such as battlefield simulation/training, telerobotics, and telemedicine. Head motion is currently measurable by a head-mounted 6-degrees-of-freedom inertial measurement unit. However, even given this information, overall VE-system latencies cannot be reduced under about 25 ms. We present a novel approach to eliminating latencies, which is premised on the fact that myoelectric signals from a muscle precede its exertion of force, thereby limb or head acceleration. We thus suggest utilizing neck-muscles' myoelectric signals to anticipate head motion. We trained a neural network to map such signals onto equivalent time-advanced inertial outputs. The resulting network can achieve time advances of up to 70 ms.

  14. Center of Mass-Based Adaptive Fast Block Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Kuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an efficient adaptive algorithm based on center of mass (CEM for fast block motion estimation. Binary transform, subsampling, and horizontal/vertical projection techniques are also proposed. As the conventional CEM calculation is computationally intensive, binary transform and subsampling approaches are proposed to simplify CEM calculation; the binary transform center of mass (BITCEM is then derived. The BITCEM motion types are classified by percentage of (0,0 BITCEM motion vectors. Adaptive search patterns are allocated according to the BITCEM moving direction and the BITCEM motion type. Moreover, the BITCEM motion vector is utilized as the initial search point for near-still or slow BITCEM motion types. To support the variable block sizes, the horizontal/vertical projections of a binary transformed macroblock are utilized to determine whether the block requires segmentation. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is better than the five conventional algorithms, that is, three-step search (TSS, new three-step search (N3SS, four three-step search (4SS, block-based gradient decent search (BBGDS, and diamond search (DS, in terms of speed or picture quality for eight benchmark sequences.

  15. Center of Mass-Based Adaptive Fast Block Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hung Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an efficient adaptive algorithm based on center of mass (CEM for fast block motion estimation. Binary transform, subsampling, and horizontal/vertical projection techniques are also proposed. As the conventional CEM calculation is computationally intensive, binary transform and subsampling approaches are proposed to simplify CEM calculation; the binary transform center of mass (BITCEM is then derived. The BITCEM motion types are classified by percentage of (0,0 BITCEM motion vectors. Adaptive search patterns are allocated according to the BITCEM moving direction and the BITCEM motion type. Moreover, the BITCEM motion vector is utilized as the initial search point for near-still or slow BITCEM motion types. To support the variable block sizes, the horizontal/vertical projections of a binary transformed macroblock are utilized to determine whether the block requires segmentation. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is better than the five conventional algorithms, that is, three-step search (TSS, new three-step search (N3SS, four three-step search (4SS, block-based gradient decent search (BBGDS, and diamond search (DS, in terms of speed or picture quality for eight benchmark sequences.

  16. Adaptive Fuzzy Knowledge Based Controller for Autonomous Robot Motion Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbaitiga Zacharie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Research into robot motion control offers research opportunities that will change scientists and engineers for year to come. Autonomous robots are increasingly evident in many aspects of industry and everyday life and a robust robot motion control can be used for homeland security and many consumer applications. This study discussed the adaptive fuzzy knowledge based controller for robot motion control in indoor and outdoor environment. Approach: The proposed method consisted of two components: the process monitor that detects changes in the process characteristics and the adaptation mechanism that used information passed to it by the process monitor to update the controller parameters. Results: Experimental evaluation had been done in both indoor and outdoor environment where the robot communicates with the base station through its Wireless fidelity antenna and the performance monitor used a set of five performance criteria to access the fuzzy knowledge based controller. Conclusion: The proposed method had been found to be robust.

  17. Adaptive Motion Estimation Processor for Autonomous Video Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dias

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motion estimation is the most demanding operation of a video encoder, corresponding to at least 80% of the overall computational cost. As a consequence, with the proliferation of autonomous and portable handheld devices that support digital video coding, data-adaptive motion estimation algorithms have been required to dynamically configure the search pattern not only to avoid unnecessary computations and memory accesses but also to save energy. This paper proposes an application-specific instruction set processor (ASIP to implement data-adaptive motion estimation algorithms that is characterized by a specialized datapath and a minimum and optimized instruction set. Due to its low-power nature, this architecture is highly suitable to develop motion estimators for portable, mobile, and battery-supplied devices. Based on the proposed architecture and the considered adaptive algorithms, several motion estimators were synthesized both for a Virtex-II Pro XC2VP30 FPGA from Xilinx, integrated within an ML310 development platform, and using a StdCell library based on a 0.18 μm CMOS process. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture is able to estimate motion vectors in real time for QCIF and CIF video sequences with a very low-power consumption. Moreover, it is also able to adapt the operation to the available energy level in runtime. By adjusting the search pattern and setting up a more convenient operating frequency, it can change the power consumption in the interval between 1.6 mW and 15 mW.

  18. Adaptive Motion Estimation Processor for Autonomous Video Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion estimation is the most demanding operation of a video encoder, corresponding to at least 80% of the overall computational cost. As a consequence, with the proliferation of autonomous and portable handheld devices that support digital video coding, data-adaptive motion estimation algorithms have been required to dynamically configure the search pattern not only to avoid unnecessary computations and memory accesses but also to save energy. This paper proposes an application-specific instruction set processor (ASIP to implement data-adaptive motion estimation algorithms that is characterized by a specialized datapath and a minimum and optimized instruction set. Due to its low-power nature, this architecture is highly suitable to develop motion estimators for portable, mobile, and battery-supplied devices. Based on the proposed architecture and the considered adaptive algorithms, several motion estimators were synthesized both for a Virtex-II Pro XC2VP30 FPGA from Xilinx, integrated within an ML310 development platform, and using a StdCell library based on a 0.18 μm CMOS process. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture is able to estimate motion vectors in real time for QCIF and CIF video sequences with a very low-power consumption. Moreover, it is also able to adapt the operation to the available energy level in runtime. By adjusting the search pattern and setting up a more convenient operating frequency, it can change the power consumption in the interval between 1.6 mW and 15 mW.

  19. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pfister, Bryan J.; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI betw...

  20. Repurposing the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v2 for external head motion tracking for brain PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, P. J.; Howard, J.; Hallett, W. A.; Gunn, R. N.

    2015-11-01

    Medical imaging systems such as those used in positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of spatial resolutions that enable the imaging of small, functionally important brain structures. However, the quality of data from PET brain studies is often limited by subject motion during acquisition. This is particularly challenging for patients with neurological disorders or with dynamic research studies that can last 90 min or more. Restraining head movement during the scan does not eliminate motion entirely and can be unpleasant for the subject. Head motion can be detected and measured using a variety of techniques that either use the PET data itself or an external tracking system. Advances in computer vision arising from the video gaming industry could offer significant benefits when re-purposed for medical applications. A method for measuring rigid body type head motion using the Microsoft Kinect v2 is described with results presenting  ⩽0.5 mm spatial accuracy. Motion data is measured in real-time at 30 Hz using the KinectFusion algorithm. Non-rigid motion is detected using the residual alignment energy data of the KinectFusion algorithm allowing for unreliable motion to be discarded. Motion data is aligned to PET listmode data using injected pulse sequences into the PET/CT gantry allowing for correction of rigid body motion. Pilot data from a clinical dynamic PET/CT examination is shown.

  1. VFI-based Robotic Arm Control for Natural Adaptive Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woosung Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Since neural oscillator based control methods can generate rhythmic motion without information on system dynamics, they can be a promising alternative to traditional motion planning based control approaches. However, for field application, they still need to be robust against unexpected forces or changes in environments so as to be able to generate “natural motion” like most biological systems. In this study a biologically inspired control algorithm that combines neural oscillators and virtual force is proposed. This work gives the condition with respect to parameters tuning to stably activate the neural oscillators. This is helpful to achieve motion adaptability to environmental changes keeping the motion repeatability. He efficacy and efficiency of the proposed methods are tested in the control of a planar three-linkage robotic arm. It is shown that the proposed controller generates a given circular path stably and repeatedly, even with unexpected contact with a wall. The adaptivity of motion control is also tested in control of a robotic arm with redundant degrees of freedom. The proposed control algorithm works throughout the simulations and experiments.

  2. Motion-compensated wavelet video coding using adaptive mode selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Fan; Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.

    2004-01-01

    A motion-compensated wavelet video coder is presented that uses adaptive mode selection (AMS) for each macroblock (MB). The block-based motion estimation is performed in the spatial domain, and an embedded zerotree wavelet coder (EZW) is employed to encode the residue frame. In contrast to other motion-compensated wavelet video coders, where all the MBs are forced to be in INTER mode, we construct the residue frame by combining the prediction residual of the INTER MBs with the coding residual of the INTRA and INTER_ENCODE MBs. Different from INTER MBs that are not coded, the INTRA and INTER_ENCODE MBs are encoded separately by a DCT coder. By adaptively selecting the quantizers of the INTRA and INTER_ENCODE coded MBs, our goal is to equalize the characteristics of the residue frame in order to improve the overall coding efficiency of the wavelet coder. The mode selection is based on the variance of the MB, the variance of the prediction error, and the variance of the neighboring MBs' residual. Simulations show that the proposed motion-compensated wavelet video coder achieves a gain of around 0.7-0.8dB PSNR over MPEG-2 TM5, and a comparable PSNR to other 2D motion-compensated wavelet-based video codecs. It also provides potential visual quality improvement.

  3. Effect of head swing motion on hydrodynamic performance of fishlike robot propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 陈维山; 刘军考; 吴泽

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of the head swing motion on the fishlike robot swimming performance numerically. Two critical parameters are employed in describing the kinematics of the head swing: the leading edge amplitude of the head and the trailing edge amplitude of the head. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are used to compute the viscous flow over the robot. The user-defined functions and the dynamic mesh technology are used to simulate the fishlike swimming with the head swing motion. The results reveal that it is of great benefit for the fish to improve the thrust and also the propulsive efficiency by increasing the two amplitudes properly. Superior hydrodynamic performance can be achieved at the leading edge amplitudes of0.05L (L is the fish length) and the trailing edge amplitudes of0.08L. The unsteady flow fields clearly indicate the evolution process of the flow structures along the swimming fish. Thrust-indicative flow structures with two pairs of pressure cores in a uniform mode are generated in the superior performance case with an appropriate head swing, rather than with one pair of pressure cores in the case of no head swing. The findings suggest that the swimming biological device design may improve its hydrodynamic performance through the head swing motion.

  4. Adaptation of median partial sternotomy in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpitzer, Thomas; Saute, Milton; Gilat, Hanna; Raveh, Eyal; Koren, Ilan; Shvero, Jacob; Bahar, Gideon; Feinmesser, Raphael

    2007-12-01

    Upper mediastinum involvement in diseases of the head and neck may require a sternal split. This study describes our adaptation of the upper median or "minimal" sternotomy technique for the treatment of head and neck pathologies. Between April 2002 and October 2005, 17 patients aged 4 to 82 years underwent minimal sternotomy in our institution for a variety of head and neck pathologies. The 17 patients included 11 adults with metastatic thyroid disease (six metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma, two medullary carcinoma, and one Hiirthle cell carcinoma) and huge retrosternal goiter (n = 2), four adults with parathyroid disease (two primary parathyroid adenoma, one secondary hyperplasia, and one parathyroid carcinoma), and two children with lymphangioma and huge thymic cyst (one each). Average hospitalization was 8 days. Four patients needed a thoracic drain for 2 days, one had recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, and one had phrenic nerve paresis. There were no postoperative deaths. Minimal sternotomy appears to be an excellent alternative for surgical exploration of the mediastinum and may be used in head and neck surgery for a range of indications.

  5. Three-Dimensional Facial Adaptation for MPEG-4 Talking Heads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Grammalidis

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a new method for three-dimensional (3D facial model adaptation and its integration into a text-to-speech (TTS system. The 3D facial adaptation requires a set of two orthogonal views of the user′s face with a number of feature points located on both views. Based on the correspondences of the feature points′ positions, a generic face model is deformed nonrigidly treating every facial part as a separate entity. A cylindrical texture map is then built from the two image views. The generated head models are compared to corresponding models obtained by the commonly used adaptation method that utilizes 3D radial bases functions. The generated 3D models are integrated into a talking head system, which consists of two distinct parts: a multilingual text to speech sub-system and an MPEG-4 compliant facial animation sub-system. Support for the Greek language has been added, while preserving lip and speech synchronization.

  6. Addressing Head Motion Dependencies for Small-World Topologies in Functional Connectomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gan eYan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Graph theoretical explorations of functional interactions within the human connectome, are rapidly advancing our understanding of brain architecture. In particular, global and regional topological parameters are increasingly being employed to quantify and characterize inter-individual differences in human brain function. Head motion remains a significant concern in the accurate determination of resting-state fMRI based assessments of the connectome, including those based on graph theoretical analysis (e.g., motion can increase local efficiency, while decreasing global efficiency and small-worldness. This study provides a comprehensive examination of motion correction strategies on the relationship between motion and commonly used topological parameters. At the individual-level, we evaluated different models of head motion regression and scrubbing, as well as the potential benefits of using partial correlation (estimated via graphical lasso instead of full correlation. At the group-level, we investigated the utility of regression of motion and mean intrinsic functional connectivity before topological parameters calculation and/or after. Consistent with prior findings, none of the explicit motion-correction approaches at individual-level were able to remove motion relationships for topological parameters. Global signal regression (GSR emerged as an effective means of mitigating relationships between motion and topological parameters; though at the risk of altering the connectivity structure and topological hub distributions when higher densities graphs are employed (e.g., > 6%. Group-level analysis correction for motion was once again found to be a crucial step. Finally, similar to recent work, we found a constellation of findings suggestive of the possibility that some of the motion-relationships detected may reflect neural or trait signatures of motion, rather than simply motion-induced artifact.

  7. List-Mode PET Motion Correction Using Markerless Head Tracking: Proof-of-Concept With Scans of Human Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Mulnix, Tim

    2013-01-01

    scanner. Head motion was independently measured, with a commercial marker-based device and the proposed vision-based system. A list-mode event-by-event reconstruction algorithm using the detected motion was applied. A phantom study with hand-controlled continuous random motion was obtained. Motion...

  8. Improved Pulse Detection from Head Motions Using DCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    . To measure it, physicians traditionally, either sense the pulsations of some blood vessels or install some sensors on the body. In either case, there is a need for a physical contact between the sensor and the body to obtain the heartbeat rate. This might not be always feasible, for example, for applications...... like remote patient monitoring. In such cases, contactless sensors, mostly based on computer vision techniques, are emerging as interesting alternatives. This paper proposes such a system, in which the heartbeats (pulses) are detected by subtle motions that appear on the face due to blood circulation...

  9. Simulation of motion parallax by correcting the out-the-window scenery for head position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledegang, W.D.; Bos, J.E.; Houben, M.M.J.; Groen, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study in a fixed-based simulator to investigate the possible advantage (more presence) and disadvantage (more simulator sickness) of enhancing the visual realism in terms of head-slaved motion parallax. The study was performed in a flight simulator. Since most

  10. Children’s head motion during fMRI tasks is heritable and stable over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Engelhardt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Head motion during fMRI scans negatively impacts data quality, and as post-acquisition techniques for addressing motion become increasingly stringent, data retention decreases. Studies conducted with adult participants suggest that movement acts as a relatively stable, heritable phenotype that serves as a marker for other genetically influenced phenotypes. Whether these patterns extend downward to childhood has critical implications for the interpretation and generalizability of fMRI data acquired from children. We examined factors affecting scanner motion in two samples: a population-based twin sample of 73 participants (ages 7–12 years and a case-control sample of 32 non-struggling and 78 struggling readers (ages 8–11 years, 30 of whom were scanned multiple times. Age, but not ADHD symptoms, was significantly related to scanner movement. Movement also varied as a function of task type, run length, and session length. Twin pair concordance for head motion was high for monozygotic twins and moderate for dizygotic twins. Cross-session test-retest reliability was high. Together, these findings suggest that children’s head motion is a genetically influenced trait that has the potential to systematically affect individual differences in BOLD changes within and across groups. We discuss recommendations for future work and best practices for pediatric neuroimaging.

  11. Effect of head and jaw position on respiratory-related motion of the genioglossus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingshu; Brown, Elizabeth C; Hatt, Alice; Cheng, Shaokoon; Bilston, Lynne E

    2016-04-01

    Head and jaw position influence upper airway patency and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the main upper airway dilator muscle, the genioglossus. However, it is not known whether changes in genioglossus EMG activity translate into altered muscle movement during respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of head and jaw position on dilatory motion of the genioglossus in healthy adult men during quiet breathing by measuring the displacement of the posterior tongue in six positions--neutral, head extension, head rotation, head flexion, mouth opening, and mandibular advancement. Respiratory-related motion of the genioglossus was imaged with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM) in 12 awake male participants. Tissue displacement was quantified with harmonic phase (HARP) analysis. The genioglossus moved anteriorly beginning immediately before or during inspiration, and there was greater movement in the oropharynx than in the velopharynx in all positions. Anterior displacements of the oropharyngeal tongue varied between neutral head position (0.81 ± 0.41 mm), head flexion (0.62 ± 0.45 mm), extension (0.39 ± 0.19 mm), axial rotation (0.39 ± 0.2 mm), mouth open (1.24 ± 0.72 mm), and mandibular advancement (1.08 ± 0.65 mm). Anteroposterior displacement increased in the mouth-open position and decreased in the rotated position relative to cross-sectional area (CSA) (P = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively), but CSA did not independently predict anteroposterior movement overall (P = 0.057). The findings of this study suggest that head position influences airway dilation during inspiration and may contribute to variation in airway patency in different head positions. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Measurement and correction of microscopic head motion during magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Maclaren

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a widely used method for non-invasive study of the structure and function of the human brain. Increasing magnetic field strengths enable higher resolution imaging; however, long scan times and high motion sensitivity mean that image quality is often limited by the involuntary motion of the subject. Prospective motion correction is a technique that addresses this problem by tracking head motion and continuously updating the imaging pulse sequence, locking the imaging volume position and orientation relative to the moving brain. The accuracy and precision of current MR-compatible tracking systems and navigator methods allows the quantification and correction of large-scale motion, but not the correction of very small involuntary movements in six degrees of freedom. In this work, we present an MR-compatible tracking system comprising a single camera and a single 15 mm marker that provides tracking precision in the order of 10 m and 0.01 degrees. We show preliminary results, which indicate that when used for prospective motion correction, the system enables improvement in image quality at both 3 T and 7 T, even in experienced and cooperative subjects trained to remain motionless during imaging. We also report direct observation and quantification of the mechanical ballistocardiogram (BCG during simultaneous MR imaging. This is particularly apparent in the head-feet direction, with a peak-to-peak displacement of 140 m.

  13. Apparent motion of monocular stimuli in different depth planes with lateral head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, K; Tam, W J; Ono, H

    2007-04-01

    A stationary monocular stimulus appears to move concomitantly with lateral head movements when it is embedded in a stereogram representing two front-facing rectangular areas, one above the other at two different distances. In Experiment 1, we found that the extent of perceived motion of the monocular stimulus covaried with the amplitude of head movement and the disparity between the two rectangular areas (composed of random dots). In Experiment 2, we found that the extent of perceived motion of the monocular stimulus was reduced compared to that in Experiment 1 when the rectangular areas were defined only by an outline rather than by random dots. These results are discussed using the hypothesis that a monocular stimulus takes on features of the binocular surface area in which it is embedded and is perceived as though it were treated as a binocular stimulus with regards to its visual direction and visual depth.

  14. Visual Acuity Using Head-fixed Displays During Passive Self and Surround Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Black, F. Owen; Stallings, Valerie; Peters, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The ability to read head-fixed displays on various motion platforms requires the suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflexes. This study examined dynamic visual acuity while viewing a head-fixed display during different self and surround rotation conditions. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to report the orientation of Landolt C optotypes presented on a micro-display fixed to a rotating chair at 50 cm distance. Acuity thresholds were determined by the lowest size at which the subjects correctly identified 3 of 5 optotype orientations at peak velocity. Visual acuity was compared across four different conditions, each tested at 0.05 and 0.4 Hz (peak amplitude of 57 deg/s). The four conditions included: subject rotated in semi-darkness (i.e., limited to background illumination of the display), subject stationary while visual scene rotated, subject rotated around a stationary visual background, and both subject and visual scene rotated together. Visual acuity performance was greatest when the subject rotated around a stationary visual background; i.e., when both vestibular and visual inputs provided concordant information about the motion. Visual acuity performance was most reduced when the subject and visual scene rotated together; i.e., when the visual scene provided discordant information about the motion. Ranges of 4-5 logMAR step sizes across the conditions indicated the acuity task was sufficient to discriminate visual performance levels. The background visual scene can influence the ability to read head-fixed displays during passive motion disturbances. Dynamic visual acuity using head-fixed displays can provide an operationally relevant screening tool for visual performance during exposure to novel acceleration environments.

  15. Structured light-based motion tracking in the limited view of an MR head coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erikshøj, M., E-mail: martin@erikshoj.dk [DTU-Informatics, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Righospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Olesen, O.V. [DTU-Informatics, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Righospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Conradsen, K. [DTU-Informatics, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Højgaard, L. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Righospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, R. [DTU-Informatics, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2013-02-21

    A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions of the facial surface. The point clouds are continuously realigned to a reference scan to obtain pose estimates. The system has been tested on a mannequin head performing controlled rotational and translational axial movements within the head coil outside the range of the magnetic field. The RMS of the residual error of the rotation was 0.11° and the RMS difference in the translation with the control system was 0.17 mm, within the trackable range of movement.

  16. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  17. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution......This thesis concerns application specific 3D head tracking. The purpose is to improve motion correction in position emission tomography (PET) brain imaging through development of markerless tracking. Currently, motion correction strategies are based on either the PET data itself or tracking devices...... of a few millimeters. Stateof- the-art hardware and software solutions are integrated into an operational device. This novel system is tested against a commercial tracking system popular in PET brain imaging. Testing and demonstrations are carried out in clinical settings. A compact markerless tracking...

  18. A Multi-Task Learning Framework for Head Pose Estimation under Target Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Ricci, Elisa; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Liu, Gaowen; Lanz, Oswald; Sebe, Nicu

    2016-06-01

    Recently, head pose estimation (HPE) from low-resolution surveillance data has gained in importance. However, monocular and multi-view HPE approaches still work poorly under target motion, as facial appearance distorts owing to camera perspective and scale changes when a person moves around. To this end, we propose FEGA-MTL, a novel framework based on Multi-Task Learning (MTL) for classifying the head pose of a person who moves freely in an environment monitored by multiple, large field-of-view surveillance cameras. Upon partitioning the monitored scene into a dense uniform spatial grid, FEGA-MTL simultaneously clusters grid partitions into regions with similar facial appearance, while learning region-specific head pose classifiers. In the learning phase, guided by two graphs which a-priori model the similarity among (1) grid partitions based on camera geometry and (2) head pose classes, FEGA-MTL derives the optimal scene partitioning and associated pose classifiers. Upon determining the target's position using a person tracker at test time, the corresponding region-specific classifier is invoked for HPE. The FEGA-MTL framework naturally extends to a weakly supervised setting where the target's walking direction is employed as a proxy in lieu of head orientation. Experiments confirm that FEGA-MTL significantly outperforms competing single-task and multi-task learning methods in multi-view settings.

  19. Robotic real-time translational and rotational head motion correction during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinmin; Belcher, Andrew H.; Grelewicz, Zachary; Wiersma, Rodney D., E-mail: rwiersma@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a control system to correct both translational and rotational head motion deviations in real-time during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: A novel feedback control with a feed-forward algorithm was utilized to correct for the coupling of translation and rotation present in serial kinematic robotic systems. Input parameters for the algorithm include the real-time 6DOF target position, the frame pitch pivot point to target distance constant, and the translational and angular Linac beam off (gating) tolerance constants for patient safety. Testing of the algorithm was done using a 4D (XY Z + pitch) robotic stage, an infrared head position sensing unit and a control computer. The measured head position signal was processed and a resulting command was sent to the interface of a four-axis motor controller, through which four stepper motors were driven to perform motion compensation. Results: The control of the translation of a brain target was decoupled with the control of the rotation. For a phantom study, the corrected position was within a translational displacement of 0.35 mm and a pitch displacement of 0.15° 100% of the time. For a volunteer study, the corrected position was within displacements of 0.4 mm and 0.2° over 98.5% of the time, while it was 10.7% without correction. Conclusions: The authors report a control design approach for both translational and rotational head motion correction. The experiments demonstrated that control performance of the 4D robotic stage meets the submillimeter and subdegree accuracy required by SRS.

  20. An Adaptive Motion Segmentation for Automated Video Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain MJulius

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive motion segmentation algorithm utilizing spatiotemporal information of three most recent frames. The algorithm initially extracts the moving edges applying a novel flexible edge matching technique which makes use of a combined distance transformation image. Then watershed-based iterative algorithm is employed to segment the moving object region from the extracted moving edges. The challenges of existing three-frame-based methods include slow movement, edge localization error, minor movement of camera, and homogeneity of background and foreground region. The proposed method represents edges as segments and uses a flexible edge matching algorithm to deal with edge localization error and minor movement of camera. The combined distance transformation image works in favor of accumulating gradient information of overlapping region which effectively improves the sensitivity to slow movement. The segmentation algorithm uses watershed, gradient information of difference image, and extracted moving edges. It helps to segment moving object region with more accurate boundary even some part of the moving edges cannot be detected due to region homogeneity or other reasons during the detection step. Experimental results using different types of video sequences are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  1. Representation of behaviourally relevant information by blowfly motion-sensitive visual interneurons requires precise compensatory head movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, R.; Hateren, J.H. van; Egelhaaf, M.

    2006-01-01

    Flying blowflies shift their gaze by saccadic turns of body and head, keeping their gaze basically fixed between saccades. For the head, this results in almost pure translational optic flow between saccades, enabling visual interneurons in the fly motion pathway to extract information about translat

  2. Representation of behaviourally relevant information by blowfly motion-sensitive visual interneurons requires precise compensatory head movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, R.; Hateren, J.H. van; Egelhaaf, M.

    2006-01-01

    Flying blowflies shift their gaze by saccadic turns of body and head, keeping their gaze basically fixed between saccades. For the head, this results in almost pure translational optic flow between saccades, enabling visual interneurons in the fly motion pathway to extract information about

  3. Adaptive comb filtering for motion artifact reduction from PPG with a structure of adaptive lattice IIR notch filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boreom; Kee, Youngwook; Han, Jonghee; Yi, Won Jin

    2011-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide important information about cardiovascular and respiratory conditions of individuals in a hospital or daily life. However, PPG can be distorted by motion artifacts significantly. Therefore, the reduction of the effects of motion artifacts is very important procedure for monitoring cardio-respiratory system by PPG. There have been many adaptive techniques to reduce motion artifacts from PPG signal including normalized least mean squares (NLMS) method, recursive least squares (RLS) filter, and Kalman filter. In the present study, we propose the adaptive comb filter (ACF) for reducing the effects of motion artifacts from PPG signal. ACF with adaptive lattice infinite impulse response (IIR) notch filter (ALNF) successfully reduced the motion artifacts from the quasi-periodic PPG signal.

  4. List-mode PET motion correction using markerless head tracking: proof-of-concept with scans of human subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Oline V; Sullivan, Jenna M; Mulnix, Tim; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Bjarne; Carson, Richard E; Morris, Evan D; Larsen, Rasmus

    2013-02-01

    A custom designed markerless tracking system was demonstrated to be applicable for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Precise head motion registration is crucial for accurate motion correction (MC) in PET imaging. State-of-the-art tracking systems applied with PET brain imaging rely on markers attached to the patient's head. The marker attachment is the main weakness of these systems. A healthy volunteer participating in a cigarette smoking study to image dopamine release was scanned twice for 2 h with (11)C-racolopride on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Head motion was independently measured, with a commercial marker-based device and the proposed vision-based system. A list-mode event-by-event reconstruction algorithm using the detected motion was applied. A phantom study with hand-controlled continuous random motion was obtained. Motion was time-varying with long drift motions of up to 18 mm and regular step-wise motion of 1-6 mm. The evaluated measures were significantly better for motion-corrected images compared to no MC. The demonstrated system agreed with a commercial integrated system. Motion-corrected images were improved in contrast recovery of small structures.

  5. Kinematic Model-Based Pedestrian Dead Reckoning for Heading Correction and Lower Body Motion Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Su Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a method for finding the enhanced heading and position of pedestrians by fusing the Zero velocity UPdaTe (ZUPT-based pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR and the kinematic constraints of the lower human body. ZUPT is a well known algorithm for PDR, and provides a sufficiently accurate position solution for short term periods, but it cannot guarantee a stable and reliable heading because it suffers from magnetic disturbance in determining heading angles, which degrades the overall position accuracy as time passes. The basic idea of the proposed algorithm is integrating the left and right foot positions obtained by ZUPTs with the heading and position information from an IMU mounted on the waist. To integrate this information, a kinematic model of the lower human body, which is calculated by using orientation sensors mounted on both thighs and calves, is adopted. We note that the position of the left and right feet cannot be apart because of the kinematic constraints of the body, so the kinematic model generates new measurements for the waist position. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF on the waist data that estimates and corrects error states uses these measurements and magnetic heading measurements, which enhances the heading accuracy. The updated position information is fed into the foot mounted sensors, and reupdate processes are performed to correct the position error of each foot. The proposed update-reupdate technique consequently ensures improved observability of error states and position accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method provides all the information about the lower human body, so that it can be applied more effectively to motion tracking. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is verified via experimental results, which show that a 1.25% Return Position Error (RPE with respect to walking distance is achieved.

  6. Pharmacological control of head motion during cerebral blood flow imaging with CT or MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesay, M; Jeannin, A; Moonen, C T W; Dousset, V; Maurette, P

    2009-06-01

    Uncontrolled head motion during CT/MRI cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging has been estimated between 3 and 15% of the cases. We present a pharmacological approach which permitted us to maintain the incident at 0.06% with few side effects. The protocol involves the systematic use of general anesthesia (sevoflurane) in children below five years and those with mental retardation. In anxious, claustrophobic or agitated adults, mild sedation with propofol, midazolam or hydroxyzine was used with mild effects on CBF. We strongly recommend the availability of basic cardiorespiratory resuscitation equipment and a recovery room before any sedation or general anesthesia is undertaken.

  7. S3-3: Misbinding of Color and Motion in Human V2 Revealed by Color-Contingent Motion Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Wu, Kanai, & Shimojo (2004 Nature 429 262 described a compelling illusion demonstrating a steady-state misbinding of color and motion. Here, we took advantage of the illusion and performed psychophysical and fMRI adaptation experiments to explore the neural mechanism of color-motion misbinding. The stimulus subtended 20 deg by 14 deg of visual angle and contained two sheets of random dots, one sheet moving up and the other moving down. On the upward-moving sheet, dots in the right-end area (4 deg by 14 deg were red, and the rest of the dots were green. On the downward-moving sheet, dots in the right-end area were green, and the rest of the dots were red. When subjects fixated at the center of the stimulus, they bound the color and motion of the dots in the right-end area erroneously–the red dots appeared to move downwards and the green dots appeared to move upwards. In the psychophysical experiment, we measured the color-contingent motion aftereffect in the right-end area after adaptation to the illusory stimulus. A significant aftereffect was observed as if subjects had adapted to the perceived binding of color and motion, rather than the physical binding. For example, after adaptation, stationary red dots appeared to move upwards, and stationary green dots appeared to move downwards. In the fMRI experiment, we measured direction-selective motion adaptation effects in V1, V2, V3, V4, V3A/B, and V5. Relative to other cortical areas, V2 showed a much stronger adaptation effect to the perceived motion direction (rather than the physical direction for both the red and green dots. Significantly, the fMRI adaptation effect in V2 correlated with the color-contingent motion aftereffect across twelve subjects. This study provides the first human evidence that color and motion could be misbound at a very early stage of visual processing.

  8. Dosimetric Evaluation of Individualized Adaptive Motion Margins for Abdominal and Thoracic Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Keall, Paul

    Purpose/Objective(s): In motion inclusive radiotherapy, respiratory tumor motion is normally accounted for either by population-based CTV-PTV margins that are parallel to the room coordinate system, or by introduction of an ITV that encompasses the tumor motion in a planning CT scan. While...... the former ignores motion correlation along different axes the latter tends to overestimate the dosimetric consequences of random motion. The purpose of this study was to propose and investigate an individualized adaptive margin approach that accounts for motion correlation while still considering...... minutes: First, a cone-beam CT (CBCT) scan with 600 projections was acquired in 1 minute. The tumor position in the CBCT projections was used to estimate the mean position and covariance matrix of the tumor motion (i.e., tumor motion magnitude and tumor motion axes) during the CBCT acquisition. Next...

  9. Adaptation to real motion reveals direction-selective interactions between real and implied motion processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Kenemans, J.L.; Jellema, T.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Lommers, M.W.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Viewing static pictures of running humans evokes neural activity in the dorsal motion-sensitive cortex. To establish whether this response arises from direction-selective neurons that are also involved in real motion processing, we measured the visually evoked potential to implied motion following a

  10. Adaptation to Real Motion Reveals Direction-selective Interactions between Real and Implied Motion Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, Jeannette A.M.; Kenemans, Leon; Jellema, Tjeerd; Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Lommers, Marjolein W.; Wezel, van Richard J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Viewing static pictures of running humans evokes neural activity in the dorsal motion-sensitive cortex. To establish whether this response arises from direction-selective neurons that are also involved in real motion processing, we measured the visually evoked potential to implied motion following a

  11. Adaptive Iterative Learning Control for High Precision Motion Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotariu, I.; Steinbuch, M.; Ellenbroek, R.

    2008-01-01

    Iterative learning control (ILC) is a very effective technique to reduce systematic errors that occur in systems that repetitively perform the same motion or operation. However, several characteristics have prevented standard ILC from being widely used for high precision motion systems. Most importa

  12. Christmas Messages by heads of state Multimodality and media adaptations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauer, C.L.A.; Fetzer, A.; Lauerbach, G.E.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter investigates the multimodal quality of Christmas Messages by European heads of state on TV from a functional-pragmatic and semiotic angle. It defines them as dealing with multiple types of materialities from different modes and sub-modes. Section 1 develops the central concept of

  13. Natural motion of the optic nerve head revealed by high speed phase-sensitive OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHara, Keith; Schmoll, Tilman; Vass, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2013-03-01

    We use phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the deformation of the optic nerve head during the pulse cycle, motivated by the possibility that these deformations might be indicative of the progression of glaucoma. A spectral-domain OCT system acquired 100k A-scans per second, with measurements from a pulse-oximeter recorded simultaneously, correlating OCT data to the subject's pulse. Data acquisition lasted for 2 seconds, to cover at least two pulse cycles. A frame-rate of 200-400 B-scans per second results in a sufficient degree of correlated speckle between successive frames that the phase-differences between fames can be extracted. Bulk motion of the entire eye changes the phase by several full cycles between frames, but this does not severely hinder extracting the smaller phase-changes due to differential motion within a frame. The central cup moves about 5 μm/s relative to the retinal-pigment-epithelium edge, with tissue adjacent to blood vessels showing larger motion.

  14. Dosimetric Evaluation of Individualized Adaptive Motion Margins for Abdominal and Thoracic Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Keall, Paul

    the former ignores motion correlation along different axes the latter tends to overestimate the dosimetric consequences of random motion. The purpose of this study was to propose and investigate an individualized adaptive margin approach that accounts for motion correlation while still considering......, the smallest Dmin was 71%. The mean PTV volume was 7.6 cm3 for adaptive margins (4.3 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.0 mm margins) and 8.2 cm3 for standard margins (1.8 mm, 3.4 mm, 2.4 mm margins). Conclusions: A strategy for individualized adaptive margins that accounts for motion correlation was proposed. Compared to standard...... margins, the adaptive margins result in slightly smaller PTvs. and give fewer outliers with low minimum CTV dose....

  15. Continuous motion decoding from EMG using independent component analysis and adaptive model training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (EMG) is popularly used to decode human motion intention for robot movement control. Traditional motion decoding method uses pattern recognition to provide binary control command which can only move the robot as predefined limited patterns. In this work, we proposed a motion decoding method which can accurately estimate 3-dimensional (3-D) continuous upper limb motion only from multi-channel EMG signals. In order to prevent the muscle activities from motion artifacts and muscle crosstalk which especially obviously exist in upper limb motion, the independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the independent source EMG signals. The motion data was also transferred from 4-manifold to 2-manifold by the principle component analysis (PCA). A hidden Markov model (HMM) was proposed to decode the motion from the EMG signals after the model trained by an adaptive model identification process. Experimental data were used to train the decoding model and validate the motion decoding performance. By comparing the decoded motion with the measured motion, it is found that the proposed motion decoding strategy was feasible to decode 3-D continuous motion from EMG signals.

  16. Detection of respiratory motion in fluoroscopic images for adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, T; Nill, S; Remmert, G; Bendl, R [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, J [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: T.Moser@dkfz-heidelberg.de

    2008-06-21

    Respiratory motion limits the potential of modern high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and particle therapy. Due to the uncertainty of tumour localization, the ability of achieving dose conformation often cannot be exploited sufficiently, especially in the case of lung tumours. Various methods have been proposed to track the position of tumours using external signals, e.g. with the help of a respiratory belt or by observing external markers. Retrospectively gated time-resolved x-ray computed tomography (4D CT) studies prior to therapy can be used to register the external signals with the tumour motion. However, during treatment the actual motion of internal structures may be different. Direct control of tissue motion by online imaging during treatment promises more precise information. On the other hand, it is more complex, since a larger amount of data must be processed in order to determine the motion. Three major questions arise from this issue. Firstly, can the motion that has occurred be precisely determined in the images? Secondly, how large must, respectively how small can, the observed region be chosen to get a reliable signal? Finally, is it possible to predict the proximate tumour location within sufficiently short acquisition times to make this information available for gating irradiation? Based on multiple studies on a porcine lung phantom, we have tried to examine these questions carefully. We found a basic characteristic of the breathing cycle in images using the image similarity method normalized mutual information. Moreover, we examined the performance of the calculations and proposed an image-based gating technique. In this paper, we present the results and validation performed with a real patient data set. This allows for the conclusion that it is possible to build up a gating system based on image data, solely, or (at least in avoidance of an exceeding exposure dose) to verify gates proposed by the various external systems.

  17. Space motion sickness preflight adaptation training: preliminary studies with prototype trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.; Rock, J. C.; von Gierke, H. E.; Ouyang, L.; Reschke, M. F.; Arrott, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight training frequently has been proposed as a potential solution to the problem of space motion sickness. The paper considers successively the otolith reinterpretation, the concept for a preflight adaptation trainer and the research with the Miami University Seesaw, the Wright Patterson Air-Force Base Dynamic Environment Simulator and the Visually Coupled Airborne Systems Simulator prototype adaptation trainers.

  18. A simple integrative method for presenting head-contingent motion parallax and disparity cues on intel x86 processor-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmary, J; Hadani, I; Julesz, B

    1997-01-01

    Rogers and Graham (1979) developed a system to show that head-movement-contingent motion parallax produces monocular depth perception in random dot patterns. Their display system comprised an oscilloscope driven by function generators or a special graphics board that triggered the X and Y deflection of the raster scan signal. Replication of this system required costly hardware that is no longer on the market. In this paper the Rogers-Graham method is reproduced with an Intel processor based IBM PC compatible machine with no additional hardware cost. An adapted joystick sampled through the standard game-port can serve as a provisional head-movement sensor. Monitor resolution for displaying motion is effectively enhanced 16 times by the use of anti-aliasing, enabling the display of thousands of random dots in real-time with a refresh rate of 60 Hz or above. A color monitor enables the use of the anaglyph method, thus combining stereoscopic and monocular parallax on a single display without the loss of speed. The power of this system is demonstrated by a psychophysical measurement in which subjects nulled head-movement-contingent illusory parallax, evoked by a static stereogram, with real parallax. The amount of real parallax required to null the illusory stereoscopic parallax monotonically increased with disparity.

  19. Reduction of skin stretch induced motion artifacts in electrocardiogram monitoring using adaptive filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Pecht, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of electrocardiogram (ECG) monitors can be significantly impaired by motion artifacts which can cause misdiagnoses, lead to inappropriate treatment decisions, and trigger false alarms. Skin stretch associated with patient motion is a significant source of motion artifacts in current ECG monitoring. In this study, motion artifacts are adaptively filtered by using skin strain as the reference variable. Skin strain is measured non-invasively using a light emitting diode (LED) and an optical sensor incorporated in an ECG electrode. The results demonstrate that this device and method can significantly reduce skin strain induced ECG artifacts.

  20. Adaptive Robot to Person Encounter by Motion Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Bak, Thomas; Svenstrup, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for adaptive control of a robot approaching a person controlled by the person's interest in interaction. For adjustment of the robot behavior a cost function centered in the person is adapted according to an introduced person evaluator method relying on the three...... variables: the distance between the person and the robot, the relative velocity between the two, and position of the person. The person evaluator method determine the person's interest by evaluating the spatial relationship between robot and person in a Case Based Reasoning (CBR) system that is trained...... to determine to which degree the person is interested in interaction. The outcome of the CBR system is used to adapt the cost function around the person, so that the robot's behavior is adapted to the expressed interest. The proposed methods are evaluated by a number of physical experiments that demonstrate...

  1. Adaptive Human aware Navigation based on Motion Pattern Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Søren; Svenstrup, Mikael; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Respecting people’s social spaces is an important prerequisite for acceptable and natural robot navigation in human environments. In this paper, we describe an adaptive system for mobile robot navigation based on estimates of whether a person seeks to interact with the robot or not. The estimates...... in a real world setting. The results demonstrate that the system is able to learn to navigate based on past interaction experiences, and to adapt to different behaviors over time....

