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Sample records for adaptive fast walking

  1. Adaptive, fast walking in a biped robot under neuronal control and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate Manoonpong

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori-motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s, self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks.

  2. Fast Scramblers, Democratic Walks and Information Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Magan, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    We study a family of weighted random walks on complete graphs. These `democratic walks' turn out to be explicitly solvable, and we find the hierarchy window for which the characteristic time scale saturates the so-called fast scrambling conjecture. We show that these democratic walks describe well the properties of information spreading in systems in which every degree of freedom interacts with every other degree of freedom, such as Matrix or infinite range models. The argument is based on the analysis of suitably defined `Information fields' ($\\mathcal{I}$), which are shown to evolve stochastically towards stationarity due to unitarity of the microscopic model. The model implies that in democratic systems, stabilization of one subsystem is equivalent to global scrambling. We use these results to study scrambling of infalling perturbations in black hole backgrounds, and argue that the near horizon running coupling constants are connected to entanglement evolution of single particle perturbations in democratic...

  3. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  4. Adaptive importance sampling of random walks on continuous state spaces

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    Baggerly, K.; Cox, D.; Picard, R.

    1998-11-01

    The authors consider adaptive importance sampling for a random walk with scoring in a general state space. Conditions under which exponential convergence occurs to the zero-variance solution are reviewed. These results generalize previous work for finite, discrete state spaces in Kollman (1993) and in Kollman, Baggerly, Cox, and Picard (1996). This paper is intended for nonstatisticians and includes considerable explanatory material.

  5. Length of adaptive walk on uncorrelated and correlated fitness landscapes.

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    Seetharaman, Sarada; Jain, Kavita

    2014-09-01

    We consider the adaptation dynamics of an asexual population that walks uphill on a rugged fitness landscape which is endowed with a large number of local fitness peaks. We work in a parameter regime where only those mutants that are a single mutation away are accessible, as a result of which the population eventually gets trapped at a local fitness maximum and the adaptive walk terminates. We study how the number of adaptive steps taken by the population before reaching a local fitness peak depends on the initial fitness of the population, the extreme value distribution of the beneficial mutations, and correlations among the fitnesses. Assuming that the relative fitness difference between successive steps is small, we analytically calculate the average walk length for both uncorrelated and correlated fitnesses in all extreme value domains for a given initial fitness. We present numerical results for the model where the fitness differences can be large and find that the walk length behavior differs from that in the former model in the Fréchet domain of extreme value theory. We also discuss the relevance of our results to microbial experiments.

  6. Walking adaptability therapy after stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, C.; Roerdink, M.; Ooijen, van M.W.; Meskens, C.G.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Beek, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Walking in everyday life requires the ability to adapt walking to the environment. This adaptability is often impaired after stroke, and this might contribute to the increased fall risk after stroke. To improve safe community ambulation, walking adaptability training might be beneficial

  7. A Passive Dynamic Walking Model Based on Knee-Bend Behaviour: Stability and Adaptability for Walking Down Steep Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model based on knee-bend behaviour, which is inspired by the way human beings walk. The length and mass parameters of human beings are used in the walking model. The knee-bend mechanism of the stance leg is designed in the phase between knee-strike and heel- strike. q* which is the angular difference of the stance leg between the two events, knee-strike and knee-bend, is adjusted in order to find a stable walking motion. The results show that the stable periodic walking motion on a slope of r <0.4 can be found by adjusting q*. Furthermore, with a particular q* in the range of 0.12walk down more steps before falling down on an arbitrary slope. The walking motion is more stable and adaptable than the conventional walking motion, especially for steep slopes.

  8. Greedy adaptive walks on a correlated fitness landscape.

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    Park, Su-Chan; Neidhart, Johannes; Krug, Joachim

    2016-05-21

    We study adaptation of a haploid asexual population on a fitness landscape defined over binary genotype sequences of length L. We consider greedy adaptive walks in which the population moves to the fittest among all single mutant neighbors of the current genotype until a local fitness maximum is reached. The landscape is of the rough mount Fuji type, which means that the fitness value assigned to a sequence is the sum of a random and a deterministic component. The random components are independent and identically distributed random variables, and the deterministic component varies linearly with the distance to a reference sequence. The deterministic fitness gradient c is a parameter that interpolates between the limits of an uncorrelated random landscape (c=0) and an effectively additive landscape (c→∞). When the random fitness component is chosen from the Gumbel distribution, explicit expressions for the distribution of the number of steps taken by the greedy walk are obtained, and it is shown that the walk length varies non-monotonically with the strength of the fitness gradient when the starting point is sufficiently close to the reference sequence. Asymptotic results for general distributions of the random fitness component are obtained using extreme value theory, and it is found that the walk length attains a non-trivial limit for L→∞, different from its values for c=0 and c=∞, if c is scaled with L in an appropriate combination.

  9. Fast Link Adaptation for MIMO-OFDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Kant, Shashi; Wehinger, Joachim;

    2010-01-01

    We investigate link-quality metrics (LQMs) based on raw bit-error-rate, effective signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio, and mutual information (MI) for the purpose of fast link adaptation (LA) in communication systems employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and multiple-input–mult......We investigate link-quality metrics (LQMs) based on raw bit-error-rate, effective signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio, and mutual information (MI) for the purpose of fast link adaptation (LA) in communication systems employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and multiple...

  10. Fast adaptive elliptical filtering using box splines

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhury, Kunal Narayan; Unser, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to filter an image with an elliptic window of varying size, elongation and orientation with a fixed computational cost per pixel. Our method involves the application of a suitable global pre-integrator followed by a pointwise-adaptive localization mesh. We present the basic theory for the 1D case using a B-spline formalism and then appropriately extend it to 2D using radially-uniform box splines. The size and ellipticity of these radially-uniform box splines is adaptively controlled. Moreover, they converge to Gaussians as the order increases. Finally, we present a fast and practical directional filtering algorithm that has the capability of adapting to the local image features.

  11. Step-Detection and Adaptive Step-Length Estimation for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning at Various Walking Speeds Using a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ngoc-Huynh; Truong, Phuc Huu; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-09-02

    We propose a walking distance estimation method based on an adaptive step-length estimator at various walking speeds using a smartphone. First, we apply a fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based smoother on the acceleration data collected by the smartphone to remove the interference signals. Then, we analyze these data using a set of step-detection rules in order to detect walking steps. Using an adaptive estimator, which is based on a model of average step speed, we accurately obtain the walking step length. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we examine the distance estimation for four different distances and three speed levels. The experimental results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms conventional estimation methods in terms of accuracy.

  12. Adaptive line enhancers for fast acquisition

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    Yeh, H.-G.; Nguyen, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures - namely, conventional ALE, ALE with double filtering, and ALE with coherent accumulation - are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in the time domain. The advantages of these algorithms are their simplicity, flexibility, robustness, and applicability to general situations including the Earth-to-space uplink carrier acquisition and tracking of the spacecraft. In the acquisition mode, these algorithms act as bandpass filters; hence, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) is improved for fast acquisition. In the tracking mode, these algorithms simply act as lowpass filters to improve signal-to-noise ratio; hence, better tracking performance is obtained. It is not necessary to have a priori knowledge of the received signal parameters, such as CNR, Doppler, and carrier sweeping rate. The implementation of these algorithms is in the time domain (as opposed to the frequency domain, such as the fast Fourier transform (FFT)). The carrier frequency estimation can be updated in real time at each time sample (as opposed to the batch processing of the FFT). The carrier frequency to be acquired can be time varying, and the noise can be non-Gaussian, nonstationary, and colored.

  13. An Approach to Stable Walking over Uneven Terrain Using a Reflex-Based Adaptive Gait

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    Umar Asif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an adaptive gait in a six-legged walking robot that is capable of generating reactive stepping actions with the same underlying control methodology as an insect for stable walking over uneven terrains. The proposed method of gait generation uses feedback data from onboard sensors to generate an adaptive gait in order to surmount obstacles, gaps and perform stable walking. The paper addresses its implementation through simulations in a visual dynamic simulation environment. Finally the paper draws conclusions about the significance and performance of the proposed gait in terms of tracking errors while navigating in difficult terrains.

  14. Motion Tracking with Fast Adaptive Background Subtraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao; De-Gui; Yu; Sheng-sheng; 等

    2003-01-01

    To extract and track moving objects is usually one of the most important tasks of intelligent video surveillance systems. This paper presents a fast and adaptive background subtraction algorithm and the motion tracking process using this algorithm. The algorithm uses only luminance components of sampled image sequence pixels and models every pixel in a statistical model.The algorithm is characterized by its ability of real time detecting sudden lighting changes, and extracting and tracking motion objects faster. It is shown that our algorithm can be realized with lower time and space complexity and adjustable object detection error rate with comparison to other background subtraction algorithms. Making use of the algorithm, an indoor monitoring system is also worked out and the motion tracking process is presented in this paper.Experimental results testify the algorithms' good performances when used in an indoor monitoring system.

  15. Test-Retest Reliability of the 10-Metre Fast Walk Test and 6-Minute Walk Test in Ambulatory School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Thompson, Patricia; Beath, Tricia; Bell, Jacqueline; Jacobson, Gabrielle; Phair, Tegan; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, F. Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Short-term test-retest reliability of the 10-metre fast walk test (10mFWT) and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) was evaluated in 31 ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP), with subgroup analyses in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) Levels I (n=9), II (n=8), and III (n=14). Sixteen females and 15 males participated, mean age 9 years…

  16. Extended Evolutionary Fast Learn-to-Walk Approach for Four-Legged Robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muh.Anshar; Mary-Anne Williams

    2007-01-01

    Robot locomotion is an active research area. In this paper we focus on the locomotion of quadruped robots. An effective walking gait of quadruped robots is mainly concerned with two key aspects, namely speed and stability. The large search space of potential parameter settings for leg joints means that hand tuning is not feasible in general. As a result walking parameters are typically determined using machine learning techniques. A major shortcoming of using machine learning techniques is the significant wear and tear of robots since many parameter combinations need to be evaluated before an optimal solution is found.This paper proposes a direct walking gait learning approach, which is specifically designed to reduce wear and tear of robot motors, joints and other hardware. In essence we provide an effective learning mechanism that leads to a solution in a faster convergence time than previous algorithms. The results demonstrate that the new learning algorithm obtains a faster convergence to the best solutions in a short run. This approach is significant in obtaining faster walking gaits which will be useful for a wide range of applications where speed and stability are important. Future work will extend our methods so that the faster convergence algorithm can be applied to a two legged humanoid and lead to less wear and tear whilst still developing a fast and stable gait.

  17. Universal adaptive self-stabilizing traversal scheme: random walk and reloading wave

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Thibault; Sohier, Devan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate random walk based token circulation in dynamic environments subject to failures. We describe hypotheses on the dynamic environment that allow random walks to meet the important property that the token visits any node infinitely often. The randomness of this scheme allows it to work on any topology, and require no adaptation after a topological change, which is a desirable property for applications to dynamic systems. For random walks to be a traversal scheme and to answer the concurrence problem, one needs to guarantee that exactly one token circulates in the system. In the presence of transient failures, configurations with multiple tokens or with no token can occur. The meeting property of random walks solves the cases with multiple tokens. The reloading wave mechanism we propose, together with timeouts, allows to detect and solve cases with no token. This traversal scheme is self-stabilizing, and universal, meaning that it needs no assumption on the system topology. We describ...

  18. Successful adaptation of gait in healthy older adults during dual-task treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Karen Z H; Abbud, Gabriela A; Fraser, Sarah A; Demont, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Dual-task methods have been used to demonstrate increased prioritization of walking performance over cognition in healthy aging. This is expressed as greater dual-task costs in cognitive performance than in walking. However, other research shows that older adults can prioritize cognitive performance over walking when instructed to do so. We asked whether age-related cognitive prioritization would emerge by experimentally manipulating cognitive difficulty. Young and older adults performed mental arithmetic at two levels of difficulty, alone or while walking. Electromyography and footswitches were used to measure muscle activity and stride parameters. Under high cognitive load, older adults increased their stride time, stride length, and hamstring activity, while maintaining their cognitive performance. Young adults showed negligible dual-task costs in each domain. The older adults appeared to successfully adapt their stride in response to high cognitive demands. The results have implications for neural models of gait regulation, and age differences in task emphasis.

  19. Adaptations to walking on an uneven terrain for individuals with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

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    Gentle, J; Barnett, A L; Wilmut, K

    2016-10-01

    Given the importance of walking in everyday life, understanding why this is challenging for some populations is particularly important. Studies focusing on gait patterns of individuals with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have shown that whilst increased variability is characteristic of walking patterns for this group, differences in spatio-temporal gait variables seem only to arise when task demands increase. However, these differences occur under rather artificial conditions, for example using a treadmill. The aim of this study, therefore was to examine the step characteristics of individuals with and without DCD whilst walking along an irregular terrain. Thirty-five individuals with DCD aged 8-32years and 35 age and gender-matched controls participated in this study. Participants were divided into 3 age groups; 8-12years (n=12), 13-17years (n=12) and 18-32years (n=11). Participants walked up and down a 6m walkway for two minutes on two terrains: level and irregular. VICON 3D motion analysis was used to extract measures of foot placement, velocity and angle of the head and trunk. Results showed that both groups adapted their gait to negotiate the irregular terrain, but the DCD group was more affected than their TD peers; walking significantly slower with shorter, wider steps and inclining their head more towards the ground. This suggests an adaptive approach used by individuals with DCD to preserve stability and increase visual sampling whilst negotiating an irregular terrain.

  20. Walking-adaptability assessments with the Interactive Walkway: Between-systems agreement and sensitivity to task and subject variations.

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    Geerse, Daphne J; Coolen, Bert H; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2017-03-02

    The ability to adapt walking to environmental circumstances is an important aspect of walking, yet difficult to assess. The Interactive Walkway was developed to assess walking adaptability by augmenting a multi-Kinect-v2 10-m walkway with gait-dependent visual context (stepping targets, obstacles) using real-time processed markerless full-body kinematics. In this study we determined Interactive Walkway's usability for walking-adaptability assessments in terms of between-systems agreement and sensitivity to task and subject variations. Under varying task constraints, 21 healthy subjects performed obstacle-avoidance, sudden-stops-and-starts and goal-directed-stepping tasks. Various continuous walking-adaptability outcome measures were concurrently determined with the Interactive Walkway and a gold-standard motion-registration system: available response time, obstacle-avoidance and sudden-stop margins, step length, stepping accuracy and walking speed. The same holds for dichotomous classifications of success and failure for obstacle-avoidance and sudden-stops tasks and performed short-stride versus long-stride obstacle-avoidance strategies. Continuous walking-adaptability outcome measures generally agreed well between systems (high intraclass correlation coefficients for absolute agreement, low biases and narrow limits of agreement) and were highly sensitive to task and subject variations. Success and failure ratings varied with available response times and obstacle types and agreed between systems for 85-96% of the trials while obstacle-avoidance strategies were always classified correctly. We conclude that Interactive Walkway walking-adaptability outcome measures are reliable and sensitive to task and subject variations, even in high-functioning subjects. We therefore deem Interactive Walkway walking-adaptability assessments usable for obtaining an objective and more task-specific examination of one's ability to walk, which may be feasible for both high

  1. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard eGrinke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. They can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a walking robot is a challenging task. In this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a biomechanical walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations as well as escaping from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles. Consequently, it can successfully explore and navigate in complex environments.

  2. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables the robot to effectively escape from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles

  3. Psychotherapy: Adaptation or Walking Together? (A Roadside Conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bychkova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns psychotherapeutic work in the perspective of existential approach. Two trends are discerned in modern psychotherapy regardless of the known division into different schools – the adaptation therapy, and the one viewing a person in the context of his Personal being in the world. Therapy here is understood as the Way of mutual personal growth of both the therapist and the client. Distinction is singled out as one of the central points in forming the meanings, essential for both the normal development of a child and in psychotherapy, and remaining significant for spiritual growth in adults. 

  4. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

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    Rommelaere, Samuel; Millet, Virginie; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Gensollen, Thomas; Andreoletti, Pierre; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Bourges, Christophe; Escalière, Bertrand; Du, Xin; Xia, Yu; Imbert, Jean; Beutler, Bruce; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Galland, Franck; Naquet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting.

  5. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Rommelaere

    Full Text Available Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting.

  6. Fast-start adaptation funding: keeping promises from Copenhagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciplet, David; Roberts, J. Timmons [Brown University (United States); Chandani, Achala; Huq, Saleemul

    2010-11-15

    The most concrete commitment to come out of the international climate negotiations in Copenhagen was US$30 billion dollars in 'fast-start climate finance' to developing countries, with balanced support for both mitigation and adaptation. Fast-start adaptation finance, in particular, is crusial for poor countries facing rapid climate change. But so far, pledges for adaptation from developed countries have been inadequate and unclear. This briefing outlines ways for the Cancun negotiations to address five crucial issues for adaptation finance: (1) the amount and type of funding being offered, (2) the definition of adaptation, (3) global oversight and accounting, (4) a clear baseline and transparent spending and (5) the channel for delivering funds.

  7. δ-exceedance records and random adaptive walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Chan; Krug, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified record process where the kth record in a series of independent and identically distributed random variables is defined recursively through the condition {Y}k\\gt {Y}k-1-{δ }k-1 with a deterministic sequence {δ }k\\gt 0 called the handicap. For constant {δ }k\\equiv δ and exponentially distributed random variables it has been shown in previous work that the process displays a phase transition as a function of δ between a normal phase where the mean record value increases indefinitely and a stationary phase where the mean record value remains bounded and a finite fraction of all entries are records (Park et al 2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 042707). Here we explore the behavior for general probability distributions and decreasing and increasing sequences {δ }k, focusing in particular on the case when {δ }k matches the typical spacing between subsequent records in the underlying simple record process without handicap. We find that a continuous phase transition occurs only in the exponential case, but a novel kind of first order transition emerges when {δ }k is increasing. The problem is partly motivated by the dynamics of evolutionary adaptation in biological fitness landscapes, where {δ }k corresponds to the change of the deterministic fitness component after k mutational steps. The results for the record process are used to compute the mean number of steps that a population performs in such a landscape before being trapped at a local fitness maximum.

  8. The adaptive dynamic community detection algorithm based on the non-homogeneous random walking

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    Xin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    With the changing of the habit and custom, people's social activity tends to be changeable. It is required to have a community evolution analyzing method to mine the dynamic information in social network. For that, we design the random walking possibility function and the topology gain function to calculate the global influence matrix of the nodes. By the analysis of the global influence matrix, the clustering directions of the nodes can be obtained, thus the NRW (Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method for detecting the static overlapping communities can be established. We design the ANRW (Adaptive Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method via adapting the nodes impacted by the dynamic events based on the NRW. The ANRW combines the local community detection with dynamic adaptive adjustment to decrease the computational cost for ANRW. Furthermore, the ANRW treats the node as the calculating unity, thus the running manner of the ANRW is suitable to the parallel computing, which could meet the requirement of large dataset mining. Finally, by the experiment analysis, the efficiency of ANRW on dynamic community detection is verified.

  9. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate eManoonpong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs and sensory feedback (afferent-based control but also on internal forward models (efference copies. They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines.

  10. Uphill walking with a simple exoskeleton: plantarflexion assistance leads to proximal adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    While level walking with a pneumatic ankle-foot exoskeleton is studied extensively, less is known on uphill walking. The goals of this study were to get a better understanding of the biomechanical adaptations and the influence of actuation timing on metabolic cost during uphill walking with a plantarflexion assisting exoskeleton. Seven female subjects walked on a treadmill with 15% inclination at 1.36 ms(-1) in five conditions (4 min): one condition with an unpowered exoskeleton and four with a powered exoskeleton with onset of pneumatic muscle actuation at 19, 26, 34 and 41% of stride. During uphill walking the metabolic cost was more than 10% lower for all powered conditions compared to the unpowered condition. When actuation onset was in between 26 and 34% of the stride, metabolic cost was suggested to be minimal. While it was expected that exoskeleton assistance would reduce muscular activity of the plantarflexors during push-off, subjects used the additional power to raise the body centre of mass in the beginning of each step to a higher point compared to unpowered walking. This reduced the muscular activity in the m. vastus lateralis and the m. biceps femoris as less effort was necessary to reach the highest body centre of mass position in the single support phase. In conclusion, subjects can use plantarflexion assistance during the push-off to reduce muscular activity in more proximal joints in order to minimize energy cost during uphill locomotion. Kinetic data seem necessary to fully understand this mechanism, which highlights the complexity of human-exoskeleton interaction.

  11. Information criterion based fast PCA adaptive algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiawen; Li Congxin

    2007-01-01

    The novel information criterion (NIC) algorithm can find the principal subspace quickly, but it is not an actual principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm and hence it cannot find the orthonormal eigen-space which corresponds to the principal component of input vector.This defect limits its application in practice.By weighting the neural network's output of NIC, a modified novel information criterion (MNIC) algorithm is presented.MNIC extractes the principal components and corresponding eigenvectors in a parallel online learning program, and overcomes the NIC's defect.It is proved to have a single global optimum and nonquadratic convergence rate, which is superior to the conventional PCA online algorithms such as Oja and LMSER.The relationship among Oja, LMSER and MNIC is exhibited.Simulations show that MNIC could converge to the optimum fast.The validity of MNIC is proved.

  12. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Fast Adaptive Beamforming with Smart Antenna for Radio Frequency Repeater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a fast adaptive beamforming null algorithm with smart antenna for Radio Frequency Repeater (RFR. The smart antenna system is realized by a Direction Of Arrival (DOA Estimator, whose output is used by an adaptive beamforming algorithm to shape a suitable radiation pattern of the equivalent antenna; so that the co-channel interference due to retransmitting antenna can be reduced. The proposed adaptive beamforming algorithm, which has been proved by formulaic analysis and simulation, has a lower computation complexity yet better performance.

  14. Adaptive feedback potential in dynamic stability during disturbed walking in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Stefanie; Peper, Andreas; Karamanidis, Kiros; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2011-07-01

    After perturbation of the gait, feedback information may help regaining balance adequately, but it remains unknown whether adaptive feedback responses are possible after repetitive and unexpected perturbations during gait and if there are age-related differences. Prior experience may contribute to improved reactive behavior. Fourteen old (59-73 yrs) and fourteen young (22-31 yrs) males walked on a walkway which included one covered element. By exchanging this element participants either stepped on hard surface or unexpectedly on soft surface which caused a perturbation in gait. The gait protocol contained 5 unexpected soft trials to quantify the reactive adaptation. Each soft trial was followed by 4-8 hard trials to generate a wash-out effect. The dynamic stability was investigated by using the margin of stability (MoS), which was calculated as the difference between the anterior boundary of the base of support and the extrapolated position of the center of mass in the anterior-posterior direction. MoS at recovery leg touchdown were significantly lower in the unexpected soft trials compared to the baseline, indicating a less stable posture. However, MoS increased (p<0.05) in both groups within the disturbed trials, indicating feedback adaptive improvements. Young and old participants showed differences in the handling of the perturbation in the course of several trials. The magnitude of the reactive adaptation after the fifth unexpected perturbation was significantly different compared to the first unexpected perturbation (old: 49±30%; young: 77±40%), showing a tendency (p=0.065) for higher values in the young participants. Old individuals maintain the ability to adapt to feedback controlled perturbations. However, the locomotor behavior is more conservative compared to the young ones, leading to disadvantages in the reactive adaptation during disturbed walking.

  15. Distributed recurrent neural forward models with synaptic adaptation and CPG-based control for complex behaviors of walking robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures) with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of (1) central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models

  16. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online...... correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking...

  17. Muscular adaptations to short-term low-frequency downhill walking training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeo, S; Yamamoto, M; Kanehisa, H

    2015-02-01

    This study examined muscular adaptations of knee extensors following short-term low-frequency downhill walking training. 22 young males (training group: TG, n=12; control group: CG, n=10) participated. TG conducted 40-min downhill treadmill walking (load: 10% of body mass, gradient: 28%, velocity: 5 km/h) 1 session/week for 4 weeks. Before and after the intervention, muscle thickness of knee extensors and maximal knee extension torques in eccentric (- 120, - 60, - 30°/s), isometric (0°/s), and concentric (30, 60, 120, 240°/s) conditions were measured. For TG, muscle damage markers were also measured before and up to 72 h following each session. After the intervention, CG did not show any changes in all variables. TG had significant increases in maximal knee extension torques at all angular velocities, with higher relative gains in eccentric torques (+ 24% on average) than isometric (+ 13%) and concentric (+ 12% on average) torques. No changes were found in the muscle thickness. Although considerable muscle damage was observed after the first training session in TG, the magnitudes of changes in all markers following the second to fourth sessions were minimal. These results indicate that even with relatively short-term and low-frequency, downhill walking training can increase the strength capacity of knee extensors, especially in eccentric strength.

  18. An Adaptable Walking-skid for Seabed ROV under Strong Current Disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianting Si; Chengsiong Chin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a new concept of an adaptable multi-legged skid design for retro-fitting to a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) during high tidal current underwater pipeline inspection. The sole reliance on propeller-driven propulsion for ROV is replaced with a proposed low cost biomimetic solution in the form of an attachable hexapod walking skid. The advantage of this adaptable walking skid is the high stability in positioning and endurances to strong current on the seabed environment. The computer simulation flow studies using Solidworks Flow Simulation shown that the skid attachment in different compensation postures caused at least four times increase in overall drag, and negative lift forces on the seabed ROV to achieve a better maneuvering and station keeping under the high current condition (from 0.5 m/s to 5.0 m/s). A graphical user interface is designed to interact with the user during robot-in-the-loop testing and kinematics simulation in the pool.

  19. An adaptable walking-skid for seabed ROV under strong current disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jianting; Chin, Chengsiong

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposed a new concept of an adaptable multi-legged skid design for retro-fitting to a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) during high tidal current underwater pipeline inspection. The sole reliance on propeller-driven propulsion for ROV is replaced with a proposed low cost biomimetic solution in the form of an attachable hexapod walking skid. The advantage of this adaptable walking skid is the high stability in positioning and endurances to strong current on the seabed environment. The computer simulation flow studies using Solidworks Flow Simulation shown that the skid attachment in different compensation postures caused at least four times increase in overall drag, and negative lift forces on the seabed ROV to achieve a better maneuvering and station keeping under the high current condition (from 0.5 m/s to 5.0 m/s). A graphical user interface is designed to interact with the user during robot-in-the-loop testing and kinematics simulation in the pool.

  20. Adaptive synthesis of a wavelet transform using fast neural network

    OpenAIRE

    J. Stolarek

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for an adaptive synthesis of a wavelet transform using a fast neural network with a topology based on the lattice structure. The lattice structure and the orthogonal lattice structure are presented and their properties are discussed. A novel method for unsupervised training of the neural network is introduced. The proposed approach is tested by synthesizing new wavelets with an expected energy distribution between low- and high-pass filters. Energy compactio...

  1. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles (Buz); Reisman, Darcy S.; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 2...

  2. Multiple Decoupled CPGs with Local Sensory Feedback for Adaptive Locomotion Behaviors of Bio-inspired Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker Barikhan, Subhi; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    Walking animals show versatile locomotion. They can also adapt their movement according to the changes of their morphology and the environmental conditions. These emergent properties are realized by biomechanics, distributed central pattern generators (CPGs), local sensory feedback, and their int...... of the front legs, to deal with morphological change, and to synchronize its movement with another robot during a collaborative task....... and the environment through local sensory feedback of each leg. Simulation results show that this bio-inspired approach generates self-organizing emergent locomotion allowing the robot to adaptively form regular patterns, to stably walk while pushing an object with its front legs or performing multiple stepping...

  3. A Fast Adaptive Receive Antenna Selection Method in MIMO System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antenna selection has been regarded as an effective method to acquire the diversity benefits of multiple antennas while potentially reduce hardware costs. This paper focuses on receive antenna selection. According to the proportion between the numbers of total receive antennas and selected antennas and the influence of each antenna on system capacity, we propose a fast adaptive antenna selection algorithm for wireless multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems. Mathematical analysis and numerical results show that our algorithm significantly reduces the computational complexity and memory requirement and achieves considerable system capacity gain compared with the optimal selection technique in the same time.

  4. Fast complex memory polynomial-based adaptive digital predistorter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Sappal, Amandeep; Singh Patterh, Manjeet; Sharma, Sanjay

    2011-07-01

    Today's 3G wireless systems require both high linearity and high power amplifier (PA) efficiency. The high peak-to-average ratios of the digital modulation schemes used in 3G wireless systems require that the RF PA maintain high linearity over a large range while maintaining this high efficiency; these two requirements are often at odds with each other with many of the traditional amplifier architectures. In this article, a fast and easy-to-implement adaptive digital predistorter has been presented for Wideband Code Division Multiplexed signals using complex memory polynomial work function. The proposed algorithm has been implemented to test a Motorola LDMOSFET PA. The proposed technique also takes care of the memory effects of the PA, which have been ignored in many proposed techniques in the literature. The results show that the new complex memory polynomial-based adaptive digital predistorter has better linearisation performance than conventional predistortion techniques.

  5. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Synaptic Adaptation and CPG-based control for Complex Behaviors of Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyasingha eDasgupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of 1 central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, 2 distributed (at each leg recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and 3 searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to sensorimotor prediction outperforms the previous state of the art adaptive neuron

  6. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles Buz; Reisman, Darcy S; Rudolph, Katherine S

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 23). Disability, quadriceps strength, joint space width, malalignment, and proprioception were assessed. Kinematic and EMG data were collected during undisturbed walking and during perturbations that caused lateral translation of the foot at initial contact. Knee excursions and EMG magnitudes were analyzed. Subjects with OA walked with less knee motion and higher muscle activation and had greater pain, limitations in function, quadriceps weakness, and malalignment, but no difference was observed in proprioception. Both groups showed increased EMG and decreased knee motion in response to the first perturbation, followed by progressively decreased EMG activity and increased knee motion during midstance over the first five perturbations, but no group differences were observed. Over 30 trials, EMG levels returned to those of normal walking. The results illustrate that people with knee OA respond similarly to healthy individuals when exposed to challenging perturbations during functional weight-bearing activities despite structural, functional, and neuromotor impairments. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response in people with knee OA need further study.

  7. Qualitative adaptive reward learning with success failure maps: applied to humanoid robot walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, John; Hugel, Vincent; Ben Ouezdou, Fethi; Cheng, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    In the human brain, rewards are encoded in a flexible and adaptive way after each novel stimulus. Neurons of the orbitofrontal cortex are the key reward structure of the brain. Neurobiological studies show that the anterior cingulate cortex of the brain is primarily responsible for avoiding repeated mistakes. According to vigilance threshold, which denotes the tolerance to risks, we can differentiate between a learning mechanism that takes risks and one that averts risks. The tolerance to risk plays an important role in such a learning mechanism. Results have shown the differences in learning capacity between risk-taking and risk-avert behaviors. These neurological properties provide promising inspirations for robot learning based on rewards. In this paper, we propose a learning mechanism that is able to learn from negative and positive feedback with reward coding adaptively. It is composed of two phases: evaluation and decision making. In the evaluation phase, we use a Kohonen self-organizing map technique to represent success and failure. Decision making is based on an early warning mechanism that enables avoiding repeating past mistakes. The behavior to risk is modulated in order to gain experiences for success and for failure. Success map is learned with adaptive reward that qualifies the learned task in order to optimize the efficiency. Our approach is presented with an implementation on the NAO humanoid robot, controlled by a bioinspired neural controller based on a central pattern generator. The learning system adapts the oscillation frequency and the motor neuron gain in pitch and roll in order to walk on flat and sloped terrain, and to switch between them.

  8. Fast and Adaptive Lossless Onboard Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kimesh, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern hyperspectral imaging systems are able to acquire far more data than can be downlinked from a spacecraft. Onboard data compression helps to alleviate this problem, but requires a system capable of power efficiency and high throughput. Software solutions have limited throughput performance and are power-hungry. Dedicated hardware solutions can provide both high throughput and power efficiency, while taking the load off of the main processor. Thus a hardware compression system was developed. The implementation uses a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data (NPO-42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which achieves excellent compression performance and has low complexity. This algorithm performs predictive compression using an adaptive filtering method, and uses adaptive Golomb coding. The implementation also packetizes the coded data. The FL algorithm is well suited for implementation in hardware. In the FPGA implementation, one sample is compressed every clock cycle, which makes for a fast and practical realtime solution for space applications. Benefits of this implementation are: 1) The underlying algorithm achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that exceeds that of techniques currently in use. 2) The algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. 3) Hardware acceleration provides a throughput improvement of 10 to 100 times vs. the software implementation. A prototype of the compressor is available in software, but it runs at a speed that does not meet spacecraft requirements. The hardware implementation targets the Xilinx Virtex IV FPGAs, and makes the use of this compressor practical for Earth satellites as well as beyond-Earth missions with hyperspectral instruments.

  9. A Muscle Synergy-inspired Adaptive Control Scheme for a Hybrid Walking Neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naji A Alibeji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract--- Abstract--- A hybrid neuroprosthesis that uses an electric motor-based wearable exoskeleton and functional electrical stimulation (FES has a promising potential to restore walking in persons with paraplegia. A hybrid actuation structure introduces effector redundancy, making its automatic control a challenging task because multiple muscles and additional electric motor need to be coordinated. Inspired by the muscle synergy principle, we designed a low dimensional controller to control multiple effectors: FES of multiple muscles and electric motors. The resulting control system may be less complex and easier to control. To obtain the muscle synergy-inspired low dimensional control, a subject-specific gait model was optimized to compute optimal control signals for the multiple effectors. The optimal control signals were then dimensionally reduced by using principal component analysis to extract synergies. Then, an adaptive feedforward controller with an update law for the synergy activation was designed. In addition, feedback control was used to provide stability and robustness to the control design. The adaptive-feedforward and feedback control structure makes the low dimensional controller more robust to disturbances and variations in the model parameters and may help to compensate for other time-varying phenomena (e.g., muscle fatigue. This is proven by using a Lyapunov stability analysis, which yielded semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking. Computer simulations were performed to test the new controller on a 4 degree of freedom gait model.

