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Sample records for adaptive fast walking

  1. Adaptive, fast walking in a biped robot under neuronal control and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate Manoonpong

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori-motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s, self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks.

  2. Fast Scramblers, Democratic Walks and Information Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Magan, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    We study a family of weighted random walks on complete graphs. These `democratic walks' turn out to be explicitly solvable, and we find the hierarchy window for which the characteristic time scale saturates the so-called fast scrambling conjecture. We show that these democratic walks describe well the properties of information spreading in systems in which every degree of freedom interacts with every other degree of freedom, such as Matrix or infinite range models. The argument is based on the analysis of suitably defined `Information fields' ($\\mathcal{I}$), which are shown to evolve stochastically towards stationarity due to unitarity of the microscopic model. The model implies that in democratic systems, stabilization of one subsystem is equivalent to global scrambling. We use these results to study scrambling of infalling perturbations in black hole backgrounds, and argue that the near horizon running coupling constants are connected to entanglement evolution of single particle perturbations in democratic...

  3. Adaptive walks on correlated fitness landscapes with heterogeneous connectivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a model for studying the statistical properties of adaptive walks on correlated fitness landscapes which are established in genotype spaces of complex structure. The fitness distribution on the genotype space follows either the bivariate Gaussian distribution or the bivariate exponential distribution. In both cases the degree of correlation of the fitness landscape can be tuned by using a single parameter. To perform the adaptive walks two distinct rules are applied: the random adaptation walk (RAW) and the gradient adaptation walk (GAW). While for the RAW the mean walk length, L-bar, is a monotonic increasing function of the connectivity of the genotype space, for the GAW L-bar is a one-humped function. The RAW produces longer adaptive walks compared to the GAW, though its performance is slightly poorer and thereby the local maxima reached by the GAW algorithm are usually closer to the global optimum of the fitness landscape

  4. Unique characteristics of motor adaptation during walking in young children

    OpenAIRE

    Musselman, Kristin E.; Susan K Patrick; Vasudevan, Erin V. L.; Bastian, Amy J.; Yang, Jaynie F.

    2011-01-01

    Children show precocious ability in the learning of languages; is this the case with motor learning? We used split-belt walking to probe motor adaptation (a form of motor learning) in children. Data from 27 children (ages 8–36 mo) were compared with those from 10 adults. Children walked with the treadmill belts at the same speed (tied belt), followed by walking with the belts moving at different speeds (split belt) for 8–10 min, followed again by tied-belt walking (postsplit). Initial asymmet...

  5. Adaptive importance sampling of random walks on continuous state spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors consider adaptive importance sampling for a random walk with scoring in a general state space. Conditions under which exponential convergence occurs to the zero-variance solution are reviewed. These results generalize previous work for finite, discrete state spaces in Kollman (1993) and in Kollman, Baggerly, Cox, and Picard (1996). This paper is intended for nonstatisticians and includes considerable explanatory material

  6. Length of adaptive walk on uncorrelated and correlated fitness landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharaman, Sarada; Jain, Kavita

    2014-09-01

    We consider the adaptation dynamics of an asexual population that walks uphill on a rugged fitness landscape which is endowed with a large number of local fitness peaks. We work in a parameter regime where only those mutants that are a single mutation away are accessible, as a result of which the population eventually gets trapped at a local fitness maximum and the adaptive walk terminates. We study how the number of adaptive steps taken by the population before reaching a local fitness peak depends on the initial fitness of the population, the extreme value distribution of the beneficial mutations, and correlations among the fitnesses. Assuming that the relative fitness difference between successive steps is small, we analytically calculate the average walk length for both uncorrelated and correlated fitnesses in all extreme value domains for a given initial fitness. We present numerical results for the model where the fitness differences can be large and find that the walk length behavior differs from that in the former model in the Fréchet domain of extreme value theory. We also discuss the relevance of our results to microbial experiments.

  7. A Passive Dynamic Walking Model Based on Knee-Bend Behaviour: Stability and Adaptability for Walking Down Steep Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model based on knee-bend behaviour, which is inspired by the way human beings walk. The length and mass parameters of human beings are used in the walking model. The knee-bend mechanism of the stance leg is designed in the phase between knee-strike and heel- strike. q* which is the angular difference of the stance leg between the two events, knee-strike and knee-bend, is adjusted in order to find a stable walking motion. The results show that the stable periodic walking motion on a slope of r <0.4 can be found by adjusting q*. Furthermore, with a particular q* in the range of 0.12walk down more steps before falling down on an arbitrary slope. The walking motion is more stable and adaptable than the conventional walking motion, especially for steep slopes.

  8. Greedy adaptive walks on a correlated fitness landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Chan; Neidhart, Johannes; Krug, Joachim

    2016-05-21

    We study adaptation of a haploid asexual population on a fitness landscape defined over binary genotype sequences of length L. We consider greedy adaptive walks in which the population moves to the fittest among all single mutant neighbors of the current genotype until a local fitness maximum is reached. The landscape is of the rough mount Fuji type, which means that the fitness value assigned to a sequence is the sum of a random and a deterministic component. The random components are independent and identically distributed random variables, and the deterministic component varies linearly with the distance to a reference sequence. The deterministic fitness gradient c is a parameter that interpolates between the limits of an uncorrelated random landscape (c=0) and an effectively additive landscape (c→∞). When the random fitness component is chosen from the Gumbel distribution, explicit expressions for the distribution of the number of steps taken by the greedy walk are obtained, and it is shown that the walk length varies non-monotonically with the strength of the fitness gradient when the starting point is sufficiently close to the reference sequence. Asymptotic results for general distributions of the random fitness component are obtained using extreme value theory, and it is found that the walk length attains a non-trivial limit for L→∞, different from its values for c=0 and c=∞, if c is scaled with L in an appropriate combination.

  9. Linearly Bounded Liars, Adaptive Covering Codes, and Deterministic Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Joshua N

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a deterministic form of the random walk on the integer line called the {\\em liar machine}, similar to the rotor-router model, finding asymptotically tight pointwise and interval discrepancy bounds versus random walk. This provides an improvement in the best-known winning strategies in the binary symmetric pathological liar game with a linear fraction of responses allowed to be lies. Equivalently, this proves the existence of adaptive binary block covering codes with block length $n$, covering radius $\\leq fn$ for $f\\in(0,1/2)$, and cardinality $O(\\sqrt{\\log \\log n}/(1-2f))$ times the sphere bound $2^n/\\binom{n}{\\leq \\lfloor fn\\rfloor}$.

  10. Walking on an Oscillating Treadmill: Two Paths to Functional Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Peters, Brian T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    We mounted a treadmill on top of a six degree-of-freedom motion base platform to investigate and characterize locomotor responses produced by healthy adults when introduced to a novel walking condition. Subjects were classified into two groups according to how their stride times were affected by the perturbation. Our data suggest that a person's choice of adaptation strategy is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the external frequency imposed by the motion base. Our data suggest that a person's stride time response while walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the imposed external frequency of the motion base. This relationship may be useful for checking the efficacy of gait training and rehabilitation programs. Preselecting and manipulating a person's EST could be one way to draw him out of his preferred "entrainment well" during therapy or training.

  11. Fast Link Adaptation for MIMO-OFDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Kant, Shashi; Wehinger, Joachim;

    2010-01-01

    We investigate link-quality metrics (LQMs) based on raw bit-error-rate, effective signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio, and mutual information (MI) for the purpose of fast link adaptation (LA) in communication systems employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and multiple-input–mult......We investigate link-quality metrics (LQMs) based on raw bit-error-rate, effective signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio, and mutual information (MI) for the purpose of fast link adaptation (LA) in communication systems employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and multiple...

  12. Rapid changes in corticospinal excitability during force field adaptation of human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Alain, S; Grey, Michael James;

    2012-01-01

    be explained by changes in background TA EMG activity. These effects seemed specific to walking, as similar changes in TA MEP were not seen when seated subjects were tested during static dorsiflexion. These observations suggest that the corticospinal tract contributes to the adaptation of walking...

  13. An Approach to Stable Walking over Uneven Terrain Using a Reflex-Based Adaptive Gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Asif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an adaptive gait in a six-legged walking robot that is capable of generating reactive stepping actions with the same underlying control methodology as an insect for stable walking over uneven terrains. The proposed method of gait generation uses feedback data from onboard sensors to generate an adaptive gait in order to surmount obstacles, gaps and perform stable walking. The paper addresses its implementation through simulations in a visual dynamic simulation environment. Finally the paper draws conclusions about the significance and performance of the proposed gait in terms of tracking errors while navigating in difficult terrains.

  14. Motion Tracking with Fast Adaptive Background Subtraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao De-gui; Yu Sheng-sheng; Zhou Jing-li

    2003-01-01

    To extract and track moving objects is usually one of the most important tasks of intelligent video surveillance systems. This paper presents a fast and adaptive background subtraction algorithm and the motion tracking process using this algorithm. The algorithm uses only luminance components of sampled image sequence pixels and models every pixel in a statistical model. The algorithm is characterized by its ability of real time detecting sudden lighting changes, and extracting and tracking motion objects faster. It is shown that our algorithm can be realized with lower time and space complexity and adjustable object detection error rate with comparison to other background subtraction algorithms. Making use of the algorithm, an indoor monitoring system is also worked out and the motion tracking process is presented in this paper. Experimental results testify the algorithm's good performances when used in an indoor monitoring system.

  15. Motion Tracking with Fast Adaptive Background Subtraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao; De-Gui; Yu; Sheng-sheng; 等

    2003-01-01

    To extract and track moving objects is usually one of the most important tasks of intelligent video surveillance systems. This paper presents a fast and adaptive background subtraction algorithm and the motion tracking process using this algorithm. The algorithm uses only luminance components of sampled image sequence pixels and models every pixel in a statistical model.The algorithm is characterized by its ability of real time detecting sudden lighting changes, and extracting and tracking motion objects faster. It is shown that our algorithm can be realized with lower time and space complexity and adjustable object detection error rate with comparison to other background subtraction algorithms. Making use of the algorithm, an indoor monitoring system is also worked out and the motion tracking process is presented in this paper.Experimental results testify the algorithms' good performances when used in an indoor monitoring system.

  16. Walking Flexibility after Hemispherectomy: Split-Belt Treadmill Adaptation and Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T.; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Reisman, Darcy S.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Walking flexibility depends on use of feedback or reactive control to respond to unexpected changes in the environment, and the ability to adapt feedforward or predictive control for sustained alterations. Recent work has demonstrated that cerebellar damage impairs feedforward adaptation, but not feedback control, during human split-belt treadmill…

  17. Test-Retest Reliability of the 10-Metre Fast Walk Test and 6-Minute Walk Test in Ambulatory School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia; Beath, Tricia; Bell, Jacqueline; Jacobson, Gabrielle; Phair, Tegan; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, F. Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Short-term test-retest reliability of the 10-metre fast walk test (10mFWT) and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) was evaluated in 31 ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP), with subgroup analyses in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) Levels I (n=9), II (n=8), and III (n=14). Sixteen females and 15 males participated, mean age 9 years…

  18. Extended Evolutionary Fast Learn-to-Walk Approach for Four-Legged Robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muh.Anshar; Mary-Anne Williams

    2007-01-01

    Robot locomotion is an active research area. In this paper we focus on the locomotion of quadruped robots. An effective walking gait of quadruped robots is mainly concerned with two key aspects, namely speed and stability. The large search space of potential parameter settings for leg joints means that hand tuning is not feasible in general. As a result walking parameters are typically determined using machine learning techniques. A major shortcoming of using machine learning techniques is the significant wear and tear of robots since many parameter combinations need to be evaluated before an optimal solution is found.This paper proposes a direct walking gait learning approach, which is specifically designed to reduce wear and tear of robot motors, joints and other hardware. In essence we provide an effective learning mechanism that leads to a solution in a faster convergence time than previous algorithms. The results demonstrate that the new learning algorithm obtains a faster convergence to the best solutions in a short run. This approach is significant in obtaining faster walking gaits which will be useful for a wide range of applications where speed and stability are important. Future work will extend our methods so that the faster convergence algorithm can be applied to a two legged humanoid and lead to less wear and tear whilst still developing a fast and stable gait.

  19. Universal adaptive self-stabilizing traversal scheme: random walk and reloading wave

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Thibault; Sohier, Devan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate random walk based token circulation in dynamic environments subject to failures. We describe hypotheses on the dynamic environment that allow random walks to meet the important property that the token visits any node infinitely often. The randomness of this scheme allows it to work on any topology, and require no adaptation after a topological change, which is a desirable property for applications to dynamic systems. For random walks to be a traversal scheme and to answer the concurrence problem, one needs to guarantee that exactly one token circulates in the system. In the presence of transient failures, configurations with multiple tokens or with no token can occur. The meeting property of random walks solves the cases with multiple tokens. The reloading wave mechanism we propose, together with timeouts, allows to detect and solve cases with no token. This traversal scheme is self-stabilizing, and universal, meaning that it needs no assumption on the system topology. We describ...

  20. Task Adaptive Walking Robots for Mars Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Hickey, Gregory; Kennedy, Brett; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2000-01-01

    There are exciting opportunities for robot science that lie beyond the reach of current manipulators, rovers, balloons, penetrators, etc. Examples include mobile explorations of the densely cratered Mars highlands, of asteroids, and of moons. These sites are believed to be rich in geologic history and mineralogical detail, but are difficult to robotically access and sample. The surface terrains are rough and changeable, with variable porosity and dust layering; and the small bodies present further challenges of low-temperature, micro-gravity environments. Even the more benign areas of Mars are highly variegated in character (>VL2 rock densities), presenting significant risk to conventional rovers. The development of compact walking robots would have applications to the current mission set for Mars surface exploration, as well as enabling future Mars Outpost missions, asteroid rendezvous missions for the Solar System Exploration Program (SSE) and the mechanical assembly/inspection of large space platforms for the Human Exploration and Development of Spaces (HEDS).

  1. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables the robot to effectively escape from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles

  2. Psychotherapy: Adaptation or Walking Together? (A Roadside Conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bychkova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns psychotherapeutic work in the perspective of existential approach. Two trends are discerned in modern psychotherapy regardless of the known division into different schools – the adaptation therapy, and the one viewing a person in the context of his Personal being in the world. Therapy here is understood as the Way of mutual personal growth of both the therapist and the client. Distinction is singled out as one of the central points in forming the meanings, essential for both the normal development of a child and in psychotherapy, and remaining significant for spiritual growth in adults. 

  3. Fast Noise Compensation and Adaptive Enhancement for Speech Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Rong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel approach to improve adaptive decorrelation filtering- (ADF- based speech source separation in diffuse noise. The effects of noise on system adaptation and separation outputs are handled separately. First, fast noise compensation (NC is developed for adaptation of separation filters, forcing ADF to focus on source separation; next, output noises are suppressed by speech enhancement. By tracking noise components in output cross-correlation functions, the bias effect of noise on the system adaptation objective function is compensated, and by adaptively estimating output noise autocorrelations, the speech separation output is enhanced. For fast noise compensation, a blockwise fast ADF (FADF is implemented. Experiments were conducted on real and simulated diffuse noises. Speech mixtures were generated by convolving TIMIT speech sources with acoustic path impulse responses measured in a real room with reverberation time  second. The proposed techniques significantly improved separation performance and phone recognition accuracy of ADF outputs.

  4. δ-exceedance records and random adaptive walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Chan; Krug, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified record process where the kth record in a series of independent and identically distributed random variables is defined recursively through the condition {Y}k\\gt {Y}k-1-{δ }k-1 with a deterministic sequence {δ }k\\gt 0 called the handicap. For constant {δ }k\\equiv δ and exponentially distributed random variables it has been shown in previous work that the process displays a phase transition as a function of δ between a normal phase where the mean record value increases indefinitely and a stationary phase where the mean record value remains bounded and a finite fraction of all entries are records (Park et al 2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 042707). Here we explore the behavior for general probability distributions and decreasing and increasing sequences {δ }k, focusing in particular on the case when {δ }k matches the typical spacing between subsequent records in the underlying simple record process without handicap. We find that a continuous phase transition occurs only in the exponential case, but a novel kind of first order transition emerges when {δ }k is increasing. The problem is partly motivated by the dynamics of evolutionary adaptation in biological fitness landscapes, where {δ }k corresponds to the change of the deterministic fitness component after k mutational steps. The results for the record process are used to compute the mean number of steps that a population performs in such a landscape before being trapped at a local fitness maximum.

  5. Adaptive and Energy Efficient Walking in a Hexapod Robot under Neuromechanical Control and Sensorimotor Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2016-01-01

    energy efficient walking, compared to other small legged robots. In addition, this paper also shows that the tight combination of neural control with tunable muscle-like functions, guided by sensory feedback and coupled with sensorimotor learning, is a way forward to better understand and solve adaptive......The control of multilegged animal walking is a neuromechanical process, and to achieve this in an adaptive and energy efficient way is a difficult and challenging problem. This is due to the fact that this process needs in real time: 1) to coordinate very many degrees of freedom of jointed legs; 2......) to generate the proper leg stiffness (i.e., compliance); and 3) to determine joint angles that give rise to particular positions at the endpoints of the legs. To tackle this problem for a robotic application, here we present a neuromechanical controller coupled with sensorimotor learning. The controller...

  6. The effect of age and microstructural white matter integrity on lap time variation and fast-paced walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Shardell, Michelle D; Landman, Bennett A; Venkatraman, Vijay K; Gonzalez, Christopher E; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2016-09-01

    Macrostructural white matter damage (WMD) is associated with less uniform and slower walking in older adults. The effect of age and subclinical microstructural WM degeneration (a potentially earlier phase of WM ischemic damage) on walking patterns and speed is less clear. This study examines the effect of age on the associations of regional microstructural WM integrity with walking variability and speed, independent of macrostructural WMD. This study involved 493 participants (n = 51 young; n = 209 young-old; n = 233 old-old) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. All completed a 400-meter walk test and underwent a concurrent brain MRI with diffusion tensor imaging. Microstructural WM integrity was measured as fractional anisotropy (FA). Walking variability was measured as trend-adjusted variation in time over ten 40-meter laps (lap time variation, LTV). Fast-paced walking speed was assessed as mean lap time (MLT). Multiple linear regression models of FA predicting LTV and MLT were adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and WM hyperintensities. Independent of WM hyperintensities, lower FA in the body of the corpus callosum was associated with higher LTV and longer MLT only in the young-old. Lower FA in superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and uncinate fasciculi, the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and the anterior corona radiate was associated with longer MLT only in the young-old. While macrostructural WMD is known to predict more variable and slower walking in older adults, microstructural WM disruption is independently associated with more variable and slower fast-paced walking only in the young-old. Disrupted regional WM integrity may be a subclinical contributor to abnormal walking at an earlier phase of aging. PMID:26399234

  7. Locomotor stability and adaptation during perturbed walking across the adult female lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrum, Christopher; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to examine locomotor stability and adaptation across the adult female lifespan during perturbed walking on the treadmill. 11 young, 11 middle and 14 older-aged female adults (mean and SD: 25.5(2.1), 50.6(6.4) and 69.0(4.7) years old respectively) walked on a treadmill. We applied a sustained perturbation to the swing phase of the right leg for 18 consecutive gait cycles, followed by a step with the resistance unexpectedly removed, via an ankle strap connected to a break-and-release system. The margin of stability (MoS) at foot touchdown was calculated as the difference between the anterior boundary of the base of support (BoS) and extrapolated center of mass. Older participants showed lower MoS adaptation magnitude in the early adaptation phase (steps 1-3) compared to the young and middle-aged groups. However, in the late adaptation phase (steps 16-18) there were no significant differences in adaptation magnitude between the three age groups. After removing the resistance, all three age groups showed similar aftereffects (i.e. increased BoS). The current results suggest that in old age, the ability to recalibrate locomotion to control stability is preserved, but the rate of adaptive improvement in locomotor stability is diminished. PMID:26970886

  8. Adaptive walks in a gene network model of morphogenesis: insights into the Cambrian explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Sole, Ricard V.; Fernandez, Pau; Kauffman, Stuart A.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of complex patterns of organization close to the Cambrian boundary is known to have happened over a (geologically) short period of time. It involved the rapid diversification of body plans and stands as one of the major transitions in evolution. How it took place is a controversial issue. Here we explore this problem by considering a simple model of pattern formation in multicellular organisms. By modeling gene network-based morphogenesis and its evolution through adaptive walks...

  9. The adaptive dynamic community detection algorithm based on the non-homogeneous random walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    With the changing of the habit and custom, people's social activity tends to be changeable. It is required to have a community evolution analyzing method to mine the dynamic information in social network. For that, we design the random walking possibility function and the topology gain function to calculate the global influence matrix of the nodes. By the analysis of the global influence matrix, the clustering directions of the nodes can be obtained, thus the NRW (Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method for detecting the static overlapping communities can be established. We design the ANRW (Adaptive Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method via adapting the nodes impacted by the dynamic events based on the NRW. The ANRW combines the local community detection with dynamic adaptive adjustment to decrease the computational cost for ANRW. Furthermore, the ANRW treats the node as the calculating unity, thus the running manner of the ANRW is suitable to the parallel computing, which could meet the requirement of large dataset mining. Finally, by the experiment analysis, the efficiency of ANRW on dynamic community detection is verified.

  10. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate eManoonpong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs and sensory feedback (afferent-based control but also on internal forward models (efference copies. They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines.

  11. Information criterion based fast PCA adaptive algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiawen; Li Congxin

    2007-01-01

    The novel information criterion (NIC) algorithm can find the principal subspace quickly, but it is not an actual principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm and hence it cannot find the orthonormal eigen-space which corresponds to the principal component of input vector.This defect limits its application in practice.By weighting the neural network's output of NIC, a modified novel information criterion (MNIC) algorithm is presented.MNIC extractes the principal components and corresponding eigenvectors in a parallel online learning program, and overcomes the NIC's defect.It is proved to have a single global optimum and nonquadratic convergence rate, which is superior to the conventional PCA online algorithms such as Oja and LMSER.The relationship among Oja, LMSER and MNIC is exhibited.Simulations show that MNIC could converge to the optimum fast.The validity of MNIC is proved.

  12. Fast adaptive estimation of multidimensional psychometric functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMattina, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Recently in vision science there has been great interest in understanding the perceptual representations of complex multidimensional stimuli. Therefore, it is becoming very important to develop methods for performing psychophysical experiments with multidimensional stimuli and efficiently estimating psychometric models that have multiple free parameters. In this methodological study, I analyze three efficient implementations of the popular Ψ method for adaptive data collection, two of which are novel approaches to psychophysical experiments. Although the standard implementation of the Ψ procedure is intractable in higher dimensions, I demonstrate that my implementations generalize well to complex psychometric models defined in multidimensional stimulus spaces and can be implemented very efficiently on standard laboratory computers. I show that my implementations may be of particular use for experiments studying how subjects combine multiple cues to estimate sensory quantities. I discuss strategies for speeding up experiments and suggest directions for future research in this rapidly growing area at the intersection of cognitive science, neuroscience, and machine learning. PMID:26200886

  13. Adaptive feedback potential in dynamic stability during disturbed walking in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Stefanie; Peper, Andreas; Karamanidis, Kiros; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2011-07-01

    After perturbation of the gait, feedback information may help regaining balance adequately, but it remains unknown whether adaptive feedback responses are possible after repetitive and unexpected perturbations during gait and if there are age-related differences. Prior experience may contribute to improved reactive behavior. Fourteen old (59-73 yrs) and fourteen young (22-31 yrs) males walked on a walkway which included one covered element. By exchanging this element participants either stepped on hard surface or unexpectedly on soft surface which caused a perturbation in gait. The gait protocol contained 5 unexpected soft trials to quantify the reactive adaptation. Each soft trial was followed by 4-8 hard trials to generate a wash-out effect. The dynamic stability was investigated by using the margin of stability (MoS), which was calculated as the difference between the anterior boundary of the base of support and the extrapolated position of the center of mass in the anterior-posterior direction. MoS at recovery leg touchdown were significantly lower in the unexpected soft trials compared to the baseline, indicating a less stable posture. However, MoS increased (p<0.05) in both groups within the disturbed trials, indicating feedback adaptive improvements. Young and old participants showed differences in the handling of the perturbation in the course of several trials. The magnitude of the reactive adaptation after the fifth unexpected perturbation was significantly different compared to the first unexpected perturbation (old: 49±30%; young: 77±40%), showing a tendency (p=0.065) for higher values in the young participants. Old individuals maintain the ability to adapt to feedback controlled perturbations. However, the locomotor behavior is more conservative compared to the young ones, leading to disadvantages in the reactive adaptation during disturbed walking.

  14. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Fast Adaptive Beamforming with Smart Antenna for Radio Frequency Repeater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a fast adaptive beamforming null algorithm with smart antenna for Radio Frequency Repeater (RFR. The smart antenna system is realized by a Direction Of Arrival (DOA Estimator, whose output is used by an adaptive beamforming algorithm to shape a suitable radiation pattern of the equivalent antenna; so that the co-channel interference due to retransmitting antenna can be reduced. The proposed adaptive beamforming algorithm, which has been proved by formulaic analysis and simulation, has a lower computation complexity yet better performance.

  16. Distributed recurrent neural forward models with synaptic adaptation and CPG-based control for complex behaviors of walking robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures) with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of (1) central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models

  17. Fast Noise Compensation and Adaptive Enhancement for Speech Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxin Zhao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel approach to improve adaptive decorrelation filtering- (ADF- based speech source separation in diffuse noise. The effects of noise on system adaptation and separation outputs are handled separately. First, fast noise compensation (NC is developed for adaptation of separation filters, forcing ADF to focus on source separation; next, output noises are suppressed by speech enhancement. By tracking noise components in output cross-correlation functions, the bias effect of noise on the system adaptation objective function is compensated, and by adaptively estimating output noise autocorrelations, the speech separation output is enhanced. For fast noise compensation, a blockwise fast ADF (FADF is implemented. Experiments were conducted on real and simulated diffuse noises. Speech mixtures were generated by convolving TIMIT speech sources with acoustic path impulse responses measured in a real room with reverberation time T60=0.3 second. The proposed techniques significantly improved separation performance and phone recognition accuracy of ADF outputs.

  18. An Adaptable Walking-skid for Seabed ROV under Strong Current Disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianting Si; Chengsiong Chin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a new concept of an adaptable multi-legged skid design for retro-fitting to a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) during high tidal current underwater pipeline inspection. The sole reliance on propeller-driven propulsion for ROV is replaced with a proposed low cost biomimetic solution in the form of an attachable hexapod walking skid. The advantage of this adaptable walking skid is the high stability in positioning and endurances to strong current on the seabed environment. The computer simulation flow studies using Solidworks Flow Simulation shown that the skid attachment in different compensation postures caused at least four times increase in overall drag, and negative lift forces on the seabed ROV to achieve a better maneuvering and station keeping under the high current condition (from 0.5 m/s to 5.0 m/s). A graphical user interface is designed to interact with the user during robot-in-the-loop testing and kinematics simulation in the pool.

  19. Treadmill Adaptation and Verification of Self-Selected Walking Speed: A Protocol for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Paulo Roberto S.; Hills, Andrew; Byrne, Nuala

    2009-01-01

    Walking is a common activity of daily life and researchers have used the range 3-6 km.h[superscript -1] as reference for walking speeds habitually used for transportation. The term self-selected (i.e., individual or comfortable walking pace or speed) is commonly used in the literature and is identified as the most efficient walking speed, with…

  20. Adaptability of stride-to-stride control of stepping movements in human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnsack-McLagan, Nicole K; Cusumano, Joseph P; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2016-01-25

    Humans continually adapt their movements as they walk on different surfaces, avoid obstacles, etc. External (environmental) and internal (physiological) noise-like disturbances, and the responses that correct for them, each contribute to locomotor variability. This variability may sometimes be detrimental (perhaps increasing fall risk), or sometimes beneficial (perhaps reflecting exploration of multiple task solutions). Here, we determined how humans regulated stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking when presented different task goals that allowed them to exploit inherent redundancies in different ways. Fourteen healthy adults walked on a treadmill under each of four conditions: constant speed only (SPD), constant speed and stride length (LEN), constant speed and stride time (TIM), or constant speed, stride length, and stride time (ALL). Multiple analyses tested competing hypotheses that participants might attempt to either equally satisfy all goals simultaneously, or instead adopt systematic intermediate strategies that only partly satisfied each individual goal. Participants exhibited similar average stepping behavior, but significant differences in variability and stride-to-stride serial correlations across conditions. Analyses of the structure of stride-to-stride fluctuation dynamics demonstrated humans resolved the competing goals presented not by minimizing errors equally with respect to all goals, but instead by trying to only partly satisfy each goal. Thus, humans exploit task redundancies even when they are explicitly removed from the task specifications. These findings may help identify when variability is predictive of, or protective against, fall risk. They may also help inform rehabilitation interventions to better exploit the positive contributions of variability, while minimizing the negative. PMID:26725217

  1. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Synaptic Adaptation and CPG-based control for Complex Behaviors of Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyasingha eDasgupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of 1 central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, 2 distributed (at each leg recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and 3 searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to sensorimotor prediction outperforms the previous state of the art adaptive neuron

  2. A Fast Adaptive Receive Antenna Selection Method in MIMO System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antenna selection has been regarded as an effective method to acquire the diversity benefits of multiple antennas while potentially reduce hardware costs. This paper focuses on receive antenna selection. According to the proportion between the numbers of total receive antennas and selected antennas and the influence of each antenna on system capacity, we propose a fast adaptive antenna selection algorithm for wireless multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems. Mathematical analysis and numerical results show that our algorithm significantly reduces the computational complexity and memory requirement and achieves considerable system capacity gain compared with the optimal selection technique in the same time.

  3. A Muscle Synergy-inspired Adaptive Control Scheme for a Hybrid Walking Neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naji A Alibeji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract--- Abstract--- A hybrid neuroprosthesis that uses an electric motor-based wearable exoskeleton and functional electrical stimulation (FES has a promising potential to restore walking in persons with paraplegia. A hybrid actuation structure introduces effector redundancy, making its automatic control a challenging task because multiple muscles and additional electric motor need to be coordinated. Inspired by the muscle synergy principle, we designed a low dimensional controller to control multiple effectors: FES of multiple muscles and electric motors. The resulting control system may be less complex and easier to control. To obtain the muscle synergy-inspired low dimensional control, a subject-specific gait model was optimized to compute optimal control signals for the multiple effectors. The optimal control signals were then dimensionally reduced by using principal component analysis to extract synergies. Then, an adaptive feedforward controller with an update law for the synergy activation was designed. In addition, feedback control was used to provide stability and robustness to the control design. The adaptive-feedforward and feedback control structure makes the low dimensional controller more robust to disturbances and variations in the model parameters and may help to compensate for other time-varying phenomena (e.g., muscle fatigue. This is proven by using a Lyapunov stability analysis, which yielded semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking. Computer simulations were performed to test the new controller on a 4 degree of freedom gait model.

  4. Multiple Decoupled CPGs with Local Sensory Feedback for Adaptive Locomotion Behaviors of Bio-inspired Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker Barikhan, Subhi; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    , and their interactions during body and leg movements through the environment. Based on this concept, we present here an artificial bio-inspired walking system. Its intralimb coordination is formed by multiple decoupled CPGs while its interlimb coordination is attained by the interactions between body dynamics...... and the environment through local sensory feedback of each leg. Simulation results show that this bio-inspired approach generates self-organizing emergent locomotion allowing the robot to adaptively form regular patterns, to stably walk while pushing an object with its front legs or performing multiple stepping...

  5. Fast and Adaptive Lossless Onboard Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kimesh, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern hyperspectral imaging systems are able to acquire far more data than can be downlinked from a spacecraft. Onboard data compression helps to alleviate this problem, but requires a system capable of power efficiency and high throughput. Software solutions have limited throughput performance and are power-hungry. Dedicated hardware solutions can provide both high throughput and power efficiency, while taking the load off of the main processor. Thus a hardware compression system was developed. The implementation uses a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data (NPO-42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which achieves excellent compression performance and has low complexity. This algorithm performs predictive compression using an adaptive filtering method, and uses adaptive Golomb coding. The implementation also packetizes the coded data. The FL algorithm is well suited for implementation in hardware. In the FPGA implementation, one sample is compressed every clock cycle, which makes for a fast and practical realtime solution for space applications. Benefits of this implementation are: 1) The underlying algorithm achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that exceeds that of techniques currently in use. 2) The algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. 3) Hardware acceleration provides a throughput improvement of 10 to 100 times vs. the software implementation. A prototype of the compressor is available in software, but it runs at a speed that does not meet spacecraft requirements. The hardware implementation targets the Xilinx Virtex IV FPGAs, and makes the use of this compressor practical for Earth satellites as well as beyond-Earth missions with hyperspectral instruments.

  6. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward and Backward Walking on Land and in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadenas-Sanchez Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (p<0.05. At initial contact, knees and hips were more flexed during walking forward in water, whilst, ankles were more dorsiflexed during walking backward in water. At final stance, knees and ankles were more flexed during forward walking, whilst the hip was more flexed during backward walking. These results show how walking in water differs from walking on land, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs.

  7. Waddling Random Walk: Fast and Accurate Sampling of Motif Statistics in Large Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Guyue; Sethu, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The relative frequency of small subgraphs within a large graph, such as one representing an online social network, is of high interest to sociologists, computer scientists and marketeers alike. However, the computation of these network motif statistics via naive enumeration is infeasible for either its prohibitive computational costs or access restrictions on the full graph data. Methods to estimate the motif statistics based on random walks by sampling only a small fraction of the subgraphs ...

  8. A fast ray tracing algorithm based on adaptive space subdivision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍虎军; 彭群生

    1995-01-01

    A new fast ray tracing algorithm based on adaptive space subdivision is presented. Unlike the conventional octree and 3DDDA algorithms, the new algorithm subdivides the object space nonuniformly with the division planes coplanar with the boundary planes of bounding volumes of objects. At each recursive step, the concerned rectangular space is divided into two subcells. The partitioning direction and division plane is dynamically selected so that it has the least possibility to intersect the objects within and the difference of the number of objects enclosed in each subcell is small. An efficient traversal algorithm to search for the next node that the ray will enter is also designed. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the new algorithm is potential.

  9. Fast Adaptive Wavelet for Remote Sensing Image Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Run-Hai Jiao; Yuan-Cheng Li

    2007-01-01

    Remote sensing images are hard to achieve high compression ratio because of their rich texture. By analyzing the influence of wavelet properties on image compression, this paper proposes wavelet construction rules and builds a new biorthogonal wavelet construction model with parameters. The model parameters are optimized by using genetic algorithm and adopting energy compaction as the optimization object function. In addition, in order to resolve the computation complexity problem of online construction, according to the image classification rule proposed in this paper we construct wavelets for different classes of images and implement the fast adaptive wavelet selection algorithm (FAWS). Experimental results show wavelet bases of FAWS gain better compression performance than Daubechies9/7.

  10. Study of a new fast adaptive filtering algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-li; ZHANG Xiong-wei; YANG Ji-bin; CHEN Gong

    2006-01-01

    A new fast adaptive filtering algorithm was presented by using the correlations between the signal's former and latter sampling times.The proof of the new algorithm was also presented,which showed that its optimal weight vector was the solution of generalized Wiener equation.The new algorithm was of simple structure,fast convergence,and less stable maladjustment.It can handle many signals including both uncorrelated signal and strong correlation signal.However,its computational complexity was comparable to that of the normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm.Simulation results show that for uncorrelated signals,the stable maladjustment of the proposed algorithm is less than that of the VS-NLMS algorithm,and its convergence is comparable to that of the algorithm proposed in references but faster than that of L.E-LMS algorithm.For strong correlation signal,its performance is superior to those of the NLMS algorithm and DCR-LMS algorithm.

  11. Fast, multiphase volume adaptation to hyperosmotic shock by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Pilizota

    Full Text Available All living cells employ an array of different mechanisms to help them survive changes in extra cellular osmotic pressure. The difference in the concentration of chemicals in a bacterium's cytoplasm and the external environment generates an osmotic pressure that inflates the cell. It is thought that the bacterium Escherichia coli use a number of interconnected systems to adapt to changes in external pressure, allowing them to maintain turgor and live in surroundings that range more than two-hundred-fold in external osmolality. Here, we use fluorescence imaging to make the first measurements of cell volume changes over time during hyperosmotic shock and subsequent adaptation on a single cell level in vivo with a time resolution on the order of seconds. We directly observe two previously unseen phases of the cytoplasmic water efflux upon hyperosmotic shock. Furthermore, we monitor cell volume changes during the post-shock recovery and observe a two-phase response that depends on the shock magnitude. The initial phase of recovery is fast, on the order of 15-20 min and shows little cell-to-cell variation. For large sucrose shocks, a secondary phase that lasts several hours adds to the recovery. We find that cells are able to recover fully from shocks as high as 1 Osmol/kg using existing systems, but that for larger shocks, protein synthesis is required for full recovery.

  12. Using Efference Copy and a Forward Internal Model for Adaptive Biped Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder-Schetelig, Johannes; Manoonpong, Poramate; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2010-01-01

    To behave properly in an unknown environment, animals or robots must distinguish external from self-generated stimuli on their sensors. The biologically inspired concepts of efference copy and internal model have been successfully applied to a number of robot control problems. Here we present...... an application of this for our dynamic walking robot RunBot. We use efference copies of the motor commands with a simple forward internal model to predict the expected self-generated acceleration during walking. The difference to the actually measured acceleration is then used to stabilize the walking...... on terrains with changing slopes through its upper body component controller. As a consequence, the controller drives the upper body component (UBC) to lean forwards/backwards as soon as an error occurs resulting in dynamical stable walking. We have evaluated the performance of the system on four different...

  13. Examining links between anxiety, reinvestment and walking when talking by older adults during adaptive gait

    OpenAIRE

    Young, WR; Olonilua, M; Masters, RSW; Dimitriadis, S.; Williams, AM

    2015-01-01

    Falls by older adults often result in reduced quality of life and debilitating fear of further falls. Stopping walking when talking (SWWT) is a significant predictor of future falls by older adults and is thought to reflect age-related increases in attentional demands of walking. We examine whether SWWT is associated with use of explicit movement cues during locomotion, and evaluate if conscious control (i.e., movement specific reinvestment) is causally linked to falls-related anxiety during ...

  14. Fast Adaptive Blind MMSE Equalizer for Multichannel FIR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed-Meraim Karim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new blind minimum mean square error (MMSE equalization algorithm of noisy multichannel finite impulse response (FIR systems, that relies only on second-order statistics. The proposed algorithm offers two important advantages: a low computational complexity and a relative robustness against channel order overestimation errors. Exploiting the fact that the columns of the equalizer matrix filter belong both to the signal subspace and to the kernel of truncated data covariance matrix, the proposed algorithm achieves blindly a direct estimation of the zero-delay MMSE equalizer parameters. We develop a two-step procedure to further improve the performance gain and control the equalization delay. An efficient fast adaptive implementation of our equalizer, based on the projection approximation and the shift invariance property of temporal data covariance matrix, is proposed for reducing the computational complexity from to , where is the number of emitted signals, the data vector length, and the dimension of the signal subspace. We then derive a statistical performance analysis to compare the equalization performance with that of the optimal MMSE equalizer. Finally, simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed blind equalization algorithm.

  15. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward And Backward Walking on Land and in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Arellano, Raúl; Vanrenterghem, Jos; López-Contreras, Gracia

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg) were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (pland, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs. PMID:26839602

  16. A fast inverse dynamics model of walking for use in optimisation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hadi; Ren, Lei; Howard, David

    2016-08-01

    Computer simulation of human gait, based on measured motion data, is a well-established technique in biomechanics. However, optimisation studies requiring many iterative gait cycle simulations have not yet found widespread application because of their high computational cost. Therefore, a computationally efficient inverse dynamics model of 3D human gait has been designed and compared with an equivalent model, created using a commercial multi-body dynamics package. The fast inverse dynamics model described in this paper led to an eight fold increase in execution speed. Sufficient detail is provided to allow readers to implement the model themselves. PMID:26745213

  17. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin;

    2015-01-01

    correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking...

  18. Adaptive behaviour of the spinal cord in the transition from quiet stance to walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrao Mariano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR excitability was evaluated during gait initiation in 10 healthy subjects to investigate how load- and movement-related joint inputs activate lower spinal centres in the transition from quiet stance to walking. A motion analysis system integrated with a surface EMG device was used to acquire kinematic, kinetic and EMG variables. Starting from a quiet stance, subjects were asked to walk forward, at their natural speed. The sural nerve was stimulated and EMG responses were recorded from major hip, knee and ankle muscles. Gait initiation was divided into four subphases based on centre of pressure and centre of mass behaviours, while joint displacements were used to categorise joint motion as flexion or extension. The reflex parameters were measured and compared between subphases and in relation to the joint kinematics. Results The NWR was found to be subphase-dependent. NWR excitability was increased in the hip and knee flexor muscles of the starting leg, just prior to the occurrence of any movement, and in the knee flexor muscles of the same leg as soon as it was unloaded. The NWR was hip joint kinematics-dependent in a crossed manner. The excitability of the reflex was enhanced in the extensor muscles of the standing leg during the hip flexion of the starting leg, and in the hip flexors of the standing leg during the hip extension of the starting leg. No notable reflex modulation was observed in the ankle muscles. Conclusions Our findings show that the NWR is modulated during the gait initiation phase. Leg unloading and hip joint motion are the main sources of the observed modulation and work in concert to prepare and assist the starting leg in the first step while supporting the contralateral leg, thereby possibly predisposing the lower limbs to the cyclical pattern of walking.