  2. SU-E-J-57: First Development of Adapting to Intrafraction Relative Motion Between Prostate and Pelvic Lymph Nodes Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y; Colvill, E; O’Brien, R; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Booth, J [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Large intrafraction relative motion of multiple targets is common in advanced head and neck, lung, abdominal, gynaecological and urological cancer, jeopardizing the treatment outcomes. The objective of this study is to develop a real-time adaptation strategy, for the first time, to accurately correct for the relative motion of multiple targets by reshaping the treatment field using the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Methods The principle of tracking the simultaneously treated but differentially moving tumor targets is to determine the new aperture shape that conforms to the shifted targets. Three dimensional volumes representing the individual targets are projected to the beam’s eye view. The leaf openings falling inside each 2D projection will be shifted according to the measured motion of each target to form the new aperture shape. Based on the updated beam shape, new leaf positions will be determined with optimized trade-off between the target underdose and healthy tissue overdose, and considerations of the physical constraints of the MLC. Taking a prostate cancer patient with pelvic lymph node involvement as an example, a preliminary dosimetric study was conducted to demonstrate the potential treatment improvement compared to the state-of- art adaptation technique which shifts the whole beam to track only one target. Results The world-first intrafraction adaptation system capable of reshaping the beam to correct for the relative motion of multiple targets has been developed. The dose in the static nodes and small bowel are closer to the planned distribution and the V45 of small bowel is decreased from 110cc to 75cc, corresponding to a 30% reduction by this technique compared to the state-of-art adaptation technique. Conclusion The developed adaptation system to correct for intrafraction relative motion of multiple targets will guarantee the tumour coverage and thus enable PTV margin reduction to minimize the high target dose to the adjacent organs

  3. Impact of in-scanner head motion on multiple measures of functional connectivity: relevance for studies of neurodevelopment in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Wolf, Daniel H; Loughead, James; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E

    2012-03-01

    It has recently been reported (Van Dijk et al., 2011) that in-scanner head motion can have a substantial impact on MRI measurements of resting-state functional connectivity. This finding may be of particular relevance for studies of neurodevelopment in youth, confounding analyses to the extent that motion and subject age are related. Furthermore, while Van Dijk et al. demonstrated the effect of motion on seed-based connectivity analyses, it is not known how motion impacts other common measures of connectivity. Here we expand on the findings of Van Dijk et al. by examining the effect of motion on multiple types of resting-state connectivity analyses in a large sample of children and adolescents (n=456). Following replication of the effect of motion on seed-based analyses, we examine the influence of motion on graphical measures of network modularity, dual-regression of independent component analysis, as well as the amplitude and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation. In the entire sample, subject age was highly related to motion. Using a subsample where age and motion were unrelated, we demonstrate that motion has marked effects on connectivity in every analysis examined. While subject age was associated with increased within-network connectivity even when motion was accounted for, controlling for motion substantially attenuated the strength of this relationship. The results demonstrate the pervasive influence of motion on multiple types functional connectivity analysis, and underline the importance of accounting for motion in studies of neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative population genomics of Fusarium graminearum reveals adaptive divergence among cereal head blight pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we sequenced the genomes of 60 Fusarium graminearum, the major fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereal crops world-wide. To investigate adaptive evolution of FHB pathogens, we performed population-level analyses to characterize genomic structure, signatures...

  5. Sensitivity of fNIRS measurement to head motion: an applied use of smartphones in the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xu; Baker, Joseph M; Liu, Ning; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-04-30

    Powerful computing capabilities in small, easy to use hand-held devices have made smart technologies such as smartphones and tablets ubiquitous in today's society. The capabilities of these devices provide scientists with many tools that can be used to improve the scientific method. Here, we demonstrate how smartphones may be used to quantify the sensitivity of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signal to head motion. By attaching a smartphone to participants' heads during the fNIRS scan, we were able to capture data describing the degree of head motion. Our results demonstrate that data recorded from an off-the-shelf smartphone accelerometer may be used to identify correlations between head-movement and fNIRS signal change. Furthermore, our results identify correlations between the magnitudes of head-movement and signal artifact, as well as a relationship between the direction of head movement and the location of the resulting signal noise. These data provide a valuable proof-of-concept for the use of off-the-shelf smart technologies in neuroimaging applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Adaptation Algorithm of Geometric Graphs for Robot Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Han Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an adaptive graph algorithm for collision-free motion planning of articulated robots in dynamic environments. For this purpose, deformations of the configuration space were analyzed according to the changes of the workspace using various simulations. Subsequently, we adopted the principles of gas motion dynamics in our adaptation algorithm to address the issue of the deformation of the configuration space. The proposed algorithm has an adaptation mechanism based on expansive repulsion and sensory repulsion, and it can be performed to provide the entire adaptation using distributed processing. The simulation results confirmed that the proposed method allows the adaptation of the roadmap graph to changes of the configuration space.

  7. Adaptive filter for a miniature MEMS based attitude and heading reference system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mei; WANG Yong-quan; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    An extended Kalman filter with adaptive gain was used to build a miniature attitude and heading reference system based on a stochastic model. The adaptive filter has six states with a time variable transition matrix. When the system is in the non-acceleration mode, the accelerometer measurements of the gravity and the compass measurements of the heading have observability and yield good estimates of the states. When the system is in the high dynamic mode and the bias has converged to an accurate estimate, the attitude calculation will be maintained for a long interval of time. The adaptive filter tunes its gain automatically based on the system dynamics sensed by the accelerometers to yield optimal performance.

  8. Effects of thoracic kyphosis and forward head posture on cervical range of motion in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Pua, Yong-Hao; Clark, Ross A; Bryant, Adam L

    2013-02-01

    It is unclear how age-related postural changes such as thoracic spine kyphosis influence cervical range-of-motion (ROM) in patients with cervical spine dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the mediating effects of forward head posture (FHP) on the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and cervical mobility in older adults with cervical spine dysfunction. Fifty-one older adults (30 females, mean[SD]age = 66[4.9] years) with cervical spine dysfunction - that is, cervical pain with or without referred pain, numbness or paraesthesia - participated. Pain-related disability was measured using the neck disability index (NDI). Thoracic kyphosis was measured using a flexicurve. FHP was assessed via the craniovertebral angle (CVA) measured from a digitized, lateral-view photograph of each subject. Cervical ROM - namely, upper and general cervical rotation and cervical flexion - was measured by the Cervical Range-of-Motion (CROM) device. Greater thoracic kyphosis was significantly associated with lesser CVA (Spearman ρ = -0.48) whereas greater CVA was significantly associated with greater cervical flexion (Spearman ρ = 0.30) and general rotation ROM (ρ = 0.33), but not with upper cervical rotation ROM (ρ = 0.15). Bootstrap mediational analyses, adjusted for age, gender, weight and NDI, revealed significant indirect effects of thoracic kyphosis on cervical flexion and general rotation ROM through a FHP. Our results show that FHP mediated the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and cervical ROM, specifically general cervical rotation and flexion. These results not only support the justifiable attention given to addressing FHP to improve cervical impairments, but they also suggest that addressing thoracic kyphosis impairments may constitute an "upstream" approach.

  9. Effect of adaptive motion on cyclic fatigue resistance of a nickel titanium instrument designed for retreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Koray; Uslu, Gülşah

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance of the ProTaper Universal D1 file (Dentsply Maillefer) under continuous and adaptive motion. Materials and Methods Forty ProTaper Universal D1 files were included in this study. The cyclic fatigue tests were performed using a dynamic cyclic fatigue testing device, which had an artificial stainless steel canal with a 60° angle of curvature and a 5 mm radius of curvature. The files were randomly divided into two groups (Group 1, Rotary motion; Group 2, Adaptive motion). The time to failure of the files were recorded in seconds. The number of cycles to failure (NCF) was calculated for each group. The data were statistically analyzed using Student's t-test. The statistical significant level was set at p < 0.05. Results The cyclic fatigue resistance of the adaptive motion group was significantly higher than the rotary motion group (p < 0.05). Conclusion Within the limitations of the present study, the ‘Adaptive motion’ significantly increased the resistance of the ProTaper Universal D1 file to cyclic facture. PMID:28194362

  10. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Di; Liang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  11. Motion generated in the unstable upper cervical spine during head tilt-chin lift and jaw thrust maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasarn, Mark L; Horodyski, Marybeth; Scott, Nicole E; Konopka, Geoff; Conrad, Bryan; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2014-04-01

    Although it is essential to maintain a secure airway in a trauma patient, it is also critical to protect the potentially injured cervical spine. It has previously been suggested that the jaw thrust maneuver be used in place of the head tilt-chin lift in the suspected spine-injured patient. We sought to examine whether the jaw thrust was in fact safer to use in the setting of an unstable upper cervical spine injury. Unstable, dissociative C1-C2 injuries were surgically created in nine fresh, lightly embalmed human cadaver specimens. An electromagnetic motion analysis device was used to assess the amount of angular and linear motion with sensors placed above and below the injured segment. Measurements were recorded during execution of the two airway maneuvers. Trials were performed both with and without a cervical immobilization collar in place. There was almost twice as much angular motion in all planes when performing a head tilt-chin lift as compared with the jaw thrust, and this was statistically significant (pthrust. This was statistically significant for axial displacement and anteroposterior translation (p=.003 for both), and approached significance for mediolateral translation (p=.056). The jaw thrust maneuver results in less motion at an unstable C1-C2 injury as compared with the head tilt-chin lift maneuver. We therefore recommend the use of the jaw thrust to improve airway patency in the trauma patient with suspected cervical spine injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, George J; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-08-28

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the "motion adapted" property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence "Motion-adapted SAMPI4" and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  13. Sensorimotor aspects of high-speed artificial gravity: II. The effect of head position on illusory self motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, F. W.; Newby, N. J.; Young, L. R.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of cross-coupled stimuli on the semicircular canals are shown to be influenced by the position of the subject's head with respect to gravity and the axis of rotation, but not by the subject's head position relative to the trunk. Seventeen healthy subjects made head yaw movements out of the horizontal plane while lying on a horizontal platform (MIT short radius centrifuge) rotating at 23 rpm about an earth-vertical axis. The subjects reported the magnitude and duration of the illusory pitch or roll sensations elicited by the cross-coupled rotational stimuli acting on the semicircular canals. The results suggest an influence of head position relative to gravity. The magnitude estimation is higher and the sensation decays more slowly when the head's final position is toward nose-up (gravity in the subject's head x-z-plane) compared to when the head is turned toward the side (gravity in the subject's head y-z-plane). The results are discussed with respect to artificial gravity in space and the possible role of pre-adaptation to cross-coupled angular accelerations on earth.

  14. Evolution of motion uncertainty in rectal cancer: implications for adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jean-Paul J. E.; van Asselen, Bram; Burbach, Johannes P. M.; Intven, Martijn; Philippens, Marielle E. P.; Reerink, Onne; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of motion uncertainty by applying adaptive radiotherapy strategies depends largely on the temporal behavior of this motion. To fully optimize adaptive strategies, insight into target motion is needed. The purpose of this study was to analyze stability and evolution in time of motion uncertainty of both the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for patients with rectal cancer. We scanned 16 patients daily during one week, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner in treatment position, prior to each radiotherapy fraction. Single slice sagittal cine MRIs were made at the beginning, middle, and end of each scan session, for one minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. GTV and CTV motion were determined by registering a delineated reference frame to time-points later in time. The 95th percentile of observed motion (dist95%) was taken as a measure of motion. The stability of motion in time was evaluated within each cine-MRI separately. The evolution of motion was investigated between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of a single scan session and between the reference frame and the cine-MRIs of several days later in the course of treatment. This observed motion was then converted into a PTV-margin estimate. Within a one minute cine-MRI scan, motion was found to be stable and small. Independent of the time-point within the scan session, the average dist95% remains below 3.6 mm and 2.3 mm for CTV and GTV, respectively 90% of the time. We found similar motion over time intervals from 18 min to 4 days. When reducing the time interval from 18 min to 1 min, a large reduction in motion uncertainty is observed. A reduction in motion uncertainty, and thus the PTV-margin estimate, of 71% and 75% for CTV and tumor was observed, respectively. Time intervals of 15 and 30 s yield no further reduction in motion uncertainty compared to a 1 min time interval.

  15. Visuomotor adaptation in head-mounted virtual reality versus conventional training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, J. M.; Sugiyama, T.; Liew, S.-L.

    2017-01-01

    Immersive, head-mounted virtual reality (HMD-VR) provides a unique opportunity to understand how changes in sensory environments affect motor learning. However, potential differences in mechanisms of motor learning and adaptation in HMD-VR versus a conventional training (CT) environment have not been extensively explored. Here, we investigated whether adaptation on a visuomotor rotation task in HMD-VR yields similar adaptation effects in CT and whether these effects are achieved through similar mechanisms. Specifically, recent work has shown that visuomotor adaptation may occur via both an implicit, error-based internal model and a more cognitive, explicit strategic component. We sought to measure both overall adaptation and balance between implicit and explicit mechanisms in HMD-VR versus CT. Twenty-four healthy individuals were placed in either HMD-VR or CT and trained on an identical visuomotor adaptation task that measured both implicit and explicit components. Our results showed that the overall timecourse of adaption was similar in both HMD-VR and CT. However, HMD-VR participants utilized a greater cognitive strategy than CT, while CT participants engaged in greater implicit learning. These results suggest that while both conditions produce similar results in overall adaptation, the mechanisms by which visuomotor adaption occurs in HMD-VR appear to be more reliant on cognitive strategies. PMID:28374808

  16. Markerless rat head motion tracking using structured light for brain PET imaging of unrestrained awake small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in small animals is generally performed under anesthesia to immobilize the animal during scanning. More recently, for rat brain PET studies, methods to perform scans of unrestrained awake rats are being developed in order to avoid the unwanted effects of anesthesia on the brain response. Here, we investigate the use of a projected structure stereo camera to track the motion of the rat head during the PET scan. The motion information is then used to correct the PET data. The stereo camera calculates a 3D point cloud representation of the scene and the tracking is performed by point cloud matching using the iterative closest point algorithm. The main advantage of the proposed motion tracking is that no intervention, e.g. for marker attachment, is needed. A manually moved microDerenzo phantom experiment and 3 awake rat [18F]FDG experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed tracking method. The tracking accuracy was 0.33 mm rms. After motion correction image reconstruction, the microDerenzo phantom was recovered albeit with some loss of resolution. The reconstructed FWHM of the 2.5 and 3 mm rods increased with 0.94 and 0.51 mm respectively in comparison with the motion-free case. In the rat experiments, the average tracking success rate was 64.7%. The correlation of relative brain regional [18F]FDG uptake between the anesthesia and awake scan reconstructions was increased from on average 0.291 (not significant) before correction to 0.909 (p  <  0.0001) after motion correction. Markerless motion tracking using structured light can be successfully used for tracking of the rat head for motion correction in awake rat PET scans.

  17. Simultaneous Five-axis Motion for Identifying Geometric Deviations Through Simulation in Machining Centers with a Double Pivot Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Muditha; Yamamoto, Ken; Tsutsumi, Masaomi; Saito, Akinori; Mikami, Shigetaka

    In this paper, simultaneous five-axis control motions were newly proposed to identify the ten inherent deviations to double pivot head type five-axis machines. This motion was designed for the application of a ball bar to the measurements. The ball bar can be applied to the motion by changing the ball bar's sensitive direction in the axial, radial and tangential directions in relation to the A-axis rotation. All the three ball bar settings can be changed in a single arrangement, with a magnetic clamp fixed onto the main spindle. This leads to reduce the setting errors and setting time as well. The ten deviations are identified by using three measurements, two of which are taken in the axial direction motion while the third is extracted using the tangential or radial direction motion. From the axial direction motion, seven deviations are estimated; four of these estimations are made using the observation equation while the other three are made using simple geometric relations. The remaining three of the ten deviations are determined by using tangential or radial motion. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by simulations.

  18. Adapting the Streaming Video Based on the Estimated Motion Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Muzahim Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In real time video streaming, the frames must meet their timing constraints, typically specified as their deadlines. Wireless networks may suffer from bandwidth limitations. To reduce the data transmission over the wireless networks, we propose an adaption technique in the server side by extracting a part of the video frames that considered as a Region Of Interest (ROI, and drop the part outside the ROI from the frames that are between reference frames. The estimated position of the selection of the ROI is computed by using the Sum of Squared Differences (SSD between consecutive frames. The reconstruction mechanism to the region outside the ROI is implemented in the mobile side by using linear interpolation between reference frames. We evaluate the proposed approach by using Mean Opinion Score (MOS measurements. MOS are used to evaluate two scenarios with equivalent encoding size, where the users observe the first scenario with low bit rate for the original videos, while for the second scenario the users observe our proposed approach with high bit rate. The results show that our technique significantly reduces the amounts of data are streamed over wireless networks, while the reconstruction mechanism will provides acceptable video quality.

  19. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. Materials and Methods Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left) and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward). Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion. Results Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement. PMID:27065238

  20. Vertical Vergence Adaptation Produces an Objective Vertical Deviation That Changes With Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L.; Ramey, Nicholas A.; Adyanthaya, Rohit S.; Ying, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To document the cyclovertical ocular motor mechanism used for vertical fusion in healthy subjects, and to explore whether vertical vergence training in healthy individuals can produce objectively confirmed vertical deviations that change with head tilt, revealing a basic mechanism that can produce a pattern of misalignment in an otherwise normal ocular motor system that is similar to superior oblique muscle paresis (SOP). Methods. Seven subjects with normal orthoptic examinations were adapted to vertical image disparities using our tilting haploscopic eye-tracking apparatus presenting concentric circle targets without torsional cues. Static eye positions were recorded with head straight and when tilted 45 degrees to the left and right, during both binocular and monocular viewing. Results. Vertical fusional vergence was accompanied by a cycloversion, with the downward-moving eye intorting and the upward-moving eye extorting, implicating primary involvement of the oblique extraocular muscles. After adaptation to the slowly increasing vertical target separation, all subjects developed a temporary vertical deviation in the straight ahead position that increased with head tilt to one side and decreased with head tilt to the other side. Conclusions. These results not only show that head-tilt–dependent changes in vertical deviation are not necessarily pathognomonic for SOP, but also, and more importantly, suggest mechanisms that can mimic SOP and suggest a possible role for vertical vergence training in reducing deviations and thus the amount of head tilt required for fusion. Ultimately, vertical vergence training may provide an adjunct or alternative to extraocular muscle surgery in selected cases. PMID:23572100

  1. Intra-fractional bladder motion and margins in adaptive radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Caroline; Vestergaard, Anne; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bladder is a tumour site well suited for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional changes, but it also displays considerable intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to assess target coverage with a clinically applied method for plan selection ART and to...

  2. Adaptive mode decision with residual motion compensation for distributed video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Forchhammer, Søren; Slowack, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    mode in DVC. The adaptive mode decision is not only based on quality of key frames but also the rate of Wyner-Ziv (WZ) frames. To improve noise distribution estimation for a more accurate mode decision, a residual motion compensation is proposed to estimate a current noise residue based on a previously...

  3. Using an Empirical Model of Human Turning Motion to Aid Heading Estimation in a Personal Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Thomas

    With the adoption of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in smart phones, soldier equipment, and emergency responder navigation systems users have realized the usefulness of low cost Personal Navigation Systems. The state-of-the-art Personal Navigation System is a unit that fuses information based on external references with a low cost IMU. Due to the size, weight, power, and cost constraints imposed on a pedestrian navigation systems as well as current IMU performance limitations, the gyroscopes used to determine heading exhibit significant drift limiting the performance of the navigation system. In this thesis biomechanical signals are used to predict the onset of pedestrian turning motion. Experimental data from eight subjects captured in a gait laboratory using a Vicon motion tracking unit is used for validation. The analysis of experimental data shows the heading computed by turn prediction augmented integration is more accurate than open loop gyro integration alone.

  4. Optimization of Macro Block Size for Adaptive Rood Pattern Search Block Matching Method in Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Nar Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In area of video compression, Motion Estimation is one of the most important modules and play an important role to design and implementation of any the video encoder. It consumes more than 85% of video encoding time due to searching of a candidate block in the search window of the reference frame. Various block matching methods have been developed to minimize the search time. In this context, Adaptive Rood Pattern Search is one of the less expensive block matching methods, which is widely acceptable for better Motion Estimation in video data processing. In this paper we have proposed to optimize the macro block size used in adaptive rood pattern search method for improvement in motion estimation.

  5. Evaluation of adaptation to visually induced motion sickness based on the maximum cross-correlation between pulse transmission time and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiba Shigeru

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer graphics and virtual reality techniques are useful to develop automatic and effective rehabilitation systems. However, a kind of virtual environment including unstable visual images presented to wide field screen or a head mounted display tends to induce motion sickness. The motion sickness induced in using a rehabilitation system not only inhibits effective training but also may harm patients' health. There are few studies that have objectively evaluated the effects of the repetitive exposures to these stimuli on humans. The purpose of this study is to investigate the adaptation to visually induced motion sickness by physiological data. Methods An experiment was carried out in which the same video image was presented to human subjects three times. We evaluated changes of the intensity of motion sickness they suffered from by a subjective score and the physiological index ρmax, which is defined as the maximum cross-correlation coefficient between heart rate and pulse wave transmission time and is considered to reflect the autonomic nervous activity. Results The results showed adaptation to visually-induced motion sickness by the repetitive presentation of the same image both in the subjective and the objective indices. However, there were some subjects whose intensity of sickness increased. Thus, it was possible to know the part in the video image which related to motion sickness by analyzing changes in ρmax with time. Conclusion The physiological index, ρmax, will be a good index for assessing the adaptation process to visually induced motion sickness and may be useful in checking the safety of rehabilitation systems with new image technologies.

  6. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the “motion adapted” property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence “Motion-adapted SAMPI4” and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments. PMID:24006989

  7. A Fast Block-Matching Algorithm Using Smooth Motion Vector Field Adaptive Search Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo(李波); LI Wei(李炜); TU YaMing(涂亚明)

    2003-01-01

    In many video standards based on inter-frame compression such as H.26x and MPEG, block-matching algorithm has been widely adopted as the method for motion estimation because of its simplicity and effectiveness. Nevertheless, since motion estimation is very complex in computing. Fast algorithm for motion estimation has always been an important and attractive topic in video compression. From the viewpoint of making motion vector field smoother, this paper proposes a new algorithm SMVFAST. On the basis of motion correlation, it predicts the starting point by neighboring motion vectors according to their SADs. Adaptive search modes are usedin its search process through simply classifying motion activity. After discovering the ubiquitous ratio between the SADs of the collocated blocks in the consecutive frames, the paper proposes an effective half-stop criterion that can quickly stop the search process with good enough results.Experiments show that SMVFAST obtains almost the same results as the full search at very low computation cost, and outperforms MVFAST and PMVFAST in speed and quality, which are adopted by MPEG-4.

  8. Robust motion tracking based on adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis of OCT signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuewen; Wang, Yahui; Akansu, Ali; Belfield, Kevin D; Hubbi, Basil; Liu, Xuan

    2015-11-01

    Speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal has been used in motion tracking. In our previous study, we demonstrated that cross-correlation coefficient (XCC) between Ascans had an explicit functional dependency on the magnitude of lateral displacement (δx). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of speckle motion tracking using the derivative of function XCC(δx) on variable δx. We demonstrated the magnitude of the derivative can be maximized. In other words, the sensitivity of OCT speckle tracking can be optimized by using signals with appropriate amount of decorrelation for XCC calculation. Based on this finding, we developed an adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis strategy to achieve motion tracking with optimized sensitivity. Briefly, we used subsequently acquired Ascans and Ascans obtained with larger time intervals to obtain multiple values of XCC and chose the XCC value that maximized motion tracking sensitivity for displacement calculation. Instantaneous motion speed can be calculated by dividing the obtained displacement with time interval between Ascans involved in XCC calculation. We implemented the above-described algorithm in real-time using graphic processing unit (GPU) and demonstrated its effectiveness in reconstructing distortion-free OCT images using data obtained from a manually scanned OCT probe. The adaptive speckle tracking method was validated in manually scanned OCT imaging, on phantom as well as in vivo skin tissue.

  9. The adaptation of GDL motion recognition system to sport and rehabilitation techniques analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R

    2016-06-01

    The main novelty of this paper is presenting the adaptation of Gesture Description Language (GDL) methodology to sport and rehabilitation data analysis and classification. In this paper we showed that Lua language can be successfully used for adaptation of the GDL classifier to those tasks. The newly applied scripting language allows easily extension and integration of classifier with other software technologies and applications. The obtained execution speed allows using the methodology in the real-time motion capture data processing where capturing frequency differs from 100 Hz to even 500 Hz depending on number of features or classes to be calculated and recognized. Due to this fact the proposed methodology can be used to the high-end motion capture system. We anticipate that using novel, efficient and effective method will highly help both sport trainers and physiotherapist in they practice. The proposed approach can be directly applied to motion capture data kinematics analysis (evaluation of motion without regard to the forces that cause that motion). The ability to apply pattern recognition methods for GDL description can be utilized in virtual reality environment and used for sport training or rehabilitation treatment.

  10. Quantification of organ motion based on an adaptive image-based scale invariant feature method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133 (Italy); Peroni, Marta [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy and Paul Scherrer Institut, Zentrum für Protonentherapie, WMSA/C15, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Italy); Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, piazza L. Da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy and Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The availability of corresponding landmarks in IGRT image series allows quantifying the inter and intrafractional motion of internal organs. In this study, an approach for the automatic localization of anatomical landmarks is presented, with the aim of describing the nonrigid motion of anatomo-pathological structures in radiotherapy treatments according to local image contrast.Methods: An adaptive scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed from the integration of a standard 3D SIFT approach with a local image-based contrast definition. The robustness and invariance of the proposed method to shape-preserving and deformable transforms were analyzed in a CT phantom study. The application of contrast transforms to the phantom images was also tested, in order to verify the variation of the local adaptive measure in relation to the modification of image contrast. The method was also applied to a lung 4D CT dataset, relying on manual feature identification by an expert user as ground truth. The 3D residual distance between matches obtained in adaptive-SIFT was then computed to verify the internal motion quantification with respect to the expert user. Extracted corresponding features in the lungs were used as regularization landmarks in a multistage deformable image registration (DIR) mapping the inhale vs exhale phase. The residual distances between the warped manual landmarks and their reference position in the inhale phase were evaluated, in order to provide a quantitative indication of the registration performed with the three different point sets.Results: The phantom study confirmed the method invariance and robustness properties to shape-preserving and deformable transforms, showing residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. The adapted SIFT algorithm on the 4D CT dataset provided automated and accurate motion detection of peak to peak breathing motion. The proposed method resulted in reduced residual errors with respect to standard SIFT

  11. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: Alexandra.Jensen@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Co-Operation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  12. Structure-based molecular simulations reveal the enhancement of biased Brownian motions in single-headed kinesin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kanada

    Full Text Available Kinesin is a family of molecular motors that move unidirectionally along microtubules (MT using ATP hydrolysis free energy. In the family, the conventional two-headed kinesin was experimentally characterized to move unidirectionally through "walking" in a hand-over-hand fashion by coordinated motions of the two heads. Interestingly a single-headed kinesin, a truncated KIF1A, still can generate a biased Brownian movement along MT, as observed by in vitro single molecule experiments. Thus, KIF1A must use a different mechanism from the conventional kinesin to achieve the unidirectional motions. Based on the energy landscape view of proteins, for the first time, we conducted a set of molecular simulations of the truncated KIF1A movements over an ATP hydrolysis cycle and found a mechanism exhibiting and enhancing stochastic forward-biased movements in a similar way to those in experiments. First, simulating stand-alone KIF1A, we did not find any biased movements, while we found that KIF1A with a large friction cargo-analog attached to the C-terminus can generate clearly biased Brownian movements upon an ATP hydrolysis cycle. The linked cargo-analog enhanced the detachment of the KIF1A from MT. Once detached, diffusion of the KIF1A head was restricted around the large cargo which was located in front of the head at the time of detachment, thus generating a forward bias of the diffusion. The cargo plays the role of a diffusional anchor, or cane, in KIF1A "walking."

  13. Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects: the role of head position and neck proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Roberto; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Kyriakareli, Artemis; Schieppati, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2011-04-01

    Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100 Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.

  14. Propagating adaptive-weighted vector median filter for motion-field smoothing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林梦冬; 余松煜

    2004-01-01

    In the field of predictive video coding and format conversion, there is an increasing attention towards estimation of the true inter-frame motion. The restoration of motion vector field computed by 3-D RS is addressed and a propagating adaptive-weighted vector median (PAWVM) post-filter is proposed. This approach decomposes blocks to make a betteres timation on object borders and propagates good vectors in the scanning direction. Furthermore, a hard-thresholding method is introduced into calculating vector weights to improve the propagating. By exploiting both the spatial correlation of the vector field and the matching error of candidate vectors, PAWVM makes a good balance between the smoothness of vector field and the prediction error, and the output vector field is more valid to reflect the true motion.

  15. Adaptive update using visual models for lifting-based motion-compensated temporal filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Xiong, H. K.; Wu, Feng; Chen, Hong

    2005-03-01

    Motion compensated temporal filtering is a useful framework for fully scalable video compression schemes. However, when supposed motion models cannot represent a real motion perfectly, both the temporal high and the temporal low frequency sub-bands may contain artificial edges, which possibly lead to a decreased coding efficiency, and ghost artifacts appear in the reconstructed video sequence at lower bit rates or in case of temporal scaling. We propose a new technique that is based on utilizing visual models to mitigate ghosting artifacts in the temporal low frequency sub-bands. Specifically, we propose content adaptive update schemes where visual models are used to determine image dependent upper bounds on information to be updated. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly improve subjective visual quality of the low-pass temporal frames and at the same time, coding performance can catch or exceed the classical update steps.

  16. Characterisation of hydraulic head changes and aquifer properties in the London Basin using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry ground motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonì, R.; Cigna, F.; Bricker, S.; Meisina, C.; McCormack, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, Persistent Scatterer Interferometry was applied to ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellite data covering 1992-2000 and 2002-2010 respectively, to analyse the relationship between ground motion and hydraulic head changes in the London Basin, United Kingdom. The integration of observed groundwater levels provided by the Environment Agency and satellite-derived displacement time series allowed the estimation of the spatio-temporal variations of the Chalk aquifer storage coefficient and compressibility over an area of ∼1360 km2. The average storage coefficient of the aquifer reaches values of 1 × 10-3 and the estimated average aquifer compressibility is 7.7 × 10-10 Pa-1 and 1.2 × 10-9 Pa-1 for the periods 1992-2000 and 2002-2010, respectively. Derived storage coefficient values appear to be correlated with the hydrogeological setting, where confined by the London Clay the storage coefficient is typically an order of magnitude lower than where the chalk is overlain by the Lambeth Group. PSI-derived storage coefficient estimates agree with the values obtained from pumping tests in the same area. A simplified one-dimensional model is applied to simulate the ground motion response to hydraulic heads changes at nine piezometers. The comparison between simulated and satellite-observed ground motion changes reveals good agreement, with errors ranging between 1.4 and 6.9 mm, and being 3.2 mm on average.

  17. Heart Motion Prediction Based on Adaptive Estimation Algorithms for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Franke, Timothy J.; Bebek, Özkan; Shiose, Akira; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Robotic assisted beating heart surgery aims to allow surgeons to operate on a beating heart without stabilizers as if the heart is stationary. The robot actively cancels heart motion by closely following a point of interest (POI) on the heart surface—a process called Active Relative Motion Canceling (ARMC). Due to the high bandwidth of the POI motion, it is necessary to supply the controller with an estimate of the immediate future of the POI motion over a prediction horizon in order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy. In this paper, two least-square based prediction algorithms, using an adaptive filter to generate future position estimates, are implemented and studied. The first method assumes a linear system relation between the consecutive samples in the prediction horizon. On the contrary, the second method performs this parametrization independently for each point over the whole the horizon. The effects of predictor parameters and variations in heart rate on tracking performance are studied with constant and varying heart rate data. The predictors are evaluated using a 3 degrees of freedom test-bed and prerecorded in-vivo motion data. Then, the one-step prediction and tracking performances of the presented approaches are compared with an Extended Kalman Filter predictor. Finally, the essential features of the proposed prediction algorithms are summarized. PMID:23976889

  18. Structured Light-Based Motion Tracking in the Limited View of an MR Head Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikshøj, M.; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Conradsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    of the facial surface. The point clouds are continuously realigned to a reference scan to obtain pose estimates. The system has been tested on a mannequin head performing controlled rotational and translational axial movements within the head coil outside the range of the magnetic field. The RMS of the residual...... error of the rotation was 0.11° and the RMS difference in the translation with the control system was 0.17 mm, within the trackable range of movement....

  19. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: reducing dose while preserving image quality in the pediatric head CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Colin D.; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Baer, Aaron H.; Parmar, Hemant A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Over the last decade there has been escalating concern regarding the increasing radiation exposure stemming from CT exams, particularly in children. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a relatively new and promising tool to reduce radiation dose while preserving image quality. While encouraging results have been found in adult head and chest and body imaging, validation of this technique in pediatric population is limited. The objective of our study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and radiation dose of pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR compared to pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR in a large patient population. Retrospective analysis was performed on 82 pediatric head CT examinations. This group included 33 pediatric head CT examinations obtained with ASIR and 49 pediatric head CT examinations without ASIR. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) was recorded on all examinations. Quantitative analysis consisted of standardized measurement of attenuation and the standard deviation at the bilateral centrum semiovale and cerebellar white matter to evaluate objective noise. Qualitative analysis consisted of independent assessment by two radiologists in a blinded manner of gray-white differentiation, sharpness and overall diagnostic quality. The average CTDI{sub vol} value of the ASIR group was 21.8 mGy (SD = 4.0) while the average CTDI{sub vol} for the non-ASIR group was 29.7 mGy (SD = 13.8), reflecting a statistically significant reduction in CTDI{sub vol} in the ASIR group (P < 0.01). There were statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the 3- to 12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the 3- to 12-year-old non-ASIR group (21.5 mGy vs. 30.0 mGy; P = 0.004) as well as statistically significant reductions in CTDI for the >12-year-old ASIR group as compared to the >12-year-old non-ASIR group (29.7 mGy vs. 49.9 mGy; P = 0.0002). Quantitative analysis revealed no significant difference in the

  20. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  1. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Min Lee

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT scan.Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward. Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion.Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P < .05. Statistically significant difference in the errors between the right and left side landmark was present in the left side rotation which was opposite direction to the scanner rotation (P < .05.Patient movement during CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement.

  2. The Involvement of Centralized and Distributed Processes in Sub-second Time Interval Adaptation: An ERP Investigation of Apparent Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Utku; Yildirim, Fazilet Zeynep; Kafaligonul, Hulusi

    2017-09-09

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the timing of brief stationary sounds affects visual motion perception. Recent studies have shown that auditory time interval can alter apparent motion perception not only through concurrent stimulation but also through brief adaptation. The adaptation aftereffects for auditory time intervals were found to be similar to those for visual time intervals, suggesting the involvement of a central timing mechanism. To understand the nature of cortical processes underlying such aftereffects, we adapted observers to different time intervals by using either brief sounds or visual flashes and examined the evoked activity to the subsequently presented visual apparent motion. Both auditory and visual time interval adaptation led to significant changes in the ERPs elicited by the apparent motion. However, the changes induced by each modality were in the opposite direction. Also, they mainly occurred in different time windows and clustered over distinct scalp sites. The effects of auditory time interval adaptation were centered over parietal and parieto-central electrodes while the visual adaptation effects were mostly over occipital and parieto-occipitial regions. Moreover, the changes were much more salient when sounds were used during the adaptation phase. Taken together, our findings within the context of visual motion point to auditory dominance in the temporal domain and highlight the distinct nature of the sensory processes involved in auditory and visual time interval adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Energy consumption of Twisted File instrument used with rotary or reciprocating adaptive motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Ozyurek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the energy consumption of Twisted File (TF instrument used with rotary or adaptive motion (AM. Materials and Methods: Forty S-shaped Endo Training Blocks (Dentsply Maillefer were used. Twenty were prepared using TF 25.06 in rotary motion (RM group, and 20 were prepared using TF Adaptive SM2 in AM group. While engine-driven endodontic motors were connected to a digital wattmeter, the required torque for root canal instrumentation was analyzed by evaluating the electrical power consumption of the endodontic engine. Electric power consumption (mW/h, elapsed time (s, and a number of pecking motions required to reach the full working length (WL were calculated. The data was statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test (P < 0.05. Results: Electrical power consumption during the preparation was significantly different between the groups; RM group exerted less electric power than reciprocating AM group did (P < 0.001. The required time to reach the full WL was not statistically significant between groups (P = 0.137. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, RM group exerted less electric power than reciprocating AM group did.

  4. Motion-adaptive model-assisted compatible coding with spatiotemporal scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JaeBeom; Eleftheriadis, Alexandros

    1997-01-01

    We introduce the concept of motion adaptive spatio-temporal model-assisted compatible (MA-STMAC) coding, a technique to selectively encode areas of different importance to the human eye in terms of space and time in moving images with the consideration of object motion. PRevious STMAC was proposed base don the fact that human 'eye contact' and 'lip synchronization' are very important in person-to-person communication. Several areas including the eyes and lips need different types of quality, since different areas have different perceptual significance to human observers. The approach provides a better rate-distortion tradeoff than conventional image coding techniques base don MPEG-1, MPEG- 2, H.261, as well as H.263. STMAC coding is applied on top of an encoder, taking full advantage of its core design. Model motion tracking in our previous STMAC approach was not automatic. The proposed MA-STMAC coding considers the motion of the human face within the STMAC concept using automatic area detection. Experimental results are given using ITU-T H.263, addressing very low bit-rate compression.

  5. Coupling of Head and Body Movement with Motion of the Audible Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Villard, Sebastien; Kim, ChungGon; Ito, Kiyohide; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2009-01-01

    The authors asked whether standing posture could be controlled relative to audible oscillation of the environment. Blindfolded sighted adults were exposed to acoustic flow in a moving room, and were asked to move so as to maintain a constant distance between their head and the room. Acoustic flow had direct (source) and indirect (reflected)…

  6. Friction compensation for low velocity control of hydraulic flight motion simulator: A simple adaptive robust approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Jianyong; Jiao Zongxia; Han Songshan

    2013-01-01

    Low-velocity tracking capability is a key performance of flight motion simulator (FMS),which is mainly affected by the nonlinear friction force.Though many compensation schemes with ad hoc friction models have been proposed,this paper deals with low-velocity control without friction model,since it is easy to be implemented in practice.Firstly,a nonlinear model of the FMS middle frame,which is driven by a hydraulic rotary actuator,is built.Noting that in the low velocity region,the unmodeled friction force is mainly characterized by a changing-slowly part,thus a simple adaptive law can be employed to learn this changing-slowly part and compensate it.To guarantee the boundedness of adaptation process,a discontinuous projection is utilized and then a robust scheme is proposed.The controller achieves a prescribed output tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy in general while obtaining asymptotic output tracking in the absence of modeling errors.In addition,a saturated projection adaptive scheme is proposed to improve the globally learning capability when the velocity becomes large,which might make the previous proposed projection-based adaptive law be unstable.Theoretical and extensive experimental results are obtained to verify the high-performance nature of the proposed adaptive robust control strategy.

  7. The Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) for Vehicle Motion State Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Siwei; Liu, Yanheng; Wang, Jian; Deng, Weiwen; Oh, Heekuck

    2016-07-16

    This paper proposes a multi-sensory Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) through extending innovation-based adaptive estimation (IAE) to estimate the motion state of the moving vehicles ahead. JAKF views Lidar and Radar data as the source of the local filters, which aims to adaptively adjust the measurement noise variance-covariance (V-C) matrix 'R' and the system noise V-C matrix 'Q'. Then, the global filter uses R to calculate the information allocation factor 'β' for data fusion. Finally, the global filter completes optimal data fusion and feeds back to the local filters to improve the measurement accuracy of the local filters. Extensive simulation and experimental results show that the JAKF has better adaptive ability and fault tolerance. JAKF enables one to bridge the gap of the accuracy difference of various sensors to improve the integral filtering effectivity. If any sensor breaks down, the filtered results of JAKF still can maintain a stable convergence rate. Moreover, the JAKF outperforms the conventional Kalman filter (CKF) and the innovation-based adaptive Kalman filter (IAKF) with respect to the accuracy of displacement, velocity, and acceleration, respectively.

  8. Controlling wheelchairs by body motions: A learning framework for the adaptive remapping of space

    CERN Document Server

    Gulrez, Tauseef; Fishbach, Alon; Acosta, Santiago; Scharver, Christopher; De Rossi, Danilo; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2011-01-01

    Learning to operate a vehicle is generally accomplished by forming a new cognitive map between the body motions and extrapersonal space. Here, we consider the challenge of remapping movement-to-space representations in survivors of spinal cord injury, for the control of powered wheelchairs. Our goal is to facilitate this remapping by developing interfaces between residual body motions and navigational commands that exploit the degrees of freedom that disabled individuals are most capable to coordinate. We present a new framework for allowing spinal cord injured persons to control powered wheelchairs through signals derived from their residual mobility. The main novelty of this approach lies in substituting the more common joystick controllers of powered wheelchairs with a sensor shirt. This allows the whole upper body of the user to operate as an adaptive joystick. Considerations about learning and risks have lead us to develop a safe testing environment in 3D Virtual Reality. A Personal Augmented Reality Imm...

  9. Nonlinear Adaptive Slewing Motion Control of Spacecraft Truss Driven by Synchronous V-gimbaled CMG Precession

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Di; Zhou Jingyang

    2007-01-01

    The slewing motion control of a truss arm driven by a V-gimbaled control-moment-gyro (CMG) is a nonlinear control problem.The V-gimbaled CMG consists of a pair of gyros that must precess synchronously. The moment of inertia of the system, the angular momentum of the gyros and the external disturbances are not exactly known. With the help of feedback linearization and recursive Lyapunov design method, an adaptive nonlinear controller is designed to deal with the unknown items. Performance of the proposed controller is verified by simulation.

  10. Representation of head-centric flow in the human motion complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, J.; Dukelow, S.P.; Menon, R.S.; Vilis, T.; Berg, A.V. van den

    2006-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have identified putative homologs of macaque middle temporal area (area MT) and medial superior temporal area (area MST) in humans. Little is known about the integration of visual and nonvisual signals in human motion areas compared with monkeys. Through extra-retinal sig

  11. Robust Adaptive Beamforming against Signal Steering Vector Mismatch and Jammer Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since adaptive beamformer suffers from output performance degradation in the presence of interference nonstationarity and signal steering vector mismatch, a novel robust null broadening adaptive beamforming is proposed. The proposed method is realized by the combination of projection transform and diagonal loading techniques. First, a new projection matrix with null broadening ability is constructed and then projects the array received data onto the projection matrix. With the diagonal loading technique, a new sample covariance matrix is obtained. The theoretical analysis shows that the projection transform operation can expand the incident direction of the interference and improve orthogonality between the signal-plus-interference and the noise subspaces; thus the proposed beamformer can effectively broaden the jammer null and enhance the null depth. The analytical expressions of the proposed algorithm are also provided, which are efficient and easily solved. Simulation results are presented and demonstrated that the proposed beamformer can provide strong robustness against signal steering vector mismatch and jammer motion.

  12. Modeling and adaptive motion/force tracking for ver tical wheel on rotating table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongcai Zhang; Yuqiang Wu; Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of modeling and adaptive motion/force tracking for a class of nonholonomic dy-namic systems with affine constraints (NDSAC): a vertical wheel on a rotating table. Prior to the development of tracking control er, the dynamic model of the wheel in question is derived in a meticu-lous manner. A continuously differentiable friction model is also considered in the modeling. By exploiting the inherent cascade interconnected structure of the wheel dynamics, an adaptive mo-tion/force tracking control er is presented guaranteeing that the trajectory tracking errors asymptotical y converge to zero while the contact force tracking errors can be made smal enough by tuning design parameters. Simulation results are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking methodology.

  13. Neural adaptation in pSTS correlates with perceptual aftereffects to biological motion and with autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; van Boxtel, Jeroen J A; Monti, Martin M; Chiang, Jeffrey N; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-08-01

    The adaptive nature of biological motion perception has been documented in behavioral studies, with research showing that prolonged viewing of an action can bias judgments of subsequent actions towards the opposite of its attributes. However, the neural mechanisms underlying action adaptation aftereffects remain unknown. We examined adaptation-induced changes in brain responses to an ambiguous action after adapting to walking or running actions within two bilateral regions of interest: 1) human middle temporal area (hMT+), a lower-level motion-sensitive region of cortex, and 2) posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), a higher-level action-selective area. We found a significant correlation between neural adaptation strength in right pSTS and perceptual aftereffects to biological motion measured behaviorally, but not in hMT+. The magnitude of neural adaptation in right pSTS was also strongly correlated with individual differences in the degree of autistic traits. Participants with more autistic traits exhibited less adaptation-induced modulations of brain responses in right pSTS and correspondingly weaker perceptual aftereffects. These results suggest a direct link between perceptual aftereffects and adaptation of neural populations in right pSTS after prolonged viewing of a biological motion stimulus, and highlight the potential importance of this brain region for understanding differences in social-cognitive processing along the autistic spectrum.