  10. Fast Adaptive Wavelet for Remote Sensing Image Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Run-Hai Jiao; Yuan-Cheng Li

    2007-01-01

    Remote sensing images are hard to achieve high compression ratio because of their rich texture. By analyzing the influence of wavelet properties on image compression, this paper proposes wavelet construction rules and builds a new biorthogonal wavelet construction model with parameters. The model parameters are optimized by using genetic algorithm and adopting energy compaction as the optimization object function. In addition, in order to resolve the computation complexity problem of online construction, according to the image classification rule proposed in this paper we construct wavelets for different classes of images and implement the fast adaptive wavelet selection algorithm (FAWS). Experimental results show wavelet bases of FAWS gain better compression performance than Daubechies9/7.

  11. Study of a new fast adaptive filtering algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-li; ZHANG Xiong-wei; YANG Ji-bin; CHEN Gong

    2006-01-01

    A new fast adaptive filtering algorithm was presented by using the correlations between the signal's former and latter sampling times.The proof of the new algorithm was also presented,which showed that its optimal weight vector was the solution of generalized Wiener equation.The new algorithm was of simple structure,fast convergence,and less stable maladjustment.It can handle many signals including both uncorrelated signal and strong correlation signal.However,its computational complexity was comparable to that of the normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm.Simulation results show that for uncorrelated signals,the stable maladjustment of the proposed algorithm is less than that of the VS-NLMS algorithm,and its convergence is comparable to that of the algorithm proposed in references but faster than that of L.E-LMS algorithm.For strong correlation signal,its performance is superior to those of the NLMS algorithm and DCR-LMS algorithm.

  12. Impact of altered lower limb proprioception produced by tendon vibration on adaptation to split-belt treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Charles S; Chelette, Amber M; Pourmoghaddam, Amir

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that proprioceptive input is essential to the development of a locomotor body schema that is used to guide the assembly of successful walking. Proprioceptive information is used to signal the need for, and promotion of, locomotor adaptation in response to environmental or internal modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if tendon vibration applied to either the hamstrings or quadriceps of participants experiencing split-belt treadmill walking modified lower limb kinematics during the early adaptation period. Modifications in the adaptive process in response to vibration would suggest that the sensory-motor system had been unsuccessful in down weighting the disruptive proprioceptive input resulting from vibration. Ten participants experienced split-belt walking, with and without vibration, while gait kinematics were obtained with a 12-camera collection system. Bilateral hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were calculated and the first five strides after the split were averaged for each subject to create joint angle waveforms for each of the assessed joints, for each experimental condition. The intralimb variables of stride length, percent stance time, and relative timing between various combinations of peak joint angles were assessed using repeated measures MANOVA. Results indicate that vibration had very little impact on the split-belt walking adaptive process, although quadriceps vibration did significantly reduce percent stance time by 1.78% relative to the no vibration condition. The data suggest that the perceptual-motor system was able to down weight the disrupted proprioceptive input such that the locomotor body schema was able to effectively manage the lower limb patterns of motion necessary to adapt to the changing belt speed. Complementary explanations for the current findings are also discussed.

  13. Center of Mass-Based Adaptive Fast Block Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hung Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an efficient adaptive algorithm based on center of mass (CEM for fast block motion estimation. Binary transform, subsampling, and horizontal/vertical projection techniques are also proposed. As the conventional CEM calculation is computationally intensive, binary transform and subsampling approaches are proposed to simplify CEM calculation; the binary transform center of mass (BITCEM is then derived. The BITCEM motion types are classified by percentage of (0,0 BITCEM motion vectors. Adaptive search patterns are allocated according to the BITCEM moving direction and the BITCEM motion type. Moreover, the BITCEM motion vector is utilized as the initial search point for near-still or slow BITCEM motion types. To support the variable block sizes, the horizontal/vertical projections of a binary transformed macroblock are utilized to determine whether the block requires segmentation. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is better than the five conventional algorithms, that is, three-step search (TSS, new three-step search (N3SS, four three-step search (4SS, block-based gradient decent search (BBGDS, and diamond search (DS, in terms of speed or picture quality for eight benchmark sequences.

  14. Fast, multiphase volume adaptation to hyperosmotic shock by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Pilizota

    Full Text Available All living cells employ an array of different mechanisms to help them survive changes in extra cellular osmotic pressure. The difference in the concentration of chemicals in a bacterium's cytoplasm and the external environment generates an osmotic pressure that inflates the cell. It is thought that the bacterium Escherichia coli use a number of interconnected systems to adapt to changes in external pressure, allowing them to maintain turgor and live in surroundings that range more than two-hundred-fold in external osmolality. Here, we use fluorescence imaging to make the first measurements of cell volume changes over time during hyperosmotic shock and subsequent adaptation on a single cell level in vivo with a time resolution on the order of seconds. We directly observe two previously unseen phases of the cytoplasmic water efflux upon hyperosmotic shock. Furthermore, we monitor cell volume changes during the post-shock recovery and observe a two-phase response that depends on the shock magnitude. The initial phase of recovery is fast, on the order of 15-20 min and shows little cell-to-cell variation. For large sucrose shocks, a secondary phase that lasts several hours adds to the recovery. We find that cells are able to recover fully from shocks as high as 1 Osmol/kg using existing systems, but that for larger shocks, protein synthesis is required for full recovery.

  15. Center of Mass-Based Adaptive Fast Block Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Kuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an efficient adaptive algorithm based on center of mass (CEM for fast block motion estimation. Binary transform, subsampling, and horizontal/vertical projection techniques are also proposed. As the conventional CEM calculation is computationally intensive, binary transform and subsampling approaches are proposed to simplify CEM calculation; the binary transform center of mass (BITCEM is then derived. The BITCEM motion types are classified by percentage of (0,0 BITCEM motion vectors. Adaptive search patterns are allocated according to the BITCEM moving direction and the BITCEM motion type. Moreover, the BITCEM motion vector is utilized as the initial search point for near-still or slow BITCEM motion types. To support the variable block sizes, the horizontal/vertical projections of a binary transformed macroblock are utilized to determine whether the block requires segmentation. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is better than the five conventional algorithms, that is, three-step search (TSS, new three-step search (N3SS, four three-step search (4SS, block-based gradient decent search (BBGDS, and diamond search (DS, in terms of speed or picture quality for eight benchmark sequences.

  16. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward And Backward Walking on Land and in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Arellano, Raúl; Vanrenterghem, Jos; López-Contreras, Gracia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg) were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (p<0.05). At initial contact, knees and hips were more flexed during walking forward in water, whilst, ankles were more dorsiflexed during walking backward in water. At final stance, knees and ankles were more flexed during forward walking, whilst the hip was more flexed during backward walking. These results show how walking in water differs from walking on land, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs. PMID:26839602

  17. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward and Backward Walking on Land and in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadenas-Sanchez Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (p<0.05. At initial contact, knees and hips were more flexed during walking forward in water, whilst, ankles were more dorsiflexed during walking backward in water. At final stance, knees and ankles were more flexed during forward walking, whilst the hip was more flexed during backward walking. These results show how walking in water differs from walking on land, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs.

  18. [A model of bipedal walking adaptable to an unpredictably dynamic environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Masafumi; Tomita, Nozomi; Makino, Yoshinari

    2010-11-01

    Modern science has been developed through concept of subject-object separation. That is, nature has been cordoned off from human beings and objectified. We have attempted to discover ideal world laws wherein we can consider nature as homogeneous. The real world, however, is by far more complicated than what natural sciences have so far been able to decipher. There are many problems that cannot be effectively addressed with the existing scientific technology. Because the real world is so unpredictable and dynamic, it is impossible to objectify it in advance and apply traditional methodology. This real world problem arises especially in information processing systems, that is, the recognition and the motion control systems coping with the real world. The current information systems can only handle explicit and complete information. Life is an intrinsic part of nature. To be both pliant and sturdy in a complex environment requires autonomy capable of creating the information needed to control the self. It forms the premise for the cognizance and control of life systems that exist in reality. To "live," a life system must independently forge a harmonious relationship with an unlimited environment. It requires that the life system be capable of creating the information necessary for self-control. It is this autonomy that clearly distinguishes the world of life systems from the physical world. Here, we will show an example of adaptive bipedal walking under an indefinite environment.

  19. Fast-adaptive near-lossless image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kejing

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of image compression is to store or transmit image data efficiently. However, most compression methods emphasize the compression ratio rather than the throughput. We propose an encoding process and rules, and consequently a fast-adaptive near-lossless image compression method (FAIC) with good compression ratio. FAIC is a single-pass method, which removes bits from each codeword, then predicts the next pixel value through localized edge detection techniques, and finally uses Golomb-Rice codes to encode the residuals. FAIC uses only logical operations, bitwise operations, additions, and subtractions. Meanwhile, it eliminates the slow operations (e.g., multiplication, division, and logarithm) and the complex entropy coder, which can be a bottleneck in hardware implementations. Besides, FAIC does not depend on any precomputed tables or parameters. Experimental results demonstrate that FAIC achieves good balance between compression ratio and computational complexity in certain range (e.g., peak signal-to-noise ratio >35 dB, bits per pixel>2). It is suitable for applications in which the amount of data is huge or the computation power is limited.

  20. Fast Adaptive Blind MMSE Equalizer for Multichannel FIR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed-Meraim Karim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new blind minimum mean square error (MMSE equalization algorithm of noisy multichannel finite impulse response (FIR systems, that relies only on second-order statistics. The proposed algorithm offers two important advantages: a low computational complexity and a relative robustness against channel order overestimation errors. Exploiting the fact that the columns of the equalizer matrix filter belong both to the signal subspace and to the kernel of truncated data covariance matrix, the proposed algorithm achieves blindly a direct estimation of the zero-delay MMSE equalizer parameters. We develop a two-step procedure to further improve the performance gain and control the equalization delay. An efficient fast adaptive implementation of our equalizer, based on the projection approximation and the shift invariance property of temporal data covariance matrix, is proposed for reducing the computational complexity from to , where is the number of emitted signals, the data vector length, and the dimension of the signal subspace. We then derive a statistical performance analysis to compare the equalization performance with that of the optimal MMSE equalizer. Finally, simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed blind equalization algorithm.

  1. Adaptive behaviour of the spinal cord in the transition from quiet stance to walking

    OpenAIRE

    Serrao Mariano; Ranavolo Alberto; Andersen Ole; Conte Carmela; Don Romildo; Cortese Francesca; Mari Silvia; Draicchio Francesco; Padua Luca; Sandrini Giorgio; Pierelli Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Modulation of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) excitability was evaluated during gait initiation in 10 healthy subjects to investigate how load- and movement-related joint inputs activate lower spinal centres in the transition from quiet stance to walking. A motion analysis system integrated with a surface EMG device was used to acquire kinematic, kinetic and EMG variables. Starting from a quiet stance, subjects were asked to walk forward, at their natural speed. The su...

  2. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Syed M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI ( n = 7; Control), and GII ( n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant ( P stress did not influence the reproductive hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T3 and T4 show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland hormones play a significant role in such adaptation.

  3. An A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction method for chromosome walking without restriction site cloning bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Xu, Wentao; Shi, Hui; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-06-01

    A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was modified and employed for the isolation of genomic fragments adjacent to a known DNA sequence. The improvements in the method focus on two points. The first is the modification of the PO(4) and NH(2) groups in the adapter to inhibit the self-ligation of the adapter or the generation of nonspecific products. The second improvement is the use of the capacity of rTaq DNA polymerase to add an adenosine overhang at the 3' ends of digested DNA to suppress self-ligation in the digested DNA and simultaneously resolve restriction site clone bias. The combination of modifications in the adapter and in the digested DNA leads to T/A-specific ligation, which enhances the flexibility of this method and makes it feasible to use many different restriction enzymes with a single adapter. This novel A-T linker adapter PCR overcomes the inherent limitations of the original ligation-mediated PCR method such as low specificity and a lack of restriction enzyme choice. Moreover, this method also offers higher amplification efficiency, greater flexibility, and easier manipulation compared with other PCR methods for chromosome walking. Experimental results from 143 Arabidopsis mutants illustrate that this method is reliable and efficient in high-throughput experiments.

  4. Using Efference Copy and a Forward Internal Model for Adaptive Biped Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder-Schetelig, Johannes; Manoonpong, Poramate; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2010-01-01

    on terrains with changing slopes through its upper body component controller. As a consequence, the controller drives the upper body component (UBC) to lean forwards/backwards as soon as an error occurs resulting in dynamical stable walking. We have evaluated the performance of the system on four different...

  5. Physiological responses to food deprivation in the house sparrow, a species not adapted to prolonged fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilieh, Anton; McCue, Marshall D; Pinshow, Berry

    2012-09-01

    Many wild birds fast during reproduction, molting, migration, or because of limited food availability. Species that are adapted to fasting sequentially oxidize endogenous fuels in three discrete phases. We hypothesized that species not adapted to long fasts have truncated, but otherwise similar, phases of fasting, sequential changes in fuel oxidization, and similar changes in blood metabolites to fasting-adapted species. We tested salient predictions in house sparrows (Passer domesticus biblicus), a subspecies that is unable to tolerate more than ~32 h of fasting. Our main hypothesis was that fasting sparrows sequentially oxidize substrates in the order carbohydrates, lipids, and protein. We dosed 24 house sparrows with [(13)C]glucose, palmitic acid, or glycine and measured (13)CO(2) in their breath while they fasted for 24 h. To ascertain whether blood metabolite levels reflect fasting-induced changes in metabolic fuels, we also measured glucose, triacylglycerides, and β-hydroxybutyrate in the birds' blood. The results of both breath (13)CO(2) and plasma metabolite analyses did not support our hypothesis; i.e., that sparrows have the same metabolic responses characteristic of fasting-adapted species, but on a shorter time scale. Contrary to our main prediction, we found that recently assimilated (13)C-tracers were oxidized continuously in different patterns with no definite peaks corresponding to the three phases of fasting and also that changes in plasma metabolite levels accurately tracked the changes found by breath analysis. Notably, the rate of recently assimilated [(13)C]glycine oxidization was significantly higher (P fast for longer than 32 h is likely related to their inability to accrue large lipid stores, separately oxidize different fuels, and/or spare protein during fasting.

  6. Adaptive and Energy Efficient Walking in a Hexapod Robot under Neuromechanical Control and Sensorimotor Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2016-01-01

    feedback and for online tuning the VAAMs' stiffness parameters. The control and learning mechanisms enable the hexapod robot advanced mobility sensor driven-walking device (AMOS) to achieve variable compliant walking that accommodates different gaits and surfaces. As a consequence, AMOS can perform more......) to generate the proper leg stiffness (i.e., compliance); and 3) to determine joint angles that give rise to particular positions at the endpoints of the legs. To tackle this problem for a robotic application, here we present a neuromechanical controller coupled with sensorimotor learning. The controller...... consists of a modular neural network for coordinating 18 joints and several virtual agonist-antagonist muscle mechanisms (VAAMs) for variable compliant joint motions. In addition, sensorimotor learning, including forward models and dual-rate learning processes, is introduced for predicting foot force...

  7. Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, translation, adaptation and validation for the Persian language population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mohammadi, Roghaye; Hasson, Scott

    2015-02-01

    The Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) is a multi-item rating scale used to assess the perspectives of patients about the impact of MS on their walking ability. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the MSWS-12 in Persian speaking patients with MS. The MSWS-12 questionnaire was translated into Persian language according to internationally adopted standards involving forward-backward translation, reviewed by an expert committee and tested on the pre-final version. In this cross-sectional study, 100 participants (50 patients with MS and 50 healthy subjects) were included. The MSWS-12 was administered twice 7 days apart to 30 patients with MS for test and retest reliability. Internal consistency reliability was Cronbach's α 0.96 for test and 0.97 for retest. There were no significant floor or ceiling effects. Test-retest reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] agreement of 0.98, 95% CI, 0.95-0.99) confirming the reproducibility of the Persian MSWS-12. Construct validity using known group methods was demonstrated through a significant difference in the Persian MSWS-12 total score between the patients with MS and healthy subjects. Factor analysis extracted 2 latent factors (79.24% of the total variance). A second factor analysis suggested the 9-item Persian MSWS as a unidimensional scale for patients with MS. The Persian MSWS-12 was found to be valid and reliable for assessing walking ability in Persian speaking patients with MS.

  8. Rapid changes in corticospinal excitability during force field adaptation of human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Alain, S; Grey, Michael James;

    2012-01-01

    Force field adaptation of locomotor muscle activity is one way of studying the ability of the motor control networks in the brain and spinal cord to adapt in a flexible way to changes in the environment. Here, we investigate whether the corticospinal tract is involved in this adaptation. We...

  9. Adaptive behaviour of the spinal cord in the transition from quiet stance to walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrao Mariano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR excitability was evaluated during gait initiation in 10 healthy subjects to investigate how load- and movement-related joint inputs activate lower spinal centres in the transition from quiet stance to walking. A motion analysis system integrated with a surface EMG device was used to acquire kinematic, kinetic and EMG variables. Starting from a quiet stance, subjects were asked to walk forward, at their natural speed. The sural nerve was stimulated and EMG responses were recorded from major hip, knee and ankle muscles. Gait initiation was divided into four subphases based on centre of pressure and centre of mass behaviours, while joint displacements were used to categorise joint motion as flexion or extension. The reflex parameters were measured and compared between subphases and in relation to the joint kinematics. Results The NWR was found to be subphase-dependent. NWR excitability was increased in the hip and knee flexor muscles of the starting leg, just prior to the occurrence of any movement, and in the knee flexor muscles of the same leg as soon as it was unloaded. The NWR was hip joint kinematics-dependent in a crossed manner. The excitability of the reflex was enhanced in the extensor muscles of the standing leg during the hip flexion of the starting leg, and in the hip flexors of the standing leg during the hip extension of the starting leg. No notable reflex modulation was observed in the ankle muscles. Conclusions Our findings show that the NWR is modulated during the gait initiation phase. Leg unloading and hip joint motion are the main sources of the observed modulation and work in concert to prepare and assist the starting leg in the first step while supporting the contralateral leg, thereby possibly predisposing the lower limbs to the cyclical pattern of walking.

  10. Walking to the beat of their own drum: how children and adults meet timing constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone V Gill

    Full Text Available Walking requires adapting to meet task constraints. Between 5- and 7-years old, children's walking approximates adult walking without constraints. To examine how children and adults adapt to meet timing constraints, 57 5- to 7-year olds and 20 adults walked to slow and fast audio metronome paces. Both children and adults modified their walking. However, at the slow pace, children had more trouble matching the metronome compared to adults. The youngest children's walking patterns deviated most from the slow metronome pace, and practice improved their performance. Five-year olds were the only group that did not display carryover effects to the metronome paces. Findings are discussed in relation to what contributes to the development of adaptation in children.

  11. Reduced Interocular Transfer of Spatial Adaptation for Fast Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Baker

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Threshold elevation following monocular adaptation is weaker in the unadapted eye than in the adapted eye. At least 15 studies have measured this interocular transfer (IOT phenomenon, and typically report around 60% transfer. Yet almost all of these studies used spatial frequencies above 3c/deg, very slow temporal parameters, and criterion sensitive methods (method of adjustment, yes/no. In recent work, we (Meese and Baker 2011, i-Perception 2 159–182 found markedly weaker interocular transfer at low spatial and high temporal frequencies. Here, we measure IOT in 9 observers for a broad range of spatiotemporal frequencies (0.5, 2, and 8c/deg; 1, 4, and 15Hz using a 2AFC paradigm. Targets were horizontal Gabor patches with a full-width-at-half height of 1.67 (lower frequencies or 6.68 (8c/deg grating cycles. Adaptors were larger gratings with the same spatiotemporal properties as the targets. Observers adapted for 2 min initially, and 5 s between each trial, with monocular presentation enabled by shutter goggles. We typically found weaker IOT than previously reported (<50%, particularly for our fastest stimuli (lowest spatial and highest temporal frequencies, where it was virtually absent in all cases. Binocular summation and monocular adaptation were normal in all conditions. This implies that adaptation to ‘magno’ stimuli, not investigated in previous studies, occurs at a monocular locus. We also consider possible methodological confounds in classical studies which might have inflated the levels of IOT. These include the formation of retinal afterimages from static adaptors and changes in criterion unrelated to changes in sensitivity.

  12. Adapting the ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer for walking/climbing robotic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Dabiri, Borna E.; Kennedy, Brett; Sherrit, Stewart

    2005-05-01

    Future NASA's missions include the search for past and existing life in the Universe and evidence on how the planets in the Solar system formed and evolved. In order to fulfill these goals sampling systems that meet the stringent requirements of the various environments are required to be developed. To support these objectives an ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) device has been developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to allow drilling and coring rocks for in-situ planetary analysis [Bar-Cohen et al, 2001]. The site location and method of sampling are of vital importance to scientists. Surface rocks abrasion, small depth soil drilling, and deep drilling have been proposed. It has been suggested that another possible source of mineralogical or astrobiological information can be found by exploring the sidewall of canyons. The exploration of such sites requires the development of a limbed robotic system capable of walking and climbing slopes up to and including vertical faces and overhangs. An anchor/drilling mechanism is currently under development and is being installed on each leg of the four-legged Steep Terrain Access Robot (STAR). This paper presents the modeling, design, and preliminary testing results of the USDC for use as end-effectors of walking/climbing robots.

  13. The Automatic Image Segmentation Method Based on Fast FCM and Random Walk Algorithm%基于快速FCM与随机游走算法的图像自动分割方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许健才; 张良均; 余燕团

    2016-01-01

    在图像分割中,针对 FCM 算法存在聚类数目需要预先给定、收敛速度慢等缺点,本文把快速模糊 C 均值聚类算法和随机游走算法相结合,具体方法为先采用快速模糊 C 均值聚类算法对图像进行预分割,以便获得聚类中心的位置,然后将该中心作为随机游走的种子点,再进行图像分割,实验结果得到了较为满意的预期效果,证明该方法是可行的。本文的研究为快速 FCM 实现自适应性和开发图形图像预处理系统提供了技术支持与理论依据。%As far as image segmentation, the defeat of the number of clusters for FCM algorithm is reeded to be improued. In this paper, the fast fuzzy C-means clustering and random walk algorithm are combined to solve the problem of image segmentation. Firstly, the fast FCM for image pre-segmentation to obtain the number of clusters and cluster central location as the seed points of random walk firstly. Then, for image segmentation, experimental results show that this method is feasible, and get a more satisfactory desired purpose. Results of this study achieve self-adaptive and fast FCM develop graphical image preprocessing system provides technical support and theoretical basis.

  14. Organizational Adaptive Capacity: How Much, How Fast, and How Often

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-25

    equilibrates between internal and external factors. The objective here is to synthesize the many intuitive and disparately articulated concepts of adaptation...idea of “reversibility” emerged in the force structure debate and is included in the latest Army Posture Statement.22 The general idea 7...the Posture of the United States Army 2012, Posture Statement presented to the 112 th Cong., 2 nd Session (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the

  15. An Adaptive K-random Walks Method for Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ghorbani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing an intelligent search method in peer-to-peer networks will significantly affect efficiency of the network taking into account sending a search query to nodes which have more probably stored the desired object. Machine learning techniques such as learning automaton can be used as an appropriate tool for this purpose. This paper tries to present a search method based on the learning automaton for the peer-to-peer networks, in which each node is selected according to values stored in its memory for sending the search queries rather than being selected randomly. The probable values are stored in tables and they indicate history of the node in previous searches for finding the desired object. For evaluation, simulation is used to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms K-random walk method which randomly sends the search queries to the nodes.

  16. Motion Planning Using an Impact-Based Hybrid Control for Trajectory Generation in Adaptive Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Asif

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to solve a major drawback of walking robots i.e. their inability to react to environmental disturbances while navigating in natural rough terrains. This problem is reduced here by suggesting the use of a hybrid force‐position control based trajectory generation with the impact dynamics into consideration that compensates for the stability variations, thus helping the robot react stably in the face of environmental disturbances. As a consequence, the proposed impact‐based hybrid control helps the robot achieve better and stable motion planning than conventional position‐based control algorithms. Dynamic simulations and real world outdoor experiments performed on a six legged hexapod robot show a relevant improvement in the robot locomotion.

  17. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  18. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show...

  19. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state

    OpenAIRE

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Hal...

  20. Fast but fleeting: adaptive motor learning processes associated with aging and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewartha, Kevin M; Garcia, Angeles; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2014-10-01

    Motor learning has been shown to depend on multiple interacting learning processes. For example, learning to adapt when moving grasped objects with novel dynamics involves a fast process that adapts and decays quickly-and that has been linked to explicit memory-and a slower process that adapts and decays more gradually. Each process is characterized by a learning rate that controls how strongly motor memory is updated based on experienced errors and a retention factor determining the movement-to-movement decay in motor memory. Here we examined whether fast and slow motor learning processes involved in learning novel dynamics differ between younger and older adults. In addition, we investigated how age-related decline in explicit memory performance influences learning and retention parameters. Although the groups adapted equally well, they did so with markedly different underlying processes. Whereas the groups had similar fast processes, they had different slow processes. Specifically, the older adults exhibited decreased retention in their slow process compared with younger adults. Within the older group, who exhibited considerable variation in explicit memory performance, we found that poor explicit memory was associated with reduced retention in the fast process, as well as the slow process. These findings suggest that explicit memory resources are a determining factor in impairments in the both the fast and slow processes for motor learning but that aging effects on the slow process are independent of explicit memory declines.

  1. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    -of-the-art segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability......In this paper we propose a method for whole brain parcellation using the type of generative parametric models typically used in tissue classification. Compared to the non-parametric, multi-atlas segmentation techniques that have become popular in recent years, our method obtains state...... to handle multi-contrast (vector-valued intensities) MR data. We have validated our method by comparing its segmentations to manual delineations both within and across scanner platforms and pulse sequences, and show preliminary results on multi-contrast test-retest scans, demonstrating the feasibility...

  2. Fast Source Camera Identification Using Content Adaptive Guided Image Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Kang, Xiangui

    2016-03-01

    Source camera identification (SCI) is an important topic in image forensics. One of the most effective fingerprints for linking an image to its source camera is the sensor pattern noise, which is estimated as the difference between the content and its denoised version. It is widely believed that the performance of the sensor-based SCI heavily relies on the denoising filter used. This study proposes a novel sensor-based SCI method using content adaptive guided image filter (CAGIF). Thanks to the low complexity nature of the CAGIF, the proposed method is much faster than the state-of-the-art methods, which is a big advantage considering the potential real-time application of SCI. Despite the advantage of speed, experimental results also show that the proposed method can achieve comparable or better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy.

  3. Adaptation of an artificial diet for Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) laboratory rearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavaresco, Alvimar [EPAGRI, Estacao Experimetal de Canoinhas, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: bavaresco@epagri.rct-sc.br; Garcia, Mauro S.; Gruetzmacher, Anderson D.; Ringenberg, Rudiney; Foresti, Josemar [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade

    2004-03-15

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied on three artificial diets with different protein sources (d1 = white bean, yeast extract, soybean flour, powder milk and wheat germ; d2 = 'carioca' bean and yeast extract; d3 = corn flour, wheat germ and yeast extract). The objective of this research was to determine the most suitable diet for mass rearing S. cosmioides in laboratory. The species is highly polyphagous, and for this reason we hypothesized that diets that are suitable for other Lepidoptera can allow its development and fulfill the minimum requirements of biological quality, quantity and economy. Although S. cosmioides has completed the biological cycle on the three diets, the d1 was the most suitable for its rearing and produced the fastest development, higher total survival and pupae weight, as well as higher net reproduction rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and finite rate of natural increase (l). The number of instars varied from six to seven, predominating six in d1 and d3; in d2, half the population presented six instars and half seven. Females presented pupae duration significantly lower that the males in all diets, thus emerging earlier. Adult longevity was not affected by the diets, while total fecundity was higher in d1 and d2. In conclusion, the diet 1 is recommended to mass rearing S. cosmioides in the laboratory. (author)

  4. Adaptive Power Saving Method for Mobile Walking Guidance Device Using Motion Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognize the motion of the user and the surrounding environment with multiple sensors. We developed a guidance system based on mobile device for visually impaired person that helps the user to walk safely to the destination in the previous study. However, a mobile device having multiple sensors spends more power when the sensors are activated simultaneously and continuously. We propose a method for reducing the power consumption of a mobile device by considering the motion context of the user. We analyze and classify the user’s motion accurately by means of a decision tree and HMM (Hidden Markov Model that exploit the data from a triaxial accelerometer sensor and a tilt sensor. We can reduce battery power consumption by controlling the number of active ultrasonic sensors and the frame rate of the camera used to acquire spatial context around the user. This helps us to extend the operating time of the device and reduce the weight of the device’s built-in battery.

  5. Segmentation of heterogeneous or small FDG PET positive tissue based on a 3D-locally adaptive random walk algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoma, D P; Ruan, S; Thureau, S; Nkhali, L; Modzelewski, R; Monnehan, G A; Vera, P; Gardin, I

    2014-12-01

    A segmentation algorithm based on the random walk (RW) method, called 3D-LARW, has been developed to delineate small tumors or tumors with a heterogeneous distribution of FDG on PET images. Based on the original algorithm of RW [1], we propose an improved approach using new parameters depending on the Euclidean distance between two adjacent voxels instead of a fixed one and integrating probability densities of labels into the system of linear equations used in the RW. These improvements were evaluated and compared with the original RW method, a thresholding with a fixed value (40% of the maximum in the lesion), an adaptive thresholding algorithm on uniform spheres filled with FDG and FLAB method, on simulated heterogeneous spheres and on clinical data (14 patients). On these three different data, 3D-LARW has shown better segmentation results than the original RW algorithm and the three other methods. As expected, these improvements are more pronounced for the segmentation of small or tumors having heterogeneous FDG uptake.

  6. Adaptive integral method with fast Gaussian gridding for solving combined field integral equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakır, O.; Baǧ; Cı, H.; Michielssen, E.

    Fast Gaussian gridding (FGG), a recently proposed nonuniform fast Fourier transform algorithm, is used to reduce the memory requirements of the adaptive integral method (AIM) for accelerating the method of moments-based solution of combined field integral equations pertinent to the analysis of scattering from three-dimensional perfect electrically conducting surfaces. Numerical results that demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the AIM-FGG hybrid in comparison to an AIM-accelerated solver, which uses moment matching to project surface sources onto an auxiliary grid, are presented.

  7. Research on a Pulmonary Nodule Segmentation Method Combining Fast Self-Adaptive FCM and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD of lung cancer is to segment pathologically changed tissues fast and accurately. As pulmonary nodules are potential manifestation of lung cancer, we propose a fast and self-adaptive pulmonary nodules segmentation method based on a combination of FCM clustering and classification learning. The enhanced spatial function considers contributions to fuzzy membership from both the grayscale similarity between central pixels and single neighboring pixels and the spatial similarity between central pixels and neighborhood and improves effectively the convergence rate and self-adaptivity of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate segmentation of vascular adhesion, pleural adhesion, and ground glass opacity (GGO pulmonary nodules than other typical algorithms.

  8. Fast 3-D large-scale gravity and magnetic modeling using unstructured grids and an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-01-01

    A novel fast and accurate algorithm is developed for large-scale 3-D gravity and magnetic modeling problems. An unstructured grid discretization is used to approximate sources with arbitrary mass and magnetization distributions. A novel adaptive multilevel fast multipole (AMFM) method is developed to reduce the modeling time. An observation octree is constructed on a set of arbitrarily distributed observation sites, while a source octree is constructed on a source tetrahedral grid. A novel characteristic is the independence between the observation octree and the source octree, which simplifies the implementation of different survey configurations such as airborne and ground surveys. Two synthetic models, a cubic model and a half-space model with mountain-valley topography, are tested. As compared to analytical solutions of gravity and magnetic signals, excellent agreements of the solutions verify the accuracy of our AMFM algorithm. Finally, our AMFM method is used to calculate the terrain effect on an airborne gravity data set for a realistic topography model represented by a triangular surface retrieved from a digital elevation model. Using 16 threads, more than 5800 billion interactions between 1,002,001 observation points and 5,839,830 tetrahedral elements are computed in 453.6 s. A traditional first-order Gaussian quadrature approach requires 3.77 days. Hence, our new AMFM algorithm not only can quickly compute the gravity and magnetic signals for complicated problems but also can substantially accelerate the solution of 3-D inversion problems.

  9. A Fast and Adaptive Search Algorithm Based on Rood Pattern and Gradient Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Long; Yi, Qing-Ming; Shi, Min

    In order to achieve the real-time property for video coding, a fast and adaptive algorithm based on starting search point prediction and early-termination strategy is proposed. It analyzes center-bias property and spatial correlation property of motion vector field, and utilizes the respective characteristics of block based gradient descent search (BBGDS) and adaptive rood pattern search (ARPS) algorithm. The proposed algorithm adaptively chooses different searching strategies according to the type of the image, makes full use of the cross image motion vector distribution characteristics and optimizes the traditional ARPS algorithm. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is about 2.3∼9.2 times faster than Diamond Search (DS), 1.2∼4.0 times than ARPS. The algorithm can meet the real-time demand without reducing the image quality.

  10. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Half of the subjects trained in the fasted state (F; n = 10), while the others ingested ample carbohydrates before (∼160 g) and during (1 g·kg body wt⁻¹·h⁻¹) the training sessions (CHO; n = 10). The training similarly increased Vo(₂max) (+9%) and performance in a 60-min simulated time trial (+8%) in both groups (P Metabolic measurements were made during a 2-h constant-load exercise bout in the fasted state at ∼65% pretraining Vo(₂max). In F, exercise-induced intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) breakdown was enhanced in type I fibers (P Training did not affect IMCL breakdown in CHO. In addition, F (+21%) increased the exercise intensity corresponding to the maximal rate of fat oxidation more than did CHO (+6%) (P exercise-induced drop in blood glucose concentration (P exercise-induced net IMCL degradation. In addition, F but not CHO prevented drop of blood glucose concentration during fasting exercise.