  19. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Syed M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI ( n = 7; Control), and GII ( n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant ( P < 0.05) influence on body weight, average daily gain, respiration rate (RR), rectal temperature (RT), haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), plasma glucose, calcium, phosphorus, aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), tri-iodo-thyronine (T3), thyroxin (T4), and cortisol. However, walking stress did not influence the reproductive hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T3 and T4 show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland

  20. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star. PMID:15191182

  1. An Adaptive K-random Walks Method for Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ghorbani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing an intelligent search method in peer-to-peer networks will significantly affect efficiency of the network taking into account sending a search query to nodes which have more probably stored the desired object. Machine learning techniques such as learning automaton can be used as an appropriate tool for this purpose. This paper tries to present a search method based on the learning automaton for the peer-to-peer networks, in which each node is selected according to values stored in its memory for sending the search queries rather than being selected randomly. The probable values are stored in tables and they indicate history of the node in previous searches for finding the desired object. For evaluation, simulation is used to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms K-random walk method which randomly sends the search queries to the nodes.

  2. Fast Learning in Spiking Neural Networks by Learning Rate Adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方慧娟; 罗继亮; 王飞

    2012-01-01

    For accelerating the supervised learning by the SpikeProp algorithm with the temporal coding paradigm in spiking neural networks (SNNs), three learning rate adaptation methods (heuristic rule, delta-delta rule, and delta-bar-delta rule), which are used to speed up training in artificial neural networks, are used to develop the training algorithms for feedforward SNN. The performance of these algorithms is investigated by four experiments: classical XOR (exclusive or) problem, Iris dataset, fault diagnosis in the Tennessee Eastman process, and Poisson trains of discrete spikes. The results demonstrate that all the three learning rate adaptation methods are able to speed up convergence of SNN compared with the original SpikeProp algorithm. Furthermore, if the adaptive learning rate is used in combination with the momentum term, the two modifications will balance each other in a beneficial way to accomplish rapid and steady convergence. In the three learning rate adaptation methods, delta-bar-delta rule performs the best. The delta-bar-delta method with momentum has the fastest convergence rate, the greatest stability of training process, and the maximum accuracy of network learning. The proposed algorithms in this paper are simple and efficient, and consequently valuable for practical applications of SNN.

  3. Adaptation mechanism of interlimb coordination in human split-belt treadmill walking through learning of foot contact timing: a robotics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Soichiro; Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro; Tomita, Nozomi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Human walking behaviour adaptation strategies have previously been examined using split-belt treadmills, which have two parallel independently controlled belts. In such human split-belt treadmill walking, two types of adaptations have been identified: early and late. Early-type adaptations appear as rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination activities when the belt speeds of the treadmill change between tied (same speed for both belts) and split-belt (different speeds for each belt) configurations. By contrast, late-type adaptations occur after the early-type adaptations as a gradual change and only involve interlimb coordination. Furthermore, interlimb coordination shows after-effects that are related to these adaptations. It has been suggested that these adaptations are governed primarily by the spinal cord and cerebellum, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Because various physiological findings suggest that foot contact timing is crucial to adaptive locomotion, this paper reports on the development of a two-layered control model for walking composed of spinal and cerebellar models, and on its use as the focus of our control model. The spinal model generates rhythmic motor commands using an oscillator network based on a central pattern generator and modulates the commands formulated in immediate response to foot contact, while the cerebellar model modifies motor commands through learning based on error information related to differences between the predicted and actual foot contact timings of each leg. We investigated adaptive behaviour and its mechanism by split-belt treadmill walking experiments using both computer simulations and an experimental bipedal robot. Our results showed that the robot exhibited rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination that were similar to the early-type adaptations observed in humans. In addition, despite the lack of direct interlimb coordination control, gradual changes and after-effects in the

  4. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show...

  5. The Automatic Image Segmentation Method Based on Fast FCM and Random Walk Algorithm%基于快速FCM与随机游走算法的图像自动分割方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许健才; 张良均; 余燕团

    2016-01-01

    在图像分割中,针对 FCM 算法存在聚类数目需要预先给定、收敛速度慢等缺点,本文把快速模糊 C 均值聚类算法和随机游走算法相结合,具体方法为先采用快速模糊 C 均值聚类算法对图像进行预分割,以便获得聚类中心的位置,然后将该中心作为随机游走的种子点,再进行图像分割,实验结果得到了较为满意的预期效果,证明该方法是可行的。本文的研究为快速 FCM 实现自适应性和开发图形图像预处理系统提供了技术支持与理论依据。%As far as image segmentation, the defeat of the number of clusters for FCM algorithm is reeded to be improued. In this paper, the fast fuzzy C-means clustering and random walk algorithm are combined to solve the problem of image segmentation. Firstly, the fast FCM for image pre-segmentation to obtain the number of clusters and cluster central location as the seed points of random walk firstly. Then, for image segmentation, experimental results show that this method is feasible, and get a more satisfactory desired purpose. Results of this study achieve self-adaptive and fast FCM develop graphical image preprocessing system provides technical support and theoretical basis.

  6. [Research on Adaptive Balance Reaction for Gait Slippery Instability Events on Level Walk Based on Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameter Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Junxia; Si, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, for gait instability phenomenon, many researches have been carried out at home and abroad. However, the relationship between plantar pressure and gait parameters in the process of balance adjustment is still unclear. This study describes the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk by plantar pressure and gait analysis. Ten healthy male subjects walked on a level path wearing shoes with two contrastive contaminants (dry, oil). The study collected and analyzed the change rule of spatiotemporal parameters, plantar pressure parameters, vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), etc. The results showed that the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk mainly included lighter touch at the heel strikes, tighter grip at the toe offs, a lower velocity, a shorter stride length and longer support time. These changes are used to maintain or recover body balance. These results would be able to explore new ideas and provide reference value for slip injury prevention, walking rehabilitation training design, research and development of walking assistive equipments, etc. PMID:27079090

  7. Adaptation of an artificial diet for Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) laboratory rearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied on three artificial diets with different protein sources (d1 = white bean, yeast extract, soybean flour, powder milk and wheat germ; d2 = 'carioca' bean and yeast extract; d3 = corn flour, wheat germ and yeast extract). The objective of this research was to determine the most suitable diet for mass rearing S. cosmioides in laboratory. The species is highly polyphagous, and for this reason we hypothesized that diets that are suitable for other Lepidoptera can allow its development and fulfill the minimum requirements of biological quality, quantity and economy. Although S. cosmioides has completed the biological cycle on the three diets, the d1 was the most suitable for its rearing and produced the fastest development, higher total survival and pupae weight, as well as higher net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and finite rate of natural increase (l). The number of instars varied from six to seven, predominating six in d1 and d3; in d2, half the population presented six instars and half seven. Females presented pupae duration significantly lower that the males in all diets, thus emerging earlier. Adult longevity was not affected by the diets, while total fecundity was higher in d1 and d2. In conclusion, the diet 1 is recommended to mass rearing S. cosmioides in the laboratory. (author)

  8. Adaptation of an artificial diet for Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) laboratory rearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavaresco, Alvimar [EPAGRI, Estacao Experimetal de Canoinhas, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: bavaresco@epagri.rct-sc.br; Garcia, Mauro S.; Gruetzmacher, Anderson D.; Ringenberg, Rudiney; Foresti, Josemar [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade

    2004-03-15

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied on three artificial diets with different protein sources (d1 = white bean, yeast extract, soybean flour, powder milk and wheat germ; d2 = 'carioca' bean and yeast extract; d3 = corn flour, wheat germ and yeast extract). The objective of this research was to determine the most suitable diet for mass rearing S. cosmioides in laboratory. The species is highly polyphagous, and for this reason we hypothesized that diets that are suitable for other Lepidoptera can allow its development and fulfill the minimum requirements of biological quality, quantity and economy. Although S. cosmioides has completed the biological cycle on the three diets, the d1 was the most suitable for its rearing and produced the fastest development, higher total survival and pupae weight, as well as higher net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and finite rate of natural increase (l). The number of instars varied from six to seven, predominating six in d1 and d3; in d2, half the population presented six instars and half seven. Females presented pupae duration significantly lower that the males in all diets, thus emerging earlier. Adult longevity was not affected by the diets, while total fecundity was higher in d1 and d2. In conclusion, the diet 1 is recommended to mass rearing S. cosmioides in the laboratory. (author)

  9. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for whole brain parcellation using the type of generative parametric models typically used in tissue classification. Compared to the non-parametric, multi-atlas segmentation techniques that have become popular in recent years, our method obtains state-of-the-art...... segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability...

  10. Lack of on-going adaptations in the soleus muscle activity during walking in patients affected by large-fiber neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzaro, Nazarena; Grey, Michael James; Sinkjær, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    applied during the stance phase of the gait cycle to mimic the normal variability of the ankle trajectory during walking. Patients with demyelination of large sensory fibers (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy) and age-matched controls participated...... spindle afferents and that the reduction may be mediated by feedback from the group Ib pathways. This study provides evidence for the role of sensory feedback in the continuous adaptation of the soleus activity during the stance phase of human walking....

  11. Novel Fast Adapting Interneurons Mediate Cholinergic-Induced Fast GABAA IPSCs In Striatal Spiny Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Thomas W.; Assous, Maxime; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Previous work suggests that neostriatal cholinergic interneurons control the activity of several classes of GABAergic interneurons through fast nicotinic receptor mediated synaptic inputs. Although indirect evidence has suggested the existence of several classes of interneurons controlled by this mechanism only one such cell type, the neuropeptide-Y expressing neurogliaform neuron, has been identified to date. Here we tested the hypothesis that in addition to the neurogliaform neurons that el...

  12. Identification of fast-changing signals by means of adaptive chaotic transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Berezowski, Marek; Lawnik, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive approach of strongly non-linear fast-changing signals identification is discussed. The approach is devised by adaptive sampling based on chaotic mapping in yourself of a signal. Presented sampling way may be utilized online in the automatic control of chemical reactor (throughout identification of concentrations and temperature oscillations in real-time), in medicine (throughout identification of ECG and EEG signals in real-time), etc. In this paper, we presented it to identify t...

  13. Adaptive grouping for the higher-order multilevel fast multipole method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Jørgensen, Erik; Meincke, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    An alternative parameter-free adaptive approach for the grouping of the basis function patterns in the multilevel fast multipole method is presented, yielding significant memory savings compared to the traditional Octree grouping for most discretizations, particularly when using higher-order basis...

  14. Segmentation of heterogeneous or small FDG PET positive tissue based on a 3D-locally adaptive random walk algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoma, D P; Ruan, S; Thureau, S; Nkhali, L; Modzelewski, R; Monnehan, G A; Vera, P; Gardin, I

    2014-12-01

    A segmentation algorithm based on the random walk (RW) method, called 3D-LARW, has been developed to delineate small tumors or tumors with a heterogeneous distribution of FDG on PET images. Based on the original algorithm of RW [1], we propose an improved approach using new parameters depending on the Euclidean distance between two adjacent voxels instead of a fixed one and integrating probability densities of labels into the system of linear equations used in the RW. These improvements were evaluated and compared with the original RW method, a thresholding with a fixed value (40% of the maximum in the lesion), an adaptive thresholding algorithm on uniform spheres filled with FDG and FLAB method, on simulated heterogeneous spheres and on clinical data (14 patients). On these three different data, 3D-LARW has shown better segmentation results than the original RW algorithm and the three other methods. As expected, these improvements are more pronounced for the segmentation of small or tumors having heterogeneous FDG uptake.

  15. Global solution for a kinetic chemotaxis model with internal dynamics and its fast adaptation limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jie

    2015-12-01

    A nonlinear kinetic chemotaxis model with internal dynamics incorporating signal transduction and adaptation is considered. This paper is concerned with: (i) the global solution for this model, and, (ii) its fast adaptation limit to Othmer-Dunbar-Alt type model. This limit gives some insight to the molecular origin of the chemotaxis behaviour. First, by using the Schauder fixed point theorem, the global existence of weak solution is proved based on detailed a priori estimates, under quite general assumptions. However, the Schauder theorem does not provide uniqueness, so additional analysis is required to be developed for uniqueness. Next, the fast adaptation limit of this model is derived by extracting a weak convergence subsequence in measure space. For this limit, the first difficulty is to show the concentration effect on the internal state. Another difficulty is the strong compactness argument on the chemical potential, which is essential for passing the nonlinear kinetic equation to the weak limit.

  16. Adaptive integral method with fast Gaussian gridding for solving combined field integral equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakır, O.; Baǧ; Cı, H.; Michielssen, E.

    Fast Gaussian gridding (FGG), a recently proposed nonuniform fast Fourier transform algorithm, is used to reduce the memory requirements of the adaptive integral method (AIM) for accelerating the method of moments-based solution of combined field integral equations pertinent to the analysis of scattering from three-dimensional perfect electrically conducting surfaces. Numerical results that demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the AIM-FGG hybrid in comparison to an AIM-accelerated solver, which uses moment matching to project surface sources onto an auxiliary grid, are presented.

  17. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homoelle, D; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J, E-mail: homoelle1@llnl.go [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32x32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{mu}rad to <2{mu}rad.

  18. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homoelle, D.; Baker, K. L.; Patel, P. K.; Utterback, E.; Rushford, M. C.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32×32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from ~75μrad to <2μrad.

  19. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homoelle, D C; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-22

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32 x 32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{micro}rad to <2{micro}rad.

  20. Research on a Pulmonary Nodule Segmentation Method Combining Fast Self-Adaptive FCM and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD of lung cancer is to segment pathologically changed tissues fast and accurately. As pulmonary nodules are potential manifestation of lung cancer, we propose a fast and self-adaptive pulmonary nodules segmentation method based on a combination of FCM clustering and classification learning. The enhanced spatial function considers contributions to fuzzy membership from both the grayscale similarity between central pixels and single neighboring pixels and the spatial similarity between central pixels and neighborhood and improves effectively the convergence rate and self-adaptivity of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate segmentation of vascular adhesion, pleural adhesion, and ground glass opacity (GGO pulmonary nodules than other typical algorithms.

  1. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian S Houser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris, which fasts from food and water for periods of up to three months. During this time, ~90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM. All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures

  2. Dynamics of Human Walking

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, V B

    2004-01-01

    The problem of biped locomotion at steady speeds is discussed through the Lagrangian formulation developed for velocity-dependent, body driving forces. Human walking on a level surface is analyzed in terms of the data on the resultant ground-reaction force and the external work. It is shown that the trajectory of the human center of mass is due to a superposition of its rectilinear motion with a given speed V and a backward rotation along a shortened hypocycloid. A stiff-to-compliant crossover between walking gaits is established at mid speeds, which separate slow walking from fast walking, limited by V_{\\max}=3.4 m/s. Key words: locomotion, bipedalism, human, biomechanics, walking.

  3. Adaptive Hybrid Visual Servo Regulation of Mobile Robots Based on Fast Homography Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the monocular camera-based mobile robot system, an adaptive hybrid visual servo regulation algorithm which is based on a fast homography decomposition method is proposed to drive the mobile robot to its desired position and orientation, even when object’s imaging depth and camera’s position extrinsic parameters are unknown. Firstly, the homography’s particular properties caused by mobile robot’s 2-DOF motion are taken into account to induce a fast homography decomposition method. Secondly, the homography matrix and the extracted orientation error, incorporated with the desired view’s single feature point, are utilized to form an error vector and its open-loop error function. Finally, Lyapunov-based techniques are exploited to construct an adaptive regulation control law, followed by the experimental verification. The experimental results show that the proposed fast homography decomposition method is not only simple and efficient, but also highly precise. Meanwhile, the designed control law can well enable mobile robot position and orientation regulation despite the lack of depth information and camera’s position extrinsic parameters.

  4. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  5. Detection of trichothecene producing Fusarium spp. by PCR: adaptation, validation and application to fast food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Agodi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Food contamination by trichothecene mycotoxins is considered to be an emerging public health problem. The aim of this study was to validate a rapid sonification protocol, previously set up for cereal Fusarium DNA extraction from fast food samples, produced by a centre for research and development in the food industry in Catania, Sicily, and to validate it for a diagnostic PCR assay targeted at tri5, the key gene of trichothecene biosynthesis.

    Methods. DNA from reference Fusarium spp. strains and from fast food samples was prepared, setting up an extraction protocol adapted using some modifications based on a method recently described. Validation experiments were performed: serial dilution of DNA extracted from fungal cultures were added to food samples and then DNA was extracted. Specific primer pairs were used to detect F. graminearum and F. culmorum DNA in species-specific assays as well as trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp. in a groupspecific system.

    Results. All genomic DNA extracted from trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp. as well as from DNA-spiked fast food samples and from food still in it’s original condition resulted in the correct amplification. The detection limit was 1 x 10-4 μg of DNA. All fungal and food samples tested gave highly consistent results in repeatability assays, thus demonstrating the within-lab and within/between-day precision of the method.

    Conclusions. Information on the epidemiology of trichothecene producing Fusarium through the food chain and the identification of the most frequently contaminated components of fast food are essential in order to develop effective public health strategies for minimising consumer exposure to trichothecenes. Key words: Fusarium, fast food, trichothecenes, PCR

  6. Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klempel Monica C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternate day modified fasting (ADMF is an effective strategy for weight loss in obese adults. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the dietary and physical activity adaptations that occur during short-term ADMF, and to determine how these modulations affect rate of weight loss. Methods Sixteen obese subjects (12 women/4 men completed a 10-week trial consisting of 3 phases: 1 2-week control phase, 2 4-week ADMF controlled feeding phase, and 3 4-week ADMF self-selected feeding phase. Results Body weight decreased (P r = 0.42, P = 0.01. Dietary fat intake decreased (36% to 33% of kcal, P r = 0.38, P = 0.03. Hunger on the fast day decreased (P Conclusion These findings indicate that obese subjects quickly adapt to ADMF, and that changes in energy/macronutrient intake, hunger, and maintenance of physical activity play a role in influencing rate of weight loss by ADMF.

  7. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W. [Department of Microelectronic and Nanoelectronic Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Ilmenau University of Technology, Gustav-Kirchhoffstr. 1, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  8. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safety reasons, especially on uneven ground. See a physical therapist for exercise therapy and walking retraining. For a ... the right position for standing and walking. A physical therapist can supply these and provide exercise therapy, if ...

  9. Adaptive Movement Compensation for In Vivo Imaging of Fast Cellular Dynamics within a Moving Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Hugues; De Koninck, Paul; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In vivo non-linear optical microscopy has been essential to advance our knowledge of how intact biological systems work. It has been particularly enabling to decipher fast spatiotemporal cellular dynamics in neural networks. The power of the technique stems from its optical sectioning capability that in turn also limits its application to essentially immobile tissue. Only tissue not affected by movement or in which movement can be physically constrained can be imaged fast enough to conduct functional studies at high temporal resolution. Here, we show dynamic two-photon Ca2+ imaging in the spinal cord of a living rat at millisecond time scale, free of motion artifacts using an optical stabilization system. We describe a fast, non-contact adaptive movement compensation approach, applicable to rough and weakly reflective surfaces, allowing real-time functional imaging from intrinsically moving tissue in live animals. The strategy involves enslaving the position of the microscope objective to that of the tissue surface in real-time through optical monitoring and a closed feedback loop. The performance of the system allows for efficient image locking even in conditions of random or irregular movements. PMID:21629702

  10. Fast Adapting Ensemble: A New Algorithm for Mining Data Streams with Concept Drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ortíz Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of large data streams in the presence of concept drifts is one of the main challenges in the field of data mining, particularly when the algorithms have to deal with concepts that disappear and then reappear. This paper presents a new algorithm, called Fast Adapting Ensemble (FAE, which adapts very quickly to both abrupt and gradual concept drifts, and has been specifically designed to deal with recurring concepts. FAE processes the learning examples in blocks of the same size, but it does not have to wait for the batch to be complete in order to adapt its base classification mechanism. FAE incorporates a drift detector to improve the handling of abrupt concept drifts and stores a set of inactive classifiers that represent old concepts, which are activated very quickly when these concepts reappear. We compare our new algorithm with various well-known learning algorithms, taking into account, common benchmark datasets. The experiments show promising results from the proposed algorithm (regarding accuracy and runtime, handling different types of concept drifts.

  11. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples.

  12. Fast-adaptive fiber-optic sensor for ultra-small vibration and deformation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romashko, R V [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far-Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Girolamo, S Di [Physics Department, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kulchin, Y N [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far-Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Launay, J C [CNRS - Institute of Condensed Matter and Chemistry of Bordeaux, University Bordeaux 1, 87 Avenue Dr A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Kamshilin, A A [Physics Department, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2007-10-15

    Adaptive fiber-optic interferometer measuring system based on a dynamic hologram recorded in photorefractive CdTe crystal without applying an external electric field is developed. Vectorial mixing of two waves with different polarizations in the anisotropic diffraction geometry allows for the realization of linear regime of phase demodulation at the diffusion hologram. High sensitivity of the interferometer is achieved due to recording of the hologram in reflection geometry at high spatial frequencies in a crystal with sufficient concentration of photorefractive centers. The sensitivity obtained makes possible a broadband detection of ultra-small vibrations with amplitude of less then 0.1 nm. High cut-off frequency of the interferometer achieved using low-power light sources due to fast response of CdTe crystal allows one to eliminate temperature fluctuations and other industrial noises.

  13. Fast binarized time-reversed adapted-perturbation (b-TRAP) optical focusing inside scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Cheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Light scattering inhibits high-resolution optical imaging, manipulation and therapy deep inside biological tissue by preventing focusing. To form deep foci, wavefront-shaping and time-reversal techniques that break the optical diffusion limit have been developed. For in vivo applications, such focusing must provide high gain, high speed, and a large number of spatial modes. However, none of the previous techniques meet these requirements simultaneously. Here, we overcome this challenge by rapidly measuring the perturbed optical field within a single camera exposure followed by adaptively time-reversing the phase-binarized perturbation. Consequently, a phase-conjugated wavefront is synthesized within a millisecond, two orders of magnitude shorter than the digitally achieved record. We demonstrated real-time focusing in dynamic scattering media, and extended laser speckle contrast imaging to new depths. The unprecedented combination of fast response, high gain, and large mode count makes this work a major strid...

  14. Fast simulation of transport and adaptive permeability estimation in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berre, Inga

    2005-07-01

    The focus of the thesis is twofold: Both fast simulation of transport in porous media and adaptive estimation of permeability are considered. A short introduction that motivates the work on these topics is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the governing equations for one- and two-phase flow in porous media are presented. Overall numerical solution strategies for the two-phase flow model are also discussed briefly. The concepts of streamlines and time-of-flight are introduced in Chapter 3. Methods for computing streamlines and time-of-flight are also presented in this chapter. Subsequently, in Chapters 4 and 5, the focus is on simulation of transport in a time-of-flight perspective. In Chapter 4, transport of fluids along streamlines is considered. Chapter 5 introduces a different viewpoint based on the evolution of isocontours of the fluid saturation. While the first chapters focus on the forward problem, which consists in solving a mathematical model given the reservoir parameters, Chapters 6, 7 and 8 are devoted to the inverse problem of permeability estimation. An introduction to the problem of identifying spatial variability in reservoir permeability by inversion of dynamic production data is given in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, adaptive multiscale strategies for permeability estimation are discussed. Subsequently, Chapter 8 presents a level-set approach for improving piecewise constant permeability representations. Finally, Chapter 9 summarizes the results obtained in the thesis; in addition, the chapter gives some recommendations and suggests directions for future work. Part II In Part II, the following papers are included in the order they were completed: Paper A: A Streamline Front Tracking Method for Two- and Three-Phase Flow Including Capillary Forces. I. Berre, H. K. Dahle, K. H. Karlsen, and H. F. Nordhaug. In Fluid flow and transport in porous media: mathematical and numerical treatment (South Hadley, MA, 2001), volume 295 of Contemp. Math., pages 49

  15. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED): A New Class of Adaptable Distance Transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Theo E; van den Broek, Egon L

    2014-11-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast exact euclidean distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT starting-directly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced, followed by strategies for their efficient implementation. It is shown that FEED class algorithms unite properties of ordered propagation, raster scanning, and independent scanning DT. Moreover, FEED class algorithms shown to have a unique property: they can be tailored to the images under investigation. Benchmarks are conducted on both the Fabbri et al. data set and on a newly developed data set. Three baseline, three approximate, and three state-of-the-art DT algorithms were included, in addition to two implementations of FEED class algorithms. It illustrates that FEED class algorithms i) provide truly exact Euclidean DT; ii) do no suffer from disconnected Voronoi tiles, which is a unique feature for non-parallel but fast DT; iii) outperform any other approximate and exact Euclidean DT with its time complexity O(N), even after their optimization; and iv) are unequaled in that they can be adapted to the characteristics of the image class at hand.

  16. Adaptive modified hough transform track initiator for HFSWR tracking of fast and small targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Rujiang; Yuan Yeshu; Quan Taifan

    2005-01-01

    High frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR)is well proved to have over the horizon (OTH) detection capability to weak aerial targets, such as concealed airplanes or cruise missiles. The most important problem of detection of fast and small targets using HFSWR is earlier warning, i.e. enlargement of detection range oftargets. Therefore, the detection threshold should be decreased as low as possible, but numerous false alarms are brought about at the same time.On this condition, conventional track initiation techniques, which normally require the probability of false alarm to be at the level of 10-6, will initiate enormous false tracks and lead to abnormaloperation of tracking system. An adaptive modified hough transform (AMHT) track initiator is proposed accordingly and the relation of detection range to the performance of track initiator is analyzed in this paper. Simulations are performed to confirm the capability of track initiation to fast and small targets in dense clutter by AMHT track initiator. The tolerable probability of false alarm of detector can reach the level of 10-3. And it performs better than track initiator based on modified hough transform (MHT).

  17. A comparison of slow, uphill and fast, level walking on lower extremity biomechanics and tibiofemoral joint loading in obese and nonobese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Derek J; Lerner, Zachary F; Board, Wayne J; Browning, Raymond C

    2014-02-01

    We determined if slow, uphill walking (0.75 m/s, 6°) reduced tibiofemoral (TF) loading compared to faster, level walking (1.50 m/s) in obese and nonobese adults. We collected kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic data as 9 moderately obese and 10 nonobese participants walked on a dual-belt instrumented treadmill. We used OpenSim to scale a musculoskeletal model and calculate joint kinematics, kinetics, muscle forces, and TF forces. Compressive TF forces were greater in the obese adults during both speed/grade combinations. During level walking, obese participants walked with a straighter leg than nonobese participants, resulting in early stance vasti muscle forces that were similar in the obese and nonobese participants. Early stance peak compressive TF forces were reduced by 23% in obese (2,352 to 1,811 N) and 35% in nonobese (1,994 to 1,303 N) individuals during slow, uphill walking compared to brisk level walking. Late stance peak TF forces were similar across speeds/grades, but were greater in obese (∼2,900 N) compared to nonobese (∼1,700 N) individuals. Smaller early stance TF loads and loading rates suggest that slow, uphill walking may be appropriate exercise for obese individuals at risk for musculoskeletal pathology or pain. PMID:24127395

  18. A service-oriented medical framework for fast and adaptive information delivery in mobile environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjeong; Nam, Hyo Suk

    2009-11-01

    The need for fast treatment of patients in critical conditions motivates the use of mobile devices to provide prompt and consistent communication between hospitals and physicians. We propose a framework that supports ubiquitous access to medical systems using personalized mobile services and integrated medical systems. The proposed service-oriented medical framework provides dynamically composed services that are adapted to contextual variables such as the user's role, the network bandwidth, and resources available at mobile devices while supporting task allocation in distributed servers for massive resource-consuming services. It also manages accurate patient data by integrating local medical systems using medical information standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and Health Level 7. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of our framework by building a prototype of context-based adaptation of computerized tomography image retrieval for acute stroke treatments, which allows images to be viewed on mobile devices with WiMax wireless network. The proposed medical framework reduces hospital delays of patients and facilitates treatments in the absence of medical specialists. PMID:19775976

  19. Accurate Anomaly Detection using Adaptive Monitoring and Fast Switching in SDN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Garg

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available —Software defined networking (SDN is rapidly evolving technology which provides a suitable environment for easily applying efficient monitoring policies on the networks. SDN provides a centralized control of the whole network from which monitoring of network traffic and resources can be done with ease. SDN promises to drastically simplify network monitoring and management and also enable rapid innovation of networks through network programmability. SDN architecture separates the control of the network from the forwarding devices. With the higher innovation provided by the SDN, security threats at open interfaces of SDN also increases significantly as an attacker can target the single centralized point i.e. controller, to attack the network. Hence, efficient adaptive monitoring and measurement is required to detect and prevent malicious activities inside the network. Various such techniques have already been proposed by many researchers. This paper describes a work of applying efficient adaptive monitoring on the network while maintaining the performance of the network considering monitoring overhead over the controller. This work represents effective bandwidth utilization for calculation of threshold range while applying anomaly detection rules for monitoring of the network. Accurate detection of anomalies is implemented and also allows valid users and applications to transfer the data without any restrictions inside the network which otherwise were considered as anomalies in previous technique due to fluctuation of data and narrow threshold window. The concept of fast switching also used to improve the processing speed and performance of the networks.

  20. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy. PMID:27446674

  1. A service-oriented medical framework for fast and adaptive information delivery in mobile environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjeong; Nam, Hyo Suk

    2009-11-01

    The need for fast treatment of patients in critical conditions motivates the use of mobile devices to provide prompt and consistent communication between hospitals and physicians. We propose a framework that supports ubiquitous access to medical systems using personalized mobile services and integrated medical systems. The proposed service-oriented medical framework provides dynamically composed services that are adapted to contextual variables such as the user's role, the network bandwidth, and resources available at mobile devices while supporting task allocation in distributed servers for massive resource-consuming services. It also manages accurate patient data by integrating local medical systems using medical information standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and Health Level 7. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of our framework by building a prototype of context-based adaptation of computerized tomography image retrieval for acute stroke treatments, which allows images to be viewed on mobile devices with WiMax wireless network. The proposed medical framework reduces hospital delays of patients and facilitates treatments in the absence of medical specialists.

  2. Fast Model Adaptation for Automated Section Classification in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jian; Delaney, Brian; Florian, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Medical information extraction is the automatic extraction of structured information from electronic medical records, where such information can be used for improving healthcare processes and medical decision making. In this paper, we study one important medical information extraction task called section classification. The objective of section classification is to automatically identify sections in a medical document and classify them into one of the pre-defined section types. Training section classification models typically requires large amounts of human labeled training data to achieve high accuracy. Annotating institution-specific data, however, can be both expensive and time-consuming; which poses a big hurdle for adapting a section classification model to new medical institutions. In this paper, we apply two advanced machine learning techniques, active learning and distant supervision, to reduce annotation cost and achieve fast model adaptation for automated section classification in electronic medical records. Our experiment results show that active learning reduces the annotation cost and time by more than 50%, and distant supervision can achieve good model accuracy using weakly labeled training data only. PMID:26262005

  3. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy.

  4. 基于自适应渐消 EKF 的 FastSLAM 算法%FastSLAM algorithm based on adaptive fading extended Kalman filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹; 段建民; 于宏啸

    2016-01-01

    快速同时定位与建图(fast simultaneous localization and mapping,FastSLAM)算法的采样过程会带来粒子退化问题,为了改进算法的性能,提高估计精度,从研究粒子滤波的建议分布函数出发,提出基于自适应渐消扩展卡尔曼滤波(adaptive fading extended Kalman filter,AFEKF)的 FastSLAM 算法。该算法基于 FastSLAM的基本框架,利用 AFEKF 产生一种参数可自适应调节的建议分布函数,使其更接近移动机器人的后验位姿概率分布,减缓粒子集的退化。因此在同等粒子数的情况下,该算法有效提高了 SLAM 精度,以此减少所使用的粒子数,降低算法的复杂度。基于模拟器和标准数据集的实验仿真结果验证了该算法的有效性。%Sampling process often causes particle degradation in fast simultaneous localization and mapping (FastSLAM).From the point view of the proposal distribution function,a method named the FastSLAM based on adaptive fading extended Kalman filter is proposed to improve the performance of the algorithm and increase estimation accuracy.It uses the adaptive fading extended Kalman filter (AFEKF)to compute proposal distribu-tion based on the basic framework of FastSLAM,then this proposal distribution is more close to the posterior position of the mobile robot and the degree of particle degradation is reduced.In the case of the same number of particles,the algorithm can effectively improve the accuracy of SLAM.Hence it can reduce the number of parti-cles used in the algorithm and the complexity of the algorithm.The validity of the proposed algorithm is verified by the experimental simulation results based on the simulator and the standard data set.

  5. Reduced γ-γ time walk to below 50 ps using the multiplexed-start and multiplexed-stop fast-timing technique with LaBr3(Ce) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Rudigier, M.; Ansari, S.; Dannhoff, M.; Esmaylzadeh, A.; Fransen, C.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Karayonchev, V.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Stegemann, S.

    2016-07-01

    The electronic γ-γ fast-timing technique using arrays consisting of many LaBr3(Ce) detectors is a powerful method to determine lifetimes of nuclear excited states with a lower limit of about 5 ps. This method requires the determination of the energy-dependent time walk of the zero time which is represented by the centroid of a prompt γ-γ time distribution. The full-energy peak versus full-energy peak prompt response difference which represents the linearly combined mean γ-γ time walk of a fast-timing array consisting of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors was measured using a standard 152Eu γ-ray source for the energy region of 40-1408 keV. The data were acquired using a "multiplexed-start and multiplexed-stop" analogue electronics circuitry and analysed by employing the generalized centroid difference method. Concerning the cylindrical 1.5 in.×1.5 in. LaBr3(Ce) crystals which are coupled to the Hamamatsu R9779 photomultiplier tubes, the best fast-timing array time resolution of 202(3) ps is obtained for the two prompt γ lines of 60Co by using the leading-edge timing principle. When using the zero-crossover timing principle the time resolution is degraded by up to 30%, dependent on the energy and the shaping delay time of the constant fraction discriminator model Ortec 935. The smallest γ-γ time walk to below 50 ps is obtained by using a shaping delay time of about 17 ns and an optimum "time-walk adjustment" needed for detector output pulses with amplitudes smaller than 400 mV.

  6. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... by a single major allergen, parvalbumin (Cyp c 1) and lipid transfer protein (Pru p 3), respectively. Two approaches are being evaluated for achieving hypoallergenicity, i.e. site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. The most promising hypoallergens will be produced under GMP conditions. After pre...

  7. Fast adaptive OFDM-PON over single fiber loopback transmission using dynamic rate adaptation-based algorithm for channel performance improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartiwa, Iwa; Jung, Sang-Min; Hong, Moon-Ki; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel fast adaptive approach that was applied to an OFDM-PON 20-km single fiber loopback transmission system to improve channel performance in term of stabilized BER below 2 × 10-3 and higher throughput beyond 10 Gb/s. The upstream transmission is performed through light source-seeded modulation using 1-GHz RSOA at the ONU. Experimental results indicated that the dynamic rate adaptation algorithm based on greedy Levin-Campello could be an effective solution to mitigate channel instability and data rate degradation caused by the Rayleigh back scattering effect and inefficient resource subcarrier allocation.

  8. The adaptation of limb kinematics to increasing walking speeds in freely moving mice 129/Sv and C57BL/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serradj, Nadjet; Jamon, Marc

    2009-07-19

    The kinematics of locomotion was analyzed in two strains of great importance for the creation of mutated mice (C56BL/6 and 129/Sv). Different behavioral situations were used to trigger sequences of movement covering the whole range of velocities in the mice, and the variations of kinematic parameters were analyzed in relation with velocity. Both stride frequency and stride length contributed to the moving speed, but stride frequency was found to be the main contributor to the speed increase. A trot-gallop transition was detected at speed about 70 cm/s, in relation with a sharp shift in limb coordination. The results of this study were consistent with pieces of information previously published concerning the gait analyses of other strains, and provided an integrative view of the basic motor pattern of mice. On the other hand some qualitative differences were found in the movement characteristics of the two strains. The stride frequency showed a higher contribution to speed in 129/Sv than in C57BL/6. In addition, 129/Sv showed a phase shift in the forelimb and hindlimb, and a different position of the foot during the stance time that revealed a different gait and body position during walking. Overall, 129/Sv moved at a slower speed than C57BL/6 in any behavioral situation. This difference was related to a basal lower level of motor activity. The possibility that an alteration in the dopamine circuit was responsible for the different movement pattern in 129/Sv is discussed. PMID:19428617

  9. A Fast Adaptive Artificial Neural Network Controller for Flexible Link Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Riad Maouche

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a hybrid approach to the problem of controlling flexible link manipulators in the dynamic phase of the trajectory. A flexible beam/arm is an appealing option for civil and military applications, such as space-based robot manipulators. However, flexibility brings with it unwanted oscillations and severe chattering which may even lead to an unstable system. To tackle these challenges, a novel control architecture scheme is presented. First, a neural network controller based on the robot’s dynamic equation of motion is elaborated. Its aim is to produce a fast and stable control of the joint position and velocity and damp the vibration of each arm. Then, an adaptive Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller (CMAC is implemented to balance unmodeled dynamics, enhancing the precision of the control. Efficiency of the new controller obtained is tested on a two-link flexible manipulator. Simulation results on a dynamic trajectory with a sinusoidal form show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  10. Adaptive optics system for fast automatic control of laser beam jitters in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Salvatore; Acernese, Fausto; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems can operate fast automatic control of laser beam jitters for several applications of basic research as well as for the improvement of industrial and medical devices. We here present our theoretical and experimental research showing the opportunity of suppressing laser beam geometrical fluctuations of higher order Hermite Gauss modes in interferometric Gravitational Waves (GW) antennas. This in turn allows to significantly reduce the noise that originates from the coupling of the laser source oscillations with the interferometer asymmetries and introduces the concrete possibility of overcoming the sensitivity limit of the GW antennas actually set at 10-23 1 Hz value. We have carried out the feasibility study of a novel AO System which performs effective laser jitters suppression in the 200 Hz bandwidth. It extracts the wavefront error signals in terms of Hermite Gauss (HG) coefficients and performs the wavefront correction using the Zernike polynomials. An experimental Prototype of the AO System has been implemented and tested in our laboratory at the University of Salerno and the results we have achieved fully confirm effectiveness and robustness of the control upon first and second order laser beam geometrical fluctuations, in good accordance with GW antennas requirements. Above all, we have measured 60 dB reduction of astigmatism and defocus modes at low frequency below 1 Hz and 20 dB reduction in the 200 Hz bandwidth.

  11. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of the fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Restrictions: Only three or six significant digits options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are in Fortran77 style. Memory allocation functions from Fortran90 and above are used in a few subroutines. Additional comments: The current version of the codes is designed and written for single core/processor desktop machines. Check http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html for updates and changes. Running time: The running time varies with the number of discretized elements (N) in the system and their distributions. In most cases, it scales linearly as a function of N.

  12. Efficient Cancer Classification using Fast Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (FANFIS based on Statistical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Ananda Kumar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The increase in number of cancer is detected throughout the world. This leads to the requirement of developing a new technique which can detect the occurrence the cancer. This will help in better diagnosis in order to reduce the cancer patients. This paper aim at finding the smallest set of genes that can ensure highly accurate classification of cancer from micro array data by using supervised machine learning algorithms. The significance of finding the minimum subset is three fold: a The computational burden and noise arising from irrelevant genes are much reduced; b the cost for cancer testing is reduced significantly as it simplifies the gene expression tests to include only a very small number of genes rather than thousands of genes; c it calls for more investigation into the probable biological relationship between these small numbers of genes and cancer development and treatment. The proposed method involves two steps. In the first step, some important genes are chosen with the help of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA ranking scheme. In the second step, the classification capability is tested for all simple combinations of those important genes using a better classifier. The proposed method uses Fast Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (FANFIS as a classification model. This classification model uses Modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for learning phase. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method results in better accuracy and also it takes lesser time for classification when compared to the conventional techniques.

  13. A Fast Block-Matching Algorithm Using Smooth Motion Vector Field Adaptive Search Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo(李波); LI Wei(李炜); TU YaMing(涂亚明)

    2003-01-01

    In many video standards based on inter-frame compression such as H.26x and MPEG, block-matching algorithm has been widely adopted as the method for motion estimation because of its simplicity and effectiveness. Nevertheless, since motion estimation is very complex in computing. Fast algorithm for motion estimation has always been an important and attractive topic in video compression. From the viewpoint of making motion vector field smoother, this paper proposes a new algorithm SMVFAST. On the basis of motion correlation, it predicts the starting point by neighboring motion vectors according to their SADs. Adaptive search modes are usedin its search process through simply classifying motion activity. After discovering the ubiquitous ratio between the SADs of the collocated blocks in the consecutive frames, the paper proposes an effective half-stop criterion that can quickly stop the search process with good enough results.Experiments show that SMVFAST obtains almost the same results as the full search at very low computation cost, and outperforms MVFAST and PMVFAST in speed and quality, which are adopted by MPEG-4.