  14. An Matching Method for Vehicle-borne Panoramic Image Sequence Based on Adaptive Structure from Motion Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhengpeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Panoramic image matching method with the constraint condition of local structure from motion similarity feature is an important method, the process requires multivariable kernel density estimations for the structure from motion feature used nonparametric mean shift. Proper selection of the kernel bandwidth is a critical step for convergence speed and accuracy of matching method. Variable bandwidth with adaptive structure from motion feature for panoramic image matching method has been proposed in this work. First the bandwidth matrix is defined using the locally adaptive spatial structure of the sampling point in spatial domain and optical flow domain. The relaxation diffusion process of structure from motion similarity feature is described by distance weighting method of local optical flow feature vector. Then the expression form of adaptive multivariate kernel density function is given out, and discusses the solution of the mean shift vector, termination conditions, and the seed point selection method. The final fusions of multi-scale SIFT the features and structure features to establish a unified panoramic image matching framework. The sphere panoramic images from vehicle-borne mobile measurement system are chosen such that a comparison analysis between fixed bandwidth and adaptive bandwidth is carried out in detail. The results show that adaptive bandwidth is good for case with the inlier ratio changes and the object space scale changes. The proposed method can realize the adaptive similarity measure of structure from motion feature, improves the correct matching points and matching rate, experimental results have shown our method to be robust.

  15. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous...... surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan...... structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light...

  16. Similar range of motion and function after resurfacing large-head or standard total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Ovesen, Ole; Varmarken, Jens-Erik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Large-size hip articulations may improve range of motion (ROM) and function compared to a 28-mm THA, and the low risk of dislocation allows the patients more activity postoperatively. On the other hand, the greater extent of surgery for resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) c...... for large articulations did not improve the clinical and patient-perceived outcomes. The more extensive surgical procedure of RHA did not impair the rehabilitation. This project is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under # NCT01113762.......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Large-size hip articulations may improve range of motion (ROM) and function compared to a 28-mm THA, and the low risk of dislocation allows the patients more activity postoperatively. On the other hand, the greater extent of surgery for resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA...

  17. HIERARCHICAL ADAPTIVE ROOD PATTERN SEARCH FOR MOTION ESTIMATION AT VIDEO SEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Nguyen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper deals with the motion estimation algorithms for the analysis of video sequences in compression standards MPEG-4 Visual and H.264. Anew algorithm has been offered based on the analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of existing algorithms. Method. Thealgorithm is called hierarchical adaptive rood pattern search (Hierarchical ARPS, HARPS. This new algorithm includes the classic adaptive rood pattern search ARPS and hierarchical search MP (Hierarchical search or Mean pyramid. All motion estimation algorithms have been implemented using MATLAB package and tested with several video sequences. Main Results. The criteria for evaluating the algorithms were: speed, peak signal to noise ratio, mean square error and mean absolute deviation. The proposed method showed a much better performance at a comparable error and deviation. The peak signal to noise ratio in different video sequences shows better and worse results than characteristics of known algorithms so it requires further investigation. Practical Relevance. Application of this algorithm in MPEG-4 and H.264 codecs instead of the standard can significantly reduce compression time. This feature enables to recommend it in telecommunication systems for multimedia data storing, transmission and processing.

  18. A General, Adaptive, Roadmap-Based Algorithm for Protein Motion Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Kevin; Shehu, Amarda

    2016-03-01

    Precious information on protein function can be extracted from a detailed characterization of protein equilibrium dynamics. This remains elusive in wet and dry laboratories, as function-modulating transitions of a protein between functionally-relevant, thermodynamically-stable and meta-stable structural states often span disparate time scales. In this paper we propose a novel, robotics-inspired algorithm that circumvents time-scale challenges by drawing analogies between protein motion and robot motion. The algorithm adapts the popular roadmap-based framework in robot motion computation to handle the more complex protein conformation space and its underlying rugged energy surface. Given known structures representing stable and meta-stable states of a protein, the algorithm yields a time- and energy-prioritized list of transition paths between the structures, with each path represented as a series of conformations. The algorithm balances computational resources between a global search aimed at obtaining a global view of the network of protein conformations and their connectivity and a detailed local search focused on realizing such connections with physically-realistic models. Promising results are presented on a variety of proteins that demonstrate the general utility of the algorithm and its capability to improve the state of the art without employing system-specific insight.

  19. VIDEO DENOISING USING SWITCHING ADAPTIVE DECISION BASED ALGORITHM WITH ROBUST MOTION ESTIMATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jayaraj

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A Non-linear adaptive decision based algorithm with robust motion estimation technique is proposed for removal of impulse noise, Gaussian noise and mixed noise (impulse and Gaussian with edge and fine detail preservation in images and videos. The algorithm includes detection of corrupted pixels and the estimation of values for replacing the corrupted pixels. The main advantage of the proposed algorithm is that an appropriate filter is used for replacing the corrupted pixel based on the estimation of the noise variance present in the filtering window. This leads to reduced blurring and better fine detail preservation even at the high mixed noise density. It performs both spatial and temporal filtering for removal of the noises in the filter window of the videos. The Improved Cross Diamond Search Motion Estimation technique uses Least Median Square as a cost function, which shows improved performance than other motion estimation techniques with existing cost functions. The results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithms in the visual point of view and in Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Mean Square Error and Image Enhancement Factor.

  20. The relationship between the active cervical range of motion and changes in head and neck posture after continuous VDT work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu; An, Duk-Hyun

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the active cervical range of motion (ROM) and changes in the head and neck posture after continuous visual display terminal (VDT) work. Twenty VDT workers were recruited from laboratories. The active cervical ROM of the participants was measured and videotaped to capture the craniocervical and cervicothoracic angles using a single video camera before and after VDT work. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between active cervical ROM measurements and the changes in the craniocervical and cervicothoracic angles after continuous VDT work. Active neck extension (r=-0.84, p<0.01) was negatively correlated with the mean craniocervical angle, and active neck flexion (r=-0.82, p<0.01) and left lateral flexion (r=-0.67, p<0.01) were negatively correlated with the mean cervicothoracic angle.

  1. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeben, Bianca A. W.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], e-mail: b.hoeben@rther.umcn.nl; Oyen, Wim J. G. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G. C. [Maastro Clinic, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer 18F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  2. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  3. SU-E-J-81: Adaptive Radiotherapy for IMRT Head & Neck Patient in AKUH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousuf, A; Qureshi, B; Qadir, A; Abbasi, N [Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Sindh (Pakistan); Hussain, A [Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study we proposed Adaptive radiotherapy for IMRT patients which will brought an additional dimension to the management of patients with H&N cancer in Aga Khan University Hospital. Methods: In this study 5 Head and Neck (H&N) patients plan where selected, who’s Re-CT were done during the course of their treatment, they were simulated with IMRT technique to learn the consequence of anatomical changes that may occur during the treatment, as they are more dramatic changes can occur as compare to conventional treatment. All the organ at risk were drawn according RTOG guidelines and doses were checked as per NCCN guidelines. Results: The reduction in size of Planning target volume (PTV) is more than 20% in all the cases which leads to 3 to 5 % overdose to normal tissues and Organ at Risk. Conclusion: Through this study we would like to emphasis the importance of Adaptive Radiotherapy practice in all IMRT (H&N) patients, although prospective studies are required with larger sample sizes to address the safety and the clinical effect of such approaches on patient outcome, also one need to develop protocols before implementation of this technique in practice.

  4. High-precision Detection of Facial Landmarks to Estimate Head Motions Based on Vision Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong W. Gao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach of determination of head movement is presented from the pictures recorded via digital cameras monitoring the scanning processing of PET. Two human vision models of CIECAMs and BMV are applied to segment the face region via skin colour and to detect local facial landmarks respectively. The developed algorithms are evaluated on the pictures (n=12 monitoring a subject’s head while simulating PET scanning captured by two calibrated cameras (located in the front and left side from a subject. It is shown that centers of chosen facial landmarks of eye corners and middle point of nose basement have been detected with very high precision (1 0.64 pixels. Three landmarks on pictures received by the front camera and two by the side camera have been identified. Preliminary results on 2D images with known moving parameters show that movement parameters of rotations and translations along X, Y, and Z directions can be obtained very accurately via the described methods.

  5. Improving preschooler conduct adaptation by using a social learning program based on motion games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa Szilárda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Being aware of the changes which occur under the influence of environmental conditions, education, culture and social roles upon the child is indispensable with a view to build up a conduct adapted to the social environment. For any preschooler child, entering kindergarten is an important social event and getting adapted to the new situation is not easy. Broadening the relational framework with objects, other individuals, with one’s own self, results in disciplining preschooler conducts and increasing the number of socially desirable conducts. Relying upon the above statements, this study is aimed at working out a social learning programme made up of motion games involving socialization/cooperation elements intended for inducing amelioration in terms of the child’s conduct during the process of adaptation to the kindergarten environment. The experiment was conducted using a sample of “little group” preschoolers (children 3-4 years of age. As research methods, the following have been used: studying the reference literature, the method of pedagogical observation, the method of experiment and the method of playing. Further to the practical application of the programme worked out with a view to enhance the adaptation conduct in the said subjects, the experimental group proved to have undergone a significant positive evolution and each subject showed improvements considering the conduct of adaptation to kindergarten conditions, as highlighted by the change i.e. higher values in terms of the individual scores achieved at the final test. Preschool education is meant to provide all possible ways and means to enable any child’s integration into groups of children of a peer age, to develop sociability in children and to create favorable conditions for building out inter-children networks.

  6. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P  0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P  0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  7. A Comparison Study on Motion/Force Transmissibility of Two Typical 3-DOF Parallel Manipulators: The Sprint Z3 and A3 Tool Heads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison study of two important three-degree-of-freedom (DOF parallel manipulators, the Sprint Z3 head and the A3 head, both commonly used in industry. As an initial step, the inverse kinematics are derived and an analysis of two classes of limbs is carried out via screw theory. For comparison, three transmission indices are then defined to describe their motion/force transmission performance. Based on the same main parameters, the compared results reveal some distinct characteristics in addition to the similarities between the two parallel manipulators. To a certain extent, the A3 head outperforms the common Sprint Z3 head, providing a new and satisfactory option for a machine tool head in industry.

  8. Self-Adaptive Correction of Heading Direction in Stair Climbing for Tracked Mobile Robots Using Visual Servoing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Song, Aiguo; Song, Zimo; Liu, Yuqing; Jiang, Guohua; Zhao, Guopu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a heading direction correction algorithm for a tracked mobile robot. To save hardware resources as far as possible, the mobile robot’s wrist camera is used as the only sensor, which is rotated to face stairs. An ensemble heading deviation detector is proposed to help the mobile robot correct its heading direction. To improve the generalization ability, a multi-scale Gabor filter is used to process the input image previously. Final deviation result is acquired by applying the majority vote strategy on all the classifiers’ results. The experimental results show that our detector is able to enable the mobile robot to correct its heading direction adaptively while it is climbing the stairs.

  9. A Microswitch-Cluster Program to Foster Adaptive Responses and Head Control in Students with Multiple Disabilities: Replication and Validation Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Gatti, Michela; Manfredi, Francesco; Megna, Gianfranco; La Martire, Maria L.; Tota, Alessia; Smaldone, Angela; Groeneweg, Jop

    2008-01-01

    A program relying on microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of microswitches) and preferred stimuli was recently developed to foster adaptive responses and head control in persons with multiple disabilities. In the last version of this program, preferred stimuli (a) are scheduled for adaptive responses occurring in combination with head control…

  10. Influence of environmental information in natural scenes and the effects of motion adaptation on a fly motion-sensitive neuron during simulated flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Ullrich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gaining information about the spatial layout of natural scenes is a challenging task that flies need to solve, especially when moving at high velocities. A group of motion sensitive cells in the lobula plate of flies is supposed to represent information about self-motion as well as the environment. Relevant environmental features might be the nearness of structures, influencing retinal velocity during translational self-motion, and the brightness contrast. We recorded the responses of the H1 cell, an individually identifiable lobula plate tangential cell, during stimulation with image sequences, simulating translational motion through natural sceneries with a variety of differing depth structures. A correlation was found between the average nearness of environmental structures within large parts of the cell's receptive field and its response across a variety of scenes, but no correlation was found between the brightness contrast of the stimuli and the cell response. As a consequence of motion adaptation resulting from repeated translation through the environment, the time-dependent response modulations induced by the spatial structure of the environment were increased relatively to the background activity of the cell. These results support the hypothesis that some lobula plate tangential cells do not only serve as sensors of self-motion, but also as a part of a neural system that processes information about the spatial layout of natural scenes.

  11. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  12. Head and Neck Margin Reduction With Adaptive Radiation Therapy: Robustness of Treatment Plans Against Anatomy Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kranen, Simon; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Wolf, Annelisa; Damen, Eugène; van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2016-11-01

    We set out to investigate loss of target coverage from anatomy changes in head and neck cancer patients as a function of applied safety margins and to verify a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based adaptive strategy with an average patient anatomy to overcome possible target underdosage. For 19 oropharyngeal cancer patients, volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment plans (2 arcs; simultaneous integrated boost, 70 and 54.25 Gy; 35 fractions) were automatically optimized with uniform clinical target volume (CTV)-to-planning target volume margins of 5, 3, and 0 mm. We applied b-spline CBCT-to-computed tomography (CT) deformable registration to allow recalculation of the dose on modified CT scans (planning CT deformed to daily CBCT following online positioning) and dose accumulation in the planning CT scan. Patients with deviations in primary or elective CTV coverage >2 Gy were identified as candidates for adaptive replanning. For these patients, a single adaptive intervention was simulated with an average anatomy from the first 10 fractions. Margin reduction from 5 mm to 3 mm to 0 mm generally led to an organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose (Dmean) sparing of approximately 1 Gy/mm. CTV shrinkage was mainly seen in the elective volumes (up to 10%), likely related to weight loss. Despite online repositioning, substantial systematic errors were present (>3 mm) in lymph node CTV, the parotid glands, and the larynx. Nevertheless, the average increase in OAR dose was small: maximum of 1.2 Gy (parotid glands, Dmean) for all applied margins. Loss of CTV coverage >2 Gy was found in 1, 3, and 7 of 73 CTVs, respectively. Adaptive intervention in 0-mm plans substantially improved coverage: in 5 of 7 CTVs (in 6 patients) to 2 Gy in 0-mm plans may be identified early in treatment using dose accumulation. A single intervention with an average anatomy derived from CBCT effectively mitigates discrepancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of a Braille-Reading-Inspired Finger Motion Adaptive Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Ulusoy

    Full Text Available Braille reading is a complex process involving intricate finger-motion patterns and finger-rubbing actions across Braille letters for the stimulation of appropriate nerves. Although Braille reading is performed by smoothly moving the finger from left-to-right, research shows that even fluent reading requires right-to-left movements of the finger, known as "reversal". Reversals are crucial as they not only enhance stimulation of nerves for correctly reading the letters, but they also show one to re-read the letters that were missed in the first pass. Moreover, it is known that reversals can be performed as often as in every sentence and can start at any location in a sentence. Here, we report experimental results on the feasibility of an algorithm that can render a machine to automatically adapt to reversal gestures of one's finger. Through Braille-reading-analogous tasks, the algorithm is tested with thirty sighted subjects that volunteered in the study. We find that the finger motion adaptive algorithm (FMAA is useful in achieving cooperation between human finger and the machine. In the presence of FMAA, subjects' performance metrics associated with the tasks have significantly improved as supported by statistical analysis. In light of these encouraging results, preliminary experiments are carried out with five blind subjects with the aim to put the algorithm to test. Results obtained from carefully designed experiments showed that subjects' Braille reading accuracy in the presence of FMAA was more favorable then when FMAA was turned off. Utilization of FMAA in future generation Braille reading devices thus holds strong promise.

  14. Experimental Evaluation of a Braille-Reading-Inspired Finger Motion Adaptive Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Melda; Sipahi, Rifat

    2016-01-01

    Braille reading is a complex process involving intricate finger-motion patterns and finger-rubbing actions across Braille letters for the stimulation of appropriate nerves. Although Braille reading is performed by smoothly moving the finger from left-to-right, research shows that even fluent reading requires right-to-left movements of the finger, known as "reversal". Reversals are crucial as they not only enhance stimulation of nerves for correctly reading the letters, but they also show one to re-read the letters that were missed in the first pass. Moreover, it is known that reversals can be performed as often as in every sentence and can start at any location in a sentence. Here, we report experimental results on the feasibility of an algorithm that can render a machine to automatically adapt to reversal gestures of one's finger. Through Braille-reading-analogous tasks, the algorithm is tested with thirty sighted subjects that volunteered in the study. We find that the finger motion adaptive algorithm (FMAA) is useful in achieving cooperation between human finger and the machine. In the presence of FMAA, subjects' performance metrics associated with the tasks have significantly improved as supported by statistical analysis. In light of these encouraging results, preliminary experiments are carried out with five blind subjects with the aim to put the algorithm to test. Results obtained from carefully designed experiments showed that subjects' Braille reading accuracy in the presence of FMAA was more favorable then when FMAA was turned off. Utilization of FMAA in future generation Braille reading devices thus holds strong promise.

  15. Motion Adaptive Vertical Handoff in Cellular/WLAN Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals’ handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms.

  16. Anticipatory control of motion-to-force transitions with the fingertips adapts optimally to task difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Flor A; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    Moving our fingertips toward objects to produce well-directed forces immediately upon contact is fundamental to dexterous manipulation. This apparently simple motion-to-force transition in fact involves a time-critical, predictive switch in control strategy. Given that dexterous manipulation must accommodate multiple mechanical conditions, we investigated whether and how this transition adapts to task difficulty. Eight adults (19-39 yr) produced ramps of isometric vertical fingertip force against a rigid surface immediately following a tapping motion. By changing target surface friction and size, we defined an easier (sandpaper, 11 mm diam) versus a more difficult (polished steel, 5 mm diam) task. As in prior work, we assembled fine-wire electromyograms from all seven muscles of the index finger into a seven-dimensional vector defining the full muscle coordination pattern-and quantified its temporal evolution as its alignment with a reference coordination pattern vector for steady-state force production. As predicted by numerical optimizations to neuromuscular delays, our empirical and sigmoidal nonlinear regression analyses show that the coordination pattern transitions begin sooner for the more difficult tasks than for the easier tasks ( approximately 120 ms, P 0.7 in most cases). Importantly, the force vector following contact had smaller directional error (P optimization to counteract neuromuscular delays and noise to enable this fundamental element of dexterous manipulation.

  17. Store-and-feedforward adaptive gaming system for hand-finger motion tracking in telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockery, Daniel; Peters, James F; Ramanna, Sheela; Shay, Barbara L; Szturm, Tony

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a telerehabilitation system that encompasses a webcam and store-and-feedforward adaptive gaming system for tracking finger-hand movement of patients during local and remote therapy sessions. Gaming-event signals and webcam images are recorded as part of a gaming session and then forwarded to an online healthcare content management system (CMS) that separates incoming information into individual patient records. The CMS makes it possible for clinicians to log in remotely and review gathered data using online reports that are provided to help with signal and image analysis using various numerical measures and plotting functions. Signals from a 6 degree-of-freedom magnetic motion tracking system provide a basis for video-game sprite control. The MMT provides a path for motion signals between common objects manipulated by a patient and a computer game. During a therapy session, a webcam that captures images of the hand together with a number of performance metrics provides insight into the quality, efficiency, and skill of a patient.

  18. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  19. Effects of musical cadence in the acute physiologic adaptations to head-out aquatic exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Sousa, Vítor F; Silva, António J; Reis, Vítor M; Marinho, Daniel A; Bragada, José A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between musical cadence and the physiologic adaptations to basic head-out aquatic exercises. Fifteen young and clinically healthy women performed, immersed to the breast, a cardiovascular aquatic exercise called the "rocking horse." The study design included an intermittent and progressive protocol starting at a 90 b.min(-1) rhythm and increasing every 6 minutes, by 15 b.min(-1), up to 195 b.min(-1) or exhaustion. The rating of perceived effort (RPE) at the maximal heart rate achieved during each bout (HRmax), the percentage of the maximal theoretical heart rate estimated (%HRmax), and the blood lactate concentration ([La-]) were evaluated. The musical cadence was also calculated at 4 mmol.L(-1) of blood lactate (R4), the RPE at R4 (RPE@R4), the HR at R4 (HR@R4), and the %HRmax at R4 (%HRmax@R4). Strong relationships were verified between the musical cadence and the RPE (R2 = 0.85; p musical cadence created an increase in the physiologic response. Therefore, instructors must choose musical cadences according to the goals of the session they are conducting to achieve the desired intensity.

  20. Dynamic social adaptation of motion-related neurons in primate parietal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotaka Fujii

    Full Text Available Social brain function, which allows us to adapt our behavior to social context, is poorly understood at the single-cell level due largely to technical limitations. But the questions involved are vital: How do neurons recognize and modulate their activity in response to social context? To probe the mechanisms involved, we developed a novel recording technique, called multi-dimensional recording, and applied it simultaneously in the left parietal cortices of two monkeys while they shared a common social space. When the monkeys sat near each other but did not interact, each monkey's parietal activity showed robust response preference to action by his own right arm and almost no response to action by the other's arm. But the preference was broken if social conflict emerged between the monkeys-specifically, if both were able to reach for the same food item placed on the table between them. Under these circumstances, parietal neurons started to show complex combinatorial responses to motion of self and other. Parietal cortex adapted its response properties in the social context by discarding and recruiting different neural populations. Our results suggest that parietal neurons can recognize social events in the environment linked with current social context and form part of a larger social brain network.

  1. Regionally Adaptable Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) from Empirical Models of Fourier and Duration of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Sanjay; Scherbaum, Frank; Kuehn, Nicolas; Stafford, Peter; Edwards, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The current practice of deriving empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) involves using ground motions recorded at multiple sites. However, in applications like site-specific (e.g., critical facility) hazard ground motions obtained from the GMPEs are need to be adjusted/corrected to a particular site/site-condition under investigation. This study presents a complete framework for developing a response spectral GMPE, within which the issue of adjustment of ground motions is addressed in a manner consistent with the linear system framework. The present approach is a two-step process in which the first step consists of deriving two separate empirical models, one for Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) and the other for a random vibration theory (RVT) optimized duration (Drvto) of ground motion. In the second step the two models are combined within the RVT framework to obtain full response spectral amplitudes. Additionally, the framework also involves a stochastic model based extrapolation of individual Fourier spectra to extend the useable frequency limit of the empirically derived FAS model. The stochastic model parameters were determined by inverting the Fourier spectral data using an approach similar to the one as described in Edwards and Faeh (2013). Comparison of median predicted response spectra from present approach with those from other regional GMPEs indicates that the present approach can also be used as a stand-alone model. The dataset used for the presented analysis is a subset of the recently compiled database RESORCE-2012 across Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region.

  2. WE-G-BRD-08: Motion Analysis for Rectal Cancer: Implications for Adaptive Radiotherapy On the MR-Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B van; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Philippens, M; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this study is to find the optimal trade-off between adaptation interval and margin reduction and to define the implications of motion for rectal cancer boost radiotherapy on a MR-linac. Methods: Daily MRI scans were acquired of 16 patients, diagnosed with rectal cancer, prior to each radiotherapy fraction in one week (N=76). Each scan session consisted of T2-weighted and three 2D sagittal cine-MRI, at begin (t=0 min), middle (t=9:30 min) and end (t=18:00 min) of scan session, for 1 minute at 2 Hz temporal resolution. Tumor and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated on each T2-weighted scan and transferred to each cine-MRI. The start frame of the begin scan was used as reference and registered to frames at time-points 15, 30 and 60 seconds, 9:30 and 18:00 minutes and 1, 2, 3 and 4 days later. Per time-point, motion of delineated voxels was evaluated using the deformation vector fields of the registrations and the 95th percentile distance (dist95%) was calculated as measure of motion. Per time-point, the distance that includes 90% of all cases was taken as estimate of required planning target volume (PTV)-margin. Results: Highest motion reduction is observed going from 9:30 minutes to 60 seconds. We observe a reduction in margin estimates from 10.6 to 2.7 mm and 16.1 to 4.6 mm for tumor and CTV, respectively, when adapting every 60 seconds compared to not adapting treatment. A 75% and 71% reduction, respectively. Further reduction in adaptation time-interval yields only marginal motion reduction. For adaptation intervals longer than 18:00 minutes only small motion reductions are observed. Conclusion: The optimal adaptation interval for adaptive rectal cancer (boost) treatments on a MR-linac is 60 seconds. This results in substantial smaller PTV-margin estimates. Adaptation intervals of 18:00 minutes and higher, show little improvement in motion reduction.

  3. The Proper Motion of Pyxis: the first use of Adaptive Optics in tandem with HST on a faint halo object

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, Tobias K; Zivick, Paul; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Beaton, Rachael; Bovy, Jo; Sales, Laura V; Sohn, Tony; Angell, Dylan; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Carrasco, Eleazar R; Damke, Gulliermo; Davies, Richard; Majewski, Steve; Neichel, Benoit; van der Marel, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    We present a proper motion measurement for the halo globular cluster Pyxis, using HST/ACS data as the first epoch, and GeMS/GSAOI Adaptive Optics data as the second, separated by a baseline of about 5 years. This is both the first measurement of the proper motion of Pyxis and the first calibration and use of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics data to measure an absolute proper motion for a faint, distant halo object. Consequently, we present our analysis of the Adaptive Optics data in detail. We obtain a proper motion of mu_alpha cos(delta)=0.89+/-0.30 mas/yr and mu_delta=0.62+/-0.29 mas/yr. From the proper motion and the line-of-sight velocity we find the orbit of Pyxis is rather eccentric with its apocenter at 100 to 400 kpc and its pericenter at about 27 kpc. We also investigate two literature-proposed associations for Pyxis with the recently discovered ATLAS stream and the Magellanic system. Combining our measurements with dynamical modeling and cosmological numerical simulations we find it unlikely Pyxis is...

  4. An efficient content-adaptive motion-compensated 3-D DWT with enhanced spatial and temporal scalability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrseresht, Nagita; Taubman, David

    2006-06-01

    We propose a novel, content adaptive method for motion-compensated three-dimensional wavelet transformation (MC 3-D DWT) of video. The proposed method overcomes problems of ghosting and nonaligned aliasing artifacts which can arise in regions of motion model failure, when the video is reconstructed at reduced temporal or spatial resolutions. Previous MC 3-D DWT structures either take the form of MC temporal DWT followed by a spatial transform ("t+2D"), or perform the spatial transform first ("2D + t"), limiting the spatial frequencies which can be jointly compensated in the temporal transform, and hence limiting the compression efficiency. When the motion model fails, the "t + 2D" structure causes nonaligned aliasing artifacts in reduced spatial resolution sequences. Essentially, the proposed transform continuously adapts itself between the "t + 2D" and "2D + t" structures, based on information available within the compressed bit stream. Ghosting artifacts may also appear in reduced frame-rate sequences due to temporal low-pass filtering along invalid motion trajectories. To avoid the ghosting artifacts, we continuously select between different low-pass temporal filters, based on the estimated accuracy of the motion model. Experimental results indicate that the proposed adaptive transform preserves high compression efficiency while substantially improving the quality of reduced spatial and temporal resolution sequences.

  5. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer—Can an Old Goal Evolve into a New Standard?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT techniques cause significant toxicity. This may be explained in part by the fact that IMRT cannot compensate for changes in the location of disease and normal anatomy during treatment, leading to exposure of at-risk bystander tissues to higher-than-anticipated doses. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART is a novel approach to correct for daily tumor and normal tissue variations through online or offline modification of original IMRT target volumes and plans. ART has been discussed on a conceptual level for many years, but technical limitations have hampered its integration into routine care. In this paper, we review the key anatomic, dosimetric, and treatment delivery issues at play in current investigational development of head and neck ART. We also describe pilot findings from initial clinical deployment of head and neck ART, as well as emerging pathways of future research.

  6. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C; Erickson, B; Quiroz, F; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cooper, D; Lachaine, M [Elekta Inc., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries of the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in part by

  7. A stabilized adaptive appearance changes model for 3D head tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Zoran; Heijden, van der Ferdinand; Williams, A.Denise

    2001-01-01

    A simple method is presented for 3D head pose estimation and tracking in monocular image sequences. A generic geometric model is used. The initialization consists of aligning the perspective projection of the geometric model with the subjects head in the initial image. After the initialization, the

  8. Sapc - Application for Adapting Scanned Analogue Photographs to Use Them in Structure from Motion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salach, A.

    2017-05-01

    The documentary value of analogue scanned photographs is invaluable. A large and rich collection of archival photographs is often the only source of information about past of the selected area. This paper presents a method of adaptation of scanned, analogue photographs to suitable form allowing to use them in Structure from Motion technology. For this purpose, an automatic algorithm, implemented in the application called SAPC (Scanned Aerial Photographs Correction), which transforms scans to a form, which characteristic similar to the images captured by a digital camera, was invented. Images, which are created in the applied program as output data, are characterized by the same principal point position in each photo and the same resolution through cutting out the black photo frame. Additionally, SAPC generates a binary image file, which can mask areas of fiducial marks. In the experimental section, scanned, analogue photographs of Warsaw, which had been captured in 1986, were used in two variants: unprocessed and processed in SAPC application. An insightful analysis was conducted on the influence of transformation in SAPC on quality of spatial orientation of photographs. Block adjustment through aerial triangulation was calculated using two SfM software products: Agisoft PhotoScan and Pix4d and their results were compared with results obtained from professional photogrammetric software - Trimble Inpho. The author concluded that pre-processing in SAPC application had a positive impact on a quality of block orientation of scanned, analogue photographs, using SfM technology.

  9. Genetic interactions between diverged alleles of Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) and Heading date 3a (Hd3a)/ RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1) control differential heading and contribute to regional adaptation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Hongyi; Ren, Ding; Tang, Huiwu; Qiu, Rong; Feng, Jinglei; Long, Yunming; Niu, Baixiao; Chen, Danping; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yao-Guang; Guo, Jingxin

    2015-11-01

    Initiation of flowering, also called heading, in rice (Oryza sativa) is determined by the florigens encoded by Heading date 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1). Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) regulates Hd3a and RFT1. However, different rice varieties have diverged alleles of Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 and their genetic interactions remain largely unclear. Here we generated three segregating populations for different combinations of diverged Ehd1 and Hd3a/RFT1 alleles, and analyzed their genetic interactions between these alleles. We demonstrated that, in an ehd1 mutant background, Hd3a was silenced, but RFT1 was expressed (although at lower levels than in plants with a functional Ehd1) under short-day (SD) and long-day (LD) conditions. We identified a nonfunctional RFT1 allele (rft1); the lines carrying homozygous ehd1 and Hd3a/rft1 failed to induce the floral transition under SD and LD conditions. Like Hd3a, RFT1 also interacted with 14-3-3 proteins, the florigen receptors, but a nonfunctional RFT1 with a crucial E105K mutation failed to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. Furthermore, analyses of sequence variation and geographic distribution suggested that functional RFT1 alleles were selected during rice adaptation to high-latitude regions. Our results demonstrate the important roles of RFT1 in rice flowering and regional adaptation.

  10. Discrimination of Human Forearm Motions on the Basis of Myoelectric Signals by Using Adaptive Fuzzy Inference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiso, Atsushi; Seki, Hirokazu

    This paper describes a method for discriminating of the human forearm motions based on the myoelectric signals using an adaptive fuzzy inference system. In conventional studies, the neural network is often used to estimate motion intention by the myoelectric signals and realizes the high discrimination precision. On the other hand, this study uses the fuzzy inference for a human forearm motion discrimination based on the myoelectric signals. This study designs the membership function and the fuzzy rules using the average value and the standard deviation of the root mean square of the myoelectric potential for every channel of each motion. In addition, the characteristics of the myoelectric potential gradually change as a result of the muscle fatigue. Therefore, the motion discrimination should be performed by taking muscle fatigue into consideration. This study proposes a method to redesign the fuzzy inference system such that dynamic change of the myoelectric potential because of the muscle fatigue will be taken into account. Some experiments carried out using a myoelectric hand simulator show the effectiveness of the proposed motion discrimination method.

  11. Adaptive-backstepping force/motion control for mobile-manipulator robot based on fuzzy CMAC neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thang-Long MAI; Yaonan WANG

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive backstepping fuzzy cerebellar-model-articulation-control neural-networks control (ABFCNC) system for motion/force control of the mobile-manipulator robot (MMR) is proposed. By applying the ABFCNC in the tracking-position controller, the unknown dynamics and parameter variation problems of the MMR control system are relaxed. In addition, an adaptive robust compensator is proposed to eliminate uncertainties that consist of approximation errors, uncertain disturbances. Based on the tracking position-ABFCNC design, an adaptive robust control strategy is also developed for the nonholonomic-constraint force of the MMR. The design of adaptive-online learning algorithms is obtained by using the Lyapunov stability theorem. Therefore, the proposed method proves that it not only can guarantee the stability and robustness but also the tracking performances of the MMR control system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control system are verified by comparative simulation results.

  12. Real-Time Head Pose Estimation Using a WEBCAM: Monocular Adaptive View-Based Appearance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Huang (2006). Graph embedded analysis for head pose estimation. In Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition , pp. 3–8. Fu, Y. and T...of human- computer and human-robot interaction. Possible appli- cations include novel computer input devices (Fu and Huang, 2007), head gesture ... recognition , driver fatigue recognition systems (Baker et al., 2004), attention aware- ness for intelligent tutoring systems, and social interac- tion

  13. A Study on Maneuvering Obstacle Motion State Estimation for Intelligent Vehicle Using Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Current Statistical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The obstacle motion state estimation is an essential task in intelligent vehicle. The ASCL group has developed such a system that uses a radar and GPS/INS. When running on the road, the acceleration of the vehicle is always changing, so it is hard for constant velocity (CV model and constant acceleration (CA model to describe the motion state of the vehicle. This paper introduced Current Statistical (CS model from military field, which uses the modified Rayleigh distribution to describe acceleration. The adaptive Kalman filter based on CS model was used to estimate the motion state of the target. We conducted simulation experiments and real vehicle tests, and the results showed that the estimation of position, velocity, and acceleration can be precise.

  14. An alternative approach to the ground motion prediction problem by a non-parametric adaptive regression method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerlikaya-Özkurt, Fatma; Askan, Aysegul; Weber, Gerhard-Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) are empirical relationships which are used for determining the peak ground response at a particular distance from an earthquake source. They relate the peak ground responses as a function of earthquake source type, distance from the source, local site conditions where the data are recorded and finally the depth and magnitude of the earthquake. In this article, a new prediction algorithm, called Conic Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (CMARS), is employed on an available dataset for deriving a new GMPE. CMARS is based on a special continuous optimization technique, conic quadratic programming. These convex optimization problems are very well-structured, resembling linear programs and, hence, permitting the use of interior point methods. The CMARS method is performed on the strong ground motion database of Turkey. Results are compared with three other GMPEs. CMARS is found to be effective for ground motion prediction purposes.

  15. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Mingyao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Bharat, Shyam [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, New York (United States); Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Hou, Wei-Hsien [St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  16. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Post-Prostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, H; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso® 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in post-prostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for post-prostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Results Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: − 0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5 degrees, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion Target rotational motion could cause under-dosage to partial volume of the post-prostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. PMID:23021439

  17. Adaptive radiation therapy for postprostatectomy patients using real-time electromagnetic target motion tracking during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M; Gay, Hiram A; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J

    2013-03-15

    Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: -0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive retrospective correction of motion artifacts in cranial MRI with multicoil three-dimensional radial acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley G; Velikina, Julia; Block, Walter; Wieben, Oliver; Samsonov, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Despite reduction in imaging times through improved hardware and rapid acquisition schemes, motion artifacts can compromise image quality in magnetic resonance imaging, especially in three-dimensional imaging with its prolonged scan durations. Direct extension of most state-of-the-art two-dimensional rigid body motion compensation techniques to the three-dimensional case is often challenging or impractical due to a significant increase in sampling requirements. This article introduces a novel motion correction technique that is capable of restoring image quality in motion corrupted two-dimensional and three-dimensional radial acquisitions without a priori assumptions about when motion occurs. The navigating properties of radial acquisitions-corroborated by multiple receiver coils-are exploited to detect actual instances of motion. Pseudorandom projection ordering provides flexibility of reconstructing navigator images from the obtained motion-free variable-width subsets for subsequent estimation of rigid body motion parameters by coregistration. The proposed approach does not require any additional navigators or external motion estimation schemes. The capabilities and limitations of the method are described and demonstrated through simulations and representative volunteer cranial acquisitions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Eye movements to yaw, pitch, and roll about vertical and horizontal axes : Adaptation, and motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Bles, W.; Graaf, B. de

    2002-01-01

    Background: In the search for parameters to predict motion sickness that can be measured in the laboratory, we performed a longitudinal investigation in aviators. Since the vestibular system is involved in the generation of motion sickness as well as eye movements, vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) para

  20. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  1. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Strübbe

    Full Text Available The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  2. Fast Muting Adaptation for LTE-A HetNets with Remote Radio Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Kolding, Troels Emil;

    2013-01-01

    delay over the X2 inter-cell interface. In this paper we investigate dynamic solutions for the allocation of the muted resources with small cells in the form of Remote Radio Heads (RRH), connected to the macro cell through a low latency interface. A simple eICIC framework for intercell Radio Resource...

  3. Pilot Evaluation of Adaptive Control in Motion-Based Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Campbell, Stefan Forrest

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the strengths, weaknesses, and robustness characteristics of several MRAC (Model-Reference Adaptive Control) based adaptive control technologies garnering interest from the community as a whole. To facilitate this, a control study using piloted and unpiloted simulations to evaluate sensitivities and handling qualities was conducted. The adaptive control technologies under consideration were ALR (Adaptive Loop Recovery), BLS (Bounded Linear Stability), Hybrid Adaptive Control, L1, OCM (Optimal Control Modification), PMRAC (Predictor-based MRAC), and traditional MRAC

  4. An adaptive neural mechanism for acoustic motion perception with varying sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    .e. extracting information about its direction and velocity. Here we focus on auditory motion perception of sound stimuli, which is poorly understood as compared to its visual counterpart. In earlier work we have developed a bio-inspired neural learning mechanism for acoustic motion perception. The mechanism...... extracts directional information via a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The mechanism uses only this directional information obtained via specific motor behaviour to learn the angular velocity of unoccluded sound stimuli in motion. In nature however the stimulus being tracked may...... be occluded by artefacts in the environment, such as an escaping prey momentarily disappearing behind a cover of trees. This article extends the earlier work by presenting a comparative investigation of auditory motion perception for unoccluded and occluded tonal sound stimuli with a frequency of 2.2 k...

  5. MagicPlate-512: A 2D silicon detector array for quality assurance of stereotactic motion adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petasecca, M., E-mail: marcop@uow.edu.au; Newall, M. K.; Aldosari, A. H.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A. A.; Porumb, C. S.; Guatelli, S.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Illawarra Health Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Booth, J. T.; Colvill, E. [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Duncan, M.; Cammarano, D. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carolan, M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Health Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Oborn, B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Perevertaylo, V. [SPA-BIT, Kiev 02232 (Ukraine); Keall, P. J. [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial and temporal resolutions are two of the most important features for quality assurance instrumentation of motion adaptive radiotherapy modalities. The goal of this work is to characterize the performance of the 2D high spatial resolution monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” for quality assurance of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking technique for motion compensation. Methods: MagicPlate-512 is used in combination with the movable platform HexaMotion and a research version of radiofrequency tracking system Calypso driving MLC tracking software. The authors reconstruct 2D dose distributions of small field square beams in three modalities: in static conditions, mimicking the temporal movement pattern of a lung tumor and tracking the moving target while the MLC compensates almost instantaneously for the tumor displacement. Use of Calypso in combination with MagicPlate-512 requires a proper radiofrequency interference shielding. Impact of the shielding on dosimetry has been simulated by GEANT4 and verified experimentally. Temporal and spatial resolutions of the dosimetry system allow also for accurate verification of segments of complex stereotactic radiotherapy plans with identification of the instant and location where a certain dose is delivered. This feature allows for retrospective temporal reconstruction of the delivery process and easy identification of error in the tracking or the multileaf collimator driving systems. A sliding MLC wedge combined with the lung motion pattern has been measured. The ability of the MagicPlate-512 (MP512) in 2D dose mapping in all three modes of operation was benchmarked by EBT3 film. Results: Full width at half maximum and penumbra of the moving and stationary dose profiles measured by EBT3 film and MagicPlate-512 confirm that motion has a significant impact on the dose distribution. Motion

  6. Adapter for converting an oil burner head for burning of pulverized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, J.E.

    1988-03-29

    This patent describes a burner head means forming a primary air passage in the burner head including a portion of generally circular configuration in cross-section having openings uniformally circularly disposed about its periphery, and a manifold effective to envelope the primary air passage means. The manifold has inlet means for connection to a source of pulverized coal and air, internal coal and air passages downstream of the inlet effective to divide incoming coal and air into a plurality of discrete streams thereof, and a manifold coal and air outlet opening from each coal and air passage. The manifold outlet openings each are in communication with a duct means having an outlet discharging into one of the openings about the periphery of the primary air passage means.

  7. Accelerating the development of emotion competence in Head Start children: effects on adaptive and maladaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Carroll E; King, Kristen A; Trentacosta, Christopher J; Morgan, Judith K; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Krauthamer-Ewing, E Stephanie; Finlon, Kristy J

    2008-01-01

    Separate studies of rural and urban Head Start systems tested the hypothesis that an emotion-based prevention program (EBP) would accelerate the development of emotion and social competence and decrease agonistic behavior and potential precursors of psychopathology. In both studies, Head Start centers were randomly assigned to treatment and control/comparison group conditions. In Study 1 (rural community), results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that compared to the control condition (Head Start as usual), EBP produced greater increases in emotion knowledge and emotion regulation and greater decreases in children's negative emotion expressions, aggression, anxious/depressed behavior, and negative peer and adult interactions. In Study 2 (inner city), compared to the established prevention program I Can Problem Solve, EBP led to greater increases in emotion knowledge, emotion regulation, positive emotion expression, and social competence. In Study 2, emotion knowledge mediated the effects of EBP on emotion regulation, and emotion competence (an aggregate of emotion knowledge and emotion regulation) mediated the effects of EBP on social competence.