  11. Evaluating functional roles of phase resetting in generation of adaptive human bipedal walking with a physiologically based model of the spinal pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shinya; Ogihara, Naomichi; Funato, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    The central pattern generators (CPGs) in the spinal cord strongly contribute to locomotor behavior. To achieve adaptive locomotion, locomotor rhythm generated by the CPGs is suggested to be functionally modulated by phase resetting based on sensory afferent or perturbations. Although phase resetting has been investigated during fictive locomotion in cats, its functional roles in actual locomotion have not been clarified. Recently, simulation studies have been conducted to examine the roles of phase resetting during human bipedal walking, assuming that locomotion is generated based on prescribed kinematics and feedback control. However, such kinematically based modeling cannot be used to fully elucidate the mechanisms of adaptation. In this article we proposed a more physiologically based mathematical model of the neural system for locomotion and investigated the functional roles of phase resetting. We constructed a locomotor CPG model based on a two-layered hierarchical network model of the rhythm generator (RG) and pattern formation (PF) networks. The RG model produces rhythm information using phase oscillators and regulates it by phase resetting based on foot-contact information. The PF model creates feedforward command signals based on rhythm information, which consists of the combination of five rectangular pulses based on previous analyses of muscle synergy. Simulation results showed that our model establishes adaptive walking against perturbing forces and variations in the environment, with phase resetting playing important roles in increasing the robustness of responses, suggesting that this mechanism of regulation may contribute to the generation of adaptive human bipedal locomotion.

  12. Improving GPU-accelerated adaptive IDW interpolation algorithm using fast kNN search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-nearest neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is obtained by weighted interpolating using the power parameter. In this work, we develop a fast kNN search approach based on the space-partitioning data structure, even grid, to improve the previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm. The improved algorithm is composed of the stages of kNN search and weighted interpolating. To evaluate the performance of the improved algorithm, we perform five groups of experimental tests. The experimental results indicate: (1) the improved algorithm can achieve a speedup of up to 1017 over the corresponding serial algorithm; (2) the improved algorithm is at least two times faster than our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm; and (3) the utilization of fast kNN search can significantly improve the computational efficiency of the entire GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm.

  13. Adaptive Hybrid Visual Servo Regulation of Mobile Robots Based on Fast Homography Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the monocular camera-based mobile robot system, an adaptive hybrid visual servo regulation algorithm which is based on a fast homography decomposition method is proposed to drive the mobile robot to its desired position and orientation, even when object’s imaging depth and camera’s position extrinsic parameters are unknown. Firstly, the homography’s particular properties caused by mobile robot’s 2-DOF motion are taken into account to induce a fast homography decomposition method. Secondly, the homography matrix and the extracted orientation error, incorporated with the desired view’s single feature point, are utilized to form an error vector and its open-loop error function. Finally, Lyapunov-based techniques are exploited to construct an adaptive regulation control law, followed by the experimental verification. The experimental results show that the proposed fast homography decomposition method is not only simple and efficient, but also highly precise. Meanwhile, the designed control law can well enable mobile robot position and orientation regulation despite the lack of depth information and camera’s position extrinsic parameters.

  14. FastTrack to supercritical fluid chromatographic purification: Implementation of a walk-up analytical supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry screening system in the medicinal chemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurigemma, Christine; Farrell, William

    2010-09-24

    Medicinal chemists often depend on analytical instrumentation for reaction monitoring and product confirmation at all stages of pharmaceutical discovery and development. To obtain pure compounds for biological assays, the removal of side products and final compounds through purification is often necessary. Prior to purification, chemists often utilize open-access analytical LC/MS instruments because mass confirmation is fast and reliable, and the chromatographic separation of most sample constituents is sufficient. Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is often used as an orthogonal technique to HPLC or when isolation of the free base of a compound is desired. In laboratories where SFC is the predominant technique for analysis and purification of compounds, a reasonable approach for quickly determining suitable purification conditions is to screen the sample against different columns. This can be a bottleneck to the purification process. To commission SFC for open-access use, a walk-up analytical SFC/MS screening system was implemented in the medicinal chemistry laboratory. Each sample is automatically screened through six column/method conditions, and on-demand data processing occurs for the chromatographers after each screening method is complete. This paper highlights the "FastTrack" approach to expediting samples through purification.

  15. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  16. Adaptive grouping for the higher-order multilevel fast multipole method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Jørgensen, Erik; Meincke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An alternative parameter-free adaptive approach for the grouping of the basis function patterns in the multilevel fast multipole method is presented, yielding significant memory savings compared to the traditional Octree grouping for most discretizations, particularly when using higher-order basis...... functions. Results from both a uniformly and nonuniformly meshed scatterer are presented, showing how the technique is worthwhile even for regular meshes, and demonstrating that there is no loss of accuracy in spite of the large reduction in memory requirements and the relatively low computational cost....

  17. Detection of trichothecene producing Fusarium spp. by PCR: adaptation, validation and application to fast food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Agodi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Food contamination by trichothecene mycotoxins is considered to be an emerging public health problem. The aim of this study was to validate a rapid sonification protocol, previously set up for cereal Fusarium DNA extraction from fast food samples, produced by a centre for research and development in the food industry in Catania, Sicily, and to validate it for a diagnostic PCR assay targeted at tri5, the key gene of trichothecene biosynthesis.

    Methods. DNA from reference Fusarium spp. strains and from fast food samples was prepared, setting up an extraction protocol adapted using some modifications based on a method recently described. Validation experiments were performed: serial dilution of DNA extracted from fungal cultures were added to food samples and then DNA was extracted. Specific primer pairs were used to detect F. graminearum and F. culmorum DNA in species-specific assays as well as trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp. in a groupspecific system.

    Results. All genomic DNA extracted from trichothecene-producing Fusarium spp. as well as from DNA-spiked fast food samples and from food still in it’s original condition resulted in the correct amplification. The detection limit was 1 x 10-4 μg of DNA. All fungal and food samples tested gave highly consistent results in repeatability assays, thus demonstrating the within-lab and within/between-day precision of the method.

    Conclusions. Information on the epidemiology of trichothecene producing Fusarium through the food chain and the identification of the most frequently contaminated components of fast food are essential in order to develop effective public health strategies for minimising consumer exposure to trichothecenes. Key words: Fusarium, fast food, trichothecenes, PCR

  18. Motion-capture-based walking simulation of digital human adapted to laser-scanned 3D as-is environments for accessibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Maruyama

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to our rapidly aging society, accessibility evaluation to enhance the ease and safety of access to indoor and outdoor environments for the elderly and disabled is increasing in importance. Accessibility must be assessed not only from the general standard aspect but also in terms of physical and cognitive friendliness for users of different ages, genders, and abilities. Meanwhile, human behavior simulation has been progressing in the areas of crowd behavior analysis and emergency evacuation planning. However, in human behavior simulation, environment models represent only “as-planned” situations. In addition, a pedestrian model cannot generate the detailed articulated movements of various people of different ages and genders in the simulation. Therefore, the final goal of this research was to develop a virtual accessibility evaluation by combining realistic human behavior simulation using a digital human model (DHM with “as-is” environment models. To achieve this goal, we developed an algorithm for generating human-like DHM walking motions, adapting its strides, turning angles, and footprints to laser-scanned 3D as-is environments including slopes and stairs. The DHM motion was generated based only on a motion-capture (MoCap data for flat walking. Our implementation constructed as-is 3D environment models from laser-scanned point clouds of real environments and enabled a DHM to walk autonomously in various environment models. The difference in joint angles between the DHM and MoCap data was evaluated. Demonstrations of our environment modeling and walking simulation in indoor and outdoor environments including corridors, slopes, and stairs are illustrated in this study.

  19. Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klempel Monica C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternate day modified fasting (ADMF is an effective strategy for weight loss in obese adults. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the dietary and physical activity adaptations that occur during short-term ADMF, and to determine how these modulations affect rate of weight loss. Methods Sixteen obese subjects (12 women/4 men completed a 10-week trial consisting of 3 phases: 1 2-week control phase, 2 4-week ADMF controlled feeding phase, and 3 4-week ADMF self-selected feeding phase. Results Body weight decreased (P r = 0.42, P = 0.01. Dietary fat intake decreased (36% to 33% of kcal, P r = 0.38, P = 0.03. Hunger on the fast day decreased (P Conclusion These findings indicate that obese subjects quickly adapt to ADMF, and that changes in energy/macronutrient intake, hunger, and maintenance of physical activity play a role in influencing rate of weight loss by ADMF.

  20. Fast Adapting Ensemble: A New Algorithm for Mining Data Streams with Concept Drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ortíz Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of large data streams in the presence of concept drifts is one of the main challenges in the field of data mining, particularly when the algorithms have to deal with concepts that disappear and then reappear. This paper presents a new algorithm, called Fast Adapting Ensemble (FAE, which adapts very quickly to both abrupt and gradual concept drifts, and has been specifically designed to deal with recurring concepts. FAE processes the learning examples in blocks of the same size, but it does not have to wait for the batch to be complete in order to adapt its base classification mechanism. FAE incorporates a drift detector to improve the handling of abrupt concept drifts and stores a set of inactive classifiers that represent old concepts, which are activated very quickly when these concepts reappear. We compare our new algorithm with various well-known learning algorithms, taking into account, common benchmark datasets. The experiments show promising results from the proposed algorithm (regarding accuracy and runtime, handling different types of concept drifts.

  1. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples.

  2. Fast pixel-wise adaptive visual tracking of non-rigid objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffner, Stefan; Garcia, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new algorithm for realtime single-object tracking in videos in unconstrained environments. The algorithm comprises two different components that are trained "in one shot" at the first video frame: a detector that makes use of the generalised Hough transform with colour and gradient descriptors, and a probabilistic segmentation method based on global models for foreground and background colour distributions. Both components work at pixel level and are used for tracking in a combined way adapting each other in a cotraining manner. Moreover, we propose an adaptive shape model as well as a new probabilistic method for updating the scale of the tracker. Through effective model adaptation and segmentation, the algorithm is able to track objects that undergo rigid and non-rigid deformations and considerable shape and appearance variations. The proposed tracking method has been thoroughly evaluated on challenging benchmarks, and outperforms state-ofthe- art tracking methods designed for the same task. Finally, a very efficient implementation of the proposed models allows for extremely fast tracking.

  3. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safety reasons, especially on uneven ground. See a physical therapist for exercise therapy and walking retraining. For a ... the right position for standing and walking. A physical therapist can supply these and provide exercise therapy, if ...

  4. Fast binarized time-reversed adapted-perturbation (b-TRAP) optical focusing inside scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Cheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Light scattering inhibits high-resolution optical imaging, manipulation and therapy deep inside biological tissue by preventing focusing. To form deep foci, wavefront-shaping and time-reversal techniques that break the optical diffusion limit have been developed. For in vivo applications, such focusing must provide high gain, high speed, and a large number of spatial modes. However, none of the previous techniques meet these requirements simultaneously. Here, we overcome this challenge by rapidly measuring the perturbed optical field within a single camera exposure followed by adaptively time-reversing the phase-binarized perturbation. Consequently, a phase-conjugated wavefront is synthesized within a millisecond, two orders of magnitude shorter than the digitally achieved record. We demonstrated real-time focusing in dynamic scattering media, and extended laser speckle contrast imaging to new depths. The unprecedented combination of fast response, high gain, and large mode count makes this work a major strid...

  5. Centralized and Distributed Solutions for Fast Muting Adaptation in LTE-Advanced HetNets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced Intercell Interference Coordination (eICIC) is known to provide promising performance benefits for LTE-Advanced Heterogeneous Networks. The use of eICIC facilitates more flexible inter-layer load balancing by means of small cell Range Extension (RE) and Almost Blank Subframes (ABS). Even...... though the eICIC configuration (RE and ABS) ideally should be instantaneously adapted to follow the fluctuations of the traffic and the channel conditions over time, previous studies have focused on slow intercell coordination. In this paper, we investigate fast dynamic eICIC solutions for centralized...... and distributed Radio Resource Management (RRM) architectures. The centralized RRM architecture assumes macro and Remote Radio Heads (RRHs) inter-connected via high-speed fronthaul connections, while the distributed architecture is based on traditional macro and pico cells deployments with X2 backhaul interface...

  6. THE HP-VERSION OF BEM-FAST CONVERGENCE, ADAPTIVITY AND EFFICIENT PRECONDITIONING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ernst P.Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In this survey paper we report on recent developments of the hp-version of the boundary element method(BEM).As model problems we consider weakly singular and hypersingular integral equations of the first kind on a planar,open surface.We show that the Galerkin solutions (computed with the hp-version on geometric meshes) converge exponentially fast towards the exact solutions of the integral equations.An hp-adaptive algorithm is given and the implementation of the hp-version BEM is discussed together with the choice of efficient preconditioners for the ill-conditioned boundary element stiffness matrices.We also comment on the use of the hp-version BEM for solving Signorini contact problems in linear elasticity where the contact conditions are enforced only on the discrete set of Gauss-Lobatto points.Numerical results are presented which underline the theoretical results.

  7. Fast simulation of transport and adaptive permeability estimation in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berre, Inga

    2005-07-01

    The focus of the thesis is twofold: Both fast simulation of transport in porous media and adaptive estimation of permeability are considered. A short introduction that motivates the work on these topics is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the governing equations for one- and two-phase flow in porous media are presented. Overall numerical solution strategies for the two-phase flow model are also discussed briefly. The concepts of streamlines and time-of-flight are introduced in Chapter 3. Methods for computing streamlines and time-of-flight are also presented in this chapter. Subsequently, in Chapters 4 and 5, the focus is on simulation of transport in a time-of-flight perspective. In Chapter 4, transport of fluids along streamlines is considered. Chapter 5 introduces a different viewpoint based on the evolution of isocontours of the fluid saturation. While the first chapters focus on the forward problem, which consists in solving a mathematical model given the reservoir parameters, Chapters 6, 7 and 8 are devoted to the inverse problem of permeability estimation. An introduction to the problem of identifying spatial variability in reservoir permeability by inversion of dynamic production data is given in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, adaptive multiscale strategies for permeability estimation are discussed. Subsequently, Chapter 8 presents a level-set approach for improving piecewise constant permeability representations. Finally, Chapter 9 summarizes the results obtained in the thesis; in addition, the chapter gives some recommendations and suggests directions for future work. Part II In Part II, the following papers are included in the order they were completed: Paper A: A Streamline Front Tracking Method for Two- and Three-Phase Flow Including Capillary Forces. I. Berre, H. K. Dahle, K. H. Karlsen, and H. F. Nordhaug. In Fluid flow and transport in porous media: mathematical and numerical treatment (South Hadley, MA, 2001), volume 295 of Contemp. Math., pages 49

  8. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED): A New Class of Adaptable Distance Transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Theo E; van den Broek, Egon L

    2014-11-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast exact euclidean distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT starting-directly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced, followed by strategies for their efficient implementation. It is shown that FEED class algorithms unite properties of ordered propagation, raster scanning, and independent scanning DT. Moreover, FEED class algorithms shown to have a unique property: they can be tailored to the images under investigation. Benchmarks are conducted on both the Fabbri et al. data set and on a newly developed data set. Three baseline, three approximate, and three state-of-the-art DT algorithms were included, in addition to two implementations of FEED class algorithms. It illustrates that FEED class algorithms i) provide truly exact Euclidean DT; ii) do no suffer from disconnected Voronoi tiles, which is a unique feature for non-parallel but fast DT; iii) outperform any other approximate and exact Euclidean DT with its time complexity O(N), even after their optimization; and iv) are unequaled in that they can be adapted to the characteristics of the image class at hand.

  9. Adaptive modified hough transform track initiator for HFSWR tracking of fast and small targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Rujiang; Yuan Yeshu; Quan Taifan

    2005-01-01

    High frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR)is well proved to have over the horizon (OTH) detection capability to weak aerial targets, such as concealed airplanes or cruise missiles. The most important problem of detection of fast and small targets using HFSWR is earlier warning, i.e. enlargement of detection range oftargets. Therefore, the detection threshold should be decreased as low as possible, but numerous false alarms are brought about at the same time.On this condition, conventional track initiation techniques, which normally require the probability of false alarm to be at the level of 10-6, will initiate enormous false tracks and lead to abnormaloperation of tracking system. An adaptive modified hough transform (AMHT) track initiator is proposed accordingly and the relation of detection range to the performance of track initiator is analyzed in this paper. Simulations are performed to confirm the capability of track initiation to fast and small targets in dense clutter by AMHT track initiator. The tolerable probability of false alarm of detector can reach the level of 10-3. And it performs better than track initiator based on modified hough transform (MHT).

  10. Regulation of skeletal muscle energy/nutrient-sensing pathways during metabolic adaptation to fasting in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A; Bakker, Leontine E H; van der Zon, Gerard C; 't Hoen, Peter A C; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Jazet, Ingrid M; Pijl, Hanno; Guigas, Bruno

    2014-11-15

    During fasting, rapid metabolic adaptations are required to maintain energy homeostasis. This occurs by a coordinated regulation of energy/nutrient-sensing pathways leading to transcriptional activation and repression of specific sets of genes. The aim of the study was to investigate how short-term fasting affects whole body energy homeostasis and skeletal muscle energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and transcriptome in humans. For this purpose, 12 young healthy men were studied during a 24-h fast. Whole body glucose/lipid oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry, and blood and skeletal muscle biopsies were collected and analyzed at baseline and after 10 and 24 h of fasting. As expected, fasting induced a time-dependent decrease in plasma insulin and leptin levels, whereas levels of ketone bodies and free fatty acids increased. This was associated with a metabolic shift from glucose toward lipid oxidation. At the molecular level, activation of the protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways was time-dependently reduced in skeletal muscle during fasting, whereas the AMP-activated protein kinase activity remained unaffected. Furthermore, we report some changes in the phosphorylation and/or content of forkhead protein 1, sirtuin 1, and class IIa histone deacetylase 4, suggesting that these pathways might be involved in the transcriptional adaptation to fasting. Finally, transcriptome profiling identified genes that were significantly regulated by fasting in skeletal muscle at both early and late time points. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive map of the main energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and transcriptomic changes during short-term adaptation to fasting in human skeletal muscle.

  11. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqu......ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  12. Accurate Anomaly Detection using Adaptive Monitoring and Fast Switching in SDN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Garg

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available —Software defined networking (SDN is rapidly evolving technology which provides a suitable environment for easily applying efficient monitoring policies on the networks. SDN provides a centralized control of the whole network from which monitoring of network traffic and resources can be done with ease. SDN promises to drastically simplify network monitoring and management and also enable rapid innovation of networks through network programmability. SDN architecture separates the control of the network from the forwarding devices. With the higher innovation provided by the SDN, security threats at open interfaces of SDN also increases significantly as an attacker can target the single centralized point i.e. controller, to attack the network. Hence, efficient adaptive monitoring and measurement is required to detect and prevent malicious activities inside the network. Various such techniques have already been proposed by many researchers. This paper describes a work of applying efficient adaptive monitoring on the network while maintaining the performance of the network considering monitoring overhead over the controller. This work represents effective bandwidth utilization for calculation of threshold range while applying anomaly detection rules for monitoring of the network. Accurate detection of anomalies is implemented and also allows valid users and applications to transfer the data without any restrictions inside the network which otherwise were considered as anomalies in previous technique due to fluctuation of data and narrow threshold window. The concept of fast switching also used to improve the processing speed and performance of the networks.

  13. A service-oriented medical framework for fast and adaptive information delivery in mobile environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjeong; Nam, Hyo Suk

    2009-11-01

    The need for fast treatment of patients in critical conditions motivates the use of mobile devices to provide prompt and consistent communication between hospitals and physicians. We propose a framework that supports ubiquitous access to medical systems using personalized mobile services and integrated medical systems. The proposed service-oriented medical framework provides dynamically composed services that are adapted to contextual variables such as the user's role, the network bandwidth, and resources available at mobile devices while supporting task allocation in distributed servers for massive resource-consuming services. It also manages accurate patient data by integrating local medical systems using medical information standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and Health Level 7. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of our framework by building a prototype of context-based adaptation of computerized tomography image retrieval for acute stroke treatments, which allows images to be viewed on mobile devices with WiMax wireless network. The proposed medical framework reduces hospital delays of patients and facilitates treatments in the absence of medical specialists.

  14. A Fast Variational Method for the Construction of Resolution Adaptive C-Smooth Molecular Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L; Xu, Guoliang; Zhang, Qin

    2009-05-01

    We present a variational approach to smooth molecular (proteins, nucleic acids) surface constructions, starting from atomic coordinates, as available from the protein and nucleic-acid data banks. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations traditionally used in understanding protein and nucleic-acid folding processes, are based on molecular force fields, and require smooth models of these molecular surfaces. To accelerate MD simulations, a popular methodology is to employ coarse grained molecular models, which represent clusters of atoms with similar physical properties by psuedo- atoms, resulting in coarser resolution molecular surfaces. We consider generation of these mixed-resolution or adaptive molecular surfaces. Our approach starts from deriving a general form second order geometric partial differential equation in the level-set formulation, by minimizing a first order energy functional which additionally includes a regularization term to minimize the occurrence of chemically infeasible molecular surface pockets or tunnel-like artifacts. To achieve even higher computational efficiency, a fast cubic B-spline C(2) interpolation algorithm is also utilized. A narrow band, tri-cubic B-spline level-set method is then used to provide C(2) smooth and resolution adaptive molecular surfaces.

  15. 基于自适应渐消 EKF 的 FastSLAM 算法%FastSLAM algorithm based on adaptive fading extended Kalman filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹; 段建民; 于宏啸

    2016-01-01

    快速同时定位与建图(fast simultaneous localization and mapping,FastSLAM)算法的采样过程会带来粒子退化问题,为了改进算法的性能,提高估计精度,从研究粒子滤波的建议分布函数出发,提出基于自适应渐消扩展卡尔曼滤波(adaptive fading extended Kalman filter,AFEKF)的 FastSLAM 算法。该算法基于 FastSLAM的基本框架,利用 AFEKF 产生一种参数可自适应调节的建议分布函数,使其更接近移动机器人的后验位姿概率分布,减缓粒子集的退化。因此在同等粒子数的情况下,该算法有效提高了 SLAM 精度,以此减少所使用的粒子数,降低算法的复杂度。基于模拟器和标准数据集的实验仿真结果验证了该算法的有效性。%Sampling process often causes particle degradation in fast simultaneous localization and mapping (FastSLAM).From the point view of the proposal distribution function,a method named the FastSLAM based on adaptive fading extended Kalman filter is proposed to improve the performance of the algorithm and increase estimation accuracy.It uses the adaptive fading extended Kalman filter (AFEKF)to compute proposal distribu-tion based on the basic framework of FastSLAM,then this proposal distribution is more close to the posterior position of the mobile robot and the degree of particle degradation is reduced.In the case of the same number of particles,the algorithm can effectively improve the accuracy of SLAM.Hence it can reduce the number of parti-cles used in the algorithm and the complexity of the algorithm.The validity of the proposed algorithm is verified by the experimental simulation results based on the simulator and the standard data set.

  16. Adapting the "managing by walking around" methodology as a leadership strategy to communicate a hospital-wide strategic plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Marcie Sara; Stone, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Hospital Center (MHC) in East Harlem, New York, has undergone significant leadership changes within the past few years, and the current leadership team developed a long-term strategic plan for the organization that it wanted to effectively communicate to all hospital staff. The spread of information is a challenge at MHC, as it is in many hospitals, because of the large number of staff working various shifts, and the inability of staff to leave their units at the same time to attend general staff meetings. Because of the recent success of the hospital's Executive WalkRounds Program and Breakthough Program, which embody principles of the leadership strategy Managing By Walking Around (MBWA), the senior leadership team decided to roll out their new strategic plan in a 2-week series of rounds to each unit/department throughout the hospital during each shift. Utilizing this method, 69 percent of MHC staff attended the rounds, and 88.9 percent of management level staff and 64.5 percent of unionized/labor who participated in the hospital's Employee Satisfaction Survey stated that they understood the hospital's new strategic plan. MHC's successful strategy is easily applicable within other similar settings.

  17. Reduced γ–γ time walk to below 50 ps using the multiplexed-start and multiplexed-stop fast-timing technique with LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Régis, J.-M., E-mail: regis@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Saed-Samii, N., E-mail: nima@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Rudigier, M. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Ansari, S.; Dannhoff, M.; Esmaylzadeh, A.; Fransen, C.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Karayonchev, V.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Stegemann, S. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The electronic γ–γ fast-timing technique using arrays consisting of many LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) detectors is a powerful method to determine lifetimes of nuclear excited states with a lower limit of about 5 ps. This method requires the determination of the energy-dependent time walk of the zero time which is represented by the centroid of a prompt γ–γ time distribution. The full-energy peak versus full-energy peak prompt response difference which represents the linearly combined mean γ–γ time walk of a fast-timing array consisting of 8 LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) detectors was measured using a standard {sup 152}Eu γ-ray source for the energy region of 40–1408 keV. The data were acquired using a “multiplexed-start and multiplexed-stop” analogue electronics circuitry and analysed by employing the generalized centroid difference method. Concerning the cylindrical 1.5 in.×1.5 in. LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals which are coupled to the Hamamatsu R9779 photomultiplier tubes, the best fast-timing array time resolution of 202(3) ps is obtained for the two prompt γ lines of {sup 60}Co by using the leading-edge timing principle. When using the zero-crossover timing principle the time resolution is degraded by up to 30%, dependent on the energy and the shaping delay time of the constant fraction discriminator model Ortec 935. The smallest γ–γ time walk to below 50 ps is obtained by using a shaping delay time of about 17 ns and an optimum “time-walk adjustment” needed for detector output pulses with amplitudes smaller than 400 mV.

  18. A Fast Block-Matching Algorithm Using Smooth Motion Vector Field Adaptive Search Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo(李波); LI Wei(李炜); TU YaMing(涂亚明)

    2003-01-01

    In many video standards based on inter-frame compression such as H.26x and MPEG, block-matching algorithm has been widely adopted as the method for motion estimation because of its simplicity and effectiveness. Nevertheless, since motion estimation is very complex in computing. Fast algorithm for motion estimation has always been an important and attractive topic in video compression. From the viewpoint of making motion vector field smoother, this paper proposes a new algorithm SMVFAST. On the basis of motion correlation, it predicts the starting point by neighboring motion vectors according to their SADs. Adaptive search modes are usedin its search process through simply classifying motion activity. After discovering the ubiquitous ratio between the SADs of the collocated blocks in the consecutive frames, the paper proposes an effective half-stop criterion that can quickly stop the search process with good enough results.Experiments show that SMVFAST obtains almost the same results as the full search at very low computation cost, and outperforms MVFAST and PMVFAST in speed and quality, which are adopted by MPEG-4.

  19. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of the fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Restrictions: Only three or six significant digits options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are in Fortran77 style. Memory allocation functions from Fortran90 and above are used in a few subroutines. Additional comments: The current version of the codes is designed and written for single core/processor desktop machines. Check http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html for updates and changes. Running time: The running time varies with the number of discretized elements (N) in the system and their distributions. In most cases, it scales linearly as a function of N.

  20. A Fast Adaptive Artificial Neural Network Controller for Flexible Link Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Riad Maouche

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a hybrid approach to the problem of controlling flexible link manipulators in the dynamic phase of the trajectory. A flexible beam/arm is an appealing option for civil and military applications, such as space-based robot manipulators. However, flexibility brings with it unwanted oscillations and severe chattering which may even lead to an unstable system. To tackle these challenges, a novel control architecture scheme is presented. First, a neural network controller based on the robot’s dynamic equation of motion is elaborated. Its aim is to produce a fast and stable control of the joint position and velocity and damp the vibration of each arm. Then, an adaptive Cerebellar Model Articulation Controller (CMAC is implemented to balance unmodeled dynamics, enhancing the precision of the control. Efficiency of the new controller obtained is tested on a two-link flexible manipulator. Simulation results on a dynamic trajectory with a sinusoidal form show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  1. Fast adaptive OFDM-PON over single fiber loopback transmission using dynamic rate adaptation-based algorithm for channel performance improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartiwa, Iwa; Jung, Sang-Min; Hong, Moon-Ki; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel fast adaptive approach that was applied to an OFDM-PON 20-km single fiber loopback transmission system to improve channel performance in term of stabilized BER below 2 × 10-3 and higher throughput beyond 10 Gb/s. The upstream transmission is performed through light source-seeded modulation using 1-GHz RSOA at the ONU. Experimental results indicated that the dynamic rate adaptation algorithm based on greedy Levin-Campello could be an effective solution to mitigate channel instability and data rate degradation caused by the Rayleigh back scattering effect and inefficient resource subcarrier allocation.

  2. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, large scale gravity data sets have been collected and employed to enhance gravity problem-solving abilities of tectonics studies in China. Aiming at the large scale data and the requirement of rapid interpretation, previous authors have carried out a lot of work, including the fast gradient module inversion and Euler deconvolution depth inversion ,3-D physical property inversion using stochastic subspaces and equivalent storage, fast inversion using wavelet transforms and a logarithmic barrier method. So it can be say that 3-D gravity inversion has been greatly improved in the last decade. Many authors added many different kinds of priori information and constraints to deal with nonuniqueness using models composed of a large number of contiguous cells of unknown property and obtained good results. However, due to long computation time, instability and other shortcomings, 3-D physical property inversion has not been widely applied to large-scale data yet. In order to achieve 3-D interpretation with high efficiency and precision for geological and ore bodies and obtain their subsurface distribution, there is an urgent need to find a fast and efficient inversion method for large scale gravity data. As an entirely new geophysical inversion method, 3D correlation has a rapid development thanks to the advantage of requiring no a priori information and demanding small amount of computer memory. This method was proposed to image the distribution of equivalent excess masses of anomalous geological bodies with high resolution both longitudinally and transversely. In order to tranform the equivalence excess masses into real density contrasts, we adopt the adaptive correlation imaging for gravity data. After each 3D correlation imaging, we change the equivalence into density contrasts according to the linear relationship, and then carry out forward gravity calculation for each rectangle cells. Next, we compare the forward gravity data with real data, and

  3. Lipolytic response of adipose tissue and metabolic adaptations to long periods of fasting in red tilapia (Oreochromis sp., Teleostei: Cichlidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WALTER DIAS JUNIOR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Adaptive changes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism induced by 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 150 and 200 days of fasting were investigated in red tilapia (Oreochromis sp.. Plasma glucose, lactate and free fatty acids (FFA levels, liver and muscle glycogen and total lipid contents and rates of FFA release from mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT were measured. Plasma glucose levels showed significant differences only after 90 days of fasting, when glycemia was 34% lower (50±5mg.dL-1 than fed fish values (74±1mg.dL-1, remaining relatively constant until 200 days of fasting. The content of liver glycogen ("15% in fed tilapia fell 40% in 7 days of food deprivation. In 60, 90 and 150 days of fasting, plasma FFA levels increased 49%, 64% and 90%, respectively, compared to fed fish values. In agreement with the increase in plasma FFA, fasting induced a clear increase in lipolytic activity of MAT incubated in vitro. Addition of isobutylmethylxanthine (cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor and isoproterenol (non selective beta adrenergic agonist to the incubation medium induced a reduction of lipolysis in fasted fish, differently to what was observed in mammal adipose tissue. This study allowed a physiological assessment of red tilapia response to starvation.

  4. A fast, robust, and simple implicit method for adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, Commercon; Romain, Teyssier

    2014-01-01

    Implicit solvers present strong limitations when used on supercomputing facilities and in particular for adaptive mesh-refinement codes. We present a new method for implicit adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh refinement-grids and implementing it in the radiation hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code for astrophysical purposes and, more particularly, for protostellar collapse. We briefly recall the radiation hydrodynamics equations and the adaptive time-stepping methodology used for hydrodynamical solvers. We then introduce the different types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin) that are used at the interface between levels and present our implementation of the new method in the RAMSES code. The method is tested against classical diffusion and radiation hydrodynamics tests, after which we present an application for protostellar collapse. We show that using Dirichlet boundary conditions at level interfaces is a good compromise between robustness and accuracy and that it ca...

  5. Walking Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your legs or feet Movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease Diseases such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis Vision or balance problems Treatment of walking problems depends on the cause. Physical therapy, surgery, or mobility aids may help.

  6. The walking robot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.; Sagraniching, E.; Bennett, M.; Singh, R.

    1991-01-01

    A walking robot was designed, analyzed, and tested as an intelligent, mobile, and a terrain adaptive system. The robot's design was an application of existing technologies. The design of the six legs modified and combines well understood mechanisms and was optimized for performance, flexibility, and simplicity. The body design incorporated two tripods for walking stability and ease of turning. The electrical hardware design used modularity and distributed processing to drive the motors. The software design used feedback to coordinate the system and simple keystrokes to give commands. The walking machine can be easily adapted to hostile environments such as high radiation zones and alien terrain. The primary goal of the leg design was to create a leg capable of supporting a robot's body and electrical hardware while walking or performing desired tasks, namely those required for planetary exploration. The leg designers intent was to study the maximum amount of flexibility and maneuverability achievable by the simplest and lightest leg design. The main constraints for the leg design were leg kinematics, ease of assembly, degrees of freedom, number of motors, overall size, and weight.

  7. Anatomy of Shoulder Girdle Muscle Modifications and Walking Adaptation in the Scaly Chinese Pangolin (Manis Pentadactyla Pentadactyla: Pholidota) Compared with the Partially Osteoderm-Clad Armadillos (Dasypodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Thorington, Richard W; Bohaska, Paula W; Chen, Yen-Jean; Sato, Fumi

    2015-07-01

    Because pangolins are unique mammals with a body and limbs almost entirely sheathed in hard keratinous overlapping scales and with digging and climbing abilities, the shoulder girdle muscles may differ significantly from those of other mammals including the partially osteoderm-clad armadillos. Therefore, we conducted a functional anatomical study of the shoulder girdle muscles in Chinese pangolins (Manis pentadactyla pentadactyla, Pholidota) and some armadillo species (Dasypodidae). Our CT scans revealed that the pangolin's overlapping scales are hard structures completely encasing the limbs. The armadillo's limbs, however, are covered with small relatively soft non-overlapping scales embedded in the skin, and articulate completely free of the hard osteodermal carapace. The attachments of some shoulder girdle muscles in the pangolin have moved from the surrounding edges of the scapula to the spine, and they, therefore, fully cover the scapula. In addition, some pangolin shoulder girdle muscles cross the shoulder joint to insert on the distal humerus, but this does not occur in armadillos. We cannot rule out the possibility that these muscle modifications represent adaptations for digging and/or climbing in pangolins. Our results and previous literature do not establish specific links between them and locomotive modes. However, we propose that the Chinese pangolin may use its derived muscular features when walking to move its armor-restricted forelimbs more effectively by swinging its head from side to side.