  14. Endocrine response to realimentation in young northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris): Indications for development of fasting adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rachael E; Fontaine, Christine M; Avery, Julie P

    2016-09-01

    Most organisms undergo changes in their environment, both predictably and unpredictably, which require them to alter priorities in nutrient allocation with regards to food availability. Species that more predictably encounter extended periods of limited food resources or intake while mitigating the negative effects of starvation are considered to be fasting adapted. Northern elephant seals (NES) are one such species and routinely undergo extended periods of fasting for breeding, molting, as well as a post-weaning fast at 6-8weeks of age. However, during unusual times of nutritional deprivation, animals may enter stage III fasting. While fasting and foraging in this species has been extensively studied, realimentation following fasting beyond normal life history parameters has not been investigated. In this study, changes in ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I were compared across 8weeks of realimentation following emaciation in three age classes: neonates, post-molt pups, and yearlings. Longitudinal changes in hormone profiles indicate that neonate and post-molt pups are slow to recover mass and positive energy balance despite an energy dense diet fed at 10% body mass. In addition, ghrelin and GH concentrations remained elevated in post-molt pups compared to other age classes. Changes in hormone concentrations early in realimentation indicate that yearling animals recover more rapidly from periods of nutritional deprivation than do younger animals. Overall, this suggests that the ability to regulate metabolic homeostasis with regards to nutrient allocation may develop over time, even in a species that is considered to be fasting adapted. PMID:27288636

  15. A fast, robust, and simple implicit method for adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, Commercon; Romain, Teyssier

    2014-01-01

    Implicit solvers present strong limitations when used on supercomputing facilities and in particular for adaptive mesh-refinement codes. We present a new method for implicit adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh refinement-grids and implementing it in the radiation hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code for astrophysical purposes and, more particularly, for protostellar collapse. We briefly recall the radiation hydrodynamics equations and the adaptive time-stepping methodology used for hydrodynamical solvers. We then introduce the different types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin) that are used at the interface between levels and present our implementation of the new method in the RAMSES code. The method is tested against classical diffusion and radiation hydrodynamics tests, after which we present an application for protostellar collapse. We show that using Dirichlet boundary conditions at level interfaces is a good compromise between robustness and accuracy and that it ca...

  16. Adaptive Control of Active Balancing System for a Fast Speed-varying Jeffcott Rotor with Actuator Time Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bing; FANG Zhi-chu

    2008-01-01

    Due to actuator time delay existing in an adaptive control of the active balancing system for a fastspeed-varying Jeffcott rotor, if an unsynchronized control force (correction imbalance) is applied to the system,it may lead to degradation in control efficiency and instability of the control system. In order to avoid theseshortcomings, a simple adaptive controller was designed for a strictly positive real rotor system with actuatortime delay, then a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was constructed after an appropriate transform of this sys-tem model, the stability conditions of this adaptive control system with actuator time delay were derived. Afteradding a filter function, the active balancing system for the fast speed-varying Jeffcott rotor with actuator timedelay can easily be converted to a strictly positive real system, and thus it can use the above adaptive controllersatisfying the stability conditions. Finally, numerical simulations show that the adaptive controller proposedworks very well to perform the active balancing for the fast speed-varying Jeffcott rotor with actuator timedelay.

  17. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, large scale gravity data sets have been collected and employed to enhance gravity problem-solving abilities of tectonics studies in China. Aiming at the large scale data and the requirement of rapid interpretation, previous authors have carried out a lot of work, including the fast gradient module inversion and Euler deconvolution depth inversion ,3-D physical property inversion using stochastic subspaces and equivalent storage, fast inversion using wavelet transforms and a logarithmic barrier method. So it can be say that 3-D gravity inversion has been greatly improved in the last decade. Many authors added many different kinds of priori information and constraints to deal with nonuniqueness using models composed of a large number of contiguous cells of unknown property and obtained good results. However, due to long computation time, instability and other shortcomings, 3-D physical property inversion has not been widely applied to large-scale data yet. In order to achieve 3-D interpretation with high efficiency and precision for geological and ore bodies and obtain their subsurface distribution, there is an urgent need to find a fast and efficient inversion method for large scale gravity data. As an entirely new geophysical inversion method, 3D correlation has a rapid development thanks to the advantage of requiring no a priori information and demanding small amount of computer memory. This method was proposed to image the distribution of equivalent excess masses of anomalous geological bodies with high resolution both longitudinally and transversely. In order to tranform the equivalence excess masses into real density contrasts, we adopt the adaptive correlation imaging for gravity data. After each 3D correlation imaging, we change the equivalence into density contrasts according to the linear relationship, and then carry out forward gravity calculation for each rectangle cells. Next, we compare the forward gravity data with real data, and

  18. Tracking fast changing non-stationary distributions with a topologically adaptive neural network: Application to video tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Drumea, Georges,; Frezza-Buet, Hervé

    2007-01-01

    International audience In this paper, an original method named GNG-T, extended from GNG-U algorithm by Fritzke is presented. The method performs continuously vector quantization over a distribution that changes over time. It deals with both sudden changes and continuous ones, and is thus suited for video tracking framework, where continuous tracking is required as well as fast adaptation to incoming and outgoing people. The central mechanism relies on the management of quantization resolut...

  19. Transient impairment of the adaptive response to fasting in FXR-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cariou, B; van Harmelen, K; Duran-Sandoval, D; van Dijk, T; Grefhorst, A; Bouchaert, E; Fruchart, JC; Gonzalez, FJ; Kuipers, F; Staels, B

    2005-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been suggested to play a role in gluconeogenesis. To determine whether FXR modulates the response to fasting in vivo, FXR-deficient (FXR-/-) and wild-type mice were submitted to fasting for 48 h. Our results demonstrate that FXR modulates the kinetics of alteration

  20. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  1. Does gene flow constrain adaptive divergence or vice versa? A test using ecomorphology and sexual isolation in Timema cristinae walking-sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosil, P; Crespi, B J

    2004-01-01

    Population differentiation often reflects a balance between divergent natural selection and the opportunity for homogenizing gene flow to erode the effects of selection. However, during ecological speciation, trait divergence results in reproductive isolation and becomes a cause, rather than a consequence, of reductions in gene flow. To assess both the causes and the reproductive consequences of morphological differentiation, we examined morphological divergence and sexual isolation among 17 populations of Timema cristinae walking-sticks. Individuals from populations adapted to using Adenostoma as a host plant tended to exhibit smaller overall body size, wide heads, and short legs relative to individuals using Ceonothus as a host. However, there was also significant variation in morphology among populations within host-plant species. Mean trait values for each single population could be reliably predicted based upon host-plant used and the potential for homogenizing gene flow, inferred from the size of the neighboring population using the alternate host and mitochondrial DNA estimates of gene flow. Morphology did not influence the probability of copulation in between-population mating trials. Thus, morphological divergence is facilitated by reductions in gene flow, but does not cause reductions in gene flow via the evolution of sexual isolation. Combined with rearing data indicating that size and shape have a partial genetic basis, evidence for parallel origins of the host-associated forms, and inferences from functional morphology, these results indicate that morphological divergence in T. cristinae reflects a balance between the effects of host-specific natural selection and gene flow. Our findings illustrate how data on mating preferences can help determine the causal associations between trait divergence and levels of gene flow. PMID:15058723

  2. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    FMM-YUKAWA is a mathematical software package primarily for rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensional space. Since its release, we have revised and re-organized the data structure, software architecture, and user interface, for the purpose of enabling more flexible, broader and easier use of the package. The package and its documentation are available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/, along with a few other closely related mathematical software packages. New version program summaryProgram title: FMM-Yukawa Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 854 265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 90, and C. Requires gcc and gfortran version 4.4.3 or later Computer: All Operating system: Any Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2331 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: The new version of fast multipole method (FMM) that diagonalizes the multipole-to-local translation operator is applied with the tree structure adaptive to sample particle locations. Reasons for new version: To handle much larger particle ensembles, to enable the iterative use of the subroutines in a solver, and to remove potential contention in assignments for parallelization. Summary of revisions: The software package FMM-Yukawa has been

  3. A new adaptive fast motion estimation algorithm based on local motion similarity degree (LMSD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Long; HAN Chongzhao; BAI Yan

    2005-01-01

    In the motion vector field adaptive search technique (MVFAST) and the predictive motion vector field adaptive search technique (PMVFAST), the size of the largest motion vector from the three adjacent blocks (left, top, top-right) is compared with the threshold to select different search scheme. But a suitable search center and search pattern will not be selected in the adaptive search technique when the adjacent motion vectors are not coherent in local region. This paper presents an efficient adaptive search algorithm. The motion vector variation degree (MVVD) is considered a reasonable factor for adaptive search selection. By the relationship between local motion similarity degree (LMSD) and the variation degree of motion vector (MVVD), the motion vectors are classified as three categories according to corresponding LMSD; then different proposed search schemes are adopted for motion estimation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has a significant computational speedup compared with MVFAST and PMVFAST algorithms, and offers a similar, even better performance.

  4. 15 Gbit/s indoor optical wireless systems employing fast adaptation and imaging reception in a realistic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wireless systems are promising candidates for next-generation indoor communication networks. Optical wireless technology offers freedom from spectrum regulations and, compared to current radio-frequency networks, higher data rates and increased security. This paper presents a fast adaptation method for multibeam angle and delay adaptation systems and a new spot-diffusing geometry, and also considers restrictions needed for complying with eye safety regulations. The fast adaptation algorithm reduces the computational load required to reconfigure the transmitter in the case of transmitter and/or receiver mobility. The beam clustering approach enables the transmitter to assign power to spots within the pixel's field of view (FOV) and increases the number of such spots. Thus, if the power per spot is restricted to comply with eye safety standards, the new approach, in which more spots are visible within the FOV of the pixel, leads to enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simulation results demonstrate that the techniques proposed in this paper lead to SNR improvements that enable reliable operation at data rates as high as 15 Gbit/s. These results are based on simulation and not on actual measurements or experiments.

  5. Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver for Fast Frequency Hopping Systems during Partial-Band Noise Jamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖立民; 许希斌; 姚彦

    2001-01-01

    Diversity combining technologies are analyzed for fastfrequency-hopping spread spectrum systems during partial-band noise jamming to develop a novel combining receiver called an Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver (ATCCR). The optimal clipping level for an ATCCR is analyzed, computed, and compared with several other diversity combining technologies. Since the ATCCR can estimate the power of the jamming and the number of jammed frequency cells to adaptively adjust the clipper's threshold, the system performance using the adaptive threshold clipper combining technique can be greatly improved.

  6. Fast and Flexible Tracking and Mitigating a Jamming Signal with an Adaptive Notch Filter

    OpenAIRE

    BORIO DANIELE; O'DRISCOLL CILLIAN; Fortuny Guasch, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    GNSS jammers are small portable devices able to broadcast disruptive interference and overpower the much weaker GNSS signals. The authors consider the use of an adaptive notch filter as an effective solution for mitigating jamming effects.

  7. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) : A new class of adaptable distance transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; van den Broek, Egon L.

    2014-01-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT startingdirectly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced,

  8. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED): A new class of adaptable distance transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2014-01-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT starting directly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced

  9. Fast Muting Adaptation for LTE-A HetNets with Remote Radio Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Kolding, Troels Emil;

    2013-01-01

    Management in macro-RRH cases is developed. Based on minimal information collection, we propose an algorithm that adjusts the ABS ratio on a fast basis, aiming at balancing the instantaneous load betweeen the macro and the RRH layer. Performance results with bursty traffic and low and high load conditions...

  10. Role of PGC-1{alpha} in exercise and fasting induced adaptations in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Tobias Nørresø; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Leick, Lotte;

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a plays a role in regulation of several metabolic pathways. By use of whole body PGC-1a knockout (KO) mice we investigated the role of PGC-1a in fasting, acute exercise and exercise training...

  11. Metabolic and endocrine adaptations to fasting in lean and obese individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examined several effects of fasting in lean and obese individuals. As expected, both the hormonal response as well as the metabolic shift from glucose towards lipid oxidation was impaired in obese individuals. At baseline, mitochondrial protein content in skeletal muscle of obese s

  12. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation for ultra-fast IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Niklas; Bangert, Mark; Kamerling, Cornelis P; Ziegenhein, Peter; Bol, Gijsbert H; Raaymakers, Bas W; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-07-08

    Conventional treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a trial-and-error process that usually involves tedious tweaking of optimization parameters. Here, we present an algorithm that automates part of this process, in particular the adaptation of voxel-based penalties within normal tissue. Thereby, the proposed algorithm explicitly considers a priori known physical limitations of photon irradiation. The efficacy of the developed algorithm is assessed during treatment planning studies comprising 16 prostate and 5 head and neck cases. We study the eradication of hot spots in the normal tissue, effects on target coverage and target conformity, as well as selected dose volume points for organs at risk. The potential of the proposed method to generate class solutions for the two indications is investigated. Run-times of the algorithms are reported. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation is an adequate means to automatically detect and eradicate hot-spots during IMRT planning while maintaining target coverage and conformity. Negative effects on organs at risk are comparably small and restricted to lower doses. Using physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation, it was possible to improve the generation of class solutions for both indications. Considering the reported run-times of less than 20 s, physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation has the potential to reduce the clinical workload during planning and automated treatment plan generation in the long run, facilitating adaptive radiation treatments.

  13. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  14. Different transcriptional responses from slow and fast growth rate strains of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska eCordero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8 ºC of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8 °C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  15. Detection of trichothecene producing Fusarium spp. by PCR: adaptation, validation and application to fast food

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Agodi; Martina Barchitta; Margherita Ferrante; Salvatore Sciacca; Ludwig Niessen

    2005-01-01

    Background. Food contamination by trichothecene mycotoxins is considered to be an emerging public health problem. The aim of this study was to validate a rapid sonification protocol, previously set up for cereal Fusarium DNA extraction from fast food samples, produced by a centre for research and development in the food industry in Catania, Sicily, and to validate it for a diagnostic PCR assay targeted at tri5, the key gene of trichothecene biosynthesis.&...

  16. Generation of fast neturon spectra using an adaptive Gauss-Kronrod Quadrature algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Brian Scott

    A lattice physics calculation is often the first step in analyzing a nuclear reactor. This calculation condenses regions of the reactor into average parameters (i.e., group constants) that can be used in coarser full-core, time-dependent calculations. This work presents a high-fidelity deterministic method for calculating the neutron energy spectrum in an infinite medium. The spectrum resulting from this calculation can be used to generate accurate group constants. This method includes a numerical algorithm based on Gauss-Kronrod Quadrature to determine the neutron transfer source to a given energy while controlling numerical error. This algorithm was implemented in a pointwise transport solver program called Pointwise Fast Spectrum Generator (PWFSG). PWFSG was benchmarked against the Monte Carlo program MCNP and another pointwise spectrum generation program, CENTRM, for a set of fast reactor infinite medium example cases. PWFSG showed good agreement with MCNP, yielding coefficients of determination above 98% for all example cases. In addition, PWFSG had 6 to 8 times lower flux estimation error than CENTRM in the cases examined. With run-times comparable to CENTRM, PWFSG represents a robust set of methods for generation of fast neutron spectra with increased accuracy without increased computational cost.

  17. Fast heating and cooling in nanoimprint using a spring-loaded adapter in a preheated press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schift, Helmut; Bellini, Sandro; Gobrecht, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    By using a spring-loaded adapter, instant heating and cooling of wafer-type substrates was implemented in standard hot embossing equipment. This was possible by using the well-known concept of a clamped stack of stamp and substrate, pre-assembled in an alignment fixture. A number of thermoplastic...

  18. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  19. Research on fast real-time adaptive audio mixing in multimedia conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xing; GU Wei-kang; YE Xiu-qing

    2005-01-01

    In multimedia conference, the capability of audio processing is basic and requires more for real-time criteria. In this article, we categorize and analyze the schemes, and provide several multipoint speech audio mixing schemes using weighted algorithm, which meet the demand of practical needs for real-time multipoint speech mixing, for which the ASW and AEW schemes are especially recommended. Applying the adaptive algorithms, the high-performance schemes we provide do not use the saturation operation widely used in multimedia processing. Therefore, no additional noise will be added to the output. The above adaptive algorithms have relatively low computational complexity and good hearing perceptibility. The schemes are designed for parallel processing, and can be easily implemented with hardware, such as DSPs, and widely applied in multimedia conference systems.

  20. Adaptive prediction in digitally controlled buck converter with fast load transient response

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, TLA; Chan, PCH

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive prediction scheme based on linear extrapolation for digitally controlled voltage-mode buck-type switching converter is presented. A major drawback of conventional digitally controlled switching converters is bandwidth limitation due to the additional phase lag in the digital feedback control loop. By predicting the future error voltage, the ADC sampling time delay is compensated in order to achieve a higher bandwidth even with a modest sampling rate. Both simulation and measuremen...

  1. Wavelet multiresolution analyses adapted for the fast solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawerth, Bjoern; Sweldens, Wim

    1993-01-01

    We present ideas on how to use wavelets in the solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations. Rather than using classical wavelets, we adapt their construction so that they become (bi)orthogonal with respect to the inner product defined by the operator. The stiffness matrix in a Galerkin method then becomes diagonal and can thus be trivially inverted. We show how one can construct an O(N) algorithm for various constant and variable coefficient operators.

  2. Amplifying effect of a release mechanism for fast adaptation in the hair bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Bora; Iwasa, Kuni H

    2009-07-01

    A "release" mechanism, which has been experimentally observed as the fast component in the hair bundle's response to mechanical stimulation, appears similar to common mechanical relaxation with a damping effect. This observation is puzzling because such a response is expected to have an amplifying role in the mechanoelectrical transduction process in hair cells. Here it is shown that a release mechanism can indeed have a role in amplification, if it is associated with negative stiffness due to the gating of the mechonoelectric transducer channel. PMID:19603855

  3. Fast Fourier and Wavelet Transforms for Wavefront Reconstruction in Adaptive Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowla, F U; Brase, J M; Olivier, S S

    2000-07-28

    Wavefront reconstruction techniques using the least-squares estimators are computationally quite expensive. We compare wavelet and Fourier transforms techniques in addressing the computation issues of wavefront reconstruction in adaptive optics. It is shown that because the Fourier approach is not simply a numerical approximation technique unlike the wavelet method, the Fourier approach might have advantages in terms of numerical accuracy. However, strictly from a numerical computations viewpoint, the wavelet approximation method might have advantage in terms of speed. To optimize the wavelet method, a statistical study might be necessary to use the best basis functions or ''approximation tree.''

  4. A Modified Fast Approximated Power Iteration Subspace Tracking Method for Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a subspace-tracking-based space-time adaptive processing technique for airborne radar applications. By applying a modified approximated power iteration subspace tracing algorithm, the principal subspace in which the clutter-plus-interference reside is estimated. Therefore, the moving targets are detected by projecting the data on the minor subspace which is orthogonal to the principal subspace. The proposed approach overcomes the shortcomings of the existing methods and has satisfactory performance. Simulation results confirm that the performance improvement is achieved at very small secondary sample support, a feature that is particularly attractive for applications in heterogeneous environments.

  5. Life in the Fast Lane: The Evolution of an Adaptive Vehicle Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Jochem, Todd; Pomerleau, Dean

    1996-01-01

    Giving robots the ability to operate in the real world has been, and continues to be, one of the most difficult tasks in AI research. Since 1987, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have been investigating one such task. Their research has been focused on using adaptive, vision-based systems to increase the driving performance of the Navlab line of on-road mobile robots. This research has led to the development of a neural network system that can learn to drive on many road types simply...

  6. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  7. Fast Total-Variation Image Deconvolution with Adaptive Parameter Estimation via Split Bregman Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The total-variation (TV regularization has been widely used in image restoration domain, due to its attractive edge preservation ability. However, the estimation of the regularization parameter, which balances the TV regularization term and the data-fidelity term, is a difficult problem. In this paper, based on the classical split Bregman method, a new fast algorithm is derived to simultaneously estimate the regularization parameter and to restore the blurred image. In each iteration, the regularization parameter is refreshed conveniently in a closed form according to Morozov’s discrepancy principle. Numerical experiments in image deconvolution show that the proposed algorithm outperforms some state-of-the-art methods both in accuracy and in speed.

  8. Adaptation and Performance of the Cartesian Coordinates Fast Multipole Method for Nanomagnetic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Wen

    2008-01-01

    An implementation of the fast multiple method (FMM) is performed for magnetic systems with long-ranged dipolar interactions. Expansion in spherical harmonics of the original FMM is replaced by expansion of polynomials in cartesian coordinates, which is considerably simpler. Under open boundary conditions, an expression for multipole moments of point dipoles in a cell is derived. These make the program appropriate for nanomagnetic simulations, including magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids. The performance is optimized in terms of cell size and parameter set (expansion order and opening angle) and trade off between computing time and accuracy is quantitatively studied. A rule of thumb is proposed to decide the average number of dipoles in the smallest cells, and an optimal choice of parameter set is suggested.

  9. Target Localization by Resolving the Time Synchronization Problem in Bistatic Radar Systems Using Space Fast-Time Adaptive Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Madurasinghe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposed technique allows the radar receiver to accurately estimate the range of a large number of targets using a transmitter of opportunity as long as the location of the transmitter is known. The technique does not depend on the use of communication satellites or GPS systems, instead it relies on the availability of the direct transmit copy of the signal from the transmitter and the reflected paths off the various targets. An array-based space-fast time adaptive processor is implemented in order to estimate the path difference between the direct signal and the delayed signal, which bounces off the target. This procedure allows us to estimate the target distance as well as bearing.

  10. A fast and efficient adaptive threshold rate control scheme for remote sensing images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Xu, Xiaoqing

    2012-01-01

    The JPEG2000 image compression standard is ideal for processing remote sensing images. However, its algorithm is complex and it requires large amounts of memory, making it difficult to adapt to the limited transmission and storage resources necessary for remote sensing images. In the present study, an improved rate control algorithm for remote sensing images is proposed. The required coded blocks are sorted downward according to their numbers of bit planes prior to entropy coding. An adaptive threshold computed from the combination of the minimum number of bit planes, along with the minimum rate-distortion slope and the compression ratio, is used to truncate passes of each code block during Tier-1 encoding. This routine avoids the encoding of all code passes and improves the coding efficiency. The simulation results show that the computational cost and working buffer memory size of the proposed algorithm reach only 18.13 and 7.81%, respectively, of the same parameters in the postcompression rate distortion algorithm, while the peak signal-to-noise ratio across the images remains almost the same. The proposed algorithm not only greatly reduces the code complexity and buffer requirements but also maintains the image quality.

  11. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  12. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Boutant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF. Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  13. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different. PMID:26923584

  14. An adaptive immune optimization algorithm with dynamic lattice searching operation for fast optimization of atomic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Genhua

    2014-08-01

    Geometrical optimization of atomic clusters is performed by a development of adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA) with dynamic lattice searching (DLS) operation (AIOA-DLS method). By a cycle of construction and searching of the dynamic lattice (DL), DLS algorithm rapidly makes the clusters more regular and greatly reduces the potential energy. DLS can thus be used as an operation acting on the new individuals after mutation operation in AIOA to improve the performance of the AIOA. The AIOA-DLS method combines the merit of evolutionary algorithm and idea of dynamic lattice. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the optimization of Lennard-Jones clusters within 250 atoms and silver clusters described by many-body Gupta potential within 150 atoms. Results reported in the literature are reproduced, and the motif of Ag61 cluster is found to be stacking-fault face-centered cubic, whose energy is lower than that of previously obtained icosahedron.

  15. Fast and intuitive programming of adaptive laser cutting of lace enabled by machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaamonde, Iago; Souto-López, Álvaro; García-Díaz, Antón

    2015-07-01

    A machine vision system has been developed, validated, and integrated in a commercial laser robot cell. It permits an offline graphical programming of laser cutting of lace. The user interface allows loading CAD designs and aligning them with images of lace pieces. Different thread widths are discriminated to generate proper cutting program templates. During online operation, the system aligns CAD models of pieces and lace images, pre-checks quality of lace cuts and adapts laser parameters to thread widths. For pieces detected with the required quality, the program template is adjusted by transforming the coordinates of every trajectory point. A low-cost lace feeding system was also developed for demonstration of full process automation.

  16. 快行时脑卒中患者与健康人下肢肌肉活动差异%The Lower Extremity Muscles' Activity Differences Between Stroke Patients and Healthy Controls under the State of Fast Walking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马静; 陈谦

    2012-01-01

    Compare the differences between patients and healthy persons under the state of fast walking, including the lower extremity muscles' activity duration, AEMG, MPF, complexity. Methods:10 male hemiparetic stroke patients and 10 healthy controls make a linearity walking for 8 steps with the walking velocity, step length of 40cm rhythm of 60 bit per minute. Collecte the surface electromyography of tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris on the paretic side and the gait cycle with footswitch. Results: (1)Patients' durations of the tibialis an- terior during the swing phase, as well as the gastrocnemius medialis during the swing phase and the first double sup- port phase are significantly longer than healthy controls. (2)The AEMG of patients' tibialis anterior and biceps femo- ris are larger than that of controls' but the slope of the rectus femoris' MPF is smaller than that of controls'.%目的:探讨快速步行时,脑卒中患者与健康被试下肢肌肉在活动持续时间百分比、AEMG、MPF、复杂度等指标上的差异。方法:男性脑卒中患者10名及健康对照组被试10名,按照步长40cm步频60次/min的不同步速在平地上直线行走8步,采集患者偏瘫侧及健康被试对照侧胫骨前肌、内侧腓肠肌、股直肌、股二头肌的肌电信号,并利用足底步态开关记录行走过程中的步态周期。结果:①患者胫骨前肌在摆动期、内侧腓肠肌在摆动期及第一次双侧支撑期的活动持续时间均显著长于健康被试;②患者胫骨前肌及股二头肌的平均肌电值增加,股直肌的平均功率频率下降率变小。

  17. Adaptive GDDA-BLAST: fast and efficient algorithm for protein sequence embedding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoojin Hong

    Full Text Available A major computational challenge in the genomic era is annotating structure/function to the vast quantities of sequence information that is now available. This problem is illustrated by the fact that most proteins lack comprehensive annotations, even when experimental evidence exists. We previously theorized that embedded-alignment profiles (simply "alignment profiles" hereafter provide a quantitative method that is capable of relating the structural and functional properties of proteins, as well as their evolutionary relationships. A key feature of alignment profiles lies in the interoperability of data format (e.g., alignment information, physio-chemical information, genomic information, etc.. Indeed, we have demonstrated that the Position Specific Scoring Matrices (PSSMs are an informative M-dimension that is scored by quantitatively measuring the embedded or unmodified sequence alignments. Moreover, the information obtained from these alignments is informative, and remains so even in the "twilight zone" of sequence similarity (<25% identity. Although our previous embedding strategy was powerful, it suffered from contaminating alignments (embedded AND unmodified and high computational costs. Herein, we describe the logic and algorithmic process for a heuristic embedding strategy named "Adaptive GDDA-BLAST." Adaptive GDDA-BLAST is, on average, up to 19 times faster than, but has similar sensitivity to our previous method. Further, data are provided to demonstrate the benefits of embedded-alignment measurements in terms of detecting structural homology in highly divergent protein sequences and isolating secondary structural elements of transmembrane and ankyrin-repeat domains. Together, these advances allow further exploration of the embedded alignment data space within sufficiently large data sets to eventually induce relevant statistical inferences. We show that sequence embedding could serve as one of the vehicles for measurement of low

  18. An adaptively fast ensemble empirical mode decomposition method and its applications to rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jianzhong; Xu, Yanhe; Zhu, Wenlong; Li, Chaoshun

    2015-10-01

    Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) represents a significant improvement over the original empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method for eliminating the mode mixing problem. However, the added white noises generate some tough problems including the high computational cost, the determination of the two critical parameters (the amplitude of the added white noise and the number of ensemble trials), and the contamination of the residue noise in the signal reconstruction. To solve these problems, an adaptively fast EEMD (AFEEMD) method combined with complementary EEMD (CEEMD) is proposed in this paper. In the proposed method, the two critical parameters are respectively fixed as 0.01 times standard deviation of the original signal and two ensemble trials. Instead, the upper frequency limit of the added white noise is the key parameter which needs to be prescribed beforehand. Unlike the original EEMD method, only two high-frequency white noises are added to the signal to be investigated with anti-phase in AFEEMD. Furthermore, an index termed relative root-mean-square error is employed for the adaptive selection of the proper upper frequency limit of the added white noises. Simulation test and vibration signals based fault diagnosis of rolling element bearing under different fault types are utilized to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis results indicate that the AFEEMD method represents a sound improvement over the original EEMD method, and has strong practicability.

  19. Real-time fast inverse dose optimization for image guided adaptive radiation therapy-Enhancements to fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. P.; Turnbull, D.; Johnson, C.; Chen, J. Z.; Battista, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    A fast, accurate and stable optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for implementing dose-adaptive radiotherapy in the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms with positive beam weight constraints generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima regions of the objective function landscape. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but it will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We review here a direct solution of the inverse problem that is efficient and does not yield unphysical negative beam weights. In fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO) method the objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reducible to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is then found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad hoc conditions. In its original version [S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, in Proceedings of the XIVth International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, 2004, pp. 112-115; S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, Med. Phys. 32, 3007 (2005)], FIDO was tested on single two-dimensional computed tomography (CT) slices with sharp KERMA beams without scatter, in order to establish a proof of concept which demonstrated that FIDO could be a viable method for the optimization of cancer treatment plans. In this paper we introduce the latest advancements in FIDO that now include not only its application to three-dimensional volumes irradiated by beams with full scatter but include as well a complete implementation of clinical dose-volume constraints including maximum and minimum dose as well as equivalent uniform dose

  20. SPSmart: adapting population based SNP genotype databases for fast and comprehensive web access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last five years large online resources of human variability have appeared, notably HapMap, Perlegen and the CEPH foundation. These databases of genotypes with population information act as catalogues of human diversity, and are widely used as reference sources for population genetics studies. Although many useful conclusions may be extracted by querying databases individually, the lack of flexibility for combining data from within and between each database does not allow the calculation of key population variability statistics. Results We have developed a novel tool for accessing and combining large-scale genomic databases of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in widespread use in human population genetics: SPSmart (SNPs for Population Studies. A fast pipeline creates and maintains a data mart from the most commonly accessed databases of genotypes containing population information: data is mined, summarized into the standard statistical reference indices, and stored into a relational database that currently handles as many as 4 × 109 genotypes and that can be easily extended to new database initiatives. We have also built a web interface to the data mart that allows the browsing of underlying data indexed by population and the combining of populations, allowing intuitive and straightforward comparison of population groups. All the information served is optimized for web display, and most of the computations are already pre-processed in the data mart to speed up the data browsing and any computational treatment requested. Conclusion In practice, SPSmart allows populations to be combined into user-defined groups, while multiple databases can be accessed and compared in a few simple steps from a single query. It performs the queries rapidly and gives straightforward graphical summaries of SNP population variability through visual inspection of allele frequencies outlined in standard pie-chart format. In addition, full

  1. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism......Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical...... when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether...

  2. Real-time MRI-guided hyperthermia treatment using a fast adaptive algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhursky, Vadim L; Arabe, Omar; Cheng, Kung-Shan; Macfall, James; Maccarini, Paolo; Craciunescu, Oana; Dewhirst, Mark; Stauffer, Paul; Das, Shiva K

    2009-04-01

    ratio of integral temperature in the tumor to integral temperature in normal tissue) by up to six-fold, compared to the first iteration. The integrated MR-HT treatment algorithm successfully steered the focus of heating into the desired target volume for both the simple homogeneous and the more challenging muscle equivalent phantom with tumor insert models of human extremity sarcomas after 16 and 2 iterations, correspondingly. The adaptive method for MR thermal image guided focal steering shows promise when tested in phantom experiments on a four-antenna phased array applicator.

  3. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  4. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  5. Randomized random walk on a random walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses generalizations of the model introduced by Kehr and Kunter of the random walk of a particle on a one-dimensional chain which in turn has been constructed by a random walk procedure. The superimposed random walk is randomised in time according to the occurrences of a stochastic point process. The probability of finding the particle in a particular position at a certain instant is obtained explicitly in the transform domain. It is found that the asymptotic behaviour for large time of the mean-square displacement of the particle depends critically on the assumed structure of the basic random walk, giving a diffusion-like term for an asymmetric walk or a square root law if the walk is symmetric. Many results are obtained in closed form for the Poisson process case, and these agree with those given previously by Kehr and Kunter. (author)

  6. Adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  7. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Myronenko, A; Jordan, P [Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, United States. (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  8. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, 'High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings' (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  9. Walk This Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Nick

    2007-01-01

    A generation ago, it was part of growing up for all kids when they biked or walked to school. But in the last 30 years, heavier traffic, wider roads and more dangerous intersections have made it riskier for students walking or pedaling. Today, fewer than 15 percent of kids bike or walk to school compared with more than 50 percent in 1969. In the…

  10. Intra-limb coordination while walking is affected by cognitive load and walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanavati, Tabassom; Salavati, Mahyar; Karimi, Noureddin; Negahban, Hossein; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Mehravar, Mohammad; Hessam, Masumeh

    2014-07-18

    Knowledge about intra-limb coordination (ILC) during challenging walking conditions provides insight into the adaptability of central nervous system (CNS) for controlling human gait. We assessed the effects of cognitive load and speed on the pattern and variability of the ILC in young people during walking. Thirty healthy young people (19 female and 11 male) participated in this study. They were asked to perform 9 walking trials on a treadmill, including walking at three paces (preferred, slower and faster) either without a cognitive task (single-task walking) or while subtracting 1׳s or 3׳s from a random three-digit number (simple and complex dual-task walking, respectively). Deviation phase (DP) and mean absolute relative phase (MARP) values-indicators of variability and phase dynamic of ILC, respectively-were calculated using the data collected by a motion capture system. We used a two-way repeated measure analysis of variance for statistical analysis. The results showed that cognitive load had a significant main effect on DP of right shank-foot and thigh-shank, left shank-foot and pelvis-thigh (peffect of walking speed was significant on DP of all segments in each side and MARP of both thigh-shank and pelvis-thigh segments (pcognitive load and walking speed was only significant for MARP values of left shank-foot and right pelvis-thigh (pcognitive load and speed could significantly affect the ILC and variability and phase dynamic during walking. PMID:24861632

  11. Effects of wintertime fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK and ACC in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and liver of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2016-02-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid with autumnal fattening and passive wintering strategy. We examined the effects of wintertime fasting and seasonality on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of metabolism, and its target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) on the species. Twelve farmed raccoon dogs (eleven females/one male) were divided into two groups: half were fasted for ten weeks in December-March (winter fasted) and the others were fed ad libitum (winter fed). A third group (autumn fed, eight females) was fed ad libitum and sampled in December. Total AMPK, ACC and their phosphorylated forms (pAMPK, pACC) were measured from hypothalamus, liver, intra-abdominal (iWAT) and subcutaneous white adipose tissues (sWAT). The fasted animals lost 32% and the fed 20% of their body mass. Hypothalamic AMPK expression was lower and pACC levels higher in the winter groups compared to the autumn fed group. Liver pAMPK was lower in the winter fasted group, with consistently decreased ACC and pACC. AMPK and pAMPK were down-regulated in sWAT and iWAT of both winter groups, with a parallel decline in pACC in sWAT. The responses of AMPK and ACC to fasting were dissimilar to the effects observed previously in non-seasonal mammals and hibernators. Differences between the winter fed and autumn fed groups indicate that the functions of AMPK and ACC could be regulated in a season-dependent manner. Furthermore, the distinctive effects of prolonged fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK-ACC pathway could contribute to the wintering strategy of the raccoon dog. PMID:26603554

  12. Self-adaptive Bionic Legs and the Way of Walking Self-switchable Vehicle%具有自适应性仿生腿及行走方式可切换式汽车

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王棋; 刘群

    2016-01-01

    高性能移动机器人主要用于灾难搜救、星球探测、军事侦察、矿山开采等非结构化环境中,其移动系统可分为轮式、腿式、履带式以及轮腿结合式4类。其中,轮腿式机器人不仅具备腿式机器人的高越障性能和对复杂地形的高适应性能,还兼备轮式机器人在平整地面上滚动的高速高效性能。具有自适应性仿生腿及行走方式可切换式汽车综合了轮式系统和腿式系统的优势,具备多种运动姿态,包括滚动、攀爬楼梯等,具有运行平稳、带负载能力强以及越障性能好的优点。可作为移动机器人平台搭载相关设备完成星球探测、军事侦察、扫雷排险等多种工作。%Autonomous robots have many potential applications like farming, exploration, investigation and waste lean-up, based on their well-designed locomotion system. Wheel-legged rover is a typical hybrid mobility system, inherits both advantages of wheeled and walking systems, i.e. the high-speed and efficient rolling performance for the first one; and the obstacle clearance performance as well as high adaptability to rough terrains for the second. The self-adaptive bionic legs and the way of walking self-switchable vehicle have many potential applications, including geological investigation, space exploration, military reconnaissance, defense, demining, etc.

  13. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    ; Frumkin 2002). The term ‘walkability’ focuses on how the physical structures in the urban environment can promote walking, and how this potentially eases issues of public health and liveability in our cities (Krizek et al. 2009). However, the study of walking should not be reduced merely to the ‘hardware...... factors like lifestyle and life situation should be addressed in order to understand ‘walkability’ fully. The challenge is to approach issues linked to the ‘more-than representational’ (Thrift 2007; Vannini 2012) act of walking and thereby understand pedestrian behaviour in general, but also...... the individual perception of walking. This chapter exemplifies shows how a ‘more-than representational’ dimension can be added to the act of walking and open up for a more value-based discussion of walking, in this chapter exemplified in the Danish context. The chapter provides seven different cases of how...

  14. Walking Without Moving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.

    Recent technological advances may soon bring immersive virtual reality (IVR) out of the laboratory and into the homes of consumers. This means that IVR systems will be deployed in settings where the physical interaction space is very limited in size. If users wish to navigate virtual environments...... on foot, these spatial constraints are problematic since they make real walking infeasible. Walking-in-Place (WIP) techniques constitute a convenient and inexpensive approach to facilitating walking within virtual environments. This thesis focuses on the factors influencing the degree of perceived...... naturalness of WIP locomotion; i.e., the degree to which the user’s experience of walking through a virtual environment using WIP locomotion is mistakable for the experience of real walking. I take the degree of correspondence between the sensorimotor loops of real walking and WIP locomotion as my point...

  15. Synthetic Physiology: Strategies for Adapting Tools from Nature for Genetically-Targeted Control of Fast Biological Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Brian Y.; Chuong, Amy S.; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The life and operation of cells involve many physiological processes that take place over fast timescales of milliseconds to minutes. Genetically-encoded technologies for driving or suppressing specific fast physiological processes in intact cells, perhaps embedded within intact tissues in living organisms, are critical for the ability to understand how these physiological processes contribute to emergent cellular and organismal functions and behaviors. Such “synthetic physiology” tools are o...

  16. Walks on Weighted Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU An-Cai; XU Xin-Jian; WU Zhi-Xi; WANG Ying-Hai

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of random walks on weighted networks. Assuming that the edge weight and the node strength are used as local information by a random walker. Two kinds of walks, weight-dependent walk and strength-dependent walk, are studied. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and average return time are derived and confirmed by computer simulations. The distribution of average return time and the mean-square that a weight-dependent walker can arrive at a new territory more easily than a strength-dependent one.

  17. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  18. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  19. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eFranek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al. 1999 on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of movement

  20. Fast multiple run_before decoding method for efficient implementation of an H.264/advanced video coding context-adaptive variable length coding decoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Dae Wook; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-07-01

    We propose a fast new multiple run_before decoding method in context-adaptive variable length coding (CAVLC). The transform coefficients are coded using CAVLC, in which the run_before symbols are generated for a 4×4 block input. To speed up the CAVLC decoding, the run_before symbols need to be decoded in parallel. We implemented a new CAVLC table for simultaneous decoding of up to three run_befores. The simulation results show a Total Speed-up Factor of 205%˜144% over various resolutions and quantization steps.

  1. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  2. Dynamic walking with Dribbel

    OpenAIRE

    Dertien, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of Dribbel, a passivity-based walking robot. Dribbel has been designed and built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente. This paper focuses on the practical side: the design approach, construction, electronics, and software design. After a short introduction of dynamic walking, the design process, starting with simulation, is discussed.

  3. Whole transcriptome analysis of the fasting and fed Burmese python heart: insights into extreme physiological cardiac adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher E; Cozza, Steven; Riquelme, Cecilia A; McCombie, W Richard; Heimiller, Joseph K; Marr, Thomas G; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The infrequently feeding Burmese python (Python molurus) experiences significant and rapid postprandial cardiac hypertrophy followed by regression as digestion is completed. To begin to explore the molecular mechanisms of this response, we have sequenced and assembled the fasted and postfed Burmese python heart transcriptomes with Illumina technology using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome as a reference. In addition, we have used RNA-seq analysis to identify differences in the expression of biological processes and signaling pathways between fasted, 1 day postfed (DPF), and 3 DPF hearts. Out of a combined transcriptome of ∼2,800 mRNAs, 464 genes were differentially expressed. Genes showing differential expression at 1 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for biological processes involved in metabolism and energetics, while genes showing differential expression at 3 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for processes involved in biogenesis, structural remodeling, and organization. Moreover, we present evidence for the activation of physiological and not pathological signaling pathways in this rapid, novel model of cardiac growth in pythons. Together, our data provide the first comprehensive gene expression profile for a reptile heart.