  8. Adaptive momentum-based motion detection approach and its application on handoff in wireless networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tein-Yaw; Chen, Yung-Mu; Hsu, Chih-Hung

    2009-01-01

    Positioning and tracking technologies can detect the location and the movement of mobile nodes (MNs), such as cellular phone, vehicular and mobile sensor, to predict potential handoffs. However, most motion detection mechanisms require additional hardware (e.g., GPS and directed antenna), costs (e.g., power consumption and monetary cost) and supply systems (e.g., network fingerprint server). This paper proposes a Momentum of Received Signal Strength (MRSS) based motion detection method and its application on handoff. MRSS uses the exponentially weighted moving average filter with multiple moving average window size to analyze the received radio signal. With MRSS, an MN can predict its motion state and make a handoff trigger at the right time without any assistance from positioning systems. Moreover, a novel motion state dependent MRSS scheme called Dynamic MRSS (DMRSS) algorithm is proposed to adjust the motion detection sensitivity. In our simulation, the MRSS- and DMRSS-based handoff algorithms can reduce the number of unnecessary handoffs up to 44% and save battery power up to 75%.

  9. Adaptive Momentum-Based Motion Detection Approach and Its Application on Handoff in Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Mu Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Positioning and tracking technologies can detect the location and the movement of mobile nodes (MNs, such as cellular phone, vehicular and mobile sensor, to predict potential handoffs. However, most motion detection mechanisms require additional hardware (e.g., GPS and directed antenna, costs (e.g., power consumption and monetary cost and supply systems (e.g., network fingerprint server. This paper proposes a Momentum of Received Signal Strength (MRSS based motion detection method and its application on handoff. MRSS uses the exponentially weighted moving average filter with multiple moving average window size to analyze the received radio signal. With MRSS, an MN can predict its motion state and make a handoff trigger at the right time without any assistance from positioning systems. Moreover, a novel motion state dependent MRSS scheme called Dynamic MRSS (DMRSS algorithm is proposed to adjust the motion detection sensitivity. In our simulation, the MRSSand DMRSS-based handoff algorithms can reduce the number of unnecessary handoffs up to 44% and save battery power up to 75%.

  10. Analysis of Relative Motion between Femoral Head and Acetabular Cup and Advances in Computation of the Wear Factor for the Prosthetic Hip Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Calonius

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount and type of wear produced in the prosthetic hip joint depends on the type of relative motion between the femoral head and the acetabular cup. Wear particles removed from the bearing surfaces of the joint can cause adverse tissue reactions resulting in osteolysis and ultimately in loosening of the fixation of the implant. When designing a simulator for evaluation of prospective materials for artificial hip joints it is important to verify that the type of relative motion at the articulation is similar to that produced in walking, involving continually changing direction of sliding. This paper is an overview of recent research done at Helsinki University of Technology on the analysis of the relationship between relative motion and wear in the prosthetic hip joint.To analyze the relative motion, software for computing tracks, referred to as slide tracks, drawn on the counterface by marker points on the bearing surface was developed and experimentally verified. The overall relative motion of the joint was illustrated by a slide track pattern, produced by many points. The patterns resulting from walking motion and from motion produced in ten contemporary hip simulator types were compared. The slide track computations were not limited to illustrational purposes but offered a basis for computing variations of sliding distances, sliding speeds and direction of sliding during a cycle. This was done for the slide track termed the force track, drawn by the resultant contact force. In addition, the product of the instantaneous load and increment of sliding distance was numerically integrated over a cycle. This track integral of load had so far not been determined for the majority of contemporary hip simulators. The track integral can be used in determining the wear factor, making it possible to compare clinical wear rates with those produced by hip simulators. The computation of the wear factor was subsequently improved by replacing the track

  11. An adaptive neural mechanism for acoustic motion perception with varying sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    extracts directional information via a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The mechanism uses only this directional information obtained via specific motor behaviour to learn the angular velocity of unoccluded sound stimuli in motion. In nature however the stimulus being tracked may.......e. extracting information about its direction and velocity. Here we focus on auditory motion perception of sound stimuli, which is poorly understood as compared to its visual counterpart. In earlier work we have developed a bio-inspired neural learning mechanism for acoustic motion perception. The mechanism......Hz in both simulation and practice. Three instances of each stimuli are employed, differing in their movement velocities–0.5 deg / time step, 1.0 deg / time step and 1.5 deg / time step. To validate the approach in practice, we implement the proposed neural mechanism on a wheeled mobile robot and evaluate...

  12. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0 for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Marçon Barroso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. METHODS: A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. CONCLUSION: The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation.

  13. The evaluation of composite dose using deformable image registration in adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chul Hwan; Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seok Yoon; Ye, Soo Young; Kang, Se Sik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    In adaptive radiotherapy(ART), generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue on overall treatment course which is using deformable image registration from multistage images. Also, compared with doses summed by each treatment plan and clinical significance is considered. From the first of May, 2011 to the last of July, 2012. Patients who were given treatment and had the head and neck cancer with 3-dimension conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy, those who were carried out adaptive radiotherapy cause of tumor shrinkage and weight loss. Generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue using deformable image registration was been possible, statistically significant difference was showed to mandible(48.95±3.89 vs 49.10±3.55 Gy), oral cavity(36.93±4.03 vs 38.97±5.08 Gy), parotid gland(35.71±6.22 vs 36.12±6.70 Gy) and temporomandibular joint(18.41±9.60 vs 20.13±10.42 Gy) compared with doses summed by each treatment plan. The results of this study show significant difference between composite dose by deformable image registration and doses summed by each treatment plan, composite dose by deformable image registration may generate more exact evaluation to surrounding normal tissue in adaptive radiotherapy.

  14. Motion synchronization of dual-cylinder pneumatic servo systems with integration of adaptive robust control and cross-coupling approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-yuan MENG; Guo-liang TAO; Ai-min LI; Wei LI

    2014-01-01

    We investigate motion synchronization of dual-cylinder pneumatic servo systems and develop an adaptive robust synchronization controller. The proposed controller incorporates the cross-coupling technology into the integrated direct/indirect adaptive robust control (DIARC) architecture by feeding back the coupled position errors, which are formed by the trajectory tracking errors of two cylinders and the synchronization error between them. The controller employs an online recursive least squares estimation algorithm to obtain accurate estimates of model parameters for reducing the extent of parametric uncertainties, and uses a robust control law to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodeled dynamics, and disturbances. Therefore, asymptotic convergence to zero of both trajectory tracking and synchronization errors can be guaranteed. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  15. The role of regularization in deformable image registration for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardo, D; Peroni, M; Riboldi, M; Alterio, D; Baroni, G; Orecchia, R

    2013-08-01

    Deformable image registration provides a robust mathematical framework to quantify morphological changes that occur along the course of external beam radiotherapy treatments. As clinical reliability of deformable image registration is not always guaranteed, algorithm regularization is commonly introduced to prevent sharp discontinuities in the quantified deformation and achieve anatomically consistent results. In this work we analyzed the influence of regularization on two different registration methods, i.e. B-Splines and Log Domain Diffeomorphic Demons, implemented in an open-source platform. We retrospectively analyzed the simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and the corresponding re-planning computed tomography (CTrepl) scans in 30 head and neck cancer patients. First, we investigated the influence of regularization levels on hounsfield units (HU) information in 10 test patients for each considered method. Then, we compared the registration results of the open-source implementation at selected best performing regularization levels with a clinical commercial software on the remaining 20 patients in terms of mean volume overlap, surface and center of mass distances between manual outlines and propagated structures. The regularized B-Splines method was not statistically different from the commercial software. The tuning of the regularization parameters allowed open-source algorithms to achieve better results in deformable image registration for head and neck patients, with the additional benefit of a framework where regularization can be tuned on a patient specific basis.

  16. Ambulatory human motion tracking by fusion of inertial and magnetic sensing with adaptive actuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Roetenberg, Daniel; Veltink, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years, inertial sensing has proven to be a suitable ambulatory alternative to traditional human motion tracking based on optical position measurement systems, which are generally restricted to a laboratory environment. Besides many advantages, a major drawback is the inherent drift cau

  17. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James; Ruan, Su; Anastasio, Mark; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity coefficient (93.28%  ±  1

  18. Neuro-fuzzy controller of low head hydropower plants using adaptive-network based fuzzy inference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M.B. [Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Power Systems; Calovic, M.S. [Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Vesovic, B.V. [Inst. Mihajlo Pupin, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Automatic Control; Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an attempt of nonlinear, multivariable control of low-head hydropower plants, by using adaptive-network based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The new design technique enhances fuzzy controllers with self-learning capability for achieving prescribed control objectives in a near optimal manner. The controller has flexibility for accepting more sensory information, with the main goal to improve the generator unit transients, by adjusting the exciter input, the wicket gate and runner blade positions. The developed ANFIS controller whose control signals are adjusted by using incomplete on-line measurements, can offer better damping effects to generator oscillations over a wide range of operating conditions, than conventional controllers. Digital simulations of hydropower plant equipped with low-head Kaplan turbine are performed and the comparisons of conventional excitation-governor control, state-feedback optimal control and ANFIS based output feedback control are presented. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme and the robustness of the acquired neuro-fuzzy controller, the controller has been implemented on a complex high-order non-linear hydrogenerator model.

  19. Effects of cervical spine manual therapy on range of motion, head repositioning, and balance in participants with cervicogenic dizziness: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Susan A; Callister, Robin; Katekar, Michael G; Rivett, Darren A

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of 2 manual therapy interventions on cervical spine range of motion (ROM), head repositioning accuracy, and balance in patients with chronic cervicogenic dizziness. Randomized controlled trial with 12-week follow-up using blinded outcome assessment. University School of Health Sciences. Participants (N=86; mean age ± SD, 62.0 ± 12.7 y; 50% women) with chronic cervicogenic dizziness. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs) with self-SNAG exercises, passive joint mobilization (PJM) with ROM exercises, or a placebo. Participants each received 2 to 6 treatments over 6 weeks. Cervical ROM, head repositioning accuracy, and balance. SNAG therapy resulted in improved (P ≤.05) cervical spine ROM in all 6 physiological cervical spine movement directions immediately posttreatment and at 12 weeks. Treatment with PJM resulted in improvement in 1 of the 6 cervical movement directions posttreatment and 1 movement direction at 12 weeks. There was a greater improvement (Pbalance or head repositioning accuracy. SNAG treatment improved cervical ROM, and the effects were maintained for 12 weeks after treatment. PJM had very limited impact on cervical ROM. There was no conclusive effect of SNAGs or PJMs on joint repositioning accuracy or balance in people with cervicogenic dizziness. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging in the Head and Neck: Correlation with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Department of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon 22711 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Young Jin [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 47392 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D{sup *} and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T{sub max}, E{sub max}, initial AUC{sub 60}, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D{sup *} and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D{sup *} (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  1. Intravoxel incoehrent motion MR imaging in the head and neck: Correlation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Beak, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D{sup *} and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T{sub max}, E{sub max}, initial AUC{sub 60}, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D{sup *} and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D{sup *} (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  2. Article Volume : 3 Issue :5 Month : October (2016 ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THORACIC KYPHOSIS, HEAD POSTURE AND CERVICAL RANGE OF MOTION IN ADULTS WITH AND WITHOUT CERVICAL SPINE DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhi Shah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive Thoracic Kyphosis (TK and Forward Head Posture(FHP become more apparent in aging adults from the accumulation of remodeling in response to habitual postures. Faulty posture of the shoulders, neck, and particularly the head may contribute to the onset and perpetuation of cervical pain dysfunction syndrome. Current literature suggests that an association exists between the head posture, thoracic kyphosis and cervical range of motion in individuals with cervical spine dysfunction. Since age as well as cervical spine dysfunction may affect the above parameters, the objective of our research was to study the association between these in adults with and without cervical spine dysfunction. Methods: 50 adults with CSD and 50 adults without CSD were assessed for TK, FHP and Cervical range of motion (CROM by flexicurve method Kipnotic Index (KI, measuring cranio-vertebral angle(CVA using a lateral-view photograph(digitized of the subject and using Universal Goniometer respectively. Results: In both groups, there was increased KI (TK, lesser CVA i.e. FHP and reduced CROM when compared to normative values, however there was no statistical difference in KI and CVA between the two groups (p=0.53,0.75. Cervical extension and rotation ranges were significantly reduced in CSD adults (p=0.00,0.00,0.00. Correlation between CVA and CROM, KI and CROM and KI and CVA was not significant in adults with as well as without CSD (p=0.16-0.51,0.05-0.35,p=0.08-0.69,0.19-0.52,p=0.13,0.94 respectively. Conclusion: Correlation between FHP and CROM,TK and CROM, FHP and TK in adults with and without CSD was not significant.

  3. Adaptive Power Saving Method for Mobile Walking Guidance Device Using Motion Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognize the motion of the user and the surrounding environment with multiple sensors. We developed a guidance system based on mobile device for visually impaired person that helps the user to walk safely to the destination in the previous study. However, a mobile device having multiple sensors spends more power when the sensors are activated simultaneously and continuously. We propose a method for reducing the power consumption of a mobile device by considering the motion context of the user. We analyze and classify the user’s motion accurately by means of a decision tree and HMM (Hidden Markov Model that exploit the data from a triaxial accelerometer sensor and a tilt sensor. We can reduce battery power consumption by controlling the number of active ultrasonic sensors and the frame rate of the camera used to acquire spatial context around the user. This helps us to extend the operating time of the device and reduce the weight of the device’s built-in battery.

  4. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Martin; Svedmark, Åsa; Srinivasan, Divya; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical range of motion (ROM) is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension) or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine. Methods Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition) and maximal protraction (low torque condition) in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM), from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure. Findings Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour. Interpretation The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments. PMID:28099504

  5. Space motion sickness preflight adaptation training Preliminary studies with prototype trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.; Ouyang, L.; Rock, J. C.; Von Gierke, H. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation hypothesis (Parker et al., 1985), preflight adaptation procedures and several preflight adaptation trainers (PATs) have been developed. Two PAT prototypes, the Miami University Seesaw (MUS) and the Dynamic Environmental Simulator (DES), include a physical room that is moved relative to the restrained subject. Results from the MUS and DES PAT experiments indicate that exposure to the produced sensory rearrangement can change eye movement reflexes. The changes persisted for a period longer than the training exposure period, indicating similarity with the eye-movement reflexes observed immediately postflight in weightlessness-adapted astronauts. It is concluded that the apparatus and procedures to preadapt astronauts to the sensory rearrangement of weightless space flight can be developed on the basis of the reported PATs and procedures. The third PAT prototype tested, which employs a computer-generated scene, failed to produce changes similar to those recorded in the MUS and DES experiments.

  6. Application of adaptive inverse filtering approach in weigh-in-motion of vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinsong; Wu, Jie; Wan, Jiuqing; Li, Xingshan

    2006-11-01

    In this paper an adaptive inverse filter is employed which suppress noise within the bandwidth of the desired signal with the particular aim to improve the accuracy of WIM systems. Within the framework of the FIR filter, the inverse system of WIM system is constructed by using LMS adaptive algorithm as an innovative filter. Moreover, an additional filter, a noise filter, is adopted as well, in order to best improvement the measurement accuracy. The final results processed by cascaded filter combination show a significant improvement in estimation of static weight of moving vehicles.

  7. SENSOR-BASED MOTION CONTROLUSING ADAPTIVE NAVIGATION RULES IN THE DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENT FOR MOBILE ROBOT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In the multi-robots system , it's important for a robot to acquire adaptive navigation rules for reaching the goal and avoiding other robots and obstacles and in the real-time environment.An efficient approach to collision-avoidance in multi-robots system is suggested .It is based on velocity information of moving objects and the distances between the robots and the obstacles in three specified directions and makes the robot navigate adaptively without collision with each other in a complicated situation.The effectiveness of algorithm is proved by the several simple examples in the physical world.

  8. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  9. Adaptive mode decision with residual motion compensation for distributed video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Forchhammer, Søren; Slowack, Jurgen;

    2015-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm that entails low complexity encoding by exploiting the source statistics at the decoder. To improve the DVC coding efficiency, this paper proposes a novel adaptive technique for mode decision to control and take advantage of skip mode and intra...

  10. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  11. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  12. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of the use of deformable image registration in adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiland, R B; Maare, Christian; Sjöström, D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out geometric and dosimetric evaluation of the usefulness of a deformable image registration algorithm utilized for adaptive head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Data consisted of seven patients, each with a planning CT (pCT), a rescanning CT (Re...

  13. Motion adaptive patch-based low-rank approach for compressed sensing cardiac cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Huisu; Kim, Kyung Sang; Kim, Daniel; Bresler, Yoram; Ye, Jong Chul

    2014-11-01

    One of the technical challenges in cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to reduce the acquisition time to enable the high spatio-temporal resolution imaging of a cardiac volume within a short scan time. Recently, compressed sensing approaches have been investigated extensively for highly accelerated cine MRI by exploiting transform domain sparsity using linear transforms such as wavelets, and Fourier. However, in cardiac cine imaging, the cardiac volume changes significantly between frames, and there often exist abrupt pixel value changes along time. In order to effectively sparsify such temporal variations, it is necessary to exploit temporal redundancy along motion trajectories. This paper introduces a novel patch-based reconstruction method to exploit geometric similarities in the spatio-temporal domain. In particular, we use a low rank constraint for similar patches along motion, based on the observation that rank structures are relatively less sensitive to global intensity changes, but make it easier to capture moving edges. A Nash equilibrium formulation with relaxation is employed to guarantee convergence. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm clearly reconstructs important anatomical structures in cardiac cine image and provides improved image quality compared to existing state-of-the-art methods such as k-t FOCUSS, k-t SLR, and MASTeR.

  14. The effects of cervical joint manipulation, based on passive motion analysis, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture, and cervical ROM in university students with abnormal posture of the cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Wontae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cervical posture manipulation, based on passive motion analysis (MBPMA) and general mobilization, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture (FHP), and cervical ROM in university students with problems in cervical posture and range of motion (ROM). [Subjects] The Subjects were 40 university students in their 20s who displayed problems in cervical posture and ROM; they were divided into an MBPMA group (n=20) and a mobilization grou...

  15. Bionic Model for Coordinated Head-eye Motion Control%头眼协调运动控制仿生模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛晓波; 陈铁军

    2011-01-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex(VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.%深入分析灵长类动物在注视点转移过程中眼球运动、头部运动及头眼协调运动的关系,将头眼协调运动的神经生理机制引入工程领域,改善机器人视觉系统的头眼协调问题.提出一种仿生型机器人头眼协调运动控制策略,将注视转移过程分为初始的快相和随后的慢相两个阶段.快相组合了高速眼球扫视运动(saccade)眼球运动和缓慢的头部运动,两者协调配合迅速切换注视点至新的目标;慢相通过前庭动眼反射(VOR),依靠头和眼的等量反向旋转运动维持目标稳定的同时,调整头部位置,使其朝向目标.建立了注视转移的仿生控制模型.仿真结果与生理学实验数据进行了对比分析,证明了所提控制策略与控制模型的可行性.

  16. An optimized DSP implementation of adaptive filtering and ICA for motion artifact reduction in ambulatory ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berset, Torfinn; Geng, Di; Romero, Iñaki

    2012-01-01

    Noise from motion artifacts is currently one of the main challenges in the field of ambulatory ECG recording. To address this problem, we propose the use of two different approaches. First, an adaptive filter with electrode-skin impedance as a reference signal is described. Secondly, a multi-channel ECG algorithm based on Independent Component Analysis is introduced. Both algorithms have been designed and further optimized for real-time work embedded in a dedicated Digital Signal Processor. We show that both algorithms improve the performance of a beat detection algorithm when applied in high noise conditions. In addition, an efficient way of choosing this methods is suggested with the aim of reduce the overall total system power consumption.

  17. Can a 5 Week Strength Training Program Produce Range of Motion Adaptations in Amateur Female Tennis Players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. SHIM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess range of motion adaptations in amateur tennis players based on the effects of a five week strength training program on the dominant and non-dominant arm. Subjects: An experimental and control group of six collegiate women tennis players (Div II and NAIA participated. After initial assessment, six subjects participated in a five week, four times a week, pre-season strength training program consisting of five exercises: External Rotation 90°, Seated Row, Scaption, Chest Press, and External Shoulder Rotation (Rubber tubing. Results: Data analysis through a paired t-test showed that there were no significant changes in ROM in the experimental group when compared to the control group. In conclusion, a strength training program is highly recommended for female overhead athletes combined with a proper flexibility regimen to promote best practice.

  18. Motion Planning Using an Impact-Based Hybrid Control for Trajectory Generation in Adaptive Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Asif

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to solve a major drawback of walking robots i.e. their inability to react to environmental disturbances while navigating in natural rough terrains. This problem is reduced here by suggesting the use of a hybrid force‐position control based trajectory generation with the impact dynamics into consideration that compensates for the stability variations, thus helping the robot react stably in the face of environmental disturbances. As a consequence, the proposed impact‐based hybrid control helps the robot achieve better and stable motion planning than conventional position‐based control algorithms. Dynamic simulations and real world outdoor experiments performed on a six legged hexapod robot show a relevant improvement in the robot locomotion.

  19. Multi-optimization Criteria-based Robot Behavioral Adaptability and Motion Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, Francois G.

    2002-06-01

    Robotic tasks are typically defined in Task Space (e.g., the 3-D World), whereas robots are controlled in Joint Space (motors). The transformation from Task Space to Joint Space must consider the task objectives (e.g., high precision, strength optimization, torque optimization), the task constraints (e.g., obstacles, joint limits, non-holonomic constraints, contact or tool task constraints), and the robot kinematics configuration (e.g., tools, type of joints, mobile platform, manipulator, modular additions, locked joints). Commercially available robots are optimized for a specific set of tasks, objectives and constraints and, therefore, their control codes are extremely specific to a particular set of conditions. Thus, there exist a multiplicity of codes, each handling a particular set of conditions, but none suitable for use on robots with widely varying tasks, objectives, constraints, or environments. On the other hand, most DOE missions and tasks are typically ''batches of one''. Attempting to use commercial codes for such work requires significant personnel and schedule costs for re-programming or adding code to the robots whenever a change in task objective, robot configuration, number and type of constraint, etc. occurs. The objective of our project is to develop a ''generic code'' to implement this Task-space to Joint-Space transformation that would allow robot behavior adaptation, in real time (at loop rate), to changes in task objectives, number and type of constraints, modes of controls, kinematics configuration (e.g., new tools, added module). Our specific goal is to develop a single code for the general solution of under-specified systems of algebraic equations that is suitable for solving the inverse kinematics of robots, is useable for all types of robots (mobile robots, manipulators, mobile manipulators, etc.) with no limitation on the number of joints and the number of controlled Task-Space variables, can

  20. Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan S; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Cullen, Kathleen E; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-05-01

    By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith end organs can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head-mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third, and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of 1 week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2-5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans.

  1. Trypanosome Motion Represents an Adaptation to the Crowded Environment of the Vertebrate Bloodstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddergott, Niko; Krüger, Timothy; Babu, Sujin B.; Wei, Ai; Stellamanns, Erik; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Pfohl, Thomas; Stark, Holger; Engstler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Blood is a remarkable habitat: it is highly viscous, contains a dense packaging of cells and perpetually flows at velocities varying over three orders of magnitude. Only few pathogens endure the harsh physical conditions within the vertebrate bloodstream and prosper despite being constantly attacked by host antibodies. African trypanosomes are strictly extracellular blood parasites, which evade the immune response through a system of antigenic variation and incessant motility. How the flagellates actually swim in blood remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the mode and dynamics of trypanosome locomotion are a trait of life within a crowded environment. Using high-speed fluorescence microscopy and ordered micro-pillar arrays we show that the parasites mode of motility is adapted to the density of cells in blood. Trypanosomes are pulled forward by the planar beat of the single flagellum. Hydrodynamic flow across the asymmetrically shaped cell body translates into its rotational movement. Importantly, the presence of particles with the shape, size and spacing of blood cells is required and sufficient for trypanosomes to reach maximum forward velocity. If the density of obstacles, however, is further increased to resemble collagen networks or tissue spaces, the parasites reverse their flagellar beat and consequently swim backwards, in this way avoiding getting trapped. In the absence of obstacles, this flagellar beat reversal occurs randomly resulting in irregular waveforms and apparent cell tumbling. Thus, the swimming behavior of trypanosomes is a surprising example of micro-adaptation to life at low Reynolds numbers. For a precise physical interpretation, we compare our high-resolution microscopic data to results from a simulation technique that combines the method of multi-particle collision dynamics with a triangulated surface model. The simulation produces a rotating cell body and a helical swimming path, providing a functioning simulation method for a

  2. The impact of 8 weeks selected corrective exercises on neck pain, range of motion in the shoulder and neck of lifesaver women who suffering from forward head posture and myofascial pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Tabatabaei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this research was studying the impact of 8 weeks selected corrective exercises on neck pain, range of motion in the shoulder and neck of lifesaver women who suffering from forward head posture and myofascial pain syndrome. Methods: The method of research is semi-experimental. The population consists of 30 lifesaver women who suffering from forward head posture and myofascial pain syndrome who they placed randomly in two groups of experimental (33±2.2 and control (33±2.5. Research plan was as the pre-test and post-test with control group. The exercise protocol was carried out by experimental groups for 8 weeks, 3 sessions per week, each session lasting 45 minutes. Studied variables include myofascial pain in the neck, shoulder and neck range of motion. The mean and standard deviation were used as descriptive statistics and in the section of inferential statistics analysis of covariance was used. Results: Results of research indicated that, the protocol on the reform exercise of neck pain (P=0.001, range of motion of shoulder joint (P=0.001 and neck range of motion (P=0.001 has significant difference. Conclusion: Therefore, lifesavers women can benefit from it as a training program to improve and prevent damage caused by head forward and myofascial pain syndrome.

  3. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics-Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Capps, Arlie G; Kim, Dae Yu; Panorgias, Athanasios; Stevenson, Scott B; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S

    2014-03-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of a retinal image with OCT introduce motion artifacts into the image, complicating analysis and registration. This effect is especially pronounced in high-resolution datasets acquired with AO-OCT instruments. Several retinal tracking systems have been introduced to correct retinal motion during data acquisition. We present a method for correcting motion artifacts in AO-OCT volume data after acquisition using simultaneously captured adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) images. We extract transverse eye motion data from the AO-SLO images, assign a motion adjustment vector to each AO-OCT A-scan, and re-sample from the scattered data back onto a regular grid. The corrected volume data improve the accuracy of quantitative analyses of microscopic structures.

  4. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics–Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Capps, Arlie G.; Kim, Dae Yu; Panorgias, Athanasios; Stevenson, Scott B.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of a retinal image with OCT introduce motion artifacts into the image, complicating analysis and registration. This effect is especially pronounced in high-resolution datasets acquired with AO-OCT instruments. Several retinal tracking systems have been introduced to correct retinal motion during data acquisition. We present a method for correcting motion artifacts in AO-OCT volume data after acquisition using simultaneously captured adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) images. We extract transverse eye motion data from the AO-SLO images, assign a motion adjustment vector to each AO-OCT A-scan, and re-sample from the scattered data back onto a regular grid. The corrected volume data improve the accuracy of quantitative analyses of microscopic structures. PMID:25544826

  5. DNA cleavage site selection by Type III restriction enzymes provides evidence for head-on protein collisions following 1D bidirectional motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Friedrich W.; van Aelst, Kara; Tóth, Júlia; Seidel, Ralf; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III Restriction–Modification enzymes requires communication in 1D between two distant indirectly-repeated recognitions sites, yet results in non-specific dsDNA cleavage close to only one of the two sites. To test a recently proposed ATP-triggered DNA sliding model, we addressed why one site is selected over another during cleavage. We examined the relative cleavage of a pair of identical sites on DNA substrates with different distances to a free or protein blocked end, and on a DNA substrate using different relative concentrations of protein. Under these conditions a bias can be induced in the cleavage of one site over the other. Monte-Carlo simulations based on the sliding model reproduce the experimentally observed behaviour. This suggests that cleavage site selection simply reflects the dynamics of the preceding stochastic enzyme events that are consistent with bidirectional motion in 1D and DNA cleavage following head-on protein collision. PMID:21724613

  6. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  7. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lourenço, Ana Mónica [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Acoustics and Ionizing Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Mouinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; McClelland, Jamie R. [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used to propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of

  8. 一种人体头部运动姿态的测量方法%A Method of Measurement of Human Head Motion Attitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾培刚; 王少梅

    2011-01-01

    为了解决人体头部在空间环境中运动时,头部的不良姿态对人体身心健康的影响,设计了一种三维姿态传感器用于测量人体头部运动姿态.三维姿态传感器以单片机为处理核心,恒温系统保证系统的测量精度,两路MEMS高精度加速度传感器测量X轴和Y轴姿态,MEMS磁强计测量Z轴姿态,测得的姿态信号经过16位ADC转换器进行模数转换后,由单片机完成数据处理,通过CAN将三种初始姿态信息欧拉角、方向余弦和四元数传输到计算机.用户可以根据不同需要选择一种初始数据采用专用软件实时计算所需的姿态角、速度和位移量等姿态信息.通过计算结果分析,得出人们在不同环境空间里人体身心最佳状态时头部运动的角度、速度和位移等的姿态信息范围,为人们在以后的生活和工作中更好的调控人体头部姿态提供一个标准,使人体始终处在一个舒适愉悦的状态.实验结果表明三维姿态传感器的测量精度分别达到0.08°、0.03°、0.05°,达到了一般实际工程的测量精度要求,且此方法快速、简单、切实可行.%A sensor of 3D attitude is designed to measure the human head motion attitude in order to analyze the problem that the defective human head motion attitude affects the physical and mental health. The core is MCU in the 3D attitude sensor, whose constant temperature system can ensure the measurement accuracy of the system. Two high accuracy acceleration sensors of MEMS measure attitude of X axis and Y axis respectively, and MEMS magnetometer measures the attitude of Z axis. After these measurements being converted by 16-bit ADC, data is managed by MCU, and three initial informations, such as eulerian angles, direction cosine and quaternions,are transmited to computer by CAN. One group of initial data can be chosen as needed to calculate attitude angle, rate or displacement of attitude information in real time by dedicated

  9. Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibault, Johanna; Vaillant, Jacques; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Dedering, Åsa; Peolsson, Anneli

    2013-10-01

    This study had two purposes: to compare head repositioning accuracy (HRA) using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device between individuals with cervical radiculopathy caused by disc disease (CDD; n = 71) and neck- healthy individuals (n = 173); and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD, and criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals, with quantification of measurement errors. Parameters of reliability and validity were expressed with intra- class- correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement errors with standard error of measurement (SEM) and Bland Altman limits of agreement. HRA (Mdn, IQR) differed significantly between individuals with CDD and neck- healthy individuals after rotation right 2.7° (6.0), 1.7° (2.7); and rotation left 2.7° (3.3), 1.3° (2.7) (p < = 0.021); 31% of individuals with CDD were classified as having impairment in HRA. The test-retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD showed ICCs of 0.79- 0.85, and SEMs of 1.4°- 2°. The criterion validity between the CROM device and the laser in neck-healthy individuals showed ICCs of 0.43- 0.91 and SEMs of 0.8°- 1.3°. The results support the use of the CROM device for quantifying HRA impairment in individuals with CDD in clinical practice; however, criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals was questionable. HRA impairment in individuals with CDD may be important to consider during rehabilitation and evaluated with the criterion established with the CROM device in neck-healthy individuals.

  10. Eye-head coordination abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eye-movement abnormalities in schizophrenia are a well-established phenomenon that has been observed in many studies. In such studies, visual targets are usually presented in the center of the visual field, and the subject's head remains fixed. However, in every-day life, targets may also appear in the periphery. This study is among the first to investigate eye and head movements in schizophrenia by presenting targets in the periphery of the visual field. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two different visual recognition tasks, color recognition and Landolt orientation tasks, were presented at the periphery (at a visual angle of 55° from the center of the field of view. Each subject viewed 96 trials, and all eye and head movements were simultaneously recorded using video-based oculography and magnetic motion tracking of the head. Data from 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 controls were considered. The patients had similar saccadic latencies in both tasks, whereas controls had shorter saccadic latencies in the Landolt task. Patients performed more head movements, and had increased eye-head offsets during combined eye-head shifts than controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Patients with schizophrenia may not be able to adapt to the two different tasks to the same extent as controls, as seen by the former's task-specific saccadic latency pattern. This can be interpreted as a specific oculomotoric attentional dysfunction and may support the hypothesis that schizophrenia patients have difficulties determining the relevance of stimuli. Patients may also show an uneconomic over-performance of head-movements, which is possibly caused by alterations in frontal executive function that impair the inhibition of head shifts. In addition, a model was created explaining 93% of the variance of the response times as a function of eye and head amplitude, which was only observed in the controls, indicating abnormal eye-head coordination in patients

  11. Adaptive and Challenged Parenting among African American Mothers: Parenting Profiles Relate to Head Start Children's Aggression and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Johanna L.; Mendez, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: This study used a within-group research design and person-centered analytic methods to identify multidimensional profiles of parenting styles, parenting practices, and related emotional factors in a sample of 274 African American mothers recruited from Head Start programs in the northeastern and southeastern United States.…

  12. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of standard-dose and low-dose pediatric head computed tomography: a retrospective study assessing the effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Koray; Erbas, Gonca; Guryildirim, Melike; Konus, Oznur Leman; Arac, Mehmet; Ilgit, Erhan; Isik, Sedat

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on pediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. We retrospectively reviewed 305 pediatric head CT examinations. The study population consisted of standard dose (STD, n = 152) examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection and low dose (LD, n = 153) examinations reconstructed with 30% (LD30) and 0% (LD0) ASIR. We compared groups by means of radiation dose, noise measures, and visual grading. Student t test, 1-way analysis of variance test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis. The dose in the LD30 group was significantly lower (29%) than that in the STD group (P < 0.001). The noise in the white matter (P < 0.001), SNR (P < 0.001), and subjective image noise (P = 0.044) was significantly better in the STD group than those in the LD30 group. There was no significant difference between LD30 and STD groups in the sharpness (P = 0.141), diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.079), and artifacts (P = 0.750) and contrast-to-noise ratio (P = 0.718). In conclusion, we found that a blend of 30% ASIR in a 16-slice multidetector CT produces diagnostically acceptable pediatric head CT examinations with a 29% less dose.

  13. A Motion Adaptive De-interlacing Technique and VLSI Architecture%一种运动自适应去隔行技术及其VLSI结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    普玉伟; 叶兵; 曾德瑞; 蒋特林

    2011-01-01

    An efficient motion adaptive de-interlacing is proposed in this paper. The mixing pixels is classified to fast motion, slow motion or static region according to the motion detection of the same parity field, the corresponding interpolation method is used in different motion region. The edge detection uses the improved ELA algorithm which overcomes the traditional ELA algorithm's deficiency at processing horizontal edge, and the edge is preserved effectively. Compared with motion compensated algorithm, our proposed algorithm required lower computational complexity, and it is easier to implement by VLSI .The experiment shows that the proposed algorithm gains better de-interlacing and high peak signal-to-noise ratio.%提出一种有效的运动自适应去隔行算法.该算法通过对同极性的相邻场进行运动检测,把插值点所处的区域分为快速运动区域、慢速运动区域和静止区域,对不同的区域采用不同的插值算法.在边缘检测方面,采用改进型ELA算法克服了传统的ELA算法处理水平边缘方面的不足,使边缘得到有效保护.与运动补偿算法相比,该算法计算复杂度较低,易于VLSI实现.实验结果显示,该算法取得了良好的去隔行效果和较高的峰值信噪比.

  14. Effect of inherent misalignment and head motion in neurological PET/MR with the Philips Ingenuity TF – phantom and patient study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuho, Jarmo; Johansson, Jarkko; Saunavaara, Virva; Kemppainen, Nina; Teräs, Mika [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2014-07-29

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of misalignment and head motion on image quantification in PET/MR with a novel brain phantom and a healthy control group. The phantom was imaged at two time points in PET/MR, concurrently with PET and PET/CT. Phantom images were evaluated visually and the relative difference in hemispheric accumulation was calculated. Difference in cortical accumulation in a healthy control group was evaluated from non-attenuation corrected (NAC) and MR attenuation corrected (MRAC) images. Regional ROI mean values from F{sup 18}-FDG ratio images and regional hemispheric asymmetries were calculated. Controls were divided to high and low asymmetry groups. A student’s t-test (p<0.005) for group difference and NAC versus MRAC data was performed. Finally, mean PET-MR registration parameters were measured. Only the first phantom scan exhibited asymmetry in lateral frontal cortex (17%) and temporal cortex (19%). Correcting the misalignment of 2.63mm reduced the asymmetry to less than 5%, to a level seen in PET and PET/CT. A significant asymmetry was found in the temporal and parietal cortex between groups in MRAC data with no significant asymmetry in NAC data. Asymmetries in affected MRAC data in temporal and parietal cortex were 9.4% and 11.7%. NAC data from both groups had asymmetry less than 5% in all regions. Both groups had significant y- and z-translation, while only the asymmetry group had significant z-rotation and x-translation. The shift in x-, y-, or z-direction in both groups was less than 4 mm, with no significant differences. Thus, PET-MRAC misalignment may cause under- and overestimation of attenuation in the lines of response on opposite sides of the cortical regions, resulting to asymmetric difference between the hemispheres. Our findings stress the need for novel QC procedures for PET-MR alignment and suggest confirming the quality of PET-MRAC alignment from PET-NAC images.

  15. Numerical simulation of ship motions in irregular head waves%船模不规则波中顶浪运动数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石博文; 刘正江; 吴明

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics simulation method was developed to establish a 3D viscous nu-merical wave tank (NWT), and high precision irregular waves of ITTC spectrum and white noise spectrum were generated. The problem of surface ship free motion in irregular head waves is predicted by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations describing the flow around ship and the kinematics equation of rigid body simultaneously, and the moving grid method was used, which let all grids moving together according to the calculation results in each time step. The pitch and heave transfer functions for ship model DTMB5512 in irregular wave were obtained. The simulation results are examined by the com-parisons with strip theoretical results and experimental data from IIHR, and show good agreement, which demonstrates the ability of the present method to assess seakeeping characteristics.%基于粘性流理论建立了三维数值波浪水池,生成了高精度的ITTC谱和白噪声波谱的长峰不规则波,通过同时求解描述船舶流场的RANS方程和刚体运动学方程,结合网格整体移动方法,实现了船模不规则波中顶浪运动的数值模拟,给出了DTMB5512船模不规则波中顶浪纵摇和垂荡运动时历,并通过频谱分析得到了纵摇和垂荡的频率响应函数,与势流理论计算结果及IIHR船模水池试验数据进行了比对,均吻合良好,证明了文中方法研究船舶耐波性问题的可行性。

  16. A vision-based system for measuring the displacements of large structures: Simultaneous adaptive calibration and full motion estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C. Almeida; Costa, C. Oliveira; Batista, J.

    2016-05-01

    The paper describes a kinematic model-based solution to estimate simultaneously the calibration parameters of the vision system and the full-motion (6-DOF) of large civil engineering structures, namely of long deck suspension bridges, from a sequence of stereo images captured by digital cameras. Using an arbitrary number of images and assuming a smooth structure motion, an Iterated Extended Kalman Filter is used to recursively estimate the projection matrices of the cameras and the structure full-motion (displacement and rotation) over time, helping to meet the structure health monitoring fulfilment. Results related to the performance evaluation, obtained by numerical simulation and with real experiments, are reported. The real experiments were carried out in indoor and outdoor environment using a reduced structure model to impose controlled motions. In both cases, the results obtained with a minimum setup comprising only two cameras and four non-coplanar tracking points, showed a high accuracy results for on-line camera calibration and structure full motion estimation.

  17. An SRWNN-based approach on developing a self-learning and self-evolving adaptive control system for motion platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onur Ari, Evrim; Kocaoglan, Erol

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a self-recurrent wavelet neural network (SRWNN)-based indirect adaptive control architecture is modified for performing speed control of a motion platform. The transient behaviour of the original learning algorithm has been improved by modifying the learning rate updates. The contribution of the proposed modification has been verified via both simulations and experiments. Moreover, the performance of the proposed architecture is compared with robust RST designs performed on a similar benchmark system, to show that via adaptive nonlinear control, it is possible to obtain a fast step response without degrading the robustness of a multi-body mechanical system. Finally, the architecture is further improved so as to possess structural learning for populating the SRWNNs automatically, rather than employing static network structures, and simulation results are provided to show the performance of the proposed structural learning algorithm.

  18. Observation of dynamic wavelength shifts of a four-beam laser diode and study of its adaptability to optical heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, M; Kime, K

    1995-04-01

    Dynamic wavelength shifts for a four-beam laser diode were observed with a streak camera system. The wavelength shift does not exceed 2 nm for pulsed laser beam operation at a bottom power of 5 mW and a peak power of 40 mW. For a 5-mW continuous operation laser beam, the induced wavelength shift in the presence of another laser beam under the above pulse condition does not exceed 1 nm. The observed wavelength shifts are small enough for practical use, and this four-beam laser diode can be successfully applied to multibeam optical heads for parallel data processing.

  19. Head movements while steering around bends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Oving, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of head motions (rotations) when driving around bends were investigated when drivers viewed the scene through a head-mounted display. The scene camera was either fixed or coupled to head motions along 2 or 3 axes of rotation. Eight participants drove around a

  20. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  1. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T., E-mail: s.heijkoop@erasmusmc.nl; Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  2. What Is the Critical Value of Glenoid Bone Loss at Which Soft Tissue Bankart Repair Does Not Restore Glenohumeral Translation, Restricts Range of Motion, and Leads to Abnormal Humeral Head Position?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Koh, Yong Won; Bui, Christopher; Jeong, Woong Kyo; Akeda, Masaki; Cho, Nam Su; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-11-01

    A general consensus has been formed that glenoid bone loss greater than 20% to 25% is the critical amount at which bony augmentation procedures are needed; however, recent clinical results suggest that the critical levels must be reconsidered to lower values. This study aimed to find the critical value of anterior glenoid bone loss when a soft tissue repair is not adequate to restore anterior-inferior glenohumeral translation, rotational range of motion, or humeral head position using a biomechanical anterior shoulder instability model. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested with a customized shoulder testing system. Range of motion, translation, and humeral head position were measured at 60° of glenohumeral abduction in the scapular plane under a total of 40-N rotator cuff muscle loading in the following 11 conditions: intact; soft tissue Bankart lesion and repair; Bankart lesion with 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% glenoid bone defects based on the largest anteroposterior width of the glenoid; and soft tissue Bankart repair for each respective glenoid defect. Serial osteotomies for each percentage of bone loss were made parallel to the long axis of the glenoid. There was significantly decreased external rotation (121.2° ± 2.8° to 113.5° ± 3.3°; P = .004), increased anteroinferior translation with an externally applied load (3.0 ± 1.2 mm to 7.5 ± 1.1 mm at 20 N; P = .008), and increased posterior (0.2 ± 0.6 mm to 2.7 ± 0.8 mm; P = .049) and inferior shift (2.9 ± 0.7 mm to 6.6 ± 1.1 mm; P = .018) of the humeral head apex in the position of maximum external rotation after soft tissue Bankart repair of a 15% glenoid defect compared with the repair of a Bankart lesion without a glenoid defect, respectively. Glenoid defects of 15% or more of the largest anteroposterior glenoid width should be considered the critical bone loss amount at which soft tissue repair cannot restore glenohumeral translation, restricts rotational range of motion

  3. Ambiguous Tilt and Translation Motion Cues after Space Flight and Otolith Assessment during Post-Flight Re-Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clarke, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Rupert, A. H.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes during space flight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation and perceptual illusions following Gtransitions. These studies are designed to examine both the physiological basis and operational implications for disorientation and tilt-translation disturbances following short duration space flights.