  8. Transient impairment of the adaptive response to fasting in FXR-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cariou, B; van Harmelen, K; Duran-Sandoval, D; van Dijk, T; Grefhorst, A; Bouchaert, E; Fruchart, JC; Gonzalez, FJ; Kuipers, F; Staels, B

    2005-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been suggested to play a role in gluconeogenesis. To determine whether FXR modulates the response to fasting in vivo, FXR-deficient (FXR-/-) and wild-type mice were submitted to fasting for 48 h. Our results demonstrate that FXR modulates the kinetics of alteration

  9. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  10. Interdependence of AMPK and SIRT1 for metabolic adaptation to fasting and exercise in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantó, Carles; Jiang, Lake Q; Deshmukh, Atul S

    2010-01-01

    During fasting and after exercise, skeletal muscle efficiently switches from carbohydrate to lipid as the main energy source to preserve glycogen stores and blood glucose levels for glucose-dependent tissues. Skeletal muscle cells sense this limitation in glucose availability and transform...... and lipid utilization genes. Deficient AMPK activity compromises SIRT1-dependent responses to exercise and fasting, resulting in impaired PGC-1alpha deacetylation and blunted induction of mitochondrial gene expression. Thus, we conclude that AMPK acts as the primordial trigger for fasting- and exercise...

  11. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    FMM-YUKAWA is a mathematical software package primarily for rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensional space. Since its release, we have revised and re-organized the data structure, software architecture, and user interface, for the purpose of enabling more flexible, broader and easier use of the package. The package and its documentation are available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/, along with a few other closely related mathematical software packages. New version program summaryProgram title: FMM-Yukawa Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 854 265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 90, and C. Requires gcc and gfortran version 4.4.3 or later Computer: All Operating system: Any Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2331 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: The new version of fast multipole method (FMM) that diagonalizes the multipole-to-local translation operator is applied with the tree structure adaptive to sample particle locations. Reasons for new version: To handle much larger particle ensembles, to enable the iterative use of the subroutines in a solver, and to remove potential contention in assignments for parallelization. Summary of revisions: The software package FMM-Yukawa has been

  12. 15 Gbit/s indoor optical wireless systems employing fast adaptation and imaging reception in a realistic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wireless systems are promising candidates for next-generation indoor communication networks. Optical wireless technology offers freedom from spectrum regulations and, compared to current radio-frequency networks, higher data rates and increased security. This paper presents a fast adaptation method for multibeam angle and delay adaptation systems and a new spot-diffusing geometry, and also considers restrictions needed for complying with eye safety regulations. The fast adaptation algorithm reduces the computational load required to reconfigure the transmitter in the case of transmitter and/or receiver mobility. The beam clustering approach enables the transmitter to assign power to spots within the pixel's field of view (FOV) and increases the number of such spots. Thus, if the power per spot is restricted to comply with eye safety standards, the new approach, in which more spots are visible within the FOV of the pixel, leads to enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simulation results demonstrate that the techniques proposed in this paper lead to SNR improvements that enable reliable operation at data rates as high as 15 Gbit/s. These results are based on simulation and not on actual measurements or experiments.

  13. A new adaptive fast motion estimation algorithm based on local motion similarity degree (LMSD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Long; HAN Chongzhao; BAI Yan

    2005-01-01

    In the motion vector field adaptive search technique (MVFAST) and the predictive motion vector field adaptive search technique (PMVFAST), the size of the largest motion vector from the three adjacent blocks (left, top, top-right) is compared with the threshold to select different search scheme. But a suitable search center and search pattern will not be selected in the adaptive search technique when the adjacent motion vectors are not coherent in local region. This paper presents an efficient adaptive search algorithm. The motion vector variation degree (MVVD) is considered a reasonable factor for adaptive search selection. By the relationship between local motion similarity degree (LMSD) and the variation degree of motion vector (MVVD), the motion vectors are classified as three categories according to corresponding LMSD; then different proposed search schemes are adopted for motion estimation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has a significant computational speedup compared with MVFAST and PMVFAST algorithms, and offers a similar, even better performance.

  14. Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R

    2009-10-17

    High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

  15. Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver for Fast Frequency Hopping Systems during Partial-Band Noise Jamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖立民; 许希斌; 姚彦

    2001-01-01

    Diversity combining technologies are analyzed for fastfrequency-hopping spread spectrum systems during partial-band noise jamming to develop a novel combining receiver called an Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver (ATCCR). The optimal clipping level for an ATCCR is analyzed, computed, and compared with several other diversity combining technologies. Since the ATCCR can estimate the power of the jamming and the number of jammed frequency cells to adaptively adjust the clipper's threshold, the system performance using the adaptive threshold clipper combining technique can be greatly improved.

  16. Role of PGC-1{alpha} in exercise and fasting induced adaptations in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Tobias Nørresø; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Leick, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a plays a role in regulation of several metabolic pathways. By use of whole body PGC-1a knockout (KO) mice we investigated the role of PGC-1a in fasting, acute exercise and exercise training...... induced regulation of key proteins in gluconeogenesis and metabolism in the liver. In both wild type (WT) and PGC-1a KO mice liver, the mRNA content of the gluconeogenic proteins glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was upregulated during fasting. Pyruvate...... carboxylase (PC) remained unchanged after fasting in WT mice, but was upregulated in PGC-1a KO mice. In response to a single exercise bout G6Pase mRNA was upregulated in both genotypes, whereas no significant changes were detected in PEPCK or PC mRNA. While G6Pase and PC protein remained unchanged, liver...

  17. Fast Spectral Velocity Estimation Using Adaptive Techniques: In-Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Udesen, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window(OW) is very sbort. In this paper two adaptive techniques are tested and compared to the averaged perlodogram (Welch) for blood velocity estimation. The Blood Power...... spectral Capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slowtime and depth. The Blood Amplitude and Phase Estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering...... the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the power spectral density estimate. In this paper, the two adaptive methods are explained, and performance Is assessed in controlled steady How experiments and in-vivo measurements. The three methods were tested on a circulating How rig...

  18. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) : A new class of adaptable distance transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; van den Broek, Egon L.

    2014-01-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT startingdirectly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced,

  19. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED): A new class of adaptable distance transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2014-01-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT starting directly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced

  20. Fast characterization of two ultrasound longitudinal waves in cancellous bone using an adaptive beamforming technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Hirofumi; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The received signal in through-transmission ultrasound measurements of cancellous bone consists of two longitudinal waves, called the fast and slow waves. Analysis of these fast and slow waves may reveal characteristics of the cancellous bone that would be good indicators of osteoporosis. Because the two waves often overlap, decomposition of the received signal is an important problem in the characterization of bone quality. This study proposes a fast and accurate decomposition method based on the frequency domain interferometry imaging method with a modified wave transfer function that uses a phase rotation parameter. The proposed method accurately characterized the fast and slow waves in the experimental study, and the residual intensity, which was normalized with respect to the received signal intensity, was less than -20 dB over the bone specimen thickness range from 6 to 15 mm. In the simulation study, the residual intensity was less than -20 dB over the specimen thickness range from 3 to 8 mm. Decomposition of a single received signal takes only 5 s using a laptop personal computer with a single central processing unit. The proposed method has great potential to provide accurate and rapid measurements of indicators of osteoporosis in cancellous bone.

  1. Metabolic and endocrine adaptations to fasting in lean and obese individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examined several effects of fasting in lean and obese individuals. As expected, both the hormonal response as well as the metabolic shift from glucose towards lipid oxidation was impaired in obese individuals. At baseline, mitochondrial protein content in skeletal muscle of obese s

  2. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  3. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation for ultra-fast IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Niklas; Bangert, Mark; Kamerling, Cornelis P; Ziegenhein, Peter; Bol, Gijsbert H; Raaymakers, Bas W; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-07-08

    Conventional treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a trial-and-error process that usually involves tedious tweaking of optimization parameters. Here, we present an algorithm that automates part of this process, in particular the adaptation of voxel-based penalties within normal tissue. Thereby, the proposed algorithm explicitly considers a priori known physical limitations of photon irradiation. The efficacy of the developed algorithm is assessed during treatment planning studies comprising 16 prostate and 5 head and neck cases. We study the eradication of hot spots in the normal tissue, effects on target coverage and target conformity, as well as selected dose volume points for organs at risk. The potential of the proposed method to generate class solutions for the two indications is investigated. Run-times of the algorithms are reported. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation is an adequate means to automatically detect and eradicate hot-spots during IMRT planning while maintaining target coverage and conformity. Negative effects on organs at risk are comparably small and restricted to lower doses. Using physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation, it was possible to improve the generation of class solutions for both indications. Considering the reported run-times of less than 20 s, physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation has the potential to reduce the clinical workload during planning and automated treatment plan generation in the long run, facilitating adaptive radiation treatments.

  4. Different transcriptional responses from slow and fast growth rate strains of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska eCordero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8 ºC of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8 °C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  5. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  6. Fast heating and cooling in nanoimprint using a spring-loaded adapter in a preheated press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schift, Helmut; Bellini, Sandro; Gobrecht, Jens

    2007-01-01

    By using a spring-loaded adapter, instant heating and cooling of wafer-type substrates was implemented in standard hot embossing equipment. This was possible by using the well-known concept of a clamped stack of stamp and substrate, pre-assembled in an alignment fixture. A number of thermoplastic...

  7. Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2013-12-17

    Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback-Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria.

  8. Research on fast real-time adaptive audio mixing in multimedia conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xing; GU Wei-kang; YE Xiu-qing

    2005-01-01

    In multimedia conference, the capability of audio processing is basic and requires more for real-time criteria. In this article, we categorize and analyze the schemes, and provide several multipoint speech audio mixing schemes using weighted algorithm, which meet the demand of practical needs for real-time multipoint speech mixing, for which the ASW and AEW schemes are especially recommended. Applying the adaptive algorithms, the high-performance schemes we provide do not use the saturation operation widely used in multimedia processing. Therefore, no additional noise will be added to the output. The above adaptive algorithms have relatively low computational complexity and good hearing perceptibility. The schemes are designed for parallel processing, and can be easily implemented with hardware, such as DSPs, and widely applied in multimedia conference systems.

  9. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  10. A fast adaptive convex hull algorithm on two-dimensional processor arrays with a reconfigurable BUS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olariu, S.; Schwing, J.; Zhang, J.

    1991-01-01

    A bus system that can change dynamically to suit computational needs is referred to as reconfigurable. We present a fast adaptive convex hull algorithm on a two-dimensional processor array with a reconfigurable bus system (2-D PARBS, for short). Specifically, we show that computing the convex hull of a planar set of n points taken O(log n/log m) time on a 2-D PARBS of size mn x n with 3 less than or equal to m less than or equal to n. Our result implies that the convex hull of n points in the plane can be computed in O(1) time in a 2-D PARBS of size n(exp 1.5) x n.

  11. Low Loss Electro-Optic Polymer Based Fast Adaptive Phase Shifters Realized in Silicon Nitride and Oxynitride Waveguide Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Baudzus

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive study on how to design and fabricate low loss electro-optic phase shifters based on an electro-optic polymer and the silicon nitride and silicon oxynitride waveguide material systems. The loss mechanisms of phase shifters with an electro-optic (EO polymer cladding are analyzed in detail and design solutions to achieve lowest losses are presented. In order to verify the low loss design a proof of concept prototype phase shifter was fabricated, which exhibits an attenuation of 0.8 dB/cm at 1550 nm and an electro-optic efficiency factor of 27%. Furthermore, the potential of this class of phase shifters is evaluated in numerical simulations, from which the optimal design parameters and achievable figures of merit were derived. The presented phase shifter design has its potential for application in fast adaptive multi stage devices for optical signal processing.

  12. Fast Total-Variation Image Deconvolution with Adaptive Parameter Estimation via Split Bregman Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The total-variation (TV regularization has been widely used in image restoration domain, due to its attractive edge preservation ability. However, the estimation of the regularization parameter, which balances the TV regularization term and the data-fidelity term, is a difficult problem. In this paper, based on the classical split Bregman method, a new fast algorithm is derived to simultaneously estimate the regularization parameter and to restore the blurred image. In each iteration, the regularization parameter is refreshed conveniently in a closed form according to Morozov’s discrepancy principle. Numerical experiments in image deconvolution show that the proposed algorithm outperforms some state-of-the-art methods both in accuracy and in speed.

  13. Fast adaptive principal component extraction based on a generalized energy function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳缮; 保铮; 廖桂生

    2003-01-01

    By introducing an arbitrary diagonal matrix, a generalized energy function (GEF) is proposed for searching for the optimum weights of a two layer linear neural network. From the GEF, we derive a recur- sive least squares (RLS) algorithm to extract in parallel multiple principal components of the input covari-ance matrix without designing an asymmetrical circuit. The local stability of the GEF algorithm at the equilibrium is analytically verified. Simulation resultsshow that the GEF algorithm for parallel multiple principal components extraction exhibits the fast convergence and has the improved robustness resis- tance tothe eigenvalue spread of the input covariance matrix as compared to the well-known lateral inhi- bition model (APEX) and least mean square error reconstruction(LMSER) algorithms.

  14. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  15. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  16. A fast and efficient adaptive threshold rate control scheme for remote sensing images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Xu, Xiaoqing

    2012-01-01

    The JPEG2000 image compression standard is ideal for processing remote sensing images. However, its algorithm is complex and it requires large amounts of memory, making it difficult to adapt to the limited transmission and storage resources necessary for remote sensing images. In the present study, an improved rate control algorithm for remote sensing images is proposed. The required coded blocks are sorted downward according to their numbers of bit planes prior to entropy coding. An adaptive threshold computed from the combination of the minimum number of bit planes, along with the minimum rate-distortion slope and the compression ratio, is used to truncate passes of each code block during Tier-1 encoding. This routine avoids the encoding of all code passes and improves the coding efficiency. The simulation results show that the computational cost and working buffer memory size of the proposed algorithm reach only 18.13 and 7.81%, respectively, of the same parameters in the postcompression rate distortion algorithm, while the peak signal-to-noise ratio across the images remains almost the same. The proposed algorithm not only greatly reduces the code complexity and buffer requirements but also maintains the image quality.

  17. 快行时脑卒中患者与健康人下肢肌肉活动差异%The Lower Extremity Muscles' Activity Differences Between Stroke Patients and Healthy Controls under the State of Fast Walking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马静; 陈谦

    2012-01-01

    Compare the differences between patients and healthy persons under the state of fast walking, including the lower extremity muscles' activity duration, AEMG, MPF, complexity. Methods:10 male hemiparetic stroke patients and 10 healthy controls make a linearity walking for 8 steps with the walking velocity, step length of 40cm rhythm of 60 bit per minute. Collecte the surface electromyography of tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris on the paretic side and the gait cycle with footswitch. Results: (1)Patients' durations of the tibialis an- terior during the swing phase, as well as the gastrocnemius medialis during the swing phase and the first double sup- port phase are significantly longer than healthy controls. (2)The AEMG of patients' tibialis anterior and biceps femo- ris are larger than that of controls' but the slope of the rectus femoris' MPF is smaller than that of controls'.%目的:探讨快速步行时,脑卒中患者与健康被试下肢肌肉在活动持续时间百分比、AEMG、MPF、复杂度等指标上的差异。方法:男性脑卒中患者10名及健康对照组被试10名,按照步长40cm步频60次/min的不同步速在平地上直线行走8步,采集患者偏瘫侧及健康被试对照侧胫骨前肌、内侧腓肠肌、股直肌、股二头肌的肌电信号,并利用足底步态开关记录行走过程中的步态周期。结果:①患者胫骨前肌在摆动期、内侧腓肠肌在摆动期及第一次双侧支撑期的活动持续时间均显著长于健康被试;②患者胫骨前肌及股二头肌的平均肌电值增加,股直肌的平均功率频率下降率变小。

  18. Fast and intuitive programming of adaptive laser cutting of lace enabled by machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaamonde, Iago; Souto-López, Álvaro; García-Díaz, Antón

    2015-07-01

    A machine vision system has been developed, validated, and integrated in a commercial laser robot cell. It permits an offline graphical programming of laser cutting of lace. The user interface allows loading CAD designs and aligning them with images of lace pieces. Different thread widths are discriminated to generate proper cutting program templates. During online operation, the system aligns CAD models of pieces and lace images, pre-checks quality of lace cuts and adapts laser parameters to thread widths. For pieces detected with the required quality, the program template is adjusted by transforming the coordinates of every trajectory point. A low-cost lace feeding system was also developed for demonstration of full process automation.

  19. Adaptive GDDA-BLAST: fast and efficient algorithm for protein sequence embedding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoojin Hong

    Full Text Available A major computational challenge in the genomic era is annotating structure/function to the vast quantities of sequence information that is now available. This problem is illustrated by the fact that most proteins lack comprehensive annotations, even when experimental evidence exists. We previously theorized that embedded-alignment profiles (simply "alignment profiles" hereafter provide a quantitative method that is capable of relating the structural and functional properties of proteins, as well as their evolutionary relationships. A key feature of alignment profiles lies in the interoperability of data format (e.g., alignment information, physio-chemical information, genomic information, etc.. Indeed, we have demonstrated that the Position Specific Scoring Matrices (PSSMs are an informative M-dimension that is scored by quantitatively measuring the embedded or unmodified sequence alignments. Moreover, the information obtained from these alignments is informative, and remains so even in the "twilight zone" of sequence similarity (<25% identity. Although our previous embedding strategy was powerful, it suffered from contaminating alignments (embedded AND unmodified and high computational costs. Herein, we describe the logic and algorithmic process for a heuristic embedding strategy named "Adaptive GDDA-BLAST." Adaptive GDDA-BLAST is, on average, up to 19 times faster than, but has similar sensitivity to our previous method. Further, data are provided to demonstrate the benefits of embedded-alignment measurements in terms of detecting structural homology in highly divergent protein sequences and isolating secondary structural elements of transmembrane and ankyrin-repeat domains. Together, these advances allow further exploration of the embedded alignment data space within sufficiently large data sets to eventually induce relevant statistical inferences. We show that sequence embedding could serve as one of the vehicles for measurement of low

  20. A fast and adaptive method for complex-valued S AR image denoising based on lk norm regularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG WeiWei; WANG ZhengMing; YUAN ZhenYu; LI MingShan

    2009-01-01

    This paper developed a fast and adaptive method for SAR complex image denoising based on lk norm regularization, as viewed from parameters estimation. We firstly establish the relationship between denoising model and ill-posed inverse problem via convex half-quadratic regularization, and compare the difference between the estimator variance obtained from the iterative formula and biased CramerRao bound, which proves the theoretic flaw of the existent methods of parameter selection. Then, the analytic expression of the model solution as the function with respect to the regularization parameter is obtained. On this basis, we study the method for selecting the regularization parameter through minimizing mean-square error of estimators and obtain the final analytic expression, which resulted in the direct calculation, high processing speed, and adaptability. Finally, the effect of regularization parameter selection on the resolution of point targets is analyzed. The experiment results of simulation and real complex-valued SAR images illustrate the validity of the proposed method.

  1. Estimation of pathological tremor from recorded signals based on adaptive sliding fast Fourier transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological tremor is an approximately rhythmic movement and considerably affects patients’ daily living activities. Biomechanical loading and functional electrical stimulation are proposed as potential alternatives for canceling the pathological tremor. However, the performance of suppression methods is associated with the separation of tremor from the recorded signals. In this literature, an algorithm incorporating a fast Fourier transform augmented with a sliding convolution window, an interpolation procedure, and a damping module of the frequency is presented to isolate tremulous components from the measured signals and estimate the instantaneous tremor frequency. Meanwhile, a mechanism platform is designed to provide the simulation tremor signals with different degrees of voluntary movements. The performance of the proposed algorithm and existing procedures is compared with simulated signals and experimental signals collected from patients. The results demonstrate that the proposed solution could detect the unknown dominant frequency and distinguish the tremor components with higher accuracy. Therefore, this algorithm is useful for actively compensating tremor by functional electrical stimulation without affecting the voluntary movement.

  2. SPSmart: adapting population based SNP genotype databases for fast and comprehensive web access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last five years large online resources of human variability have appeared, notably HapMap, Perlegen and the CEPH foundation. These databases of genotypes with population information act as catalogues of human diversity, and are widely used as reference sources for population genetics studies. Although many useful conclusions may be extracted by querying databases individually, the lack of flexibility for combining data from within and between each database does not allow the calculation of key population variability statistics. Results We have developed a novel tool for accessing and combining large-scale genomic databases of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in widespread use in human population genetics: SPSmart (SNPs for Population Studies. A fast pipeline creates and maintains a data mart from the most commonly accessed databases of genotypes containing population information: data is mined, summarized into the standard statistical reference indices, and stored into a relational database that currently handles as many as 4 × 109 genotypes and that can be easily extended to new database initiatives. We have also built a web interface to the data mart that allows the browsing of underlying data indexed by population and the combining of populations, allowing intuitive and straightforward comparison of population groups. All the information served is optimized for web display, and most of the computations are already pre-processed in the data mart to speed up the data browsing and any computational treatment requested. Conclusion In practice, SPSmart allows populations to be combined into user-defined groups, while multiple databases can be accessed and compared in a few simple steps from a single query. It performs the queries rapidly and gives straightforward graphical summaries of SNP population variability through visual inspection of allele frequencies outlined in standard pie-chart format. In addition, full

  3. Fast parallel MR image reconstruction via B1-based, adaptive restart, iterative soft thresholding algorithms (BARISTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckley, Matthew J; Noll, Douglas C; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Sparsity-promoting regularization is useful for combining compressed sensing assumptions with parallel MRI for reducing scan time while preserving image quality. Variable splitting algorithms are the current state-of-the-art algorithms for SENSE-type MR image reconstruction with sparsity-promoting regularization. These methods are very general and have been observed to work with almost any regularizer; however, the tuning of associated convergence parameters is a commonly-cited hindrance in their adoption. Conversely, majorize-minimize algorithms based on a single Lipschitz constant have been observed to be slow in shift-variant applications such as SENSE-type MR image reconstruction since the associated Lipschitz constants are loose bounds for the shift-variant behavior. This paper bridges the gap between the Lipschitz constant and the shift-variant aspects of SENSE-type MR imaging by introducing majorizing matrices in the range of the regularizer matrix. The proposed majorize-minimize methods (called BARISTA) converge faster than state-of-the-art variable splitting algorithms when combined with momentum acceleration and adaptive momentum restarting. Furthermore, the tuning parameters associated with the proposed methods are unitless convergence tolerances that are easier to choose than the constraint penalty parameters required by variable splitting algorithms.

  4. Fast Adaptive Thermal Camouflage Based on Flexible VO₂/Graphene/CNT Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Ma, He; Liu, Junku; Zhao, Wei; Jia, Yi; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Kai; Wu, Yang; Wei, Yang; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2015-12-09

    Adaptive camouflage in thermal imaging, a form of cloaking technology capable of blending naturally into the surrounding environment, has been a great challenge in the past decades. Emissivity engineering for thermal camouflage is regarded as a more promising way compared to merely temperature controlling that has to dissipate a large amount of excessive heat. However, practical devices with an active modulation of emissivity have yet to be well explored. In this letter we demonstrate an active cloaking device capable of efficient thermal radiance control, which consists of a vanadium dioxide (VO2) layer, with a negative differential thermal emissivity, coated on a graphene/carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film. A slight joule heating drastically changes the emissivity of the device, achieving rapid switchable thermal camouflage with a low power consumption and excellent reliability. It is believed that this device will find wide applications not only in artificial systems for infrared camouflage or cloaking but also in energy-saving smart windows and thermo-optical modulators.

  5. Evidence of fast serotonin transmission in frog slowly adapting type 1 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Daniel; Mutlu, Sevinç; Güçlü, Burak

    2010-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite (MCN) complex generates slowly adapting type 1 (SA1) response when mechanically stimulated. Both serotonin (5-HT) and glutamate have been implicated in the generation of normal SA1 responses, but previous studies have been inconclusive as to what their roles are or how synaptic transmission occurs. In this study, excised dorsal skin patches from common water frogs (Rana ridibunda) were stimulated by von Frey hairs during perfusion in a tissue bath, and single-unit spike activity was recorded from SA1 fibres. Serotonin had no significant effect on the SA1 response at low (10 µM) concentration, significantly increased activity in a force-independent manner at 100 µM, but decreased activity with reduced responsiveness to force at 1 mM. Glutamate showed no effect on the responsiveness to force at 100 µM. MDL 72222 (100 µM), an ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, completely abolished the responsiveness to force, suggesting that serotonin is released from Merkel cells as a result of mechanical stimulation, and activated 5-HT3 receptors on the neurite. The metabotropic 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, greatly reduced the SA1 fibre's responsiveness to force, as did the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid. This supports a role for serotonin and glutamate as neuromodulators in the MCN complex, possibly by activation and/or inhibition of signalling cascades in the Merkel cell associated with vesicle release. Additionally, it was observed that SA1 responses contained a force-independent component, similar to a dynamic response observed during mechanical vibrations.

  6. Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to-Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Particle-to- Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method by Richard H Haney and Dale Shires......ARL-TR-7315 ● JUNE 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to- Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor

  7. Real-time MRI-guided hyperthermia treatment using a fast adaptive algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhursky, Vadim L; Arabe, Omar; Cheng, Kung-Shan; Macfall, James; Maccarini, Paolo; Craciunescu, Oana; Dewhirst, Mark; Stauffer, Paul; Das, Shiva K

    2009-04-01

    ratio of integral temperature in the tumor to integral temperature in normal tissue) by up to six-fold, compared to the first iteration. The integrated MR-HT treatment algorithm successfully steered the focus of heating into the desired target volume for both the simple homogeneous and the more challenging muscle equivalent phantom with tumor insert models of human extremity sarcomas after 16 and 2 iterations, correspondingly. The adaptive method for MR thermal image guided focal steering shows promise when tested in phantom experiments on a four-antenna phased array applicator.

  8. Real-time MRI-guided hyperthermia treatment using a fast adaptive algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhursky, Vadim L.; Arabe, Omar; Cheng, Kung-Shan; MacFall, James; Maccarini, Paolo; Craciunescu, Oana; Dewhirst, Mark; Stauffer, Paul; Das, Shiva K.

    2009-04-01

    temperature in the tumor to integral temperature in normal tissue) by up to six-fold, compared to the first iteration. The integrated MR-HT treatment algorithm successfully steered the focus of heating into the desired target volume for both the simple homogeneous and the more challenging muscle equivalent phantom with tumor insert models of human extremity sarcomas after 16 and 2 iterations, correspondingly. The adaptive method for MR thermal image guided focal steering shows promise when tested in phantom experiments on a four-antenna phased array applicator.

  9. Walking, places and wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Dick; Smajic, Ifeta

    2015-01-01

    While there is a substantial body of research on the health implications of walking, the physical, emotional and social outcomes of walking have received limited attention. This paper explores the wellbeing effects of walking and how the walking environment fosters or hinders such wellbeing effects.

  10. The Walk Poem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Ron

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the long history of writing poems about a walk, noting many titles. Notes four basic types of walk poems and includes one by American poet Bill Zavatksy, called "Class Walk With Notebooks After Storm." Offers numerous brief ideas for both the writing and the form of walk poems. (SR)

  11. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  12. An approximation to the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neuron model allows fast and predictive fitting to physiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreen eHertäg

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For large-scale network simulations, it is often desirable to have computationally tractable, yet in a defined sense still physiologically valid neuron models. In particular, these models should be able to reproduce physiological measurements, ideally in a predictive sense, and under different input regimes in which neurons may operate in vivo. Here we present an approach to parameter estimation for a simple spiking neuron model mainly based on standard f-I curves obtained from in vitro recordings. Such recordings are routinely obtained in standard protocols and assess a neuron's response under a wide range of mean input currents. Our fitting procedure makes use of closed-form expressions for the firing rate derived from an approximation to the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire (AdEx model. The resulting fitting process is simple and about two orders of magnitude faster compared to methods based on numerical integration of the differential equations. We probe this method on different cell types recorded from rodent prefrontal cortex. After fitting to the f-I current-clamp data, the model cells are tested on completely different sets of recordings obtained by fluctuating ('in-vivo-like' input currents. For a wide range of different input regimes, cell types, and cortical layers, the model could predict spike times on these test traces quite accurately within the bounds of physiological reliability, although no information from these distinct test sets was used for model fitting. Further analyses delineated some of the empirical factors constraining model fitting and the model's generalization performance. An even simpler adaptive LIF neuron was also examined in this context. Hence, we have developed a 'high-throughput' model fitting procedure which is simple and fast, with good prediction performance, and which relies only on firing rate information and standard physiological data widely and easily available.

  13. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  14. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2016-04-15

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle.

  15. Lack of on-going adaptations in the soleus muscle activity during walking in patients affected by large-fiber neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazarena, Mazzaro; Grey, Michael James; Sinkjær, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    applied during the stance phase of the gait cycle to mimic the normal variability of the ankle trajectory during walking. Patients with demyelination of large sensory fibers (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy) and age-matched controls participated...... in this study. The patients had absent light-touch sense in the toes and feet and absent quadriceps and Achilles tendon reflexes, indicating functional loss of large sensory fibers. Moreover, their soleus stretch reflex response consisted of a single electromyographic (EMG) burst with delayed onset and longer...... duration (P

  16. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Myronenko, A; Jordan, P [Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, United States. (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  17. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R

    2007-08-01

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, "High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings" (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  18. On alternating quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseva, Jenia; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2017-03-01

    We study an inhomogeneous quantum walk on a line that evolves according to alternating coins, each a rotation matrix. For the quantum walk with the coin alternating between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations by the same angle, we derive a closed form solution for the propagation of probabilities, and provide its asymptotic approximation via the method of stationary phase. Finally, we observe that for a x03c0;/4 angle, this alternating rotation walk will replicate the renown Hadamard walk.

  19. Groups, graphs and random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatori, Maura; Sava-Huss, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and panoramic account of the theory of random walks on groups and graphs, stressing the strong connections of the theory with other branches of mathematics, including geometric and combinatorial group theory, potential analysis, and theoretical computer science. This volume brings together original surveys and research-expository papers from renowned and leading experts, many of whom spoke at the workshop 'Groups, Graphs and Random Walks' celebrating the sixtieth birthday of Wolfgang Woess in Cortona, Italy. Topics include: growth and amenability of groups; Schrödinger operators and symbolic dynamics; ergodic theorems; Thompson's group F; Poisson boundaries; probability theory on buildings and groups of Lie type; structure trees for edge cuts in networks; and mathematical crystallography. In what is currently a fast-growing area of mathematics, this book provides an up-to-date and valuable reference for both researchers and graduate students, from which future research activities will undoubted...

  20. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  1. Effects of wintertime fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK and ACC in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and liver of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2016-02-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid with autumnal fattening and passive wintering strategy. We examined the effects of wintertime fasting and seasonality on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of metabolism, and its target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) on the species. Twelve farmed raccoon dogs (eleven females/one male) were divided into two groups: half were fasted for ten weeks in December-March (winter fasted) and the others were fed ad libitum (winter fed). A third group (autumn fed, eight females) was fed ad libitum and sampled in December. Total AMPK, ACC and their phosphorylated forms (pAMPK, pACC) were measured from hypothalamus, liver, intra-abdominal (iWAT) and subcutaneous white adipose tissues (sWAT). The fasted animals lost 32% and the fed 20% of their body mass. Hypothalamic AMPK expression was lower and pACC levels higher in the winter groups compared to the autumn fed group. Liver pAMPK was lower in the winter fasted group, with consistently decreased ACC and pACC. AMPK and pAMPK were down-regulated in sWAT and iWAT of both winter groups, with a parallel decline in pACC in sWAT. The responses of AMPK and ACC to fasting were dissimilar to the effects observed previously in non-seasonal mammals and hibernators. Differences between the winter fed and autumn fed groups indicate that the functions of AMPK and ACC could be regulated in a season-dependent manner. Furthermore, the distinctive effects of prolonged fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK-ACC pathway could contribute to the wintering strategy of the raccoon dog.

  2. Psychometric performance of a generic walking scale (Walk-12G) in multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladh, Stina; Nilsson, Maria H; Hariz, Gun-Marie; Westergren, Albert; Hobart, Jeremy; Hagell, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Walking difficulties are common in neurological and other disorders, as well as among the elderly. There is a need for reliable and valid instruments for measuring walking difficulties in everyday life since existing gait tests are clinician rated and focus on situation specific capacity. The Walk-12G was adapted from the 12-item multiple sclerosis walking scale as a generic patient-reported rating scale for walking difficulties in everyday life. The aim of this study is to examine the psychometric properties of the Walk-12G in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson's disease (PD). The Walk-12G was translated into Swedish and evaluated qualitatively among 25 people with and without various neurological and other conditions. Postal survey (MS, n = 199; PD, n = 189) and clinical (PD, n = 36) data were used to test its psychometric properties. Respondents considered the Walk-12G relevant and easy to use. Mean completion time was 3.5 min. Data completeness was good (0.6). Coefficient alpha and test-retest reliabilities were >0.9, and standard errors of measurement were 2.3-2.8. Construct validity was supported by correlations in accordance with a priori expectations. Results are similar to those with previous Walk-12G versions, indicating that scale adaptation was successful. Data suggest that the Walk-12G meets rating scale criteria for clinical trials, making it a valuable complement to available gait tests. Further studies involving other samples and application of modern psychometric methods are warranted to examine the scale in more detail.

  3. Evaluating functional roles of phase resetting in generation of adaptive human bipedal walking with a physiologically based model of the spinal pattern generator.

    OpenAIRE

    Aoi, Shinya; Ogihara, Naomichi; Funato, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The central pattern generators (CPGs) in the spinal cord strongly contribute to locomotor behavior. To achieve adaptive locomotion, locomotor rhythm generated by the CPGs is suggested to be functionally modulated by phase resetting based on sensory afferent or perturbations. Although phase resetting has been investigated during fictive locomotion in cats, its functional roles in actual locomotion have not been clarified. Recently, simulation studies have been conducted to examine the roles of...