  4. IAS15: A fast, adaptive, high-order integrator for gravitational dynamics, accurate to machine precision over a billion orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Rein, Hanno

    2014-01-01

    We present IAS15, a 15th-order integrator to simulate gravitational dynamics. The integrator is based on a Gau{\\ss}-Radau quadrature and can handle conservative as well as non-conservative forces. We develop a step-size control that can automatically choose an optimal timestep. The algorithm can handle close encounters and high-eccentricity orbits. The systematic errors are kept well below machine precision and long-term orbit integrations over $10^9$ orbits show that IAS15 is optimal in the sense that it follows Brouwer's law, i.e. the energy error behaves like a random walk. Our tests show that IAS15 is superior to a mixed-variable symplectic integrator (MVS) and other high-order integrators in both speed and accuracy. In fact, IAS15 preserves the symplecticity of Hamiltonian systems better than the commonly-used nominally symplectic integrators to which we compared it. We provide an open-source implementation of IAS15. The package comes with several easy-to-extend examples involving resonant planetary syst...

  5. Random walks on combs

    CERN Document Server

    Durhuus, B; Wheater, J; Durhuus, Bergfinnur; Jonsson, Thordur; Wheater, John

    2006-01-01

    We develop techniques to obtain rigorous bounds on the behaviour of random walks on combs. Using these bounds we calculate exactly the spectral dimension of random combs with infinite teeth at random positions or teeth with random but finite length. We also calculate exactly the spectral dimension of some fixed non-translationally invariant combs. We relate the spectral dimension to the critical exponent of the mass of the two-point function for random walks on random combs, and compute mean displacements as a function of walk duration. We prove that the mean first passage time is generally infinite for combs with anomalous spectral dimension.

  6. Can barley (Hordeum vulgare L. s.l.) adapt to fast climate changes? A controlled selection experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemayehu, Fikadu Reta; Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon;

    2013-01-01

    The projected future climate will affect the global agricultural production negatively, however, to keep abreast of the expected increase in global population, the agricultural production must increase. Therefore, to safeguard the future crop yield and quality, the adaptive potential of crops to ...

  7. When Human Walking is a Random Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.

    1998-03-01

    The complex, hierarchical locomotor system normally does a remarkable job of controlling an inherently unstable, multi-joint system. Nevertheless, the stride interval --- the duration of a gait cycle --- fluctuates from one stride to the next, even under stationary conditions. We used random walk analysis to study the dynamical properties of these fluctuations under normal conditions and how they change with disease and aging. Random walk analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations of healthy, young adult men surprisingly reveals a self-similar pattern: fluctuations at one time scale are statistically similar to those at multiple other time scales (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1995). To study the stability of this fractal property, we analyzed data obtained from healthy subjects who walked for 1 hour at their usual pace, as well as at slower and faster speeds. The stride interval fluctuations exhibited long-range correlations with power-law decay for up to a thousand strides at all three walking rates. In contrast, during metronomically-paced walking, these long-range correlations disappeared; variations in the stride interval were uncorrelated and non-fractal (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1996). To gain insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for this fractal property, we examined the effects of aging and neurological impairment. Using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we computed α, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. α was significantly lower in healthy elderly subjects compared to young adults (p < .003) and in subjects with Huntington's disease, a neuro-degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, compared to disease-free controls (p < 0.005) (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1997). α was also significantly related to degree of functional impairment in subjects with Huntington's disease (r=0.78). Recently, we have observed that just as

  8. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Neural Control for Complex Locomotion in Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin;

    2015-01-01

    over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models, which have hitherto been the state of the art, to model a subset of similar walking behaviors in walking robots....... environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing...

  9. Quantum graph walks I: mapping to quantum walks

    OpenAIRE

    Higuchi, Yusuke; Konno, Norio; Sato, Iwao; Segawa, Etsuo

    2012-01-01

    We clarify that coined quantum walk is determined by only the choice of local quantum coins. To do so, we characterize coined quantum walks on graph by disjoint Euler circles with respect to symmetric arcs. In this paper, we introduce a new class of coined quantum walk by a special choice of quantum coins determined by corresponding quantum graph, called quantum graph walk. We show that a stationary state of quantum graph walk describes the eigenfunction of the quantum graph.

  10. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte;

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  11. Mac-Phy Cross-Layer analysis and design of Mimo-Ofdm Wlans based on fast link adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Martorell Lliteras, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The latestWLAN standard, known as IEEE 802.11n, has notably increased the network capacity with respect to its predecessors thanks to the incorporation of the multipleinput multiple-output (MIMO) technology. Nonetheless, the new amendment, as its previous ones, does not specify how crucial configuration mechanisms, most notably the adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) algorithm should be implemented. The AMC process has proved essential to fully exploit the system resources in ...

  12. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca;

    2015-01-01

    , extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens...... evidence for convergent evolution with native human populations and woolly mammoths, suggesting that only a few evolutionary strategies are compatible with survival in extremely cold environments....

  13. Why not walk faster?

    OpenAIRE

    Usherwood, James Richard

    2005-01-01

    Bipedal walking following inverted pendulum mechanics is constrained by two requirements: sufficient kinetic energy for the vault over midstance and sufficient gravity to provide the centripetal acceleration required for the arc of the body about the stance foot. While the acceleration condition identifies a maximum walking speed at a Froude number of 1, empirical observation indicates favoured walk–run transition speeds at a Froude number around 0.5 for birds, humans and humans under manipul...

  14. Fast Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm Incorporating Convex Combination of Bilateral Filter with Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kadambavanam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fast Generalized Fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm (FGFCM and its variants are effective methods for image clustering. Even though the incorporation of local spatial information to the objective function reduces their sensitivity to noise to some extent, they are still lack behind in suppressing the effect of noise and outliers on the edges and tiny areas of input image. This article proposes an algorithm to mitigate the disadvantage of FGFCM and its variants and enhances the performance of clustering. The experiments on the synthetic and real images are presented, to exhibit the improvements in the image clustering due to the proposed algorithm.

  15. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  16. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing. PMID:27176307

  17. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  18. Exergame and Balance Training modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and enhance Executive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eEggenberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE or balance and stretching training (BALANCE. The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 minutes per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9±6.9 years. Prefrontal cortex (PFC activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < .05 or trend, r = .25 to .36, while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-second walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC (F(1, 31 = 3.54, p = .035, r = .32. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < .05 or trend, r = .31 to .50. The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults.

  19. Exergame and Balance Training Modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and Enhance Executive Function in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Wolf, Martin; Schumann, Martina; de Bruin, Eling D

    2016-01-01

    Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE) or balance and stretching training (BALANCE). The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 min per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9 ± 6.9 years). Prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.25-0.36), while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-s walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC [F (1, 31) = 3.54, p = 0.035, r = 0.32]. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < 0.05 or trend, r = 0.31-0.50). The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults. PMID:27148041

  20. Performance evaluation of coherent free space optical communications with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror adaptive optics system depending on the Greenwood frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yao, Kainan; Huang, Danian; Lin, Xudong; Wang, Liang; Lv, Yaowen

    2016-06-13

    The Greenwood frequency (GF) is influential in performance improvement for the coherent free space optical communications (CFSOC) system with a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) unit. We analyze the impact of tilt and high-order aberrations on the mixing efficiency (ME) and bit-error-rate (BER) under different GF. The root-mean-square value (RMS) of the ME related to the RMS of the tilt aberrations, and the GF is derived to estimate the volatility of the ME. Furthermore, a numerical simulation is applied to verify the theoretical analysis, and an experimental correction system is designed with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror and a 97-element continuous surface deformable mirror. The conclusions of this paper provide a reference for designing the AO system for the CFSOC system. PMID:27410346

  1. Paradoxical regulation of human FGF21 by both fasting and feeding signals: is FGF21 a nutritional adaptation factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Uebanso

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 has recently emerged as a metabolic hormone involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in mouse, but the regulatory mechanisms and actions of FGF21 in humans remain unclear. Here we have investigated the regulatory mechanisms of the human FGF21 gene at the transcriptional level. A deletion study of the human FGF21 promoter (-1672 to +230 bp revealed two fasting signals, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα and glucagon signals, that independently induced human FGF21 gene transcription in mouse primary hepatocytes. In addition, two feeding signals, glucose and xylitol, also dose-dependently induced human FGF21 gene transcription and mRNA expression in both human HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. FGF21 protein expression and secretion were also induced by high glucose stimulation. The human FGF21 promoter (-1672 to +230 bp was found to have a carbohydrate-responsive element at -380 to -366 bp, which is distinct from the PPAR response element (PPRE. Knock-down of the carbohydrate response element binding protein by RNAi diminished glucose-induced human FGF21 transcription. Moreover, we found that a region from -555 to -443 bp of the human FGF21 promoter region exerts an important role in the activation of basic transcription. In conclusion, human FGF21 gene expression is paradoxically and independently regulated by both fasting and feeding signals. These regulatory mechanisms suggest that human FGF21 is increased with nutritional crisis, including starvation and overfeeding.

  2. Adaptive welding of fillet welds using a fast seam-tracking sensor in combination with a standard industrial robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischetsrieder, Alexandra

    1996-08-01

    In laser welding, problems often arise from the accuracy required by the laser process, particularly where joints have narrow tolerance limits, e.g. with a fillet weld at an overlap joint. In a number of applications seam-tracking sensors can improve this situation. They are able to detect and follow the joint geometry autonomously. In addition to the tolerances, a varying gap between the parts to weld can cause welding flaws. To solve the problems caused by the height of the gap a functionality for adaptive welding can be integrated into the tracking sensor, rendering possible a determined influence on process parameters. Functional dependencies between the height of the gap and the welding parameters are presented in this paper. To further enhance the accuracy of path tracking the dynamic behavior of the system is investigated. With the integration of these dependencies into the tracking sensor, an algorithm for adaptive welding has been obtained, which takes another step towards the raise of profitability of laser installations by a simplified weld seam preparation and an enhanced stability of the welding process.

  3. Online Joint Trajectory Generation of Human-like Biped Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Wook Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biped walking has long been studied in the area of gait analysis and robotic locomotion. The goal of this paper is to establish a systematic methodology for human-like natural walking by fusing the measured human joint data and optimal pattern generation techniques based on a full-body humanoid model. To this end, this paper proposes an adaptive two-stage gait pattern by which the step length and walking velocity can be changed with two scaling factors. In addition, to cope with the situations involving passing over a small obstacle, the joint trajectories of the swing foot can be adjusted with a novel concept of differential angle trajectory using a reliable optimization method, viz. particle swarm optimization. The feasibility of the proposed walking scheme is validated by walking experiments with the robot platform DARwIn-OP.

  4. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    CERN Document Server

    Dickson, Bradley M; Ramjan, Zachary H; Xu, H Eric; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4. Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1{\\mu}second-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  5. 基于自适应排列的快速图像加密算法%Fast Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Self-adaptive Permutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘梅

    2009-01-01

    现有自适应图像加密算法可以抵抗已知明文攻击,其单轮加密速度很快,但安全性和整体加密速度较低.基于自适应排列提出一种新的快速图像加密算法,在确保加密操作简单高效的前提下,改变加密前后图像的像素分布.实验结果表明,该算法性能优于其他同类算法.%Existing self-adaptive image encryption algorithm is resistant to known plaintext attacks and with high speed of single round eneryption, but its security and speed of whole round encryption is low. This paper proposes a new fast image encryption algorithm based on self-adaptive permutation. This algorithm insures the simpleness and high efficiency of encryption operation, and changes the pixel distribution of encrypted image compared with that of original image. Experimental results show that this algorithm has better performance than other kindred algorithms.

  6. Fast protocol for extraction of DNA from Prosopis spp leaves (plant adapted to arid environment) without liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-López, C Y; González-Mendoza, D; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2013-09-27

    The extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Prosopis spp for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is complicated, owing to the presence of a high percentage of secondary metabolites that bind to or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. In the present study, we report a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate/phenol protocol that eliminates the use of liquid nitrogen in the maceration process, β-mercaptoethanol in the buffer extraction, and the ethanol precipitation step. The A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ absorbance ratios of the isolated DNA were approximately 2.0 to 1.9, suggesting that the DNA fraction was pure and can be used for further PCR analysis. The DNA isolated by this protocol is of sufficient quality for molecular applications; this technique could be applied to other organisms that have similar substances that hinder DNA extraction. Finally, this proposal represents an alternative fast, cheap, and effective method for the isolation of genomic DNA from fresh leaves of Prosopis spp, even in low-technology laboratories.

  7. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  8. Walks on SPR neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Lee, Jinnie; St John, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    A nearest-neighbor-interchange (NNI)-walk is a sequence of unrooted phylogenetic trees, T1, T2, . . . , T(k) where each consecutive pair of trees differs by a single NNI move. We give tight bounds on the length of the shortest NNI-walks that visit all trees in a subtree-prune-and-regraft (SPR) neighborhood of a given tree. For any unrooted, binary tree, T, on n leaves, the shortest walk takes Θ(n²) additional steps more than the number of trees in the SPR neighborhood. This answers Bryant’s Second Combinatorial Challenge from the Phylogenetics Challenges List, the Isaac Newton Institute, 2011, and the Penny Ante Problem List, 2009. PMID:23702562

  9. Walking With Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McDuff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is beneficial for people with dementia, but little research explores subjective experiences of physical activity in this population. Interpretive description guided the analysis of 26 interviews conducted with 12 people with dementia. Three themes described the subjective meaning of everyday physical activity: Participants were attracted to activity because it improved physical well-being, provided social connections, gave opportunity to be in nature, and provided structure and focus; participants experienced impediments to activity because of physical discomfort, environmental factors, lack of enthusiasm, and memory loss; and participants made adjustments by choosing walking over other activities and by being active with others. Results show that physical activity remains important for people with dementia, although they encounter barriers. They may prefer walking with others as a form of activity. Findings could influence how nurses conceptualize wandering and suggest that walking programs could be well received by people with dementia.

  10. From Walking to Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Juergen; Blum, Yvonne; Seyfarth, Andre

    The implementation of bipedal gaits in legged robots is still a challenge in state-of-the-art engineering. Human gaits could be realized by imitating human leg dynamics where a spring-like leg behavior is found as represented in the bipedal spring-mass model. In this study we explore the gap between walking and running by investigating periodic gait patterns. We found an almost continuous morphing of gait patterns between walking and running. The technical feasibility of this transition is, however, restricted by the duration of swing phase. In practice, this requires an abrupt gait transition between both gaits, while a change of speed is not necessary.

  11. Walking for data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Browning, David; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking.......We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking....

  12. DELPHI - fast and adaptive computational laser point detection and visual footprint quantification for arbitrary underwater image collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timm eSchoening

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine researchers continue to create large quantities of benthic images e.g. using AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. In order to quantify the size of sessile objects in the images, a pixel-to-centimetre ratio is required for each image, often indirectly provided through a geometric laser point (LP pattern, projected onto the seafloor. Manual annotation of these LPs in all images is too time-consuming and thus infeasible for nowadays data volumes. Because of the technical evolution of camera rigs, the LP's geometrical layout and colour features vary for different expeditions and projects. This makes the application of one algorithm, tuned to a strictly defined LP pattern, also ineffective.Here we present the web-tool DELPHI, that efficiently learns the LP layout for one image transect / collection from just a small number of hand labelled LPs and applies this layout model to the rest of the data. The efficiency in adapting to new data allows to compute the LPs and the pixel-to-centimetre ratio fully automatic and with high accuracy. DELPHI is applied to two real-world examples and shows clear improvements regarding reduction of tuning effort for new LP patterns as well as increasing detection performance.

  13. Effect of concurrent walking and interlocutor distance on conversational speech intensity and rate in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, Cassandra M; Adams, Scott G; Dykstra, Allyson D; Jog, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a negative effect of concurrent walking and talking on gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) but there is limited information about the effect of concurrent walking on speech production. The present study examined the effect of sitting, standing, and three concurrent walking tasks (slow, normal, fast) on conversational speech intensity and speech rate in fifteen individuals with hypophonia related to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and fourteen age-equivalent controls. Interlocuter (talker-to-talker) distance effects and walking speed were also examined. Concurrent walking was found to produce a significant increase in speech intensity, relative to standing and sitting, in both the control and PD groups. Faster walking produced significantly greater speech intensity than slower walking. Concurrent walking had no effect on speech rate. Concurrent walking and talking produced significant reductions in walking speed in both the control and PD groups. In general, the results of the present study indicate that concurrent walking tasks and the speed of concurrent walking can have a significant positive effect on conversational speech intensity. These positive, "energizing" effects need to be given consideration in future attempts to develop a comprehensive model of speech intensity regulation and they may have important implications for the development of new evaluation and treatment procedures for individuals with hypophonia related to PD.

  14. Implementation of a model reference adaptive control system using neural network to control a fast breeder reactor evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial intelligence is foreseen as the base for new control systems aimed to replace traditional controllers and to assist and eventually advise plant operators. This paper discusses the development of an indirect model reference adaptive control (MRAC) system, using the artificial neural network (ANN) technique, and its implementation to control the outlet steam temperature of a sodium to water evaporator. The ANN technique is applied in the identification and in the control process of the indirect MRAC system. The emphasis is placed on demonstrating the efficacy of the indirect MRAC system in controlling the outlet steam temperature of the evaporator, and on showing the important function covered by the ANN technique. An important characteristic of this control system is that it relays only on some selected input variables and output variables of the evaporator model. These are the variables that can be actually measured or calculated in a real environment. The results obtained applying the indirect MRAC system to control the evaporator model are quite remarkable. The outlet temperature of the steam is almost perfectly kept close to its desired set point, when the evaporator is forced to depart from steady state conditions, either due to the variation of some input variables or due to the alteration of some of its internal parameters. The results also show the importance of the role played by the ANN technique in the overall control action. The connecting weights of the ANN nodes self adjust to follow the modifications which may occur in the characteristic of the evaporator model during a transient. The efficiency and the accuracy of the control action highly depends on the on-line identification process of the ANN, which is responsible for upgrading the connecting weights of the ANN nodes. (J.P.N.)

  15. Walking along water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Steep slopes, white peaks and deep valleys make up the Andes. As phenomenologists of landscape have told us, different people have different landscapes. By moving across the terrain, walking along, we might get a sense of how this has been carved out by the movement of wind and water, tectonics...

  16. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal

    2007-01-01

    I report on our construction and analysis of the effective low energy Lagrangian for the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are constrained by imposing modified Weinberg sum rules and by imposing a value for the S parameter estimated from the under...

  17. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  18. Snakes and perturbed random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Gopal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study some properties of random walks perturbed at extrema, which are generalizations of the walks considered e.g., in Davis (1999). This process can also be viewed as a version of {\\em excited random walk}, studied recently by many authors. We obtain a few properties related to the range of the process with infinite memory. We also prove the Strong law, Central Limit Theorem, and the criterion for the recurrence of the perturbed walk with finite memory.

  19. Walking and Sensing Mobile Lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk.......In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk....

  20. Random Walks on Random Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Colin; Frieze, Alan

    The aim of this article is to discuss some of the notions and applications of random walks on finite graphs, especially as they apply to random graphs. In this section we give some basic definitions, in Section 2 we review applications of random walks in computer science, and in Section 3 we focus on walks in random graphs.

  1. Gait Evaluation of Overground Walking and Treadmill Walking Using Compass-Type Walking Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yousuke; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Funabiki, Shigeyuki

    A treadmill is a useful apparatus for the gait training and evaluation. However, many differences are reported between treadmill and overground walking. Experimental comparisons of the muscle activity of the leg and the heart rate have been carried out. However, the dynamic comparison has not been performed. The dynamic evaluation of the overground walking and the treadmill walking using a compass-type walking model (CTWM) which is a simple bipedal walking model, then their comparison is discussed. It is confirmed that the walking simulation using the CTWM can simulate the difference of that walk, it is clarified that there are the differences of the kick impulse on the ground and the turning impulse of the foot to the variation of the belt speed and then differences are the main factor of two walking.

  2. Physical activity effected by fast walking in elderly patients with type 2 diabetic disease%快速健步走运动对老年2型糖尿病患者身体活动能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳玲; 张伟; 张金立; 冯娜; 许浩军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of fast walking exercise on the physical activity in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in glucose metabolism and physical activity indicators. Methods 80 patients with T2DM were randomly divided into two groups:exercise group and the control group, 40 cases in each group. Exercise group performed on 16 weeks of fast walking, before the movement of glucose metabolism and physical activity indicators were compared. Results The experimental group iftness program VO2max before and after exercise, 30s arm lfexion and extension, 2min standing still, chair-reach, grab the back stretch, 6min walk, six test scores were signiifcantly increased (P0.05). 2h postprandial blood glucose (2hPG) decreased significantly (P0.05). Lower extremity muscle strength tests comparing exercise group had ankle flexion and extension muscle strength growth to varying. Conclusion Fast walking exercise training program will help to improve glucose metabolism and activity in patients with T2DM.%目的:探讨快速健步走运动对老年2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者糖代谢及身体活动能力各项指标的影响。方法将T2DM患者80例随机分为运动组及对照组,每组40例。对运动组患者进行为期16周的快速健步走运动训练,将运动前后糖代谢及身体活动能力各项指标进行对比。结果运动组运动前后体适能项目VO2max 、2 min原地踏步、6 min行走、30 s臂屈伸运动、抓背伸展运动、坐椅体前伸运动等6项测试指标比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05);运动组患者餐后2 h血糖下降明显(P0.05)。下肢肌力测试比较,运动组患者踝关节屈伸肌力量均有不同程度增长。结论快速健步走运动训练方案有利于改善T2DM患者糖代谢及活动能力。

  3. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  4. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Acevedo, O [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Institut fuer Mathematik und Informatik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn Str.15a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Gobron, T [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2006-01-20

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We completely characterize quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Some examples are given including a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford algebra.

  5. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  6. The effect of walking speed on gait kinematics and kinetics after endoprosthetic knee replacement following bone tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yusuke; Tatematsu, Noriatsu; Nagai, Koutatsu; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamata, Takeharu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Toguchida, Junya; Ichihashi, Noriaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsuboyama, Tadao

    2014-09-01

    Gait function is one of the most important components of functional outcome evaluation in patients with a tumor around the knee. In addition to walking at a preferred speed, the patients might be sometimes required to walk fast in daily life (e.g., schooling and working) because the major types of bone tumors often occur in adolescence and young adults. Therefore, recovering the ability to walk fast would increase the quality of life of these patients. To clarify which parts of the lower limb are exerted while walking fast, we investigated the kinematic and kinetic changes during fast walking in patients who underwent endoprosthetic knee replacement after bone tumor resection. Laboratory-based gait analysis was performed on eight patients who had undergone endoprosthetic knee replacement following resection of a tumor around the knee. Patients walked at a preferred and faster speed, and the gait parameters were compared between the two walking speeds for each leg. To increase walking speed, patients tended to rely on the bilateral hip, ankle, and contralateral knee to generate additional power. Kinetic analysis showed that involved-side vertical body support was not significantly increased during late stance to increase walking speed, which was associated with a small increase in ankle plantarflexion moment and concentric power. These results suggest to patients after knee reconstruction how to effectively increase their walking speed or redistribute the mechanical load on the muscles and joints to prevent excessive stress on the lower limbs.

  7. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Michelitsch, Thomas; Riascos, Alejandro Perez; Nowakowski, Andrzeij; Nicolleau, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We analyze time-discrete and continuous `fractional' random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in $n=1,2,3,..$ dimensions.The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving {\\it fractional powers of Laplacian matrices $L^{\\frac{\\alpha}{2}}$}where $\\alpha=2$ recovers the normal walk.First we demonstrate thatthe interval $0\\textless{}\\alpha\\leq 2$ is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for fractional transition matrix and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain thefundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$, and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk.The representation for the fundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$ relates fractional random walks with normal random walks.We show that the fractional transition matrix elements exihibit for large cubic $n$-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an $n$-dimensional infinite spaceRiesz fractional deriva...

  8. Fast adaptive backup routing for mobile Ad Hoc network%移动Ad Hoc网快速自适应后备路由协议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周鹏

    2012-01-01

    移动Ad Hoc网拓扑结构经常变化.自适应后备路由局部修复AODV协议AODV-ABL通过监听RREP包和数据包来产生后备路由,并存于后备路由表中.仅当链路错误时,AODV-ABL才试图利用后备路由表进行局部修复.为提高对网络拓扑变化的自适应性,在AODV-ABL基础上,提出了一种快速自适应后备AODV路由协议AODV-FABL.AODV-FABL合并主路由表和后备路由表,在监听包时同步更新路由,路由能尽快地得到优化.实验结果表明,AODV-FABL取得了比AODV-LR、AODV-ABL更好的包投递率、端对端时延、控制开销和对流量负载变化的适应性.%The network topology changes frequently in mobile Ad Hoc networks. In AODV-Adaptive Backup with Local repair routing (AODV-ABL) protocol, the backup route can be created by overhearing RREP packets and data packets and can be stored in alternate route table. Only when the link error occurs, AODV-ABL tries to start a local repair process by using alternate route table. In order to improve the adaptability to the network topology changing, a Fast AODV-ABL routing (AODV-FABL) protocol, which based on AODV-ABL, is proposed. AODV-FABL merges the primary route table with the alternate route table, and updates routes when overhearing packets, thus the routes can be optimized as soon as possible. Experimental results show that AODV-FABL has better packet delivery ratio, end-to-end delay, control overhead and adaptability to the variational traffic load than AODV-LR and AODV-ABL.

  9. Adaptive fusion method of visible light and infrared images based on non-subsampled shearlet transform and fast non-negative matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiwei; Lei, Yang; Zhao, Huaixun

    2014-11-01

    The issue of visible light and infrared images fusion has been an active topic in both military and civilian areas, and a great many relevant algorithms and techniques have been developed accordingly. This paper addresses a novel adaptive approach to the above two patterns of images fusion problem, employing multi-scale geometry analysis (MGA) of non-subsampled shearlet transform (NSST) and fast non-negative matrix factorization (FNMF) together. Compared with other existing conventional MGA tools, NSST owns not only better feature-capturing capabilities, but also much lower computational complexities. As a modification version of the classic NMF model, FNMF overcomes the local optimum property inherent in NMF to a large extent. Furthermore, use of the FNMF with a less complex structure and much fewer iteration numbers required leads to the enhancement of the overall computational efficiency, which is undoubtedly meaningful and promising in so many real-time applications especially the military and medical technologies. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to other current popular ones in both aspects of subjective visual and objective performance.

  10. Adaptive control based on fast online algebraic identification and GPI control for magnetic levitation systems with time-varying input gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, R.; Sira-Ramírez, H.; Feliu, V.

    2014-08-01

    This paper considers the position tracking problem of a voltage-controlled magnetic levitation system (MLS) in the presence of modelling errors caused by uncertainties in the system's physical parameters. An adaptive control based on fast online algebraic parameter estimation and generalised proportional integral (GPI) output feedback control is considered as a control scheme candidate. The GPI controller guarantees an asymptotically exponentially stable behaviour of the controlled ball position and the possibilities of carrying out rest-to-rest trajectory tracking tasks. The nature of the control input gain in an MLS is that of a state-dependent time-varying gain, reflecting the nonlinear character of the magnetic force with regard to the distance and the properties of the metallic ball. The system gain has therefore been locally approximated using a periodically updated time polynomial function (of second degree), where the coefficients of the polynomial are estimated during a very short period of time. This estimation is achieved using the recently introduced algebraic online parameter estimation approach. The stability of the closed-loop system is demonstrated under the assumption that no external factors cause changes in the parameter during the time interval in which the stability is analysed. Finally, experimental results are presented for the controlled MLS demonstrating the excellent stabilisation and position tracking performance of the control system designed in the presence of significant nonlinearities and uncertainties of the underlying system.

  11. 一种快速收敛的自适应蚁群算法%Investigation on a Fast Convergent Adaptive Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘伟强; 李长云; 胡盛龙

    2012-01-01

    The ant colony optimization has deficiencies of slow convergence speed and difficult parameters selection.By analyzing the parameters'effect on the algorithm and comparing multiple parameter optimization methods,adopts the hybrid algorithm of particle swarm optimization and ant colony optimization to optimize parameters,and proposes a fast convergent adaptive ant colony optimization.The simulation of the traveling salesman problem shows that the algorithm is feasible and effective.%针对蚁群算法收敛速度慢、参数选择难的不足,通过分析各参数对算法的影响和比较多种参数寻优方法,采用粒子群算法对蚁群算法进行参数寻优,并提出了一种快速收敛的自适应蚁群算法。针对旅行商问题的仿真试验表明,该算法是可行且有效的。

  12. Perception of Self-Motion and Regulation of Walking Speed in Young-Old Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde-Parsi, Marie-Jasmine; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2015-07-01

    Whether a reduced perception of self-motion contributes to poor walking speed adaptations in older adults is unknown. In this study, speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual task) and walking speed adaptations (walking task) were compared between young (19-27 years) and young-old individuals (63-74 years), and the relationship between the performance on the two tasks was examined. Participants were evaluated while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Speed discrimination thresholds were determined using a staircase procedure. Walking speed modulation was assessed on a self-paced treadmill while exposed to different self-motion speeds ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the participants' comfortable speed. For each speed, participants were instructed to match the self-motion speed described by the moving corridor. On the walking task, participants displayed smaller walking speed errors at comfortable walking speeds compared with slower of faster speeds. The young-old adults presented larger speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual experiment) and larger walking speed errors (walking experiment) compared with young adults. Larger walking speed errors were associated with higher discrimination thresholds. The enhanced performance on the walking task at comfortable speed suggests that intersensory calibration processes are influenced by experience, hence optimized for frequently encountered conditions. The altered performance of the young-old adults on the perceptual and walking tasks, as well as the relationship observed between the two tasks, suggest that a poor perception of visual motion information may contribute to the poor walking speed adaptations that arise with aging.

  13. Random walks of a quantum particle on a circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the quantum planar rotor is put on a lattice, its dynamics can be approximated by random walks on a circle. This allows for fast and accurate Monto Carlo simulations to determine the topological charge of different configurations of the system and thereby the Θ-dependency of the lowest energy levels

  14. Covering walks in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  15. The Walking Droplet Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    A droplet of liquid that partially wets a solid substrate assumes a spherical-cap equilibrium shape. We show that the spherical-cap with a mobile contact-line is unstable to a non-axisymmetric disturbance and we characterize the instability mechanism, as it depends upon the wetting properties of the substrate. We then solve the hydrodynamic problem for inviscid motions showing that the flow associated with the instability correlates with horizontal motion of the droplet's center-of-mass. We calculate the resulting ``walking speed.'' A novel feature is that the energy conversion mechanism is not unique, so long as the contact-line is mobilized. Hence, the walking droplet instability is potentially significant to a number of industrial applications, such as self-cleansing surfaces or energy harvesting devices.

  16. Walking Algorithm of Humanoid Robot on Uneven Terrain with Terrain Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Yi; Qiuguo Zhu; Rong Xiong; Jun Wu

    2016-01-01

    Humanoid robots are expected to achieve stable walking on uneven terrains. In this paper, a control algorithm for humanoid robots walking on previously unknown terrains with terrain estimation is proposed, which requires only minimum modification to the original walking gait. The swing foot trajectory is redesigned to ensure that the foot lands at the desired horizontal positions under various terrain height. A compliant terrain adaptation method is applied to the landing foot to achieve a fi...

  17. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M

    2011-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biolog...

  18. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  19. Walking with springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  20. Research advances in control methods of wearable walking assist robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As the proportion of the elderly in China increases, the need for robotic assist walking is growing. The assisted-as-needed (AAN property of a wearable walking assist robot matches a user’s biological need and improves the flexibility, appetency and friendliness of a mechanical system. To realize AAN walking and aiming at realizing master/slave flexible assist, a new hybrid control method consisting of hip joint control based on central pattern generators and knee joint impedance structured control is proposed. The adaptation of a robot's master/slave motion mode to a user's physical function, the continuous switching method for knee joint impedance structured control and its stability, and the AAN effect of the Hybrid control theory are studied, which provides a new thought for the development of wearable walking assist robots.

  1. Neuromechanical Control for Dynamic Bipedal Walking with Reduced Impact Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widenka, Johannes; Xiong, Xiaofeng; Matthias Braun, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    Human walking emerges from an intricate interaction of nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Inspired by this principle, we integrate neural control and muscle-like mechanisms to achieve neuromechanical control of the biped robot RunBot. As a result, the neuromechanical controller enables RunBot t......Bot to perform more human-like walking and reduce impact force during walking, compared to original neural control. Moreover, it also generates adaptive joint motions of RunBot; thereby allowing it to deal with different terrains......Human walking emerges from an intricate interaction of nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Inspired by this principle, we integrate neural control and muscle-like mechanisms to achieve neuromechanical control of the biped robot RunBot. As a result, the neuromechanical controller enables Run...

  2. Swing- and support-related muscle actions differentially trigger human walk-run and run-walk transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilutsky, B I; Gregor, R J

    2001-07-01

    There has been no consistent explanation as to why humans prefer changing their gait from walking to running and from running to walking at increasing and decreasing speeds, respectively. This study examined muscle activation as a possible determinant of these gait transitions. Seven subjects walked and ran on a motor-driven treadmill for 40s at speeds of 55, 70, 85, 100, 115, 130 and 145% of the preferred transition speed. The movements of subjects were videotaped, and surface electromyographic activity was recorded from seven major leg muscles. Resultant moments at the leg joints during the swing phase were calculated. During the swing phase of locomotion at preferred running speeds (115, 130, 145%), swing-related activation of the ankle, knee and hip flexors and peaks of flexion moments were typically lower (Prunning than during walking. At preferred walking speeds (55, 70, 85%), support-related activation of the ankle and knee extensors was typically lower during stance of walking than during stance of running (Prun transition might be triggered by the increased sense of effort due to the exaggerated swing-related activation of the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and hamstrings; this increased activation is necessary to meet the higher joint moment demands to move the swing leg during fast walking. The preferred run-walk transition might be similarly triggered by the sense of effort due to the higher support-related activation of the soleus, gastrocnemius and vastii that must generate higher forces during slow running than during walking at the same speed.

  3. Urban form and psychosocial factors : Do they interact for leisure-time walking?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenackers, Mariëlle A.; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M; Prins, Richard G.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Burdorf, Alex; Van Lenthe, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This cross-sectional study uses an adaptation of a social-ecological model on the hierarchy of walking needs to explore direct associations and interactions of urban-form characteristics and individual psychosocial factors for leisure-time walking. METHODS: Questionnaire data (n = 736)

  4. The quenched invariance principle for random walks in random environments admitting a bounded cycle representation

    OpenAIRE

    Deuschel, Jean-Dominique; Kösters, Holger

    2008-01-01

    We derive a quenched invariance principle for random walks in random environments whose transition probabilities are defined in terms of weighted cycles of bounded length. To this end, we adapt the proof for random walks among random conductances by Sidoravicius and Sznitman (Probab. Theory Related Fields 129 (2004) 219--244) to the non-reversible setting.

  5. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. Thus we consider quantum walks on a general basis and try to classify them as a preliminary step in the construction of new algorithms that could be devised in this way. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space, and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We characterize completely the quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Examples are given among which a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford Algebra.

  6. The quantum walk temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Romanelli, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic theory is developed to describe the behavior of the entanglement between the coin and position degrees of freedom of the quantum walk on the line. This theory shows that, in spite of the unitary evolution, a steady state is established after a Markovian transient stage. This study suggests that if a quantum dynamics is developed in a composite Hilbert space (i.e. the tensor product of several sub-spaces) then the behavior of an operator that only belongs to one of the sub-spaces may camouflage the unitary character of the global evolution.

  7. A slow walk back

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woof, M.

    2002-09-01

    The article reports on the activity in the dragline sector which has been greater in the past 18 months than in previous years. One notable event is the recent order by BNI Coal in the USA of a large walking dragline, the Marion 8200 model from Bucyrus, for removal of overburden at the Center Mine in North Dakota. The Marison draglines have an oval rigid structure which provides an effective load and boom support. The article reports uses of other Bucyrus draglines in Canada and Australia. 2 figs.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD TEST FOR EVALUATING AEROBIC FITNESS IN MIDDLE-AGED ADULTS: VALIDITY OF A 15-M INCREMENTAL SHUTTLE WALK AND RUN TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Mikawa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15mISWRT], incorporating an incremental and progressive structure, to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 68 middle-aged men performed three tests in random order between one to two week intervals: 15-m ISWRT, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX, and 1500-m fast walk. Variables evaluated were 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed, VO2max measured by CPX, 1500-m fast walk performance (walking time, and HR response in 15-m ISWRT and 1500-m fast walk. Validity of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing the associations among the 15-m ISWRT performance, VO2max and the 1500-m fast walk performance. Changes in HR response during the 15-m ISWRT and the 1500-m fast walk were also compared. Correlations between each variable were as follows: the correlation between 15- m ISWRT performance and VO2max was very high, r = 0.86 (p < 0.01, the correlation between the 1500-m fast walk and VO2max was r = ?0.51 (p < 0.01. HR response during the 15-m ISWRT gently increased initially, whereas HR response during the 1500-m fast walk rapidly increased from the start. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the 15-m ISWRT is valid and safe for evaluating VO2max in middle-aged adults.

  9. Solar walk-off protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaya, H.; Bedard, R.

    1985-04-01

    A point-focus solar concentrator is normally pointed toward the sun during operations to direct concentrated solar flux into the aperture of the receiver. If solar-tracking control is lost, severe damage may occur when the concentrated solar beam moves, or walks off the aperture across the face of the receiver. Alternative methods of solar walk-off prevention/protection for a specific assumed generic dish module and electric plant design are identified. The cost of a baseline case (no walk-off prevention/protection) is first calculated, including initial capital; recurring operating, maintenance, and capital replacement costs; and the cost of restoring the plant to operation following a solar walk-off. The alternative cases (with walk-off prevention/protection) are then evaluated by increasing the solar plant cost as a function of specific walk-off prevention/protection design alternatives and decreasing the cost of walk-off events given the specific level of prevention or protection offered by the alternative cases. The alternative plant designs are then compared with the baseline case and against each other by annualizing all costs. No single walk-off protection solution is universally applicable. Decisions concerning solar walk-off prevention/protection for specific installations must be based on engineering evaluations that consider the alternative choices given a specific plant, dish module, and site.

  10. Quantum Walks on the Hypercube

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that one-dimensional quantum walks can mix more quickly than classical random walks, suggesting that quantum Monte Carlo algorithms can outperform their classical counterparts. We study two quantum walks on the n-dimensional hypercube, one in discrete time and one in continuous time. In both cases we show that the quantum walk mixes in (\\pi/4)n steps, faster than the O(n log n) steps required by the classical walk. In the continuous-time case, the probability distribution is {\\em exactly} uniform at this time. More importantly, these walks expose several subtleties in the definition of mixing time for quantum walks. Even though the continuous-time walk has an O(n) instantaneous mixing time at which it is precisely uniform, it never approaches the uniform distribution when the stopping time is chosen randomly as in [AharonovAKV2001]. Our analysis treats interference between terms of different phase more carefully than is necessary for the walk on the cycle; previous general bounds p...

  11. Physical implementation of quantum walks

    CERN Document Server

    Manouchehri, Kia

    2013-01-01

    Given the extensive application of random walks in virtually every science related discipline, we may be at the threshold of yet another problem solving paradigm with the advent of quantum walks. Over the past decade, quantum walks have been explored for their non-intuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to radically new quantum algorithms. This growing interest has been paralleled by a flurry of research into how one can implement quantum walks in laboratories. This book presents numerous proposals as well as actual experiments for such a physical realization, underpinned by a wide range of

  12. Disruption of locomotor adaptation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia Tsok Lam; Bouyer, Laurent J; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Locomotor patterns are adapted on a trial-and-error basis to account for predictable dynamics. Once a walking pattern is adapted, the new calibration is stored and must be actively de-adapted. Here, we tested the hypothesis that storage of newly acquired ankle adaptation in walking is dependent o...... on corticospinal mechanisms. Subjects were exposed to an elastic force that resisted ankle dorsiflexion during treadmill walking. Ankle movement was adapted in...

  13. Saccadic head and thorax movements in freely walking blowflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, G.; Hateren, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    Visual information processing is adapted to the statistics of natural visual stimuli, and these statistics depend to a large extent on the movements of an animal itself. To investigate such movements in freely walking blowflies, we measured the orientation and position of their head and thorax, with

  14. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  15. Random-walk enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  16. Biped walking robot based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhihuai; Yao, Yan'an; Kong, Xianwen

    2014-03-01

    Existing biped robots mainly fall into two categories: robots with left and right feet and robots with upper and lower feet. The load carrying capability of a biped robot is quite limited since the two feet of a walking robot supports the robot alternatively during walking. To improve the load carrying capability, a novel biped walking robot is proposed based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism. The biped walking robot is composed of two identical platforms(feet) and four limbs, including two UPU(universal-prismatic-universal serial chain) limbs and two UU limbs. To enhance its terrain adaptability like articulated vehicles, the two feet of the biped walking robot are designed as two vehicles in detail. The conditions that the geometric parameters of the feet must satisfy are discussed. The degrees-of-freedom of the mechanism is analyzed by using screw theory. Gait analysis, kinematic analysis and stability analysis of the mechanism are carried out to verify the structural design parameters. The simulation results validate the feasibility of walking on rugged terrain. Experiments with a physical prototype show that the novel biped walking robot can walk stably on smooth terrain. Due to its unique feet design and high stiffness, the biped walking robot may adapt to rugged terrain and is suitable for load-carrying.