  4. MO-C-17A-06: Online Adaptive Re-Planning to Account for Independent Motions Between Multiple Targets During Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, F; Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional independent motions between multiple targets in radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer, and to study the dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning method to account for these variations. Methods: Ninety five diagnostic-quality daily CTs acquired for 9 lung cancer patients treated with IGRT using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. On each daily CT set, contours of the targets (GTV, CTV, or involved nodes) and organs at risk were generated by populating the planning contours using an auto-segmentation tool (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing. For each patient, an IMRT plan was generated based on the planning CT with a prescription dose of 60 Gy in 2Gy fractions. Three plans were generated and compared for each daily CT set: an IGRT (repositioning) plan by copying the original plan with the required shifts, an online adaptive plan by rapidly modifying the aperture shapes and segment weights of the original plan to conform to the daily anatomy, and a new fully re-optimized plan based on the daily CT using a planning system (Panther, Prowess). Results: The daily deviations of the distance between centers of masses of the targets from the plans varied daily from -10 to 8 mm with an average −0.9±4.1 mm (one standard deviation). The average CTV V100 are 99.0±0.7%, 97.9±2.8%, 99.0±0.6%, and 99.1±0.6%, and the lung V20 Gy 928±332 cc, 944±315 cc, 917±300 cc, and 891±295 cc for the original, repositioning, adaptive, and re-optimized plans, respectively. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests show that the adaptive plans are statistically significantly better than the repositioning plans and comparable with the reoptimized plans. Conclusion: There exist unpredictable, interfractional, relative volume changes and independent motions between multiple targets during lung cancer RT which cannot be accounted for by the current IGRT repositioning but can be corrected by the online adaptive replanning method.

  5. Adaptation of the Euler-Lagrange equation for studying one-dimensional motions in a constant force

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Clenilda F; Silva, Gislene M; Santos, Creuza A S; Barros, Pedro; Carvalho-Santos, Vagson L

    2012-01-01

    In this work we have shown that the Euler-Lagrange equation (ELE) can be simplified for one-dimensional motions. By using the partial derivative operators definition, we have proposed two operators, here called \\textit{mean delta operators}, which may be used to solve the ELE in a simplest way. We have applied this simplification to solve three known mechanical problems: a free fall body, the Atwood's machine and the inclinated plan. The proposed simplification may be used for introducing the lagrangian formalism for classical mechanics in introductory physics students, e.g., high school or undergraduate students in the beginning of engineering, mathematics and/or physics courses.

  6. Technical concept and evaluation of a novel shoulder simulator with adaptive muscle force generation and free motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verjans Mark

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human shoulder is one of the most complex joints of the human body, and due to the high range of motion and the complex soft tissue apparatus prone to injuries. Surgical therapies and joint replacements often lead to unsatisfactory results. To improve the understanding of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder, experimental investigations have to be conducted. For this purpose a new shoulder simulator with an innovative muscle force generation was developed. On the basis of a modular concept six artificial pneumatic muscles were integrated to represent the functionally most important muscles of the shoulder joint, whereby a free and controlled movement of the humerus can be conducted. For each muscle individual setpoints for muscle length control based on a user defined shoulder movement for any artificial or cadaver specimen are created by manual motion “Teach-In”. Additional to muscle forces and lengths, optical tracking and a joint force measurement is used to enable different biomechanical studies of the shoulder joint. This paper describes the technical setup as well as the control strategy and first results of its experimental functional validation.

  7. Keep Your Head in the Gutter: Engendering Empathy Through Participatory Delusion in Christian de Metter's Graphic Adaptation of Shutter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servitje, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    This paper argues that the graphic adaptation of Dennis Lehane's Shutter Island utilizes the medium to evoke an affective participation and investment from the reader. It explores the ways the graphic novel overcomes problematic representations of mental illness in the popular film version. Drawing on graphic fiction theory, I contend that readers' engagement in and construction of the story between panels, in the "gutters," allows them to participate in the protagonist's persecutory delusion. Additionally, I draw on Foucault's conceptualizations of the medical gaze and historical figurations of madness connected to water in order to demonstrate the mechanism by which the reader is placed in a dual subject position, becoming both observer and observed. In this capacity, I suggest that graphic fiction provides a unique experience to engender empathy for psychiatric illness.

  8. Evaluation of atlas based auto-segmentation for head and neck target volume delineation in adaptive/replan IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, R.; Karakaya, E.; Prestwich, R.; Sen, M.; Lindsay, R.; Harding, R.; Sykes, J.

    2014-03-01

    IMRT for head and neck patients requires clinicians to delineate clinical target volumes (CTV) on a planning-CT (>2hrs/patient). When patients require a replan-CT, CTVs must be re-delineated. This work assesses the performance of atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS), which uses deformable image registration between planning and replan-CTs to auto-segment CTVs on the replan-CT, based on the planning contours. Fifteen patients with planning-CT and replan-CTs were selected. One clinician delineated CTVs on the planning-CTs and up to three clinicians delineated CTVs on the replan-CTs. Replan-CT volumes were auto-segmented using ABAS using the manual CTVs from the planning-CT as an atlas. ABAS CTVs were edited manually to make them clinically acceptable. Clinicians were timed to estimate savings using ABAS. CTVs were compared using dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean distance to agreement (MDA). Mean inter-observer variability (DSC>0.79 and MDA0.91 and MDAABAS to manual CTVs gave DSC=0.86 and MDA=2.07mm. Once edited, ABAS volumes agreed more closely with the manual CTVs (DSC=0.87 and MDA=1.87mm). The mean clinician time required to produce CTVs reduced from 169min to 57min when using ABAS. ABAS segments volumes with accuracy close to inter-observer variability however the volumes require some editing before clinical use. Using ABAS reduces contouring time by a factor of three.

  9. 双足跳跃机器人的适应性 CPG 运动控制%Adaptive Motion Control of a Biped Jumping Robot Based on CPG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婷婷; 富生; 郭伟; 李满天; 孙立宁

    2014-01-01

    为解决双足跳跃机器人在突发状况下的适应性控制问题,依据生物中枢模式发生器(CPG)运动控制原理,建立了可变结构的 CPG 运动控制机制;模拟生物神经网络的自重构特性,在运动控制机制中添加了时间延迟响应环节,用于突发状况的判断与调节。在机器人肢体突发故障或运动受到限制时,此机制可通过对自身状态的感知自发地调整神经网络结构,以继续维持稳定的运动。最后,在仿真平台上验证了此控制机制在正常行走与肢体自由度突然受到限制2种情况下的控制效果。%For solving the adapt control problem of biped hopping robot in unexpected situations,we build a CPG control mechanism which is able to change its control structure according to robot motion status simulating the CPG control mechanism in animals.Imi-tating the self reconfigurable feature of animal control mechanism,a time delayed response link is added to this control mechanism,for judging and adjusting the robot motion under unexpected situations.When the limbs of robot suddenly fails or the motion of robot limb is restricted,this control mechanism can sponta-neously adjust the structure of neural network accord-ing to perception of the robot motion status,and main-tain stable hopping motion.Finally,this control mecha-nism is studied on a simulation platform under two situations:normal hopping and hopping when one robotlimb suddenly fails.

  10. WE-G-BRD-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An Integrated Model-Based Intrafractional Organ Motion Tracking Approach with Dynamic MRI in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Dolly, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Wooten, H; Gay, H; Mutic, S; Thorstad, W; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay incorporated, Oakwood Village, Ohio (United States); Ruan, S [University of Rouen, QuantIF - EA 4108 LITIS, Rouen (France); Low, D [Deparment of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In-treatment dynamic cine images, provided by the first commercially available MRI-guided radiotherapy system, allow physicians to observe intrafractional motion of head and neck (H&N) internal structures. Nevertheless, high anatomical complexity and relatively poor cine image contrast/resolution have complicated automatic intrafractional motion evaluation. We proposed an integrated model-based approach to automatically delineate and analyze moving structures from on-board cine images. Methods: The H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein severe internal motion often occurs, was selected as the target-to-be-tracked. To reliably capture its motion, a hierarchical structure model containing three statistical shapes (face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) was first built from a set of manually delineated shapes using principal component analysis. An integrated model-fitting algorithm was then employed to align the statistical shapes to the first to-be-detected cine frame, and multi-feature level-set contour propagation was performed to identify the airway shape change in the remaining frames. Ninety sagittal cine MR image sets, acquired from three H&N cancer patients, were utilized to demonstrate this approach. Results: The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 20 randomly selected images from each patient. The resulting dice similarity coefficient (93.28+/−1.46 %) and margin error (0.49+/−0.12 mm) showed good agreement with the manual results. Intrafractional displacements of anterior, posterior, inferior, and superior airway boundaries were observed, with values of 2.62+/−2.92, 1.78+/−1.43, 3.51+/−3.99, and 0.68+/−0.89 mm, respectively. The H&N airway motion was found to vary across directions, fractions, and patients, and highly correlated with patients’ respiratory frequency. Conclusion: We proposed the integrated computational approach, which for the first

  11. Can use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction reduce radiation dose in unenhanced head CT? An analysis of qualitative and quantitative image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerås, Bjørn Helge; Heggen, Kristin Livelten; Pedersen, Hans Kristian; Andersen, Hilde Kjernlie; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2016-08-01

    Iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and thereby facilitate dose reduction. To evaluate qualitative and quantitative image quality for full dose and dose reduced head computed tomography (CT) protocols reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Fourteen patients undergoing follow-up head CT were included. All patients underwent full dose (FD) exam and subsequent 15% dose reduced (DR) exam, reconstructed using FBP and 30% ASIR. Qualitative image quality was assessed using visual grading characteristics. Quantitative image quality was assessed using ROI measurements in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white matter, peripheral and central gray matter. Additionally, quantitative image quality was measured in Catphan and vendor's water phantom. There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between FD FBP and DR ASIR. Comparing same scan FBP versus ASIR, a noise reduction of 28.6% in CSF and between -3.7 and 3.5% in brain parenchyma was observed. Comparing FD FBP versus DR ASIR, a noise reduction of 25.7% in CSF, and -7.5 and 6.3% in brain parenchyma was observed. Image contrast increased in ASIR reconstructions. Contrast-to-noise ratio was improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP. In phantoms, noise reduction was in the range of 3 to 28% with image content. There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between full dose FBP and dose reduced ASIR. CNR improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP mostly due to increased contrast, not reduced noise. Therefore, we recommend using caution if reducing dose and applying ASIR to maintain image quality.

  12. Automated tube voltage adaptation in head and neck computed tomography between 120 and 100 kV: effects on image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); University Erlangen, Imaging Science Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Kramer, Manuel R.; Eller, Achim; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Brand, Michael; Saake, Marc [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Low tube voltage allows for computed tomography (CT) imaging with increased iodine contrast at reduced radiation dose. We sought to evaluate the image quality and potential dose reduction using a combination of attenuation based tube current modulation (TCM) and automated tube voltage adaptation (TVA) between 100 and 120 kV in CT of the head and neck. One hundred thirty consecutive patients with indication for head and neck CT were examined with a 128-slice system capable of TCM and TVA. Reference protocol was set at 120 kV. Tube voltage was reduced to 100 kV whenever proposed by automated analysis of the localizer. An additional small scan aligned to the jaw was performed at a fixed 120 kV setting. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists on a standardized Likert-scale and measurements of signal- (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Radiation dose was assessed as CTDI{sub vol}. Diagnostic image quality was excellent in both groups and did not differ significantly (p = 0.34). Image noise in the 100 kV data was increased and SNR decreased (17.8/9.6) in the jugular veins and the sternocleidomastoid muscle when compared to 120 kV (SNR 24.4/10.3), but not in fatty tissue and air. However, CNR did not differ statistically significant between 100 (23.5/14.4/9.4) and 120 kV data (24.2/15.3/8.6) while radiation dose was decreased by 7-8 %. TVA between 100 and 120 kV in combination with TCM led to a radiation dose reduction compared to TCM alone, while keeping CNR constant though maintaining diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  13. Automated tube voltage adaptation in head and neck computed tomography between 120 and 100 kV: effects on image quality and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Kramer, Manuel R; Eller, Achim; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Brand, Michael; Saake, Marc; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Low tube voltage allows for computed tomography (CT) imaging with increased iodine contrast at reduced radiation dose. We sought to evaluate the image quality and potential dose reduction using a combination of attenuation based tube current modulation (TCM) and automated tube voltage adaptation (TVA) between 100 and 120 kV in CT of the head and neck. One hundred thirty consecutive patients with indication for head and neck CT were examined with a 128-slice system capable of TCM and TVA. Reference protocol was set at 120 kV. Tube voltage was reduced to 100 kV whenever proposed by automated analysis of the localizer. An additional small scan aligned to the jaw was performed at a fixed 120 kV setting. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists on a standardized Likert-scale and measurements of signal- (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Radiation dose was assessed as CTDIvol. Diagnostic image quality was excellent in both groups and did not differ significantly (p = 0.34). Image noise in the 100 kV data was increased and SNR decreased (17.8/9.6) in the jugular veins and the sternocleidomastoid muscle when compared to 120 kV (SNR 24.4/10.3), but not in fatty tissue and air. However, CNR did not differ statistically significant between 100 (23.5/14.4/9.4) and 120 kV data (24.2/15.3/8.6) while radiation dose was decreased by 7-8%. TVA between 100 and 120 kV in combination with TCM led to a radiation dose reduction compared to TCM alone, while keeping CNR constant though maintaining diagnostic image quality.

  14. A three-dimensional head-and-neck phantom for validation of multimodality deformable image registration for adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhrao, Kamal; Kirby, Neil; Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a three-dimensional (3D) deformable head-and-neck (H and N) phantom with realistic tissue contrast for both kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging modalities and use it to objectively evaluate deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: The phantom represents H and N patient anatomy. It is constructed from thermoplastic, which becomes pliable in boiling water, and hardened epoxy resin. Using a system of additives, the Hounsfield unit (HU) values of these materials were tuned to mimic anatomy for both kV and MV imaging. The phantom opens along a sagittal midsection to reveal radiotransparent markers, which were used to characterize the phantom deformation. The deformed and undeformed phantoms were scanned with kV and MV imaging modalities. Additionally, a calibration curve was created to change the HUs of the MV scans to be similar to kV HUs, (MC). The extracted ground-truth deformation was then compared to the results of two commercially available DIR algorithms, from Velocity Medical Solutions and MIM software. Results: The phantom produced a 3D deformation, representing neck flexion, with a magnitude of up to 8 mm and was able to represent tissue HUs for both kV and MV imaging modalities. The two tested deformation algorithms yielded vastly different results. For kV–kV registration, MIM produced mean and maximum errors of 1.8 and 11.5 mm, respectively. These same numbers for Velocity were 2.4 and 7.1 mm, respectively. For MV–MV, kV–MV, and kV–MC Velocity produced similar mean and maximum error values. MIM, however, produced gross errors for all three of these scenarios, with maximum errors ranging from 33.4 to 41.6 mm. Conclusions: The application of DIR across different imaging modalities is particularly difficult, due to differences in tissue HUs and the presence of imaging artifacts. For this reason, DIR algorithms must be validated specifically for this purpose. The developed H and N phantom is an effective tool

  15. Adaptive network models of collective decision making in swarming systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Huepe, Cristián; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    We consider a class of adaptive network models where links can only be created or deleted between nodes in different states. These models provide an approximate description of a set of systems where nodes represent agents moving in physical or abstract space, the state of each node represents the agent's heading direction, and links indicate mutual awareness. We show analytically that the adaptive network description captures a phase transition to collective motion in some swarming systems, such as the Vicsek model, and that the properties of this transition are determined by the number of states (discrete heading directions) that can be accessed by each agent.

  16. Adaptive network models of collective decision making in swarming systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li; Gross, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    We consider a class of adaptive network models where links can only be created or deleted between nodes in different states. These models provide an approximate description of a set of systems where nodes represent agents moving in physical or abstract space, the state of each node represents the agent's heading direction, and links indicate mutual awareness. We show analytically that the adaptive network description captures the phase transition to collective motion in swarming systems and that the properties of this transition are determined by the number of states (discrete heading directions) that can be accessed by each agent.

  17. Motion-capture-based walking simulation of digital human adapted to laser-scanned 3D as-is environments for accessibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Maruyama

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to our rapidly aging society, accessibility evaluation to enhance the ease and safety of access to indoor and outdoor environments for the elderly and disabled is increasing in importance. Accessibility must be assessed not only from the general standard aspect but also in terms of physical and cognitive friendliness for users of different ages, genders, and abilities. Meanwhile, human behavior simulation has been progressing in the areas of crowd behavior analysis and emergency evacuation planning. However, in human behavior simulation, environment models represent only “as-planned” situations. In addition, a pedestrian model cannot generate the detailed articulated movements of various people of different ages and genders in the simulation. Therefore, the final goal of this research was to develop a virtual accessibility evaluation by combining realistic human behavior simulation using a digital human model (DHM with “as-is” environment models. To achieve this goal, we developed an algorithm for generating human-like DHM walking motions, adapting its strides, turning angles, and footprints to laser-scanned 3D as-is environments including slopes and stairs. The DHM motion was generated based only on a motion-capture (MoCap data for flat walking. Our implementation constructed as-is 3D environment models from laser-scanned point clouds of real environments and enabled a DHM to walk autonomously in various environment models. The difference in joint angles between the DHM and MoCap data was evaluated. Demonstrations of our environment modeling and walking simulation in indoor and outdoor environments including corridors, slopes, and stairs are illustrated in this study.

  18. Adaptive radiation therapy in head and neck cancer for clinical practice: state of the art and practical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veresezan, Ovidiu; Troussier, Idriss; Lacout, Alexis; Kreps, Sarah; Maillard, Sophie; Toulemonde, Aude; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Huguet, Florence; Thariat, Juliette

    2017-02-01

    Modern radiation therapy techniques are characterized by high conformality to tumor volumes and steep dose gradients to spare normal organs. These techniques require accurate clinical target volume definitions and rigorous assessment of set up uncertainties using image guidance, a concept called image-guided radiation therapy. Due to alteration of patient anatomy, changes in tissue density/volumes and tumor shrinkage over the course of treatment, treatment accuracy may be challenged. This may result in excessive irradiation of organs at risk/healthy tissues and undercoverage of target volumes with a significant risk of locoregional failure. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a concept allowing the clinician to reconsider the planned dose based on potential changes to accurately delivering the remaining radiation dose to the tumor while optimally minimizing irradiation of healthy tissues. There is little consensus on how to apply this concept in clinical practice. The current review investigates the current ART issues, including patient selection, clinical/dosimetric criteria and timing for re-planning, and practical technical issues. A practical algorithm is proposed for patient management in cases where ART is required.

  19. Polar motion as boundary condition in an adaptive Kalman filter approach for the determination of period and damping of the Chandler oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, F.; Kirschner, S.; Neubersch, D.

    2012-12-01

    Earth rotation has been monitored using space geodetic techniques since many decades. The geophysical interpretation of observed time series of Earth rotation parameters (ERP) polar motion and length-of-day is commonly based on numerical models that describe and balance variations of angular momentum in various subsystems of the Earth. Naturally, models are dependent on geometrical, rheological and physical parameters. Many of these are weakly determined from other models or observations. In our study we present an adaptive Kalman filter approach for the improvement of parameters of the dynamic Earth system model DyMEG which acts as a simulator of ERP. In particular we focus on the improvement of the pole tide Love number k2. In the frame of a sensitivity analysis k2 has been identified as one of the most crucial parameters of DyMEG since it directly influences the modeled Chandler oscillation. At the same time k2 is one of the most uncertain parameters in the model. Our simulations with DyMEG cover a period of 60 years after which a steady state of k2 is reached. The estimate for k2, accounting for the anelastic response of the Earth's mantle and the ocean, is 0.3531 + 0.0030i. We demonstrate that the application of the improved parameter k2 in DyMEG leads to significantly better results for polar motion than the original value taken from the Conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS).

  20. REALISATION TRAJECTORY CONTROL IN A HORIZONTAL WITH ADAPTIVE ALGORITHM OF MANAGEMENT OF THWART MOTION OF THE PLANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Vereshikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In article results of researches are presented according to efficiency of application of adaptive algorithm of management by the maneuverable plane realised in a cross-section control path, on the basis of identification of some aerodynamic characteristics of the plane and the indignations caused by formation by an asymmetrical configuration of placing of external suspension. By modelling of movement of the plane during performance S - figurative maneuvers with use of a programmno-modelling complex and the flight stand substantial improvement of characteristics of controllability of the asymmetrical plane and, thus, increase of efficiency of its application is shown.

  1. Micro-Computed Tomography Study of Filling Material Removal from Oval-shaped Canals by Using Rotary, Reciprocating, and Adaptive Motion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozeta, Bruno Monguilhott; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; Mazzi-Chaves, Jardel Francisco; Fantinato, Thais; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated filling material removal from distal oval-shaped canals of mandibular molars with rotary, reciprocating, and adaptive motion systems by using micro-computed tomography. After cone-beam computed tomography scanning, 21 teeth were selected, prepared up to a size 40 file, root filled, and divided into 3 groups (n = 7) according to the filling material removal technique: group PTUR, ProTaper Universal Retreatment combined with ProTaper Universal F2, F3, F4, and F5 files; group RP, Reciproc R50 file; and group TFA: TF Adaptive 50.04 files. The specimens were scanned preoperatively and postoperatively to assess filling material removal by using micro-computed tomography imaging, and the percent volume of residual filling material was calculated. The statistical analysis showed the lowest percent volume of residual filling material at the coronal third in all groups (P  .05). In the middle third, group TFA (31.2 ± 10.1) showed lower volume of residual filling material than group RP (52.4 ± 14.1) (P material than group RP (70.6 ± 7.2) (P material from the canals. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Water equivalent path length calculations using scatter-corrected head and neck CBCT images to evaluate patients for adaptive proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihun; Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory; Busse, Paul; Winey, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Proton therapy has dosimetric advantages due to the well-defined range of the proton beam over photon radiotherapy. When the proton beams, however, are delivered to the patient in fractionated radiation treatment, the treatment outcome is affected by delivery uncertainties such as anatomic change in the patient and daily patient setup error. This study aims at establishing a method to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the anatomic change and patient setup error during head and neck proton therapy. Range variations due to the delivery uncertainties were assessed by calculating water equivalent path length (WEPL) to the distal edge of tumor volume using planning CT and weekly treatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Specifically, mean difference and root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of the distal WEPLs were calculated as the weekly range variations. To accurately calculate the distal WEPLs, an existing CBCT scatter correction algorithm was used. An automatic rigid registration was used to align the planning CT and treatment CBCT images, simulating a six degree-of-freedom couch correction at treatments. The authors conclude that the dosimetric impact of the anatomic change and patient setup error was reasonably captured in the differences of the distal WEPL variation with a range calculation uncertainty of 2%. The proposed method to calculate the distal WEPL using the scatter-corrected CBCT images can be an essential tool to decide the necessity of re-planning in adaptive proton therapy.

  3. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and bismuth shielding for evaluation of dose reduction to the eye and image quality during head CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Seong [The Korean National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Won [Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Young [Hallym University of Graduate Studies, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The Korean National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    There is a concern regarding the adverse effects of increasing radiation doses due to repeated computed tomography (CT) scans, especially in radiosensitive organs and portions thereof, such as the lenses of the eyes. Bismuth shielding with an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm was recently introduced in our clinic as a method to reduce the absorbed radiation dose. This technique was applied to the lens of the eye during CT scans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reduction in the absorbed radiation dose and to determine the noise level when using bismuth shielding and the ASIR algorithm with the GE DC 750 HD 64-channel CT scanner for CT of the head of a humanoid phantom. With the use of bismuth shielding, the noise level was higher in the beam-hardening artifact areas than in the revealed artifact areas. However, with the use of ASIR, the noise level was lower than that with the use of bismuth alone; it was also lower in the artifact areas. The reduction in the radiation dose with the use of bismuth was greatest at the surface of the phantom to a limited depth. In conclusion, it is possible to reduce the radiation level and slightly decrease the bismuth-induced noise level by using a combination of ASIR as an algorithm process and bismuth as an in-plane hardware-type shielding method.

  4. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Macchia Mariangela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To validate, in the context of adaptive radiotherapy, three commercial software solutions for atlas-based segmentation. Methods and materials Fifteen patients, five for each group, with cancer of the Head&Neck, pleura, and prostate were enrolled in the study. In addition to the treatment planning CT (pCT images, one replanning CT (rCT image set was acquired for each patient during the RT course. Three experienced physicians outlined on the pCT and rCT all the volumes of interest (VOIs. We used three software solutions (VelocityAI 2.6.2 (V, MIM 5.1.1 (M by MIMVista and ABAS 2.0 (A by CMS-Elekta to generate the automatic contouring on the repeated CT. All the VOIs obtained with automatic contouring (AC were successively corrected manually. We recorded the time needed for: 1 ex novo ROIs definition on rCT; 2 generation of AC by the three software solutions; 3 manual correction of AC. To compare the quality of the volumes obtained automatically by the software and manually corrected with those drawn from scratch on rCT, we used the following indexes: overlap coefficient (DICE, sensitivity, inclusiveness index, difference in volume, and displacement differences on three axes (x, y, z from the isocenter. Results The time saved by the three software solutions for all the sites, compared to the manual contouring from scratch, is statistically significant and similar for all the three software solutions. The time saved for each site are as follows: about an hour for Head&Neck, about 40 minutes for prostate, and about 20 minutes for mesothelioma. The best DICE similarity coefficient index was obtained with the manual correction for: A (contours for prostate, A and M (contours for H&N, and M (contours for mesothelioma. Conclusions From a clinical point of view, the automated contouring workflow was shown to be significantly shorter than the manual contouring process, even though manual correction of the VOIs is always needed.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  8. Effect of bimaxillary surgery on adaptive condylar head remodeling: metric analysis and image interpretation using cone-beam computed tomography volume superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Byung; Yang, Yu-Mi; Kim, Yong-Il; Cho, Bong-Hae; Jung, Yun-Hoa; Hwang, Dae-Seok

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use cone-beam computed tomography volume superimposition to investigate the effect of bimaxillary orthognathic surgery on condylar head remodeling. Using a retrospective study design, 2 investigators evaluated the cone-beam computed tomography data of subjects who had undergone Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular setback surgery. The predictor variable was time, grouped as preoperative versus postoperative. The outcome variables were the measurement changes of the condylar heads and the distribution of the condylar head remodeling signs. Paired t and χ(2) tests were performed for the purposes of the 2-dimensional metric analysis and the condylar head remodeling distribution. P Bimaxillary orthognathic surgery caused a decrease in the condylar heights and condylar head remodeling. The cone-beam computed tomography volume superimposition method showed that the condylar head had undergone remodeling after bimaxillary surgery. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Paralytic strabismus compensatory head position and abnormal cervical motion%麻痹性斜视代偿头位与颈椎异常运动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文华

    2016-01-01

    在眼科临床诊疗过程中,眼性斜颈比较常见。麻痹斜视与颈椎异常运动相互联系,相互影响。颈椎是脊椎的带头“大哥”,颈椎的异常运动引发整个脊柱的运动异常,出现全身姿势异常。%In the clinical diagnosis and treatment process of the ophthalmology,the ocular torticollis is more common.The paralytic strabismus and abnormal cervical motion have mutual connection and mutual influence.Cervical spine is the lead "big brother" of spine,and the abnormal movement of the cervical spine causes the abnormal movement of the entire spine,appears abnormal body posture.

  10. Semiautomated head-and-neck IMRT planning using dose warping and scaling to robustly adapt plans in a knowledge database containing potentially suboptimal plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthew; Lo, Joseph Y; Grzetic, Shelby; Lutzky, Carly; Brizel, David M; Das, Shiva K

    2015-08-01

    Prior work by the authors and other groups has studied the creation of automated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans of equivalent quality to those in a patient database of manually created clinical plans; those database plans provided guidance on the achievable sparing to organs-at-risk (OARs). However, in certain sites, such as head-and-neck, the clinical plans may not be sufficiently optimized because of anatomical complexity and clinical time constraints. This could lead to automated plans that suboptimally exploit OAR sparing. This work investigates a novel dose warping and scaling scheme that attempts to reduce effects of suboptimal sparing in clinical database plans, thus improving the quality of semiautomated head-and-neck cancer (HNC) plans. Knowledge-based radiotherapy (KBRT) plans for each of ten "query" patients were semiautomatically generated by identifying the most similar "match" patient in a database of 103 clinical manually created patient plans. The match patient's plans were adapted to the query case by: (1) deforming the match beam fluences to suit the query target volume and (2) warping the match primary/boost dose distribution to suit the query geometry and using the warped distribution to generate query primary/boost optimization dose-volume constraints. Item (2) included a distance scaling factor to improve query OAR dose sparing with respect to the possibly suboptimal clinical match plan. To further compensate for a component plan of the match case (primary/boost) not optimally sparing OARs, the query dose volume constraints were reduced using a dose scaling factor to be the minimum from either (a) the warped component plan (primary or boost) dose distribution or (b) the warped total plan dose distribution (primary + boost) scaled in proportion to the ratio of component prescription dose to total prescription dose. The dose-volume constraints were used to plan the query case with no human intervention to adjust constraints during

  11. Deformable Image Registration for Adaptive Radiation Therapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Accuracy and Precision in the Presence of Tumor Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencarelli, Angelo, E-mail: a.mencarelli@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kranen, Simon Robert van; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Beek, Suzanne van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nico Rasch, Coenraad Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy and precision for normal and tumor tissues in head and neck cancer patients during the course of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with oropharyngeal tumors, who underwent submucosal implantation of small gold markers (average 6, range 4-10) around the tumor and were treated with RT were retrospectively selected. Two observers identified 15 anatomical features (landmarks) representative of normal tissues in the planning computed tomography (pCT) scan and in weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs). Gold markers were digitally removed after semiautomatic identification in pCTs and CBCTs. Subsequently, landmarks and gold markers on pCT were propagated to CBCTs, using a b-spline-based DIR and, for comparison, rigid registration (RR). To account for observer variability, the pair-wise difference analysis of variance method was applied. DIR accuracy (systematic error) and precision (random error) for landmarks and gold markers were quantified. Time trend of the precisions for RR and DIR over the weekly CBCTs were evaluated. Results: DIR accuracies were submillimeter and similar for normal and tumor tissue. DIR precision (1 SD) on the other hand was significantly different (P<.01), with 2.2 mm vector length in normal tissue versus 3.3 mm in tumor tissue. No significant time trend in DIR precision was found for normal tissue, whereas in tumor, DIR precision was significantly (P<.009) degraded during the course of treatment by 0.21 mm/week. Conclusions: DIR for tumor registration proved to be less precise than that for normal tissues due to limited contrast and complex non-elastic tumor response. Caution should therefore be exercised when applying DIR for tumor changes in adaptive procedures.

  12. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS) into Portuguese (Brazil) to evaluate patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirola, William Eduardo; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Kissane, David W; Serrano, Claudia Valéria Maseti Pimenta; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-11-09

    Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) is the sixth leading cause of death from cancer worldwide and its treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The surgical procedure may cause mutilating sequelae, that can alter patient self-image. Thus, HNC is often connected to the negative stigma with decreased quality of life. Few studies assess the social stigma and shame perceived by patients with HNC. To perform the translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS) into Portuguese (Brazil). Two independent translations (English into Portuguese) were carried out by two professionals fluent in the English language. After the synthesis of the translations, two independent back-translations (from Portuguese into English) were performed by two translators whose native language is English. All translations were critically assessed by a committee of experts consisting of five members. A sample of 15 patients answered the Brazilian Portuguese version of the SSS to carry out the pretest. At this step, the patients were able to suggest modifications and evaluate the understanding of the items. There was no need to change the scale after this step. Based on the previous steps, we obtained the Portuguese (Brazil) version of the SSS, which was called "Escala de Vergonha e Estigma". The Portuguese (Brazil) version of the SSP was shown to be adequate to be applied to the population with HNC and, therefore, the psychometric properties of the tool will be evaluated during following steps. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of the Earth's pole tide Love number k2 from observations of polar motion using an adaptive Kalman filter approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, F.; Kirschner, S.; Neubersch, D.

    2012-09-01

    The geophysical interpretation of observed time series of Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is commonly based on numerical models that describe and balance variations of angular momentum in various subsystems of the Earth. Naturally, models are dependent on geometrical, rheological and physical parameters. Many of these are weakly determined from other models or observations. In our study we present an adaptive Kalman filter approach for the improvement of parameters of the dynamic Earth system model DyMEG which acts as a simulator of ERP. In particular we focus on the improvement of the pole tide Love number k2. In the frame of a sensitivity analysis k2 has been identified as one of the most crucial parameters of DyMEG since it directly influences the modeled Chandler oscillation. At the same time k2 is one of the most uncertain parameters in the model. Our simulations with DyMEG cover a period of 60 years after which a steady state of k2 is reached. The estimate for k2, accounting for the anelastic response of the Earth's mantle and the ocean, is 0.3531 + 0.0030i. We demonstrate that the application of the improved parameter k2 in DyMEG leads to significantly better results for polar motion than the original value taken from the Conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS).

  14. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tandem flight. Thus, it may serve as an adaptation to save the head from violent mechanical disturbance and to stabilize gaze in a variety of behavioural situations. This study shows the evolutionary trend of the arrester in the order Odonata by using scanning electron microscopy and measurements of arrester structures in 227 species from 26 odonate families. The arrester design occurring in the Epiophlebiidae, Gomphidae, Neopetaliidae, Petaluridae and Chlorogomphinae is suggested to be the basic one. Two convergent pathways of head-arrester evolution among Zygoptera and Anisoptera are proposed. The possible functional significance of the arrester system is discussed.

  15. Cross-axis adaptation of torsional components in the yaw-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillenberg, P.; Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The three pairs of semicircular canals within the labyrinth are not perfectly aligned with the pulling directions of the six extraocular muscles. Therefore, for a given head movement, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends upon central neural mechanisms that couple the canals to the muscles with the appropriate functional gains in order to generate a response that rotates the eye the correct amount and around the correct axis. A consequence of these neural connections is a cross-axis adaptive capability, which can be stimulated experimentally when head rotation is around one axis and visual motion about another. From this visual-vestibular conflict the brain infers that the slow-phase eye movement is rotating around the wrong axis. We explored the capability of human cross-axis adaptation, using a short-term training paradigm, to determine if torsional eye movements could be elicited by yaw (horizontal) head rotation (where torsion is normally inappropriate). We applied yaw sinusoidal head rotation (+/-10 degrees, 0.33 Hz) and measured eye movement responses in the dark, and before and after adaptation. The adaptation paradigm lasted 45-60 min, and consisted of the identical head motion, coupled with a moving visual scene that required one of several types of eye movements: (1) torsion alone (-Roll); (2) horizontal/torsional, head right/CW torsion (Yaw-Roll); (3) horizontal/torsional, head right/CCW torsion (Yaw+Roll); (4) horizontal, vertical, torsional combined (Yaw+Pitch-Roll); and (5) horizontal and vertical together (Yaw+Pitch). The largest and most significant changes in torsional amplitude occurred in the Yaw-Roll and Yaw+Roll conditions. We conclude that short-term, cross-axis adaptation of torsion is possible but constrained by the complexity of the adaptation task: smaller torsional components are produced if more than one cross-coupling component is required. In contrast, vertical cross-axis components can be easily trained to occur with yaw head

  16. 减少头部运动伪影及磁敏感伪影的propller技术应用价值评价%To Reduce the Head Motion Artifact and Magnetic Sensitive Artifacts Propller Technology Application Value Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海博

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨 Propl er 技术对减少头部运动伪影及磁敏感伪影的应用价值。方法我院于2010年3月至2013年对55例磁共振头颅检查时躁动或难以自控的患者,进行常规 FRFSE T2WI 和 Propel er T2WI 轴位扫描;对33例磁敏感伪影明显者行常规扩散加权图像(DWI)和Propel er DWI 扫描。观察并对照分析 FRFSE T2WI 和 Propel er T2WI 以及 DWI 与 Propel er DWI 的图像质量状况。结果通过 T2WI 检查55例,对存在明显运动伪影的患者行 Propel er T2WI 扫描后明显减少或消除了运动伪影,与 T2WI 检查结果相比差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。DWI 检查33例患者有显著磁敏感伪影,采用 ProDel er DWI 后,与 DWI 检查结果相比差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论应用 Propel er 技术能够明显减少或消除 T2WI 及 DWI 上运动伪影及磁敏感伪影,值得推广应用。%Objective To study the Propl er technology to reduce the head motion artifact and the application value of the magnetic sensitive artifact. Methods Our hospital from March 2010 to 2013, 55 cases of MRI head check agitation or patients with difficult to control, for regular FRFSE T2WI and Propel er T2WI axial scanning; 33 cases of magnetic sensitive artifact obvious line of conventional diffusion weighted image (DWI) can and Propel er DWI scan can. Observation and contrast analysis FRFSE T2WI and Propel er T2WI and DWI and Propel er can DWI image quality can. Results Through T2WI check 55 cases of patients with obvious motion artifact line Propel er T2WI scan significantly reduce or eliminate the motion artifacts, clear difference compared with T2WI results, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). DWI examination can 33 patients had significant magnetic sensitive artifacts, adopting ProDeller DWI, can clear difference compared with DWI results can, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion Application of Propel er technology

  17. Motion compensation for fully 4D PET reconstruction using PET superset data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaeghe, J.; Gravel, P.; Mio, R.; Fukasawa, R.; Rosa-Neto, P.; Soucy, J.-P.; Thompson, C. J.; Reader, A. J.

    2010-07-01

    Fully 4D PET image reconstruction is receiving increasing research interest due to its ability to significantly reduce spatiotemporal noise in dynamic PET imaging. However, thus far in the literature, the important issue of correcting for subject head motion has not been considered. Specifically, as a direct consequence of using temporally extensive basis functions, a single instance of movement propagates to impair the reconstruction of multiple time frames, even if no further movement occurs in those frames. Existing 3D motion compensation strategies have not yet been adapted to 4D reconstruction, and as such the benefits of 4D algorithms have not yet been reaped in a clinical setting where head movement undoubtedly occurs. This work addresses this need, developing a motion compensation method suitable for fully 4D reconstruction methods which exploits an optical tracking system to measure the head motion along with PET superset data to store the motion compensated data. List-mode events are histogrammed as PET superset data according to the measured motion, and a specially devised normalization scheme for motion compensated reconstruction from the superset data is required. This work proceeds to propose the corresponding time-dependent normalization modifications which are required for a major class of fully 4D image reconstruction algorithms (those which use linear combinations of temporal basis functions). Using realistically simulated as well as real high-resolution PET data from the HRRT, we demonstrate both the detrimental impact of subject head motion in fully 4D PET reconstruction and the efficacy of our proposed modifications to 4D algorithms. Benefits are shown both for the individual PET image frames as well as for parametric images of tracer uptake and volume of distribution for 18F-FDG obtained from Patlak analysis.