  4. Synthetic Physiology: Strategies for Adapting Tools from Nature for Genetically-Targeted Control of Fast Biological Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Brian Y.; Chuong, Amy S; Klapoetke, Nathan C.; Edward S Boyden

    2011-01-01

    The life and operation of cells involve many physiological processes that take place over fast timescales of milliseconds to minutes. Genetically-encoded technologies for driving or suppressing specific fast physiological processes in intact cells, perhaps embedded within intact tissues in living organisms, are critical for the ability to understand how these physiological processes contribute to emergent cellular and organismal functions and behaviors. Such “synthetic physiology” tools are o...

  5. Self-adaptive Bionic Legs and the Way of Walking Self-switchable Vehicle%具有自适应性仿生腿及行走方式可切换式汽车

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王棋; 刘群

    2016-01-01

    高性能移动机器人主要用于灾难搜救、星球探测、军事侦察、矿山开采等非结构化环境中,其移动系统可分为轮式、腿式、履带式以及轮腿结合式4类。其中,轮腿式机器人不仅具备腿式机器人的高越障性能和对复杂地形的高适应性能,还兼备轮式机器人在平整地面上滚动的高速高效性能。具有自适应性仿生腿及行走方式可切换式汽车综合了轮式系统和腿式系统的优势,具备多种运动姿态,包括滚动、攀爬楼梯等,具有运行平稳、带负载能力强以及越障性能好的优点。可作为移动机器人平台搭载相关设备完成星球探测、军事侦察、扫雷排险等多种工作。%Autonomous robots have many potential applications like farming, exploration, investigation and waste lean-up, based on their well-designed locomotion system. Wheel-legged rover is a typical hybrid mobility system, inherits both advantages of wheeled and walking systems, i.e. the high-speed and efficient rolling performance for the first one; and the obstacle clearance performance as well as high adaptability to rough terrains for the second. The self-adaptive bionic legs and the way of walking self-switchable vehicle have many potential applications, including geological investigation, space exploration, military reconnaissance, defense, demining, etc.

  6. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in Adaptive Mesh Refinement codes Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Valdivia, Valeska

    2014-01-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims. Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods. We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results. We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the ...

  7. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eFranek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al. 1999 on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of movement

  8. Virtually Abelian quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo; Erba, Marco; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    We study discrete-time quantum walks on Cayley graphs of non-Abelian groups, focusing on the easiest case of virtually Abelian groups. We present a technique to reduce the quantum walk to an equivalent one on an Abelian group with coin system having larger dimension. This method allows one to extend the notion of wave-vector to the virtually Abelian case and study analytically the walk dynamics. We apply the technique in the case of two quantum walks on virtually Abelian groups with planar Cayley graphs, finding the exact solution in terms of dispersion relation.

  9. Walks on Weighted Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU An-Cai; XU Xin-Jian; WU Zhi-Xi; WANG Ying-Hai

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of random walks on weighted networks. Assuming that the edge weight and the node strength are used as local information by a random walker. Two kinds of walks, weight-dependent walk and strength-dependent walk, are studied. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and average return time are derived and confirmed by computer simulations. The distribution of average return time and the mean-square that a weight-dependent walker can arrive at a new territory more easily than a strength-dependent one.

  10. Fast multiple run_before decoding method for efficient implementation of an H.264/advanced video coding context-adaptive variable length coding decoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Dae Wook; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-07-01

    We propose a fast new multiple run_before decoding method in context-adaptive variable length coding (CAVLC). The transform coefficients are coded using CAVLC, in which the run_before symbols are generated for a 4×4 block input. To speed up the CAVLC decoding, the run_before symbols need to be decoded in parallel. We implemented a new CAVLC table for simultaneous decoding of up to three run_befores. The simulation results show a Total Speed-up Factor of 205%˜144% over various resolutions and quantization steps.

  11. Whole transcriptome analysis of the fasting and fed Burmese python heart: insights into extreme physiological cardiac adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher E; Cozza, Steven; Riquelme, Cecilia A; McCombie, W Richard; Heimiller, Joseph K; Marr, Thomas G; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The infrequently feeding Burmese python (Python molurus) experiences significant and rapid postprandial cardiac hypertrophy followed by regression as digestion is completed. To begin to explore the molecular mechanisms of this response, we have sequenced and assembled the fasted and postfed Burmese python heart transcriptomes with Illumina technology using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome as a reference. In addition, we have used RNA-seq analysis to identify differences in the expression of biological processes and signaling pathways between fasted, 1 day postfed (DPF), and 3 DPF hearts. Out of a combined transcriptome of ∼2,800 mRNAs, 464 genes were differentially expressed. Genes showing differential expression at 1 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for biological processes involved in metabolism and energetics, while genes showing differential expression at 3 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for processes involved in biogenesis, structural remodeling, and organization. Moreover, we present evidence for the activation of physiological and not pathological signaling pathways in this rapid, novel model of cardiac growth in pythons. Together, our data provide the first comprehensive gene expression profile for a reptile heart.

  12. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  13. Humanoid robot Lola: design and walking control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Thomas; Lohmeier, Sebastian; Ulbrich, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the humanoid robot LOLA, its mechatronic hardware design, simulation and real-time walking control. The goal of the LOLA-project is to build a machine capable of stable, autonomous, fast and human-like walking. LOLA is characterized by a redundant kinematic configuration with 7-DoF legs, an extremely lightweight design, joint actuators with brushless motors and an electronics architecture using decentralized joint control. Special emphasis was put on an improved mass distribution of the legs to achieve good dynamic performance. Trajectory generation and control aim at faster, more flexible and robust walking. Center of mass trajectories are calculated in real-time from footstep locations using quadratic programming and spline collocation methods. Stabilizing control uses hybrid position/force control in task space with an inner joint position control loop. Inertial stabilization is achieved by modifying the contact force trajectories.

  14. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  15. IAS15: A fast, adaptive, high-order integrator for gravitational dynamics, accurate to machine precision over a billion orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Rein, Hanno

    2014-01-01

    We present IAS15, a 15th-order integrator to simulate gravitational dynamics. The integrator is based on a Gau{\\ss}-Radau quadrature and can handle conservative as well as non-conservative forces. We develop a step-size control that can automatically choose an optimal timestep. The algorithm can handle close encounters and high-eccentricity orbits. The systematic errors are kept well below machine precision and long-term orbit integrations over $10^9$ orbits show that IAS15 is optimal in the sense that it follows Brouwer's law, i.e. the energy error behaves like a random walk. Our tests show that IAS15 is superior to a mixed-variable symplectic integrator (MVS) and other high-order integrators in both speed and accuracy. In fact, IAS15 preserves the symplecticity of Hamiltonian systems better than the commonly-used nominally symplectic integrators to which we compared it. We provide an open-source implementation of IAS15. The package comes with several easy-to-extend examples involving resonant planetary syst...

  16. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below −70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformation...

  17. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca; Schubert, Mikkel; Jónsson, Hákon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Fumagalli, Matteo; Yang, Melinda A; Gamba, Cristina; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie D; Petersen, Bent; Hoover, Cindi A; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Boulygina, Eugenia; Tsygankova, Svetlana; Neuditschko, Markus; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Thèves, Catherine; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Alquraishi, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Popov, Ruslan; Grigoriev, Semyon; Alekseev, Anatoly N; Rubin, Edward M; McCue, Molly; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso; Tikhonov, Alexei; Crubézy, Eric; Slatkin, Montgomery; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Kantanen, Juha; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-12-15

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below -70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations, extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens dating from the early 19th century and ∼5,200 y ago. By comparing these genomes with the genomes of two Late Pleistocene, 27 domesticated, and three wild Przewalski's horses, we find that contemporary Yakutian horses do not descend from the native horses that populated the region until the mid-Holocene, but were most likely introduced following the migration of the Yakut people a few centuries ago. Thus, they represent one of the fastest cases of adaptation to the extreme temperatures of the Arctic. We find cis-regulatory mutations to have contributed more than nonsynonymous changes to their adaptation, likely due to the comparatively limited standing variation within gene bodies at the time the population was founded. Genes involved in hair development, body size, and metabolic and hormone signaling pathways represent an essential part of the Yakutian horse adaptive genetic toolkit. Finally, we find evidence for convergent evolution with native human populations and woolly mammoths, suggesting that only a few evolutionary strategies are compatible with survival in extremely cold environments.

  18. Crossover from random walk to self-avoiding walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Jens

    1988-11-01

    A one-dimensional n-step random walk on openZ1 which must not visit a vertex more than k times is studied via Monte Carlo methods. The dependences of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the walk and of the fraction of trapped walks on λ=(k-1)/n will be given for the range from λ=0 (self-avoiding walk) to λ=1 (unrestricted random walk). From the results it is conjectured that in the limit n-->∞ the walk obeys simple random walk statistics with respect to its static properties for all λ>0.

  19. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  20. When Human Walking is a Random Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.

    1998-03-01

    The complex, hierarchical locomotor system normally does a remarkable job of controlling an inherently unstable, multi-joint system. Nevertheless, the stride interval --- the duration of a gait cycle --- fluctuates from one stride to the next, even under stationary conditions. We used random walk analysis to study the dynamical properties of these fluctuations under normal conditions and how they change with disease and aging. Random walk analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations of healthy, young adult men surprisingly reveals a self-similar pattern: fluctuations at one time scale are statistically similar to those at multiple other time scales (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1995). To study the stability of this fractal property, we analyzed data obtained from healthy subjects who walked for 1 hour at their usual pace, as well as at slower and faster speeds. The stride interval fluctuations exhibited long-range correlations with power-law decay for up to a thousand strides at all three walking rates. In contrast, during metronomically-paced walking, these long-range correlations disappeared; variations in the stride interval were uncorrelated and non-fractal (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1996). To gain insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for this fractal property, we examined the effects of aging and neurological impairment. Using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we computed α, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. α was significantly lower in healthy elderly subjects compared to young adults (p < .003) and in subjects with Huntington's disease, a neuro-degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, compared to disease-free controls (p < 0.005) (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1997). α was also significantly related to degree of functional impairment in subjects with Huntington's disease (r=0.78). Recently, we have observed that just as

  1. Exergame and Balance Training modulate Prefrontal Brain Activity during Walking and enhance Executive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eEggenberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of exercise training have the potential to induce structural and functional brain plasticity in the elderly. Thereby, functional brain adaptations were observed during cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that correlated with improved cognitive performance. This study aimed to investigate if exercise training induces functional brain plasticity during challenging treadmill walking and elicits associated changes in cognitive executive functions. Forty-two elderly participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either interactive cognitive-motor video game dancing (DANCE or balance and stretching training (BALANCE. The 8-week intervention included three sessions of 30 minutes per week and was completed by 33 participants (mean age 74.9±6.9 years. Prefrontal cortex (PFC activity during preferred and fast walking speed on a treadmill was assessed applying functional near infrared spectroscopy pre- and post-intervention. Additionally, executive functions comprising shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed. The results showed that both interventions significantly reduced left and right hemispheric PFC oxygenation during the acceleration of walking (p < .05 or trend, r = .25 to .36, while DANCE showed a larger reduction at the end of the 30-second walking task compared to BALANCE in the left PFC (F(1, 31 = 3.54, p = .035, r = .32. These exercise training induced modulations in PFC oxygenation correlated with improved executive functions (p < .05 or trend, r = .31 to .50. The observed reductions in PFC activity may release cognitive resources to focus attention on other processes while walking, which could be relevant to improve mobility and falls prevention in the elderly. This study provides a deeper understanding of the associations between exercise training, brain function during walking, and cognition in older adults.

  2. Walking Shoes: Features and Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a pair of walking shoes: Wear the same socks you'll wear when walking, or take the socks with you to the store. Shop for shoes ... fits snugly in each shoe and doesn't slip as you walk. All walking shoes eventually show ...

  3. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider ...... set of experiential or ‘felt’ qualities of living with mobile technologies. Moving from reflections on the value of walking with people, the paper outlines some affordances of a smartphone application built to capture place experiences through walking.......Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  4. Toe Walking in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may simply monitor your child's gait during regular office visits. If a physical problem is contributing to toe walking, treatment options may include: Physical therapy. Gentle stretching of the leg and foot muscles may improve ...

  5. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    individuals in Denmark conduct and experience walking, and the ‘rationalities’ (Giddens 1984) that lie behind their choice of mobility. It provides insight into how different lifestyles perceive and act walking in their everyday life. Kaufmann (2002) describes how the individual mobility is influenced......’ of mobility (Jensen 2013:111) such as the urban environment, and the infrastructures. Walking has indeed also a ‘software dimension’ as an embodied performance that trigger the human senses (Jensen 2013) and which is closely related to the habitus and identity of the individual (Halprin 1963). The individual...... by individual strategies, values, perceptions and habits, and how appropriation of mobility is constructed through the internalization of standards and values. The act of walking could thus be understood as the result of dynamic internal negotiation of individual, everyday mobility strategies (Lassen 2005...

  6. Myoelectric walking mode classification for transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason D; Beazer, Mahyo Seyedali; Hahn, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Myoelectric control algorithms have the potential to detect an amputee's motion intent and allow the prosthetic to adapt to changes in walking mode. The development of a myoelectric walking mode classifier for transtibial amputees is outlined. Myoelectric signals from four muscles (tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris) were recorded for five nonamputee subjects and five transtibial amputees over a variety of walking modes: level ground at three speeds, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent. These signals were decomposed into relevant features (mean absolute value, variance, wavelength, number of slope sign changes, number of zero crossings) over three subwindows from the gait cycle and used to test the ability of classification algorithms for transtibial amputees using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. Detection of all seven walking modes had an accuracy of 97.9% for the amputee group and 94.7% for the nonamputee group. Misclassifications occurred most frequently between different walking speeds due to the similar nature of the gait pattern. Stair ascent/descent had the best classification accuracy with 99.8% for the amputee group and 100.0% for the nonamputee group. Stability of the developed classifier was explored using an electrode shift disturbance for each muscle. Shifting the electrode placement of the MG had the most pronounced effect on the classification accuracy for both samples. No increase in classification accuracy was observed when using SVM compared to LDA for the current dataset.

  7. Adaptive evolution for fast growth on glucose and the effects on the regulation of glucose transport system in Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Li, Shuang; Hu, Yi; Xu, Qing; Huang, He

    2012-03-01

    Laboratory adaptive evolution of microorganisms offers the possibility of relating acquired mutations to increased fitness of the organism under the conditions used. By combining a fibrous-bed bioreactor, we successfully developed a simple and valuable adaptive evolution strategy in repeated-batch fermentation mode with high initial substrate concentration and evolved Clostridium tyrobutyricum mutant with significantly improved butyric acid volumetric productivity up to 2.25 g/(L h), which is the highest value in batch fermentation reported so far. Further experiments were conducted to pay attention to glucose transport system in consideration of the high glucose consumption rate resulted from evolution. Complete characterization and comparison of the glucose phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) were carried out in the form of toluene-treated cells and cell-free extracts derived from both C. tyrobutyricum wide-type and mutant, while an alternative glucose transport route that requires glucokinase was confirmed by the phenomena of resistance to the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose and ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation. Our results suggest that C. tyrobutyricum mutant is defective in PTS activity and compensates for this defect with enhanced glucokinase activity, resulting in the efficient uptake and consumption of glucose during the whole metabolism.

  8. Adaptive welding of fillet welds using a fast seam-tracking sensor in combination with a standard industrial robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischetsrieder, Alexandra

    1996-08-01

    In laser welding, problems often arise from the accuracy required by the laser process, particularly where joints have narrow tolerance limits, e.g. with a fillet weld at an overlap joint. In a number of applications seam-tracking sensors can improve this situation. They are able to detect and follow the joint geometry autonomously. In addition to the tolerances, a varying gap between the parts to weld can cause welding flaws. To solve the problems caused by the height of the gap a functionality for adaptive welding can be integrated into the tracking sensor, rendering possible a determined influence on process parameters. Functional dependencies between the height of the gap and the welding parameters are presented in this paper. To further enhance the accuracy of path tracking the dynamic behavior of the system is investigated. With the integration of these dependencies into the tracking sensor, an algorithm for adaptive welding has been obtained, which takes another step towards the raise of profitability of laser installations by a simplified weld seam preparation and an enhanced stability of the welding process.

  9. Rapid analysis of phthalic acid esters in environmental water using fast elution gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and adaptive library spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pao; Mei, Zhen; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    A method for the fast determination of the components in a complex sample by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry was developed and used for the quantitative analysis of phthalic acid esters in environmental water. In the method, the adaptively corrected mass spectra were used to compensate for the differences between the library spectra and the measured ones in the experiment. The correction was obtained by the iterative transformation of the library spectra using iterative target transformation factor analysis, and the resolution was performed by non-negative immune algorithm using the corrected spectra. Rapid analysis of 16 phthalic acid esters in water samples was achieved using fast elution gas chromatography with mass spectrometry measurements. The results show that the mass spectra and chromatographic profiles of the phthalic acid esters can be obtained from the overlapping signal of 13 min elution, and accurate quantitative analysis can be obtained. The recoveries of the phthalic acid esters obtained by standard addition are between 90.3 and 107.4%, and the relative standard deviations obtained in repeated measurements are less than 9%.

  10. Fast coeff_token decoding method and new memory architecture design for an efficient H.264/AVC context-based adaptive variable length coding decoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yong Ho; Yoon, Kun Su; Ha, Seok Wun

    2009-12-01

    A fast coeff_token decoding method based on new memory architecture is proposed to implement an efficient context-based adaptive variable length-coding (CAVLC) decoder. The heavy memory access needed in CAVLC decoding is a significant issue in designing a real system, such as digital multimedia broadcasting players, portable media players, and mobile phones with video, because it results in high power consumption and delay in operations. Recently, a new coeff_token variable-length decoding method has been suggested to achieve memory access reduction. However, it still requires a large portion of the total memory access in CAVLC decoding. In this work, an effective memory architecture is designed through careful examination of codewords in variable-length code tables. In addition, a novel fast decoding method is proposed to further reduce the memory accesses required for reconstructing the coeff_token element. Only one memory access is used for reconstructing each coeff_token element in the proposed method.

  11. Blubber transcriptome response to acute stress axis activation involves transient changes in adipogenesis and lipolysis in a fasting-adapted marine mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakov, J. I.; Champagne, C. D.; Meneghetti, L. M.; Crocker, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Stress can compromise an animal’s ability to conserve metabolic stores and participate in energy-demanding activities that are critical for fitness. Understanding how wild animals, especially those already experiencing physiological extremes (e.g. fasting), regulate stress responses is critical for evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on physiology and fitness, key challenges for conservation. However, studies of stress in wildlife are often limited to baseline endocrine measurements and few have investigated stress effects in fasting-adapted species. We examined downstream molecular consequences of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation by exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in blubber of northern elephant seals due to the ease of blubber sampling and its key role in metabolic regulation in marine mammals. We report the first phocid blubber transcriptome produced by RNAseq, containing over 140,000 annotated transcripts, including metabolic and adipocytokine genes of interest. The acute response of blubber to stress axis activation, measured 2 hours after ACTH administration, involved highly specific, transient (lasting <24 hours) induction of gene networks that promote lipolysis and adipogenesis in mammalian adipocytes. Differentially expressed genes included key adipogenesis factors which can be used as blubber-specific markers of acute stress in marine mammals of concern for which sampling of other tissues is not possible. PMID:28186107

  12. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    CERN Document Server

    Dickson, Bradley M; Ramjan, Zachary H; Xu, H Eric; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4. Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1{\\mu}second-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  13. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Bradley M.; de Waal, Parker W.; Ramjan, Zachary H.; Xu, H. Eric; Rothbart, Scott B.

    2016-10-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4). Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1 μs-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  14. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  15. Online Joint Trajectory Generation of Human-like Biped Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Wook Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biped walking has long been studied in the area of gait analysis and robotic locomotion. The goal of this paper is to establish a systematic methodology for human-like natural walking by fusing the measured human joint data and optimal pattern generation techniques based on a full-body humanoid model. To this end, this paper proposes an adaptive two-stage gait pattern by which the step length and walking velocity can be changed with two scaling factors. In addition, to cope with the situations involving passing over a small obstacle, the joint trajectories of the swing foot can be adjusted with a novel concept of differential angle trajectory using a reliable optimization method, viz. particle swarm optimization. The feasibility of the proposed walking scheme is validated by walking experiments with the robot platform DARwIn-OP.

  16. Adaptive-weighted cubic B-spline using lookup tables for fast and efficient axial resampling of 3D confocal microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indhumathi, C; Cai, Y Y; Guan, Y Q; Opas, M; Zheng, J

    2012-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has become a most powerful tool to visualize and analyze the dynamic behavior of cellular molecules. Photobleaching of fluorochromes is a major problem with confocal image acquisition that will lead to intensity attenuation. Photobleaching effect can be reduced by optimizing the collection efficiency of the confocal image by fast z-scanning. However, such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the z dimension, which causes disparities in the x, y, and z directions of the voxels with the original image stacks. As a result, reliable segmentation and feature extraction of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Image interpolation is especially needed for the correction of undersampling artifact in the axial plane of three-dimensional images generated by a confocal microscope to obtain cubic voxels. In this work, we present an adaptive cubic B-spline-based interpolation with the aid of lookup tables by deriving adaptive weights based on local gradients for the sampling nodes in the interpolation formulae. Thus, the proposed method enhances the axial resolution of confocal images by improving the accuracy of the interpolated value simultaneously with great reduction in computational cost. Numerical experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed interpolation approach and demonstrate its superiority both in terms of accuracy and speed compared to other interpolation algorithms.

  17. Fast protocol for extraction of DNA from Prosopis spp leaves (plant adapted to arid environment) without liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-López, C Y; González-Mendoza, D; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2013-09-27

    The extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Prosopis spp for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is complicated, owing to the presence of a high percentage of secondary metabolites that bind to or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. In the present study, we report a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate/phenol protocol that eliminates the use of liquid nitrogen in the maceration process, β-mercaptoethanol in the buffer extraction, and the ethanol precipitation step. The A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ absorbance ratios of the isolated DNA were approximately 2.0 to 1.9, suggesting that the DNA fraction was pure and can be used for further PCR analysis. The DNA isolated by this protocol is of sufficient quality for molecular applications; this technique could be applied to other organisms that have similar substances that hinder DNA extraction. Finally, this proposal represents an alternative fast, cheap, and effective method for the isolation of genomic DNA from fresh leaves of Prosopis spp, even in low-technology laboratories.

  18. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes.

  19. Unitary equivalence of quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Sandeep K., E-mail: sandeep.goyal@ucalgary.ca [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, 4000 Durban (South Africa); Konrad, Thomas [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, 4000 Durban (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa); Diósi, Lajos [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49 (Hungary)

    2015-01-23

    Highlights: • We have found unitary equivalent classes in coined quantum walks. • A single parameter family of coin operators is sufficient to realize all simple one-dimensional quantum walks. • Electric quantum walks are unitarily equivalent to time dependent quantum walks. - Abstract: A simple coined quantum walk in one dimension can be characterized by a SU(2) operator with three parameters which represents the coin toss. However, different such coin toss operators lead to equivalent dynamics of the quantum walker. In this manuscript we present the unitary equivalence classes of quantum walks and show that all the nonequivalent quantum walks can be distinguished by a single parameter. Moreover, we argue that the electric quantum walks are equivalent to quantum walks with time dependent coin toss operator.

  20. The Fast Adaptive Resonance Theory Network%快速自适应共振理论网络

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭小萍; 林小竹; 王嵩

    2012-01-01

    基于实验心理学理论,按记忆强度分组自适应共振理论网络聚类,将模式识别过程划分成若干按序进行的子过程.通过合理设置网络参数,在保证准确识别的前提下,尽可能地避免了自适应共振网络所固有的遍历匹配运算.实验表明,新网络的模式识别性能与原网络相当,而计算效率却得到了显著提升.%In this paper, based on the experimental psychology, the network clusters have been grouped according to their level of memory strength, so the pattern recognition process can be divided into several sub-processes that are carried out In sequence. Through a reasonable setting of network parameters, -while ensuring the accurate recognition of the premise, the new network avoids the full matching operation inherent in the adaptive resonance networks as far as possible. Experiments show that the new network's pattern recognition performance is equivalent to the original network, but its calculating efficiency has been significantly improved.

  1. DELPHI - fast and adaptive computational laser point detection and visual footprint quantification for arbitrary underwater image collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timm eSchoening

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine researchers continue to create large quantities of benthic images e.g. using AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. In order to quantify the size of sessile objects in the images, a pixel-to-centimetre ratio is required for each image, often indirectly provided through a geometric laser point (LP pattern, projected onto the seafloor. Manual annotation of these LPs in all images is too time-consuming and thus infeasible for nowadays data volumes. Because of the technical evolution of camera rigs, the LP's geometrical layout and colour features vary for different expeditions and projects. This makes the application of one algorithm, tuned to a strictly defined LP pattern, also ineffective.Here we present the web-tool DELPHI, that efficiently learns the LP layout for one image transect / collection from just a small number of hand labelled LPs and applies this layout model to the rest of the data. The efficiency in adapting to new data allows to compute the LPs and the pixel-to-centimetre ratio fully automatic and with high accuracy. DELPHI is applied to two real-world examples and shows clear improvements regarding reduction of tuning effort for new LP patterns as well as increasing detection performance.

  2. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    We developed an autonomous powered leg exoskeleton capable of providing large amounts of positive mechanical power to the wearer during powered plantarflexion phase of walking. The autonomous exoskeleton consisted of a winch actuator fasted to the shin which pulled on fiberglass struts attached to a boot. The fiberglass struts formed a rigid extension of the foot when the proximal end of the strut was pulled in forward by the winch actuator. This lightweight, geometric transmission allowed the electric winch actuator to efficiently produce biological levels of power at the ankle joint. The exoskeleton was powered and controlled by lithium polymer batteries and motor controller worn around the waist. Preliminary testing on two subjects walking at 1.4 m/s resulted in the exoskeleton reducing the metabolic cost of walking by 6-11% as compared to not wearing the device. The exoskeleton provided a peak mechanical power of over 180 W at each ankle (mean standard ± deviation) and an average positive mechanical power of 27 ± 1 W total to both ankles, while electrically using 75-89 W of electricity. The batteries (800 g) used in this experiment are estimated to be capable of providing this level of assistance for up to 7 km of walking.

  3. Bouncing and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molacek, Jan; Bush, John

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the hydrodynamic quantum analogue system of Yves Couder, we examine the dynamics of silicone oil drops bouncing on a vertically vibrating liquid bath. We report regime diagrams indicating the dependence of the vertical drop motion on the system parameters. A logarithmic spring model for the interface is developed, and provides new rationale for the regime diagrams. We further examine the spatio-temporal evolution of the standing waves created on the bath surface by repeated drop impacts. Measurement of the tangential coefficient of restitution of drops bouncing on a quiescent bath enables us to accurately determine all the major forces acting on the drop during flight and impact. By combining the horizontal and vertical dynamics, we thus develop a model for the walking drops that enables us to rationalize both the extent of the walking regime and the walking speeds. The model predictions compare favorably with experimental data in the parameter range explored.

  4. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  5. Ways of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eslambolchilar, Parisa; Bødker, Mads; Chamberlain, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It seems logical to argue that mobile computing technologies are intended for use "on-the-go." However, on closer inspection, the use of mobile technologies pose a number of challenges for users who are mobile, particularly moving around on foot. In engaging with such mobile technologies...... and their envisaged development, we argue that interaction designers must increasingly consider a multitude of perspectives that relate to walking in order to frame design problems appropriately. In this paper, we consider a number of perspectives on walking, and we discuss how these may inspire the design of mobile...... technologies. Drawing on insights from non-representational theory, we develop a partial vocabulary with which to engage with qualities of pedestrian mobility, and we outline how taking more mindful approaches to walking may enrich and inform the design space of handheld technologies....

  6. Walking With Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McDuff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is beneficial for people with dementia, but little research explores subjective experiences of physical activity in this population. Interpretive description guided the analysis of 26 interviews conducted with 12 people with dementia. Three themes described the subjective meaning of everyday physical activity: Participants were attracted to activity because it improved physical well-being, provided social connections, gave opportunity to be in nature, and provided structure and focus; participants experienced impediments to activity because of physical discomfort, environmental factors, lack of enthusiasm, and memory loss; and participants made adjustments by choosing walking over other activities and by being active with others. Results show that physical activity remains important for people with dementia, although they encounter barriers. They may prefer walking with others as a form of activity. Findings could influence how nurses conceptualize wandering and suggest that walking programs could be well received by people with dementia.

  7. Walking for data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Browning, David; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking.......We suggest that ‘walking’ in ethnographic work sensitizes researchers to a particular means of making sense of place. Following a brief conceptual exposition, we present our research tool iMaCam) that supports capturing and representing activities such as walking....

  8. From Walking to Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Juergen; Blum, Yvonne; Seyfarth, Andre

    The implementation of bipedal gaits in legged robots is still a challenge in state-of-the-art engineering. Human gaits could be realized by imitating human leg dynamics where a spring-like leg behavior is found as represented in the bipedal spring-mass model. In this study we explore the gap between walking and running by investigating periodic gait patterns. We found an almost continuous morphing of gait patterns between walking and running. The technical feasibility of this transition is, however, restricted by the duration of swing phase. In practice, this requires an abrupt gait transition between both gaits, while a change of speed is not necessary.

  9. Aperiodic Quantum Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, P; Mosseri, R; Ribeiro, Pedro; Milman, Perola; Mosseri, Remy

    2004-01-01

    We generalize the quantum random walk protocol for a particle in a one-dimensional chain, by using several types of biased quantum coins, arranged in aperiodic sequences, in a manner that leads to a rich variety of possible wave function evolutions. Quasiperiodic sequences, following the Fibonacci prescription, are of particular interest, leading to a sub-ballistic wavefunction spreading. In contrast, random sequences leads to diffusive spreading, similar to the classical random walk behaviour. We also describe how to experimentally implement these aperiodic sequences.

  10. Effect of concurrent walking and interlocutor distance on conversational speech intensity and rate in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, Cassandra M; Adams, Scott G; Dykstra, Allyson D; Jog, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a negative effect of concurrent walking and talking on gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) but there is limited information about the effect of concurrent walking on speech production. The present study examined the effect of sitting, standing, and three concurrent walking tasks (slow, normal, fast) on conversational speech intensity and speech rate in fifteen individuals with hypophonia related to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and fourteen age-equivalent controls. Interlocuter (talker-to-talker) distance effects and walking speed were also examined. Concurrent walking was found to produce a significant increase in speech intensity, relative to standing and sitting, in both the control and PD groups. Faster walking produced significantly greater speech intensity than slower walking. Concurrent walking had no effect on speech rate. Concurrent walking and talking produced significant reductions in walking speed in both the control and PD groups. In general, the results of the present study indicate that concurrent walking tasks and the speed of concurrent walking can have a significant positive effect on conversational speech intensity. These positive, "energizing" effects need to be given consideration in future attempts to develop a comprehensive model of speech intensity regulation and they may have important implications for the development of new evaluation and treatment procedures for individuals with hypophonia related to PD.

  11. Late gestation over- and undernutrition predispose for visceral adiposity in response to a post-natal obesogenic diet, but with differential impacts on glucose-insulin adaptations during fasting in lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanal, Prabhat; Husted, Sanne Vinter; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen

    2014-01-01

    -fat or a moderate diet until 6 months of age (around puberty), where metabolic and endocrine adaptability to fasting was examined, and subgroups of animals were killed. Results: Animals exposed to either prenatal under- or overnutrition had reduced subcutaneous fat deposition when fed a high-fat diet, resulting...

  12. Physical activity effected by fast walking in elderly patients with type 2 diabetic disease%快速健步走运动对老年2型糖尿病患者身体活动能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳玲; 张伟; 张金立; 冯娜; 许浩军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of fast walking exercise on the physical activity in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in glucose metabolism and physical activity indicators. Methods 80 patients with T2DM were randomly divided into two groups:exercise group and the control group, 40 cases in each group. Exercise group performed on 16 weeks of fast walking, before the movement of glucose metabolism and physical activity indicators were compared. Results The experimental group iftness program VO2max before and after exercise, 30s arm lfexion and extension, 2min standing still, chair-reach, grab the back stretch, 6min walk, six test scores were signiifcantly increased (P0.05). 2h postprandial blood glucose (2hPG) decreased significantly (P0.05). Lower extremity muscle strength tests comparing exercise group had ankle flexion and extension muscle strength growth to varying. Conclusion Fast walking exercise training program will help to improve glucose metabolism and activity in patients with T2DM.%目的:探讨快速健步走运动对老年2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者糖代谢及身体活动能力各项指标的影响。方法将T2DM患者80例随机分为运动组及对照组,每组40例。对运动组患者进行为期16周的快速健步走运动训练,将运动前后糖代谢及身体活动能力各项指标进行对比。结果运动组运动前后体适能项目VO2max 、2 min原地踏步、6 min行走、30 s臂屈伸运动、抓背伸展运动、坐椅体前伸运动等6项测试指标比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05);运动组患者餐后2 h血糖下降明显(P0.05)。下肢肌力测试比较,运动组患者踝关节屈伸肌力量均有不同程度增长。结论快速健步走运动训练方案有利于改善T2DM患者糖代谢及活动能力。

  13. Dynamics of longitudinal arch support in relation to walking speed: contribution of the plantar aponeurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Pataky, Todd; Günther, Michael; Savage, Russell; Crompton, Robin

    2010-09-01

    The plantar aponeurosis (PA), in spanning the whole length of the plantar aspect of the foot, is clearly identified as one of the key structures that is likely to affect compliance and stability of the longitudinal arch. A recent study performed in our laboratory showed that tension/elongation in the PA can be predicted from the kinematics of the segments to which the PA is attached. In the present investigation, stereophotogrammetry and inverse kinematics were employed to shed light on the mechanics of the longitudinal arch and its main passive stabilizer, the PA, in relation to walking speed. When compared with a neutral unloaded position, the medial longitudinal arch underwent greater collapse during the weight-acceptance phase of stance at higher walking speed (0.1 degrees +/-1.9 degrees in slow walking; 0.9 degrees +/-2.6 degrees in fast walking; P = 0.0368). During late stance the arch was higher (3.4 degrees +/-3.1 degrees in slow walking; 2.8 degrees +/-2.7 degrees in fast walking; P = 0.0227) and the metatarsophalangeal joints more dorsiflexed (e.g. at the first metatarsophalangeal joint, 52 degrees +/-5 degrees in slow walking; 64 degrees +/-4 degrees in fast walking; P plantar aspect of the foot when walking at faster speeds.