  17. Quantum walks and search algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Portugal, Renato

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting area of quantum computation called quantum walks, which play an important role in building quantum algorithms, in particular search algorithms. Quantum walks are the quantum analogue of classical random walks. It is known that quantum computers have great power for searching unsorted databases. This power extends to many kinds of searches, particularly to the problem of finding a specific location in a spatial layout, which can be modeled by a graph. The goal is to find a specific node knowing that the particle uses the edges to jump from one node to the next. This book is self-contained with main topics that include: Grover's algorithm, describing its geometrical interpretation and evolution by means of the spectral decomposition of the evolution operater Analytical solutions of quantum walks on important graphs like line, cycles, two-dimensional lattices, and hypercubes using Fourier transforms Quantum walks on generic graphs, describing methods to calculate the limiting d...

  18. Human treadmill walking needs attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the attentional requirements of steady state treadmill walking in human subjects using a dual task paradigm. The extent of decrement of a secondary (cognitive RT task provides a measure of the attentional resources required to maintain performance of the primary (locomotor task. Varying the level of difficulty of the reaction time (RT task is used to verify the priority of allocation of attentional resources. Methods 11 healthy adult subjects were required to walk while simultaneously performing a RT task. Participants were instructed to bite a pressure transducer placed in the mouth as quickly as possible in response to an unpredictable electrical stimulation applied on the back of the neck. Each subject was tested under five different experimental conditions: simple RT task alone and while walking, recognition RT task alone and while walking, walking alone. A foot switch system composed of a pressure sensitive sensor was placed under the heel and forefoot of each foot to determine the gait cycle duration. Results Gait cycle duration was unchanged (p > 0.05 by the addition of the RT task. Regardless of the level of difficulty of the RT task, the RTs were longer during treadmill walking than in sitting conditions (p 0.05 was found between the attentional demand of the walking task and the decrement of performance found in the RT task under varying levels of difficulty. This finding suggests that the healthy subjects prioritized the control of walking at the expense of cognitive performance. Conclusion We conclude that treadmill walking in young adults is not a purely automatic task. The methodology and outcome measures used in this study provide an assessment of the attentional resources required by walking on the treadmill at a steady state.

  19. A fast ionised wind in a star-forming quasar system at z ~ 1.5 resolved through adaptive optics assisted near-infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, M.; Perna, M.; Cresci, G.; Schramm, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Lanzuisi, G.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Zamorani, G.; Berta, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Kakkad, D.; Marconi, A.; Rosario, D.; Contini, T.; Lamareille, F.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Outflow winds are invoked in co-evolutionary models to link the growth of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena, and from the analysis of both galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) samples at z ~ 1-3, it is becoming clear that powerful outflows may be very common in AGN hosts. High-resolution and high S/N observations are needed to uncover the physical properties of the wind through kinematics analysis. Methods: We exploited VLT/VIMOS, VLT/SINFONI, and Subaru/IRCS adaptive optics (AO) data to study the kinematics properties on the scale of the host galaxy of XID5395; this galaxy is a luminous, X-ray obscured starburst/quasar (SB-QSO) merging system at z ~ 1.5, detected in the XMM-COSMOS field, associated with an extreme [O II] emitter (with equivalent width, EW, ~200 Å). For the first time, we mapped the kinematics of the [O III] and Hα line complexes and linked them with the [O II] emission at high resolution. The high spatial resolution achieved allowed us to resolve all the components of the SB-QSO system. Results: Our analysis, with a resolution of few kpc, reveals complexities and asymmetries in and around the nucleus of XID5395. The velocity field measured via non-parametric analysis reveals different kinematic components with maximum blueshifted and redshifted velocities up to ≳ 1300 km s-1 that are not spatially coincident with the nuclear core. These extreme values of the observed velocities and spatial location can be explained by the presence of fast moving material. We also spectroscopically confirm the presence of a merging system at the same redshift as the AGN host. Conclusions: We propose that EW as large as >150 Å in X-ray selected AGN may be an efficient criterion to isolate objects associated with the short, transition phase of "feedback" in the AGN-galaxy co-evolutionary path. This co-evolutionary path subsequently evolves into an unobscured QSO, as suggested from the different observational evidence (e.g. merger, compact

  20. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  1. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  2. walk around Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is noteworthy that this country develops through two types of events: either through a jubilee or through a catastrophe.It seems that Irkutsk Airport will be built only after the next crash. At least the interest to this problem returns regularly after sad events, and this occurs almost half a century (a jubilee, too! – the Council of Ministers decided to relocate the Airport away from the city as long ago as 1962. The Airport does not relate to the topic of this issue, but an attentive reader understands that it is our Carthage, and that the Airport should be relocated. The Romans coped with it faster and more effectively.Back to Irkutsk’s jubilee, we should say that we will do without blare of trumpets. We will just make an unpretentious walk around the city in its summer 350. Each our route covers new (some of them have been completed by the jubilee and old buildings, some of them real monuments. All these buildings are integrated into public spaces of different quality and age.We will also touch on the problems, for old houses, especially the wooden ones often provoke a greedy developer to demolish or to burn them down. Thus a primitive thrift estimates an output of additional square meters. Not to mention how attractive it is to seize public spaces without demolition or without reallocation of the dwellers. Or, rather, the one who is to preserve, to cherish and to improve such houses for the good of the citizens never speaks about this sensitive issue. So we have to do it.Walking is a no-hurry genre, unlike the preparation for the celebration. Walking around the city you like is a pleasant and cognitive process. It will acquaint the architects with the works of their predecessors and colleagues. We hope that such a walk may be interesting for Irkutsk citizens and visitors, too. Isn’t it interesting to learn “at first hand” the intimate details of the restoration of the Trubetskoys’ estate

  3. Kinematic correlates of walking cadence in the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Leardini, Alberto; Crompton, Robin

    2010-08-26

    Evidence has frequently been reported of modifications in gait patterns within the lower limb related to the cadence of walking. Most reports have concerned relationships between cadence and kinematic and the kinetic changes occurring in the main joints and muscles of the lower limb as a whole. The aim of the present study was to assess whether significant changes are also measurable in kinematics of the foot segments. An existing 15 marker-set protocol allowed a four-segment foot and shank model to be defined for relative rotations between the segments to be calculated. Stereophotogrammetry was employed to record marker position data from ten subjects walking at three cadences. The slow- and normal cadence datasets showed similar profiles of joint rotation in three anatomical planes, but significant differences were found between these and the fast cadence. At all joints, frame-by-frame statistical analysis revealed increased dorsiflexion from heel-strike to midstance (p walking.

  4. A bioinspired multi-modal flying and walking robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim to extend the versatility and adaptability of robots in complex environments, a novel multi-modal flying and walking robot is presented. The robot consists of a flying wing with adaptive morphology that can perform both long distance flight and walking in cluttered environments for local exploration. The robot's design is inspired by the common vampire bat Desmodus rotundus, which can perform aerial and terrestrial locomotion with limited trade-offs. Wings’ adaptive morphology allows the robot to modify the shape of its body in order to increase its efficiency during terrestrial locomotion. Furthermore, aerial and terrestrial capabilities are powered by a single locomotor apparatus, therefore it reduces the total complexity and weight of this multi-modal robot. (paper)

  5. Walking around to grasp interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Jantzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    -alongs the research-ers acted as facilitators and partners in the engagement with the sound installa-tions. The study provided good insight into advantages and challenges with the walk-along method, for instance the importance of shared, embodied sensing of space for the understanding of the experience. The common...... knowledge of spa-tial conditions, e.g. noise, crowds, darkness provided a profound and shared un-derstanding of e.g. the visitors’ engagement in and dislike of the installations. Another finding concerns group walking that, compared to walking with a sin-gle person, generated a diversified discussion...

  6. The Dead Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Phillips

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monsters have always enjoyed a significant presence in the human imagination, and religion was instrumental in replacing the physical horror they engendered with that of a moral threat. Zombies, however, are amoral – their motivation purely instinctive and arbitrary, yet they are, perhaps, the most loathed of all contemporary monsters. One explanation for this lies in the theory of the uncanny valley, proposed by robotics engineer Masahiro Mori. According to the theory, we reserve our greatest fears for those things which seem most human, yet are not – such as dead bodies. Such a reaction is most likely a survival mechanism to protect us from danger and disease – a mechanism even more essential when the dead rise up and walk. From their beginnings zombies have reflected western societies’ greatest fears – be they of revolutionary Haitians, women, or communists. In recent years the rise in the popularity of the zombie in films, books and television series reflects our fears for the planet, the economy, and of death itself

  7. Big power from walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illenberger, Patrin K.; Madawala, Udaya K.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEG) offer an opportunity to capture the energy otherwise wasted from human motion. By integrating a DEG into the heel of standard footwear, it is possible to harness this energy to power portable devices. DEGs require substantial auxiliary systems which are commonly large, heavy and inefficient. A unique challenge for these low power generators is the combination of high voltage and low current. A void exists in the semiconductor market for devices that can meet these requirements. Until these become available, existing devices must be used in an innovative way to produce an effective DEG system. Existing systems such as the Bi-Directional Flyback (BDFB) and Self Priming Circuit (SPC) are an excellent example of this. The BDFB allows full charging and discharging of the DEG, improving power gained. The SPC allows fully passive voltage boosting, removing the priming source and simplifying the electronics. This paper outlines the drawbacks and benefits of active and passive electronic solutions for maximizing power from walking.

  8. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  9. Walking Robot Locomotion System Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova D.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is a brief analysis on the application and perspective of using the walking robots in different areas in practice. The most common characteristics of walking four legs robots are presented here. The specific features of the applied actuators in walking mechanisms are also shown in the article. The experience of Institute of Mechanics - BAS is illustrated in creation of Spiroid and Helicon1 gears and their assembly in actuation of studied robots. Loading on joints reductors of robot legs is modelled, when the geometrical and the walking parameters of the studied robot are preliminary defined. The obtained results are purposed for designing the control of the loading of reductor type Helicon in the legs of the robot, when it is experimentally tested.

  10. Localization of reinforced random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyze how reinforced random walks can eventually localize, i.e. only visit finitely many sites. After introducing vertex and edge self-interacting walks on a discrete graph in a general setting, and stating the main results and conjectures so far on the topic, we present martingale techniques that provide an alternative proof of the a.s. localization of vertex-reinforced random walks (VRRWs) on the integers on finitely many sites and, with positive probability, on five consecutive sites, initially proved by Pemantle and Volkov (1999). Next we introduce the continuous time-lines representation (sometimes called Rubin construction) and its martingale counterpart, and explain how it has been used to prove localization of some reinforced walks on one attracting edge. Then we show how a modified version of this construction enables one to propose a new short proof of the a.s. localization of VRRWs on five sites on Z.

  11. Identifying Emotion from Natural Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Liqing; Li, Shun; Zhang, Wan; Zhang, Zhan; Zhu, Tingshao

    2015-01-01

    Emotion identification from gait aims to automatically determine persons affective state, it has attracted a great deal of interests and offered immense potential value in action tendency, health care, psychological detection and human-computer(robot) interaction.In this paper, we propose a new method of identifying emotion from natural walking, and analyze the relevance between the traits of walking and affective states. After obtaining the pure acceleration data of wrist and ankle, we set a...

  12. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinali, M; Bondy, M I Ferretti; Hoek, M; Lauth, W; Rosner, C; Sfienti, C; Thiel, M

    2015-01-01

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investi...

  13. Preliminary study of novel, timed walking tests for children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Lanovaz, Joel; Bisaro, Derek; Oates, Alison; Musselman, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Walking assessment is an important aspect of rehabilitation practice; yet, clinicians have few psychometrically sound options for evaluating walking in highly ambulatory children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of two new measures of walking function—the Obstacles and Curb tests—relative to the 10-Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test in children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Methods: A total of 16 ambulatory children with spina bifida (n=9) or cerebral palsy (n=7) (9 boys; mean age 7years, 7months; standard deviation 3years, 4months) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children participated. Children completed the walking tests, at both self-selected and fast speeds, twice. To evaluate discriminative validity, scores were compared between typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy groups. Within the spina bifida/cerebral palsy group, inter-test correlations evaluated convergent validity and intraclass correlation coefficients evaluated within-session test–retest reliability. Results: At fast speeds, all tests showed discriminative validity (p<0.006 for typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy comparisons) and convergent validity (rho=0.81–0.90, p⩽0.001, for inter-test correlations). At self-selected speeds, only the Obstacles test discriminated between groups (p=0.001). Moderately strong correlations (rho=0.73–0.78, p⩽0.001) were seen between the 10-Meter Walk test, Curb test, and Timed Up and Go test. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.97, with higher test–retest reliability for tests performed at fast speeds rather than self-selected speeds. Conclusion: The Obstacles and Curb tests are promising measures for assessing walking in this population. Performing tests at fast walking speeds may improve their validity and test–retest reliability for children with spina bifida/cerebral palsy. PMID:27493754

  14. Attuning one's steps to visual targets reduces comfortable walking speed in both young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, C Lieke E; de Dreu, Miek J; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2015-03-01

    Comfortable walking speed (CWS) is indicative of clinically relevant factors in the elderly, such as fall risk and mortality. Standard CWS tests involve walking on a straight, unobstructed surface, while in reality surfaces are uneven and cluttered and so walkers rely on visually guided adaptations to avoid trips or slips. Hence, the predictive value of CWS may be expected to increase when assessed for walking in more realistic (visually guided) conditions. We examined CWS in young (n=18) and older (n=18) adults for both overground and treadmill walking. Overground CWS was assessed using the 10-meter walk test with and without visual stepping targets. For treadmill walking, four conditions were examined: (i) uncued walking, and (ii-iv) cued walking with visual stepping targets where the inter-stepping target distance varied by 0%, 20%, or 40%. Pre-experimental measures were taken so that the average inter-stepping target distance could be adjusted for each belt speed based on each participant's self-selected gait characteristics. Results showed that CWS was significantly slower when stepping targets were present in both overground (p<.001) and treadmill walking (p<.001). Thus, attuning steps to visual targets significantly affected CWS, even when the patterning of these targets matched the participant's own gait pattern (viz. 0%-treadmill-walking condition). Results from the treadmill-walking task showed that the amount of variation in inter-stepping target distance did not differentially affect CWS. Our results suggest that it may be worthwhile in clinical assessments to not only determine walking speed using standard conditions but also in situations that require visually guided stepping.

  15. Acute effects of walking on inflammatory and cardiovascular risk in sedentary post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jillian; Murphy, Marie; Trinick, Tom; Duly, Ellie; Nevill, Alan; Davison, Gareth

    2008-02-01

    Biochemical markers of inflammation are emerging as new predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and may alter acutely with exercise. Few studies have been conducted on the effects of walking on these markers or whether different walking intensities elicit varied effects. As there is growing interest in modifiable lifestyle factors such as walking to reduce CVD risk, these inflammatory responses warrant investigation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of walking at 50% versus 70% of predicted maximal heart rate on C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma fibrinogen, and triglycerides in sedentary post-menopausal women. Twelve post-menopausal women (mean age 58 years, s +/-6; stature 1.62 m, s+/-0.06; body mass 66.8 kg, s +/-6.2) completed two 30-min treadmill walks in a randomized cross-over design. Fasted blood samples were taken (for the determination of plasma fibrinogen, CRP, and lipids) before, immediately after, and 1 and 24 h after exercise. Triglyceride concentrations decreased from pre-exercise to 24 h post exercise at both walking intensities (time x group interaction, P 0.05). The results of this study suggest that fasting plasma triglycerides are decreased on the morning after 30 min of brisk walking at either 50% or 70% of maximal heart rate (moderate and vigorous intensity).

  16. Walk and roll robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A mobile robotic unit features a main body, a plurality of legs for supporting the main body on and moving the main body in forward and reverse directions about a base surface, and a drive assembly. According to an exemplary embodiment each leg includes a respective pivotal hip joint, a pivotal knee joint, and a wheeled foot adapted to roll along the base surface. Also according to an exemplary embodiments the drive assembly includes a motor operatively associated with the hip and knee joints and the wheeled foot for independently driving pivotal movement of the hip joint and the knee joint and rolling motion of the wheeled foot. The hip joint may include a ball-and-socket-type joint interconnecting top portion of the leg to the main body, such that the hip joint is adapted to pivot said leg in a direction transverse to a forward-and-reverse direction.

  17. Theories of bipedal walking: an odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Christopher L

    2003-04-01

    In this paper six theories of bipedal walking, and the evidence in support of the theories, are reviewed. They include: evolution, minimising energy consumption, maturation in children, central pattern generators, linking control and effect, and robots on two legs. Specifically, the six theories posit that: (1) bipedalism is the fundamental evolutionary adaptation that sets hominids--and therefore humans--apart from other primates; (2) locomotion is the translation of the centre of gravity along a pathway requiring the least expenditure of energy; (3) when a young child takes its first few halting steps, his or her biomechanical strategy is to minimise the risk of falling; (4) a dedicated network of interneurons in the spinal cord generates the rhythm and cyclic pattern of electromyographic signals that give rise to bipedal gait; (5) bipedal locomotion is generated through global entrainment of the neural system on the one hand, and the musculoskeletal system plus environment on the other; and (6) powered dynamic gait in a bipedal robot can be realised only through a strategy which is based on stability and real-time feedback control. The published record suggests that each of the theories has some measure of support. However, it is important to note that there are other important theories of locomotion which have not been covered in this review. Despite such omissions, this odyssey has explored the wide spectrum of bipedal walking, from its origins through to the integration of the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems.

  18. Error signals driving locomotor adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo;

    2016-01-01

    perturbations. Forces were applied to the ankle joint during the early swing phase using an electrohydraulic ankle-foot orthosis. Repetitive 80 Hz electrical stimulation was applied to disrupt cutaneous feedback from the superficial peroneal nerve (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerve (foot sole) during...... walking (Choi et al. 2013). Sensory tests were performed to measure cutaneous touch threshold and perceptual threshold of force perturbations. Ankle movement were measured while subjects walked on the treadmill over three periods: baseline (1 min), adaptation (1 min) and post-adaptation (3 min). Subjects...... (n = 10) showed increased touch thresholds measured with Von Frey monofilaments and increased force perception thresholds with stimulation. Stimulation reduced the magnitude of walking adaptation to force perturbation. In addition, we compared the effects of interrupting cutaneous feedback using...

  19. It's how you get there: Walking down a virtual alley activates premotor and parietal areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eWagner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary drive is crucial for motor learning, therefore we are interested in the role that motor planning plays in gait movements. In this study we examined the impact of an interactive Virtual Environment (VE feedback task on the EEG patterns during robot assisted walking. We compared walking in the VE modality to two control conditions: walking with a visual attention paradigm, in which visual stimuli were unrelated to the motor task; and walking with mirror feedback, in which participants observed their own movements. Eleven healthy participants were considered. Application of independent component analysis to the EEG revealed three independent component clusters in premotor and parietal areas showing increased activity during walking with the adaptive VE training paradigm compared to the control conditions. During the interactive VE walking task spectral power in frequency ranges 8-12Hz, 15-20Hz and 23-40Hz was significantly (p ≤ 0.05 decreased. This power decrease is interpreted as a correlate of an active cortical area. Furthermore activity in the premotor cortex revealed gait cycle related modulations significantly different (p ≤ 0.05 from baseline in the frequency range 23-40Hz during walking. These modulations were significantly (p ≤ 0.05 reduced depending on gait cycle phases in the interactive VE walking task compared to the control conditions.We demonstrate that premotor and parietal areas show increased activity during walking with the adaptive VE training paradigm, when compared to walking with mirror- and movement unrelated feedback. Previous research has related a premotor-parietal network to motor planning and motor intention. We argue that movement related interactive feedback enhances motor planning and motor intention. We hypothesize that this might improve gait recovery during rehabilitation.

  20. 基于稀疏Parzen窗密度估计的快速自适应相似度聚类方法%Fast Adaptive Similarity-based Clustering Using Sparse Parzen Window Density Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱鹏江; 王士同; 邓赵红

    2011-01-01

    相似度聚类方法(Similarity-based clustering method,SCM)因其简单易实现和具有鲁棒性而广受关注.但由于内含相似度聚类算法(Similarity clustering algorithm,SCA)的高时间复杂度和凝聚型层次聚类(Agglomerative hierarchicalclustering,AHC)的高空间复杂度,SCM不适用大数据集场合.本文首先发现了 SCM和核密度估计问题的本质联系,并以此入手,通过快速压缩集密度估计器(Fast reduced set density estimator,FRSDE)和基于图的松弛聚类(Graph-based relaxed clustering,GRC)算法提出了快速自适应相似度聚类方法(Fast adaptive similarity-based clustering method,FASCM).相比于原SCM,该方法的主要优点是:1)其总体渐近时间复杂度与样本容量呈线性关系;2)不依赖于人工经验的干预,具有了自适应性.由此,FASCM适用于大数据集环境.该方法的有效性在图像分割应用中进行了验证.%Similarity-based clustering method (SCM) has received much attention because it is robust and can be implemented simply and easily.However, because of its high time complexity of the embedded similarity clustering algorithm (SCA) and high space complexity of the embedded agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC), SCM is impractical for large data sets.In this paper, the relationship is revealed between SCM and the kernel density estimation of samples, a novel fast adaptive similarity-based clustering method (FASCM) is accordingly proposed by adopting fast reduced set density estimator (FRSDE) and graph-based relaxed clustering (GRC).The distinctive advantages of FMSSC over MSSC exist in: 1) its asymptotic linear time complexity with the data size; 2) independent on artificial experience and its adaptability.Thus, FASCM is practical for large datasets.Its effectiveness has also been demonstrated in image segmentation examples.

  1. Single and Dual Task Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie de Bruin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the viability and efficacy of integrating cadence-matched, salient music into a walking intervention for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Twenty-two people with PD were randomised to a control (CTRL, n=11 or experimental (MUSIC, n=11 group. MUSIC subjects walked with an individualised music playlist three times a week for the intervention period. Playlists were designed to meet subject's musical preferences. In addition, the tempo of the music closely matched (±10–15 bpm the subject's preferred cadence. CTRL subjects continued with their regular activities during the intervention. The effects of training accompanied by “walking songs” were evaluated using objective measures of gait score. The MUSIC group improved gait velocity, stride time, cadence, and motor symptom severity following the intervention. This is the first study to demonstrate that music listening can be safely implemented amongst PD patients during home exercise.

  2. Assessing interactions among multiple physiological systems during walking outside a laboratory: An Android based gait monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, E; Millecamps, A; Teoli, J; Rothfuss, M A; Franconi, N G; Perera, S; Jones, A K; Brach, J S; Mickle, M H

    2015-12-01

    Gait function is traditionally assessed using well-lit, unobstructed walkways with minimal distractions. In patients with subclinical physiological abnormalities, these conditions may not provide enough stress on their ability to adapt to walking. The introduction of challenging walking conditions in gait can induce responses in physiological systems in addition to the locomotor system. There is a need for a device that is capable of monitoring multiple physiological systems in various walking conditions. To address this need, an Android-based gait-monitoring device was developed that enabled the recording of a patient's physiological systems during walking. The gait-monitoring device was tested during self-regulated overground walking sessions of fifteen healthy subjects that included 6 females and 9 males aged 18-35 years. The gait-monitoring device measures the patient's stride interval, acceleration, electrocardiogram, skin conductance and respiratory rate. The data is stored on an Android phone and is analyzed offline through the extraction of features in the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. The analysis of the data depicted multisystem physiological interactions during overground walking in healthy subjects. These interactions included locomotion-electrodermal, locomotion-respiratory and cardiolocomotion couplings. The current results depicting strong interactions between the locomotion system and the other considered systems (i.e., electrodermal, respiratory and cardiovascular systems) warrant further investigation into multisystem interactions during walking, particularly in challenging walking conditions with older adults.

  3. Limited transfer of newly acquired movement patterns across walking and running in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogawa

    Full Text Available The two major modes of locomotion in humans, walking and running, may be regarded as a function of different speed (walking as slower and running as faster. Recent results using motor learning tasks in humans, as well as more direct evidence from animal models, advocate for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying different locomotion tasks. In the current study, we investigated the possible independence of the neural mechanisms underlying human walking and running. Subjects were tested on a split-belt treadmill and adapted to walking or running on an asymmetrically driven treadmill surface. Despite the acquisition of asymmetrical movement patterns in the respective modes, the emergence of asymmetrical movement patterns in the subsequent trials was evident only within the same modes (walking after learning to walk and running after learning to run and only partial in the opposite modes (walking after learning to run and running after learning to walk (thus transferred only limitedly across the modes. Further, the storage of the acquired movement pattern in each mode was maintained independently of the opposite mode. Combined, these results provide indirect evidence for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying the two locomotive modes.

  4. Minnesota Walk-In Access Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Minnesota Walk-In Access site (WIA) GIS data represents areas of private land that have been made open to the public for the purpose of walk-in (foot travel)...

  5. Fast adaptation and Ca2+-sensitivity of the mechanotransducer require myosin-XVa in inner but not outer cochlear hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanyan, Ruben; Frolenkov, Gregory I.

    2009-01-01

    In inner ear hair cells, activation of mechotransduction channels is followed by extremely rapid deactivation that depends on the influx of Ca2+ through these channels. Although the molecular mechanisms of this “fast” adaptation are largely unknown, the predominant models assume Ca2+ sensitivity as an intrinsic property of yet unidentified mechanotransduction channels. Here we examined mechanotransduction in the hair cells of young postnatal shaker 2 mice (Myo15sh2/sh2). These mice have no fu...

  6. A walk on sunset boulevard

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Luise; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    A walk on sunset boulevard can teach us about transcendental functions associated to Feynman diagrams. On this guided tour we will see multiple polylogarithms, differential equations and elliptic curves. A highlight of the tour will be the generalisation of the polylogarithms to the elliptic setting and the all-order solution for the sunset integral in the equal mass case.

  7. Closed walks for community detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Sun, Peng Gang; Hu, Xia; Li, Zhou Jun

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel measure that integrates both the concept of closed walks and clustering coefficients to replace the edge betweenness in the well-known divisive hierarchical clustering algorithm, the Girvan and Newman method (GN). The edges with the lowest value are removed iteratively until the network is degenerated into isolated nodes. The experimental results on computer generated networks and real-world networks showed that our method makes a better tradeoff of accuracy and runtime. Based on the analysis of the results, we observe that the nontrivial closed walks of order three and four can be considered as the basic elements in constructing community structures. Meanwhile, we discover that those nontrivial closed walks outperform trivial closed walks in the task of analyzing the structure of networks. The double peak structure problem is mentioned in the last part of the article. We find that our proposed method is a novel way to solve the double peak structure problem. Our work can provide us with a new perspective for understanding community structure in complex networks.

  8. A Walk to the Well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Phil

    1994-01-01

    During a walk, an outdoor education teacher reflects on the status of outdoor education in Ottawa (Canada) and importance of maintaining a close relationship with nature. He looks for signs of an old log home site, observes a hawk's flight, discovers remains of a plastic bag in an owl pellet, and realizes that everyone is working on survival. (LP)

  9. Walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithms using gait phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeen-Shing; Lin, Che-Wei; Yang, Ya-Ting C; Ho, Yu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a walking pattern classification and a walking distance estimation algorithm using gait phase information. A gait phase information retrieval algorithm was developed to analyze the duration of the phases in a gait cycle (i.e., stance, push-off, swing, and heel-strike phases). Based on the gait phase information, a decision tree based on the relations between gait phases was constructed for classifying three different walking patterns (level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs). Gait phase information was also used for developing a walking distance estimation algorithm. The walking distance estimation algorithm consists of the processes of step count and step length estimation. The proposed walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithm have been validated by a series of experiments. The accuracy of the proposed walking pattern classification was 98.87%, 95.45%, and 95.00% for level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed walking distance estimation algorithm was 96.42% over a walking distance.

  10. [Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sanpablo, Alberto Isaac; Hernández-Arenas, Claudia; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Quiñones-Uriostegui, Ivett; Alessi Montero, Aldo; Núñez-Carrera, Lidia; Boll-Woehrlen, Marie Catherine; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease (PD) patients is assessed, across multiple treadmill walking sessions. Thirteen PD subjects were enrolled into the study (Eight were in a moderate stage of the disease, and 5 in an advanced stage). PD subjects attended a progressive program consisting of 12 sessions of 20 min. Walking speed, cadence, step length and coefficient of variation were assessed. ANOVA test were used to evaluate progression of disease and time influence over familiarization. PD Subjects baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between both groups and typical dependencies over progression of disease and velocity were found for cadence, step length and coefficient of variation. However, we showed that some PD subjects may require longer familiarization times and that familiarization is an adaptation process which involves parameters as velocity, cadence and gait stability. A better definition of familiarization to treadmill is needed since some parameters such as step length does not change significantly while others such as cadence, coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient does. Therefore familiarization to treadmill walking should remain on measures of velocity, cadence, reliability and variability. However, a bigger sample size is needed in order to improve the results of the present study.

  11. Numerical studies of planar closed random walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattice numerical simulations for planar closed random walks and their winding sectors are presented. The frontiers of the random walks and of their winding sectors have a Hausdorff dimension dH = 4/3. However, when properly defined by taking into account the inner 0-winding sectors, the frontiers of the random walks have a Hausdorff dimension dH≈1.77

  12. Claimed walking distance of lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Dijkstra, PU

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Walking ability in general and specifically for lower limb amputees is of major importance for social mobility and ADL independence. Walking determines prosthesis prescription. The aim of this study was to mathematically analyse factors influencing claimed walking distance of lower limb amp

  13. 双足机器人自适应常值驱动与传感反馈结合的仿生行走控制%Bionic walking control based on adaptive constant torque and sensory feedback for the biped robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽梅; 田彦涛

    2013-01-01

    To make the chaotic gaits converge to a stable cycle gait, a control algorithm is proposed for the biped robot with knees. Firstly, the passive gaits changes with the changing of the slope are studied by using the Poincarésection method. It shows that the increasing of the ground slope will result in the appearance of period-doubling and chaotic gaits. Then, based on the biomechanics in human walking and delayed feedback control theory, bionic walking control based on adaptive constant torque and sensory feedback for the biped robot is designed. The controller parameters are regulated gradually in terms of the initial states of the current step and the first two steps. Finally, the chaotic gaits converge to the cycle gaits with this controller. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the presented control algorithm.%  为了将双足机器人的混沌步态控制收敛到稳定的周期步态,提出一种控制策略。首先用庞卡莱截面法研究斜坡倾角变化对步态的影响,结果表明,坡度增大会导致倍周期步态到混沌步态的产生;然后以人类步行的生物力学为仿生依据,根据延迟反馈控制的基本思路,设计了自适应常值驱动与传感反馈相结合的仿生行走控制策略,并依据当前步和前两步初始状态对控制器参数进行逐步调节,最终将混沌步态控制收敛到周期步态。仿真结果表明了所提出算法的有效性。

  14. Active quantum walks: a framework for quantum walks with adiabatic quantum evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Fangmin; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    We study a new methodology for quantum walk based algorithms. Different from the passive quantum walk, in which a walker is guided by a quantum walk procedure, the new framework that we developed allows the walker to move by an adiabatic procedure of quantum evolution, as an active way. The use of this active quantum walk is helpful to develop new quantum walk based searching and optimization algorithms.

  15. Late gestation over- and undernutrition predispose for visceral adiposity in response to a post-natal obesogenic diet, but with differential impacts on glucose-insulin adaptations during fasting in lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanal, Prabhat; Husted, Sanne Vinter; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen;

    2014-01-01

    of subcutaneous adipose tissue and induced differential physiological adaptations to fasting. This study does not suggest that exposure to gestational overnutrition will provide a protective effect against development of hyperglycaemia later in life. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.......Aim: To investigate if late gestation under- or overnutrition has similar adverse impacts on visceral adiposity, metabolic and endocrine function in sheep, and if subsequent exposure to a high-fat diet in early post-natal life exaggerates the prenatal programming outcomes later in life. Methods......, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acids, triglyceride and lactate combined with abdominal obesity. Peri-renal fat appeared to be a particular target of a high-fat diet post-natally. Conclusion: Both prenatal under- and overnutrition predisposed for abdominal adiposity, apparently by reducing the expandability...

  16. Estresse e Modos de Andar a Vida: uma contribuição de Canguilhem para a compreensão da Síndrome Geral de Adaptação Stress and Ways of Walking Through Life: a contribution of Canguilhem to the understanding of the General Adaptation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurici Tadeu Ferreira dos Santos

    2012-09-01

    " - "gratifying" and considered them as manners to engender ways of walking through life. Thus, we perceived that events considered pleasurable or painful, and referred to in a diffuse and nonspecific way, may trigger adaptive disorders often interpreted as stress by those who experience them.

  17. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Thomas Townsley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing inherent properties of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries.

  18. Adaptive Packet Buffering Algorithm Based on Priority and Traffic Throughput for Reducing Packet Loss in Fast Handover for Mobile IPv6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anesa Maolod Omar Al-Najeh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The packet loss has become an important issue to the research community, which needs to be addressed. In FMIPv6, Packet losses are significantly related to the handover latency and buffer size used for packet buffering. In the case of increased handover latency or decreased buffer size, packet losses will be increased. To solve the problem, we propose an adaptive packet buffering (APT algorithm based on priority of packets and traffic throughput in layer 3 (L3 were the packets are buffered by the predefined rule in the new access point during handover. This algorithm is designed to reduce packet loss in FMIPv6 and high level of throughput and low delay can be achieved through the proposed technique. To achieve a fair comparison with Adaptive Buffer Limit Tuning (ALT algorithm, we have implemented the APT algorithm in Omnet++ along with the FMIPv6 to develop the model and the algorithm. The results of the simulation study show that the proposed algorithm can reduce the packet loss as well as the delay.

  19. Do functional walk tests reflect cardiorespiratory fitness in sub-acute stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayley Mark T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT has been employed as a measure of functional capacity, but its relationship to cardiorespiratory fitness in stroke is not well established. Gait speed measured over short distances is commonly used as an index of walking competency following stroke. We evaluated the relationship between the 6MWT, aerobic fitness (VO2peak and walking competency in sub-acute stroke. Methods Thirty-six individuals (mean age ± SD, 64.6 ± 14.4 years; time post-stroke 16.2 ± 13.3 days were evaluated using the 6MWT (distance, speed, heart rate, a maximal exercise test (VO2peak, heart rate, exercise test duration, and walking competency using a five meter walk (speed, symmetry ratio. Correlation analyses were used to examine the relationships between these outcomes. Results There was a strong correlation between the 6MWT and five meter walk velocity for preferred (r = 0.79 and fast (r = 0.82 speed (p 2peak (r = 0.56, p Conclusion The speed selected during the 6MWT was strongly related to the velocities selected during the five meter walk distance (intermediate to the selected preferred and fast speeds. Although the 6MWT may be challenging to the cardiorespiratory system, it appears to be more strongly influenced by potential limits to walking speed rather than cardiorespiratory capacity. As a result, this test is not, by itself, an adequate measure of aerobic fitness early after stroke.

  20. Italian Validation of the 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Solaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gait impairment is commonly in people with multiple sclerosis (MS. The 12-item MS walking scale (MSWS-12 assesses patients’ measurement of walking quality. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the MSWS-12 for the Italian population with MS. Methods. Six MS out-patient clinics across Italy enrolled subjects between June 2013 and December 2013. Construct validity of MSWS-12 was determined by examining correlations with the Italian version of the EDSS, the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW, and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Results. 321 MS subjects were enrolled. Mean age was 47.55 years and mean disease duration was 13.8 years. Mean EDSS score was 4.46. 185 subjects had a relapsing-remitting course, 92 were secondary progressive, 43 were primary progressive, and 1 had a clinically isolated syndrome. The mean total score of the MSWS-12 was 49.6 (SD: 31 with values ranging between 0 and 100. Correlations between the MSWS-12 with age, disease duration, and disease course were found but not with gender. Values of the MSWS-12/IT were significantly related to EDSS (0.71, to the T25FW (0.65, and to the FSS (0.51. Conclusion. MSWS-12/IT has been adapted and validated, it is a reliable and reproducible scale for Italian patients with MS.

  1. Biased random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Biased random walks on complex networks are a particular type of walks whose motion is biased on properties of the destination node, such as its degree. In recent years they have been exploited to design efficient strategies to explore a network, for instance by constructing maximally mixing trajectories or by sampling homogeneously the nodes. In multiplex networks, the nodes are related through different types of links (layers or communication channels), and the presence of connections at different layers multiplies the number of possible paths in the graph. In this work we introduce biased random walks on multiplex networks and provide analytical solutions for their long-term properties such as the stationary distribution and the entropy rate. We focus on degree-biased walks and distinguish between two subclasses of random walks: extensive biased walks consider the properties of each node separately at each layer, intensive biased walks deal instead with intrinsically multiplex variables. We study the effec...

  2. Acquisition of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains during long-term hospitalization and fast adaptation of enterococcal flora to antibiotic treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Berit; Wolz, Christiane; Schumacher, Ulrike; Beyser, Kurt; Heeg, Peter; Borgmann, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been suspected that long durations of hospitalization might be a possible risk factor to get colonized by multiple VRE strains. Here we present the case of a patient who underwent stem cell transplantation and subsequently stayed at the hospital for about 4 months until death. At least four different Enterococcus faecium strains were identified from routinely taken microbiological specimens as demonstrated by pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis. Additionally, these strains showed variable susceptibility to quinupristine/dalfopristine, vancomycin, and/or linezolid depending on different antibiotic administrations. These findings indicate that patients might be colonized with multiple Enterococcus faecium strains and that the enterococcal flora quickly adapts due to antibiotic exposure.

  3. Random walk near the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-07-01

    The random walk of a particle on a three-dimensional semi-infinite lattice is considered. In order to study the effect of the surface on the random walk, it is assumed that the velocity of the particle depends on the distance to the surface. Moreover it is assumed that at any point the particle may be absorbed with a certain probability. The probability of the return of the particle to the starting point and the average time of eventual return are calculated. The dependence of these quantities on the distance to the surface, the probability of absorption and the properties of the surface is discussed. The method of generating functions is used.

  4. City Walks and Tactile Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Diaconu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories.

  5. Stable walking with asymmetric legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  6. Quantum walk on a cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bru, Luis A; Di Molfetta, Giuseppe; Pérez, Armando; Roldán, Eugenio; Silva, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We consider the 2D alternate quantum walk on a cylinder. We concentrate on the study of the motion along the open dimension, in the spirit of looking at the closed coordinate as a small or "hidden" extra dimension. If one starts from localized initial conditions on the lattice, the dynamics of the quantum walk that is obtained after tracing out the small dimension shows the contribution of several components, which can be understood from the study of the dispersion relations for this problem. In fact, these components originate from the contribution of the possible values of the quasi-momentum in the closed dimension. In the continuous space-time limit, the different components manifest as a set of Dirac equations, with each quasi-momentum providing the value of the corresponding mass. We briefly discuss the possible link of these ideas to the simulation of high energy physical theories that include extra dimensions.

  7. Acceleration patterns of the head and pelvis when walking on level and irregular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Lord, Stephen R; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate acceleration patterns at the head and pelvis while subjects walked on a level and an irregular walking surface, to develop an understanding of how the postural control system responds to challenging walking conditions. Thirty young, healthy subjects walked on a level corridor and on artificial grass underlain with foam and wooden blocks placed in an arbitrary manner. Temporo-spatial gait parameters and acceleration patterns at the head and pelvis were measured. The results revealed that when walking on the irregular surface, subjects were able to maintain their velocity, but adopted a slower and more variable cadence and a significantly longer stride length. The magnitude of pelvis accelerations increased, however head accelerations were not affected by the walking surface. When considered as an overall pattern of movement, these findings suggest that one of the primary objectives of the postural control system when walking on irregular surfaces is head control, and that subjects adapt their stepping pattern on irregular surfaces to ensure that the head remains stable. PMID:12855299

  8. Strategies of Healthy Adults Walking on a Laterally Oscillating Treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Peters, Brian T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2008-01-01

    We mounted a treadmill on top of a six degree-of-freedom motion base platform to investigate locomotor responses produced by healthy adults introduced to a dynamic walking surface. The experiment examined self-selected strategies employed by participants when exposed to continuous, sinusoidal lateral motion of the support surface while walking. Torso translation and step width were used to classify responses used to stabilize gait in a novel, dynamic environment. Two response categories emerged. Participants tended to either fix themselves in space (FIS), allowing the treadbelt to move laterally beneath them, or they fixed themselves to the base (FTB), moving laterally as the motion base oscillated. The degree of fixation in both extremes varied across participants. This finding suggests that normal adults have innate and varied preferences for reacquiring gait stability, some depending more heavily on vision (FIS group) and others on proprioception (FTB group). Keywords: Human locomotion, Unstable surface, Treadmill, Adaptation, Stability

  9. Coverage maximization under resource constraints using proliferating random walks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudipta Saha; Niloy Ganguly; Abhijit Guria

    2015-02-01

    Dissemination of information has been one of the prime needs in almost every kind of communication network. The existing algorithms for this service, try to maximize the coverage, i.e., the number of distinct nodes to which a given piece of information could be conveyed under the constraints of time and energy. However, the problem becomes challenging for unstructured and decentralized environments. Due to its simplicity and adaptability, random walk (RW) has been a very useful tool for such environments. Different variants of this technique have been studied. In this paper, we study a history-based non-uniform proliferating random strategy where new walkers are dynamically introduced in the sparse regions of the network. Apart from this, we also study the breadth-first characteristics of the random walk-based algorithms through an appropriately designed metrics.