  18. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, Akila, E-mail: akumara1@hfhs.org; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  19. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Ten H&N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3-4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm(3). Organs with volumes <3 cm(3) and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼ 0.5-0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm(3)), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was "clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours." Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine

  20. SU-E-J-257: A PCA Model to Predict Adaptive Changes for Head&neck Patients Based On Extraction of Geometric Features From Daily CBCT Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkov, M [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Gordon, J [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) to develop principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes in head and neck (H&N) patients and to assess the possibility of using these prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of 4 H&N patients were deformed to model several different systematic changes in patient anatomy during the course of the radiation therapy (RT). A Pinnacle plugin was used to linearly interpolate the systematic change in patient for the 35 fraction RT course and to generate a set of 35 synthetic CBCTs. Each synthetic CBCT represents the systematic change in patient anatomy for each fraction. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between the pCT and synthetic CBCTs with random fraction-to-fraction changes were superimposed on the DVFs. A patient-specific PCA model was built using these DVFs containing systematic plus random changes. It was hypothesized that resulting eigenDVFs (EDVFs) with largest eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment. Results: For all 4 patients, the PCA model provided different results depending on the type and size of systematic change in patient’s body. PCA was more successful in capturing the systematic changes early in the treatment course when these were of a larger scale with respect to the random fraction-to-fraction changes in patient’s anatomy. For smaller scale systematic changes, random changes in patient could completely “hide” the systematic change. Conclusion: The leading EDVF from the patientspecific PCA models could tentatively be identified as a major systematic change during treatment if the systematic change is large enough with respect to random fraction-to-fraction changes. Otherwise, leading EDVF could not represent systematic changes reliably. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant

  1. SU-E-J-220: Evaluation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation (ABAS) in Head-And-Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q; Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the accuracy of atlas-based auto segmentation of organs at risk (OARs) on both helical CT (HCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images in head and neck (HN) cancer adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Six HN patients treated in the ART process were included in this study. For each patient, three images were selected: pretreatment planning CT (PreTx-HCT), in treatment CT for replanning (InTx-HCT) and a CBCT acquired in the same day of the InTx-HCT. Three clinical procedures of auto segmentation and deformable registration performed in the ART process were evaluated: a) auto segmentation on PreTx-HCT using multi-subject atlases, b) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to InTx-HCT using deformable HCT-to-HCT image registration, and c) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to CBCT using deformable CBCT-to-HCT image registration. Seven OARs (brainstem, cord, L/R parotid, L/R submandibular gland and mandible) were manually contoured on PreTx-HCT and InTx-HCT for comparison. In addition, manual contours on InTx-CT were copied on the same day CBCT, and a local region rigid body registration was performed accordingly for each individual OAR. For procedures a) and b), auto contours were compared to manual contours, and for c) auto contours were compared to those rigidly transferred contours on CBCT. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean surface distances of agreement (MSDA) were calculated for evaluation. Results: For procedure a), the mean DSC/MSDA of most OARs are >80%/±2mm. For intra-patient HCT-to-HCT propagation, the Resultimproved to >85%/±1.5mm. Compared to HCT-to-HCT, the mean DSC for HCT-to-CBCT propagation drops ∼2–3% and MSDA increases ∼0.2mm. This Resultindicates that the inferior imaging quality of CBCT seems only degrade auto propagation performance slightly. Conclusion: Auto segmentation and deformable propagation can generate OAR structures on HCT and CBCT images with clinically acceptable accuracy. Therefore

  2. CUSUM analysis of learning curves for the head-mounted microscope in phonomicrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Vamos, Andrew C; Dailey, Seth H; Jiang, Jack J

    2016-10-01

    To observe the learning curve of the head-mounted microscope in a phonomicrosurgery simulator using cumulative summation (CUSUM) analysis, which incorporates a magnetic phonomicrosurgery instrument tracking system (MPTS). Retrospective case series. Eight subjects (6 medical students and 2 surgeons inexperienced in phonomicrosurgery) operated on phonomicrosurgical simulation cutting tasks while using the head-mounted microscope for 400 minutes total. Two 20-minute sessions occurred each day for 10 total days, with operation quality (Qs ) and completion time (T) being recorded after each session. Cumulative summation analysis of Qs and T was performed by using subjects' performance data from trials completed using a traditional standing microscope as success criteria. The motion parameters from the head-mounted microscope were significantly better than the standing microscope (P microscope (P microscope, as assessed by CUSUM analysis. Cumulative summation analysis can objectively monitor the learning process associated with a phonomicrosurgical simulator system, ultimately providing a tool to assess learning status. Also, motion parameters determined by our MPTS showed that, although the head-mounted microscope provides better motion control, worse Qs and longer T resulted. This decrease in Qs is likely a result of the relatively unstable visual environment that it provides. Overall, the inexperienced surgeons participating in this study failed to adapt to the head-mounted microscope in our simulated phonomicrosurgery environment. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2295-2300, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Functional therapy for partial radial head fractures: early motion of the elbow%制动结合早期功能锻炼治疗桡骨头边缘骨折的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力丹; 刘兴华; 蒋协远; 王满宜

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical results of functional therapy for partial radial head fractures with early motion of the elbow. Methods From June 2006 to December 2009, we managed 39 cases of partial radial head fractures through functional rehabilitation. Of them, 16 cases were of Mason type Ⅰ and 23 of type Ⅱ. Early motion of the elbow was conducted as soon as possible under the instruction and supervision of the surgeon while the elbow was immobilized except for the time of early motion. Full range of motion was performed one to 2 times per day in the first 2 weeks and increased later on. Immobilization with brace or sling continued for 4 to 6 weeks. Results The patients were followed up for 8 to 24 weeks (mean, 12 weeks). No limitation of the extension and rotation of the elbow was observed in 12 cases. In all the cases, limitation of extension of the elbow was less than 30°, pronation was larger than 60° and supination larger than 80°. The average Broberg-Morrey elbow score was 95 (from 85 to 100). The excellent to good rate was 100% for this series. ConcLusion Immobilization plus early motion of the elbow can achieve nearly full functional recovery for patients with partial radial head fractures.%目的 探讨应用制动结合早期功能锻炼治疗桡骨头边缘骨折的临床疗效.方法 对2006年6月至2009年12月在门诊行制动结合早期肘关节活动功能锻炼治疗的39例桡骨头边缘骨折患者进行回顾性分析,男22例,女17例;年龄16~66岁,平均37岁.骨折按Mason分型:Ⅰ型16例,Ⅱ型23例.首次就诊时间在伤后10 d以内,制动同时尽早开始行主、被动肘关节全范围活动,1~2次/d,包括伸屈和旋转活动.随时间延长逐渐增加活动次数,支具或颈腕吊带制动4~6周.门诊每1~2周复查一次,指导患者功能锻炼.结果 所有患者术后获8~24周(平均12周)随访.12例患者肘关节伸曲旋转活动无受限,伸肘可达0.所有患

  4. Evaluation of radiotherapy methods for adaptative head and neck treatment with RapidArc®; Avaliacao de uma metodologia de radioterapia adaptativa para tratamentos de cabeca e pescoco com RapidArc®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaro, Sarah J.; Vasconcellos, Herminiane L.; Silva, Laura E. da; Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Leonardo P. da; Alvaro S; Migoviski, Igor, E-mail: sarahmazaro@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer Jose de Alencar Gomes da Silva (INCA), Rio de Janeiro,RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Head and neck cancer is considered a public health problem worldwide. The intensity-modulated techniques have shown benefit in the treatment of these sites, particularly with respect to reduction of deterministic effects of risk, such as parotid. Anatomical variations in cases of head and neck are very frequent and may lead, for example, to an overdose in the parotid. This can be mitigated if making use of adaptive radiation therapy. The work aims to analyze a methodology to redo the planning of treatments, through 02 acquisitions of TC. The results showed that, due to a reduction in the volumes of the parotid, the doses delivered to these organs are underestimated, which is relevant to readapt the treatment, with the addition of only a second scan without the need of the third. (author)

  5. Classifying Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  6. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Moinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); D’Souza, Derek [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  7. Multimodal MRI Neuroimaging with Motion Compensation Based on Particle Filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Kim, Boklye; Meyer, Charles; Hero, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Head movement during scanning impedes activation detection in fMRI studies. Head motion in fMRI acquired using slice-based Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) can be estimated and compensated by aligning the images onto a reference volume through image registration. However, registering EPI images volume to volume fails to consider head motion between slices, which may lead to severely biased head motion estimates. Slice-to-volume registration can be used to estimate motion parameters for each slice by more accurately representing the image acquisition sequence. However, accurate slice to volume mapping is dependent on the information content of the slices: middle slices are information rich, while edge slides are information poor and more prone to distortion. In this work, we propose a Gaussian particle filter based head motion tracking algorithm to reduce the image misregistration errors. The algorithm uses a dynamic state space model of head motion with an observation equation that models continuous slice acquisitio...

  8. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...

  9. Head orientation prediction: delta quaternions versus quaternions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himberg, Henry; Motai, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    Display lag in simulation environments with helmet-mounted displays causes a loss of immersion that degrades the value of virtual/augmented reality training simulators. Simulators use predictive tracking to compensate for display lag, preparing display updates based on the anticipated head motion. This paper proposes a new method for predicting head orientation using a delta quaternion (DQ)-based extended Kalman filter (EKF) and compares the performance to a quaternion EKF. The proposed framework operates on the change in quaternion between consecutive data frames (the DQ), which avoids the heavy computational burden of the quaternion motion equation. Head velocity is estimated from the DQ by an EKF and then used to predict future head orientation. We have tested the new framework with captured head motion data and compared it with the computationally expensive quaternion filter. Experimental results indicate that the proposed DQ method provides the accuracy of the quaternion method without the heavy computational burden.

  10. Developmental changes in head movement kinematics during swimming in Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänzi, Sara; Straka, Hans

    2017-01-15

    During the post-embryonic developmental growth of animals, a number of physiological parameters such as locomotor performance, dynamics and behavioural repertoire are adjusted to match the requirements determined by changes in body size, proportions and shape. Moreover, changes in movement parameters also cause changes in the dynamics of self-generated sensory stimuli, to which motion-detecting sensory systems have to adapt. Here, we examined head movements and swimming kinematics of Xenopus laevis tadpoles with a body length of 10-45 mm (developmental stage 46-54) and compared these parameters with fictive swimming, recorded as ventral root activity in semi-intact in vitro preparations. Head movement kinematics was extracted from high-speed video recordings of freely swimming tadpoles. Analysis of these locomotor episodes indicated that the swimming frequency decreased with development, along with the angular velocity and acceleration of the head, which represent self-generated vestibular stimuli. In contrast, neither head oscillation amplitude nor forward velocity changed with development despite the ∼3-fold increase in body size. The comparison between free and fictive locomotor dynamics revealed very similar swimming frequencies for similarly sized animals, including a comparable developmental decrease of the swimming frequency. Body morphology and the motor output rhythm of the spinal central pattern generator therefore develop concurrently. This study thus describes development-specific naturalistic head motion profiles, which form the basis for more natural stimuli in future studies probing the vestibular system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Exploring the genetic basis of adaptation to high elevations in reptiles: a comparative transcriptome analysis of two toad-headed agamas (genus Phrynocephalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhao Yang

    Full Text Available High elevation adaptation offers an excellent study system to understand the genetic basis of adaptive evolution. We acquired transcriptome sequences of two closely related lizards, Phrynocephalus przewalskii from low elevations and P. vlangalii from high elevations. Within a phylogenetic framework, we compared their genomic data along with green anole, chicken and Chinese softshell turtle, and identified candidate genes and functional categories that are potentially linked to adaptation to high elevation environments. More than 100 million sequence reads were generated for each species via Illumina sequencing. A de novo assembly produced 70,919 and 62,118 transcripts for P. przewalskii and P. vlangalii, respectively. Based on a well-established reptile phylogeny, we detected 143 positively selected genes (PSGs along the P. vlangalii lineage from the 7,012 putative orthologs using a branch-site model. Furthermore, ten GO categories and one KEGG pathway that are over-represented by PSGs were recognized. In addition, 58 GO categories were revealed to have elevated evolutionary rates along the P. vlangalii lineage relative to P. przewalskii. These functional analyses further filter out PSGs that are most likely involved in the adaptation process to high elevations. Among them, ADAM17, MD, and HSP90B1 likely contributed to response to hypoxia, and POLK likely contributed to DNA repair. Many other candidate genes involved in gene expression and metabolism were also identified. Genome-wide scan for candidate genes may serve as the first step to explore the genetic basis of high elevation adaptation. Detailed comparative study and functional verification are needed to solidify any conclusions. High elevation adaptation requires coordinated changes in multiple genes that involve various physiological and biochemical pathways; we hope that our genetic studies will provide useful directions for future physiological or molecular studies in reptiles as well

  12. 顶浪中船舶水动力计算与运动模拟研究%Numerical Simulation and Calculation of the Hydrodynamic Forces and Motions of Ships in Head Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方昭昭; 赵丙乾; 金武雷; 朱仁传

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,a Numerical Wave Tank(NWT)is constructed based on Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD),and the hydrodynamic properties of a ship model is analyzed. Specifically,the genera-tion and propagation of regular waves are first simulated and verified with a reference coordinate system, through which the hydrodynamic forces and motions of the Wigley-III model advancing in head waves at different speeds are calculated. The obtained results are then compared with the experimental data collect-ed by Delft University of Technology,and good agreement can be observed. Overall,the proposed simula-tion technique,compared with the physical experimental method,is relatively easy to implement and con-trol. Therefore,this method has extensive applicability in analyzing the wave hydrodynamic performance of ships and marine floating structures.%基于计算流体动力学(CFD)方法建立数值波浪水池,对顶浪中航行船舶的水动力与运动进行数值计算研究。推导出一种船舶在波浪中航行的数值模拟的波浪环境表达方法并进行模拟验证,计算不同航速下顶浪中Wigley-III船模所受的水动作用力,以及顶浪中航行的Wigley-III船模的运动。通过将计算结果与DUT (Delft University of Technology)相关的试验数据进行比较,吻合良好。研究表明:基于数值波浪水池的数值模拟较试验更容易实现和控制,能够获得船体周围详细的流场信息,在波浪中舰船水动力性能与运动的研究等方面具有广泛的适用性。

  13. Direction-specific adaptation effects acquired in a slow rotation room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Knepton, J.

    1972-01-01

    Thirty-eight subjects were required to execute 120 head movements in a slow rotation room at each 1-rpm increase in velocity of the room between 0 and 6 rpm and, after a single-step gradual return to zero velocity, execute 120 head movements either immediately after return or after delay periods varying from 1 to 24 hours unless, at any time, more than mild symptoms of motion sickness were elicited. A second stress profile differed by the sequential addition of an incremental adaptation schedule (identical to the first) in which the direction of rotation was reversed. The experimental findings demonstrated the acquisition of direction-specific adaptation effects that underwent spontaneous decay with a short time constant (hours). With their disappearance a nondirection-specific adaptation was revealed with a long-time constant (days). Speculations are presented which could account for the simultaneous acquisition of short-term and long-term adaptation effects.

  14. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  15. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... When this happens, the neck muscles go into spasm, causing the head to tilt to one side. ...

  16. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  17. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart valves Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not ... to: Abnormal blood vessels in the brain ( arteriovenous malformations of the head ) Tumor of the nerve that ...

  18. Alpha motion based on a motion detector, but not on the Müller-Lyer illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the mechanism of alpha motion, the apparent motion of the Müller-Lyer figure's shaft that occurs when the arrowheads and arrow tails are alternately presented. The following facts were found: (a) reduced exposure duration decreased the amount of alpha motion, and this phenomenon was not explainable by the amount of the Müller-Lyer illusion; (b) the motion aftereffect occurred after adaptation to alpha motion; (c) occurrence of alpha motion became difficult when the temporal frequency increased, and this characteristic of alpha motion was similar to the characteristic of a motion detector that motion detection became difficult when the temporal frequency increased from the optimal frequency. These findings indicated that alpha motion occurs on the basis of a motion detector but not on the Müller-Lyer illusion, and that the mechanism of alpha motion is the same as that of general motion perception.

  19. Fractional motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo I., E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il [Holon Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Shlesinger, Michael F., E-mail: mike.shlesinger@navy.mil [Office of Naval Research, Code 30, 875 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Brownian motion is the archetypal model for random transport processes in science and engineering. Brownian motion displays neither wild fluctuations (the “Noah effect”), nor long-range correlations (the “Joseph effect”). The quintessential model for processes displaying the Noah effect is Lévy motion, the quintessential model for processes displaying the Joseph effect is fractional Brownian motion, and the prototypical model for processes displaying both the Noah and Joseph effects is fractional Lévy motion. In this paper we review these four random-motion models–henceforth termed “fractional motions” –via a unified physical setting that is based on Langevin’s equation, the Einstein–Smoluchowski paradigm, and stochastic scaling limits. The unified setting explains the universal macroscopic emergence of fractional motions, and predicts–according to microscopic-level details–which of the four fractional motions will emerge on the macroscopic level. The statistical properties of fractional motions are classified and parametrized by two exponents—a “Noah exponent” governing their fluctuations, and a “Joseph exponent” governing their dispersions and correlations. This self-contained review provides a concise and cohesive introduction to fractional motions.

  20. TU-AB-303-06: Does Online Adaptive Radiation Therapy Mean Zero Margin for Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer? An Intra-Fractional Seminal Vesicles Motion Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Y; Li, T; Lee, W; Yin, F; Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide benchmark for seminal vesicles (SVs) margin selection to account for intra-fractional motion; and to investigate the effectiveness of two motion surrogates in predicting intra-fractional SV underdosage. Methods: 9 prostate SBRT patients were studied; each has five pairs of pre-treatment and post-treatment cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Each pair of CBCTs was registered based on fiducial markers in the prostate. To provide “ground truth” for coverage evaluation, all pre-treatment SVs were expanded with isotropic margin of 1,2,3,5 and 8mm, and their overlap with post-treatment SVs were used to quantify intra-fractional coverage. Two commonly used motion surrogates, the center-of-mass (COM) and the border of contour (the most distal points in SI/AP/LR directions) were evaluated using Receiver-Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses for predicting SV underdosage due to intra-fractional motion. Action threshold of determining underdosage for each surrogate was calculated by selecting the optimal balancing between sensitivity and specificity. For comparison, margin for each surrogate was also calculated based on traditional margin recipe. Results: 90% post-treatment SV coverage can be achieved in 47%, 82%, 91%, 98% and 98% fractions for 1,2,3,5 and 8mm margins. 3mm margin ensured the 90% intra-fractional SV coverage in 90% fractions when prostate was aligned. The ROC analysis indicated the AUC for COM and border were 0.88 and 0.72. The underdosage threshold was 2.9mm for COM and 4.1mm for border. The Van Herk’s margin recipe recommended 0.5, 0 and 1.8mm margin in LR, AP and SI direction based on COM and for border, the corresponding margin was 2.1, 4.5 and 3mm. Conclusion: 3mm isotropic margin is the minimum required to mitigate the intra-fractional SV motion when prostate is aligned. ROC analysis reveals that both COM and border are acceptable predictors for SV underdosage with 2.9mm and 4.1mm action threshold. Traditional margin calculation is less

  1. Motion psychophysics: 1985-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, David; Thompson, Peter

    2011-07-01

    This review traces progress made in the field of visual motion research from 1985 through to 2010. While it is certainly not exhaustive, it attempts to cover most of the major achievements during that period, and speculate on where the field is heading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Horizontal plane head stabilization during locomotor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, R L; Newton, R A; Carlton, L G

    2001-03-01

    Frequency characteristics of head stabilization were examined during locomotor tasks in healthy young adults(N = 8) who performed normal walking and 3 walking tasks designed to produce perturbations primarily in the horizontal plane. In the 3 walking tasks, the arms moved in phase with leg movement, with abnormally large amplitude, and at twice the frequency of leg movement. Head-in-space angular velocity was examined at the predominant frequencies of trunk motion. Head movements in space occurred at low frequencies ( 4.0 Hz) when the arms moved at twice the frequency of the legs. Head stabilization strategies were determined from head-on-trunk with respect to trunk frequency profiles derived from angular velocity data. During natural walking at low frequencies (head-on-trunk movement was less than trunk movement. At frequencies 3.0 Hz or greater, equal and opposite compensatory movement ensured head stability. When arm swing was altered, compensatory movement guaranteed head stability at all frequencies. Head stabilization was successful for frequencies up to 10.0 Hz during locomotor tasks. Maintaining head stability at high frequencies during voluntary tasks suggests that participants used feedforward mechanisms to coordinate head and trunk movements. Maintenance of head stability during dynamic tasks allows optimal conditions for vestibulo-ocular reflex function.

  3. Fuzzy Logic Unmanned Air Vehicle Motion Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Sabo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of scenarios in which the mission objectives rely on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV being capable of maneuvering in an environment containing obstacles in which there is little prior knowledge of the surroundings. With an appropriate dynamic motion planning algorithm, UAVs would be able to maneuver in any unknown environment towards a target in real time. This paper presents a methodology for two-dimensional motion planning of a UAV using fuzzy logic. The fuzzy inference system takes information in real time about obstacles (if within the agent's sensing range and target location and outputs a change in heading angle and speed. The FL controller was validated, and Monte Carlo testing was completed to evaluate the performance. Not only was the path traversed by the UAV often the exact path computed using an optimal method, the low failure rate makes the fuzzy logic controller (FLC feasible for exploration. The FLC showed only a total of 3% failure rate, whereas an artificial potential field (APF solution, a commonly used intelligent control method, had an average of 18% failure rate. These results highlighted one of the advantages of the FLC method: its adaptability to complex scenarios while maintaining low control effort.

  4. Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  5. Muscle's Motion in an Overdamped Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Bao-Quan; WANG Xian-Ju; LIU Liang-Gang; M. Nakano; H. Matsuura

    2002-01-01

    Based on the stochastic inclined rods model proposed by H. Matsuura et al., we study the motion of actin myosin system in an overdamped regime. Our model is composed ofan inclined spring (rod), a myosin head and a myosin filament. The results of calculation show that the modelcan convert the random motion to one-directional motion, and the myosin head works as a resonator of random noise, which absorbs the energy through a stochastic resonance. The results show that the inclined rod and the intermolecular potential are very important for the system to move.

  6. Visual motion detection sensitivity is enhanced by an orthogonal motion aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Hiromasa; Murakami, Ikuya

    2010-09-09

    A recent study (H. Takemura & I. Murakami, 2010) showed enhancement of motion detection sensitivity by an orthogonal induced motion, suggesting that a weak motion component can combine with an orthogonal motion component to generate stronger oblique motion perception. Here we examined how an orthogonal motion aftereffect (MAE) affects motion detection sensitivity. After adaptation to vertical motion, a Gabor patch barely moving leftward or rightward was presented. As a result of an interaction between horizontal physical motion and a vertical MAE, subjects perceived the stimulus as moving obliquely. Subjects were asked to judge the horizontal direction of motion irrespective of the vertical MAE. The performance was enhanced when the Gabor patch was perceived as moving obliquely as the result of a weak MAE. The enhancement effect depended on the strength of the MAE for each subject rather than on the temporal frequency of the adapting stimulus. These results suggest that weak motion information that is hard to detect can interact with orthogonal adaptation and yield stronger oblique motion perception, making directional judgment easier. Moreover, the present results indicate that the enhancement effect of orthogonal motion involves general motion integration mechanisms rather than a specific mechanism only applicable to a particular type of illusory motion.

  7. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  8. A wavelet method for modeling and despiking motion artifacts from resting-state fMRI time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X.; Kundu, Prantik; Rubinov, Mikail; Jones, P. Simon; Vértes, Petra E.; Ersche, Karen D.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of in-scanner head movement on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has long been established as undesirable. These effects have been traditionally corrected by methods such as linear regression of head movement parameters. However, a number of recent independent studies have demonstrated that these techniques are insufficient to remove motion confounds, and that even small movements can spuriously bias estimates of functional connectivity. Here we propose a new data-driven, spatially-adaptive, wavelet-based method for identifying, modeling, and removing non-stationary events in fMRI time series, caused by head movement, without the need for data scrubbing. This method involves the addition of just one extra step, the Wavelet Despike, in standard pre-processing pipelines. With this method, we demonstrate robust removal of a range of different motion artifacts and motion-related biases including distance-dependent connectivity artifacts, at a group and single-subject level, using a range of previously published and new diagnostic measures. The Wavelet Despike is able to accommodate the substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity of motion artifacts and can consequently remove a range of high and low frequency artifacts from fMRI time series, that may be linearly or non-linearly related to physical movements. Our methods are demonstrated by the analysis of three cohorts of resting-state fMRI data, including two high-motion datasets: a previously published dataset on children (N = 22) and a new dataset on adults with stimulant drug dependence (N = 40). We conclude that there is a real risk of motion-related bias in connectivity analysis of fMRI data, but that this risk is generally manageable, by effective time series denoising strategies designed to attenuate synchronized signal transients induced by abrupt head movements. The Wavelet Despiking software described in this article is freely available for download at www

  9. Optical Tracking With Two Markers for Robust Prospective Motion Correction for Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya; Zahneisen, Benjamin; Keating, Brian; Herbst, Michael; Chang, Linda; Zaitsev, Maxim; Ernst, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Object Prospective motion correction (PMC) during brain imaging using camera-based tracking of a skin-attached marker may suffer from problems including loss of marker visibility due to the coil and false correction due to non-rigid-body facial motion, such as frowning or squinting. A modified PMC system is introduced to mitigate these problems and increase the robustness of motion correction. Materials and Methods The method relies on simultaneously tracking two markers, each providing six degrees of freedom, that are placed on the forehead. This allows us to track head motion when one marker is obscured, and detect skin movements to prevent false corrections. Experiments were performed to compare the performance of the two-marker motion correction technique to the previous single-marker approach. Results Experiments validate the theory developed for adaptive marker tracking and skin movement detection, and demonstrate improved image quality during obstruction of the line-of-sight of one marker, when subjects squint, or when subjects squint and move simultaneously. Conclusion The proposed methods eliminate two common failure modes of PMC and substantially improve the robustness of PMC and can be applied to other optical tracking systems capable of tracking multiple markers. The methods presented can be adapted to the use of more than two markers. PMID:26121941

  10. 基于自适应动态碰撞检测的工业机器人运动规划算法研究%A novel motion planning algorithm with adaptive dynamic collision detection for industrial robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金明杰; 楼云江; 刘冠峰; 凌强

    2012-01-01

    A PRM (probabilistic roadmaps) based novel motion planning algorithm was proposed for industrial robots. It could significantly reduce computational efforts by carrying out robot path calculation in both Cartesian space and configuration space. This algorithm was embedded with a fast space partition method to improve sampling efficiency. Since both the robot and obstacles were modeled as cuboids, the static collision detection was formulated as a convex optimization problem. By applying the adaptive dynamic collision detection method, the motion planning problem was solved efficiently and completely without loss of computation precision.%提出了一种基于PRM (probabilistic roadmaps)算法思想的新型工业机器人运动规划算法.将PRM规划算法由全部C空间计算优化为大部分在欧氏空间、小部分在C空间的计算模式,大幅减少了计算量;使用优化空间分割方法提高采样效率;采用凸优化方法解决了机器人静止姿态碰撞检测问题,并结合自适应动态碰撞检测算法,实现在不降低计算精度的前提下,提高运算速度,使规划结果具有完备性.

  11. Impaired T-wave amplitude adaptation to heart-rate induced by cardiac deconditioning after 5-days of head-down bed-rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiani, Enrico G.; Pellegrini, Alessandro; Bolea, Juan; Sotaquira, Miguel; Almeida, Rute; Vaïda, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The study of QT/RR relationship is important for the clinical evaluation of possible risk of acquired or congenital ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In the hypothesis that microgravity exposure could induce changes in the repolarization mechanisms, our aim was to test if a short 5-days strict 6° head-down bed-rest (HDBR) could induce alterations in the QT/RR relationship and spatial repolarization heterogeneity. Twenty-two healthy men (mean age 31±6) were enrolled as part of the European Space Agency HDBR studies. High fidelity (1000 Hz) 24 h Holter ECG (12-leads, Mortara Instrument) was acquired before (PRE), the last day of HDBR (HDT5), and four days after its conclusion (POST). The night period (23:00-06:30) was selected for analysis. X, Y, Z leads were derived and the vectorcardiogram computed. Selective beat averaging was used to obtain averages of P-QRS-T complexes preceded by the same RR (10 ms bin amplitude, in the range 900-1200 ms). For each averaged waveform (i.e., one for each bin), T-wave maximum amplitude (Tmax), T-wave area (Tarea), RTapex, RTend, ventricular gradient (VG) magnitude and spatial QRS-T angle were computed. Non-parametric Friedman test was applied. Compared to PRE, at HDT5 both RTapex and RTend resulted shortened (-4%), with a decrease in T-wave amplitude (-8%) and area (-13%). VG was diminished by 10%, and QRS-T angle increased by 14°. At POST, QT duration and area parameters, as well as QRS-T angle were restored while Tmax resulted larger than PRE (+5%) and VG was still decreased by 3%. Also, a marked loss in strength of the linear regression with RR was found at HDT5 in Tmax and Tarea, that could represent a new dynamic marker of increased risk for life-threatening arrhythmias. Despite the short-term HDBR, ventricular repolarization during the night period was affected. This should be taken into account in astronauts for risk assessment during space flight.

  12. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  13. Zero torque gear head wrench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  14. Motion sickness and development of synergy within the spatial orientation system. A hypothetical unifying concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedry, F. E.; Rupert, A. R.; Reschke, M. F.

    1998-01-01

    Adaptation to research paradigms such as rotating rooms and optical alteration of visual feedback during movement results in development of perceptual-motor programs that provide the reflexive assistance that is necessary to skilled control of movement and balance. The discomfort and stomach awareness that occur during the adaptation process has been attributed to conflicting sensory information about the state of motion. Vestibular signals depend on the kinematics of head movements irrespective of the presence or absence of signals from other senses. We propose that sensory conflict when vestibular signals are at least one component of the conflict are innately disturbing and unpleasant. This innate reaction is part of a continuum that operates early in life to prevent development of inefficient perceptual-motor programs. This reaction operates irrespective of and in addition to reward and punishment from parental guidance or goal attainment to yield efficient control of whole body movement in the operating environment of the individual. The same mechanism is involved in adapting the spatial orientation system to strange environments. This conceptual model "explains" why motion sickness is associated with adaptation to novel environments and is in general consistent with motion sickness literature.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  16. Modeling depth from motion parallax with the motion/pursuit ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eNawrot

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of unambiguous scaled depth from motion parallax relies on both retinal image motion and an extra-retinal pursuit eye movement signal. The motion/pursuit ratio represents a dynamic geometric model linking these two proximal cues to the ratio of depth to viewing distance. An important step in understanding the visual mechanisms serving the perception of depth from motion parallax is to determine the relationship between these stimulus parameters and empirically determined perceived depth magnitude. Observers compared perceived depth magnitude of dynamic motion parallax stimuli to static binocular disparity comparison stimuli at three different viewing distances, in both head-moving and head-stationary conditions. A stereo-viewing system provided ocular separation for stereo stimuli and monocular viewing of parallax stimuli. For each motion parallax stimulus, a point of subjective equality was estimated for the amount of binocular disparity that generates the equivalent magnitude of perceived depth from motion parallax. Similar to previous results, perceived depth from motion parallax had significant foreshortening. Head-moving conditions produced even greater foreshortening due to the differences in the compensatory eye movement signal. An empirical version of motion/pursuit law, termed the empirical motion/pursuit ratio, which models perceived depth magnitude from these stimulus parameters, is proposed.

  17. Modeling depth from motion parallax with the motion/pursuit ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Mark; Ratzlaff, Michael; Leonard, Zachary; Stroyan, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unambiguous scaled depth from motion parallax relies on both retinal image motion and an extra-retinal pursuit eye movement signal. The motion/pursuit ratio represents a dynamic geometric model linking these two proximal cues to the ratio of depth to viewing distance. An important step in understanding the visual mechanisms serving the perception of depth from motion parallax is to determine the relationship between these stimulus parameters and empirically determined perceived depth magnitude. Observers compared perceived depth magnitude of dynamic motion parallax stimuli to static binocular disparity comparison stimuli at three different viewing distances, in both head-moving and head-stationary conditions. A stereo-viewing system provided ocular separation for stereo stimuli and monocular viewing of parallax stimuli. For each motion parallax stimulus, a point of subjective equality (PSE) was estimated for the amount of binocular disparity that generates the equivalent magnitude of perceived depth from motion parallax. Similar to previous results, perceived depth from motion parallax had significant foreshortening. Head-moving conditions produced even greater foreshortening due to the differences in the compensatory eye movement signal. An empirical version of the motion/pursuit law, termed the empirical motion/pursuit ratio, which models perceived depth magnitude from these stimulus parameters, is proposed.

  18. Coriolis effects and motion sickness modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bles, W

    1998-11-15

    Coriolis effects are notorious in relation to disorientation and motion sickness in aircrew. A review is provided of experimental data on these Coriolis effects, including the modulatory effects of adding visual or somatosensory rotatory motion information. A vector analysis of the consequences of head movements during somatosensory, visual and/or vestibular rotatory motion stimulation revealed that the more the sensed angular velocity vector after the head movements is aligned with the gravitoinertial force vector, the less nauseating effects are experienced. It is demonstrated that this is a special case of the subjective vertical conflict theory on motion sickness that assumes that motion sickness may be provoked if a discrepancy is detected between the subjective vertical and the sensed vertical as determined on the basis of incoming sensory information.

  19. Using Tri-Axial Accelerometers to Assess the Dynamic Control of Head Posture During Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, John H., III

    2003-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight is known to cause a variety of biomedical stressors to the astronaut. One of the more functionally destabilizing effects of spaceflight involves microgravity-induced changes in vestibular or balance control. Balance control requires the integration of the vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive systems. In the microgravity environment, the normal gravity vector present on Earth no longer serves as a reference for the balance control system. Therefore, adaptive changes occur to the vestibular system to affect control of body orientation with altered, or non-present, gravity and/or proprioceptive inputs. Upon return to a gravity environment, the vestibular system must re-incorporate the gravity vector and gravity-induced proprioceptive inputs into the balance control regime. The result is often a period of postural instability, which may also be associated with space motion sickness (oscillopsia, nausea, and vertigo). Previous studies by the JSC Neuroscience group have found that returning astronauts often employ alterations in gait mechanics to maintain postural control during gait. It is believed that these gait alterations are meant to decrease the transfer of heel strike shock energy to the head, thus limiting the contradictory head and eye movements that lead to gait instability and motion sickness symptoms. We analyzed pre- and post-spaceflight tri-axial accelerometer data from the NASA/MIR long duration spaceflight missions to assess the heel to head transfer of heel strike shock energy during locomotion. Up to seven gait sessions (three preflight, four postflight) of head and shank (lower leg) accelerometer data was previously collected from six astronauts who engaged in space flights of four to six months duration. In our analysis, the heel to head transmission of shock energy was compared using peak vertical acceleration (a), peak jerk (j) ratio, and relative kinetic energy (a). A host of generalized movement variables was produced

  20. Physiological Motion Axis for the Seat of a Dynamic Office Chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Roman Peter; Bauer, Christoph Markus; Oetiker, Sarah; Kool, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and verify the optimal location of the motion axis (MA) for the seat of a dynamic office chair. A dynamic seat that supports pelvic motion may improve physical well-being and decrease the risk of sitting-associated disorders. However, office work requires an undisturbed view on the work task, which means a stable position of the upper trunk and head. Current dynamic office chairs do not fulfill this need. Consequently, a dynamic seat was adapted to the physiological kinematics of the human spine. Three-dimensional motion tracking in free sitting helped determine the physiological MA of the spine in the frontal plane. Three dynamic seats with physiological, lower, and higher MA were compared in stable upper body posture (thorax inclination) and seat support of pelvic motion (dynamic fitting accuracy). Spinal kinematics during sitting and walking were compared. The physiological MA was at the level of the 11th thoracic vertebra, causing minimal thorax inclination and high dynamic fitting accuracy. Spinal motion in active sitting and walking was similar. The physiological MA of the seat allows considerable lateral flexion of the spine similar to walking with a stable upper body posture and a high seat support of pelvic motion. The physiological MA enables lateral flexion of the spine, similar to walking, without affecting stable upper body posture, thus allowing active sitting while focusing on work. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  1. Motion Model Employment using interacting Motion Model Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2006-01-01

    model being correct is computed through a likelihood function for each model.  The study presented a simple technique to introduce additional models into the system using deterministic acceleration which basically defines the dynamics of the system.  Therefore, based on this value more motion models can...... be employed to increase the coverage.  Finally, the combined estimate is obtained using posteriori probabilities from different filter models.   The implemented approach provides an adaptive scheme for selecting various number of motion models.  Motion model description is important as it defines the kind...

  2. Neck strength imbalance correlates with increased head acceleration in soccer heading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezman, Zachary D W; Ledet, Eric H; Kerr, Hamish A

    2013-07-01

    Soccer heading is using the head to directly contact the ball, often to advance the ball down the field or score. It is a skill fundamental to the game, yet it has come under scrutiny. Repeated subclinical effects of heading may compound over time, resulting in neurologic deficits. Greater head accelerations are linked to brain injury. Developing an understanding of how the neck muscles help stabilize and reduce head acceleration during impact may help prevent brain injury. Neck strength imbalance correlates to increasing head acceleration during impact while heading a soccer ball. Observational laboratory investigation. Sixteen Division I and II collegiate soccer players headed a ball in a controlled indoor laboratory setting while player motions were recorded by a 14-camera Vicon MX motion capture system. Neck flexor and extensor strength of each player was measured using a spring-type clinical dynamometer. Players were served soccer balls by hand at a mean velocity of 4.29 m/s (±0.74 m/s). Players returned the ball to the server using a heading maneuver at a mean velocity of 5.48 m/s (±1.18 m/s). Mean neck strength difference was positively correlated with angular head acceleration (rho = 0.497; P = 0.05), with a trend toward significance for linear head acceleration (rho = 0.485; P = 0.057). This study suggests that symmetrical strength in neck flexors and extensors reduces head acceleration experienced during low-velocity heading in experienced collegiate players. Balanced neck strength may reduce head acceleration cumulative subclinical injury. Since neck strength is a measureable and amenable strength training intervention, this may represent a modifiable intrinsic risk factor for injury.

  3. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  4. Motion-corrected Fourier ptychography

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Liheng; Guo, Kaikai; Suo, Jinli; Yang, Changhuei; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychography (FP) is a recently proposed computational imaging technique for high space-bandwidth product imaging. In real setups such as endoscope and transmission electron microscope, the common sample motion largely degrades the FP reconstruction and limits its practicability. In this paper, we propose a novel FP reconstruction method to efficiently correct for unknown sample motion. Specifically, we adaptively update the sample's Fourier spectrum from low spatial-frequency regions towards high spatial-frequency ones, with an additional motion recovery and phase-offset compensation procedure for each sub-spectrum. Benefiting from the phase retrieval redundancy theory, the required large overlap between adjacent sub-spectra offers an accurate guide for successful motion recovery. Experimental results on both simulated data and real captured data show that the proposed method can correct for unknown sample motion with its standard deviation being up to 10% of the field-of-view scale. We have released...

  5. Research on genetics of rice heading date

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Heading date is one of the most important traits for rice adaptation to cultivation area and crop seasons, and it is mainly determined by photoperiod, basic vegetative growth, and temperature of cultivars. The diversity of combinations of photo-sensitive varieties and the basic vegetative, makes the heading date varied. On one hand, this supplies abundant resources for different ecotypes breeding; on the other hand, it complicates the inheritance of heading date. In recent years, transgression of late maturity has often been encountered, especially between indica and japonica subspecies, this had inhabited the use of hybrid vigor. Therefore, understanding the inheritance basis of heading date is very important for breeding practices.

  6. Objective Motion Cueing Criteria Investigation Based on Three Flight Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Chung, William W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to help establish fidelity criteria to accompany the simulator motion system diagnostic test specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization. Twelve air- line transport pilots flew three tasks in the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator under four different motion conditions. The experiment used three different hexapod motion configurations, each with a different tradeoff between motion filter gain and break frequency, and one large motion configuration that utilized as much of the simulator's motion space as possible. The motion condition significantly affected: 1) pilot motion fidelity ratings, and sink rate and lateral deviation at touchdown for the approach and landing task, 2) pilot motion fidelity ratings, roll deviations, maximum pitch rate, and number of stick shaker activations in the stall task, and 3) heading deviation after an engine failure in the takeoff task. Significant differences in pilot-vehicle performance were used to define initial objective motion cueing criteria boundaries. These initial fidelity boundaries show promise but need refinement.

  7. Markerless motion tracking of awake animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Se, Stephen; Meikle, Steven; Angelis, Georgios; Ryder, Will; Popovic, Kata; Yatigammana, Dylan; Fulton, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging of awake, unrestrained small animals using motion-compensation removes the need for anesthetics and enables an animal's behavioral response to stimuli or administered drugs to be studied concurrently with imaging. While the feasibility of motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of awake rodents using marker-based optical motion tracking has been shown, markerless motion tracking would avoid the risk of marker detachment, streamline the experimental workflow, and potentially provide more accurate pose estimates over a greater range of motion. We have developed a stereoscopic tracking system which relies on native features on the head to estimate motion. Features are detected and matched across multiple camera views to accumulate a database of head landmarks and pose is estimated based on 3D-2D registration of the landmarks to features in each image. Pose estimates of a taxidermal rat head phantom undergoing realistic rat head motion via robot control had a root mean square error of 0.15 and 1.8 mm using markerless and marker-based motion tracking, respectively. Markerless motion tracking also led to an appreciable reduction in motion artifacts in motion-compensated positron emission tomography imaging of a live, unanesthetized rat. The results suggest that further improvements in live subjects are likely if nonrigid features are discriminated robustly and excluded from the pose estimation process.

  8. A Method for Head-shoulder Segmentation and Human Facial Feature Positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of head-shoulder segmentation and human facial feature allocation for videotelephone application. Utilizing the characteristic of multi-resolution processing of human eyes, analyzing the edge information of only a single frame in different frequency bands, this method can automatically perform head-shoulder segmentation and locate the facial feature regions (eyes, mouth, etc.) with rather high precision, simple and fast computation. Therefore, this method makes the 3-D model automatic adaptation and 3-D motion estimation possible. However, this method may fail while processing practical images with a complex background. Then it is preferable to use some pre-known information and multi-frame joint processing.

  9. Biological Form is Sufficient to Create a Biological Motion Sex Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiris, Eric; Mirenzi, Aaron; Janis, Katie

    2016-10-01

    In a series of five experiments we sought to determine what causes the biological motion sex aftereffect-adaptation of a general representation of the stimulus sex, adaptation to the motion in the stimulus, or adaptation to the form in the stimulus. The experiments showed that (a) adaptation to gendered faces and gendered full body images did not create a biological motion sex aftereffect; (b) adaptation to moving partial biological motion displays containing the most important motion cues for sex discrimination (shoulders and hips or shoulders, hips, and feet) did not create a biological motion sex aftereffect; and (c) adaptation to a static frame or shapes derived from a static frame did create a biological motion sex aftereffect. These results suggest that form information is sufficient to create a biological motion sex aftereffect and suggests that biological motion sex aftereffects may be a result of lower level rather than higher level adaptation in the visual system.

  10. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mattijs Arnoldussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. 1. Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit.We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow’s rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals.2. Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semicircular canals (SCC? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those BOLD signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes.3. We investigated if subject’s sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is not arranged into

  11. Respiratory Motion Prediction in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Sastry

    Active respiratory motion management has received increasing attention in the past decade as a means to reduce the internal margin (IM) component of the clinical target volume (CTV)—planning target volume (PTV) margin typically added around the gross tumor volume (GTV) during radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Engineering and technical developments in linear accelerator design and respiratory motion monitoring respectively have made the delivery of motion adaptive radiation therapy possible through real-time control of either dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion (gantry based linear accelerator design) or robotic arm motion (robotic arm mounted linear accelerator design).

  12. The moving minimum audible angle is smaller during self motion than during source motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Owen eBrimijoin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We are rarely perfectly still: our heads rotate in three axes and move in three dimensions, constantly varying the spectral and binaural cues at the ear drums. In spite of this motion, static sound sources in the world are typically perceived as stable objects. This argues that the auditory system – in a manner not unlike the vestibulo-ocular reflex – works to compensate for self motion and stabilize our sensory representation of the world. We tested a prediction arising from this postulate: that self motion should be processed more accurately than source motion.We used an infrared motion tracking system to measure head angle, and real-time interpolation of head related impulse responses to create head-stabilized signals that appeared to remain fixed in space as the head turned. After being presented with pairs of simultaneous signals consisting of a man and a woman speaking a snippet of speech, normal and hearing impaired listeners were asked to report whether the female voice was to the left or the right of the male voice. In this way we measured the moving minimum audible angle (MMAA. This measurement was made while listeners were asked to turn their heads back and forth between ± 15° and the signals were stabilized in space. After this self-motion condition we measured MMAA in a second source-motion condition when listeners remained still and the virtual locations of the signals were moved using the trajectories from the first condition.For both normal and hearing impaired listeners, we found that the MMAA for signals moving relative to the head was ~1-2° smaller when the movement was the result of self motion than when it was the result of source motion, even though the motion with respect to the head was identical. These results as well as the results of past experiments suggest that spatial processing involves an ongoing and highly accurate comparison of spatial acoustic cues with self-motion cues.

  13. 多体系统动力学方程的反馈参数自适应约束违约稳定法%Adaptive Feedback Parameters for Baumgarte's Constraint Violation Stabilization Methods of Multibody System's Equations of Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖; 马建敏

    2012-01-01

    The reasonable selection of the feedback parameters is one of the important factors,which affects the accuracy and stability of the implement of the Baumgarte's constraint violation Stabilization Methods(BSM).For the equations of motion of multibody system,a modified BSM with adaptive feedback parameters is proposed.The feedback parameters are determined by the computational error,the degree of the position constraints violation and that of the velocity constraints violation.The numerical simulations show that the proposed method is applicable to the explicit(for example Dopri5) and implicit(for example Radau5) arithmetics,with constant or adaptive step size,and is also favorable to reduce the accumulation and magnification of the computational error during iterations.It is also easy to implement and embedded into the known arithmetics,and independent of special arithmetic.%约束违约稳定法的反馈参数的正确选择,是影响其计算准确性和稳定性的重要因素之一.通过计算误差、位移约束违约程度和速度约束违约程度3项指标来综合选择反馈参数,提出了一种多体系统动力学方程的反馈参数自适应的约束违约稳定法.数值分析表明:该方法适用于定步长和变步长、显式和隐式算法,有利于减小数值误差的积累和数值解的漂移,执行简单、高效、易于嵌入已有算法,且无需依赖于特定的积分方法.