  14. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  15. k-Walk-Regular Digraphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen LIU; Jing LIN

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we define a class of strongly connected digraph,called the k-walk-regular digraph,study some properties of it,provide its some algebraic characterization and point out that the O-walk-regular digraph is the same as the walk-regular digraph discussed BY Liu and Lin in 2010 and the D-walk-regular digraph is identical with the weakly distance-regular digraph defined by Comellas et al in 2004.

  16. Snakes and perturbed random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Gopal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study some properties of random walks perturbed at extrema, which are generalizations of the walks considered e.g., in Davis (1999). This process can also be viewed as a version of {\\em excited random walk}, studied recently by many authors. We obtain a few properties related to the range of the process with infinite memory. We also prove the Strong law, Central Limit Theorem, and the criterion for the recurrence of the perturbed walk with finite memory.

  17. Walking and Sensing Mobile Lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk.......In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk....

  18. Walking Advisement: Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram Hills School District, Armonk, NY.

    The Walking Advisement program at Crittenden Middle School in Armonk, New York was started during the 1984-1985 school year. It was based on the work of Alfred Arth, a middle school specialist at the University of Wyoming. Essentially, the program attempts to expand the guidance function of the school by bringing faculty and students together to…

  19. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  20. Walking along water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Steep slopes, white peaks and deep valleys make up the Andes. As phenomenologists of landscape have told us, different people have different landscapes. By moving across the terrain, walking along, we might get a sense of how this has been carved out by the movement of wind and water, tectonics...

  1. Dynamic walking with Dribbel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dertien, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of Dribbel, a passivity-based walking robot. Dribbel has been designed and built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente. This paper focuses on the practical side: the design approach, construction, electronics, and software desig

  2. Walking. Sensing. Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses three meditations to contemplate walking, sensing and participation as three ways with which we can extend the notion of ‘experiential computing’ proposed by Yoo (2010). By using the form of meditations, loosely associated concepts that are part introspective and part ‘causative’, i...

  3. How do brochures encourage walking in natural environments in the UK? A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Abraham, Charles

    2016-10-29

    Although walking for leisure can support health, there has been little systematic attempt to consider how recreational walking is best promoted. In the UK, local authorities create promotional materials for walking networks, but little is known about whether they effectively encourage walking through persuasive messaging. Many of these materials pertain to walks in natural environments which evidence suggests are generally visited less frequently by physically inactive individuals. Consequently the present study explores whether and how recreational walking brochures use persuasive messages in their promotion of walks in natural environments. A coding taxonomy was developed to classify text in recreational walking brochures according to five behavioural content areas and 87 categories of potentially persuasive messages. Reliability of the taxonomy was ascertained and a quantitative content analysis was applied to 26 brochures collected from Devon, UK. Brochures often provided information about an advertised route, highlighted cultural and aesthetic points of interest, and provided directions. Brochures did not use many potentially effective messages. Text seldom prompted behaviour change or built confidence for walking. Social norm related information was rarely provided and there was a general lack of information on physical activity and its benefits for health and well-being. The limited range of message strategies used in recreational walking brochures may not optimally facilitate walking in natural environments for inactive people. Future research should examine the effects of theory-informed brochures on walking intentions and behaviour. The taxonomy could be adapted to suit different media and practices surrounding physical activity in natural environments.

  4. Fast adaptive backup routing for mobile Ad Hoc network%移动Ad Hoc网快速自适应后备路由协议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周鹏

    2012-01-01

    移动Ad Hoc网拓扑结构经常变化.自适应后备路由局部修复AODV协议AODV-ABL通过监听RREP包和数据包来产生后备路由,并存于后备路由表中.仅当链路错误时,AODV-ABL才试图利用后备路由表进行局部修复.为提高对网络拓扑变化的自适应性,在AODV-ABL基础上,提出了一种快速自适应后备AODV路由协议AODV-FABL.AODV-FABL合并主路由表和后备路由表,在监听包时同步更新路由,路由能尽快地得到优化.实验结果表明,AODV-FABL取得了比AODV-LR、AODV-ABL更好的包投递率、端对端时延、控制开销和对流量负载变化的适应性.%The network topology changes frequently in mobile Ad Hoc networks. In AODV-Adaptive Backup with Local repair routing (AODV-ABL) protocol, the backup route can be created by overhearing RREP packets and data packets and can be stored in alternate route table. Only when the link error occurs, AODV-ABL tries to start a local repair process by using alternate route table. In order to improve the adaptability to the network topology changing, a Fast AODV-ABL routing (AODV-FABL) protocol, which based on AODV-ABL, is proposed. AODV-FABL merges the primary route table with the alternate route table, and updates routes when overhearing packets, thus the routes can be optimized as soon as possible. Experimental results show that AODV-FABL has better packet delivery ratio, end-to-end delay, control overhead and adaptability to the variational traffic load than AODV-LR and AODV-ABL.

  5. 一种快速收敛的自适应蚁群算法%Investigation on a Fast Convergent Adaptive Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘伟强; 李长云; 胡盛龙

    2012-01-01

    The ant colony optimization has deficiencies of slow convergence speed and difficult parameters selection.By analyzing the parameters'effect on the algorithm and comparing multiple parameter optimization methods,adopts the hybrid algorithm of particle swarm optimization and ant colony optimization to optimize parameters,and proposes a fast convergent adaptive ant colony optimization.The simulation of the traveling salesman problem shows that the algorithm is feasible and effective.%针对蚁群算法收敛速度慢、参数选择难的不足,通过分析各参数对算法的影响和比较多种参数寻优方法,采用粒子群算法对蚁群算法进行参数寻优,并提出了一种快速收敛的自适应蚁群算法。针对旅行商问题的仿真试验表明,该算法是可行且有效的。

  6. Fast simulated annealing and adaptive Monte Carlo sampling based parameter optimization for dense optical-flow deformable image registration of 4DCT lung anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Tai H.; Min, Yugang; Neylon, John; Thomas, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important step in radiotherapy treatment planning. An optimal input registration parameter set is critical to achieve the best registration performance with the specific algorithm. Methods In this paper, we investigated a parameter optimization strategy for Optical-flow based DIR of the 4DCT lung anatomy. A novel fast simulated annealing with adaptive Monte Carlo sampling algorithm (FSA-AMC) was investigated for solving the complex non-convex parameter optimization problem. The metric for registration error for a given parameter set was computed using landmark-based mean target registration error (mTRE) between a given volumetric image pair. To reduce the computational time in the parameter optimization process, a GPU based 3D dense optical-flow algorithm was employed for registering the lung volumes. Numerical analyses on the parameter optimization for the DIR were performed using 4DCT datasets generated with breathing motion models and open-source 4DCT datasets. Results showed that the proposed method efficiently estimated the optimum parameters for optical-flow and closely matched the best registration parameters obtained using an exhaustive parameter search method.

  7. The effect of walking speed on gait kinematics and kinetics after endoprosthetic knee replacement following bone tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yusuke; Tatematsu, Noriatsu; Nagai, Koutatsu; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamata, Takeharu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Toguchida, Junya; Ichihashi, Noriaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsuboyama, Tadao

    2014-09-01

    Gait function is one of the most important components of functional outcome evaluation in patients with a tumor around the knee. In addition to walking at a preferred speed, the patients might be sometimes required to walk fast in daily life (e.g., schooling and working) because the major types of bone tumors often occur in adolescence and young adults. Therefore, recovering the ability to walk fast would increase the quality of life of these patients. To clarify which parts of the lower limb are exerted while walking fast, we investigated the kinematic and kinetic changes during fast walking in patients who underwent endoprosthetic knee replacement after bone tumor resection. Laboratory-based gait analysis was performed on eight patients who had undergone endoprosthetic knee replacement following resection of a tumor around the knee. Patients walked at a preferred and faster speed, and the gait parameters were compared between the two walking speeds for each leg. To increase walking speed, patients tended to rely on the bilateral hip, ankle, and contralateral knee to generate additional power. Kinetic analysis showed that involved-side vertical body support was not significantly increased during late stance to increase walking speed, which was associated with a small increase in ankle plantarflexion moment and concentric power. These results suggest to patients after knee reconstruction how to effectively increase their walking speed or redistribute the mechanical load on the muscles and joints to prevent excessive stress on the lower limbs.

  8. Walking behaviour of healthy elderly: attention should be paid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt André

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported an association between executive function (EF and measures of gait, particularly among older adults. This study examined the relationship between specific components of executive functions and the relative dual task costs of gait (DTC in community-dwelling non-demented older adults, aged 65 years and older. Methods Temporal (stride time, stride velocity and spatial (stride length gait characteristics were measured using a GAITRite®-System among 62 healthy community dwelling older adults while walking with and without backward counting (BC at preferred and fast walking speeds. Specific executive functions divided attention, memory and inhibition were assessed using the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP. Other measures included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, amount of daily medications taken, educational level and sociodemographic characteristics. Adjusted and unadjusted multivariable linear regression models were developed to assess the relations between variables. Results High relative DTC for stride time, stride velocity and stride length were associated with divided attention at fast walking speed. High relative DTC for stride time was associated with divided attention at preferred walking speed. The association between high DTC of stride length and memory was less robust and only observable at preferred walking speed. None of the gait measures was associated with inhibition. Conclusions Spatial and temporal dual task cost characteristics of gait are especially associated with divided attention in older adults. The results showed that the associated DTC differ by executive function and the nature of the task (preferred versus fast walking. Further research is warranted to determine whether improvement in divided attention translates to better performance on selected complex walking tasks.

  9. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Acevedo, O [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Institut fuer Mathematik und Informatik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn Str.15a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Gobron, T [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2006-01-20

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We completely characterize quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Some examples are given including a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford algebra.

  10. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  11. Perception of Self-Motion and Regulation of Walking Speed in Young-Old Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde-Parsi, Marie-Jasmine; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2015-07-01

    Whether a reduced perception of self-motion contributes to poor walking speed adaptations in older adults is unknown. In this study, speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual task) and walking speed adaptations (walking task) were compared between young (19-27 years) and young-old individuals (63-74 years), and the relationship between the performance on the two tasks was examined. Participants were evaluated while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Speed discrimination thresholds were determined using a staircase procedure. Walking speed modulation was assessed on a self-paced treadmill while exposed to different self-motion speeds ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the participants' comfortable speed. For each speed, participants were instructed to match the self-motion speed described by the moving corridor. On the walking task, participants displayed smaller walking speed errors at comfortable walking speeds compared with slower of faster speeds. The young-old adults presented larger speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual experiment) and larger walking speed errors (walking experiment) compared with young adults. Larger walking speed errors were associated with higher discrimination thresholds. The enhanced performance on the walking task at comfortable speed suggests that intersensory calibration processes are influenced by experience, hence optimized for frequently encountered conditions. The altered performance of the young-old adults on the perceptual and walking tasks, as well as the relationship observed between the two tasks, suggest that a poor perception of visual motion information may contribute to the poor walking speed adaptations that arise with aging.

  12. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Michelitsch, Thomas; Riascos, Alejandro Perez; Nowakowski, Andrzeij; Nicolleau, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We analyze time-discrete and continuous `fractional' random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in $n=1,2,3,..$ dimensions.The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving {\\it fractional powers of Laplacian matrices $L^{\\frac{\\alpha}{2}}$}where $\\alpha=2$ recovers the normal walk.First we demonstrate thatthe interval $0\\textless{}\\alpha\\leq 2$ is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for fractional transition matrix and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain thefundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$, and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk.The representation for the fundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$ relates fractional random walks with normal random walks.We show that the fractional transition matrix elements exihibit for large cubic $n$-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an $n$-dimensional infinite spaceRiesz fractional deriva...

  13. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2011-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biolog...

  14. Simulation Studies of Bipedal Walking on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Narukawa, Terumasa; Takahashi, Masaki; Hase, Kimitaka; Liu, Meigen; Mukai, Chiaki

    In order to walk upright on the Moon or Mars without falling, a specific walking strategy to account for altered gravitational conditions must be verified. We have therefore been studying changes in the kinematics of walking at different gravitational loads using a body weight suspension system. Our simulation consisted of three gravitational conditions: 1 g (Earth); 1/3 g (Mars); and 1/6 g (the Moon). Surface EMG recordings were taken from the leg muscles of subjects walking on a treadmill. Cadence, stance phase duration, and step length were calculated from the walking velocity and steps. Subsequent experiments revealed that muscle activity and the duration of the double support phase decreased as simulated gravity was reduced. These changes are apparently caused not only by the direct effects of unloading but also by kinematic adaptations to the same. It can be said that humans walk slowly with a shortened stride and elongated stance phase in order to adjust to low gravitational conditions. One major limitation of our study that may have affected walking stability was the fact that the suspension system was fixed to an immovable frame. We have begun further studies using a newer movable body weight suspension system to achieve more realistic simulations.

  15. Covering walks in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  16. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal

    2007-01-01

    I report on our construction and analysis of the effective low energy Lagrangian for the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are constrained by imposing modified Weinberg sum rules and by imposing a value for the S parameter estimated from the under...... the underlying Technicolor theory. The constrained effective Lagrangian allows for an inverted vector vs. axial-vector mass spectrum in a large part of the parameter space....

  17. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  18. Research advances in control methods of wearable walking assist robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As the proportion of the elderly in China increases, the need for robotic assist walking is growing. The assisted-as-needed (AAN property of a wearable walking assist robot matches a user’s biological need and improves the flexibility, appetency and friendliness of a mechanical system. To realize AAN walking and aiming at realizing master/slave flexible assist, a new hybrid control method consisting of hip joint control based on central pattern generators and knee joint impedance structured control is proposed. The adaptation of a robot's master/slave motion mode to a user's physical function, the continuous switching method for knee joint impedance structured control and its stability, and the AAN effect of the Hybrid control theory are studied, which provides a new thought for the development of wearable walking assist robots.

  19. Fast Adaptive Maneuvering Experiment (Fame)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-29

    29. 1992 35 0e /* Declaration of the Hll register addresses defined in t’e litzary /* c:\\introl\\ kjh \\kjhstart.oll...Update History: Version 1.0, February 23, 1992 1* *** indicates functions and their prototypes S--- -indicates ISRs #include "c:\\introl\\ kjh \\KJHSTDIO.h...used WITH the /* JBUFFALO monitor. The executable code and initialized tS placed in an 8Kx8 RA-M at OxCOOC. * /* Modification history: /V KJH : for

  20. Swing- and support-related muscle actions differentially trigger human walk-run and run-walk transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilutsky, B I; Gregor, R J

    2001-07-01

    There has been no consistent explanation as to why humans prefer changing their gait from walking to running and from running to walking at increasing and decreasing speeds, respectively. This study examined muscle activation as a possible determinant of these gait transitions. Seven subjects walked and ran on a motor-driven treadmill for 40s at speeds of 55, 70, 85, 100, 115, 130 and 145% of the preferred transition speed. The movements of subjects were videotaped, and surface electromyographic activity was recorded from seven major leg muscles. Resultant moments at the leg joints during the swing phase were calculated. During the swing phase of locomotion at preferred running speeds (115, 130, 145%), swing-related activation of the ankle, knee and hip flexors and peaks of flexion moments were typically lower (Prunning than during walking. At preferred walking speeds (55, 70, 85%), support-related activation of the ankle and knee extensors was typically lower during stance of walking than during stance of running (Prun transition might be triggered by the increased sense of effort due to the exaggerated swing-related activation of the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and hamstrings; this increased activation is necessary to meet the higher joint moment demands to move the swing leg during fast walking. The preferred run-walk transition might be similarly triggered by the sense of effort due to the higher support-related activation of the soleus, gastrocnemius and vastii that must generate higher forces during slow running than during walking at the same speed.

  1. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Neural Control for Complex Locomotion in Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental...

  2. Urban form and psychosocial factors : Do they interact for leisure-time walking?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenackers, Mariëlle A.; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M; Prins, Richard G.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Burdorf, Alex; Van Lenthe, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This cross-sectional study uses an adaptation of a social-ecological model on the hierarchy of walking needs to explore direct associations and interactions of urban-form characteristics and individual psychosocial factors for leisure-time walking. METHODS: Questionnaire data (n = 736)

  3. Visual evoked responses during standing and walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Gramann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cognition has been shaped both by our body structure and by its complex interactionswith its environment. Our cognition is thus inextricably linked to our own and others’ motorbehavior. To model brain activity associated with natural cognition, we propose recording theconcurrent brain dynamics and body movements of human subjects performing normal actions.Here we tested the feasibility of such a mobile brain/body (MoBI imaging approach byrecording high-density electroencephalographic (EEG activity and body movements of subjectsstanding or walking on a treadmill while performing a visual oddball response task. Independentcomponent analysis (ICA of the EEG data revealed visual event-related potentials (ERPs thatduring standing, slow walking, and fast walking did not differ across movement conditions,demonstrating the viability of recording brain activity accompanying cognitive processes duringwhole body movement. Non-invasive and relatively low-cost MoBI studies of normal, motivatedactions might improve understanding of interactions between brain and body dynamics leadingto more complete biological models of cognition.

  4. Predicting human walking gaits with a simple planar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne E; Schmiedeler, James P

    2014-04-11

    Models of human walking with moderate complexity have the potential to accurately capture both joint kinematics and whole body energetics, thereby offering more simultaneous information than very simple models and less computational cost than very complex models. This work examines four- and six-link planar biped models with knees and rigid circular feet. The two differ in that the six-link model includes ankle joints. Stable periodic walking gaits are generated for both models using a hybrid zero dynamics-based control approach. To establish a baseline of how well the models can approximate normal human walking, gaits were optimized to match experimental human walking data, ranging in speed from very slow to very fast. The six-link model well matched the experimental step length, speed, and mean absolute power, while the four-link model did not, indicating that ankle work is a critical element in human walking models of this type. Beyond simply matching human data, the six-link model can be used in an optimization framework to predict normal human walking using a torque-squared objective function. The model well predicted experimental step length, joint motions, and mean absolute power over the full range of speeds.

  5. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. Thus we consider quantum walks on a general basis and try to classify them as a preliminary step in the construction of new algorithms that could be devised in this way. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space, and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We characterize completely the quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Examples are given among which a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford Algebra.

  6. Quantum walks on general graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kendon, V

    2003-01-01

    A scheme for a discrete time quantum walk on a general graph of N vertices with undirected edges is given, and compared with the continuous time quantum walk on a general graph introduced by Farhi and Gutmann [PRA 58 915 (1998)]. Both walks are contrasted with the examples of quantum walks in the literature treating graphs of fixed, small (< log N) degree. This illustrates the way in which extra information about the graph allows more efficient algorithms to be designed. To obtain a quantum speed up over classical for comparable resources it is necessary to code the position space of the quantum walk into a qubit register (or equivalent). The role of the oracle is also discussed and an efficient gate sequence is presented for implementing a discrete quantum walk given one copy of a quantum state encoding the adjacency matrix of the graph.

  7. Physical implementation of quantum walks

    CERN Document Server

    Manouchehri, Kia

    2013-01-01

    Given the extensive application of random walks in virtually every science related discipline, we may be at the threshold of yet another problem solving paradigm with the advent of quantum walks. Over the past decade, quantum walks have been explored for their non-intuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to radically new quantum algorithms. This growing interest has been paralleled by a flurry of research into how one can implement quantum walks in laboratories. This book presents numerous proposals as well as actual experiments for such a physical realization, underpinned by a wide range of

  8. Persistence of random walk records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ˜ t-β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ˜ t-α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position.

  9. Quantum Walks on the Hypercube

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that one-dimensional quantum walks can mix more quickly than classical random walks, suggesting that quantum Monte Carlo algorithms can outperform their classical counterparts. We study two quantum walks on the n-dimensional hypercube, one in discrete time and one in continuous time. In both cases we show that the quantum walk mixes in (\\pi/4)n steps, faster than the O(n log n) steps required by the classical walk. In the continuous-time case, the probability distribution is {\\em exactly} uniform at this time. More importantly, these walks expose several subtleties in the definition of mixing time for quantum walks. Even though the continuous-time walk has an O(n) instantaneous mixing time at which it is precisely uniform, it never approaches the uniform distribution when the stopping time is chosen randomly as in [AharonovAKV2001]. Our analysis treats interference between terms of different phase more carefully than is necessary for the walk on the cycle; previous general bounds p...

  10. A mathematical nature walk

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, John A

    2009-01-01

    How heavy is that cloud? Why can you see farther in rain than in fog? Why are the droplets on that spider web spaced apart so evenly? If you have ever asked questions like these while outdoors, and wondered how you might figure out the answers, this is a book for you. An entertaining and informative collection of fascinating puzzles from the natural world around us, A Mathematical Nature Walk will delight anyone who loves nature or math or both. John Adam presents ninety-six questions about many common natural phenomena--and a few uncommon ones--and then shows how to answer them using mostly b

  11. Collisions of Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Barlow, Martin T; Sousi, Perla

    2010-01-01

    A recurrent graph $G$ has the infinite collision property if two independent random walks on $G$, started at the same point, collide infinitely often a.s. We give a simple criterion in terms of Green functions for a graph to have this property, and use it to prove that a critical Galton-Watson tree with finite variance conditioned to survive, the incipient infinite cluster in $\\Z^d$ with $d \\ge 19$ and the uniform spanning tree in $\\Z^2$ all have the infinite collision property. For power-law combs and spherically symmetric trees, we determine precisely the phase boundary for the infinite collision property.

  12. Cookie branching random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, Christian; Kochler, Thomas; Müller, Sebastian; Popov, Serguei

    2011-01-01

    We consider a branching random walk on $\\Z$, where the particles behave differently in visited and unvisited sites. Informally, each site on the positive half-line contains initially a cookie. On the first visit of a site its cookie is removed and particles at positions with a cookie reproduce and move differently from particles on sites without cookies. Therefore, the movement and the reproduction of the particles depend on the previous behaviour of the population of particles. We study the question if the process is recurrent or transient, i.e., whether infinitely many particles visit the origin or not.

  13. Saccadic head and thorax movements in freely walking blowflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, G.; Hateren, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    Visual information processing is adapted to the statistics of natural visual stimuli, and these statistics depend to a large extent on the movements of an animal itself. To investigate such movements in freely walking blowflies, we measured the orientation and position of their head and thorax, with

  14. Walking strategies in subjects with congenital or early onset strabismus

    OpenAIRE

    Irene eAprile; Maurizio eFerrarin; Luca ePadua; Enrica eDi Sipio; Chiara eSimbolotti; Sergio ePetroni; Costanza eTredici; Anna eDickmann

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In congenital strabismus, sensory adaptations occur hampering the correct development of normal binocular vision. The aim of this study is to investigate if patients with congenital or early onset exotropic or esotropic strabismus adopt different walking strategies with respect to healthy subjects. Our hypothesis is that the abnormal binocular cooperation, occurring in patients with exotropic or esotropic strabismus, could influence neurosensorial adaptation of the gait pattern....

  15. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  16. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  17. Random-walk enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  18. Biped walking robot based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhihuai; Yao, Yan'an; Kong, Xianwen

    2014-03-01

    Existing biped robots mainly fall into two categories: robots with left and right feet and robots with upper and lower feet. The load carrying capability of a biped robot is quite limited since the two feet of a walking robot supports the robot alternatively during walking. To improve the load carrying capability, a novel biped walking robot is proposed based on a 2-UPU+2-UU parallel mechanism. The biped walking robot is composed of two identical platforms(feet) and four limbs, including two UPU(universal-prismatic-universal serial chain) limbs and two UU limbs. To enhance its terrain adaptability like articulated vehicles, the two feet of the biped walking robot are designed as two vehicles in detail. The conditions that the geometric parameters of the feet must satisfy are discussed. The degrees-of-freedom of the mechanism is analyzed by using screw theory. Gait analysis, kinematic analysis and stability analysis of the mechanism are carried out to verify the structural design parameters. The simulation results validate the feasibility of walking on rugged terrain. Experiments with a physical prototype show that the novel biped walking robot can walk stably on smooth terrain. Due to its unique feet design and high stiffness, the biped walking robot may adapt to rugged terrain and is suitable for load-carrying.

  19. A model of human walking energetics with an elastically-suspended load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jeffrey; Seipel, Justin

    2014-06-03

    Elastically-suspended loads have been shown to reduce the peak forces acting on the body while walking with a load when the suspension stiffness and damping are minimized. However, it is not well understood how elastically-suspended loads can affect the energetic cost of walking. Prior work shows that elastically suspending a load can yield either an increase or decrease in the energetic cost of human walking, depending primarily on the suspension stiffness, load, and walking speed. It would be useful to have a simple explanation that reconciles apparent differences in existing data. The objective of this paper is to help explain different energetic outcomes found with experimental load suspension backpacks and to systematically investigate the effect of load suspension parameters on the energetic cost of human walking. A simple two-degree-of-freedom model is used to approximate the energetic cost of human walking with a suspended load. The energetic predictions of the model are consistent with existing experimental data and show how the suspension parameters, load mass, and walking speed can affect the energetic cost of walking. In general, the energetic cost of walking with a load is decreased compared to that of a stiffly-attached load when the natural frequency of a load suspension is tuned significantly below the resonant walking frequency. The model also shows that a compliant load suspension is more effective in reducing the energetic cost of walking with low suspension damping, high load mass, and fast walking speed. This simple model could improve our understanding of how elastic load-carrying devices affect the energetic cost of walking with a load.

  20. Walking speed and distance in different environments of subjects in the later stage post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiane; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Willén, Carin

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess short- and long-distance walking performance in indoor and outdoor environments of slow and fast walkers' subjects living in the community in the later stage post-stroke. Thirty-six subjects with at least 6 months post-stroke were included and divided into two groups based on their walking speed in the clinical setting. Thirty-meter walk tests (30 mWT) at self-selected and maximum speeds were assessed in three environments: (1) clinical setting; (2) basement setting; and (3) outdoor setting. Six-minute walk test (6 MWT) distance was assessed in the clinical and outdoor settings. The differences between the 30 mWT and the 6 MWT, as measured by the actual distance obtained in the 6 MWT and the predicted distance calculated for the 30 mWT, were also investigated. There was no difference in walking speed when subjects performed short-distance walking in different environments. However, a difference was found in performance of long-distance walking. Subjects who walked 0.8 m/s or faster also walked further in the outdoor setting. The findings of our study demonstrate that in those who scored below 0.8 m/s, performance of short- and long-distance walking evaluated in an indoor environment reflects the results obtained in an outdoor environment. However, for subjects post-stroke who score 0.8 m/s or faster, distance was increased in the outdoor environments during long-distance walking. Walking speed obtained over a short distance seemed to overestimate long-distance walking capacity for the slow walkers, despite the environment.

  1. Quantum walks and search algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Portugal, Renato

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting area of quantum computation called quantum walks, which play an important role in building quantum algorithms, in particular search algorithms. Quantum walks are the quantum analogue of classical random walks. It is known that quantum computers have great power for searching unsorted databases. This power extends to many kinds of searches, particularly to the problem of finding a specific location in a spatial layout, which can be modeled by a graph. The goal is to find a specific node knowing that the particle uses the edges to jump from one node to the next. This book is self-contained with main topics that include: Grover's algorithm, describing its geometrical interpretation and evolution by means of the spectral decomposition of the evolution operater Analytical solutions of quantum walks on important graphs like line, cycles, two-dimensional lattices, and hypercubes using Fourier transforms Quantum walks on generic graphs, describing methods to calculate the limiting d...

  2. Walking around to grasp interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Jantzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    with the sound installations. The aim was to gain an understanding of the role of the in-teraction, if interaction makes a difference for the understanding of the sound art. 30 walking interviews were carried out at ZKM, Karlsruhe with a total of 57 museum guests, individuals or groups. During the walk......The paper presents experiences from a study using walk-alongs to provide insight into museum visitors’ experience with interactive features of sound art installations. The overall goal of the study was to learn about the participants’ opinions and feelings about the possibility of interaction...... knowledge of spa-tial conditions, e.g. noise, crowds, darkness provided a profound and shared un-derstanding of e.g. the visitors’ engagement in and dislike of the installations. Another finding concerns group walking that, compared to walking with a sin-gle person, generated a diversified discussion...

  3. Kinematic correlates of walking cadence in the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Leardini, Alberto; Crompton, Robin

    2010-08-26

    Evidence has frequently been reported of modifications in gait patterns within the lower limb related to the cadence of walking. Most reports have concerned relationships between cadence and kinematic and the kinetic changes occurring in the main joints and muscles of the lower limb as a whole. The aim of the present study was to assess whether significant changes are also measurable in kinematics of the foot segments. An existing 15 marker-set protocol allowed a four-segment foot and shank model to be defined for relative rotations between the segments to be calculated. Stereophotogrammetry was employed to record marker position data from ten subjects walking at three cadences. The slow- and normal cadence datasets showed similar profiles of joint rotation in three anatomical planes, but significant differences were found between these and the fast cadence. At all joints, frame-by-frame statistical analysis revealed increased dorsiflexion from heel-strike to midstance (p walking.

  4. A dual-learning paradigm can simultaneously train multiple characteristics of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statton, Matthew A; Toliver, Alexis; Bastian, Amy J

    2016-05-01

    Impairments in human motor patterns are complex: what is often observed as a single global deficit (e.g., limping when walking) is actually the sum of several distinct abnormalities. Motor adaptation can be useful to teach patients more normal motor patterns, yet conventional training paradigms focus on individual features of a movement, leaving others unaddressed. It is known that under certain conditions, distinct movement components can be simultaneously adapted without interference. These previous "dual-learning" studies focused solely on short, planar reaching movements, yet it is unknown whether these findings can generalize to a more complex behavior like walking. Here we asked whether a dual-learning paradigm, incorporating two distinct motor adaptation tasks, can be used to simultaneously train multiple components of the walking pattern. We developed a joint-angle learning task that provided biased visual feedback of sagittal joint angles to increase peak knee or hip flexion during the swing phase of walking. Healthy, young participants performed this task independently or concurrently with another locomotor adaptation task, split-belt treadmill adaptation, where subjects adapted their step length symmetry. We found that participants were able to successfully adapt both components of the walking pattern simultaneously, without interference, and at the same rate as adapting either component independently. This leads us to the interesting possibility that combining rehabilitation modalities within a single training session could be used to help alleviate multiple deficits at once in patients with complex gait impairments.

  5. Are the average gait speeds during the 10meter and 6minute walk tests redundant in Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Ryan P; Combs-Miller, Stephanie A; McNeely, Marie E; Leddy, Abigail L; Cavanaugh, James T; Dibble, Leland E; Ellis, Terry D; Ford, Matthew P; Foreman, K Bo; Earhart, Gammon M

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the relationships between average gait speed collected with the 10Meter Walk Test (Comfortable and Fast) and 6Minute Walk Test (6MWT) in 346 people with Parkinson disease (PD) and how the relationships change with increasing disease severity. Pearson correlation and linear regression analyses determined relationships between 10Meter Walk Test and 6MWT gait speed values for the entire sample and for sub-samples stratified by Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) stage I (n=53), II (n=141), III (n=135) and IV (n=17). We hypothesized that redundant tests would be highly and significantly correlated (i.e. r>0.70, pMeter Walk Test (r=0.75) and Fast 10Meter Walk Test (r=0.79) gait speed, with 56% and 62% of the variance in 6MWT gait speed explained, respectively. The regression model of 6MWT gait speed predicted by Comfortable 10 Meter Walk gait speed produced slope and intercept values near 1 and 0, respectively, especially for participants in H&Y stages II-IV. In contrast, slope and intercept values were further from 1 and 0, respectively, for the Fast 10Meter Walk Test. Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test and 6MWT gait speeds appeared to be redundant in people with moderate to severe PD, suggesting the Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test can be used to estimate 6MWT distance in this population.

  6. Human treadmill walking needs attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the attentional requirements of steady state treadmill walking in human subjects using a dual task paradigm. The extent of decrement of a secondary (cognitive RT task provides a measure of the attentional resources required to maintain performance of the primary (locomotor task. Varying the level of difficulty of the reaction time (RT task is used to verify the priority of allocation of attentional resources. Methods 11 healthy adult subjects were required to walk while simultaneously performing a RT task. Participants were instructed to bite a pressure transducer placed in the mouth as quickly as possible in response to an unpredictable electrical stimulation applied on the back of the neck. Each subject was tested under five different experimental conditions: simple RT task alone and while walking, recognition RT task alone and while walking, walking alone. A foot switch system composed of a pressure sensitive sensor was placed under the heel and forefoot of each foot to determine the gait cycle duration. Results Gait cycle duration was unchanged (p > 0.05 by the addition of the RT task. Regardless of the level of difficulty of the RT task, the RTs were longer during treadmill walking than in sitting conditions (p 0.05 was found between the attentional demand of the walking task and the decrement of performance found in the RT task under varying levels of difficulty. This finding suggests that the healthy subjects prioritized the control of walking at the expense of cognitive performance. Conclusion We conclude that treadmill walking in young adults is not a purely automatic task. The methodology and outcome measures used in this study provide an assessment of the attentional resources required by walking on the treadmill at a steady state.

  7. Walking indoors, walking outdoors: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eDalla Volta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An observation/execution matching system for walking has not been assessed yet. The present fMRI study was aimed at assessing whether, as for object-directed actions, an observation/execution matching system is active for walking and whether the spatial context of walking (open or narrow space recruits different neural correlates. Two experimental conditions were employed. In the execution condition, while being scanned, participants performed walking on a rolling cylinder located just outside the scanner. The same action was performed also while observing a video presenting either an open space (a country field or a narrow space (a corridor. In the observation condition, participants observed a video presenting an individual walking on the same cylinder on which the actual action was executed, the open space video and the narrow space video, respectively. Results showed common bilateral activations in the dorsal premotor/supplementary motor areas and in the posterior parietal lobe for both execution and observation of walking, thus supporting a matching system for this action. Moreover, specific sectors of the occipital-temporal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus were consistently active when processing a narrow space versus an open one, thus suggesting their involvement in the visuo-motor transformation required when walking in a narrow space. We forward that the present findings may have implications for rehabilitation of gait and sport training.