  10. Walking Algorithm of Humanoid Robot on Uneven Terrain with Terrain Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Humanoid robots are expected to achieve stable walking on uneven terrains. In this paper, a control algorithm for humanoid robots walking on previously unknown terrains with terrain estimation is proposed, which requires only minimum modification to the original walking gait. The swing foot trajectory is redesigned to ensure that the foot lands at the desired horizontal positions under various terrain height. A compliant terrain adaptation method is applied to the landing foot to achieve a firm contact with the ground. Then a terrain estimation method that takes into account the deformations of the linkages is applied, providing the target for the following correction and adjustment. The algorithm was validated through walking experiments on uneven terrains with the full-size humanoid robot Kong.

  11. Random walk study of electron motion in helium in crossed electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Random walk theory, previously adapted to electron motion in the presence of an electric field, is extended to include a transverse magnetic field. In principle, the random walk approach avoids mathematical complexity and concomitant simplifying assumptions and permits determination of energy distributions and transport coefficients within the accuracy of available collisional cross section data. Application is made to a weakly ionized helium gas. Time of relaxation of electron energy distribution, determined by the random walk, is described by simple expressions based on energy exchange between the electron and an effective electric field. The restrictive effect of the magnetic field on electron motion, which increases the required number of collisions per walk to reach a terminal steady state condition, as well as the effect of the magnetic field on electron transport coefficients and mean energy can be quite adequately described by expressions involving only the Hall parameter.

  12. Genetic changes during a laboratory adaptive evolution process that allowed fast growth in glucose to an Escherichia coli strain lacking the major glucose transport system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar César

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS, which is the major bacterial component involved in glucose transport and its phosphorylation, accumulate high amounts of phosphoenolpyruvate that can be diverted to the synthesis of commercially relevant products. However, these strains grow slowly in glucose as sole carbon source due to its inefficient transport and metabolism. Strain PB12, with 400% increased growth rate, was isolated after a 120 hours adaptive laboratory evolution process for the selection of faster growing derivatives in glucose. Analysis of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain that lacks PTS will allow a better understanding of the basis of its growth adaptation and, therefore, in the design of improved metabolic engineering strategies for enhancing carbon diversion into the aromatic pathways. Results Whole genome analyses using two different sequencing methodologies: the Roche NimbleGen Inc. comparative genome sequencing technique, and high throughput sequencing with Illumina Inc. GAIIx, allowed the identification of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain. Both methods detected 23 non-synonymous and 22 synonymous point mutations. Several non-synonymous mutations mapped in regulatory genes (arcB, barA, rpoD, rna and in other putative regulatory loci (yjjU, rssA and ypdA. In addition, a chromosomal deletion of 10,328 bp was detected that removed 12 genes, among them, the rppH, mutH and galR genes. Characterization of some of these mutated and deleted genes with their functions and possible functions, are presented. Conclusions The deletion of the contiguous rppH, mutH and galR genes that occurred simultaneously, is apparently the main reason for the faster growth of the evolved PB12 strain. In support of this interpretation is the fact that inactivation of the rppH gene in the parental PB11 strain substantially increased

  13. Implementation of interval walking training in patients with type 2 diabetes in Denmark: rationale, design, and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Thomsen, Reimar W; Berencsi, Klara; Brinkløv, Cecilie F; Brøns, Charlotte; Valentiner, Laura S; Karstoft, Kristian; Langberg, Henning; Vaag, Allan A; Pedersen, Bente K; Nielsen, Jens S

    2016-01-01

    Promoting physical activity is a first-line choice of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, there is a need for more effective tools and technologies to facilitate structured lifestyle interventions and to ensure a better compliance, sustainability, and health benefits of exercise training in patients with T2D. The InterWalk initiative and its innovative application (app) for smartphones described in this study were developed by the Danish Centre for Strategic Research in T2D aiming at implementing, testing, and validating interval walking in patients with T2D in Denmark. The interval walking training approach consists of repetitive 3-minute cycles of slow and fast walking with simultaneous intensity guiding, based on the exercise capacity of the user. The individual intensity during slow and fast walking is determined by a short initial self-conducted and audio-guided fitness test, which combined with automated audio instructions strives to motivate the individual to adjust the intensity to the predetermined individualized walking intensities. The InterWalk app data are collected prospectively from all users and will be linked to the unique Danish nationwide databases and administrative registries, allowing extensive epidemiological studies of exercise in patients with T2D, such as the level of adherence to InterWalk training and long-term effectiveness surveys of important health outcomes, including cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Currently, the InterWalk app has been downloaded by >30,000 persons, and the achieved epidemiological data quality is encouraging. Of the 9,466 persons providing personal information, 80% of the men and 62% women were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥25). The InterWalk project represents a contemporary technology-driven public health approach to monitor real-life exercise adherence and to propagate improved health through exercise intervention in T2D and in the general population. PMID:27354828

  14. A fast ionised wind in a Star Forming-Quasar system at z~1.5 resolved through Adaptive Optics assisted near-infrared data

    CERN Document Server

    Brusa, M; Cresci, G; Schramm, M; Delvecchio, I; Lanzuisi, G; Mainieri, V; Mignoli, M; Zamorani, G; Berta, S; Bongiorno, A; Comastri, A; Fiore, F; Kakkad, D; Marconi, A; Rosario, D; Contini, T; Lamareille, F

    2016-01-01

    Outflows are invoked in co-evolutionary models to link the growth of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena, and from the analysis of both galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) samples at z$\\sim1-3$, it is becoming clear that powerful winds are quite common in AGN hosts. High-resolution and high S/N observations are needed in order to uncover the physical properties of the wind through kinematics analysis. We exploited VIMOS, SINFONI and Subaru/IRCS Adaptive Optics data to study the kinematics properties on the scale the host galaxy of XID5395, a luminous, X-ray obscured Starburst/Quasar merging system at z$\\sim1.5$ detected in the XMM-COSMOS field, and associated with an extreme [O II] emitter (EW$\\sim200$ \\AA). We mapped, for the first time, at high resolution the kinematics of the [O III] and H$\\alpha$ line complexes and linked them with the [O II] emission. The high spatial resolution achieved allowed us to resolve all the components of the SB-QSO system. Our analysis with a resolution of few kp...

  15. Quantum mechanics by walking 1. Foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum mechanics by walking introduces to the foundations of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. This book applies to studyings of teaching physics as well as all studyings of physics, who look for an appropriate, easy, fresh, and modern approach to the field. In the present first volume the essential principles of quantum mechanics are worked out. in order to be able to develop their mathematical formulation as fastly and clearly as possible, systematically between wave mechanics and algebraic presentation is changed. Beside themes, which are traditionally in textbooks of quantum mechanics, extensively actual aspects like interaction-free quantum measurement, neutrino oscillations, or quantum cryptography are considered as well as fundamental problems and epistemological questions discussed, as they occur in connection with the measurement process. The list of the postulates of quantum mechanics closes this volume; they form the framework for the extensions and applications, which are discussed in the second volume. The required mathematical aids are introduced step by step. In the appendix the most important mathematical tools are compactly collected, so that supplementing literature can be far reachingly abandoned. Furthermore in the appendix supplementing themes are deepened as for instance the Quantum Zeno effect or delayed-choice experiments.

  16. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Smith, Mike; Price, Michael J; Wright, Sheila Leddington

    2015-01-01

    This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60-76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P = 0.0001) whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise) enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  17. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60–76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P=0.0001 whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  18. Walk-Startup of a Two-Legged Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babković, Kalman; Nagy, László; Krklješ, Damir; Borovac, Branislav

    There is a growing interest towards humanoid robots. One of their most important characteristic is the two-legged motion - walk. Starting and stopping of humanoid robots introduce substantial delays. In this paper, the goal is to explore the possibility of using a short unbalanced state of the biped robot to quickly gain speed and achieve the steady state velocity during a period shorter than half of the single support phase. The proposed method is verified by simulation. Maintainig a steady state, balanced gait is not considered in this paper.

  19. System overview and walking dynamics of a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “passive dynamic walking robot” refers to the robot that can walk down a shallow slope stably without any actuation and control which shows a limit cycle during walking. By adding actuation at some joints, the passive dynamic walking robot can walk stably on level ground and exhibit more versatile gaits than fully passive robot, namely, the “limit cycle walker.” In this article, we present the mechanical structures and control system design for a passive dynamic walking robot with series elastic actuators at hip joint and ankle joints. We built a walking model that consisted of an upper body, knee joints, and flat feet and derived its walking dynamics that involve double stance phases in a walking cycle based on virtual power principle. The instant just before impact was chosen as the start of one step to reduce the number of independent state variables. A numerical simulation was implemented by using MATLAB, in which the proposed passive dynamic walking model could walk stably down a shallow slope, which proves that the derived walking dynamics are correct. A physical passive robot prototype was built finally, and the experiment results show that by only simple control scheme the passive dynamic robot could walk stably on level ground.

  20. Nordic Walking and chronic low back pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartvigsen Jan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism. Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether there is a difference in compliance between persons receiving supervised Nordic Walking and persons doing unsupervised Nordic Walking. Methods One hundred and fifty patients with low back pain for at least eight weeks and referred to a specialized secondary sector outpatient back pain clinic are included in the study. After completion of the standard back centre treatment patients are randomized into one of three groups: A Nordic Walking twice a week for eight weeks under supervision of a specially trained instructor; B Unsupervised Nordic Walking for eight weeks after one training session with an instructor; C A one hour motivational talk including advice to stay active. Outcome measures are pain, function, overall health, cardiovascular ability and

  1. Positive messaging promotes walking in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Notthoff, Nanna; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Walking is among the most cost-effective and accessible means of exercise. Mounting evidence suggests that walking may help to maintain physical and cognitive independence in old age by preventing a variety of health problems. However, older Americans fall far short of meeting the daily recommendations for walking. In two studies, we examined whether considering older adults’ preferential attention to positive information may effectively enhance interventions aimed at promot...

  2. Numerical studies of planar closed random walks

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Jean; Ouvry, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Lattice numerical simulations for planar closed random walks and their winding sectors are presented. The frontiers of the random walks and of their winding sectors have a Hausdorff dimension $d_H=4/3$. However, when properly defined by taking into account the inner 0-winding sectors, the frontiers of the random walks have a Hausdorff dimension $d_H\\approx 1.77$.

  3. Factors Influencing Whether Children Walk to School

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jason G.; Jerrett, Michael; McCONNELL, ROB; Berhane, Kiros; Dunton, Genevieve; Shankardass, Ketan; reynolds, Kim; Chang, Roger; Wolch, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated multiple levels of influence simultaneously on whether children walk to school. A large cohort of 4,338 subjects from ten communities was used to identify the determinants of walking through (1) a one-level logistic regression model for individual-level variables and (2) a two-level mixed regression model for individual and school-level variables. Walking rates were positively associated with home-to-school proximity, greater age, and living in neighborhoods charact...

  4. Quantum random walks - an introductory overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kempe, J

    2003-01-01

    This article aims to provide an introductory survey on quantum random walks. Starting from a physical effect to illustrate the main ideas we will introduce quantum random walks, review some of their properties and outline their striking differences to classical walks. We will touch upon both physical effects and computer science applications, introducing some of the main concepts and language of present day quantum information science in this context. We will mention recent developments in this new area and outline some open questions.

  5. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  6. The role of the neck and trunk in facilitating head stability during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Justin; Barrett, Rod; Morrison, Steven

    2006-07-01

    An apparent goal of the human postural system is to maintain head stability during walking. Although much is known about sensory-motor stabilising mechanisms associated with the head and neck, less is known about how the postural system attenuates motion between the trunk and neck segments in order to regulate head motion. Therefore the purpose of this study was to determine the role that the neck and the trunk play in stabilising the head at a range of walking speeds. Eight healthy male subjects (age: 23+/-4 years) performed self-selected slow, preferred, and fast walking speed trials along a 30 m walkway. Four custom-designed wireless triaxial accelerometers were attached to the head, upper trunk, lower trunk, and shank of each subject to measure vertical (VT), anterior-posterior (AP), and mediolateral (ML) accelerations. Acceleration data were examined in each direction using RMS, power spectral, harmonic, and regularity measures. Signal regularity was increased from the lower to upper trunk for all walking speeds and directions with the exception of the slow speed in the AP direction. Evidence from analysis of power spectral and amplitude characteristics of acceleration signals was suggestive that accelerations are also attenuated from the lower to upper trunk by dynamics of the intervening trunk segment. Differences in selected power spectral and amplitude characteristics between the accelerations of the upper trunk and head due to the intervening neck segment were only detected in the AP direction at preferred and fast walking speeds. Overall the findings of the present study suggest that the trunk segment plays a critical role in regulating gait-related oscillations in all directions. Only accelerations in the direction of travel at preferred and fast speeds required additional control from the neck segment in order to enhance head stability during walking.

  7. Quantum Walks for Computer Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation, one of the latest joint ventures between physics and the theory of computation, is a scientific field whose main goals include the development of hardware and algorithms based on the quantum mechanical properties of those physical systems used to implement such algorithms. Solving difficult tasks (for example, the Satisfiability Problem and other NP-complete problems) requires the development of sophisticated algorithms, many of which employ stochastic processes as their mathematical basis. Discrete random walks are a popular choice among those stochastic processes. Inspir

  8. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizzi Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies. In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%. Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules, as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns.

  9. Walking in Place Through Virtual Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality (IVR) is seemingly on the verge of entering the homes of consumers. Enabling users to walk through virtual worlds in a limited physical space presents a challenge. With an outset in a taxonomy of virtual travel techniques, we argue that Walking-in-Place (WIP) techniques...... constitute a promising approach to virtual walking in relation to consumer IVR. Subsequently we review existing approaches to WIP locomotion and highlight the need for a more explicit focus on the perceived naturalness of WIP techniques; i.e., the degree to which WIP locomotion feels like real walking...

  10. Community-dwelling people with chronic stroke need disproportionate attention while walking and negotiating obstacles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Bert de; Smulders, K.; Swigchem, R. van; Geurts, Alexander; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the attentional demands of gait adaptations required to walk over irregular terrain in community-dwelling people with chronic stroke. Eight community ambulators (>6 months post-stroke, aged 57 ± 15 years) and eight age-matched healthy controls partic

  11. Community-dwelling people with chronic stroke need disproportionate attention while walking and negotiating obstacles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, K.; Swigchem, R. van; Swart, B.J.M. de; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the attentional demands of gait adaptations required to walk over irregular terrain in community-dwelling people with chronic stroke. Eight community ambulators (>6 months post-stroke, aged 57 +/- 15 years) and eight age-matched healthy controls p

  12. Pointwise upper estimates for transition probability of continuous time random walks on graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xinxing

    2013-01-01

    Let $X$ be a continuous time random walk on a weighted graph. Given the on-diagonal upper bounds of transition probabilities at two vertices $x_1$ and $x_2$, we use an adapted metric initiated by Davies, and obtain Gaussian upper estimates for the off-diagonal transition probability $P_{x_1}(X_t=x_2)$.

  13. Feasibility and Reliability of Two Different Walking Tests in People With Severe Intellectual and Sensory Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, A.; Evenhuis, I. J.; van Wijck, R.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe feasibility and test-retest reliability of the six-minute walking distance test (6MWD) and an adapted shuttle run test (aSRT) in persons with severe intellectual and sensory (multiple) disabilities. Materials and Methods Forty-seven persons with se

  14. Feasibility and Reliability of Two Different Walking Tests in People with Severe Intellectual and Sensory Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waninge, A.; Evenhuis, I. J.; van Wijck, R.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to describe feasibility and test-retest reliability of the six-minute walking distance test (6MWD) and an adapted shuttle run test (aSRT) in persons with severe intellectual and sensory (multiple) disabilities. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven persons with severe multiple disabilities, with Gross Motor…

  15. IMU-based ambulatory walking speed estimation in constrained treadmill and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a walking speed estimation system based on using an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The walking speed estimation algorithm segments the walking sequence into individual stride cycles (two steps) based on the inverted pendulum-like behaviour of the stance leg during walking and it integrates the angular velocity and linear accelerations of the shank to determine the displacement of each stride. The evaluation was performed in both treadmill and overground walking experiments with various constraints on walking speed, step length and step frequency to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the system. Promising results were obtained in providing accurate and consistent walking speed/step length estimation in different walking conditions. An overall percentage root mean squared error (%RMSE) of 4.2 and 4.0% was achieved in treadmill and overground walking experiments, respectively. With an increasing interest in understanding human walking biomechanics, the IMU-based ambulatory system could provide a useful walking speed/step length measurement/control tool for constrained walking studies.

  16. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Catherine A; Meng, Lin; Conway, Bernard A; Porr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG) in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation. PMID:25347544

  17. A new fast algorithm of self-adaptive search scope for SIFT matching%一种自适应搜索范围的SIFT特征点快速匹配算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐坤; 韩斌

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at the high time cost of feature vectors matching in SIFT, a new fast algorithm, called Auto ARV&DP, of self⁃adaptive search scope for SIFT matching is put forward. Firstly, an appropriate reference vector is computed based on the feature vectors set. Secondly, a self⁃adaptive search scope is determined by this reference vector. Finally, the matching of SIFT is performed in a small feature vectors set, which is filtered by norm. Experi⁃mental results showed that compared with the classical BBF algorithm, Auto ARV&DP can effectively decrease the time cost of feature vector matching of SIFT with no loss of matching performance when the size of feature vector set is large.%针对SIFT特征向量匹配时间成本高的问题,提出了一种自适应搜索范围的快速匹配算法-AutoARV&DP。该算法首先根据特征向量集合计算一个合适的参考向量,然后自适应确定一个搜索范围,最后在一个通过距离过滤后的较小搜索空间中进行特征向量匹配。实验结果表明,与经典的BBF算法相比较,AutoARV&在获得满意匹配效果的同时,能够有效地降低SIFT特征点匹配的时间成本。

  18. 基于最小包含球的大数据集域自适应快速算法%A Fast Learning Algorithm Based on Minimum Enclosing Ball for Large Domain Adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许敏; 王士同; 顾鑫; 俞林

    2013-01-01

    相同应用领域,不同时间、地点或设备检测到的数据域不一定完整.文中针对如何进行数据域间知识传递问题,提出相同领域的概率分布差异可用两域最小包含球中心点表示且其上限与半径无关的定理.基于上述定理,在原有支持向量域描述算法基础上,提出一种数据域中心校正的领域自适应算法,并利用人造数据集和KDD CUP 99入侵检测数据集验证该算法.实验表明,这种领域自适应算法具有较好的性能.%The data fields detected from different times,places or devices are not always complete even if they come from the same data resource.To solve the problem of effectively transferring the knowledge between the two fields,the theorem is proposed that the difference between two probability distributions from two domains can be expressed by the center of each domain's minimum enclosing ball and its up limit has nothing to do with the radius.Based on the theorem,a fast center calibration domain adaptive algorithm,center calibration-core sets support vector data description (CC-CSVDD),is proposed for large domain adaptation by modifying the original support vector domain description (SVDD) algorithm.The validity of the proposed algorithm is experimentally verified on the artificial datasets and the real KDD CUP-99 datasets.Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has good performance.

  19. Walking performance: correlation between energy cost of walking and walking participation. new statistical approach concerning outcome measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Walking ability, though important for quality of life and participation in social and economic activities, can be adversely affected by neurological disorders, such as Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis or Traumatic Brain Injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the energy cost of walking (CW, in a mixed group of chronic patients with neurological diseases almost 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation wards, can predict the walking performance and any walking restriction on community activities, as indicated by Walking Handicap Scale categories (WHS. One hundred and seven subjects were included in the study, 31 suffering from Stroke, 26 from Spinal Cord Injury and 50 from Multiple Sclerosis. The multivariable binary logistical regression analysis has produced a statistical model with good characteristics of fit and good predictability. This model generated a cut-off value of.40, which enabled us to classify correctly the cases with a percentage of 85.0%. Our research reveal that, in our subjects, CW is the only predictor of the walking performance of in the community, to be compared with the score of WHS. We have been also identifying a cut-off value of CW cost, which makes a distinction between those who can walk in the community and those who cannot do it. In particular, these values could be used to predict the ability to walk in the community when discharged from the rehabilitation units, and to adjust the rehabilitative treatment to improve the performance.

  20. Does perceptual-motor calibration generalize across two different forms of locomotion? Investigations of walking and wheelchairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Kunz

    Full Text Available The relationship between biomechanical action and perception of self-motion during walking is typically consistent and well-learned but also adaptable. This perceptual-motor coupling can be recalibrated by creating a mismatch between the visual information for self-motion and walking speed. Perceptual-motor recalibration of locomotion has been demonstrated through effects on subsequent walking without vision, showing that learned perceptual-motor coupling influences a dynamic representation of one's spatial position during walking. Our present studies test whether recalibration of wheelchair locomotion, a novel form of locomotion for typically walking individuals, similarly influences subsequent wheelchair locomotion. Furthermore, we test whether adaptation to the pairing of visual information for self-motion during one form of locomotion transfers to a different locomotion modality. We find strong effects of perceptual-motor recalibration for matched locomotion modalities--walking/walking and wheeling/wheeling. Transfer across incongruent locomotion modalities showed weak recalibration effects. The results have implications both for theories of perceptual-motor calibration mechanisms and their effects on spatial orientation, as well as for practical applications in training and rehabilitation.

  1. Development of a field test for evaluating aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults: validity of a 15-m incremental shuttle walk and run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, Kotaro; Senjyu, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized and externally paced field test (15-m Incremental Shuttle Walk and Run Test [15mISWRT]), incorporating an incremental and progressive structure, to assess aerobic fitness in middle-aged adults. 68 middle-aged men performed three tests in random order between one to two week intervals: 15-m ISWRT, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX), and 1500-m fast walk. Variables evaluated were 15-m ISWRT performance (distance completed), VO2max measured by CPX, 1500-m fast walk performance (walking time), and HR response in 15-m ISWRT and 1500-m fast walk. Validity of the 15-m ISWRT was tested by comparing the associations among the 15-m ISWRT performance, VO2max and the 1500-m fast walk performance. Changes in HR response during the 15-m ISWRT and the 1500-m fast walk were also compared. Correlations between each variable were as follows: the correlation between 15- m ISWRT performance and VO2max was very high, r = 0.86 (p middle-aged adults. Key pointsThe 15-m ISWRT is valid and safe for evaluating VO2max in middle-aged adults.In comparison with the 1500-m fast walk, the 15-m ISWRT may be a more favourable field-based assessment of aerobic fitness in the middle-aged adults.The 15-m ISWRT could become a valid means for evaluating aerobic fitness as an alternative to CPX in institutions and situations where CPX is difficult to implement. PMID:24149563

  2. Treadmill walking is not equivalent to overground walking for the study of walking smoothness and rhythmicity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row Lazzarini, Brandi S; Kataras, Theodore J

    2016-05-01

    Treadmills are appealing for gait studies, but some gait mechanics are disrupted during treadmill walking. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of speed and treadmill walking on walking smoothness and rhythmicity of 40 men and women between the ages of 70-96 years. Gait smoothness was examined during overground (OG) and treadmill (TM) walking by calculating the harmonic ratio from linear accelerations measured at the level of the lumbar spine. Rhythmicity was quantified as the stride time standard deviation. TM walking was performed at two speeds: a speed matching the natural OG walk speed (TM-OG), and a preferred TM speed (PTM). A dual-task OG condition (OG-DT) was evaluated to determine if TM walking posed a similar cognitive challenge. Statistical analysis included a one-way Analysis of Variance with Bonferroni corrected post hoc comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for non-normally distributed variables. Average PTM speed was slower than OG. Compared to OG, those who could reach the TM-OG speed (74.3% of sample) exhibited improved ML smoothness and rhythmicity, and the slower PTM caused worsened vertical and AP smoothness, but did not affect rhythmicity. PTM disrupted smoothness and rhythmicity differently than the OG-DT condition, likely due to reduced speed. The use of treadmills for gait smoothness and rhythmicity studies in older adults is problematic; some participants will not achieve OG speed during TM walking, walking at the TM-OG speed artificially improves rhythmicity and ML smoothness, and walking at the slower PTM speed worsens vertical and AP gait smoothness.

  3. Cellular telephone use during free-living walking significantly reduces average walking speed

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob E. Barkley; Lepp, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellular telephone (cell phone) use decreases walking speed in controlled laboratory experiments and there is an inverse relationship between free-living walking speed and heart failure risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of cell phone use on walking speed in a free-living environment. Methods Subjects (n = 1142) were randomly observed walking on a 50 m University campus walkway. The time it took each subject to walk 50 m was recorded and subjects were coded i...

  4. Non-Markovian decoherent quantum walks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Peng; Zhang Yong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantum walks act in obviously different ways from their classical counterparts,but decoherence will lessen and close this gap between them.To understand this process,it is necessary to investigate the evolution of quantum walks under different decoherence situations.In this article,we study a non-Markovian decoherent quantum walk on a line.In a short time regime,the behavior of the walk deviates from both ideal quantum walks and classical random walks.The position variance as a measure of the quantum walk collapses and revives for a short time,and tends to have a linear relation with time.That is,the walker's behavior shows a diffusive spread over a long time limit,which is caused by non-Markovian dephasing affecting the quantum correlations between the quantum walker and his coin.We also study both quantum discord and measurement-induced disturbance as measures of the quantum correlations,and observe both collapse and revival in the short time regime,and the tendency to be zero in the long time limit.Therefore,quantum walks with non-Markovian decoherence tend to have diffusive spreading behavior over long time limits,while in the short time regime they oscillate between ballistic and diffusive spreading behavior,and the quantum correlation collapses and revives due to the memory effect.

  5. Rhythmic walking interactions with auditory feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jylhä, Antti; Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur

    2012-01-01

    Walking is a natural rhythmic activity that has become of interest as a means of interacting with software systems such as computer games. Therefore, designing multimodal walking interactions calls for further examination. This exploratory study presents a system capable of different kinds of...

  6. Transition matrix from a random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Schulman, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Given a random walk a method is presented to produce a matrix of transition probabilities that is consistent with that random walk. The method is tested by using a transition matrix to produce a path and then using that path to create the estimate. The two matrices are then compared.

  7. Realisation of an energy efficient walking robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dertien, Edwin; Oort, van Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    In this video the walking robot ‘Dribbel’ is presented, which has been built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente, the Netherlands. This robot has been designed with a focus on minimal energy consumption, using a passive dynamic approach. It is a so-called four-legged 2D walk

  8. Multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training to enhance dual-task walking of older adults: a secondary analysis of a 6-month randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggenberger P

    2015-10-01

    significant advantage compared to PHYS in DT costs of step time variability at fast walking (P=0.044. Training-specific gait adaptations were found on comparing DANCE and MEMORY: DANCE reduced step time at fast walking (P=0.007 and MEMORY reduced gait variability in DT and DT costs at preferred walking speed (both trend P=0.062. Global linear time effects showed improved gait (P<0.05, functional fitness (P<0.05, and reduced fall frequency (-77%, P<0.001. Only single-task fast walking, gait variability at preferred walking speed, and Short Physical Performance Battery were reduced at follow-up (all P<0.05 or trend.Conclusion: Long-term multicomponent cognitive–physical and exclusive physical training programs demonstrated similar potential to counteract age-related decline in physical functioning. Keywords: elderly, dance video game, gait, falls, functional fitness, detraining, sex

  9. Design Issues for Hexapod Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tedeschi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hexapod walking robots have attracted considerable attention for several decades. Many studies have been carried out in research centers, universities and industries. However, only in the recent past have efficient walking machines been conceived, designed and built with performances that can be suitable for practical applications. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art on hexapod walking robots by referring both to the early design solutions and the most recent achievements. Careful attention is given to the main design issues and constraints that influence the technical feasibility and operation performance. A design procedure is outlined in order to systematically design a hexapod walking robot. In particular, the proposed design procedure takes into account the main features, such as mechanical structure and leg configuration, actuating and driving systems, payload, motion conditions, and walking gait. A case study is described in order to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed design procedure.

  10. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  11. Walk modularity and community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrle, David; Harkin, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Modularity maximization has been one of the most widely used approaches in the last decade for discovering community structure in networks of practical interest in biology, computing, social science, statistical mechanics, and more. Modularity is a quality function that measures the difference between the number of edges found within clusters minus the number of edges one would statistically expect to find based on random chance. We present a natural generalization of modularity based on the difference between the actual and expected number of walks within clusters, which we call walk-modularity. Walk-modularity can be expressed in matrix form, and community detection can be performed by finding leading eigenvectors of the walk-modularity matrix. We demonstrate community detection on both synthetic and real-world networks and find that walk-modularity maximization returns significantly improved results compared to traditional modularity maximization.

  12. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  13. One dimensional quantum walk with unitary noise

    CERN Document Server

    Shapira, D; Bracken, A J; Hackett, M; Shapira, Daniel; Biham, Ofer; Hackett, Michelle

    2003-01-01

    The effect of unitary noise on the discrete one-dimensional quantum walk is studied using computer simulations. For the noiseless quantum walk, starting at the origin (n=0) at time t=0, the position distribution Pt(n) at time t is very different from the Gaussian distribution obtained for the classical random walk. Furthermore, its standard deviation, sigma(t) scales as sigma(t) ~ t, unlike the classical random walk for which sigma(t) ~ sqrt{t}. It is shown that when the quantum walk is exposed to unitary noise, it exhibits a crossover from quantum behavior for short times to classical-like behavior for long times. The crossover time is found to be T ~ alpha^(-2) where alpha is the standard deviation of the noise.

  14. Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andy

    2015-09-01

    There is now compelling evidence that many organisms have movement patterns that can be described as Lévy walks, or Lévy flights. Lévy movement patterns have been identified in cells, microorganisms, molluscs, insects, reptiles, fish, birds and even human hunter-gatherers. Most research into Lévy walks as models of organism movement patterns has been shaped by the 'Lévy flight foraging hypothesis'. This states that, since Lévy walks can optimize search efficiencies, natural selection should lead to adaptations that select for Lévy walk foraging. However, a growing body of research on generative mechanisms suggests that Lévy walks can arise freely as by-products of otherwise innocuous behaviours; consequently their advantageous properties are purely coincidental. This suggests that the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis should be amended, or even replaced, by a simpler and more general hypothesis. This new hypothesis would state that 'Lévy walks emerge spontaneously and naturally from innate behaviours and innocuous responses to the environment but, if advantageous, then there could be selection against losing them'. The new hypothesis has the virtue of making fewer assumptions and being broader than the original hypothesis; it also encompasses the many examples of suboptimal Lévy patterns that challenge the prevailing paradigm. This does not detract from the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis, in fact, it adds to the theory by providing a stronger and more compelling case for the occurrence of Lévy walks. It dispenses with concerns about the theoretical arguments in support of the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis and so may lead to a wider acceptance of Lévy walks as models of movement pattern data. Furthermore, organisms can approximate Lévy walks by adapting intrinsic behaviour in simple ways; this occurs when Lévy movement patterns are advantageous, but come with an associated cost. These new developments represent a major change in perspective and

  15. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking. PMID:24968942

  16. Quantum walking in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Facchini, Stefano; Forets, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    A discrete-time quantum walk (QW) is essentially a unitary operator driving the evolution of a single particle on the lattice. Some QWs admit a continuum limit, leading to familiar PDEs (e.g., the Dirac equation). In this paper, we study the continuum limit of a wide class of QWs and show that it leads to an entire class of PDEs, encompassing the Hamiltonian form of the massive Dirac equation in (1+1) curved spacetime. Therefore, a certain QW, which we make explicit, provides us with a unitary discrete toy model of a test particle in curved spacetime, in spite of the fixed background lattice. Mathematically, we have introduced two novel ingredients for taking the continuum limit of a QW, but which apply to any quantum cellular automata: encoding and grouping.

  17. Random walks on reductive groups

    CERN Document Server

    Benoist, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The classical theory of Random Walks describes the asymptotic behavior of sums of independent identically distributed random real variables. This book explains the generalization of this theory to products of independent identically distributed random matrices with real coefficients. Under the assumption that the action of the matrices is semisimple – or, equivalently, that the Zariski closure of the group generated by these matrices is reductive - and under suitable moment assumptions, it is shown that the norm of the products of such random matrices satisfies a number of classical probabilistic laws. This book includes necessary background on the theory of reductive algebraic groups, probability theory and operator theory, thereby providing a modern introduction to the topic.

  18. Symbolic walk in regular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Leonardo; Carlo, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    We find that a symbolic walk (SW)—performed by a walker with memory given by a Bernoulli shift—is able to distinguish between the random or chaotic topology of a given network. We show this result by means of studying the undirected baker network, which is defined by following the Ulam approach for the baker transformation in order to introduce the effect of deterministic chaos into its structure. The chaotic topology is revealed through the central role played by the nodes associated with the positions corresponding to the shortest periodic orbits of the generating map. They are the overwhelmingly most visited nodes in the limit cycles at which the SW asymptotically arrives. Our findings contribute to linking deterministic chaotic dynamics with the properties of networks constructed using the Ulam approach.

  19. Interval-walking training for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H.;

    Formål: To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetes patients, and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training (IWT) versus continuous-walking training (CWT) upon self reported health, physical fitness, body composition and glycemic control. Metoder...... alternated 3-min repetitions at low and high intensity. Before and after the 4-month intervention, the following variables were measured: Self-reported health, Physical fitness (VO2max), body composition, and glycemic control (fasting glucose, HbA1c, oral glucose tolerance test, continuous glucose monitoring......: Subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomized to a control (n = 8), CWT (n = 12), or IWT group (n = 12). Training groups were prescribed five sessions per week (60 min/session) and were controlled with an accelerometer and a heart-rate monitor. CWT performed all training at moderate intensity, whereas IWT...

  20. Continuity and anomalous fluctuations in random walks in dynamic random environments: numerics, phase diagrams and conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Avena, L

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations for one dimensional continuous-time random walks in two dynamic random environments with fast (independent spin-flips) and slow (simple symmetric exclusion) decay of space-time correlations, respectively. We focus on the asymptotic speeds and the scaling limits of such random walks. We observe different behaviors depending on the dynamics of the underlying random environment and the ratio between the jump rate of the random walk and the one of the environment. We compare our data with well known results for static random environment. We observe that the non-diffusive regime known so far only for the static case can occur in the dynamic setup too. Such anomalous fluctuations emerge in a new phase diagram. Further we discuss possible consequences for general static and dynamic random environments.

  1. The application of multilevel modelling to account for the influence of walking speed in gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, David J; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Differences in gait performance can be explained by variations in walking speed, which is a major analytical problem. Some investigators have standardised speed during testing, but this can result in an unnatural control of gait characteristics. Other investigators have developed test procedures where participants walking at their self-selected slow, preferred and fast speeds, with computation of gait characteristics at a standardised speed. However, this analysis is dependent upon an overlap in the ranges of gait speed observed within and between participants, and this is difficult to achieve under self-selected conditions. In this report a statistical analysis procedure is introduced that utilises multilevel modelling to analyse data from walking tests at self-selected speeds, without requiring an overlap in the range of speeds observed or the routine use of data transformations.

  2. Blindman-Walking Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization methods are all implemented with the hypothesis of unknowing the mathematic express of objective objection. Using the human analogy innovative method, the one-dimension blind-walking optimal method is proposed in this paper. The theory and the algorithm of this method includes halving, doubling, reversing probing step and verifying the applicability condition. Double-step is available to make current point moving to the extremum point. Half-step is available to accelerate convergence. In order to improve the optimization, the applicability condition decides whether update current point or not. The operation process, algorithmic flow chart and characteristic analysis of the method were given. Two optimization problems with unimodal or multimodal objective function were solved by the proposed method respectively. The simulation result shows that the proposed method is better than the ordinary method. The proposed method has the merit of rapid convergence, little calculation capacity, wide applicable range, etc. Taking the method as innovative kernel, the random research method, feasible direction method and complex shape method were improved. Taking the innovative content of this paper as innovative kernel, a monograph was published. The other innovations of the monograph are listed, such as applied algorithm of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT qualifications on judging the restriction extremum point, the design step of computing software, the complementarity and derivation of Powell criterion, the method of keeping the complex shape not to deduce dimension and the analysis of gradual optimization characteristic, the reinforced wall of inner point punish function method, the analysis of problem with constrained monstrosity extremum point, the improvement of Newton method and the validation of optimization idea of blind walking repeatedly, the explanation of later-day optimization method, the conformity of seeking algorithm needing the

  3. Convergence in law for the branching random walk seen from its tip

    CERN Document Server

    Madaule, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Considering a critical branching random walk on the real line. In a recent paper, Aidekon [3] developed a powerful method to obtain the convergence in law of its minimum after a log-factor normalization. By an adaptation of this method, we show that the point process formed by the branching random walk and its minimum converge in law to a Poisson point process colored by a certain point process. This result, confirming a conjecture of Brunet and Derrida [10], can be viewed as a discrete analog of the corresponding results for the branching brownian motion, previously established by Arguin et al. [5] [6] and Aidekon et al. [2].

  4. Knee Joint Kinematics during Walking Influences the Spatial Cartilage Thickness Distribution in the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Seungbum; Rylander, Jonathan H.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    The regional adaptation of knee cartilage morphology to the kinematics of walking has been suggested as an important factor in the evaluation of the consequences of alteration in normal gait leading to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of spatial cartilage thickness distributions of the femur and tibia in the knee to the knee kinematics during walking. Gait data and knee MR images were obtained from 17 healthy volunteers (age 33.2±9.8 years). Cartila...

  5. Law of large numbers for non-elliptic random walks in dynamic random environments

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den; Sidoravicius, Vladas

    2011-01-01

    We prove a law of large numbers for a class of $\\Z^d$-valued random walks in dynamic random environments, including \\emph{non-elliptic} examples. We assume that the random environment has a mixing property called \\emph{conditional cone-mixing} and that the random walk tends to stay inside space-time cones. The proof is based on a generalization of the regeneration scheme developed by Comets and Zeitouni for static random environments, which was adapted by Avena, den Hollander and Redig to dynamic random environments. We exhibit some one-dimensional examples to which our result applies. In some cases, the sign of the speed can be determined.

  6. A novel walking speed estimation scheme and its application to treadmill control for gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jungwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual reality (VR technology along with treadmill training (TT can effectively provide goal-oriented practice and promote improved motor learning in patients with neurological disorders. Moreover, the VR + TT scheme may enhance cognitive engagement for more effective gait rehabilitation and greater transfer to over ground walking. For this purpose, we developed an individualized treadmill controller with a novel speed estimation scheme using swing foot velocity, which can enable user-driven treadmill walking (UDW to more closely simulate over ground walking (OGW during treadmill training. OGW involves a cyclic acceleration-deceleration profile of pelvic velocity that contrasts with typical treadmill-driven walking (TDW, which constrains a person to walk at a preset constant speed. In this study, we investigated the effects of the proposed speed adaptation controller by analyzing the gait kinematics of UDW and TDW, which were compared to those of OGW at three pre-determined velocities. Methods Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk in each mode (TDW, UDW, and OGW at three pre-determined speeds (0.5 m/s, 1.0 m/s, and 1.5 m/s with real time feedback provided through visual displays. Temporal-spatial gait data and 3D pelvic kinematics were analyzed and comparisons were made between UDW on a treadmill, TDW, and OGW. Results The observed step length, cadence, and walk ratio defined as the ratio of stride length to cadence were not significantly different between UDW and TDW. Additionally, the average magnitude of pelvic acceleration peak values along the anterior-posterior direction for each step and the associated standard deviations (variability were not significantly different between the two modalities. The differences between OGW and UDW and TDW were mainly in swing time and cadence, as have been reported previously. Also, step lengths between OGW and TDW were different for 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s gait velocities

  7. Reduction and technical simplification of testing protocol for walking based on repeatability analyses: An Interreg IVa pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define the most appropriate gait measurement protocols to be used in our future studies in the Mobility in Ageing project. A group of young healthy volunteers took part in the study. Each subject carried out a 10-metre walking test at five different speeds (preferred, very slow, very fast, slow, and fast. Each walking speed was repeated three times, making a total of 15 trials which were carried out in a random order. Each trial was simultaneously analysed by three observers using three different technical approaches: a stop watch, photo cells and electronic kinematic dress. In analysing the repeatability of the trials, the results showed that of the five self-selected walking speeds, three of them (preferred, very fast, and very slow had a significantly higher repeatability of the average walking velocity, step length and cadence than the other two speeds. Additionally, the data showed that one of the three technical methods for gait assessment has better metric characteristics than the other two. In conclusion, based on repeatability, technical and organizational simplification, this study helped us to successfully define a simple and reliable walking test to be used in the main study of the project.