  14. A Countermeasure for Space Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Somers, J. T.; Leigh, R. J.; Jones, G. Melvill

    2006-01-01

    Overall, the results obtained in both the U.S. and the Russian space programs indicate that most space crews will experience some symptoms of motion sickness (MS) causing significant impact on the operational objectives that must be accomplished to assure mission success. At this time the primary countermeasure for MS requires the administration of Promethazine. Promethazine is not a benign drug, and is most frequently administered just prior to the sleep cycle to prevent its side effects from further compromising mission objectives. Clearly other countermeasures for SMS must be developed. Currently the primary focus is on two different technologies: (1) developing new and different pharmacological compounds with less significant side effects, (2) preflight training. The primary problem with all of these methods for controlling MS is time. New drugs that may be beneficial are years from testing and development, and preflight training requires a significant investment of crew time during an already intensive pre-launch schedule. Granted, motion sickness symptoms can be minimized with either of the two methods detailed above, however, it may be possible to develop a countermeasure that does not require either extensive adaptation time or exposure to motion sickness. Approximately 25 years ago Professor Geoffrey Melvill Jones presented his work on adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) using optically reversed vision (left-right prisms) during head rotations in the horizontal plane. It was of no surprise that most subjects experienced motion sickness while wearing the optically reversing prisms. However, a serendipitous finding emerged during this research showing that the same subjects did not experience motion sickness symptoms when wearing the reversing prisms under stroboscopic illumination. The mechanism, by which this side-effect was believed to have occurred, is not clearly understood. However, the fact that no motion sickness was ever noted, suggests

  15. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory experimental set - up for studying the behaviour of sediment in presence of a turbulent field with zero mean flow is compared with the behaviour of turbidity currents [1] . Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the sediment lift - off. The behaviour of the turbidity current in a flat ground is compared with the zero mean flow oscilating grid generated turbulence as when wave flow lifts off suspended sediments [2,3]. Some examples of the results obtained with this set-up relating the height of the head of the turbidity current to the equilibrium level of stirred lutoclines are shown. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', and the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size [1,3]. Combining grid stirring and turbidty current head shapes analyzed by means of advanced image analysis, sediment vertical fluxes and settling speeds can be measured [4,5]. [1] D. Hernandez Turbulent structure of turbidity currents and sediment transport Ms Thesis ETSECCPB, UPC. Barcelona 2009. [2] A. Sánchez-Arcilla; A. Rodríguez; J.C. Santás; J.M. Redondo; V. Gracia; R. K'Osyan; S. Kuznetsov; C. Mösso. Delta'96 Surf-zone and nearshore measurements at the Ebro Delta. A: International Conference on Coastal Research through large Scale Experiments (Coastal Dynamics '97). University of Plymouth, 1997, p. 186-187. [3] P. Medina, M. A. Sánchez and J. M. Redondo. Grid stirred turbulence: applications to the initiation of sediment motion and lift-off studies Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part B: Hydrology, Oceans and Atmosphere. 26, Issue 4, 2001, Pages 299-304 [4] M.O. Bezerra, M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. Study on the influence of waves on

  16. A WIDE DISTRIBUTION OF A NEW VRN-B1c ALLELE OF WHEAT TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. IN RUSSIA, UKRAINE AND ADJACENT REGIONS: A LINK WITH THE HEADING TIME AND ADAPTIVE POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherban A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation of common wheat (T. aestivum L. to diverse environmental conditions is greatly under the control of genes involved in determination of vernalization response (Vrn-1 genes. It was found that the variation in common wheat heading time is affected not only by combination of Vrn-1 homoeoalleles but also by multiple alleles at a separate Vrn-1 locus. Previously, we described the Vrn-B1c allele from T.aestivum cv. 'Saratovskaya 29' and found significant differences in the structure of the first (1st intron of this allele when compared to another highly abundant Vrn-B1a allele, specifically, the deletion of 0.8 kb coupled with the duplication of 0.4 kb. We suggested that the changes in the intron 1 of Vrn-B1c allele caused earlier ear emergence in the near-isogenic line and cultivars, carrying this allele. In this study we investigate the distribution of the Vrn-B1c allele in a wide set of spring wheat cultivars from Russia, Ukraine and adjacent regions. The analysis revealed that 40% of Russian and 53% of Ukranian spring wheat cultivars contain the Vrn-B1c allele. The high distribution of the Vrn-B1c allele can be explained by a frequent using of 'Saratovskaya 29' in the breeding process inside the studied area. From the other hand, the predominance of the Vrn-B1c allele among cultivars cultivated in West Siberia and Kazakhstan may be due to the selective advantage of this allele for the region where there is a high risk of early fall frosts.

  17. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young...... patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios...

  18. Motion Model Employment using interacting Motion Model Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a simulation study to track a maneuvering target using a selective approach in choosing Interacting Multiple Models (IMM) algorithm to provide a wider coverage to track such targets.  Initially, there are two motion models in the system to track a target.  Probability of each...... model being correct is computed through a likelihood function for each model.  The study presented a simple technique to introduce additional models into the system using deterministic acceleration which basically defines the dynamics of the system.  Therefore, based on this value more motion models can...... be employed to increase the coverage.  Finally, the combined estimate is obtained using posteriori probabilities from different filter models.   The implemented approach provides an adaptive scheme for selecting various number of motion models.  Motion model description is important as it defines the kind...

  19. Motion aftereffect of combined first-order and second-order motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Smagt, M J; Verstraten, F A; Vaessen, E B; van Londen, T; van de Grind, W A

    1999-01-01

    When, after prolonged viewing of a moving stimulus, a stationary (test) pattern is presented to an observer, this results in an illusory movement in the direction opposite to the adapting motion. Typically, this motion aftereffect (MAE) does not occur after adaptation to a second-order motion stimulus (i.e. an equiluminous stimulus where the movement is defined by a contrast or texture border, not by a luminance border). However, a MAE of second-order motion is perceived when, instead of a static test pattern, a dynamic test pattern is used. Here, we investigate whether a second-order motion stimulus does affect the MAE on a static test pattern (sMAE), when second-order motion is presented in combination with first-order motion during adaptation. The results show that this is indeed the case. Although the second-order motion stimulus is too weak to produce a convincing sMAE on its own, its influence on the sMAE is of equal strength to that of the first-order motion component, when they are adapted to simultaneously. The results suggest that the perceptual appearance of the sMAE originates from the site where first-order and second-order motion are integrated.

  20. [Illustrations of visceral referred pain. "Head-less" Head's zones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, C; Beissner, F

    2011-04-01

    Reviewing anatomical, physiological and neurological standard literature for illustrations of referred visceral pain only one type of illustration can frequently be found, which is referred to as Treves and Keith. In fact, the original illustration as a model for most current pictures stems from the German edition of Sir Frederick Treves' famous book "Surgical Applied Anatomy" from 1914, which was reillustrated for didactical reasons for the German readership. While neither Treves and Keith nor the German illustrator Otto Kleinschmidt ever published any work on referred pain this illustration must have been adapted or copied from older sources by the illustrator. Therefore the comprehensive systematic original works before 1914 were reviewed, namely those of Sir Henry Head and Sir James Mackenzie. Due to the name of the phenomenon in the German literature of Head's zones, the illustrations were expected to be based mainly on Head's work. However, a comparison of all available illustrations led to the conclusion that Kleinschmidt chiefly used information from Mackenzie as a model for his illustration. Due to the inexact reproduction of Mackenzie's work by the illustrator some important features were lost that had been reported by the original authors. These include the phenomenon of Head's maximum points, which nowadays has fallen into oblivion.Therefore current charts, based on the illustration by Kleinschmidt from 1914, lack experimental evidence and appear to be a simplification of the observational results of both Head's and Mackenzie's original systematic works.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  3. Motion in gauge theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tresguerres, Romualdo

    2012-01-01

    A description of motion is proposed, adapted to the composite bundle interpretation of Poincar\\'e Gauge Theory. Reference frames, relative positions and time evolution are characterized in gauge-theoretical terms. The approach is illustrated by an appropriate formulation of the familiar example of orbital motion induced by Schwarzschild spacetime.

  4. Mechatronic design of the Twente humanoid head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Visser, Ludo C.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the mechatronic design of the Twente humanoid head, which has been realized in the purpose of having a research platform for human-machine interaction. The design features a fast, four degree of freedom neck, with long range of motion, and a vision system with three degrees of f

  5. Driving with head-slaved camera system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oving, A.B.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    In a field experiment, we tested the effectiveness of a head-slaved camera system for driving an armoured vehicle under armour. This system consists of a helmet-mounted display (HMD), a headtracker, and a motion platform with two cameras. Subjects performed several driving tasks on paved and in

  6. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnoldussen, D.M.; Goossens, J.; Berg, A.V. van den

    2013-01-01

    Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. (1)

  7. Prospective multiaxial motion correction for fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, H A; Riederer, S J; Grimm, R C; Ehman, R L; Felmlee, J P; Jack, C R

    2000-03-01

    Corruption of the image time series due to interimage head motion limits the clinical utility of functional MRI. This paper presents a method for real-time prospective correction of rotation and translation in all six degrees of rigid body motion. By incorporating an orbital navigator (ONAV) echo for each of the sagittal, axial, and coronal planes into the fMRI pulse sequence, rotation and translation can be measured and the spatial orientation of the image acquisition sequence that follows can be corrected prospectively in as little as 160 msec. Testing of the method using a computerized motion phantom capable of performing complex multiaxial motion showed subdegree rotational and submillimeter translational accuracy over a range of +/-8 degrees and +/-8 mm of motion. In vivo images demonstrate correction of simultaneous through-plane and in-plane motion and improved detection of fMRI activation in the presence of head motion.

  8. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  9. A Hybrid Motion Compensation De-interlacing Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Motion compensation de-interlacing is expected to be better than linear techniques; but all the block-based motion compensation de-interlacing methods cause block artifacts. The algorithm proposed in this paper is concerned with reducing the deficiency of motion-compensated interpolation by using adaptive hybrid de-interlacing methods. A spatio-temporal tensor-based approach is used to get more accurate motion field for de-interlacing. Motion vector is assigned for each position with pixel precision; the block artifact is reduced significantly. To deal with the artifacts introduced by motion-compensation when the motion estimation is incorrect, linear techniques are considered by adaptive weighting. Furthermore, directional filter is adapted to preserve details and the edge discontinuity could be eliminated greatly. Our approach is robust to incorrect motion vector estimation.

  10. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  11. Modulation of Head Movement Control During Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/sec (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2m from their eyes. The relative motion of the head and the net torque acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were used as measures of coordination. It was found that the net torque applied to the head counteracts the destabilizing forces acting on the upper body during locomotion. The average net torque impulse was significantly different (p less than 0.05) between the heel strike and swing phases and were found to be symmetrical between the right and left leg events of the gait cycle. However, the average net displacement of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (p greater than 0.05) throughout the gait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixing of targets during walking.

  12. A motion retargeting algorithm based on model simplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new motion retargeting algorithm is presented, which adapts the motion capture data to a new character. To make the resulting motion realistic, the physically-based optimization method is adopted. However, the optimization process is difficult to converge to the optimal value because of high complexity of the physical human model. In order to address this problem, an appropriate simplified model automatically determined by a motion analysis technique is utilized, and then motion retargeting with this simplified model as an intermediate agent is implemented. The entire motion retargeting algorithm involves three steps of nonlinearly constrained optimization: forward retargeting, motion scaling and inverse retargeting. Experimental results show the validity of this algorithm.

  13. 风帆助航船舶运动的模糊自适应迭代滑模控制%Fuzzy-adaptive iterative sliding-mode control for sail-assisted ship motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈智鹏; 姜仲昊; 王国峰; 郭晨

    2016-01-01

    A kind of fuzzy⁃adaptive nonlinear sliding⁃mode controller is presented for a sail⁃assisted ship motion mod⁃el, which has the characteristics of high nonlinearity and uncertainty. The iterative sliding⁃mode controller ( ISMC) , which uses a nonlinear hyperbolic tangent function, is designed for the system output. The sliding⁃surface feedback control method is combined with the ISMC without needing to estimate the uncertain parameters and disturbances. The stability of the proposed controller can be proved by the strict boundedness of the hyperbolic tangent function and the constraint of the system input. To enhance the adaptability of the controller, a fuzzy system is introduced to optimize the parameters of the ISMC. Finally, numerical simulations were carried out of the 76000 DWT large ocean⁃going bulk carrier ‘Wen Zhuhai’ . The results of the simulations indicate that the proposed fuzzy nonlinear iterative sliding⁃mode controller ( FAISMC) is robust against perturbations from the uncertain parameters and wave disturbances, and its control output is more appropriate than that from the ISMC.%针对风帆助航船舶运动模型的不确定性和高度非线性特点,设计了一种自适应非线性滑模控制器。该控制器利用非线性双曲正切函数对系统输出进行迭代滑动模态设计,应用滑模面反馈控制方法,无需对系统的不确定项和外界干扰进行估计,根据双曲正切函数的严格有界性和控制输入约束条件证明了控制器稳定性,同时引入模糊系统对迭代滑模参数进行优化,增强控制器的自适应性。以“文竹海”号76000DWT 散货船为目标进行控制仿真,结果表明,所设计控制器对系统模型不确定参数摄动及风浪作用不敏感,具有强鲁棒性,且与迭代滑模控制器相比所得控制量输出更加合理有效。

  14. Bearings-only target motion analysis based on decreasing dimension by self-adaption aethod to ascertain initial distance%初距自适应估计的降维纯方位目标运动分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马鑫; 舒象兰; 孙荣光; 綦敦浩

    2013-01-01

    Bearings-only target motion analysis(BO-TMA) is to estimate the position and velocity of a target from bearing measurements with corrupted noise obtained by an observation platform.Since the problem of the tardy convergence rate and low calculation precision,a least square BTMA model taking the initial distance as the parameter has been formatted and an adaptive method to ascertain initial distance is proposed,this method translates three-dimensional problem into two-dimensional problem and,consequently boosts convergence rate and low calculation precision.Computer simulation results verify the effectiveness of the method.%纯方位目标运动分析(BO-TMA)是一种从探测器所观测到的加噪方位信息和测量载体的机动信息中估算出目标运动要素的方法.针对传统纯方位目标运动分析收敛速度慢,参数估计精度低的问题,本文通过建立以初距为参量的纯方位最小二乘TMA模型,提出一种自适应确定初始距离并求解速度信息的方法,该方法将三维问题转化为二维问题,从而提高收敛速度与估计精度.仿真结果验证了该方法的有效性.

  15. Research on the Driven Head's Elliptic Motion of the V-Shape Linear Ultrasonic Motor%V形直线超声波电动机运动分析和实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许海; 李志荣

    2012-01-01

    The V-shape linear ultrasonic motor was large thrust, high efficiency by making full use of the piezoelectric ceramic d33 effect. The author developed this type of prototype, analyzed the motor symmetric and anti-symmetry modal excitation process, and the elliptic movement of driven head in actual work process, and proved the ellipse was inclined. The angle of the inclined ellipse was not only depended on the longitudinal vibration of the Langevin vibrators, but also the installation angle θ. The installation angle d affected the maximum speed and the maximum output thrust of linear ultrasonic motor. This angle should be fully guarantee accuracy in design and installation.%试制了V型直线超声波电动机样机,分析了该电机实际工作状态下对称和反对称模态的激发过程;对实际工作过程中驱动足的椭圆运动进行了分析,得出电机实际工作时驱动足的椭圆运动轨迹为一斜椭圆.斜椭圆的轨迹不仅与两个兰杰文振子的纵向振幅有关还和安装角θ角有关.通过理论分析可知,安装角θ直接影响到电机的最大速度和电机最大输出推力.该角度在设计和安装时应该充分保证精度.

  16. Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  17. Do crash helmets retain their position on the head in case of an impact ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beusenberg, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    This report gives the description and results of three sled tests with each four dummy heads, to record the behaviour of the head and neck of the dummy and the helmet in case of a simulated accident. The simulated accident resulted in a motions of the head, neck and helmet owing to the effects of in

  18. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R. (Riender); de Bruijn, E. (Edo); Forbes, P.A. (Patrick A.); F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans C.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization,

  19. 头颈部肿瘤自适应放射治疗的研究进展%Progress in Research of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任刚; 徐寿平; 杜镭; 马林

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is as one of the most important treatment method for head and neck cancer. Compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has better conformal property and uniformity. Tumor target area receives higher doses of irradiation and organs at risk receive lower doses of irradiation using IMRT technology. At present, based on treatment prior to the localization of CT image design, inverse planning is completed during IMRT treatment, without regard to the difference between the actual dose and planning dose. The difference is for changes of organ anatomy, reduced tumor volume and body weight loss. Because of the difference dose between target area and surrounding organs at risk is very large in IMRT technology, anatomical changes greater impact the plan implementation compared to conventional radiotherapy. Therefore, only according to positioning CT image and not fully considering the course of organ anatomy changes, plan design is implemented. This method not only may cause target less, but also may cause additional complications. In order to solve this problem, adaptive radiotherapy (ART) is appeared, which has recently become a hot topic in the radiation oncology community. The so-called ART technology is a treatment technique or model, which analyzes the different anatomic shape and dose between the actual plan and original plan about target volume and organs at risk based on the treatment of feedback in the process, in order to adjust follow-up treatment plan timely. This paper reviews the research status of ART technology in head and neck cancer, retrospectively studying the related literature at home and abrdad, combineing with the experience of our department.%放疗已成为头颈部肿瘤治疗中重要的治疗手段之一.与三维适形放疗相比,调强放疗(Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy,IMRT)具有更好的适形性和均匀性,在高剂量照射肿瘤靶区的同时,减少了对周围

  20. Vergence-dependent adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) normally depends on the distance between the subject and the visual target, but it remains uncertain whether vergence angle can be linked to changes in VOR gain through a process of context-dependent adaptation. In this study, we examined this question with an adaptation paradigm that modified the normal relationship between vergence angle and retinal image motion. Subjects were rotated sinusoidally while they viewed an optokinetic (OKN) stimulus through either diverging or converging prisms. In three subjects the diverging prisms were worn while the OKN stimulus moved out of phase with the head, and the converging prisms were worn when the OKN stimulus moved in-phase with the head. The relationship between the vergence angle and OKN stimulus was reversed in the fourth subject. After 2 h of training, the VOR gain at the two vergence angles changed significantly in all of the subjects, evidenced by the two different VOR gains that could be immediately accessed by switching between the diverged and converged conditions. The results demonstrate that subjects can learn to use vergence angle as the contextual cue that retrieves adaptive changes in the angular VOR.

  1. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Berger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  2. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    OpenAIRE

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tan...

  3. Collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  4. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  5. Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannucci, Lorenzo; Tolu, Silvia; Falotico, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Two main classes of reflexes relying on the vestibular system are involved in the stabilization of the human gaze: The vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), which stabilizes the head in space and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which stabilizes the visual axis to minimize retinal image motion. The VOR...... on the coordination of VCR and VOR and OKR. The model, inspired on neuroscientific cerebellar theories, is provided with learning and adaptation capabilities based on internal models. Tests on a simulated humanoid platform confirm the effectiveness of our approach....

  6. A MEMS-based Adaptive AHRS for Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yunlong; Hussain, Dil Muhammed Akbar; Soltani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Satellite tracking is a challenging task for marine applications. An attitude determination system should estimate the wave disturbances on the ship body accurately. To achieve this, an Attitude Heading Reference System (AHRS) based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors, composed...... of three-axis gyroscope, accelerometer and magnetometer, is developed for Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna (MSTA). In this paper, the attitude determination algorithm is improved using an adaptive mechanism that tunes the attitude estimator parameters based on an estimation of ship motion frequency...

  7. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  8. One-year results of cemented bipolar radial head prostheses for comminuted radial head fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laun, Reinhold

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comminuted radial head fractures (Mason type III continue to pose a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. When internal fixation is not possible, radial head arthroplasty has been advocated as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiological short-term results of patients with Mason type III radial head fractures treated with a cemented bipolar radial prosthesis. Methods: Twelve patients received cemented bipolar radial head hemiarthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures. In all patients a CT scan was obtained prior to surgical treatment to assess all associated injuries. Postoperatively an early motion protocol was applied. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at an average of 12.7 months.Results: According to the Mayo Modified Wrist Score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the functional rating index of Broberg and Morrey, and the DASH Score good to excellent results were obtained. Grip strength and range of motion were almost at the level of the unaffected contralateral side. Patient satisfaction was high, no instability or signs of loosening of the implant, and only mild signs of osteoarthritis were seen.Conclusion: Overall good to excellent short-term results for primary arthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures were observed. These encouraging results warrant the conduction of further studies with long-term follow-up and more cases to see if these short-term results can be maintained over time.

  9. The "motion silencing" illusion results from global motion and crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turi, Marco; Burr, David

    2013-04-18

    Suchow and Alvarez (2011) recently devised a striking illusion, where objects changing in color, luminance, size, or shape appear to stop changing when they move. They refer to the illusion as "motion silencing of awareness to visual change." Here we present evidence that the illusion results from two perceptual processes: global motion and crowding. We adapted Suchow and Alvarez's stimulus to three concentric rings of dots, a central ring of "target dots" flanked on either side by similarly moving flanker dots. Subjects had to identify in which of two presentations the target dots were continuously changing (sinusoidally) in size, as distinct from the other interval in which size was constant. The results show: (a) Motion silencing depends on target speed, with a threshold around 0.2 rotations per second (corresponding to about 10°/s linear motion). (b) Silencing depends on both target-flanker spacing and eccentricity, with critical spacing about half eccentricity, consistent with Bouma's law. (c) The critical spacing was independent of stimulus size, again consistent with Bouma's law. (d) Critical spacing depended strongly on contrast polarity. All results imply that the "motion silencing" illusion may result from crowding.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  11. Humans perceive object motion in world coordinates during obstacle avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajen, Brett R; Parade, Melissa S; Matthis, Jonathan S

    2013-07-25

    A fundamental question about locomotion in the presence of moving objects is whether movements are guided based upon perceived object motion in an observer-centered or world-centered reference frame. The former captures object motion relative to the moving observer and depends on both observer and object motion. The latter captures object motion relative to the stationary environment and is independent of observer motion. Subjects walked through a virtual environment (VE) viewed through a head-mounted display and indicated whether they would pass in front of or behind a moving obstacle that was on course to cross their future path. Subjects' movement through the VE was manipulated such that object motion in observer coordinates was affected while object motion in world coordinates was the same. We found that when moving observers choose routes around moving obstacles, they rely on object motion perceived in world coordinates. This entails a process, which has been called flow parsing (Rushton & Warren, 2005; Warren & Rushton, 2009a), that recovers the component of optic flow due to object motion independent of self-motion. We found that when self-motion is real and actively generated, the process by which object motion is recovered relies on both visual and nonvisual information to factor out the influence of self-motion. The remaining component contains information about object motion in world coordinates that is needed to guide locomotion.

  12. Head injury from a bungee run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj; Convery, Fiona; Watt, Michael; Fulton, Ailsa; McKinstry, Steven; Flannery, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    An adaptation of bungee jumping, 'bungee running', involves participants attempting to run as far as they can whilst connected to an elastic rope which is anchored to a fixed point. Usually considered a safe recreational activity, we report a potentially life-threatening head injury following a bungee running accident.

  13. Function of head-bobbing behavior in diving little grebes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunji, Megu; Fujita, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Most birds show a characteristic head movement that consists of head stabilization and quick displacement. In this movement, which is analogous to saccadic eye movement in mammals, head stabilization plays an important role in stabilizing the retinal image. This head movement, called "head bobbing", is particularly pronounced during walking. Previous studies focusing on anatomical and behavioral features have pointed out that visual information is also important for diving birds, indicating its significance in the head movements of diving birds. In the present study, the kinematic and behavioral features of head bobbing in diving little grebes were described by motion analysis to identify the head movement in diving birds. The results showed that head-bobbing stroke (HBS) consisted of a thrust phase and a hold phase as is typical for head bobbing during walking birds. This suggests that HBS is related to visual stabilization under water. In HBS, grebes tended to dive with longer stroke length and smaller stroke frequency than in non-bobbing stroke. This suggests that the behavior, which is related to vision, affects the kinematic stroke parameters. This clarification of underwater head movement will help in our understanding not only of vision, but also of the kinematic strategy of diving birds.

  14. Wireless inertial measurement of head kinematics in freely-moving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Matthieu O.; Tihy, Matthieu; Gourgeon, Aurélie; Pompili, Marco N.; Godsil, Bill P.; Léna, Clément; Dugué, Guillaume P.

    2016-01-01

    While miniature inertial sensors offer a promising means for precisely detecting, quantifying and classifying animal behaviors, versatile inertial sensing devices adapted for small, freely-moving laboratory animals are still lacking. We developed a standalone and cost-effective platform for performing high-rate wireless inertial measurements of head movements in rats. Our system is designed to enable real-time bidirectional communication between the headborne inertial sensing device and third party systems, which can be used for precise data timestamping and low-latency motion-triggered applications. We illustrate the usefulness of our system in diverse experimental situations. We show that our system can be used for precisely quantifying motor responses evoked by external stimuli, for characterizing head kinematics during normal behavior and for monitoring head posture under normal and pathological conditions obtained using unilateral vestibular lesions. We also introduce and validate a novel method for automatically quantifying behavioral freezing during Pavlovian fear conditioning experiments, which offers superior performance in terms of precision, temporal resolution and efficiency. Thus, this system precisely acquires movement information in freely-moving animals, and can enable objective and quantitative behavioral scoring methods in a wide variety of experimental situations. PMID:27767085

  15. Protection of the side of the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, A; Mills, N J

    1996-07-01

    The side of the head is a frequent impact site for pedal cyclists, motorcyclists, and industrial workers. It is vulnerable to impact, yet many helmet standards do not have impact tests at the side of the helmet. Laboratory impact tests should reproduce the phenomena in real impacts, but usually they do not allow the headform to rotate, or ignore the effect of the neck on the motion of the head. The authors designed a linkage, simulating the flexibility of the neck, for use with anthropomorphic dummies in helmet testing. Impacts at the side of the helmet, normal to the helmet surface, were made with flat and hemispherical strikers. Head rotation during impacts caused the impact site to move, in some cases to below the level protected by the helmet. The peak angular head acceleration correlated with the peak linear accelerations. Neck flexibility means that helmets can protect the head from higher kinetic energy impacts than those specified in standards using immovable headforms or impact anvils. The load spreading efficiency of polypropylene foam, used in soft shell bicycle helmets, is better than that of polystyrene foam. The authors conclude that the side of the head can be protected by a suitable helmet design.

  16. A robust adaptive robot controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, Harry; Ortega, Romeo; Nijmeijer, Henk

    1993-01-01

    A globally convergent adaptive control scheme for robot motion control with the following features is proposed. First, the adaptation law possesses enhanced robustness with respect to noisy velocity measurements. Second, the controller does not require the inclusion of high gain loops that may excit

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  18. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of lung cancer radiotherapy are intra/inter-fraction tumor/organ anatomy/motion changes and the need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D) image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed. PMID:20814539

  19. Biomechanics of Heading a Soccer Ball: Implications for Player Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F. Babbs

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the risk and safety of heading a soccer ball, the author created a set of simple mathematical models based upon Newton�s second law of motion to describe the physics of heading. These models describe the player, the ball, the flight of the ball before impact, the motion of the head and ball during impact, and the effects of all of these upon the intensity and the duration of acceleration of the head. The calculated head accelerations were compared to those during presumably safe daily activities of jumping, dancing, and head nodding and also were related to established criteria for serious head injury from the motor vehicle crash literature. The results suggest heading is usually safe but occasionally dangerous, depending on key characteristics of both the player and the ball. Safety is greatly improved when players head the ball with greater effective body mass, which is determined by a player�s size, strength, and technique. Smaller youth players, because of their lesser body mass, are more at risk of potentially dangerous headers than are adults, even when using current youth size balls. Lower ball inflation pressure reduces risk of dangerous head accelerations. Lower pressure balls also have greater “touch” and “playability”, measured in terms of contact time and contact area between foot and ball during a kick. Focus on teaching proper technique, the re-design of age-appropriate balls for young players with reduced weight and inflation pressure, and avoidance of head contact with fast, rising balls kicked at close range can substantially reduce risk of subtle brain injury in players who head soccer balls.

  20. Biomechanics of heading a soccer ball: implications for player safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbs, C F

    2001-08-08

    To better understand the risk and safety of heading a soccer ball, the author created a set of simple mathematical models based upon Newton's second law of motion to describe the physics of heading. These models describe the player, the ball, the flight of the ball before impact, the motion of the head and ball during impact, and the effects of all of these upon the intensity and the duration of acceleration of the head. The calculated head accelerations were compared to those during presumably safe daily activities of jumping, dancing, and head nodding and also were related to established criteria for serious head injury from the motor vehicle crash literature. The results suggest heading is usually safe but occasionally dangerous, depending on key characteristics of both the player and the ball. Safety is greatly improved when players head the ball with greater effective body mass, which is determined by a player"s size, strength, and technique. Smaller youth players, because of their lesser body mass, are more at risk of potentially dangerous headers than are adults, even when using current youth size balls. Lower ball inflation pressure reduces risk of dangerous head accelerations. Lower pressure balls also have greater "touch" and "playability", measured in terms of contact time and contact area between foot and ball during a kick. Focus on teaching proper technique, the re-design of age-appropriate balls for young players with reduced weight and inflation pressure, and avoidance of head contact with fast, rising balls kicked at close range can substantially reduce risk of subtle brain injury in players who head soccer balls.

  1. Modification of Eye Movements and Motion Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Denise, P.; CLement, G.

    2006-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both torsional and horizontal eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane, and modulation of vertical and vergence eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the sagittal plane. Previous studies have demonstrated that tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses, as well as motion perception, vary as a function of stimulus frequency during OVAR. The purpose of this study is to examine normative OVAR responses in healthy human subjects, and examine adaptive changes in astronauts following short duration space flight at low (0.125 Hz) and high (0.5 Hz) frequencies. Data was obtained on 24 normative subjects (14 M, 10 F) and 14 (13 M, 1F) astronaut subjects. To date, astronauts have participated in 3 preflight sessions (n=14) and on R+0/1 (n=7), R+2 (n= 13) and R+4 (n= 13) days after landing. Subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography. Perceived motion was evaluated using verbal reports and a two-axis joystick (pitch and roll tilt) mounted on top of a two-axis linear stage (anterior-posterior and medial-lateral translation). Eye responses were obtained in ten of the normative subjects with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias of the responses over several cycles at each stimulus frequency. Eye responses during 0.125 Hz OVAR were dominated by modulation of torsional and vertical eye position, compensatory for tilt relative to gravity. While there is a bias horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV), the

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be needed for children who cannot hold still. Motion will cause blurring of the images and degrade ... to hold your breath during the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to ...

  3. The Early Outcomes with Titanium Radial Head Implants in the Treatment of Radial Head Comminuted Fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jijun; YANG Shuhua; HU Yong

    2007-01-01

    The study assessed the early functional outcomes with cemented titanium implants of ra- dius in the treatment of comminuted fractures of radial heads. The functional outcomes of arthro- plasty with cemented titanium implants of radius in the treatment of radial head fractures (Mason Type Ⅲ: 6; Mason Type Ⅳ: 4) in l0 consecutive patients (mean age, 38 years) were evaluated over a mean time of 23.7 months (18-31 months). The patients were assessed on the basis of physical ex- amination, functional rating (Mayo) and radiographic findings. The parameters evaluated included motion, stability, pain, and grip strength. Five patients were considered to have excellent results, 4 patients had good results and 1 patient had fairly good results. There were no cases of infection, prosthetic failure, heterotopic ossification or dislocation. When medial collateral ligament was injured, radial head became the main stabilizing structure of the elbow. Titanium radial head implant may provide the stability similar to that of native radial head. We believe that titanium radial head im- plants may be indicated for the Mason Type Ⅲ and Mason Type Ⅳ radial head fractures.

  4. Visual and non-visual contributions to 3D heading selectivity in area MSTd

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Yong; Watkins, Paul V.; Angelaki, Dora E.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2006-01-01

    Robust perception of self-motion requires integration of visual motion signals with non-visual cues. Neurons in area MSTd may be involved in this sensory integration, as they respond selectively to global patterns of optic flow, as well as translational motion in darkness. Using a virtual reality system, we have characterized the three-dimensional (3D) tuning of MSTd neurons to heading directions defined by optic flow alone, inertial motion alone, and congruent combinations of the two cues. A...

  5. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPET...

  6. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Technique for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auday Al-Mayyahi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS for solving navigation problems of an autonomous ground vehicle (AGV. The system consists of four ANFIS controllers; two of which are used for regulating both the left and right angular velocities of the AGV in order to reach the target position; and other two ANFIS controllers are used for optimal heading adjustment in order to avoid obstacles. The two velocity controllers receive three sensor inputs: front distance (FD; right distance (RD and left distance (LD for the low-level motion control. Two heading controllers deploy the angle difference (AD between the heading of AGV and the angle to the target to choose the optimal direction. The simulation experiments have been carried out under two different scenarios to investigate the feasibility of the proposed ANFIS technique. The simulation results have been presented using MATLAB software package; showing that ANFIS is capable of performing the navigation and path planning task safely and efficiently in a workspace populated with static obstacles.

  7. Simulation and design of fuzzy sliding-mode controller for ship heading-tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Hansong

    2011-03-01

    In considering the characteristic of a rudder, the maneuvers of a ship were described by an unmatched uncertain nonlinear mathematic model with unknown virtual control coefficient and parameter uncertainties. In order to solve the uncertainties in the ship heading control, specifically the controller singular and paramount re-estimation problem, a new multiple sliding-mode adaptive fuzzy control algorithm was proposed by combining Nussbaum gain technology, the approximation property of fuzzy logic systems, and a multiple sliding-mode control algorithm. Based on the Lyapunov function, it was proven in theory that the controller made all signals in the nonlinear system of unmatched uncertain ship motion uniformly bounded, with tracking errors converging to zero. Simulation results show that the demonstrated controller design can track a desired course fast and accurately. It also exhibits strong robustness peculiarity in relation to system uncertainties and disturbances.

  8. A novel scheme for DVL-aided SINS in-motion alignment using UKF techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanli; Wang, Jinling; Lu, Liangqing; Wu, Wenqi

    2013-01-15

    In-motion alignment of Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems (SINS) without any geodetic-frame observations is one of the toughest challenges for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV). This paper presents a novel scheme for Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) aided SINS alignment using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) which allows large initial misalignments. With the proposed mechanism, a nonlinear SINS error model is presented and the measurement model is derived under the assumption that large misalignments may exist. Since a priori knowledge of the measurement noise covariance is of great importance to robustness of the UKF, the covariance-matching methods widely used in the Adaptive KF (AKF) are extended for use in Adaptive UKF (AUKF). Experimental results show that the proposed DVL-aided alignment model is effective with any initial heading errors. The performances of the adaptive filtering methods are evaluated with regards to their parameter estimation stability. Furthermore, it is clearly shown that the measurement noise covariance can be estimated reliably by the adaptive UKF methods and hence improve the performance of the alignment.

  9. A Novel Scheme for DVL-Aided SINS In-Motion Alignment Using UKF Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In-motion alignment of Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems (SINS without any geodetic-frame observations is one of the toughest challenges for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV. This paper presents a novel scheme for Doppler Velocity Log (DVL aided SINS alignment using Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF which allows large initial misalignments. With the proposed mechanism, a nonlinear SINS error model is presented and the measurement model is derived under the assumption that large misalignments may exist. Since a priori knowledge of the measurement noise covariance is of great importance to robustness of the UKF, the covariance-matching methods widely used in the Adaptive KF (AKF are extended for use in Adaptive UKF (AUKF. Experimental results show that the proposed DVL-aided alignment model is effective with any initial heading errors. The performances of the adaptive filtering methods are evaluated with regards to their parameter estimation stability. Furthermore, it is clearly shown that the measurement noise covariance can be estimated reliably by the adaptive UKF methods and hence improve the performance of the alignment.

  10. Optic Flow Information Influencing Heading Perception during Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederick C. Niehorster

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated what roles global spatial frequency, surface structure, and foreground motion play in heading perception during simulated rotation from optic flow. The display (110°Hx94°V simulated walking on a straight path over a ground plane (depth range: 1.4–50 m at 2 m/s while fixating a target off to one side (mean R/T ratios: ±1, ±2, ±3 under six display conditions. Four displays consisted of nonexpanding dots that were distributed so as to manipulate the amount of foreground motion and the presence of surface structure. In one further display the ground was covered with disks that expanded during the trial and lastly a textured ground display was created with the same spatial frequency power spectrum as the disk ground. At the end of each 1s trial, observers indicated their perceived heading along a line at the display's center. Mean heading biases were smaller for the textured than for the disk ground, for the displays with more foreground motion and for the displays with surface structure defined by dot motion than without. We conclude that while spatial frequency content is not a crucial factor, dense motion parallax and surface structure in optic flow are important for accurate heading perception during rotation.

  11. Physiology and pathology of eye-head coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudlock, Frank Antony; Gottlob, Irene

    2007-09-01

    Human head movement control can be considered as part of the oculomotor system since the control of gaze involves coordination of the eyes and head. Humans show a remarkable degree of flexibility in eye-head coordination strategies, nonetheless an individual will often demonstrate stereotypical patterns of eye-head behaviour for a given visual task. This review examines eye-head coordination in laboratory-based visual tasks, such as saccadic gaze shifts and combined eye-head pursuit, and in common tasks in daily life, such as reading. The effect of the aging process on eye-head coordination is then reviewed from infancy through to senescence. Consideration is also given to how pathology can affect eye-head coordination from the lowest through to the highest levels of oculomotor control, comparing conditions as diverse as eye movement restrictions and schizophrenia. Given the adaptability of the eye-head system we postulate that this flexible system is under the control of the frontal cortical regions, which assist in planning, coordinating and executing behaviour. We provide evidence for this based on changes in eye-head coordination dependant on the context and expectation of presented visual stimuli, as well as from changes in eye-head coordination caused by frontal lobe dysfunction.

  12. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürichen, R.; Wissel, T.; Ernst, F.; Schlaefer, A.; Schweikard, A.

    2014-10-01

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs—normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)—and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation.

  13. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  14. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon;

    2016-01-01

    AND MATERIALS: Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without...... accounted for realistic tumor motion accurately and performed to a similar high standard, with real-time adaptation significantly outperforming non-adaptive delivery methods....

  15. Ulnar Head Replacement and Related Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, Michael; Arsalan-Werner, Annika; Enderle, Elena; Vetter, Miriam; Vonier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A stable distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is mandatory for the function and load transmission in the wrist and forearm. Resectional salvage procedures such as the Darrach procedure, Bowers arthroplasty, and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure include the potential risk of radioulnar instability and impingement, which can lead to pain and weakness. Soft tissue stabilizing techniques have only limited success rates in solving these problems. In an attempt to stabilize the distal forearm mechanically following ulnar head resection, various endoprostheses have been developed to replace the ulnar head. The prostheses can be used for secondary treatment of failed ulnar head resection, but they can also achieve good results in the primary treatment of osteoarthritis of the DRUJ. Our experience consists of twenty-five patients (follow-up 30 months) with DRUJ osteoarthritis who were treated with an ulnar head prosthesis, with improvement in pain, range of motion, and grip strength. An ulnar head prosthesis should be considered as a treatment option for a painful DRUJ. PMID:24436786

  16. Effects of retinal position on the visuo-motor adaptation of visual stability in a virtual environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Michiteru

    2013-01-01

    Although the retinal image changes a great deal with the movement of our head or eyes, we perceive a stable world (a phenomenon known as visual stability or position constancy). Visual stability adaptively changes for each new combination of vision and head motion, or to compensate for manipulated visuo-motor gain. This study aims to investigate the effects of retinal positions on visuo-motor adaptation and to discuss the neural mechanisms involved. I found that visuo-motor adaptation occurred, and was transferable from right to left visual fields (Experiment 1), between the upper and lower visual fields (Experiment 2), and between the central and peripheral visual fields (Experiment 4), and that for the left visual field (Experiment 1) and the large visual field (Experiment 3) visuo-motor adaptations were effective. The dominance of the central vision was found in Experiment 3 but not found in Experiment 4. These results suggest that the visuo-motor adaptation of visual stability was not specific to the retinal location, but is processed by a relatively high level of the perceptual system. PMID:24349685

  17. Effects of Retinal Position on the Visuo-Motor Adaptation of Visual Stability in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiteru Kitazaki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the retinal image changes a great deal with the movement of our head or eyes, we perceive a stable world (a phenomenon known as visual stability or position constancy. Visual stability adaptively changes for each new combination of vision and head motion, or to compensate for manipulated visuo-motor gain. This study aims to investigate the effects of retinal positions on visuo-motor adaptation and to discuss the neural mechanisms involved. I found that visuo-motor adaptation occurred, and was transferable from right to left visual fields (Experiment 1, between the upper and lower visual fields (Experiment 2, and between the central and peripheral visual fields (Experiment 4, and that for the left visual field (Experiment 1 and the large visual field (Experiment 3 visuo-motor adaptations were effective. The dominance of the central vision was found in Experiment 3 but not found in Experiment 4. These results suggest that the visuo-motor adaptation of visual stability was not specific to the retinal location, but is processed by a relatively high level of the perceptual system.

  18. Head Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  19. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Højgaar, Liselotte; Roed, Bjarne; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D point clouds are matched to a reference surface using a robust iterative closest point algorithm. A main challenge is the narrow geometry requiring a compact structured light system and an oblique angle of observation. The system is validated using a mannequin head mounted on a rotary stage. We compare the system to a standard optical motion tracker based on a rigid tracking tool. Our system achieves an angular RMSE of 0.11 degrees demonstrating its relevance for motion compensated 3D scan image reconstructions as well as its competitiveness against the standard optical system with an RMSE of 0.08 degrees. Finally, we demonstrate qualitative result on real face motion estimation.

  20. Sensorimotor aspects of high-speed artificial gravity: I. Sensory conflict in vestibular adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erika L.; Hecht, Heiko; Young, Laurence R.

    2002-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation offers a promising and affordable countermeasure to the adverse effects of prolonged weightlessness. However, head movements made in a fast rotating environment elicit Coriolis effects, which seriously compromise sensory and motor processes. We found that participants can adapt to these Coriolis effects when exposed intermittently to high rotation rates and, at the same time, can maintain their perceptual-motor coordination in stationary environments. In this paper, we explore the role of inter-sensory conflict in this adaptation process. Different measures (vertical nystagmus, illusory body tilt, motion sickness) react differently to visual-vestibular conflict and adapt differently. In particular, proprioceptive-vestibular conflict sufficed to adapt subjective parameters and the time constant of nystagmus decay, while retinal slip was required for VOR gain adaptation. A simple correlation between the strength of intersensory conflict and the efficacy of adaptation fails to explain the data. Implications of these findings, which differ from existing data for low rotation rates, are discussed.

  1. Multiple Face Location Using Motion Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Face location is a difficult problem for face recognition and multiple face location is more challenging. In this paper, two new methods are presented for multiple face location via motion analysis techniques. The first method is based on motion segmentation. The authors introduce a new segmentation method by computing optical flow only on the Motion Zero-Crossing Boundary (MZCB) followed by a simple clustering method to segment each person. Then an intuitive but effective location algorithm is applied to locate each face. The second method is derived from the Hough Transform (HT). After modeling a head outline as a curve consisting of circle segments, a modified HT is used to find the center of each face. Finally, the two methods are compared and the future research directions are given.

  2. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Dizziness and Motion Sickness Dizziness and Motion Sickness Patient ... vision or speech, or hearing loss. What is dizziness? Dizziness can be described in many ways, such ...