  8. walk around Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is noteworthy that this country develops through two types of events: either through a jubilee or through a catastrophe.It seems that Irkutsk Airport will be built only after the next crash. At least the interest to this problem returns regularly after sad events, and this occurs almost half a century (a jubilee, too! – the Council of Ministers decided to relocate the Airport away from the city as long ago as 1962. The Airport does not relate to the topic of this issue, but an attentive reader understands that it is our Carthage, and that the Airport should be relocated. The Romans coped with it faster and more effectively.Back to Irkutsk’s jubilee, we should say that we will do without blare of trumpets. We will just make an unpretentious walk around the city in its summer 350. Each our route covers new (some of them have been completed by the jubilee and old buildings, some of them real monuments. All these buildings are integrated into public spaces of different quality and age.We will also touch on the problems, for old houses, especially the wooden ones often provoke a greedy developer to demolish or to burn them down. Thus a primitive thrift estimates an output of additional square meters. Not to mention how attractive it is to seize public spaces without demolition or without reallocation of the dwellers. Or, rather, the one who is to preserve, to cherish and to improve such houses for the good of the citizens never speaks about this sensitive issue. So we have to do it.Walking is a no-hurry genre, unlike the preparation for the celebration. Walking around the city you like is a pleasant and cognitive process. It will acquaint the architects with the works of their predecessors and colleagues. We hope that such a walk may be interesting for Irkutsk citizens and visitors, too. Isn’t it interesting to learn “at first hand” the intimate details of the restoration of the Trubetskoys’ estate

  9. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  10. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  11. Water-walking devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using highspeed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  12. How to Help Freshmen Walk out of Confusion in Adaptive Phase%大学新生适应期心理迷茫的调查及疏导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭涛; 柯亚莉

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on questionnaire surveys of and interviews with freshmen. After analyzing the causes for their confusion, the article suggests to help firstyear college students walk out of perplexities by attaching special importance to orientation, caring for each student, intensifying education and teaching, creating activity platforms and building excellent classes.%通过对大一新生进行问卷调查和访谈,在分析大一新生迷茫的原因基础上,提出了注重入学教育、关爱每位学生、强化教育教学、搭建活动平台、建设优秀班级等方面的建议,以期帮助大一新生尽快走出迷茫期。

  13. Disruption of locomotor adaptation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia Tsok Lam; Bouyer, Laurent J; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Locomotor patterns are adapted on a trial-and-error basis to account for predictable dynamics. Once a walking pattern is adapted, the new calibration is stored and must be actively de-adapted. Here, we tested the hypothesis that storage of newly acquired ankle adaptation in walking is dependent o...

  14. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinali, M; Bondy, M I Ferretti; Hoek, M; Lauth, W; Rosner, C; Sfienti, C; Thiel, M

    2015-01-01

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investi...

  15. Bouchaud walks with variable drift

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, Manuel Cabezas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a sequence of Bouchaud trap models on $\\mathbb{Z}$ with drift. We analyze the possible scaling limits for a sequence of walks, where we make the drift decay to 0 as we rescale the walks. Depending on the speed of the decay of the drift we obtain three different scaling limits. If the drift decays slowly as we rescale the walks we obtain the inverse of an \\alpha$-stable subordinator as scaling limit. If the drift decays quickly as we rescale the walks, we obtain the F.I.N. diffusion as scaling limit. There is a critical speed of decay separating these two main regimes, where a new process appears as scaling limit. This critical speed is related to the index $\\alpha$ of the inhomogeneity of the environment.

  16. Quantum Snake Walk on Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2010-01-01

    I introduce a new type of continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states which most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. No efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  17. Localization of reinforced random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyze how reinforced random walks can eventually localize, i.e. only visit finitely many sites. After introducing vertex and edge self-interacting walks on a discrete graph in a general setting, and stating the main results and conjectures so far on the topic, we present martingale techniques that provide an alternative proof of the a.s. localization of vertex-reinforced random walks (VRRWs) on the integers on finitely many sites and, with positive probability, on five consecutive sites, initially proved by Pemantle and Volkov (1999). Next we introduce the continuous time-lines representation (sometimes called Rubin construction) and its martingale counterpart, and explain how it has been used to prove localization of some reinforced walks on one attracting edge. Then we show how a modified version of this construction enables one to propose a new short proof of the a.s. localization of VRRWs on five sites on Z.

  18. Walking Robot Locomotion System Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova D.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is a brief analysis on the application and perspective of using the walking robots in different areas in practice. The most common characteristics of walking four legs robots are presented here. The specific features of the applied actuators in walking mechanisms are also shown in the article. The experience of Institute of Mechanics - BAS is illustrated in creation of Spiroid and Helicon1 gears and their assembly in actuation of studied robots. Loading on joints reductors of robot legs is modelled, when the geometrical and the walking parameters of the studied robot are preliminary defined. The obtained results are purposed for designing the control of the loading of reductor type Helicon in the legs of the robot, when it is experimentally tested.

  19. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2012-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75–1.75 m s−1 and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  20. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  1. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  2. Big power from walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illenberger, Patrin K.; Madawala, Udaya K.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEG) offer an opportunity to capture the energy otherwise wasted from human motion. By integrating a DEG into the heel of standard footwear, it is possible to harness this energy to power portable devices. DEGs require substantial auxiliary systems which are commonly large, heavy and inefficient. A unique challenge for these low power generators is the combination of high voltage and low current. A void exists in the semiconductor market for devices that can meet these requirements. Until these become available, existing devices must be used in an innovative way to produce an effective DEG system. Existing systems such as the Bi-Directional Flyback (BDFB) and Self Priming Circuit (SPC) are an excellent example of this. The BDFB allows full charging and discharging of the DEG, improving power gained. The SPC allows fully passive voltage boosting, removing the priming source and simplifying the electronics. This paper outlines the drawbacks and benefits of active and passive electronic solutions for maximizing power from walking.

  3. The Dead Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Phillips

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monsters have always enjoyed a significant presence in the human imagination, and religion was instrumental in replacing the physical horror they engendered with that of a moral threat. Zombies, however, are amoral – their motivation purely instinctive and arbitrary, yet they are, perhaps, the most loathed of all contemporary monsters. One explanation for this lies in the theory of the uncanny valley, proposed by robotics engineer Masahiro Mori. According to the theory, we reserve our greatest fears for those things which seem most human, yet are not – such as dead bodies. Such a reaction is most likely a survival mechanism to protect us from danger and disease – a mechanism even more essential when the dead rise up and walk. From their beginnings zombies have reflected western societies’ greatest fears – be they of revolutionary Haitians, women, or communists. In recent years the rise in the popularity of the zombie in films, books and television series reflects our fears for the planet, the economy, and of death itself

  4. Quantum Walk with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Lavička, H; Kiss, T; Lutz, E; Jex, I

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a special class of 1-D quantum walks (QWs) realized using optical multi-ports. We assume non-perfect multi-ports showing errors in the connectivity, i.e. with a small probability the multi- ports can connect not to their nearest neighbor but to another multi-port at a fixed distance - we call this a jump. We study two cases of QW with jumps where multiple displacements can emerge at one timestep. The first case assumes time-correlated jumps (static disorder). In the second case, we choose the positions of jumps randomly in time (dynamic disorder). The probability distributions of position of the QW walker in both instances differ significantly: dynamic disorder leads to a Gaussian-like distribution, while for static disorder we find two distinct behaviors depending on the parity of jump size. In the case of even-sized jumps, the distribution exhibits a three-peak profile around the position of the initial excitation, whereas the probability distribution in the odd case follows a Laplace-like discre...

  5. Preliminary study of novel, timed walking tests for children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Lanovaz, Joel; Bisaro, Derek; Oates, Alison; Musselman, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Walking assessment is an important aspect of rehabilitation practice; yet, clinicians have few psychometrically sound options for evaluating walking in highly ambulatory children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of two new measures of walking function—the Obstacles and Curb tests—relative to the 10-Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test in children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Methods: A total of 16 ambulatory children with spina bifida (n=9) or cerebral palsy (n=7) (9 boys; mean age 7years, 7months; standard deviation 3years, 4months) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children participated. Children completed the walking tests, at both self-selected and fast speeds, twice. To evaluate discriminative validity, scores were compared between typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy groups. Within the spina bifida/cerebral palsy group, inter-test correlations evaluated convergent validity and intraclass correlation coefficients evaluated within-session test–retest reliability. Results: At fast speeds, all tests showed discriminative validity (p<0.006 for typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy comparisons) and convergent validity (rho=0.81–0.90, p⩽0.001, for inter-test correlations). At self-selected speeds, only the Obstacles test discriminated between groups (p=0.001). Moderately strong correlations (rho=0.73–0.78, p⩽0.001) were seen between the 10-Meter Walk test, Curb test, and Timed Up and Go test. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.97, with higher test–retest reliability for tests performed at fast speeds rather than self-selected speeds. Conclusion: The Obstacles and Curb tests are promising measures for assessing walking in this population. Performing tests at fast walking speeds may improve their validity and test–retest reliability for children with spina bifida/cerebral palsy. PMID:27493754

  6. Local ensemble transform Kalman filter, a fast non-stationary control law for adaptive optics on ELTs: theoretical aspects and first simulation results

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Morgan; Rodionov, Sergey; Bocquet, Marc; Bertino, Laurent; Ferrari, Marc; Fusco, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm for an adaptive optics system control law, based on the Linear Quadratic Gaussian approach and a Kalman Filter adaptation with localizations. It allows to handle non-stationary behaviors, to obtain performance close to the optimality defined with the residual phase variance minimization criterion, and to reduce the computational burden with an intrinsically parallel implementation on the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs).

  7. EMG patterns during assisted walking in the exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; d'Avella, Andrea; Pisotta, Iolanda; Tamburella, Federica; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Wang, Shiqian; Wang, Letian; van Asseldonk, Edwin; van der Kooij, Herman; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cheron, Guy; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Ilzkovitz, Michel; Gancet, Jeremi; Hauffe, Ralf; Zanov, Frank; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology and robotic exoskeletons are being developed to facilitate stepping, reduce muscle efforts, and promote motor recovery. Nevertheless, the guidance forces of an exoskeleton may influence the sensory inputs, sensorimotor interactions and resulting muscle activity patterns during stepping. The aim of this study was to report the muscle activation patterns in a sample of intact and injured subjects while walking with a robotic exoskeleton and, in particular, to quantify the level of muscle activity during assisted gait. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of different leg and arm muscles during overground walking in an exoskeleton in six healthy individuals and four spinal cord injury (SCI) participants. In SCI patients, EMG activity of the upper limb muscles was augmented while activation of leg muscles was typically small. Contrary to our expectations, however, in neurologically intact subjects, EMG activity of leg muscles was similar or even larger during exoskeleton-assisted walking compared to normal overground walking. In addition, significant variations in the EMG waveforms were found across different walking conditions. The most variable pattern was observed in the hamstring muscles. Overall, the results are consistent with a non-linear reorganization of the locomotor output when using the robotic stepping devices. The findings may contribute to our understanding of human-machine interactions and adaptation of locomotor activity patterns.

  8. Acute effects of walking on inflammatory and cardiovascular risk in sedentary post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jillian; Murphy, Marie; Trinick, Tom; Duly, Ellie; Nevill, Alan; Davison, Gareth

    2008-02-01

    Biochemical markers of inflammation are emerging as new predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and may alter acutely with exercise. Few studies have been conducted on the effects of walking on these markers or whether different walking intensities elicit varied effects. As there is growing interest in modifiable lifestyle factors such as walking to reduce CVD risk, these inflammatory responses warrant investigation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of walking at 50% versus 70% of predicted maximal heart rate on C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma fibrinogen, and triglycerides in sedentary post-menopausal women. Twelve post-menopausal women (mean age 58 years, s +/-6; stature 1.62 m, s+/-0.06; body mass 66.8 kg, s +/-6.2) completed two 30-min treadmill walks in a randomized cross-over design. Fasted blood samples were taken (for the determination of plasma fibrinogen, CRP, and lipids) before, immediately after, and 1 and 24 h after exercise. Triglyceride concentrations decreased from pre-exercise to 24 h post exercise at both walking intensities (time x group interaction, P 0.05). The results of this study suggest that fasting plasma triglycerides are decreased on the morning after 30 min of brisk walking at either 50% or 70% of maximal heart rate (moderate and vigorous intensity).

  9. Walk and roll robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A mobile robotic unit features a main body, a plurality of legs for supporting the main body on and moving the main body in forward and reverse directions about a base surface, and a drive assembly. According to an exemplary embodiment each leg includes a respective pivotal hip joint, a pivotal knee joint, and a wheeled foot adapted to roll along the base surface. Also according to an exemplary embodiments the drive assembly includes a motor operatively associated with the hip and knee joints and the wheeled foot for independently driving pivotal movement of the hip joint and the knee joint and rolling motion of the wheeled foot. The hip joint may include a ball-and-socket-type joint interconnecting top portion of the leg to the main body, such that the hip joint is adapted to pivot said leg in a direction transverse to a forward-and-reverse direction.

  10. Comparison of forward walking and backward walking in stroke hemiplegia patients focusing on the paretic side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Misato; Takami, Akiyoshi; Oda, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the features of backward walking in stroke patients with hemiplegia by focusing on the joint movements and moments of the paretic side, walking speed, stride length, and cadence. [Subjects and Methods] Nine stroke patients performed forward walking and backward walking along a 5-m walkway. Walking speed and stride length were self-selected. Movements were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and a force plate. One walking cycle of the paretic side was analyzed. [Results] Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking. Peak hip extension was significantly lower in backward walking and peak hip flexion moment, knee extension moment, and ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion moments were lower in backward walking. [Conclusion] Unlike forward walking, backward walking requires conscious hip joint extension. Conscious extension of the hip joint is hard for stroke patients with hemiplegia. Therefore, the range of hip joint movement declined in backward walking, and walking speed and stride length also declined. The peak ankle plantar flexion moment was significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking, and it was hard to generate propulsion power in backward walking. These difficulties also affected the walking speed. PMID:28265136

  11. 基于稀疏Parzen窗密度估计的快速自适应相似度聚类方法%Fast Adaptive Similarity-based Clustering Using Sparse Parzen Window Density Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱鹏江; 王士同; 邓赵红

    2011-01-01

    相似度聚类方法(Similarity-based clustering method,SCM)因其简单易实现和具有鲁棒性而广受关注.但由于内含相似度聚类算法(Similarity clustering algorithm,SCA)的高时间复杂度和凝聚型层次聚类(Agglomerative hierarchicalclustering,AHC)的高空间复杂度,SCM不适用大数据集场合.本文首先发现了 SCM和核密度估计问题的本质联系,并以此入手,通过快速压缩集密度估计器(Fast reduced set density estimator,FRSDE)和基于图的松弛聚类(Graph-based relaxed clustering,GRC)算法提出了快速自适应相似度聚类方法(Fast adaptive similarity-based clustering method,FASCM).相比于原SCM,该方法的主要优点是:1)其总体渐近时间复杂度与样本容量呈线性关系;2)不依赖于人工经验的干预,具有了自适应性.由此,FASCM适用于大数据集环境.该方法的有效性在图像分割应用中进行了验证.%Similarity-based clustering method (SCM) has received much attention because it is robust and can be implemented simply and easily.However, because of its high time complexity of the embedded similarity clustering algorithm (SCA) and high space complexity of the embedded agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC), SCM is impractical for large data sets.In this paper, the relationship is revealed between SCM and the kernel density estimation of samples, a novel fast adaptive similarity-based clustering method (FASCM) is accordingly proposed by adopting fast reduced set density estimator (FRSDE) and graph-based relaxed clustering (GRC).The distinctive advantages of FMSSC over MSSC exist in: 1) its asymptotic linear time complexity with the data size; 2) independent on artificial experience and its adaptability.Thus, FASCM is practical for large datasets.Its effectiveness has also been demonstrated in image segmentation examples.

  12. Theories of bipedal walking: an odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Christopher L

    2003-04-01

    In this paper six theories of bipedal walking, and the evidence in support of the theories, are reviewed. They include: evolution, minimising energy consumption, maturation in children, central pattern generators, linking control and effect, and robots on two legs. Specifically, the six theories posit that: (1) bipedalism is the fundamental evolutionary adaptation that sets hominids--and therefore humans--apart from other primates; (2) locomotion is the translation of the centre of gravity along a pathway requiring the least expenditure of energy; (3) when a young child takes its first few halting steps, his or her biomechanical strategy is to minimise the risk of falling; (4) a dedicated network of interneurons in the spinal cord generates the rhythm and cyclic pattern of electromyographic signals that give rise to bipedal gait; (5) bipedal locomotion is generated through global entrainment of the neural system on the one hand, and the musculoskeletal system plus environment on the other; and (6) powered dynamic gait in a bipedal robot can be realised only through a strategy which is based on stability and real-time feedback control. The published record suggests that each of the theories has some measure of support. However, it is important to note that there are other important theories of locomotion which have not been covered in this review. Despite such omissions, this odyssey has explored the wide spectrum of bipedal walking, from its origins through to the integration of the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems.

  13. It's how you get there: Walking down a virtual alley activates premotor and parietal areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eWagner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary drive is crucial for motor learning, therefore we are interested in the role that motor planning plays in gait movements. In this study we examined the impact of an interactive Virtual Environment (VE feedback task on the EEG patterns during robot assisted walking. We compared walking in the VE modality to two control conditions: walking with a visual attention paradigm, in which visual stimuli were unrelated to the motor task; and walking with mirror feedback, in which participants observed their own movements. Eleven healthy participants were considered. Application of independent component analysis to the EEG revealed three independent component clusters in premotor and parietal areas showing increased activity during walking with the adaptive VE training paradigm compared to the control conditions. During the interactive VE walking task spectral power in frequency ranges 8-12Hz, 15-20Hz and 23-40Hz was significantly (p ≤ 0.05 decreased. This power decrease is interpreted as a correlate of an active cortical area. Furthermore activity in the premotor cortex revealed gait cycle related modulations significantly different (p ≤ 0.05 from baseline in the frequency range 23-40Hz during walking. These modulations were significantly (p ≤ 0.05 reduced depending on gait cycle phases in the interactive VE walking task compared to the control conditions.We demonstrate that premotor and parietal areas show increased activity during walking with the adaptive VE training paradigm, when compared to walking with mirror- and movement unrelated feedback. Previous research has related a premotor-parietal network to motor planning and motor intention. We argue that movement related interactive feedback enhances motor planning and motor intention. We hypothesize that this might improve gait recovery during rehabilitation.

  14. Mechanical design of walking machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Keisuke; Hirose, Shigeo

    2007-01-15

    The performance of existing actuators, such as electric motors, is very limited, be it power-weight ratio or energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss the method to design a practical walking machine under this severe constraint with focus on two concepts, the gravitationally decoupled actuation (GDA) and the coupled drive. The GDA decouples the driving system against the gravitational field to suppress generation of negative power and improve energy efficiency. On the other hand, the coupled drive couples the driving system to distribute the output power equally among actuators and maximize the utilization of installed actuator power. First, we depict the GDA and coupled drive in detail. Then, we present actual machines, TITAN-III and VIII, quadruped walking machines designed on the basis of the GDA, and NINJA-I and II, quadruped wall walking machines designed on the basis of the coupled drive. Finally, we discuss walking machines that travel on three-dimensional terrain (3D terrain), which includes the ground, walls and ceiling. Then, we demonstrate with computer simulation that we can selectively leverage GDA and coupled drive by walking posture control.

  15. Attuning one's steps to visual targets reduces comfortable walking speed in both young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, C Lieke E; de Dreu, Miek J; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2015-03-01

    Comfortable walking speed (CWS) is indicative of clinically relevant factors in the elderly, such as fall risk and mortality. Standard CWS tests involve walking on a straight, unobstructed surface, while in reality surfaces are uneven and cluttered and so walkers rely on visually guided adaptations to avoid trips or slips. Hence, the predictive value of CWS may be expected to increase when assessed for walking in more realistic (visually guided) conditions. We examined CWS in young (n=18) and older (n=18) adults for both overground and treadmill walking. Overground CWS was assessed using the 10-meter walk test with and without visual stepping targets. For treadmill walking, four conditions were examined: (i) uncued walking, and (ii-iv) cued walking with visual stepping targets where the inter-stepping target distance varied by 0%, 20%, or 40%. Pre-experimental measures were taken so that the average inter-stepping target distance could be adjusted for each belt speed based on each participant's self-selected gait characteristics. Results showed that CWS was significantly slower when stepping targets were present in both overground (pCWS, even when the patterning of these targets matched the participant's own gait pattern (viz. 0%-treadmill-walking condition). Results from the treadmill-walking task showed that the amount of variation in inter-stepping target distance did not differentially affect CWS. Our results suggest that it may be worthwhile in clinical assessments to not only determine walking speed using standard conditions but also in situations that require visually guided stepping.

  16. Single and Dual Task Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie de Bruin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the viability and efficacy of integrating cadence-matched, salient music into a walking intervention for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Twenty-two people with PD were randomised to a control (CTRL, n=11 or experimental (MUSIC, n=11 group. MUSIC subjects walked with an individualised music playlist three times a week for the intervention period. Playlists were designed to meet subject's musical preferences. In addition, the tempo of the music closely matched (±10–15 bpm the subject's preferred cadence. CTRL subjects continued with their regular activities during the intervention. The effects of training accompanied by “walking songs” were evaluated using objective measures of gait score. The MUSIC group improved gait velocity, stride time, cadence, and motor symptom severity following the intervention. This is the first study to demonstrate that music listening can be safely implemented amongst PD patients during home exercise.

  17. Assessing interactions among multiple physiological systems during walking outside a laboratory: An Android based gait monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, E; Millecamps, A; Teoli, J; Rothfuss, M A; Franconi, N G; Perera, S; Jones, A K; Brach, J S; Mickle, M H

    2015-12-01

    Gait function is traditionally assessed using well-lit, unobstructed walkways with minimal distractions. In patients with subclinical physiological abnormalities, these conditions may not provide enough stress on their ability to adapt to walking. The introduction of challenging walking conditions in gait can induce responses in physiological systems in addition to the locomotor system. There is a need for a device that is capable of monitoring multiple physiological systems in various walking conditions. To address this need, an Android-based gait-monitoring device was developed that enabled the recording of a patient's physiological systems during walking. The gait-monitoring device was tested during self-regulated overground walking sessions of fifteen healthy subjects that included 6 females and 9 males aged 18-35 years. The gait-monitoring device measures the patient's stride interval, acceleration, electrocardiogram, skin conductance and respiratory rate. The data is stored on an Android phone and is analyzed offline through the extraction of features in the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. The analysis of the data depicted multisystem physiological interactions during overground walking in healthy subjects. These interactions included locomotion-electrodermal, locomotion-respiratory and cardiolocomotion couplings. The current results depicting strong interactions between the locomotion system and the other considered systems (i.e., electrodermal, respiratory and cardiovascular systems) warrant further investigation into multisystem interactions during walking, particularly in challenging walking conditions with older adults.

  18. Limited transfer of newly acquired movement patterns across walking and running in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogawa

    Full Text Available The two major modes of locomotion in humans, walking and running, may be regarded as a function of different speed (walking as slower and running as faster. Recent results using motor learning tasks in humans, as well as more direct evidence from animal models, advocate for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying different locomotion tasks. In the current study, we investigated the possible independence of the neural mechanisms underlying human walking and running. Subjects were tested on a split-belt treadmill and adapted to walking or running on an asymmetrically driven treadmill surface. Despite the acquisition of asymmetrical movement patterns in the respective modes, the emergence of asymmetrical movement patterns in the subsequent trials was evident only within the same modes (walking after learning to walk and running after learning to run and only partial in the opposite modes (walking after learning to run and running after learning to walk (thus transferred only limitedly across the modes. Further, the storage of the acquired movement pattern in each mode was maintained independently of the opposite mode. Combined, these results provide indirect evidence for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying the two locomotive modes.

  19. Self-interacting random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Peres, Yuval; Sousi, Perla

    2012-01-01

    Let $\\mu_1,... \\mu_k$ be $d$-dimensional probability measures in $\\R^d$ with mean 0. At each step we choose one of the measures based on the history of the process and take a step according to that measure. We give conditions for transience of such processes and also construct examples of recurrent processes of this type. In particular, in dimension 3 we give the complete picture: every walk generated by two measures is transient and there exists a recurrent walk generated by three measures.

  20. Pedagogies of the Walking Dead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Peters

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the trope of the zombie and the recent upsurge in popular culture surrounding the figure of the zombie described as the “walking dead”. We investigate this trope and figure as a means of analyzing the “pedagogy of the walking dead” with particular attention to the crisis of education in the era of neoliberal capitalism. In particular we examine the professionalization and responsibilization of teachers in the new regulative environment and ask whether there is any room left for the project of critical education.

  1. Error signals driving locomotor adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    perturbations. Forces were applied to the ankle joint during the early swing phase using an electrohydraulic ankle-foot orthosis. Repetitive 80 Hz electrical stimulation was applied to disrupt cutaneous feedback from the superficial peroneal nerve (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerve (foot sole) during...... anaesthesia (n = 5) instead of repetitive nerve stimulation. Foot anaesthesia reduced ankle adaptation to external force perturbations during walking. Our results suggest that cutaneous input plays a role in force perception, and may contribute to the 'error' signal involved in driving walking adaptation when...

  2. Creatine loading elevates the intracellular phosphorylation potential and alters adaptive responses of rat fast-twitch muscle to chronic low-frequency stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Charles T; Gallo, Maria; Martins, Karen J B; MacLean, Ian M; Jendral, Michelle J; Gordon, Tessa; Syrotuik, Daniel G; Dixon, Walter T

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that elevating the intracellular phosphorylation potential (IPP = [ATP]/[ADP]free) within rat fast-twitch tibialis anterior muscles by creatine (Cr) loading would prevent fast-to-slow fibre transitions induced by chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation (CLFS, 10 Hz, 12 h/day). Creatine-control and creatine-CLFS groups drank a solution of 1% Cr + 5% dextrose, ad libitum, for 10 days before and during 10 days of CLFS; dextrose-control and dextrose-CLFS groups drank 5% dextrose. Cr loading increased total Cr (P creatine-CLFS than in dextrose-CLFS. Higher IPP was confirmed by a 58% reduction in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase α (Thr172) (P creatine-CLFS, MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa mRNA were unchanged and MyHC-IIb mRNA decreased by 75% (P creatine-CLFS, but reciprocal reductions in glycolytic reference enzymes occurred only in dextrose-CLFS (P creatine-CLFS coincided with prolonged time to peak tension and half-rise time (P < 0.01). These results highlight the IPP as an important physiological regulator of muscle fibre plasticity and demonstrate that training-induced changes typically associated with improvements in muscular endurance or increased power output are not mutually exclusive in Cr-loaded muscles.

  3. Fasting and sport: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J

    2010-06-01

    Most humans observe an overnight fast on a daily basis, and the human body copes well with short duration fasting. Periodic fasting is widely practised for cultural, religious or health reasons. Fasting may take many different forms. Prolonged restriction of food and fluid is harmful to health and performance, and it is often automatically assumed that intermittent fasting will lead to decrements in exercise performance. Athletes who choose to fast during training or competitions may therefore be at a disadvantage. The available evidence does not entirely support this view, but there is little or no information on the effects on elite athletes competing in challenging environments. Prolonged periods of training in the fasted state may not allow optimum adaptation of muscles and other tissues. Further research on a wide range of athletes with special nutrition needs is urgently required. In events where performance might be affected, other strategies to eliminate or minimise any effects must be sought.

  4. Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162978.html Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease In just 10 weeks, cholesterol, blood pressure and ... at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is ...

  5. Minnesota Walk-In Access Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Minnesota Walk-In Access site (WIA) GIS data represents areas of private land that have been made open to the public for the purpose of walk-in (foot travel)...

  6. Einstein's random walk and thermal diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Thermal diffusion has been studied for over 150 years. Despite of the long history and the increasing importance of the phenomenon, the physics of thermal diffusion remains poorly understood. In this paper Ludwig's thermal diffusion is explained using Einstein's random walk. The only new structure added is the spatial heterogeneity of the random walk to reflect the temperature gradient of thermal diffusion. Hence, the walk length and the walk speed are location dependent functions in this pap...

  7. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; O'Brien, Jeremy; Wang, Jingbo; Matthews, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise quantum walks have shown much potential as a frame- work for developing new quantum algorithms. In this paper, we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs ef...

  8. Walking Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most ppular form of exercise among older adults and it's a great choice. What can walking do for you? strengthen muscles help prevent weight gain lower risks of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and osteoporosis improve balance lower the likelihood of falling If ...

  9. Walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithms using gait phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeen-Shing; Lin, Che-Wei; Yang, Ya-Ting C; Ho, Yu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a walking pattern classification and a walking distance estimation algorithm using gait phase information. A gait phase information retrieval algorithm was developed to analyze the duration of the phases in a gait cycle (i.e., stance, push-off, swing, and heel-strike phases). Based on the gait phase information, a decision tree based on the relations between gait phases was constructed for classifying three different walking patterns (level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs). Gait phase information was also used for developing a walking distance estimation algorithm. The walking distance estimation algorithm consists of the processes of step count and step length estimation. The proposed walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithm have been validated by a series of experiments. The accuracy of the proposed walking pattern classification was 98.87%, 95.45%, and 95.00% for level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed walking distance estimation algorithm was 96.42% over a walking distance.

  10. Late gestation over- and undernutrition predispose for visceral adiposity in response to a post-natal obesogenic diet, but with differential impacts on glucose-insulin adaptations during fasting in lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanal, Prabhat; Husted, Sanne Vinter; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen;

    2014-01-01

    of subcutaneous adipose tissue and induced differential physiological adaptations to fasting. This study does not suggest that exposure to gestational overnutrition will provide a protective effect against development of hyperglycaemia later in life. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.......Aim: To investigate if late gestation under- or overnutrition has similar adverse impacts on visceral adiposity, metabolic and endocrine function in sheep, and if subsequent exposure to a high-fat diet in early post-natal life exaggerates the prenatal programming outcomes later in life. Methods......, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acids, triglyceride and lactate combined with abdominal obesity. Peri-renal fat appeared to be a particular target of a high-fat diet post-natally. Conclusion: Both prenatal under- and overnutrition predisposed for abdominal adiposity, apparently by reducing the expandability...

  11. Developmental Continuity? Crawling, Cruising, and Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Berger, Sarah E.; Leo, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between "cruising" (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior…

  12. Claimed walking distance of lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Dijkstra, PU

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Walking ability in general and specifically for lower limb amputees is of major importance for social mobility and ADL independence. Walking determines prosthesis prescription. The aim of this study was to mathematically analyse factors influencing claimed walking distance of lower limb amp

  13. Classification of people walking and jogging/running using multimodal sensor signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Sabatier, James

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we address the issues involved in detecting and classifying people walking and jogging/running. When the people are walking, sensors observe the signals for a longer period compared to the case in which people are jogging. To identify fast-moving people, one must make the decision based on the few telltale signals generated by a person jogging: a higher impact of a foot on the ground, which can be monitored by seismic sensors; the panting noise observed through an acoustic sensor; or a higher Doppler from an ultrasonic sensor, to name few. First, we investigate the phenomenology associated with seismic signals generated by a person walking and jogging. Then, we analyze ultrasonic signatures to distinguish the characteristics associated with them. Finally, we develop the algorithms to detect and classify people walking and jogging. These algorithms are tested on data collected in an outdoor environment.

  14. Adaptive Packet Buffering Algorithm Based on Priority and Traffic Throughput for Reducing Packet Loss in Fast Handover for Mobile IPv6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anesa Maolod Omar Al-Najeh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The packet loss has become an important issue to the research community, which needs to be addressed. In FMIPv6, Packet losses are significantly related to the handover latency and buffer size used for packet buffering. In the case of increased handover latency or decreased buffer size, packet losses will be increased. To solve the problem, we propose an adaptive packet buffering (APT algorithm based on priority of packets and traffic throughput in layer 3 (L3 were the packets are buffered by the predefined rule in the new access point during handover. This algorithm is designed to reduce packet loss in FMIPv6 and high level of throughput and low delay can be achieved through the proposed technique. To achieve a fair comparison with Adaptive Buffer Limit Tuning (ALT algorithm, we have implemented the APT algorithm in Omnet++ along with the FMIPv6 to develop the model and the algorithm. The results of the simulation study show that the proposed algorithm can reduce the packet loss as well as the delay.

  15. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Thomas Townsley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing inherent properties of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries.

  16. 双足机器人自适应常值驱动与传感反馈结合的仿生行走控制%Bionic walking control based on adaptive constant torque and sensory feedback for the biped robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽梅; 田彦涛

    2013-01-01

    To make the chaotic gaits converge to a stable cycle gait, a control algorithm is proposed for the biped robot with knees. Firstly, the passive gaits changes with the changing of the slope are studied by using the Poincarésection method. It shows that the increasing of the ground slope will result in the appearance of period-doubling and chaotic gaits. Then, based on the biomechanics in human walking and delayed feedback control theory, bionic walking control based on adaptive constant torque and sensory feedback for the biped robot is designed. The controller parameters are regulated gradually in terms of the initial states of the current step and the first two steps. Finally, the chaotic gaits converge to the cycle gaits with this controller. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the presented control algorithm.%  为了将双足机器人的混沌步态控制收敛到稳定的周期步态,提出一种控制策略。首先用庞卡莱截面法研究斜坡倾角变化对步态的影响,结果表明,坡度增大会导致倍周期步态到混沌步态的产生;然后以人类步行的生物力学为仿生依据,根据延迟反馈控制的基本思路,设计了自适应常值驱动与传感反馈相结合的仿生行走控制策略,并依据当前步和前两步初始状态对控制器参数进行逐步调节,最终将混沌步态控制收敛到周期步态。仿真结果表明了所提出算法的有效性。

  17. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y. [Mayo Clinic Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  18. Active quantum walks: a framework for quantum walks with adiabatic quantum evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Fangmin; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    We study a new methodology for quantum walk based algorithms. Different from the passive quantum walk, in which a walker is guided by a quantum walk procedure, the new framework that we developed allows the walker to move by an adiabatic procedure of quantum evolution, as an active way. The use of this active quantum walk is helpful to develop new quantum walk based searching and optimization algorithms.