  8. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Joh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes such as walking, bicycling and transit in auto-oriented cities such as Los Angeles. Although many past studies have analyzed changes in walking travel across the U.S., there is little clarity on the drivers of change. We address this gap by conducting a longitudinal analysis of walking travel in the greater Los Angeles area from 2001 to 2009. We use travel diary and household data from regional and national surveys to analyze changes in walking trip shares and rates across our study area. Results show that walking has significantly increased across most of Los Angeles, and that increases in walking trips generally correspond with increases in population, employment, and transit service densities. Estimates from fixed-effects regression analysis generally suggest a positive association between population density and walking, and that higher increases in transit stop density are correlated with increased walking trips to and from transit stops. These findings illustrate how regional planning efforts to pursue a coordinated land use-transit planning strategy can help promote walking in auto-oriented or vehicle adopting cities.

  9. Practice of walking and its association with perceived environment among elderly Brazilians living in a region of low socioeconomic level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Rodrigo S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was analyze associations between the practice of walking and environmental perception among elderly Brazilians in a region of low socioeconomic level. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 385 elderly people aged 60 years and over. To evaluate walking, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, long version (leisure and transport modules was used. The environment was evaluated by means of the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale (NEWS (adapted Brazilian version. For the statistical analysis, multiple logistic regression models were created separately for men and women. The practice of at least 150 minutes a week of walking was the dependent variable, and the variables of environmental perception were the independent variables. All the models were controlled for schooling level and age. Results The proportion of elderly people active in walking was 56.9% for the men and 26.4% for the women. The perception of the presence of soccer fields (OR = 4.12 and their proximity, within ten minutes' walk from home (OR = 3.43, were associated with the practice of walking among the men. The perception of the presence of public squares (OR = 4.70 and the proximity of primary healthcare units, within ten minutes' walk from home (OR = 3.71, were associated with the practice of walking among the women. An association with adequate perception of vehicle traffic remained at the threshold of significance for the women. Conclusion Accessibility of leisure structures such as football fields and public squares and of health services such as primary healthcare units were important environmental variables associated with the practice of walking among elderly people living in a region of low socioeconomic level in Brazil. These variables need to be taken into consideration when aiming to promote the practice of walking among elderly people living in similar regions.

  10. Walking With’: A Rhythmanalysis of London’s East End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I will be looking at the practice of walking through the lens of rhythmanalysis. The method is brought to attention by Lefebvre’s last book Rhythmanalysis (2004 in which he suggests a way of interrelating space and time; a phenomenological inquiry hinged on the concrete experience of lived life. My interest in the nuance of walking was initially evoked by the structural film Fergus Walking which was made by the film maker William Raban in 1978. I will explore the potential of using structural films in sensitising us to the temporal-spatial relationship of things. The main body of the paper centres around two themes: Firstly I address the primacy of movement as a mode of engaging with the world. It is through ‘muscular consciousness’ (Bachelard 1964: 11 that walking becomes a form of experiential knowing, feeling, connecting and protesting. Secondly, I examine the practices of walking in relation to the radical transformations of the Docklands’ landscape since the beginning of the 1980s. I propose that the contesting interests of different groups can be explored by analysing the rhythmic interactions of their activities. The transition and recomposition of an economy from locally based industrial activities to globalised financial services were manifested in the syncopation of regeneration rhythms to the living rhythms of the Docklands. The fast changing urban landscapes were negotiated through alternative ways of navigating the streets, hence engendering a different set of rhythms.

  11. Scaling of random walk betweenness in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, O

    2016-01-01

    The betweenness centrality of graphs using random walk paths instead of geodesics is studied. A scaling collapse with no adjustable parameters is obtained as the graph size $N$ is varied; the scaling curve depends on the graph model. A normalized random betweenness, that counts each walk passing through a node only once, is also defined. It is argued to be more useful and seen to have simpler scaling behavior. In particular, the probability for a random walk on a preferential attachment graph to pass through the root node is found to tend to unity as $N\\rightarrow\\infty.$

  12. Elements of random walk and diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Oliver C

    2013-01-01

    Presents an important and unique introduction to random walk theory Random walk is a stochastic process that has proven to be a useful model in understanding discrete-state discrete-time processes across a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. Elements of Random Walk and Diffusion Processes provides an interdisciplinary approach by including numerous practical examples and exercises with real-world applications in operations research, economics, engineering, and physics. Featuring an introduction to powerful and general techniques that are used in the application of physical and dynamic

  13. The range of a rotor walk

    OpenAIRE

    Florescu, Laura; Levine, Lionel; Peres, Yuval

    2014-01-01

    In a \\emph{rotor walk} the exits from each vertex follow a prescribed periodic sequence. On an infinite Eulerian graph embedded periodically in $\\R^d$, we show that any simple rotor walk, regardless of rotor mechanism or initial rotor configuration, visits at least on the order of $t^{d/(d+1)}$ distinct sites in $t$ steps. We prove a shape theorem for the rotor walk on the comb graph with i.i.d.\\ uniform initial rotors, showing that the range is of order $t^{2/3}$ and the asymptotic shape of ...

  14. Effect of walking speed changes on tibialis anterior EMG during healthy gait for FES envelope design in drop foot correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, C A; O'Keeffe, D T; Donnelly, A E; Lyons, G M

    2007-10-01

    Functional electrical stimulation may be used to correct hemiplegic drop foot. An optimised stimulation envelope to reproduce the EMG pattern observed in the tibialis anterior (TA) during healthy gait has been proposed by O'Keeffe et al. [O'Keeffe, D.T., Donnelly, A.E., Lyons, G.M., 2003. The development of a potential optimised stimulation intensity envelope for drop foot applications. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering]. However this envelope did not attempt to account for changes in TA activity with walking speed. The objective of this paper was to provide data to enable the specification of an algorithm to control the adaptation of an envelope with walking speed. Ten young healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at 11 different walking speeds while TA EMG was recorded. The results showed that TA EMG recorded around initial contact and at toe off changed with walking speed. At the slowest velocities, equivalent to hemiplegic walking, the toe-off burst (TOB) of EMG activity had larger peak amplitude than that of the heel-strike burst (HSB). The peak amplitude ratio of TOB:HSB was 1:0.69 at the slowest speed compared to, 1:1.18 and 1:1.5 for the self-selected and fastest speed, respectively. These results suggest that an FES envelope, which produces larger EMG amplitude for the TOB than the HSB, would be more appropriate at walking speeds typical of hemiplegic patients. PMID:16990012

  15. Holographic Walking from Tachyon DBI

    CERN Document Server

    Kutasov, David; Parnachev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    We use holography to study Conformal Phase Transitions, which are believed to be realized in four dimensional QCD and play an important role in walking technicolor models of electroweak symmetry breaking. At strong coupling they can be modeled by the non-linear dynamics of a tachyonic scalar field with mass close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound in anti de Sitter spacetime. Taking the action for this field to have a Tachyon-Dirac-Born-Infeld form gives rise to models that resemble hard and soft wall AdS/QCD, with a dynamically generated wall. For hard wall models, the highly excited spectrum has the KK form m_n ~ n; in the soft wall case we exhibit potentials with m_n ~ n^\\alpha, 0<\\alpha\\leq1/2. We investigate the finite temperature phase structure and find first or second order symmetry restoration transitions, depending on the behavior of the potential near the origin of field space.

  16. Levy random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Quantong; Zheng, Zhiming; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Random walks constitute a fundamental mechanism for many dynamics taking place on complex networks. Besides, as a more realistic description of our society, multiplex networks have been receiving a growing interest, as well as the dynamical processes that occur on top of them. Here, inspired by one specific model of random walks that seems to be ubiquitous across many scientific fields, the Levy flight, we study a new navigation strategy on top of multiplex networks. Capitalizing on spectral graph and stochastic matrix theories, we derive analytical expressions for the mean first passage time and the average time to reach a node on these networks. Moreover, we also explore the efficiency of Levy random walks, which we found to be very different as compared to the single layer scenario, accounting for the structure and dynamics inherent to the multiplex network. Finally, by comparing with some other important random walk processes defined on multiplex networks, we find that in some region of the parameters, a ...

  17. Energy Expenditure During Walking with Hand Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makalous, Susan L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study of 11 obese adults who exercised with hand weights concludes that using the weights increases the energy demands of walking but only slightly. Research and results are presented and analyzed. (JL)

  18. Database of Standardized Questionnaires About Walking & Bicycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This database contains questionnaire items and a list of validation studies for standardized items related to walking and biking. The items come from multiple national and international physical activity questionnaires.

  19. Sensitivity Study of Stochastic Walking Load Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Frier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    On flexible structures such as footbridges and long-span floors, walking loads may generate excessive structural vibrations and serviceability problems. The problem is increasing because of the growing tendency to employ long spans in structural design. In many design codes, the vibration...... serviceability limit state is assessed using a walking load model in which the walking parameters are modelled deterministically. However, the walking parameters are stochastic (for instance the weight of the pedestrian is not likely to be the same for every footbridge crossing), and a natural way forward...... investigates whether statistical distributions of bridge response are sensitive to some of the decisions made by the engineer doing the analyses. For the paper a selected part of potential influences are examined and footbridge responses are extracted using Monte-Carlo simulations and focus is on estimating...

  20. Walking (Gait), Balance, and Coordination Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and include: poor balance and slowed walking reduced proprioception (the sensation of where your body parts are ... MS Connection Visit MSConnection.org symptoms of ms proprioception" the 6th sense of ms..please learn!! general ...

  1. Simple expressions for the long walk distance

    CERN Document Server

    Chebotarev, Pavel; Balaji, R

    2011-01-01

    The walk distances in graphs are defined as the result of appropriate transformations of the $\\sum_{k=0}^\\infty(tA)^k$ proximity measures, where $A$ is the weighted adjacency matrix of a connected weighted graph and $t$ is a sufficiently small positive parameter. The walk distances are graph-geodetic, moreover, they converge to the shortest path distance and to the so-called long walk distance as the parameter $t$ approaches its limiting values. In this paper, simple expressions for the long walk distance are obtained. They involve the generalized inverse, minors, and inverses of submatrices of the symmetric irreducible singular M-matrix ${\\cal L}=\\rho I-A,$ where $\\rho$ is the Perron root of $A.$

  2. Urban Walking and the Pedagogies of the Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon the extensive literature on urban walking and also on almost 60 years' experience of walking the streets, this article argues that there is a pressing need to re-assert the educational value of going for a walk. After a brief discussion of the social significance of the "flaneur," the historic pioneer of urban walking, the article…

  3. Variability and stability analysis of walking of transfemoral amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, Claudine C.; Ainsworth, Erik; Polomski, Wojtek; Houdijk, Han

    2010-01-01

    Variability and stability of walking of eight transfemoral amputees and eight healthy controls was studied under four conditions walking inside on a smooth terrain walking while performing a dual-task and walking outside on (ir)regular surfaces Trunk accelerations were recorded with a tri-axial acce

  4. Walking as a social practice: dispersed walking and the organisation of everyday practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Tim; Rettie, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    This paper uses social practice theory to study the interweaving of walking into everyday practices and considers how greater awareness of everyday walking can influence its position within the organisation and scheduling of everyday life. Walking is of policy interest because of its perceived benefits for health. This paper asserts that increased awareness of everyday walking allows users to become more active without having to reschedule existing activities. Using Schatzki's distinction between dispersed and integrative practices, it argues that increasing awareness of dispersed walking can enlist walking into the teleoaffective organisation of some social practices and prompt the performance of new 'health practices' within everyday domains of life such as shopping and employment. While this analysis offers useful insights for the design of behaviour change strategies, it also points to some unintended consequences of using digital feedback to increase walking awareness. In directing the gaze of participants at one particular element of their daily practices, the paper suggests, digital walking feedback provides a 'partial' view of practices: by highlighting the exercise value of walking at the expense of other values it can prompt feedback recipients to pass moral judgements on themselves based on this partial view. A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be found at: https://youtu.be/WV7DUnKD5Mw. PMID:26853086

  5. Kinematic responses to changes in walking orientation and gravitational load in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César S Mendes

    Full Text Available Walking behavior is context-dependent, resulting from the integration of internal and external influences by specialized motor and pre-motor centers. Neuronal programs must be sufficiently flexible to the locomotive challenges inherent in different environments. Although insect studies have contributed substantially to the identification of the components and rules that determine locomotion, we still lack an understanding of how multi-jointed walking insects respond to changes in walking orientation and direction and strength of the gravitational force. In order to answer these questions we measured with high temporal and spatial resolution the kinematic properties of untethered Drosophila during inverted and vertical walking. In addition, we also examined the kinematic responses to increases in gravitational load. We find that animals are capable of shifting their step, spatial and inter-leg parameters in order to cope with more challenging walking conditions. For example, flies walking in an inverted orientation decreased the duration of their swing phase leading to increased contact with the substrate and, as a result, greater stability. We also find that when flies carry additional weight, thereby increasing their gravitational load, some changes in step parameters vary over time, providing evidence for adaptation. However, above a threshold that is between 1 and 2 times their body weight flies display locomotion parameters that suggest they are no longer capable of walking in a coordinated manner. Finally, we find that functional chordotonal organs are required for flies to cope with additional weight, as animals deficient in these proprioceptors display increased sensitivity to load bearing as well as other locomotive defects.

  6. The Walking Trail-Making Test is an early detection tool for mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrochon A

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaick Perrochon, Gilles Kemoun Laboratoire Mobilité, Vieillissement, Exercice (MOVE, EA 6314, Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Université de Poitiers, 8 Allée Jean Monnet, 86000 Poitiers, France; ISIS, Research Institute on Handicap and Aging, Paris, France Background: Executive function impairment (in particular, mental flexibility in the elderly, and in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, is strongly correlated with difficulties in performing complex walking tasks. The aim of this study was to determine if the adaptation of a neuropsychological test (the Trail-Making Test, to evaluate executive functions during walking, can be an early detection tool for cognitive impairment. Methods: Fifty subjects (15 young, 20 older, presumably healthy, and 15 MCI were first evaluated for cognitive functions (Mini-Mental State Examination, Frontal Assessment Battery, and Trail-Making Test and motor functions (10-meter walking test. All subjects then performed a spatial navigation, or a complex walking test (the Walking Trail-Making Test: [WTMT], and their spatiotemporal walking variables were analyzed using cluster analysis. Results: Following evaluation of WTMT locomotor performance, cluster analysis revealed three groups that were distinctly different in age and cognitive abilities: a group of young subjects, a group of healthy older subjects, MCI subjects with amnestic impairment, and a group of MCI subjects with executive function impairment. The WTMT enabled early detection, (ie, borderline MCI of dysexecutive impairment, with 78% sensitivity and 90% specificity. Conclusion: The WTMT is of interest in that it can help provide early detection of dysexecutive cognitive impairment. Keywords: spatial navigation, walking, trail making test, detection, mild cognitive impairment

  7. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  8. Equal Superposition Transformations and Quantum Random Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Preeti

    2007-01-01

    The largest ensemble of qubits which satisfy the general transformation of equal superposition is obtained by different methods, namely, linearity, no-superluminal signalling and non-increase of entanglement under LOCC. We also consider the associated quantum random walk and show that all unitary balanced coins give the same asymmetric spatial probability distribution. It is further illustrated that unbalanced coins, upon appropriate superposition, lead to new unbiased walks which have no cla...

  9. The Snail Takes a Walk with Me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宜鸣; 乐伟国

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 I'm a snake. Today God gives me a job-I should take a walk with the snail. The snail moves too slowly. I have to scare him. He looks at me, full of shame. I am very angry. I pull him, and even kick.The snail cries, so he stops walking. I feel quite helpless.

  10. Tempered stable laws as random walk limits

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarty, Arijit; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    Stable laws can be tempered by modifying the L\\'evy measure to cool the probability of large jumps. Tempered stable laws retain their signature power law behavior at infinity, and infinite divisibility. This paper develops random walk models that converge to a tempered stable law under a triangular array scheme. Since tempered stable laws and processes are useful in statistical physics, these random walk models can provide a basic physical model for the underlying physical phenomena.

  11. Walking Out of the Family Towards Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    WALKING in any city or ruralarea in China today, one will seewomen with confidence andpride, with their own work and lives.There is not much difference between theurban and rural women in dress. Theirfaces portray contentment and happiness.These are significant changes which havebeen brought about by women walking outof the family over the past near 50 years,and getting involved in society, alteringtheir dependence on men and making thempeople of dignity. The government knew clearly that to

  12. Balancing of the anthropomorphous robot walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaev, V. M.; Nikitina, D. V.; Fadeev, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Anthropomorphic robots are designed a human environment operates: buildings and structures, cabs and etc. The movement of these robots is carried out by walking which provides high throughput to overcome natural and manmade obstacles. The article presents some algorithm results for dynamic walking on the anthropomorphic robot AR601 example. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University.

  13. On a directionally reinforced random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arka; Roitershtein, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We consider a generalized version of a directionally reinforced random walk, which was originally introduced by Mauldin, Monticino, and von Weizs\\"{a}cker in \\cite{drw}. Our main result is a stable limit theorem for the position of the random walk in higher dimensions. This extends a result of Horv\\'{a}th and Shao \\cite{limits} that was previously obtained in dimension one only (however, in a more stringent functional form).

  14. Propagation in quantum walks and relativistic diffusions

    OpenAIRE

    Debbasch, Fabrice; Di Molfetta, Giuseppe; Espaze, David; Foulonneau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Propagation in quantum walks is revisited by showing that very general 1D discrete-time quantum walks with time- and space-dependent coefficients can be described, at the continuous limit, by Dirac fermions coupled to electromagnetic fields. Short-time propagation is also established for relativistic diffusions by presenting new numerical simulations of the Relativistic Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process. A geometrical generalization of Fick's law is also obtained for this process. The results sugges...

  15. The evolutionary transition to sideways-walking gaits in brachyurans was accompanied by a reduction in the number of motor neurons innervating proximal leg musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G; Belanger, Jim H

    2013-11-01

    The forwards-walking portly crab, Libinia emarginata is an ancient brachyuran. Its phylogenetic position and behavioral repertoire make it an excellent candidate to reveal the adaptations, which were required for brachyuran crabs to complete their transition to sideways-walking from their forwards-walking ancestors. Previously we showed that in common with other forwards-walking (but distantly related) crustaceans, L. emarginata relies more heavily on its more numerous proximal musculature to propel itself forward than its sideways-walking closer relatives. We investigated if the proximal musculature of L. emarginata is innervated by a greater number of motor neurons than that of sideways-walking brachyurans. We found the distal musculature of spider crabs is innervated by a highly conserved number of motor neurons. However, innervation of its proximal musculature is more numerous than in closely-related (sideways-walking) species, resembling in number and morphology those described for forwards-walking crustaceans. We propose that transition from forward- to sideways-walking in crustaceans involved a decreased role for the proximal leg in favor of the more distal merus-carpus joint.

  16. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  17. Developmental Continuity? Crawling, Cruising, and Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Berger, Sarah E.; Leo, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between “cruising” (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior to walking, amassing several weeks of experience with both skills. Study 2 showed that cruising infants perceive affordances for locomotion over an adjustable gap in a handrail used for manual support, but despite weeks of cruising experience, cruisers are largely oblivious to the dangers of gaps in the floor beneath their feet. Study 3 replicated the floor-gap findings for infants taking their first independent walking steps, and showed that new walkers also misperceive affordances for locomoting between gaps in a handrail. The findings suggest that weeks of cruising do not teach infants a basic fact about walking: the necessity of a floor to support their body. Moreover, this research demonstrated that developmental milestones that are temporally contiguous and structurally similar might have important functional discontinuities. PMID:21399716

  18. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio /2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio /2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  19. Exploring scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L; Roland, J; Acevedo, Olga Lopez; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2006-01-01

    A quantum walk, \\emph{i.e.}, the quantum evolution of a particle on a graph, is termed \\emph{scalar} if the internal space of the moving particle (often called the coin) has a dimension one. Here, we study the existence of scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs, which are built from the generators of a group. After deriving a necessary condition on these generators for the existence of a scalar quantum walk, we present a general method to express the evolution operator of the walk, assuming homogeneity of the evolution. We use this necessary condition and the subsequent constructive method to investigate the existence of scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs of various groups presented with two or three generators. In this restricted framework, we classify all groups -- in terms of relations between their generators -- that admit scalar quantum walks, and we also derive the form of the most general evolution operator. Finally, we point out some interesting special cases, and extend our study to a few examples ...

  20. Goals and Social Comparisons Promote Walking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Gretchen B; Colby, Helen; Convery, Kimberly; Coups, Elliot J

    2016-05-01

    The effectiveness of a pedometer intervention was affected by manipulating the goals given to participants and by providing social comparison feedback about how participants' performance compared with others. In study 1 (n= 148), university staff members received a low, medium, or high walking goal (10%, 50%, or 100% increase over baseline walking). Participants walked 1358 more steps per day (95% confidence interval [CI], 729, 1985), when receiving a high goal than when receiving a medium goal, but a medium goal did not increase walking relative to a low goal (554 more steps; 95% CI, -71,1179). In study 2 (n= 64), participants received individual feedback only or individual plus social comparison feedback. Participants walked 1120 more steps per day (95% CI, 538, 1703) when receiving social comparison feedback than when receiving only individual feedback. Goals and the performance of others act as reference points and influence the effect that pedometer feedback has on walking behavior, illustrating the applicability of the principles of behavioral economics and social psychology to the design of health behavior interventions. PMID:26139447

  1. Fasting: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Valter D.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but only recently studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity in part by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps...

  2. Rhythm Pattern of Sole through Electrification of the Human Body When Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Kiyoaki; Wada, Takayuki; Tohyama, Shigeki

    The rhythm of automatic cyclic movements such as walking is known to be generated by a rhythm generator called CPG in the spinal cord. The measurement of rhythm characteristics in walking is considered to be important for analyzing human bipedal walking and adaptive walking on irregular terrain. In particular, the soles that contact the terrain surface perform flexible movements similar to the movement of the fins of a lungfish, which is considered to be the predecessor of land animals. The sole movements are believed to be a basic movement acquired during prehistoric times. The detailed rhythm pattern of sole motion is considered to be important. We developed a method for measuring electrification without installing device on a subject's body and footwear for stabilizing the electrification of the human body. We measured the rhythm pattern of 20 subjects including 4 infants when walking by using this system and the corresponding equipment. Therefore, we confirmed the commonality of the correlative rhythm patterns of 20 subjects. Further, with regard to an individual subject, the reproducibility of a rhythm pattern with strong correlation coefficient > 0.93 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD) concerning rhythms of trials that are differently conducted on adult subjects could be confirmed.

  3. Surprising trunk rotational capabilities in chimpanzees and implications for bipedal walking proficiency in early hominins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nathan E.; Demes, Brigitte; O'Neill, Matthew C.; Holowka, Nicholas B.; Larson, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Human walking entails coordinated out-of-phase axial rotations of the thorax and pelvis. A long-held assumption is that this ability relies on adaptations for trunk flexibility present in humans, but not in chimpanzees, other great apes, or australopithecines. Here we use three-dimensional kinematic analyses to show that, contrary to current thinking, chimpanzees walking bipedally rotate their lumbar and thoracic regions in a manner similar to humans. This occurs despite differences in the magnitude of trunk motion, and despite morphological differences in truncal ‘rigidity' between species. These results suggest that, like humans and chimpanzees, early hominins walked with upper body rotations that countered pelvic rotation. We demonstrate that even if early hominins walked with pelvic rotations 50% larger than humans, they may have accrued the energetic and mechanical benefits of out-of-phase thoracic rotations. This would have allowed early hominins to reduce work and locomotor cost, improving walking efficiency early in hominin evolution. PMID:26441046

  4. Gait Parameter Adjustments for Walking on a Treadmill at Preferred, Slower, and Faster Speeds in Older Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of ligamentous laxity, hypotonia, and decrements associated with aging lead to stability-enhancing foot placement adaptations during routine overground walking at a younger age in adults with Down syndrome (DS compared to their peers with typical development (TD. Our purpose here was to examine real-time adaptations in older adults with DS by testing their responses to walking on a treadmill at their preferred speed and at speeds slower and faster than preferred. We found that older adults with DS were able to adapt their gait to slower and faster than preferred treadmill speeds; however, they maintained their stability-enhancing foot placements at all speeds compared to their peers with TD. All adults adapted their gait patterns similarly in response to faster and slower than preferred treadmill-walking speeds. They increased stride frequency and stride length, maintained step width, and decreased percent stance as treadmill speed increased. Older adults with DS, however, adjusted their stride frequencies significantly less than their peers with TD. Our results show that older adults with DS have the capacity to adapt their gait parameters in response to different walking speeds while also supporting the need for intervention to increase gait stability.

  5. Limited effect of dopaminergic medication on straight walking and turning in early to moderate Parkinson’s disease during single and dual tasking

    OpenAIRE

    Morad eElshehabi; Maier, Katrin S.; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Susanne eNussbaum; Heinz eHerbst; Tanja eHeger; Daniela eBerg; Markus A Hobert; Walter eMaetzler

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Parkinson’s disease (PD), the effects of dopaminergic medication on straight walking and turning were mainly investigated under single tasking (ST) conditions. However, multitasking situations are considered more daily relevant.Methods: Thirty-nine early to moderate PD patients performed the following standarized ST and dual tasks (DT) as fast as possible for one minute during On- and Off-medication while wearing inertial sensors: straight walking and turning, checking boxes, a...

  6. Limited Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Straight Walking and Turning in Early-to-Moderate Parkinson’s Disease during Single and Dual Tasking

    OpenAIRE

    Elshehabi, Morad; Maier, Katrin S.; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Nussbaum, Susanne; Herbst, Heinz; Heger, Tanja; Berg, Daniela; Markus A Hobert; Maetzler, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Background In Parkinson’s disease (PD), the effects of dopaminergic medication on straight walking and turning were mainly investigated under single tasking (ST) conditions. However, multitasking situations are considered more daily relevant. Methods Thirty-nine early-to-moderate PD patients performed the following standardized ST and dual tasks as fast as possible for 1 min during On- and Off-medication while wearing inertial sensors: straight walking and turning, checking boxes, ...

  7. A simplified analytical random walk model for proton dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weiguang; Merchant, Thomas E.; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an analytical random walk model for proton dose calculation in a laterally homogeneous medium. A formula for the spatial fluence distribution of primary protons is derived. The variance of the spatial distribution is in the form of a distance-squared law of the angular distribution. To improve the accuracy of dose calculation in the Bragg peak region, the energy spectrum of the protons is used. The accuracy is validated against Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with either air gaps or a slab of bone inserted. The algorithm accurately reflects the dose dependence on the depth of the bone and can deal with small-field dosimetry. We further applied the algorithm to patients’ cases in the highly heterogeneous head and pelvis sites and used a gamma test to show the reasonable accuracy of the algorithm in these sites. Our algorithm is fast for clinical use.

  8. The future of walking in Europe: a Delphi project to identify export opinion on Future walking scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolley, R.; Lumsdon, L.; Bickerstaff, K. [CAST - The Centre for Alternative and Sustainable Transport, Staffordshire University, Stoke on Trent (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of walking to the sustainability of cities, set against a continuing decline in everyday walking. This paper reports on a research project, which predicts trends in walking in Europe by 2010 by seeking opinion of experts who are knowledgeable about non-motorised transport. There is a consensus that there will be more walking for leisure and health, but less everyday walking. This will happen despite walking being seen as more important and there being more facilities, infrastructure, information and funding for walking. (author)

  9. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Macleod

    Full Text Available Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation.

  10. Particle resuspension due to human walking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    al. (1971)). Moreover, this technique, taking into account the surface roughness, shows that adhesion forces decrease while particle diameter increase. Finally, the analysis of AFM measurements gives a correlation linking the distribution of adhesion forces to the particle diameter, replacing the one given by Biasi et al. (2001) originally used in the Rock'n'Roll model and thereby adapt the model to particles and flooring studied in our case. Coupling, performed in ANSYS CFX software, between the calculations of friction velocity and model of particle resuspension, gives theoretical resuspension rate during shoe motion. This coupling was initially validated by comparison to the experience for the simple case of a rotating plate in a controlled volume. Secondly, experiments at the scale of a ventilated room of 30 m3 were performed by walking on an epoxy coating initially seeded by calibrated particle size (1.1 μm and 3.3 μm). These experiments highlight the parameters influencing the suspension of particles, such as step frequency and particle size. (author)

  11. Angular momentum in human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh; Popovic, Marko

    2008-02-01

    Angular momentum is a conserved physical quantity for isolated systems where no external moments act about a body's center of mass (CM). However, in the case of legged locomotion, where the body interacts with the environment (ground reaction forces), there is no a priori reason for this relationship to hold. A key hypothesis in this paper is that angular momentum is highly regulated throughout the walking cycle about all three spatial directions [|Lt| approximately 0], and therefore horizontal ground reaction forces and the center of pressure trajectory can be explained predominantly through an analysis that assumes zero net moment about the body's CM. Using a 16-segment human model and gait data for 10 study participants, we found that calculated zero-moment forces closely match experimental values (Rx2=0.91; Ry2=0.90). Additionally, the centroidal moment pivot (point where a line parallel to the ground reaction force, passing through the CM, intersects the ground) never leaves the ground support base, highlighting how closely the body regulates angular momentum. Principal component analysis was used to examine segmental contributions to whole-body angular momentum. We found that whole-body angular momentum is small, despite substantial segmental momenta, indicating large segment-to-segment cancellations ( approximately 95% medio-lateral, approximately 70% anterior-posterior and approximately 80% vertical). Specifically, we show that adjacent leg-segment momenta are balanced in the medio-lateral direction (left foot momentum cancels right foot momentum, etc.). Further, pelvis and abdomen momenta are balanced by leg, chest and head momenta in the anterior-posterior direction, and leg momentum is balanced by upper-body momentum in the vertical direction. Finally, we discuss the determinants of gait in the context of these segment-to-segment cancellations of angular momentum.

  12. Fast Algorithm for k-nearest Neighbor Serch Based on Adaptive Spatial Sphere%基于自适应空间球的k最近邻域快速搜索算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨军; 林岩龙; 王小鹏; 张瑞峰

    2014-01-01

    To solve the problem of low efficiency and weak stability in searching k-nearest neighbor of large-scale scattered point cloud by using sphere space,a fast algorithm for finding k-nearest neighbor is presented. Point cloud data is divided into different sub-space by using partition strategy without considering k. The radius of the initial dynamic sphere is determined adaptively based on the approximate density of sampling points in a sub-space. The k-nearest candidate points are searched by the circumscribed cube of a dynamic sphere. When the number of k-nearest candidate points does not meet the requirement, or the search fails, the expanding extent is ensured by a circumsphere of the circumscribed cube. Experimental results show that the proposed method obtains not only a better performance and automation than the existing algorithms,but also a quite stability for the anticipated point number of the sub-space and sampling density.%利用空间球搜索大规模点云数据k邻域存在速率慢和稳定性差的问题,为此,提出一种新的k邻域快速搜索算法。利用与k无关的分块策略对点云进行分块,使用候选点所在子块内采样点的近似密度自适应确定候选点的初始动态球半径,应用动态球的外切立方体搜索k邻域候选点。当候选点数目不满足要求或搜索不成功时,采用候选点动态球外切立方体的外接球扩大搜索范围。实验结果表明,与已有算法相比,该算法的k邻域搜索效率明显提高,而且当子块内预设点数变化、采样密度提高时具有较强稳定性,自动化程度较高。

  13. Kinematic evaluation of virtual walking trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Gabriel; Olivier, Anne-Hélène; Marchal, Maud; Pettré, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Virtual walking, a fundamental task in Virtual Reality (VR), is greatly influenced by the locomotion interface being used, by the specificities of input and output devices, and by the way the virtual environment is represented. No matter how virtual walking is controlled, the generation of realistic virtual trajectories is absolutely required for some applications, especially those dedicated to the study of walking behaviors in VR, navigation through virtual places for architecture, rehabilitation and training. Previous studies focused on evaluating the realism of locomotion trajectories have mostly considered the result of the locomotion task (efficiency, accuracy) and its subjective perception (presence, cybersickness). Few focused on the locomotion trajectory itself, but in situation of geometrically constrained task. In this paper, we study the realism of unconstrained trajectories produced during virtual walking by addressing the following question: did the user reach his destination by virtually walking along a trajectory he would have followed in similar real conditions? To this end, we propose a comprehensive evaluation framework consisting on a set of trajectographical criteria and a locomotion model to generate reference trajectories. We consider a simple locomotion task where users walk between two oriented points in space. The travel path is analyzed both geometrically and temporally in comparison to simulated reference trajectories. In addition, we demonstrate the framework over a user study which considered an initial set of common and frequent virtual walking conditions, namely different input devices, output display devices, control laws, and visualization modalities. The study provides insight into the relative contributions of each condition to the overall realism of the resulting virtual trajectories.

  14. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Svendsen, Morten B; Nørreslet, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    phase was doubled when walking on high heels. The knee joint angle showed that high-heeled walking caused the subjects to flex the knee joint significantly more in the first half of the stance phase. In the frontal plane a significant increase was observed in the knee joint abductor moment and the hip...

  15. The associated random walk and martingales in random walks with stationary increments

    CERN Document Server

    Grey, D R

    2010-01-01

    We extend the notion of the associated random walk and the Wald martingale in random walks where the increments are independent and identically distributed to the more general case of stationary ergodic increments. Examples are given where the increments are Markovian or Gaussian, and an application in queueing is considered.

  16. Exercise intensity of robot-assisted walking versus overground walking in nonambulatory stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel P. M. van Nunen, MSc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that aerobic training should be considered in stroke rehabilitation programs to counteract detrimental health effects and decrease cardiovascular risk caused by inactivity. Robot-assisted treadmill exercise (using a Lokomat device has the potential to increase the duration of walking therapy relative to conventional overground therapy. We investigated whether exercise intensity during Lokomat therapy is adequate to elicit a training effect and how assistance during walking in the Lokomat affects this exercise intensity. Ten patients with stroke (age 54 +/– 9 yr walked in both the Lokomat and in a hallway. Furthermore, 10 nondisabled subjects (age 43 +/– 14 yr walked in the Lokomat at various settings and on a treadmill at various speeds. During walking, oxygen consumption and heart rate were monitored. Results showed that for patients with stroke, exercise intensity did not reach recommended levels (30% heart rate reserve for aerobic training during Lokomat walking. Furthermore, exercise intensity during walking in the Lokomat (9.3 +/– 1.6 mL/min/kg was lower than during overground walking (10.4 +/– 1.3 mL/min/kg. Also, different settings of the Lokomat only had small effects on exercise intensity in nondisabled subjects.

  17. Energy efficient walking with central pattern generators: from passive dynamic walking to biologically inspired control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, B.W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2009-01-01

    Like human walking, passive dynamic walking—i.e. walking down a slope with no actuation except gravity—is energy efficient by exploiting the natural dynamics. In the animal world, neural oscillators termed central pattern generators (CPGs) provide the basic rhythm for muscular activity in locomotion

  18. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nørreslet, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...

  19. Does walking strategy in older people change as a function of walking distance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najafi, Bijan; Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates whether the spatio-temporal parameters of gait in the elderly vary as a function of walking distance. The gait pattern of older subjects (n = 27) over both short (SWD <10 m) and long (LWD > 20 in) walking was evaluated using an ambulatory device consisting of body-worn sensor

  20. STS-102 Astronaut Susan Helms Participates in Space Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 mission astronaut Susan J. Helms translates along the longerons of the Space Shuttle Discovery during the first of two space walks. During this walk, the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 was prepared for repositioning from the Unity Module's Earth-facing berth to its port-side berth to make room for the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), supplied by the Italian Space Agency. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space Station Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

  1. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  2. Effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual variables and performance of self-selected walking pace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Flávia Angélica Martins; Nunes, Renan Felipe Hartmann; Ferreira, Sandro Dos Santos; Krinski, Kleverton; Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklin; Alves, Ragami Chaves; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual responses as well as the performance of self-selected walking pace. [Subjects] The study included 28 adult women between 29 and 51 years old. [Methods] The subjects were divided into three groups: no musical stimulation group (control), and 90 and 140 beats per minute musical tempo groups. Each subject underwent three experimental sessions: involved familiarization with the equipment, an incremental test to exhaustion, and a 30-min walk on a treadmill at a self-selected pace, respectively. During the self-selected walking session, physiological, perceptual, and affective variables were evaluated, and walking performance was evaluated at the end. [Results] There were no significant differences in physiological variables or affective response among groups. However, there were significant differences in perceptual response and walking performance among groups. [Conclusion] Fast music (140 beats per minute) promotes a higher rating of perceived exertion and greater performance in self-selected walking pace without significantly altering physiological variables or affective response. PMID:26180303

  3. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group = 21, walking group = 18, patient education group = 17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  4. Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Rutgers, AWF; Van Weerden, TW

    1998-01-01

    Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, effects of changes in voluntary control were studied by asking PD patients and age-matched healthy subjects to adapt their walking pattern to visual cues result

  5. Scaling Argument of Anisotropic Random Walk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bing-Zhen; JIN Guo-Jun; WANG Fei-Feng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we analytically discuss the scaling properties of the average square end-to-end distance for anisotropic random walk in D-dimensional space ( D ≥ 2), and the returning probability Pn(ro) for the walker into a certain neighborhood of the origin. We will not only give the calculating formula for and Pn (ro), but also point out that if there is a symmetric axis for the distribution of the probability density of a single step displacement, we always obtain ~ n, where ⊥ refers to the projections of the displacement perpendicular to each symmetric axes of the walk; in D-dimensional space with D symmetric axes perpendicular to each other, we always have ~ n and the random walk will be like a purely random motion; if the number of inter-perpendicular symmetric axis is smaller than the dimensions of the space, we must have ~ n2 for very large n and the walk will be like a ballistic motion. It is worth while to point out that unlike the isotropic random walk in one and two dimensions, which is certain to return into the neighborhood of the origin, generally there is only a nonzero probability for the anisotropic random walker in two dimensions to return to the neighborhood.

  6. Vection in depth during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, April; Palmisano, Stephen; Apthorp, Deborah; Allison, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Vection has typically been induced in stationary observers (ie conditions providing visual-only information about self-motion). Two recent studies have examined vection during active treadmill walking--one reported that treadmill walking in the same direction as the visually simulated self-motion impaired vection (Onimaru et al, 2010 Journal of Vision 10(7):860), the other reported that it enhanced vection (Seno et al, 2011 Perception 40 747-750; Seno et al, 2011 Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 1467-1476). Our study expands on these earlier investigations of vection during observer active movement. In experiment 1 we presented radially expanding optic flow and compared the vection produced in stationary observers with that produced during walking forward on a treadmill at a 'matched' speed. Experiment 2 compared the vection induced by forward treadmill walking while viewing expanding or contracting optic flow with that induced by viewing playbacks of these same displays while stationary. In both experiments subjects' tracked head movements were either incorporated into the self-motion displays (as simulated viewpoint jitter) or simply ignored. We found that treadmill walking always reduced vection (compared with stationary viewing conditions) and that simulated viewpoint jitter always increased vection (compared with constant velocity displays). These findings suggest that while consistent visual-vestibular information about self-acceleration increases vection, biomechanical self-motion information reduces this experience (irrespective of whether it is consistent or not with the visual input).

  7. Viewer preferences for adaptive playout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sachin

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive media playout techniques are used to avoid buffer underflow in a dynamic streaming environment where the available bandwidth may be fluctuating. In this paper we report human perceptions from audio quality studies that we performed on speech and music samples for adaptive audio playout. Test methods based on ITU-R BS. 1534-1 recommendation were used. Studies were conducted for both slow playout and fast playout. Two scales - a coarse scale and a finer scale was used for the slow and fast audio playout factors. Results from our study can be used to determine acceptable slow and fast playout factors for speech and music content. An adaptive media playout algorithm could use knowledge of these upper and lower bounds on playback speeds to decide its adaptive playback schedule.

  8. Exergame and Balance Training Modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and Enhance Executive Function in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Wolf, Martin; Schumann, Martina; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Fort...

  9. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  10. Modeling, simulation and optimization of bipedal walking

    CERN Document Server

    Berns, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The model-based investigation of motions of anthropomorphic systems is an important interdisciplinary research topic involving specialists from many fields such as Robotics, Biomechanics, Physiology, Orthopedics, Psychology, Neurosciences, Sports, Computer Graphics and Applied Mathematics. This book presents a study of basic locomotion forms such as walking and running is of particular interest due to the high demand on dynamic coordination, actuator efficiency and balance control. Mathematical models and numerical simulation and optimization techniques are explained, in combination with experimental data, which can help to better understand the basic underlying mechanisms of these motions and to improve them. Example topics treated in this book are Modeling techniques for anthropomorphic bipedal walking systems Optimized walking motions for different objective functions Identification of objective functions from measurements Simulation and optimization approaches for humanoid robots Biologically inspired con...

  11. Gaussian Networks Generated by Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We propose a random walks based model to generate complex networks. Many authors studied and developed different methods and tools to analyze complex networks by random walk processes. Just to cite a few, random walks have been adopted to perform community detection, exploration tasks and to study temporal networks. Moreover, they have been used also to generate scale-free networks. In this work, we define a random walker that plays the role of "edges-generator". In particular, the random walker generates new connections and uses these ones to visit each node of a network. As result, the proposed model allows to achieve networks provided with a Gaussian degree distribution, and moreover, some features as the clustering coefficient and the assortativity show a critical behavior. Finally, we performed numerical simulations to study the behavior and the properties of the cited model.