  3. Head and neck position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    fails to be appropriately integrated in the CNS, errors in head position may occur, resulting in an inaccurate reference for HNPS, and conversely if neck proprioceptive information is inaccurate, then control of head position may be affected. The cerebellum and cortex also play a role in control of head position, providing feed-forward and modulatory influences depending on the task requirements. Position-matching tasks have been the most popular means of testing position sense in the cervical spine. These allow the appreciation of absolute, constant and variable errors in positioning and have been shown to be reliable. The results of such tests indicate that errors are relatively low (2-5 degrees). It is apparent that error is not consistently affected by age, a finding similar to studies undertaken in peripheral joints. Furthermore, the range of motion in which subjects are tested does not consistently affect accuracy in a predictable manner. However, it is evident that impairments in position sense are observed in individuals who have experienced whiplash-type injuries and individuals with chronic head and neck pain of non-traumatic origin (e.g. cervical spondylosis). While researchers advocate comprehensive retraining protocols, which include eye and neck motion targeting tasks and coordination exercises, as well as co-contraction exercises to reduce such impairments, some studies show that more general exercises and manipulation may be of benefit. Overall, there is limited information concerning the efficacy of treatment programmes.

  4. Video shot boundary detection using motion activity descriptor

    CERN Document Server

    Amel, Abdelati Malek; Abdellatif, Mtibaa

    2010-01-01

    This paper focus on the study of the motion activity descriptor for shot boundary detection in video sequences. We interest in the validation of this descriptor in the aim of its real time implementation with reasonable high performances in shot boundary detection. The motion activity information is extracted in uncompressed domain based on adaptive rood pattern search (ARPS) algorithm. In this context, the motion activity descriptor was applied for different video sequence.

  5. Less sickness with more motion and/or mental distraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, J E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Motion sickness may reduce passenger comfort and crew performance. Countermeasures are dominated by medication with specific and often undesirable side effects. OBJECTIVE: To shown that sickness due to motion can be reduced by adding an inherent non-sickening vibration and by mental distraction. METHODS: Eighteen blindfolded subjects were exposed to 20 minutes of off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR). Vibration was added by means of a head rest. Effects of OVAR and vibration were test...

  6. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion aftereffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost f

  7. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion afteraffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; van de Grind, W.A.V.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost f

  8. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion afteraffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; van de Grind, W.A.V.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost

  9. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion aftereffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost

  10. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion aftereffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost f

  11. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion afteraffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; van de Grind, W.A.V.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost f

  12. Objects in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  13. Dual adaptation and adaptive generalization of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, R. B.; Bridgeman, B.; Williams, J. A.; Semmler, R.

    1998-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the possibility that the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is subject to dual adaptation (the ability to adapt to a sensory rearrangement more rapidly and/or more completely after repeated experience with it) and adaptive generalization (the ability to adapt more readily to a novel sensory rearrangement as a result of prior dual adaptation training). In Experiment 1, the subjects actively turned the head during alternating exposure to a visual-vestibular rearrangement (target/head gain = 0.5) and the normal situation (target/head gain = 0.0). These conditions produced both adaptation and dual adaptation of the VOR but no evidence of adaptive generalization when tested with a target/head gain of 1.0. Experiment 2, in which exposure to the 0.5 gain entailed externally controlled (i.e., passive) whole body rotation, resulted in VOR adaptation but no dual adaptation. As in Experiment 1, no evidence of adaptive generalization was found.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  16. Postural instability and motion sickness in a fixed-based flight simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, T A; Hettinger, L J; Haas, M W; Roe, M M; Smart, L J

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the prediction that postural instability would precede the subjective symptoms of motion sickness in a fixed-base flight simulator. Participants sat in a cockpit in a video projection dome and were exposed to optical flow that oscillated in the roll axis with exposure durations typical of flight simulation. The frequencies of oscillation were those that characterize spontaneous postural sway during stance. Head motion was measured prior to and during exposure to imposed optical flow. Of 14 participants, 6 were classified as motion sick, either during or after exposure to the optical oscillation. Prior to the onset of subjective symptoms, head motion among participants who later became sick was significantly greater than among participants who did not become motion sick. We argue that the results support the postural instability theory of motion sickness. Actual or potential applications include the prevention or mitigation of motion sickness in virtual environments.

  17. Ulnar head replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  18. 28 CFR 71.39 - Appeal to authority head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal to authority head. 71.39 Section 71.39 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROVISIONS OF... appeal shall be stayed automatically pending resolution of the motion for reconsideration. (2) If...

  19. Blind estimation of a ship's relative wave heading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a method to estimate a ship’s relative heading against the waves. The procedure relies purely on ship- board measurements of global responses such as motion components, accelerations and the bending moment amidships. There is no particular (mathematical) model connected to t...

  20. A Motion Planning Approach to Studying Molecular Motions

    KAUST Repository

    Amato, Nancy M.

    2010-01-01

    While structurally very different, protein and RNA molecules share an important attribute. The motions they undergo are strongly related to the function they perform. For example, many diseases such as Mad Cow disease or Alzheimer\\'s disease are associated with protein misfolding and aggregation. Similarly, RNA folding velocity may regulate the plasmid copy number, and RNA folding kinetics can regulate gene expression at the translational level. Knowledge of the stability, folding, kinetics and detailed mechanics of the folding process may help provide insight into how proteins and RNAs fold. In this paper, we present an overview of our work with a computational method we have adapted from robotic motion planning to study molecular motions. We have validated against experimental data and have demonstrated that our method can capture biological results such as stochastic folding pathways, population kinetics of various conformations, and relative folding rates. Thus, our method provides both a detailed view (e.g., individual pathways) and a global view (e.g., population kinetics, relative folding rates, and reaction coordinates) of energy landscapes of both proteins and RNAs. We have validated these techniques by showing that we observe the same relative folding rates as shown in experiments for structurally similar protein molecules that exhibit different folding behaviors. Our analysis has also been able to predict the same relative gene expression rate for wild-type MS2 phage RNA and three of its mutants.

  1. Smoothing Motion Estimates for Radar Motion Compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Simple motion models for complex motion environments are often not adequate for keeping radar data coherent. Eve n perfect motion samples appli ed to imperfect models may lead to interim calculations e xhibiting errors that lead to degraded processing results. Herein we discuss a specific i ssue involving calculating motion for groups of pulses, with measurements only available at pulse-group boundaries. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report was funded by General A tomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Mission Systems under Cooperative Re search and Development Agre ement (CRADA) SC08/01749 between Sandia National Laboratories and GA-ASI. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI), an affilia te of privately-held General Atomics, is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and rel ated mission systems, includin g the Predator(r)/Gray Eagle(r)-series and Lynx(r) Multi-mode Radar.

  2. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algorithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  3. Maneuvering impact boring head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  4. Analysis methods for facial motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Mishima

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective techniques to evaluate a facial movement are indispensable for the contemporary treatment of patients with motor disorders such as facial paralysis, cleft lip, postoperative head and neck cancer, and so on. Recently, computer-assisted, video-based techniques have been devised and reported as measuring systems in which facial movements can be evaluated quantitatively. Commercially available motion analysis systems, in which a stereo-measuring technique with multiple cameras and markers to facilitate search of matching among images through all cameras, also are utilized, and are used in many measuring systems such as video-based systems. The key is how the problems of facial movement can be extracted precisely, and how useful information for the diagnosis and decision-making process can be derived from analyses of facial movement. Therefore, it is important to discuss which facial animations should be examined, and whether fixation of the head and markers attached to the face can hamper natural facial movement.

  5. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  6. Structural motion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This innovative volume provides a systematic treatment of the basic concepts and computational procedures for structural motion design and engineering for civil installations. The authors illustrate the application of motion control to a wide spectrum of buildings through many examples. Topics covered include optimal stiffness distributions for building-type structures, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, linear control, and nonlinear control. The book's primary objective is the satisfaction of motion-related design requirements, such as restrictions on displacement and acceleration. The book is ideal for practicing engineers and graduate students. This book also: ·         Broadens practitioners' understanding of structural motion control, the enabling technology for motion-based design ·         Provides readers the tools to satisfy requirements of modern, ultra-high strength materials that lack corresponding stiffness, where the motion re...

  7. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  9. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work together. Head and neck surgeons also perform craniofacial reconstruction operations. The surgery is done while you are deep asleep and pain-free (under general anesthesia ). The surgery may take ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in ... X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head ...

  16. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... hold your breath for short periods. A complete scan usually take only 30 seconds to a few ...

  17. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  19. Head and neck teratomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ajaz; Latoo, Suhail; Ahmed, Irshad; Malik, Altaf H

    2009-01-01

    Teratomas are complex lesions composed of diverse tissues from all 3 germinal cell layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. Head and neck teratomas are most commonly cervical with the oropharynx (epignathus) being the second commonest location. In this article, clinical presentation, behaviour and associated significance of head and neck teratomas have been highlightened. Because of their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic cli...

  20. Animation of 3D Model of Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michalcin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new algorithm of animation of 3D model of the human head in combination with its global motion. The designed algorithm is very fast and with low calculation requirements, because it does not need the synthesis of the input videosequence for estimation of the animation parameters as well as the parameters of global motion. The used 3D model Candide generates different expressions using its animation units which are controlled by the animation parameters. These ones are estimated on the basis of optical flow without the need of extracting of the feature points in the frames of the input videosequence because they are given by the selected vertices of the animation units of the calibrated 3D model Candide. The established multiple iterations inside the designed animation algorithm of 3D model of the human head between two successive frames significantly improved its accuracy above all for the large motion.

  1. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...... the system to a standard optical motion tracker based on a rigid tracking tool. Our system achieves an angular RMSE of 0.11 degrees demonstrating its relevance for motion compensated 3D scan image reconstructions as well as its competitiveness against the standard optical system with an RMSE of 0.08 degrees...

  2. Saccadic head and thorax movements in freely walking blowflies

    OpenAIRE

    Blaj, G.; van Hateren, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Visual information processing is adapted to the statistics of natural visual stimuli, and these statistics depend to a large extent on the movements of an animal itself. To investigate such movements in freely walking blowflies, we measured the orientation and position of their head and thorax, with high spatial and temporal accuracy. Experiments were performed on Calliphora vicina, Lucilia cuprina and L. caesar. We found that thorax and head orientation of walking flies is typically differen...

  3. Geometry Modeling of an Electronic Expansion Valve Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张川; 马善伟; 陈江平; 陈芝久; 陈文勇; 王健

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposed that the flow characteristic of electronic expansion valve should be adapted to the evaporator superheat gain to refrigerant flow rate under different working conditions. Two native methods of geometry modeling of electronic expansion valve head were introduced. By analysis of them, some shortcoming was detected and a universal modeling method of electronic expansion valve head was put forward. Through this model, the flow characteristic of EEV and the influence factors can be investigated more deeply.

  4. Driving torque reduction in linkage mechanisms using joint compliance for robot head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunhao; Yang, Xiaojun

    2015-09-01

    The conventional linkage mechanisms with compliant joint have been widely studied and implemented for increasing the adaptability of the mechanism to external contacts. However, the analysis of how compliant joints in linkage mechanism can reduce the energy consumption isn't still studied deeply. In a mobile service robot head, the actions of blinking the eyes and moving the eyeballs are realized by the planar linkage mechanism respectively. Therefore, minimizing the driving torques through motion trajectories for the linkage mechanism, which will be beneficial to extend the working time for mobile service robots. The dynamic modeling of the linkage mechanism with springs-loaded compliant joint is established. An optimization procedure for obtaining the optimal parameters of springs is proposed for minimizing the max value of driving torques within a range of desired operating conditions. The Simulations prove that the linkage mechanism with compliant joints can effectively reduce the driving torques, and reduce the energy consumption consequently. The framework can also be applied in other similar applications to reduce the driving torque and save energy. Compared with previous efforts, this is the first attempt that the linkage mechanism with complaint joint is applied in the robot head for reducing the driving torque.

  5. A robust adaptive robot controller

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    A globally convergent adaptive control scheme for robot motion control with the following features is proposed. First, the adaptation law possesses enhanced robustness with respect to noisy velocity measurements. Second, the controller does not require the inclusion of high gain loops that may excite the unmodeled dynamics and amplify the noise level. Third, we derive for the unknown parameter design a relationship between compensator gains and closed-loop convergence rates that is independen...

  6. The state of head injury biomechanics: past, present, and future part 2: physical experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Werner; Monson, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    This presentation is the continuation of the article published in Critical Reviews of Biomedical Engineering, 29(5-6), 2001. That issue contained topics dealing with components and geometry of the human head, classification of head injuries, some early experimental studies, and tolerance considerations. It then dealt with head motion and load characterization, investigations during the period from 1939 to 1966, injury causation and early modeling efforts, the 1966 Head Injury Conference and its sequels, mechanical properties of solid tissues, fluid characterization, and early investigation of the mechanical properties of cranial materials. It continued with a description of the systematic investigations of solid cranial components and structural properties since 1966, fetal cranial properties, analytical head modeling, and numerical solutions of head injury. The paper concluded with experimental dynamic loading of human living and cadaver heads, dynamic loading of surrogate heads, and head injury mechanics. This portion of the paper describes physical head injury experimentation involving animals, primarily primates, human cadavers, volunteers, and inanimate physical models. In order to address the entire domain of head injury biomechanics in the two-part survey, it was intended that this information be supplemented by discussions of head injury tolerance and criteria, automotive and sports safety considerations, and the design of protective equipment, but Professor Goldsmith passed away before these sections could be completed. It is nevertheless anticipated that this attenuated installment will provide, in conjunction with the first part of the survey, a valuable resource for students and practitioners of head injury biomechanics.

  7. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: A structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...

  8. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus; Højgaard, Liselotte;

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...

  9. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: A structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  11. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  13. Economics of head injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manmohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Head injuries account for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions and bed occupancy. Patients with head injuries also consume significant proportions of neurosurgical resources. A prospective 6-month study has been carried out to evaluate the expenditure incurred on head injury patients in a modern neurosurgical center equipped with state of the art infrastructure. Costing areas included wages / salaries of health care personnel, cost of medicines / surgical items / crystalloids, general store items, stationary, all investigation charges, equipment cost, overhead building cost, maintenance cost, electricity and water charges and cost of medical gases, air conditioning and operation theatre expenses. Expenditure in each area was calculated and apportioned to each bed. The statistical analysis was done using X2 test. The cost of stay in ward was found to be Rs. 1062 / bed / day and in neurosurgical ICU Rs. 3082 / bed / day. The operation theatre cost for each surgery was Rs. 11948. The cost of hospital stay per day for minor, moderate and severe head injury group was found to be Rs. 1921, Rs. 2569 and Rs. 2713 respectively. The patients who developed complications, the cost of stay per day in the hospital were Rs. 2867. In the operative group, the cost of hospital stay per day was Rs. 3804. The total expenditure in minor head injury was Rs. 7800 per patient, in moderate head injury was Rs. 22172 per patient, whereas in severe head injury, it was found to be Rs. 32852 per patient. Patients who underwent surgery, the total cost incurred was Rs. 33100 per operated patient.

  14. The Role of Adaptation in Body Load-Regulating Mechanisms During Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttley, Tara; Holt, Christopher; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Body loading is a fundamental parameter that modulates motor output during locomotion, and is especially important for controlling the generation of stepping patterns, dynamic balance, and termination of locomotion. Load receptors that regulate and control posture and stance in locomotion include the Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles at the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and the Ruffini endings and the Pacinian corpuscles in the soles of the feet. Increased body weight support (BWS) during locomotion results in an immediate reorganization of locomotor control, such as a reduction in stance and double support duration and decreased hip, ankle, and knee angles during the gait cycle. Previous studies on the effect during exposure to increased BWS while walking showed a reduction in lower limb joint angles and gait cycle timing that represents a reorganization of locomotor control. Until now, no studies have investigated how locomotor control responds after a period of exposure to adaptive modification in the body load sensing system. The goal of this research was to determine the adaptive properties of body load-regulating mechanisms in locomotor control during locomotion. We hypothesized that body load-regulating mechanisms contribute to locomotor control, and adaptive changes in these load-regulating mechanisms require reorganization to maintain forward locomotion. Head-torso coordination, lower limb movement patterns, and gait cycle timing were evaluated before and after a 30-minute adaptation session during which subjects walked on a treadmill at 5.4 km/hr with 40% body weight support (BWS). Before and after the adaptation period, head-torso and lower limb 3D kinematic data were obtained while performing a goal directed task during locomotion with 0% BWS using a video-based motion analysis system, and gait cycle timing parameters were collected by foot switches positioned under the heel and toe of the subjects shoes. Subjects showed adaptive modification in

  15. Measurement of visual motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildreth, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the measurement of visual motion and the use of relative movement to locate the boundaries of physical objects in the environment. It investigates the nature of the computations that are necessary to perform this analysis by any vision system, biological or artificial. Contents: Introduction. Background. Computation of the Velocity Field. An Algorithm to Compute the Velocity Field. The Computation of Motion Discontinuities. Perceptual Studies of Motion Measurement. The Psychophysics of Discontinuity Detection. Neurophysiological Studies of Motion. Summary and Conclusions. References. Author and Subject Indexes.

  16. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  17. Organisation of traumatic head injury management in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S; Sundstrøm, T; Ingebrigtsen, T

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to map and evaluate the available resources and the premises of traumatic head injury management in the Nordic countries, before the implementation of a Nordic adaption of the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines for prehospital management. METHODS: The study...... with acute traumatic head injury. A substantial proportion of the operations are performed at local and central hospitals without neurosurgical expertise, despite an efficient pre and interhospital transport system. The Nordic adaption of the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines recommends that this practice...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a needle used to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous ... sedation may be needed for children who cannot hold still. Motion will cause blurring of the images ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This loss of ... circumstances. For example, sometimes a parent wearing a lead shield may stay in the room with their ...

  20. Absence of spatial updating when the visuomotor system is unsure about stimulus motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Barneveld, Denise C P B M; Kiemeneij, Anne C M; Van Opstal, A John

    2011-07-20

    How does the visuomotor system decide whether a target is moving or stationary in space or whether it moves relative to the eyes or head? A visual flash during a rapid eye-head gaze shift produces a brief visual streak on the retina that could provide information about target motion, when appropriately combined with eye and head self-motion signals. Indeed, double-step experiments have demonstrated that the visuomotor system incorporates actively generated intervening gaze shifts in the final localization response. Also saccades to brief head-fixed flashes during passive whole-body rotation compensate for vestibular-induced ocular nystagmus. However, both the amount of retinal motion to invoke spatial updating and the default strategy in the absence of detectable retinal motion remain unclear. To study these questions, we determined the contribution of retinal motion and the vestibular canals to spatial updating of visual flashes during passive whole-body rotation. Head- and body-restrained humans made saccades toward very brief (0.5 and 4 ms) and long (100 ms) visual flashes during sinusoidal rotation around the vertical body axis in total darkness. Stimuli were either attached to the chair (head-fixed) or stationary in space and were always well localizable. Surprisingly, spatial updating only occurred when retinal stimulus motion provided sufficient information: long-duration stimuli were always appropriately localized, thus adequately compensating for vestibular nystagmus and the passive head movement during the saccade reaction time. For the shortest stimuli, however, the target was kept in retinocentric coordinates, thus ignoring intervening nystagmus and passive head displacement, regardless of whether the target was moving with the head or not.

  1. Migration from full-head mask to "open-face" mask for immobilization of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Lovelock, D Michael; Mechalakos, James; Rao, Shyam; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Amols, Howard; Lee, Nancy

    2013-09-06

    To provide an alternative device for immobilization of the head while easing claustrophobia and improving comfort, an "open-face" thermoplastic mask was evaluated using video-based optical surface imaging (OSI) and kilovoltage (kV) X-ray radiography. A three-point thermoplastic head mask with a precut opening and reinforced strips was developed. After molding, it provided sufficient visible facial area as the region of interest for OSI. Using real-time OSI, the head motion of ten volunteers in the new mask was evaluated during mask locking and 15minutes lying on the treatment couch. Using a nose mark with reference to room lasers, forced head movement in open-face and full-head masks (with a nose hole) was compared. Five patients with claustrophobia were immobilized with open-face masks, set up using OSI and kV, and treated in 121 fractions, in which 61 fractions were monitored during treatment using real-time OSI. With the open-face mask, head motion was found to be 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in volunteers during the experiment, and 0.8 ± 0.3 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in patients during treatment. These agree with patient motion calculated from pre-/post-treatment OSI and kV data using different anatomical landmarks. In volunteers, the head shift induced by mask-locking was 2.3 ± 1.7 mm and 1.8° ± 0.6°, and the range of forced movements in the open-face and full-head masks were found to be similar. Most (80%) of the volunteers preferred the open-face mask to the full-head mask, while claustrophobic patients could only tolerate the open-face mask. The open-face mask is characterized for its immobilization capability and can immobilize patients sufficiently (< 2 mm) during radiotherapy. It provides a clinical solution to the immobilization of patients with head and neck (HN) cancer undergoing radiotherapy, and is particularly beneficial for claustrophobic patients. This new open-face mask is readily adopted in radiotherapy clinic as a superior alternative to

  2. Head Rotation Detection in Marmoset Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhadri, Sravanthi

    Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and closing of the chamber door. All of these conditions were tested with either house light on or off. Infra-red camera with a frame rate of 90 Hz was used to capture of the head movement of monkeys. To assist the signal detection, two circular markers were attached to the top of monkey head. The data analysis used an image-based marker detection scheme. Images were processed using the Computation Vision Toolbox in Matlab. The markers and their positions were detected using blob detection techniques. Based on the frame-by-frame information of marker positions, the angular position, velocity and acceleration were extracted in horizontal and vertical planes. Adaptive Otsu Thresholding, Kalman filtering and bound setting for marker properties were used to overcome a number of challenges encountered during this analysis, such as finding image segmentation threshold, continuously tracking markers during large head movement, and false alarm detection. The results show that the blob detection method together with Kalman filtering yielded better performances than other image based techniques like optical flow and SURF features .The median of the maximal head turn in the horizontal plane was in the range of 20 to 70 degrees and the median of the maximal velocity in horizontal plane was in the range of a few hundreds of degrees per

  3. Rote of adaptation exercises in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Kirtane, M. V.

    1999-01-01

    Adaptation, habitution and compensation are the mechanisms involved in rehabilitation of vertigo patients. In Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT), patients are advised to perform a series of maneuvers involving head, eye and body movements which stimulate the in-built adaptive mechanisms. Cawthorne and Cooksey were the first to describe adaptation exercises, which are further modified. Norre has designed VRT test battery of specific exercises. Drug treatment used along with VRT should not...

  4. Clinical and motion studies of the Bateman bipolar prosthesis in osteonecrosis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, D; Barmada, R

    1990-02-01

    Forty-seven hips in 38 patients with femoral head osteonecrosis were reviewed for a mean follow-up period of 2.6 years. The average preoperative Harris hip score was 24.7; postoperatively, the average score was 84.5. Cineroentgenographic motion studies were carried out on 14 hips and revealed motion at both the inner and outer bearing up to seven years postoperatively. In the unloaded mode, inner- and outer-bearing motion were equal. In the weight-bearing position, inner-bearing motion increased significantly while outer-bearing motion decreased. Only one case of acetabular wear or protrusio was noted.

  5. Coordination of the head with respect to the trunk and pelvis in the roll and pitch planes during quiet stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, F; van Spijker, G J; Allum, J H J

    2012-06-28

    This study examined the relationship between head and trunk sway during quiet stance and compared this relationship with that of the pelvis to the trunk. Sixteen younger and 14 elderly subjects participated, performing four different sensory tasks: standing quietly on a firm or foam support surface, with eyes open or closed. Roll and pitch angular velocities were recorded with six body-worn gyroscopes; a set of two mounted at the upper trunk, an identical set at the hips, and another set on a head band. Angle correlation analysis was performed in three frequency bands: below 0.7 Hz (LP), above 3 Hz (HP) and in between (BP) using the integrated angle velocity signals. Angular velocities were spectrally analysed. Greater head than trunk motion was observed in angle correlations, power spectral density (PSD) ratios, and transfer functions (TFs). Head on trunk motion could be divided for all sensory conditions into a low-frequency (3 Hz) mode. There was coherent motion between head and trunk but not between head and pelvis. Trunk and pelvis data were consistent with previously reported in-phase and anti-phase movements between these segments. Significant age differences were not found. These data indicate that during quiet stance body motion increases in the order of pelvis, trunk, head and quiet stance involves control of at least two separate links: trunk on pelvis and head on trunk dominated by head resonance. The head is locked to the trunk for low-frequency motion possibly because motion is just supra-vestibular threshold. The head is not stabilised in space during stance, rather the pelvis is.

  6. Spatial perception of motion-tracked binaural sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melick, Joshua B.; Algazi, V. Ralph; Duda, Richard O.

    2005-04-01

    Motion-tracked binaural sound reproduction extends conventional headphone-based binaural techniques by providing the dynamic cues to sound localization produced by voluntary head motion [V. R. Algazi, R. O. Duda, and D. M. Thompson, J. Aud. Eng. Soc. 52, 1142-1156 (2004)]. It does this by using several microphones to sample the acoustic field around a dummy head, interpolating between the microphone signals in accordance with the dynamically measured orientation of the listener's head. Although the provision of dynamic cues reduces the sensitivity of the method to characteristics of the individual listener, differences between the scattered field produced by the dummy head and the scattered field that would be produced by a particular listener distorts the spatial perception. A common observation is that sound sources appear to rise in elevation when the listener turns to face them. We investigate this effect by comparing the perceived rise in elevation under three different conditions: recordings in which recordings are made using (a) the listener's own head, (b) a KEMAR mannequin, and (c) a cylindrical head with no torso. Quantitative results are presented showing the degree to which perceptual distortions are least for (a) and greatest for (c). [Work supported by NSF.

  7. Complexity scalable motion estimation for H.264/AVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changsung; Xin, Jun; Vetro, Anthony; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2006-01-01

    A new complexity-scalable framework for motion estimation is proposed to efficiently reduce the motioncomplexity of encoding process, with focus on long term memory motion-compensated prediction of the H.264 video coding standard in this work. The objective is to provide a complexity scalable scheme for the given motion estimation algorithm such that it reduces the encoding complexity to the desired level with insignificant penalty in rate-distortion performance. In principle, the proposed algorithm adaptively allocates available motion-complexity budget to macroblock based on estimated impact towards overall rate-distortion (RD) performance subject to the given encoding time limit. To estimate macroblock-wise tradeoff between RD coding gain (J) and motion-complexity (C), the correlation of J-C curve between current macroblock and collocated macroblock in previous frame is exploited to predict initial motion-complexity budget of current macroblock. The initial budget is adaptively assigned to each blocksize and block-partition successively and motion-complexity budget is updated at the end of every encoding unit for remaining ones. Based on experiment, proposed J-C slope based allocation is better than uniform motion-complexity allocation scheme in terms of RDC tradeoff. It is demonstrated by experimental results that the proposed algorithm can reduce the H.264 motion estimation complexity to the desired level with little degradation in the rate distortion performance.

  8. 基于参考模型的珩磨机往复位置自适应控制%Honing machines reciprocating motion position adaptive control based on reference mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周耿烈; 胡赤兵; 陈杉杉; 赵家黎

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of brief introduction to the processing of honing machine reciprocating movement , its malh-ematic model and the system of reference model were established,and then the control system was conducted hy using the tool of MATLAB. The simulation result showed that the response characteristics of the dynamic performance can keep a consistent with the adaptive control by the way of model reference adaptive control, and overshoots are reduced which can well satisfied the system performance index, and has a certain anti-interference ability.%通过简要介绍珩磨加工的基础上,建立其往复运动数学模型及其参考模型系统,然后利用MATLAB工具对控制系统进行仿真分析.结果表明采用参考模型自适应控制方法能够使珩磨头往复换向位置与参考模型一致,同时超调量也有所减小,能够很好地满足控制系统的性能指标,并具有一定的抗干扰能力.

  9. Pediatric head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  10. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  11. Human Perception of Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Lu

    2010-01-01

    Human daily activities on Earth involve motions that elicit both tilt and translation components of the head (i.e. gazing and locomotion). With otolith cues alone, tilt and translation can be ambiguous since both motions can potentially displace the otolithic membrane by the same magnitude and direction. Transitions between gravity environments (i.e. Earth, microgravity and lunar) have demonstrated to alter the functions of the vestibular system and exacerbate the ambiguity between tilt and translational motion cues. Symptoms of motion sickness and spatial disorientation can impair human performances during critical mission phases. Specifically, Space Shuttle landing records show that particular cases of tilt-translation illusions have impaired the performance of seasoned commanders. This sensorimotor condition is one of many operational risks that may have dire implications on future human space exploration missions. The neural strategy with which the human central nervous system distinguishes ambiguous inertial motion cues remains the subject of intense research. A prevailing theory in the neuroscience field proposes that the human brain is able to formulate a neural internal model of ambiguous motion cues such that tilt and translation components can be perceptually decomposed in order to elicit the appropriate bodily response. The present work uses this theory, known as the GIF resolution hypothesis, as the framework for experimental hypothesis. Specifically, two novel motion paradigms are employed to validate the neural capacity of ambiguous inertial motion decomposition in ground-based human subjects. The experimental setup involves the Tilt-Translation Sled at Neuroscience Laboratory of NASA JSC. This two degree-of-freedom motion system is able to tilt subjects in the pitch plane and translate the subject along the fore-aft axis. Perception data will be gathered through subject verbal reports. Preliminary analysis of perceptual data does not indicate that

  12. Adaptive robust motion/force coordinated control of nonholonomic wheeled mobile robot via a double closed-loop strategy%双闭环策略下非完整轮式机器人鲁棒自适应运动/力协调控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳明; 王爽; 张永顺

    2013-01-01

    非完整轮式移动机器人的路径跟踪,需要在保证机器人姿态跟踪精度的同时,增强其地面适应性能.为实现这种运动/力的协调控制目标,本文提出双闭环的控制系统结构:外环能够增加运动精度,内环则可以增强机器人对地面动态摩阻的适应性.同时,考虑到地面摩阻的慢时变性,本文通过构造观测器对其进行估计.在具体算法实现方面,采用反步法在外环构建运动控制器:而在内环,则是应用积分型的滑模技术设计力控制器与观测器.最后,对控制系统进行仿真,仿真结果证明所提出控制方法的有效性.%Path following of a nonholonomic wheeled mobile robot should harmoniously guarantee the accurate robot posture tracking and the enhancing terrain-adaptive performance.To realize this coordinated motion/force objective,we propose a double closed-loop control structure with the outer loop to improve the motion accuracy and the inner loop to enhance the dynamic terrain friction adaptability.Meanwhile,the uncertain terrain friction is estimated by an observer considering its slow time-varying characteristic.In order to realize the control algorithms,we developed the motion controller for the outer loop via backstepping method; and apply the integral sliding mode technique to design the observer and the force controller for the inner loop.Simulations are performed and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes.

  13. Facial Expression Recognition from Video Sequences Based on Spatial-Temporal Motion Local Binary Pattern and Gabor Multiorientation Fusion Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes novel framework for facial expressions analysis using dynamic and static information in video sequences. First, based on incremental formulation, discriminative deformable face alignment method is adapted to locate facial points to correct in-plane head rotation and break up facial region from background. Then, spatial-temporal motion local binary pattern (LBP feature is extracted and integrated with Gabor multiorientation fusion histogram to give descriptors, which reflect static and dynamic texture information of facial expressions. Finally, a one-versus-one strategy based multiclass support vector machine (SVM classifier is applied to classify facial expressions. Experiments on Cohn-Kanade (CK + facial expression dataset illustrate that integrated framework outperforms methods using single descriptors. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods on CK+, MMI, and Oulu-CASIA VIS datasets, our proposed framework performs better.

  14. Body Motion and Graphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  15. Teaching Projectile Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  16. A pilot study of rizatriptan and visually-induced motion sickness in migraineurs

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, Joseph M.; Marcus, Dawn A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Limited evidence suggests that rizatriptan given before vestibular stimulation reduces motion sickness in persons with migraine-related dizziness. The present study was designed to test whether rizatriptan is also effective in protecting against visually-induced motion sickness and to test whether rizatriptan blocks the augmentation of motion sickness by head pain. Material and Methods: Using randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled methodology, 10 females, 6 with migrainous ve...

  17. Head First Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  18. Head first Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Rebecca M

    2008-01-01

    Ajax is no longer an experimental approach to website development, but the key to building browser-based applications that form the cornerstone of Web 2.0. Head First Ajax gives you an up-to-date perspective that lets you see exactly what you can do -- and has been done -- with Ajax. With it, you get a highly practical, in-depth, and mature view of what is now a mature development approach. Using the unique and highly effective visual format that has turned Head First titles into runaway bestsellers, this book offers a big picture overview to introduce Ajax, and then explores the use of ind

  19. Rocket injector head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A high number of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen orifices per unit area are provided in an injector head designed to give intimate mixing and more thorough combustion. The injector head comprises a main body portion, a cooperating plate member as a flow chamber for one propellant, a cooperating manifold portion for the second propellant, and an annular end plate for enclosing an annular propellant groove formed around the outer edge of the body. All the openings for one propellant are located at the same angle with respect to a radial plane to permit a short combustion chamber.

  20. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Boeddeker

    Full Text Available Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns ("saccades" are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees' head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves.

  1. Motion control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sabanovic, Asif

    2011-01-01

    "Presents a unified approach to the fundamental issues in motion control, starting from the basics and moving through single degree of freedom and multi-degree of freedom systems In Motion Control Systems, Šabanovic and Ohnishi present a unified approach to very diverse issues covered in motion control systems, offering know-how accumulated through work on very diverse problems into a comprehensive, integrated approach suitable for application in high demanding high-tech products. It covers material from single degree of freedom systems to complex multi-body non-redundant and redundant systems. The discussion of the main subject is based on original research results and will give treatment of the issues in motion control in the framework of the acceleration control method with disturbance rejection technique. This allows consistent unification of different issues in motion control ranging from simple trajectory tracking to topics related to haptics and bilateral control without and with delay in the measure...

  2. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  3. A robust adaptive controller for robot manipulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, Harry; Ortega, Romeo; Nijmeijer, Henk

    1992-01-01

    The authors propose a globally convergent adaptive control scheme for robot motion control with the following features: first, the adaptation law processes enhanced robustness with respect to noisy velocity measurements; secondly, the controller does not require the inclusion of high-gain loops that

  4. The Study on the Adaptive Filtering Method for Eliminating the Motion Artifact in Pulse Oximetry Measurement%脉搏血氧饱和度检测中自适应滤波消除 运动伪差的方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虹; 孙卫新; 金捷

    2001-01-01

    Objective  The method of eliminating the motion artif ac t in the pulse oximetry measurement was studied in order to improve the performa nce character of the pulse oximeter. Methods  The noise paramete r was constructed by using light beat in the pulse oximetry system and the LMS(Lea st Mean Square) adaptive filter was used to eliminate the effect of motion artif act. Results  The algorithm of eliminating the motion artifact i n the pulse oximeter was developed. It can successfully extract the normal Photopl ethysmographic signal from the motion artifact in calculating oxygen saturation. Conclusion  This calculating method is simple and can be proces se d in real time, and its result is reliable. It establishes the fundament for fur ther decreasing the noise of pulse oximeter.%目的 研究脉搏血氧饱和度检测系统中运动伪差的消除方法, 以提高脉搏血氧仪检测性能。方法 通过脉搏血氧仪中的双光束构造噪声 参考信号,利用最小均方自适应滤波法消除运动伪差干扰的影响。结果  建立了脉搏血氧饱和度检测中消除运动伪差的计算方法,可成功地从运动伪差中提取正常光 电容积脉搏波信号作为计算氧饱和度的依据。结论 该计算方法简单,可 用于实时处理,且测量结果可靠,为进一步抑制脉搏血氧仪噪声奠定了基础。

  5. Motion Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Non-Visible Structured Light Tracking Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    ) a customized version of this projector replacing a visible light LED with a 850 nm near infrared LED. The latter system does not provide additional discomfort by visible light projection into the patient’s eyes. The main advantage over existing head motion tracking devices, including the Polaris Vicra system......We present a system for head motion tracking in 3D brain imaging. The system is based on facial surface reconstruction and tracking using a structured light (SL) scanning principle. The system is designed to fit into narrow 3D medical scanner geometries limiting the field of view. It is tested...... in a clinical setting on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), Siemens PET scanner with a head phantom and volunteers. The SL system is compared to a commercial optical tracking system, the Polaris Vicra system, from NDI based on translatory and rotary ground truth motions of the head phantom...

  6. Compensation of skull motion and breathing motion in CT using data-based and image-based metrics, respectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, H.; Rohkohl, C.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel reconstruction for motion correction of non-cardiac organs. With non-cooperative patients or in emergency case, breathing motion or motion of the skull may compromise image quality. Our algorithm is based on the optimization of either motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. This approach was successfully applied in cardiac CTA [1]. While motion correction of the coronary vessels requires a local motion model, global motion models are sufficient for organs like the lung or the skull. The parameter vector for the global affine motion is estimated iteratively, using the open source optimization library NLOPT. The image is updated using motion compensated reconstruction in each of the iterations. Evaluation of the metric value, e.g. the image entropy, provides information for the next iteration loop. After reaching the fixed point of the iteration, the final motion parameters are used for a motion-compensated full quality reconstruction. In head imaging the motion model is based on translation and rotation, in thoracic imaging the rotation is replaced by non-isotropic scaling in all three dimensions. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in thoracic imaging by evaluating PET-CT data from free-breathing patients. In neuro imaging, data from stroke patients showing skull tremor were analyzed. It was shown that motion artefacts can be largely reduced and spatial resolution was restored. In head imaging, similar results can be obtained using motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. In case of image-based metrics, the entropy of the image proved to be superior. Breathing motion could also be significantly reduced using entropy metric. However, in this case data driven metrics cannot be applied because the line integrals associated to the ROI of the lung have to be computed using the local ROI mechanism [2] It was shown that the lung signal is corrupted by signals originating from the complement of the lung. Thus a meaningful

  7. Modulation of head movement control in humans during treadmill walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/s (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2 m from their eyes. The net and relative angular motions of the head about the three axes of rotations, as well as the corresponding values for the moments acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were quantified and used as measures of coordination. The average net moment, as well as the average moments about the different axes were significantly different (Pphases of the gait cycle. However, the average net angular displacement as well as the average angular displacement about the axial rotation axis of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (P>0.01) throughout the gait cycle. The average angular displacement about the lateral bending axis was significantly increased (Pphase while that about the flexion-extension axis was significantly decreased (Pgait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixation of targets during walking.

  8. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  9. Vision and vestibular adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demer, J L; Crane, B T

    1998-07-01

    gaze on targets at the distances used. This modulation was evident within the first 80 msec of onset of head movement, too early to be caused by immediate visual tracking. Modeling suggests a linear interaction between canal signals and otolith signals scaled by the inverse of target distance. Vestibulo-ocular reflex performance appears to be adapted to stabilize gaze during translational and rotational perturbations that occur during natural activities, as is appropriate for relevant target distances. Although immediate visual tracking contributes little to gaze stabilization during natural activities, visual requirements determine the performance of vestibulo-ocular reflexes arising from both canals and otoliths.

  10. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  11. Heading in soccer: dangerous play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Bartsch, Adam J; Benzel, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Soccer is the world's most popular sport and unique in that players use their unprotected heads to intentionally deflect, stop, or redirect the ball for both offensive and defensive strategies. Headed balls travel at high velocity pre- and postimpact. Players, coaches, parents, and physicians are justifiably concerned with soccer heading injury risk. Furthermore, risk of long-term neurocognitive and motor deficits caused by repetitively heading a soccer ball remains unknown. We review the theoretical concerns, the results of biomechanical laboratory experiments, and the available clinical data regarding the effects of chronic, subconcussive head injury during heading in soccer.

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  13. Head space analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stekelenburg, G.J. van; Koorevaar, G.

    Additional analytical information is given about the method of head space analysis. From the data presented it can be concluded that this technique may be advantageous for enzyme kinetic studies in turbid solutions, provided a volatile organic substance is involved in the chemical reaction. Also

  14. Sculpting Ceramic Heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiro, Maurice

    1983-01-01

    Clay sculpture is difficult to produce because of the requirements of kiln firing. The problems can be overcome by modeling the original manikin head and making a plaster mold, pressing molding slabs of clay into the plaster mold to form the hollow clay armature, and sculpting on the armature. (IS)

  15. Lubricating the swordfish head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, John J.; Haydar, Deniz; Snoek, Roelant; Hoving, Henk-Jan T.; Szabo, Ben G.

    2016-01-01

    The swordfish is reputedly the fastest swimmer on Earth. The concave head and iconic sword are unique characteristics, but how they contribute to its speed is still unknown. Recent computed tomography scans revealed a poorly mineralised area near the base of the rostrum. Here we report, using magnet

  16. Prognosis in head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, J A; Rimel, R W

    1982-01-01

    The prognosis of head injury when viewed from the perspective of the Glasgow Coma Scale confirms the utility of this measure. In particular, decrease in mortality is associated with an increase in GCS. In addition, the motor score portion of the GCS was of predictive value when taken alone. The outcome of patients in coma (GCS less than 8) was closely related to three preventable or treatable factors, namely, hypoxia, shock, and increased intracranial pressure. These three factors, when considered in combination, powerfully predicted mortality. Of considerable interest was the finding that moderate head injury (GCS 9-12) was associated with a small but perhaps preventable mortality. The morbidity was intermediate between that of severe and minor and was surprisingly high. Minor head injury, while not associated with significant mortality, also resulted in considerable morbidity. Neuropsychological evaluation of the patients and an experimental study suggests that an organic component may be involved even in this group. To deal with head injury, distinctions must be made between grades of severity. The Glasgow Coma Scale is suited for this task. Nonetheless, the recognition of this basic continuity should elicit the further recognition that different health providers may be involved in the case of, say, severe, as opposed to mild, injury, and that different outcome measures are suitable for one group but not another.

  17. The importance of perceived relative motion in the control of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jonathan W; Loomis, Jack M; Beall, Andrew C

    2005-03-01

    Two experiments investigated the role of optic flow in controlling posture. Both experiments measured postural sway in two virtual environments with different 3-D structure but the same optic flow. Observers attempted to maintain balance on one foot while viewing an object that appeared either rigid with respect to the environment or that appeared to move concomitantly with head movements. The apparent object motion concomitant with head motion was achieved by changing the perceived, but not physical, depth of the object. For both objects, the optic flow information was the same and only depth information was varied. Observers showed a decrease in stability (as measured by head sway) when viewing the object that appeared to move, suggesting that perceived relative motion, not optic flow, signals self-motion to the postural control system.

  18. Head injuries, heading, and the use of headgear in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedfeldt, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    Soccer has more than 265 million players around the world and is the only contact sport with purposeful use of the head for controlling and advancing the ball. Head contact in soccer has the potential to cause acute traumatic brain injury including concussion or, potentially, a pattern of chronic brain injury. Although early retrospective research on the effects of soccer heading seemed to suggest that purposeful heading may contribute to long-term cognitive impairment, prospective controlled studies do not support this and, in fact, suggest that purposeful heading may not be a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Headgear has not been shown to be effective in reducing ball impact but may be helpful in reducing the force of non-ball-related impacts to the head. There are concerns that universal use of headgear may cause more aggressive heading and head challenges, leading to increased risk of injury.

  19. Scalable motion vector coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  20. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...