  12. Photonics walking up a human hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Burresi, Matteo; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2016-03-01

    While animals have access to sugars as energy source, this option is generally not available to artificial machines and robots. Energy delivery is thus the bottleneck for creating independent robots and machines, especially on micro- and nano- meter length scales. We have found a way to produce polymeric nano-structures with local control over the molecular alignment, which allowed us to solve the above issue. By using a combination of polymers, of which part is optically sensitive, we can create complex functional structures with nanometer accuracy, responsive to light. In particular, this allowed us to realize a structure that can move autonomously over surfaces (it can "walk") using the environmental light as its energy source. The robot is only 60 μm in total length, thereby smaller than any known terrestrial walking species, and it is capable of random, directional walking and rotating on different dry surfaces.

  13. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence non-specific learning during......Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. Here we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...

  14. Real-time Walking Pattern Generation for a Biped Robot with Hybrid CPG-ZMP Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biped robots have better mobility than conventional wheeled robots. The bio-inspired method based on a central pattern generator (CPG can be used to control biped robot walking in a manner like human beings. However, to achieve stable locomotion, it is difficult to modulate the parameters for the neural networks to coordinate every degree of freedom of the walking robot. The zero moment point (ZMP method is very popular for the stability control of biped robot walking. However, the reference trajectories have low energy efficiency, lack naturalness and need significant offline calculation. This paper presents a new method for biped real-time walking generation using a hybrid CPG-ZMP control algorithm. The method can realize a stable walking pattern by combining the ZMP criterion with rhythmic motion control. The CPG component is designed to generate the desired motion for each robot joint, which is modulated by phase resetting according to foot contact information. By introducing the ZMP location, the activity of the CPG output signal is adjusted to coordinate the limbs’ motion and allow the robot to maintain balance during the process of locomotion. The numerical simulation results show that, compared with the CPG method, the new hybrid CPG-ZMP algorithm can enhance the robustness of the CPG parameters and improve the stability of the robot. In addition, the proposed algorithm is more energy efficient than the ZMP method. The results also demonstrate that the control system can generate an adaptive walking pattern through interactions between the robot, the CPG and the environment.

  15. Asymptotically Stable Walking of a Five-Link Underactuated 3D Bipedal Robot

    CERN Document Server

    Chevallereau, Christine; Shih, Ching-Long; 10.1109/TRO.2008.2010366

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents three feedback controllers that achieve an asymptotically stable, periodic, and fast walking gait for a 3D (spatial) bipedal robot consisting of a torso, two legs, and passive (unactuated) point feet. The contact between the robot and the walking surface is assumed to inhibit yaw rotation. The studied robot has 8 DOF in the single support phase and 6 actuators. The interest of studying robots with point feet is that the robot's natural dynamics must be explicitly taken into account to achieve balance while walking. We use an extension of the method of virtual constraints and hybrid zero dynamics, in order to simultaneously compute a periodic orbit and an autonomous feedback controller that realizes the orbit. This method allows the computations to be carried out on a 2-DOF subsystem of the 8-DOF robot model. The stability of the walking gait under closed-loop control is evaluated with the linearization of the restricted Poincar\\'e map of the hybrid zero dynamics. Three strategies are explo...

  16. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Huu Truong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk.

  17. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Phuc Huu; Lee, Jinwook; Kwon, Ae-Ran; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk. PMID:27271634

  18. Comprehend DeepWalk as Matrix Factorization

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cheng; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Word2vec, as an efficient tool for learning vector representation of words has shown its effectiveness in many natural language processing tasks. Mikolov et al. issued Skip-Gram and Negative Sampling model for developing this toolbox. Perozzi et al. introduced the Skip-Gram model into the study of social network for the first time, and designed an algorithm named DeepWalk for learning node embedding on a graph. We prove that the DeepWalk algorithm is actually factoring a matrix M where each e...

  19. Topics in random walks in random environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last twenty-five years random motions in random media have been intensively investigated and some new general methods and paradigms have by now emerged. Random walks in random environment constitute one of the canonical models of the field. However in dimension bigger than one they are still poorly understood and many of the basic issues remain to this day unresolved. The present series of lectures attempt to give an account of the progresses which have been made over the last few years, especially in the study of multi-dimensional random walks in random environment with ballistic behavior. (author)

  20. Metabolic cost of lateral stabilization during walking in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, J H; Wu, M; Gordon, K E

    2015-02-01

    People with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) expend considerable energy to walk, which can lead to rapid fatigue and limit community ambulation. Selecting locomotor patterns that enhance lateral stability may contribute to this population's elevated cost of transport. The goal of the current study was to quantify the metabolic energy demands of maintaining lateral stability during gait in people with iSCI. To quantify this metabolic cost, we observed ten individuals with iSCI walking with and without external lateral stabilization. We hypothesized that with external lateral stabilization, people with iSCI would adapt their gait by decreasing step width, which would correspond with a substantial decrease in cost of transport. Our findings support this hypothesis. Subjects significantly (p<0.05) decreased step width by 22%, step width variability by 18%, and minimum lateral margin of stability by 25% when they walked with external lateral stabilization compared to unassisted walking. Metabolic cost of transport also decreased significantly (p<0.05) by 10% with external lateral stabilization. These findings suggest that this population is capable of adapting their gait to meet changing demands placed on balance. The percent reduction in cost of transport when walking with external lateral stabilization was strongly correlated with functional impairment level as assessed by subjects' scores on the Berg Balance Scale (r=0.778) and lower extremity motor score (r=0.728). These relationships suggest that as functional balance and strength decrease, the amount of metabolic energy used to maintain lateral stability during gait will increase.

  1. Knee joint kinematics during walking influences the spatial cartilage thickness distribution in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Rylander, Jonathan H; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2011-04-29

    The regional adaptation of knee cartilage morphology to the kinematics of walking has been suggested as an important factor in the evaluation of the consequences of alteration in normal gait leading to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of spatial cartilage thickness distributions of the femur and tibia in the knee to the knee kinematics during walking. Gait data and knee MR images were obtained from 17 healthy volunteers (age 33.2 ± 9.8 years). Cartilage thickness maps were created for the femoral and tibial cartilage. Locations of thickest cartilage in the medial and lateral compartments in the femur and tibia were identified using a numerical method. The flexion-extension (FE) angle associated with the cartilage contact regions on the femur, and the anterior-posterior (AP) translation and internal-external (IE) rotation associated with the cartilage contact regions on the tibia at the heel strike of walking were tested for correlation with the locations of thickest cartilage. The locations of the thickest cartilage had relatively large variation (SD, 8.9°) and was significantly associated with the FE angle at heel strike only in the medial femoral condyle (R(2)=0.41, pknee kinematics and contact surface shapes seem to affect the functional adaptation of knee articular cartilage morphology. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to kinematics at the knee during walking suggests that regional cartilage thickness variations are influenced by both loading and the number of loading cycles. Thus walking is an important consideration in the analysis of the morphological variations of articular cartilage, since it is the dominant cyclic activity of daily living. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to gait kinematics is also important in understanding the etiology and pathomechanics of osteoarthritis.

  2. 仿人机器人动态步行控制综述%Survey on dynamic walking control of humanoid robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成军; 李祖枢; 薛方正

    2009-01-01

    This paper surveys the history and current research on dynamic walking control of humanoid robot.The characteristics of dynamic walking are summarized and the stability criteria of dynamic walking are also analyzed.Posture stability criterion based on ZMP(Zero Moment Point) and gait stability criterion based on Poincaré map are introduced.The learning methods and adaptation capabilities of dynamic walking on a complex terrain are presented and the typical solutions of dynamic walking con-trol are reviewed.Several problems of dynamic walking control which need to be solved are listed and the development directions are presented.%综述了仿人机器人动态步行的研究历史和研究现状.归纳了动态步行的特点,分析了动态步行稳定性判定方法,介绍了基于ZMP的姿态稳定判据和基于庞加莱映射(Poincaré Map)的步态稳定判据.总结了仿人机器人学习适应复杂地面环境步行的方法,概述了动态步行控制实现的典型解决方案,指出了动态步行控制中待解决的问题,并探讨了未来的发展方向.

  3. Dynamic Locomotion of a Biomorphic Quadruped ‘Tekken’ Robot Using Various Gaits: Walk, Trot, Free-Gait and Bound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fukuoka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous quadruped walking and running robots have been developed to date. Each robot walks by means of a crawl, walk, trot or pace gait, or runs by means of a bound and/or gallop gait. However, it is very difficult to design a single robot that can both walk and run because of problems related to mechanisms and control. In response to this, we adapted a biological control method for legged locomotion in order to develop a dog-like quadruped robot we have named ‘Tekken’. Tekken has a control system that incorporates central pattern generators, reflexes and responses as well as a mechanism that makes the most of the control system. Tekken, which is equipped with a single mechanism, an unchangeable control method, and modifiable parameters, is capable of achieving walking and trotting on flat terrain, can walk using a free gait on irregular terrain, and is capable of running on flat terrain using a bounding gait. In this paper, we describe the mechanism, the control method and the experimental results of our new development.

  4. Environmental factors influencing older adults’ walking for transportation: a study using walk-along interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cauwenberg Jelle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current knowledge on the relationship between the physical environment and walking for transportation among older adults (≥ 65 years is limited. Qualitative research can provide valuable information and inform further research. However, qualitative studies are scarce and fail to include neighborhood outings necessary to study participants’ experiences and perceptions while interacting with and interpreting the local social and physical environment. The current study sought to uncover the perceived environmental influences on Flemish older adults’ walking for transportation. To get detailed and context-sensitive environmental information, it used walk-along interviews. Methods Purposeful convenience sampling was used to recruit 57 older adults residing in urban or semi-urban areas. Walk-along interviews to and from a destination (e.g. a shop located within a 15 minutes’ walk from the participants’ home were conducted. Content analysis was performed using NVivo 9 software (QSR International. An inductive approach was used to derive categories and subcategories from the data. Results Data were categorized in the following categories and subcategories: access to facilities (shops & services, public transit, connectivity, walking facilities (sidewalk quality, crossings, legibility, benches, traffic safety (busy traffic, behavior of other road users, familiarity, safety from crime (physical factors, other persons, social contacts, aesthetics (buildings, natural elements, noise & smell, openness, decay and weather. Conclusions The findings indicate that to promote walking for transportation a neighborhood should provide good access to shops and services, well-maintained walking facilities, aesthetically appealing places, streets with little traffic and places for social interaction. In addition, the neighborhood environment should evoke feelings of familiarity and safety from crime. Future quantitative studies should

  5. A REVIEW OF ADAPTIVE AUTORECLOSURE TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHILIP YAW OKYERE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive autoreclosing is a fast emerging technology for improving power system marginal stability during faults. It avoids reclosing untopermanent faults and recloses unto transient faults only after the secondary arc has extinguished. This paper presents a comprehensive review of various adaptive autoreclosure techniques. It aims at providing a broad perspective on adaptive autoreclosing techniques to researchers and application engineers.

  6. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...... on 10042 children with cerebral palsy born between 1976 and 1996 were gathered from 14 European centers; 9012 patients were eligible for the analyses. RESULTS: Unaided walking as the primary way of walking at 5 years of age was reported for 54%, walking with assistive devices was reported for 16......%, and no walking ability was reported for 30%. The proportion of children who were unable to walk was rather stable over time in all of the centers, with a mean proportion of 28%. Walking ability related significantly to cerebral palsy types, that is, spastic unilateral, spastic bilateral, dyskinetic, and ataxic...

  7. Laser Challenges for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuegel, J.D.; Borneis, S.; Barty, C.; LeGarrec, B.; Danson, C.; Miyanga, N.; Rambo, P.K.; LeBlanc, C.; Kessler, T.J.; Schmid, A.W.; Waxer, L.J.; Kelly, J.H.; Kruschwitz, B.; Jungquist, R.; Moses, E.; Britten, J.; Jovanovic, I.; Dawson, J.; Blanchot, N.

    2006-04-12

    The laser challenges and state of the art in high-energy, solid-state petawatt lasers for fast ignition (FI) research are reviewed. A number of new laser systems are currently under construction or being planned that will facilitate proof-of-principle FI experiments. Recent technological advances in each of the major ultrafast laser subsystems are reported, including chirped-pulse generation and broadband amplification in the front end, high-energy amplification, and pulse compression with adaptive wavefront correction.

  8. Sound design and perception in walking interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visell, Yon; Fontana, Federico; Giordano, Bruno;

    2009-01-01

    of walking, and the design, engineering, and evaluation of interfaces that utilize them. Much of this expertise has accumulated in recent years, although many questions remain to be explored. We highlight past work and current research directions in this multidisciplinary area of investigation, and point...

  9. Random Walk Method for Potential Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A local Random Walk Method (RWM) for potential problems governed by Lapalace's and Paragon's equations is developed for two- and three-dimensional problems. The RWM is implemented and demonstrated in a multiprocessor parallel environment on a Beowulf cluster of computers. A speed gain of 16 is achieved as the number of processors is increased from 1 to 23.

  10. Localization of M-Particle Quantum Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Ampadu, Clement

    2011-01-01

    We study the motion of M particles performing a quantum walk on the line. Under various conditions on the initial coin states for quantum walkers controlled by the Hadamard operator, we give theoretical criterion to observe the quantum walkers at an initial location with high probability.

  11. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  12. Go Naked: Diapers Affect Infant Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Whitney G.; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants' poor balance and wide stance. We show that…

  13. Assessment of a Solar System Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Murrell, Steven R.; Kirchner, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The idea of sending students and the general public on a walk through a scale model of the solar system in an attempt to instill an appreciation of the relative scales of the sizes of the objects compared to the immense distances between them is certainly not new. A good number of such models exist, including one on the National Mall in…

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood : Prognosis for walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, RHH; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Gulmans, VAM; Pruijs, H; Helders, PJM

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: We studied the predicted value of disease-related characteristics for the ability of children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) to walk. Study design: The severity of OI was classified according to Sillence. The parents were asked to report the age at which the child achieved motor miles

  15. The Quantum Walk of F. Riesz

    CERN Document Server

    Grunbaum, F A

    2011-01-01

    We exhibit a way to associate a quantum walk (QW) on the non-negative integers to any probability measure on the unit circle. This forces us to consider one step transitions that are not traditionally allowed. We illustrate this in the case of a very interesting measure, originally proposed by F. Riesz for a different purpose.

  16. Trying-out a walking help:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2016-01-01

    learning process in which the participants prepare, enact and assess the performance of the technology supported walking. The paper distinguishes two iterative phases in which the impaired person is constituted as an independent walker: the adjustment and assessment of a body-device relation and, further...

  17. Movement Behavior of High-Heeled Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter Christian; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar;

    2012-01-01

    The human locomotor system is flexible and enables humans to move without falling even under less than optimal conditions. Walking with high-heeled shoes constitutes an unstable condition and here we ask how the nervous system controls the ankle joint in this situation? We investigated the movement...

  18. The Physics of a Walking Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guemez, J.; Fiolhais, M.

    2013-01-01

    The physics of walking is explored, using a toy as a concrete example and a "toy model" applied to it. Besides using Newton's second law, the problem is also discussed from the thermodynamical perspective. Once the steady state (constant velocity) is achieved, we show that the internal energy of the toy is dissipated as heat in the…

  19. The physics of a walking robot

    CERN Document Server

    Güémez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The physics of walking is explored, using a toy as a concrete example and a 'toy' model applied to it. Besides the Newton's second law, the problem is also discussed from the thermodynamical perspective. Once the steady state (constant velocity) is achieved, we show that the internal energy of the toy is dissipated as heat in the surroundings.

  20. 'Walking Meetings' May Boost Employee Health, Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R. Tapia School of Business at Saint Leo University in Florida. Clayton, who has written about walking meetings in the Harvard Business Review , added that these sessions can also have psychological benefits, such as increased job satisfaction and benefits to the organization, such as heightened ...

  1. Iterated random walks with shape prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pujadas, Esmeralda Ruiz; Kjer, Hans Martin; Piella, Gemma;

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new framework for image segmentation using random walks where a distance shape prior is combined with a region term. The shape prior is weighted by a confidence map to reduce the influence of the prior in high gradient areas and the region term is computed with k-means to estimate th...

  2. Getting mobile with a walking-help

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    in Symbolic Interaction 33: 443-457. Latour, B. (2005).Reassembeling the social. An Introduction to Actor-Network-Theory. Oxford University Press. Ryave, A. L. and J. N. Schenkein. (1974). Not es on the Art of Walking. In Turner, R. (ed.) Ethnomethodology. Selected Readings. Middlesex: Penguin, 265...

  3. Myths about the Country Walk Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheit, Ross E.; Mervis, David

    2007-01-01

    The Country Walk case in Dade County, Florida was long considered a model for how to prosecute a multi-victim child sexual abuse case involving young children. In the past 10 years, however, a contrary view has emerged that the case was tainted by improper interviewing and was likely a false conviction. This is the first scholarly effort to assess…

  4. Influence of moving visual surroundings on walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mert, A.; Hak, L.; Bles, W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Balance is negatively influenced by optokinetic stimuli. Fall research with these stimuli has been done with standing subjects. Less is known of the influence these stimuli have on risk of falling while walking. The objective of this study was to qualitatively investigate the influence

  5. Random walk term weighting for information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, R.; Lioma, Christina

    2007-01-01

    We present a way of estimating term weights for Information Retrieval (IR), using term co-occurrence as a measure of dependency between terms.We use the random walk graph-based ranking algorithm on a graph that encodes terms and co-occurrence dependencies in text, from which we derive term weights...

  6. Quantifiying the stability of walking using accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarsing, Jan H.; Mayagoitia, Ruth E.; Veltink, Peter H.

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic analysis method is sought to measure the relative stability of walking, using a triaxial accelerometer. A performance parameter that can be calculated from the data from the accelerometer is defined; it should give a measure of the stability of the subject. It is based on the balancing for

  7. Exact Random Walk Distributions using Noncommutative Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bellissard, J; Barelli, A; Claro, F; Bellissard, Jean; Camacho, Carlos J; Barelli, Armelle; Claro, Francisco

    1997-01-01

    Using the results obtained by the non commutative geometry techniques applied to the Harper equation, we derive the areas distribution of random walks of length $ N $ on a two-dimensional square lattice for large $ N $, taking into account finite size contributions.

  8. DeepWalk: Online Learning of Social Representations

    OpenAIRE

    Perozzi, Bryan; Al-Rfou, Rami; Skiena, Steven

    2014-01-01

    We present DeepWalk, a novel approach for learning latent representations of vertices in a network. These latent representations encode social relations in a continuous vector space, which is easily exploited by statistical models. DeepWalk generalizes recent advancements in language modeling and unsupervised feature learning (or deep learning) from sequences of words to graphs. DeepWalk uses local information obtained from truncated random walks to learn latent representations by treating wa...

  9. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    OpenAIRE

    Marek eFranek; Leon eVan Noorden; Lukas eRezny

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al. 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a respons...

  10. Instruction sets for walks and the quantile path transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Forman, Noah Mills

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines two objects: the stacked-instructions representation of a walk on a general state space, and the novel quantile path transformation for real-valued walks.Instead of representing a walk by a chronological sequence of states visited, we may represent the walk by a collection of lists of instructions located at each state. On successive visits to a state, the walker reads and follows successive instructions from the list. However, there are some collections of finite lists f...

  11. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban

    OpenAIRE

    Franěk, Marek; Noorden, Leon van, LPAS; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a respon...

  12. Establishing the Range of Perceptually Natural Visual Walking Speeds for Virtual Walking-In-Place Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    to virtual motion. This paper describes two within-subjects studies performed with the intention of establishing the range of perceptually natural walking speeds for WIP locomotion. In both studies, subjects performed a series of virtual walks while exposed to visual gains (optic flow multipliers) ranging...... from 1.0 to 3.0. Thus, the slowest speed was equal to an estimate of the subjects normal walking speed, while the highest speed was three times greater. The perceived naturalness of the visual speed was assessed using self-reports. The first study compared four different types of movement, namely......, no leg movement, walking on a treadmill, and two forms of gestural input for WIP locomotion. The results suggest that WIP locomotion is accompanied by a perceptual distortion of the speed of optic flow. The second study was performed using a 4×2 factorial design and compared four different display field...

  13. Design and Control of a Powered Hip Exoskeleton for Walking Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingcong Wu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wearable powered exoskeleton is a human-robot cooperation system that integrates the strength of a robot with human intelligence. This paper presents the research results into a powered hip exoskeleton (PH-EXOS designed to provide locomotive assistance to individuals with walking impediments. The Bowden cable actuated exoskeleton has an anthropomorphic structure with six degrees of freedom (DOF in order to match the human hip anatomy and enable natural interaction with the user. The mechanical structure, the actuation system, and the interaction kinematics of PH EXOS are optimized to achieve preferable manoeuvrability and harmony. For the control of the exoskeleton, a real-time control system is established in xPC target environment based on Matlab/RTW. A Cascaded PID controller is developed to perform the trajectories tracking tasks in passive control mode. Besides, based on the pressure information on the thigh, a fuzzy adaptive controller is developed to perform walking assistance tasks in active control mode. Preliminary treadmill walking experiments on a healthy subject were conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed device and control approaches in reducing walking effort.

  14. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders.

  15. Validating the feedback control of intersegmental coordination by fluctuation analysis of disturbed walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, Tetsuro; Aoi, Shinya; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2015-05-01

    A walking motion is established by feedforward control for rhythmic locomotion and feedback control for adapting to environmental variations. To identify the control variables that underlie feedback control, uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis has been proposed and adopted for analyzing various movements. UCM analysis searches the controlled variables by comparing the fluctuation size of segmental groups related and unrelated to the movement of candidate variables, based on the assumption that a small fluctuation size indicates a relationship with the feedback control. The present study was based on UCM analysis and evaluated fluctuation size to determine the control mechanism for walking. While walking, the subjects were subjected to floor disturbances at two different frequencies, and the fluctuation sizes of the segmental groups related to characteristic variables were calculated and compared. The characteristic variables evaluated were the motion of the center of mass, limb axis, and head, and the intersegmental coordination of segmental groups with simultaneous coupled movements. Results showed that the fluctuations in intersegmental coordination were almost equally small for any segment, while fluctuations in the other variables were large in certain segments. Moreover, a comparison of the fluctuation sizes among the evaluated variables showed that the fluctuation size for intersegmental coordination was the smallest. These results indicate a possible relationship between intersegmental coordination and the control of walking.

  16. Thinking while walking: Experienced high-heel walkers flexibly adjust their gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eSchaefer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Theories of motor skill acquisition postulate that attentional demands of motor execution decrease with practice. Hence, motor experts should experience less attentional resource conflict when performing a motor task in their domain of expertise concurrently with a demanding cognitive task. We assessed cognitive and motor performance in high-heel experts and novices who were performing a working memory task while walking in gym shoes or high heels on a treadmill. Surprisingly, neither group showed lower working memory performance when walking than when sitting, irrespective of shoe type. However, high-heel experts adapted walking regularity more flexibly to shoe type and cognitive load than novices, by reducing the variability of time spent in the single-support phase of the gait cycle in high heels when cognitively challenged. We conclude that high-heel expertise is associated with more flexible adjustments of movement patterns. Future research should investigate whether a more demanding walking task (e.g., wearing high heels on uneven surfaces and during gait perturbations results in expertise-related differences in the simultaneous execution of a cognitive task.

  17. Adjusting kinematics and kinetics in a feedback-controlled toe walking model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenšek Andrej

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical gait assessment, the correct interpretation of gait kinematics and kinetics has a decisive impact on the success of the therapeutic programme. Due to the vast amount of information from which primary anomalies should be identified and separated from secondary compensatory changes, as well as the biomechanical complexity and redundancy of the human locomotion system, this task is considerably challenging and requires the attention of an experienced interdisciplinary team of experts. The ongoing research in the field of biomechanics suggests that mathematical modeling may facilitate this task. This paper explores the possibility of generating a family of toe walking gait patterns by systematically changing selected parameters of a feedback-controlled model. Methods From the selected clinical case of toe walking we identified typical toe walking characteristics and encoded them as a set of gait-oriented control objectives to be achieved in a feedback-controlled walking model. They were defined as fourth order polynomials and imposed via feedback control at the within-step control level. At the between-step control level, stance leg lengthening velocity at the end of the single support phase was adaptively adjusted after each step so as to facilitate gait velocity control. Each time the gait velocity settled at the desired value, selected intra-step gait characteristics were modified by adjusting the polynomials so as to mimic the effect of a typical therapeutical intervention - inhibitory casting. Results By systematically adjusting the set of control parameters we were able to generate a family of gait kinematic and kinetic patterns that exhibit similar principal toe walking characteristics, as they were recorded by means of an instrumented gait analysis system in the selected clinical case of toe walking. We further acknowledge that they to some extent follow similar improvement tendencies as those which one can

  18. Exploring Muscle Activation during Nordic Walking: A Comparison between Conventional and Uphill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Barbara; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Zoppirolli, Chiara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Bacchi, Elisabetta; Figard-Fabre, Hélène; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) owes much of its popularity to the benefits of greater energy expenditure and upper body engagement than found in conventional walking (W). Muscle activation during NW is still understudied, however. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in muscle activation and physiological responses between NW and W in level and uphill walking conditions. Nine expert Nordic Walkers (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; BMI 24.2±1.8 kg/m2) performed 5-minute treadmill trials of W and NW at 4 km/h on inclines of 0% and 15%. The electromyographic activity of seven upper body and five leg muscles and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded and pole force during NW was measured. VO2 during NW was 22.3% higher at 0% and only 6.9% higher at 15% than during W, while upper body muscle activation was 2- to 15-fold higher under both conditions. Lower body muscle activation was similarly increased during NW and W in the uphill condition, whereas the increase in erector spinae muscle activity was lower during NW than W. The lack of a significant increase in pole force during uphill walking may explain the lower extra energy expenditure of NW, indicating less upper body muscle activation to lift the body against gravity. NW seemed to reduce lower back muscle contraction in the uphill condition, suggesting that walking with poles may reduce effort to control trunk oscillations and could contribute to work production during NW. Although the difference in extra energy expenditure between NW and W was smaller in the uphill walking condition, the increased upper body muscle involvement during exercising with NW may confer additional benefit compared to conventional walking also on uphill terrains. Furthermore, people with low back pain may gain benefit from pole use when walking uphill. PMID:26418339

  19. Accumulating Brisk Walking for Fitness, Cardiovascular Risk, and Psychological Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Marie; Nevill, Alan; Neville, Charlotte; Biddle, Stuart; Hardman, Adrianne

    2002-01-01

    Compared the effects of different patterns of regular brisk walking on fitness, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and psychological well-being in previously sedentary adults. Data on adults who completed either short-bout or long-bout walking programs found that three short bouts of brisk walking accumulated throughout the day were as effective…

  20. A natural walking monitor for pulmonary patients using mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juen, Joshua; Cheng, Qian; Schatz, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    Mobile devices have the potential to continuously monitor health by collecting movement data including walking speed during natural walking. Natural walking is walking without artificial speed constraints present in both treadmill and nurse-assisted walking. Fitness trackers have become popular which record steps taken and distance, typically using a fixed stride length. While useful for everyday purposes, medical monitoring requires precise accuracy and testing on real patients with a scientifically valid measure. Walking speed is closely linked to morbidity in patients and widely used for medical assessment via measured walking. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is a standard assessment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure. Current generation smartphone hardware contains similar sensor chips as in medical devices and popular fitness devices. We developed a middleware software, MoveSense, which runs on standalone smartphones while providing comparable readings to medical accelerometers. We evaluate six machine learning methods to obtain gait speed during natural walking training models to predict natural walking speed and distance during a 6MWT with 28 pulmonary patients and ten subjects without pulmonary condition. We also compare our model's accuracy to popular fitness devices. Our universally trained support vector machine models produce 6MWT distance with 3.23% error during a controlled 6MWT and 11.2% during natural free walking. Furthermore, our model attains 7.9% error when tested on five subjects for distance estimation compared to the 50-400% error seen in fitness devices during natural walking. PMID:25935052

  1. Modeling Framework and Software Tools for Walking Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duindam, Vincent; Stramigioli, Stefano; Groen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    In research on passive dynamic walking, the aim is to study and design robots that walk naturally, i.e., with little or no control effort. McGeer [1] and others (e.g. [2, 3]) have shown that, indeed, robots can walk down a shallow slope with no actuation, only powered by gravity. In this work, we de

  2. Speed dependence of averaged EMG profiles in walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Elzinga, H; Grimmius, W; Halbertsma, JPK

    2002-01-01

    Electromyogram (EMG) profiles strongly depend on walking speed and, in pathological gait, patients do not usually walk at normal speeds. EMG data was collected from 14 muscles in two groups of healthy young subjects who walked at five different speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.75 ms(-1). We found that

  3. The Walking Classroom: Active Learning Is Just Steps Away!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kelly Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Walking is a viable and valuable form of exercise for young children that has both physical and mental health benefits. There is much evidence showing that school-age children are not getting the recommended 60 minutes of daily exercise. A school-wide walking program can be a great way to encourage walking in and out of school, can be aligned with…

  4. Adaptive Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive LightingAdaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled i...

  5. Numerical and experimental study of the virtual quadrupedal walking robot-semiquad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoustin, Yannick, E-mail: Yannick.Aoustin@irccyn.ec-nantes.fr; Chevallereau, Christine [Institut de Recherche en Communications et Cybernetique de Nantes U.M.R. 6597 1 rue de la Noe (France); Formal' sky, Alexander [Moscow Lomonosov State University, Institute of Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-15

    SemiQuad is a prototyped walking robot with a platform and two double-link legs. Thus, it is a five-link mechanism. The front leg models identical motions of two quadruped's front legs, the back leg models identical motions of two quadruped's back legs. The legs have passive (uncontrolled) feet that extend in the frontal plane. Due to this the robot is stable in the frontal plane. This robot can be viewed as a 'virtual' quadruped. Four DC motors drive the mechanism. Its control system comprises a computer, hardware servo-systems and power amplifiers. The locomotion of the prototype is planar curvet gait. In the double support our prototype is statically stable and over actuated. In the single support it is unstable and under actuated system. There is no flight phase. We describe here the scheme of the mechanism, the characteristics of the drives and the control strategy. The dynamic model of the planar walking is recalled for the double, single support phases and for the impact instant. An intuitive control strategy is detailed. The designed control strategy overcomes the difficulties appeared due to unstable and under actuated motion in the single support. Due to the control algorithm the walking regime consists of the alternating different phases. The sequence of these phases is the following. A double support phase begins. A fast bend and unbend of the front leg allows a lift-off of the front leg. During the single support on the back leg the distance between the two leg tips increases. Then an impact occurs and a new double support phase begins. A fast bend and unbend of the back leg allows the lift-off of the back leg. During the single support on the front leg the distance between the two leg tips decreases to form a cyclic walking gait. The experiments give results that are close to those of the simulation.

  6. Taking Your Mind for a Walk: A Qualitative Investigation of Walking and Thinking among Nine Norwegian Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinänen, Mia

    2016-01-01

    Walking has long been associated with thinking. Anecdotal evidence from philosophers, writers, researchers, artists, business leaders and so forth testify to the powers of walking-for-thinking. This study explores walking-for-thinking among nine academics in Norway, four university professors, two research and development professionals, two…

  7. Concave Majorants of Random Walks and Related Poisson Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Josh

    2010-01-01

    We offer a unified approach to the theory of concave majorants of random walks by providing a path transformation for a walk of finite length that leaves the law of the walk unchanged whilst providing complete information about the concave majorant. This leads to a description of a walk of random geometric length as a Poisson point process of excursions away from its concave majorant, which is then used to find a complete description of the concave majorant for a walk of infinite length. In the case where subsets of increments may have the same arithmetic mean, we investigate three nested compositions that naturally arise from our construction of the concave majorant.

  8. Random walk search in unstructured P2P

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhaoqing; You Jinyuan; Rao Ruonan; Li Minglu

    2006-01-01

    Unstructured P2P has power-law link distribution, and the random walk in power-law networks is analyzed. The analysis results show that the probability that a random walker walks through the high degree nodes is high in the power-law network, and the information on the high degree nodes can be easily found through random walk. Random walk spread and random walk search method (RWSS) is proposed based on the analysis result. Simulation results show that RWSS achieves high success rates at low cost and is robust to high degree node failure.

  9. STS-102 Astronaut James Voss Participates in Space Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 astronaut and mission specialist James S. Voss works outside Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory (shown in lower frame) on the International Space Station (ISS), while anchored to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm on the Space Shuttle Discovery during the first of two space walks. During this space walk, the longest to date in space shuttle history, Voss in tandem with Susan Helms (out of frame), prepared the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 for repositioning from the Unity Module's Earth-facing berth to its port-side berth to make room for the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) supplied by the Italian Space Agency. The The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the ISS' moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. Launched on May 8, 2001 for nearly 13 days in space, the STS-102 mission was the 8th spacecraft assembly flight to the ISS and NASA's 103rd overall mission. The mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

  10. Fast food tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000105.htm Fast food tips To use the sharing features on this ... fast food. When You Go to a Fast Food Restaurant Knowing the amount of calories, fat, and ...

  11. Factors for Lower Walking Speed in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze factors related to lower walking speed in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. The study participants were 120 consecutive PwMS, who were able to walk, even with device assistance. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Walking speed was measured in 10 m walk test. Possible factors were assessed: disability, fatigue, visual functioning, balance confidence, physical activity level, walking impact, cognitive interference, and motor planning. A forward linear multiple regression analysis examined the correlation with lower speed. Results. Lower walking speed was observed in 85% of the patients. Fatigue (41%, recurrent falls (30%, and balance problems were also present, even with mild disability (average EDSS=2.68. A good level of physical activity was noted in most of the subjects. Dual-task procedure revealed 11.58% of walking speed reduction. Many participants (69.57% imagined greater walking speed than motor execution (mean ≥ 28.42%. Physical activity level was the only characteristic that demonstrated no significant difference between the groups (lower versus normal walking speed. Many mobility measures were correlated with walking speed; however, disability, balance confidence, and motor planning were the most significant. Conclusions. Disability, balance confidence, and motor planning were correlated with lower walking speed.

  12. Distracted walking: Examining the extent to pedestrian safety problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mwakalonge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians, much like drivers, have always been engaged in multi-tasking like using hand-held devices, listening to music, snacking, or reading while walking. The effects are similar to those experienced by distracted drivers. However, distracted walking has not received similar policies and effective interventions as distracted driving to improve pedestrian safety. This study reviewed the state-of-practice on policies, campaigns, available data, identified research needs, and opportunities pertaining to distracted walking. A comprehensive review of literature revealed that some of the agencies/organizations disseminate useful information about certain distracting activities that pedestrians should avoid while walking to improve their safety. Various walking safety rules/tips have been given, such as not wearing headphones or talking on a cell phone while crossing a street, keeping the volume down, hanging up the phone while walking, being aware of traffic, and avoiding distractions like walking with texting. The majority of the past observational-based and experimental-based studies reviewed in this study on distracted walking is in agreement that there is a positive correlation between distraction and unsafe walking behavior. However, limitations of the existing crash data suggest that distracted walking may not be a severe threat to the public health. Current pedestrian crash data provide insufficient information for researchers to examine the extent to which distracted walking causes and/or contributes to actual pedestrian safety problems.

  13. Pseudo memory effects, majorization and entropy in quantum random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Anthony J [Centre for Mathematical Physics and Department of Mathematics, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Ellinas, Demosthenes [Division of Mathematics, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Chania Crete (Greece); Tsohantjis, Ioannis [Division of Physics, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Chania Crete (Greece)

    2004-02-25

    A quantum random walk on the integers exhibits pseudo memory effects, in that its probability distribution after N steps is determined by reshuffling the first N distributions that arise in a classical random walk with the same initial distribution. In a classical walk, entropy increase can be regarded as a consequence of the majorization ordering of successive distributions. The Lorenz curves of successive distributions for a symmetric quantum walk reveal no majorization ordering in general. Nevertheless, entropy can increase, and computer experiments show that it does so on average. Varying the stages at which the quantum coin system is traced out leads to new quantum walks, including a symmetric walk for which majorization ordering is valid but the spreading rate exceeds that of the usual symmetric quantum walk. (letter to the editor)

  14. Pseudo Memory Effects, Majorization and Entropy in Quantum Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bracken, A J; Tsohantjis, I; Bracken, Anthony J.; Ellinas, Demosthenes; Tsohantjis, Ioannis

    2004-01-01

    A quantum random walk on the integers exhibits pseudo memory effects, in that its probability distribution after N steps is determined by reshuffling the first N distributions that arise in a classical random walk with the same initial distribution. In a classical walk, entropy increase can be regarded as a consequence of the majorization ordering of successive distributions. The Lorenz curves of successive distributions for a symmetric quantum walk reveal no majorization ordering in general. Nevertheless, entropy can increase, and computer experiments show that it does so on average. Varying the stages at which the quantum coin system is traced out leads to new quantum walks, including a symmetric walk for which majorization ordering is valid but the spreading rate exceeds that of the usual symmetric quantum walk.

  15. Locomotion by Abdopus aculeatus (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae): walking the line between primary and secondary defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffard, Christine L

    2006-10-01

    Speeds and variation in body form during crawling, bipedal walking, swimming and jetting by the shallow-water octopus Abdopus aculeatus were compared to explore possible interactions between defense behaviors and biomechanics of these multi-limbed organisms. General body postures and patterns were more complex and varied during the slow mode of crawling than during fast escape maneuvers such as swimming and jetting. These results may reflect a trade-off between predator deception and speed, or simply a need to reduce drag during jet-propelled locomotion. Octopuses swam faster when dorsoventrally compressed, a form that may generate lift, than when swimming in the head-raised posture. Bipedal locomotion proceeded as fast as swimming and can be considered a form of fast escape (secondary defense) that also incorporates elements of crypsis and polyphenism (primary defenses). Body postures during walking suggested the use of both static and dynamic stability. Absolute speed was not correlated with body mass in any mode. Based on these findings the implications for defense behaviors such as escape from predation, aggression, and 'flatfish mimicry' performed by A. aculeatus and other octopuses are discussed. PMID:16985187

  16. A formative evaluation of a family-based walking intervention-Furness Families Walk4Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bull Fiona

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family unit may be an important mechanism for increasing physical activity levels, yet little is known about what types of family-based interventions are effective. This study involved a formative evaluation of a 12 week intervention to encourage walking as a family based activity. The intervention consisted of several key elements including led walks and tailored resources, as well as remote support provided via the telephone. The project aimed to explore factors associated with successful delivery of the programme and to identify areas of improvement for future implementation. Methods A total of nine interviews were undertaken with programme staff who were involved in either the set up or delivery of the intervention. In addition, four interviews and two focus groups were undertaken with participants to explore their experiences of the programme. The analysis involved both deductive and inductive reasoning. Results In total, 114 people participated in the programme, which included 36 adults, 10 adolescents and 68 children (≤ 10 years of age. Adult participants reported several barriers to walking including concerns over their children's behaviour and their ability to maintain 'control' of their children. Walking in a group with other families gave parents confidence to go out walking with their children and provided a valuable opportunity for social interaction for parents and children alike. The most successful walks incorporated specific destinations and an activity to undertake upon reaching the destination. Incorporating other activities along the way also helped to keep the children engaged. Conclusions The results of this study have highlighted the important contribution that formative research can make in informing and refining a programme to increase appropriateness and effectiveness. The study has helped to highlight the key characteristics associated with delivering a successful walking intervention to young

  17. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Lawrence

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU’s Not Unix Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics makes FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format. Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  18. Random Walks on Stochastic Temporal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Till; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    In the study of dynamical processes on networks, there has been intense focus on network structure -- i.e., the arrangement of edges and their associated weights -- but the effects of the temporal patterns of edges remains poorly understood. In this chapter, we develop a mathematical framework for random walks on temporal networks using an approach that provides a compromise between abstract but unrealistic models and data-driven but non-mathematical approaches. To do this, we introduce a stochastic model for temporal networks in which we summarize the temporal and structural organization of a system using a matrix of waiting-time distributions. We show that random walks on stochastic temporal networks can be described exactly by an integro-differential master equation and derive an analytical expression for its asymptotic steady state. We also discuss how our work might be useful to help build centrality measures for temporal networks.

  19. Exploring Space and Place With Walking Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Jones

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the “safe,” stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few projects have attempted to rigorously connect what participants say with where they say it. The article reviews three case studies where the authors have used different techniques, including GPS, for locating the interview in space. The article concludes by arguing that researchers considering using walking interviews need to think carefully about what kinds of data they wish to generate when deciding which approach to adopt.

  20. Revising the senior walking environmental assessment tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Yvonne L.; Keast, Erin M.; Chaudhury, Habib; Day, Kristen; Mahmood, Atiya; Sarte, Ann F.I.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Senior Walking Environmental Assessment Tool (SWEAT), an instrument for measuring built environmental features associated with physical activity of older adults, was revised to create an easier-to-use tool for use by practitioners and community members. Methods Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the modified instrument (SWEAT-R) was assessed in Portland, Oregon in 2007. Five trained observers audited street segments in 12 neighborhoods, resulting in 361 pairs of audits, including 63 repeated audits. Results Overall, 88% and 75% of items assessed had good or excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliability, respectively. The revised instrument required less time to complete than the original instrument, while obtaining more information. Conclusion SWEAT-R provides easy to gather, reliable data for use in community-based audits of built environment in relation to walking among older adults. PMID:19136025