  19. Do functional walk tests reflect cardiorespiratory fitness in sub-acute stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayley Mark T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT has been employed as a measure of functional capacity, but its relationship to cardiorespiratory fitness in stroke is not well established. Gait speed measured over short distances is commonly used as an index of walking competency following stroke. We evaluated the relationship between the 6MWT, aerobic fitness (VO2peak and walking competency in sub-acute stroke. Methods Thirty-six individuals (mean age ± SD, 64.6 ± 14.4 years; time post-stroke 16.2 ± 13.3 days were evaluated using the 6MWT (distance, speed, heart rate, a maximal exercise test (VO2peak, heart rate, exercise test duration, and walking competency using a five meter walk (speed, symmetry ratio. Correlation analyses were used to examine the relationships between these outcomes. Results There was a strong correlation between the 6MWT and five meter walk velocity for preferred (r = 0.79 and fast (r = 0.82 speed (p 2peak (r = 0.56, p Conclusion The speed selected during the 6MWT was strongly related to the velocities selected during the five meter walk distance (intermediate to the selected preferred and fast speeds. Although the 6MWT may be challenging to the cardiorespiratory system, it appears to be more strongly influenced by potential limits to walking speed rather than cardiorespiratory capacity. As a result, this test is not, by itself, an adequate measure of aerobic fitness early after stroke.

  20. Acquisition of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains during long-term hospitalization and fast adaptation of enterococcal flora to antibiotic treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Berit; Wolz, Christiane; Schumacher, Ulrike; Beyser, Kurt; Heeg, Peter; Borgmann, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been suspected that long durations of hospitalization might be a possible risk factor to get colonized by multiple VRE strains. Here we present the case of a patient who underwent stem cell transplantation and subsequently stayed at the hospital for about 4 months until death. At least four different Enterococcus faecium strains were identified from routinely taken microbiological specimens as demonstrated by pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis. Additionally, these strains showed variable susceptibility to quinupristine/dalfopristine, vancomycin, and/or linezolid depending on different antibiotic administrations. These findings indicate that patients might be colonized with multiple Enterococcus faecium strains and that the enterococcal flora quickly adapts due to antibiotic exposure.

  1. Italian Validation of the 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Solaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gait impairment is commonly in people with multiple sclerosis (MS. The 12-item MS walking scale (MSWS-12 assesses patients’ measurement of walking quality. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the MSWS-12 for the Italian population with MS. Methods. Six MS out-patient clinics across Italy enrolled subjects between June 2013 and December 2013. Construct validity of MSWS-12 was determined by examining correlations with the Italian version of the EDSS, the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW, and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Results. 321 MS subjects were enrolled. Mean age was 47.55 years and mean disease duration was 13.8 years. Mean EDSS score was 4.46. 185 subjects had a relapsing-remitting course, 92 were secondary progressive, 43 were primary progressive, and 1 had a clinically isolated syndrome. The mean total score of the MSWS-12 was 49.6 (SD: 31 with values ranging between 0 and 100. Correlations between the MSWS-12 with age, disease duration, and disease course were found but not with gender. Values of the MSWS-12/IT were significantly related to EDSS (0.71, to the T25FW (0.65, and to the FSS (0.51. Conclusion. MSWS-12/IT has been adapted and validated, it is a reliable and reproducible scale for Italian patients with MS.

  2. Biased random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Biased random walks on complex networks are a particular type of walks whose motion is biased on properties of the destination node, such as its degree. In recent years they have been exploited to design efficient strategies to explore a network, for instance by constructing maximally mixing trajectories or by sampling homogeneously the nodes. In multiplex networks, the nodes are related through different types of links (layers or communication channels), and the presence of connections at different layers multiplies the number of possible paths in the graph. In this work we introduce biased random walks on multiplex networks and provide analytical solutions for their long-term properties such as the stationary distribution and the entropy rate. We focus on degree-biased walks and distinguish between two subclasses of random walks: extensive biased walks consider the properties of each node separately at each layer, intensive biased walks deal instead with intrinsically multiplex variables. We study the effec...

  3. Genetic changes during a laboratory adaptive evolution process that allowed fast growth in glucose to an Escherichia coli strain lacking the major glucose transport system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar César

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS, which is the major bacterial component involved in glucose transport and its phosphorylation, accumulate high amounts of phosphoenolpyruvate that can be diverted to the synthesis of commercially relevant products. However, these strains grow slowly in glucose as sole carbon source due to its inefficient transport and metabolism. Strain PB12, with 400% increased growth rate, was isolated after a 120 hours adaptive laboratory evolution process for the selection of faster growing derivatives in glucose. Analysis of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain that lacks PTS will allow a better understanding of the basis of its growth adaptation and, therefore, in the design of improved metabolic engineering strategies for enhancing carbon diversion into the aromatic pathways. Results Whole genome analyses using two different sequencing methodologies: the Roche NimbleGen Inc. comparative genome sequencing technique, and high throughput sequencing with Illumina Inc. GAIIx, allowed the identification of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain. Both methods detected 23 non-synonymous and 22 synonymous point mutations. Several non-synonymous mutations mapped in regulatory genes (arcB, barA, rpoD, rna and in other putative regulatory loci (yjjU, rssA and ypdA. In addition, a chromosomal deletion of 10,328 bp was detected that removed 12 genes, among them, the rppH, mutH and galR genes. Characterization of some of these mutated and deleted genes with their functions and possible functions, are presented. Conclusions The deletion of the contiguous rppH, mutH and galR genes that occurred simultaneously, is apparently the main reason for the faster growth of the evolved PB12 strain. In support of this interpretation is the fact that inactivation of the rppH gene in the parental PB11 strain substantially increased

  4. Coverage maximization under resource constraints using proliferating random walks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudipta Saha; Niloy Ganguly; Abhijit Guria

    2015-02-01

    Dissemination of information has been one of the prime needs in almost every kind of communication network. The existing algorithms for this service, try to maximize the coverage, i.e., the number of distinct nodes to which a given piece of information could be conveyed under the constraints of time and energy. However, the problem becomes challenging for unstructured and decentralized environments. Due to its simplicity and adaptability, random walk (RW) has been a very useful tool for such environments. Different variants of this technique have been studied. In this paper, we study a history-based non-uniform proliferating random strategy where new walkers are dynamically introduced in the sparse regions of the network. Apart from this, we also study the breadth-first characteristics of the random walk-based algorithms through an appropriately designed metrics.

  5. Preferred gait and walk-run transition speeds in ostriches measured using GPS-IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Monica A; Channon, Anthony J; Nolan, Grant S; Hall, Jade

    2016-10-15

    The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is widely appreciated as a fast and agile bipedal athlete, and is a useful comparative bipedal model for human locomotion. Here, we used GPS-IMU sensors to measure naturally selected gait dynamics of ostriches roaming freely over a wide range of speeds in an open field and developed a quantitative method for distinguishing walking and running using accelerometry. We compared freely selected gait-speed distributions with previous laboratory measures of gait dynamics and energetics. We also measured the walk-run and run-walk transition speeds and compared them with those reported for humans. We found that ostriches prefer to walk remarkably slowly, with a narrow walking speed distribution consistent with minimizing cost of transport (CoT) according to a rigid-legged walking model. The dimensionless speeds of the walk-run and run-walk transitions are slower than those observed in humans. Unlike humans, ostriches transition to a run well below the mechanical limit necessitating an aerial phase, as predicted by a compass-gait walking model. When running, ostriches use a broad speed distribution, consistent with previous observations that ostriches are relatively economical runners and have a flat curve for CoT against speed. In contrast, horses exhibit U-shaped curves for CoT against speed, with a narrow speed range within each gait for minimizing CoT. Overall, the gait dynamics of ostriches moving freely over natural terrain are consistent with previous lab-based measures of locomotion. Nonetheless, ostriches, like humans, exhibit a gait-transition hysteresis that is not explained by steady-state locomotor dynamics and energetics. Further study is required to understand the dynamics of gait transitions.

  6. Quantum walk on a cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bru, Luis A; Di Molfetta, Giuseppe; Pérez, Armando; Roldán, Eugenio; Silva, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We consider the 2D alternate quantum walk on a cylinder. We concentrate on the study of the motion along the open dimension, in the spirit of looking at the closed coordinate as a small or "hidden" extra dimension. If one starts from localized initial conditions on the lattice, the dynamics of the quantum walk that is obtained after tracing out the small dimension shows the contribution of several components, which can be understood from the study of the dispersion relations for this problem. In fact, these components originate from the contribution of the possible values of the quasi-momentum in the closed dimension. In the continuous space-time limit, the different components manifest as a set of Dirac equations, with each quasi-momentum providing the value of the corresponding mass. We briefly discuss the possible link of these ideas to the simulation of high energy physical theories that include extra dimensions.

  7. Random walk near the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-07-01

    The random walk of a particle on a three-dimensional semi-infinite lattice is considered. In order to study the effect of the surface on the random walk, it is assumed that the velocity of the particle depends on the distance to the surface. Moreover it is assumed that at any point the particle may be absorbed with a certain probability. The probability of the return of the particle to the starting point and the average time of eventual return are calculated. The dependence of these quantities on the distance to the surface, the probability of absorption and the properties of the surface is discussed. The method of generating functions is used.

  8. City Walks and Tactile Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Diaconu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories.

  9. A fast ionised wind in a Star Forming-Quasar system at z~1.5 resolved through Adaptive Optics assisted near-infrared data

    CERN Document Server

    Brusa, M; Cresci, G; Schramm, M; Delvecchio, I; Lanzuisi, G; Mainieri, V; Mignoli, M; Zamorani, G; Berta, S; Bongiorno, A; Comastri, A; Fiore, F; Kakkad, D; Marconi, A; Rosario, D; Contini, T; Lamareille, F

    2016-01-01

    Outflows are invoked in co-evolutionary models to link the growth of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena, and from the analysis of both galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) samples at z$\\sim1-3$, it is becoming clear that powerful winds are quite common in AGN hosts. High-resolution and high S/N observations are needed in order to uncover the physical properties of the wind through kinematics analysis. We exploited VIMOS, SINFONI and Subaru/IRCS Adaptive Optics data to study the kinematics properties on the scale the host galaxy of XID5395, a luminous, X-ray obscured Starburst/Quasar merging system at z$\\sim1.5$ detected in the XMM-COSMOS field, and associated with an extreme [O II] emitter (EW$\\sim200$ \\AA). We mapped, for the first time, at high resolution the kinematics of the [O III] and H$\\alpha$ line complexes and linked them with the [O II] emission. The high spatial resolution achieved allowed us to resolve all the components of the SB-QSO system. Our analysis with a resolution of few kp...

  10. Anomalous diffusion in correlated continuous time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, Vincent; Metzler, Ralf, E-mail: metz@ph.tum.d [Physics Department T30 g, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-26

    We demonstrate that continuous time random walks in which successive waiting times are correlated by Gaussian statistics lead to anomalous diffusion with the mean squared displacement (r{sup 2}(t)) {approx_equal} t{sup 2/3}. Long-ranged correlations of the waiting times with a power-law exponent alpha (0 < alpha <= 2) give rise to subdiffusion of the form (r{sup 2}(t)) {approx_equal} t{sup {alpha}/(1+{alpha})}. In contrast, correlations in the jump lengths are shown to produce superdiffusion. We show that in both cases weak ergodicity breaking occurs. Our results are in excellent agreement with simulations. (fast track communication)

  11. Random walk study of electron motion in helium in crossed electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Random walk theory, previously adapted to electron motion in the presence of an electric field, is extended to include a transverse magnetic field. In principle, the random walk approach avoids mathematical complexity and concomitant simplifying assumptions and permits determination of energy distributions and transport coefficients within the accuracy of available collisional cross section data. Application is made to a weakly ionized helium gas. Time of relaxation of electron energy distribution, determined by the random walk, is described by simple expressions based on energy exchange between the electron and an effective electric field. The restrictive effect of the magnetic field on electron motion, which increases the required number of collisions per walk to reach a terminal steady state condition, as well as the effect of the magnetic field on electron transport coefficients and mean energy can be quite adequately described by expressions involving only the Hall parameter.

  12. Walking Algorithm of Humanoid Robot on Uneven Terrain with Terrain Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Humanoid robots are expected to achieve stable walking on uneven terrains. In this paper, a control algorithm for humanoid robots walking on previously unknown terrains with terrain estimation is proposed, which requires only minimum modification to the original walking gait. The swing foot trajectory is redesigned to ensure that the foot lands at the desired horizontal positions under various terrain height. A compliant terrain adaptation method is applied to the landing foot to achieve a firm contact with the ground. Then a terrain estimation method that takes into account the deformations of the linkages is applied, providing the target for the following correction and adjustment. The algorithm was validated through walking experiments on uneven terrains with the full-size humanoid robot Kong.

  13. A Fast and Adaptive Object Tracking Method%一种快速的自适应目标跟踪方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李善青; 唐亮; 刘科研; 王磊

    2012-01-01

    由于光照变化、视角差异、相机抖动和部分遮挡等因素的影响,鲁棒的目标跟踪仍然是计算机视觉领域极具挑战性的研究课题.受协同训练和粒子滤波算法的启发,提出一种快速的自适应目标跟踪方法.该方法采用HOG( histogram of oriented gradients)和LBP(local binary pattern)描述目标特征并建立分类器,通过协同训练实现分类器的在线更新,有效解决了误差累积问题.为缩小目标搜索的状态空间,利用IC()NDENSATI()N的运动模型和重要采样提高粒子采样的准确性和效率,并引入校正因子抑制虚假目标的干扰,从而提升了跟踪算法的鲁棒性和分类器更新的准确性.在两组标准测试集和两组自建测试集上的对比实验结果验证了所提出跟踪算法的有效性.与基于全局搜索的跟踪方法相比,该算法在不降低跟踪性能的前提下将处理速度提高25倍以上.%Robust object tracking is still a challenging research topic due to dynamical changes of illumination, viewpoints, camera jitter and partial occlusion. To handle such problems, this paper presents an adaptive object tracking method based on co-training and particle filtering algorithms. An online learning scheme with cooperation of two visual classifiers is designed to alleviate the drifting problem. The histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) and local binary pattern (LBP) are used to describe the object appearance. Two SVM classifiers are constructed separately based on the above two visual features, and online updated by the co-training framework. This updating strategy considers the same classification problem from two complementary viewpoints which successfully overcome the error accumulation problem. In order to reduce the searching state space, we introduce a dynamical model and importance sampling from the ICONDENSATION framework to improve the precision and efficiency of the sampling procedure. A correction term is introduced to

  14. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Smith, Mike; Price, Michael J; Wright, Sheila Leddington

    2015-01-01

    This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60-76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P = 0.0001) whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise) enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  15. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60–76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P=0.0001 whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  16. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  17. Walk-Startup of a Two-Legged Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babković, Kalman; Nagy, László; Krklješ, Damir; Borovac, Branislav

    There is a growing interest towards humanoid robots. One of their most important characteristic is the two-legged motion - walk. Starting and stopping of humanoid robots introduce substantial delays. In this paper, the goal is to explore the possibility of using a short unbalanced state of the biped robot to quickly gain speed and achieve the steady state velocity during a period shorter than half of the single support phase. The proposed method is verified by simulation. Maintainig a steady state, balanced gait is not considered in this paper.

  18. System overview and walking dynamics of a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “passive dynamic walking robot” refers to the robot that can walk down a shallow slope stably without any actuation and control which shows a limit cycle during walking. By adding actuation at some joints, the passive dynamic walking robot can walk stably on level ground and exhibit more versatile gaits than fully passive robot, namely, the “limit cycle walker.” In this article, we present the mechanical structures and control system design for a passive dynamic walking robot with series elastic actuators at hip joint and ankle joints. We built a walking model that consisted of an upper body, knee joints, and flat feet and derived its walking dynamics that involve double stance phases in a walking cycle based on virtual power principle. The instant just before impact was chosen as the start of one step to reduce the number of independent state variables. A numerical simulation was implemented by using MATLAB, in which the proposed passive dynamic walking model could walk stably down a shallow slope, which proves that the derived walking dynamics are correct. A physical passive robot prototype was built finally, and the experiment results show that by only simple control scheme the passive dynamic robot could walk stably on level ground.

  19. Differences in walking pattern during 6-min walk test between patients with COPD and healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke Annegarn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, detailed analyses of walking patterns using accelerometers during the 6-min walk test (6MWT have not been performed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent COPD patients have an altered walking pattern during the 6MWT compared to healthy elderly subjects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 79 COPD patients and 24 healthy elderly subjects performed the 6MWT wearing an accelerometer attached to the trunk. The accelerometer features (walking intensity, cadence, and walking variability and subject characteristics were assessed and compared between groups. Moreover, associations were sought with 6-min walk distance (6MWD using multiple ordinary least squares (OLS regression models. COPD patients walked with a significantly lower walking intensity, lower cadence and increased walking variability compared to healthy subjects. Walking intensity and height were the only two significant determinants of 6MWD in healthy subjects, explaining 85% of the variance in 6MWD. In COPD patients also age, cadence, walking variability measures and their interactions were included were significant determinants of 6MWD (total variance in 6MWD explained: 88%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: COPD patients have an altered walking pattern during 6MWT compared to healthy subjects. These differences in walking pattern partially explain the lower 6MWD in patients with COPD.

  20. Nordic Walking and chronic low back pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartvigsen Jan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism. Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether there is a difference in compliance between persons receiving supervised Nordic Walking and persons doing unsupervised Nordic Walking. Methods One hundred and fifty patients with low back pain for at least eight weeks and referred to a specialized secondary sector outpatient back pain clinic are included in the study. After completion of the standard back centre treatment patients are randomized into one of three groups: A Nordic Walking twice a week for eight weeks under supervision of a specially trained instructor; B Unsupervised Nordic Walking for eight weeks after one training session with an instructor; C A one hour motivational talk including advice to stay active. Outcome measures are pain, function, overall health, cardiovascular ability and

  1. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M Jason; Klenow, Tyler D; Kahle, Jason T; Wernke, Matthew M; Carey, Stephanie L; Miro, Rebecca M; Lura, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds.

  2. Synchronous EMG activity in the piper frequency band reveals the corticospinal demand of walking tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Kautz, Steven A; Bauer, Andrew R; Chen, Yen-Ting; Christou, Evangelos A

    2013-08-01

    Evidence indicates that the frequency-domain characteristics of surface electromyogram (EMG) signals are modulated according to the contributing sources of neural drive. Modulation of inter-muscular EMG synchrony within the Piper frequency band (30-60 Hz) during movement tasks has been linked to drive from the corticospinal tract. However, it is not known whether EMG synchrony is sufficiently sensitive to detect task-dependent differences in the corticospinal contribution to leg muscle activation during walking. We investigated this question in seventeen healthy older men and women. It was hypothesized that, relative to typical steady state walking, Piper band EMG synchrony of the triceps surae muscle group would be reduced for dual-task walking (because of competition for cortical resources), similar for fast walking (because walking speed is directed by an indirect locomotor pathway rather than by the corticospinal tract), and increased when taking a long step (because voluntary gait pattern modifications are directed by the corticospinal tract). Each of these hypotheses was confirmed. These findings support the use of frequency-domain analysis of EMG in future investigations into the corticospinal contribution to control of healthy and disordered human walking.

  3. The role of the neck and trunk in facilitating head stability during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Justin; Barrett, Rod; Morrison, Steven

    2006-07-01

    An apparent goal of the human postural system is to maintain head stability during walking. Although much is known about sensory-motor stabilising mechanisms associated with the head and neck, less is known about how the postural system attenuates motion between the trunk and neck segments in order to regulate head motion. Therefore the purpose of this study was to determine the role that the neck and the trunk play in stabilising the head at a range of walking speeds. Eight healthy male subjects (age: 23+/-4 years) performed self-selected slow, preferred, and fast walking speed trials along a 30 m walkway. Four custom-designed wireless triaxial accelerometers were attached to the head, upper trunk, lower trunk, and shank of each subject to measure vertical (VT), anterior-posterior (AP), and mediolateral (ML) accelerations. Acceleration data were examined in each direction using RMS, power spectral, harmonic, and regularity measures. Signal regularity was increased from the lower to upper trunk for all walking speeds and directions with the exception of the slow speed in the AP direction. Evidence from analysis of power spectral and amplitude characteristics of acceleration signals was suggestive that accelerations are also attenuated from the lower to upper trunk by dynamics of the intervening trunk segment. Differences in selected power spectral and amplitude characteristics between the accelerations of the upper trunk and head due to the intervening neck segment were only detected in the AP direction at preferred and fast walking speeds. Overall the findings of the present study suggest that the trunk segment plays a critical role in regulating gait-related oscillations in all directions. Only accelerations in the direction of travel at preferred and fast speeds required additional control from the neck segment in order to enhance head stability during walking.

  4. A new fast algorithm of self-adaptive search scope for SIFT matching%一种自适应搜索范围的SIFT特征点快速匹配算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐坤; 韩斌

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at the high time cost of feature vectors matching in SIFT, a new fast algorithm, called Auto ARV&DP, of self⁃adaptive search scope for SIFT matching is put forward. Firstly, an appropriate reference vector is computed based on the feature vectors set. Secondly, a self⁃adaptive search scope is determined by this reference vector. Finally, the matching of SIFT is performed in a small feature vectors set, which is filtered by norm. Experi⁃mental results showed that compared with the classical BBF algorithm, Auto ARV&DP can effectively decrease the time cost of feature vector matching of SIFT with no loss of matching performance when the size of feature vector set is large.%针对SIFT特征向量匹配时间成本高的问题,提出了一种自适应搜索范围的快速匹配算法-AutoARV&DP。该算法首先根据特征向量集合计算一个合适的参考向量,然后自适应确定一个搜索范围,最后在一个通过距离过滤后的较小搜索空间中进行特征向量匹配。实验结果表明,与经典的BBF算法相比较,AutoARV&在获得满意匹配效果的同时,能够有效地降低SIFT特征点匹配的时间成本。

  5. 基于最小包含球的大数据集域自适应快速算法%A Fast Learning Algorithm Based on Minimum Enclosing Ball for Large Domain Adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许敏; 王士同; 顾鑫; 俞林

    2013-01-01

    相同应用领域,不同时间、地点或设备检测到的数据域不一定完整.文中针对如何进行数据域间知识传递问题,提出相同领域的概率分布差异可用两域最小包含球中心点表示且其上限与半径无关的定理.基于上述定理,在原有支持向量域描述算法基础上,提出一种数据域中心校正的领域自适应算法,并利用人造数据集和KDD CUP 99入侵检测数据集验证该算法.实验表明,这种领域自适应算法具有较好的性能.%The data fields detected from different times,places or devices are not always complete even if they come from the same data resource.To solve the problem of effectively transferring the knowledge between the two fields,the theorem is proposed that the difference between two probability distributions from two domains can be expressed by the center of each domain's minimum enclosing ball and its up limit has nothing to do with the radius.Based on the theorem,a fast center calibration domain adaptive algorithm,center calibration-core sets support vector data description (CC-CSVDD),is proposed for large domain adaptation by modifying the original support vector domain description (SVDD) algorithm.The validity of the proposed algorithm is experimentally verified on the artificial datasets and the real KDD CUP-99 datasets.Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has good performance.

  6. Quantum walks public key cryptographic system

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachou, C; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that th...

  7. Quantum random walks - an introductory overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kempe, J

    2003-01-01

    This article aims to provide an introductory survey on quantum random walks. Starting from a physical effect to illustrate the main ideas we will introduce quantum random walks, review some of their properties and outline their striking differences to classical walks. We will touch upon both physical effects and computer science applications, introducing some of the main concepts and language of present day quantum information science in this context. We will mention recent developments in this new area and outline some open questions.

  8. Walking in Place Through Virtual Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality (IVR) is seemingly on the verge of entering the homes of consumers. Enabling users to walk through virtual worlds in a limited physical space presents a challenge. With an outset in a taxonomy of virtual travel techniques, we argue that Walking-in-Place (WIP) techniques ....... Finally, we summarize work we have performed in order to produce more natural WIP locomotion and present unexplored topics which need to be address if WIP techniques are to provide perceptually natural walking experiences....

  9. Random Walk Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the family of smooth transition autoregressive (STAR) models by proposing a specification in which the autoregressive parameters follow random walks. The random walks in the parameters can capture structural change within a regime switching framework, but in contrast to the time varying STAR (TV-STAR) speciifcation recently introduced by Lundbergh et al (2003), structural change in our random walk STAR (RW-STAR) setting follows a stochastic process rather than a determinist...

  10. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  11. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizzi Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies. In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%. Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules, as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns.

  12. Quantum walk with one variable absorbing boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feiran; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Ruifeng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks constitute a promising ingredient in the research on quantum algorithms; consequently, exploring different types of quantum walks is of great significance for quantum information and quantum computation. In this study, we investigate the progress of quantum walks with a variable absorbing boundary and provide an analytical solution for the escape probability (the probability of a walker that is not absorbed by the boundary). We simulate the behavior of escape probability under different conditions, including the reflection coefficient, boundary location, and initial state. Moreover, it is also meaningful to extend our research to the situation of continuous-time and high-dimensional quantum walks.

  13. Excited random walks: results, methods, open problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kosygina, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of self-interacting random walks in deterministic or random environments, known as excited random walks or cookie walks, on the d-dimensional integer lattice. The main purpose of this paper is two-fold: to give a survey of known results and some of the methods and to present several new results. The latter include functional limit theorems for transient one-dimensional excited random walks in bounded i.i.d. cookie environments as well as some zero-one laws. Several open problems are stated.

  14. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejczyk Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group and lean body mass (HLBM group. In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and maximal heart rate were measured. Walking economy was evaluated during two walks performed at two different speeds (4.8 and 6.0 km ‧ h-1. Results. The VO2max was similar in both groups, as were the physiological responses during slow walking. The absolute oxygen uptake or oxygen uptake relative to body mass did not significantly differentiate the studied groups. The only indicator significantly differentiating the two groups was oxygen uptake relative to LBM. Conclusions. Body composition does not significantly affect walking economy at low speed, while during brisk walking, the economy is better in the HLBM vs. HBF group, provided that walking economy is presented as oxygen uptake relative to LBM. For this reason, we recommend this manner of oxygen uptake normalization in the evaluation of walking economy.

  15. Quantum Walks for Computer Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation, one of the latest joint ventures between physics and the theory of computation, is a scientific field whose main goals include the development of hardware and algorithms based on the quantum mechanical properties of those physical systems used to implement such algorithms. Solving difficult tasks (for example, the Satisfiability Problem and other NP-complete problems) requires the development of sophisticated algorithms, many of which employ stochastic processes as their mathematical basis. Discrete random walks are a popular choice among those stochastic processes. Inspir

  16. Walk the line: station context, corridor type and bus rapid transit walk access in Jinan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yang; Mehndiratta, Shomik; Zegras, P. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines BRT station walk access patterns in rapidly urbanizing China and the relationship between bus rapid transit (BRT) station context and corridor type and the distance people will walk to access the system (i.e., catchment area). We hypothesize that certain contextual built environment features and station and right-of-way configurations will increase the walk-access catchment area; that is, that urban design influences users’ willingness to walk to BRT. We base our analysis ...

  17. Feasibility and Reliability of Two Different Walking Tests in People With Severe Intellectual and Sensory Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, A.; Evenhuis, I. J.; van Wijck, R.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe feasibility and test-retest reliability of the six-minute walking distance test (6MWD) and an adapted shuttle run test (aSRT) in persons with severe intellectual and sensory (multiple) disabilities. Materials and Methods Forty-seven persons with se

  18. A Fast and Adaptive SLAM Algorithm for Mobile Robots in Three-dimensional Space%面向3维空间的移动机器人快速自适应 SLAM 算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈世明; 郑丽楠; 吴龙龙; 方华京

    2012-01-01

    For the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem of mobile robots in the three-dimensional space, a fast and adaptive SLAM algorithm based on the improved strong tracking filter (STF) is proposed. Firstly, the noise covariance matrixes of STF are adaptively estimated on line to suppress the effects of noises on system state estimation, which makes the system state estimation converge to real values quickly. Secondly, singular value decomposition (SVD) is used to decompose the state covariance matrix which can help the algorithm get better numerical stability. This algorithm can improve the adaptive ability of time-varying systems and the state estimation precision, and the comparative simulation results with STF-SLAM algorithm illustrate the effectiveness and the superiority of the proposed algorithmon on the denoising performance and the estimation precise.%针对3维空间中移动机器人同时定位与地图构建(SLAM)问题,提出了一种基于改进强跟踪滤波(STF)的快速自适应SLAM算法.该算法首先对于强跟踪滤波器的噪声协方差阵进行在线自适应估计,用于抑制噪声对系统状态估计的影响,使系统状态估计迅速收敛到真实值附近;随后将状态协方差矩阵进行奇异值分解(SVD),提高算法的数值稳定性.该算法可提高对系统时变的自适应能力以及系统状态估计精度.与基于强跟踪滤波器的SLAM算法的仿真对比结果说明了该算法的有效性及其在抑噪性能和估计精度方面的优越性.

  19. Interlimb coordination during forward walking is largely preserved in backward walking in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Molenaers, G.; Desloovere, K.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Limb kinematics in backward walking (BW) are essentially those of forward walking (FW) in reverse. It has been argued that subcortical mechanisms could underlie both walking modes. METHODS: Therefore, we tested whether participants with supraspinal/cortical deficits (i.e. cerebral palsy)

  20. IMU-based ambulatory walking speed estimation in constrained treadmill and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a walking speed estimation system based on using an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The walking speed estimation algorithm segments the walking sequence into individual stride cycles (two steps) based on the inverted pendulum-like behaviour of the stance leg during walking and it integrates the angular velocity and linear accelerations of the shank to determine the displacement of each stride. The evaluation was performed in both treadmill and overground walking experiments with various constraints on walking speed, step length and step frequency to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the system. Promising results were obtained in providing accurate and consistent walking speed/step length estimation in different walking conditions. An overall percentage root mean squared error (%RMSE) of 4.2 and 4.0% was achieved in treadmill and overground walking experiments, respectively. With an increasing interest in understanding human walking biomechanics, the IMU-based ambulatory system could provide a useful walking speed/step length measurement/control tool for constrained walking studies.

  1. Does perceptual-motor calibration generalize across two different forms of locomotion? Investigations of walking and wheelchairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Kunz

    Full Text Available The relationship between biomechanical action and perception of self-motion during walking is typically consistent and well-learned but also adaptable. This perceptual-motor coupling can be recalibrated by creating a mismatch between the visual information for self-motion and walking speed. Perceptual-motor recalibration of locomotion has been demonstrated through effects on subsequent walking without vision, showing that learned perceptual-motor coupling influences a dynamic representation of one's spatial position during walking. Our present studies test whether recalibration of wheelchair locomotion, a novel form of locomotion for typically walking individuals, similarly influences subsequent wheelchair locomotion. Furthermore, we test whether adaptation to the pairing of visual information for self-motion during one form of locomotion transfers to a different locomotion modality. We find strong effects of perceptual-motor recalibration for matched locomotion modalities--walking/walking and wheeling/wheeling. Transfer across incongruent locomotion modalities showed weak recalibration effects. The results have implications both for theories of perceptual-motor calibration mechanisms and their effects on spatial orientation, as well as for practical applications in training and rehabilitation.

  2. Walking performance: correlation between energy cost of walking and walking participation. new statistical approach concerning outcome measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Walking ability, though important for quality of life and participation in social and economic activities, can be adversely affected by neurological disorders, such as Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis or Traumatic Brain Injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the energy cost of walking (CW, in a mixed group of chronic patients with neurological diseases almost 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation wards, can predict the walking performance and any walking restriction on community activities, as indicated by Walking Handicap Scale categories (WHS. One hundred and seven subjects were included in the study, 31 suffering from Stroke, 26 from Spinal Cord Injury and 50 from Multiple Sclerosis. The multivariable binary logistical regression analysis has produced a statistical model with good characteristics of fit and good predictability. This model generated a cut-off value of.40, which enabled us to classify correctly the cases with a percentage of 85.0%. Our research reveal that, in our subjects, CW is the only predictor of the walking performance of in the community, to be compared with the score of WHS. We have been also identifying a cut-off value of CW cost, which makes a distinction between those who can walk in the community and those who cannot do it. In particular, these values could be used to predict the ability to walk in the community when discharged from the rehabilitation units, and to adjust the rehabilitative treatment to improve the performance.

  3. Spatial search by quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Childs, Andrew M.; Goldstone, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Grover's quantum search algorithm provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, but is not directly applicable to searching a physical database. Nevertheless, Aaronson and Ambainis showed that a database of N items laid out in d spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order sqrt(N) for d>2, and in time of order sqrt(N) poly(log N) for d=2. We consider an alternative search algorithm based on a continuous time quantum walk on a graph. The case of the complete graph gives the continuous time search algorithm of Farhi and Gutmann, and other previously known results can be used to show that sqrt(N) speedup can also be achieved on the hypercube. We show that full sqrt(N) speedup can be achieved on a d-dimensional periodic lattice for d>4. In d=4, the quantum walk search algorithm takes time of order sqrt(N) poly(log N), and in d<4, the algorithm provides no speedup.

  4. Multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training to enhance dual-task walking of older adults: a secondary analysis of a 6-month randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggenberger P

    2015-10-01

    significant advantage compared to PHYS in DT costs of step time variability at fast walking (P=0.044. Training-specific gait adaptations were found on comparing DANCE and MEMORY: DANCE reduced step time at fast walking (P=0.007 and MEMORY reduced gait variability in DT and DT costs at preferred walking speed (both trend P=0.062. Global linear time effects showed improved gait (P<0.05, functional fitness (P<0.05, and reduced fall frequency (-77%, P<0.001. Only single-task fast walking, gait variability at preferred walking speed, and Short Physical Performance Battery were reduced at follow-up (all P<0.05 or trend.Conclusion: Long-term multicomponent cognitive–physical and exclusive physical training programs demonstrated similar potential to counteract age-related decline in physical functioning. Keywords: elderly, dance video game, gait, falls, functional fitness, detraining, sex

  5. Treadmill walking is not equivalent to overground walking for the study of walking smoothness and rhythmicity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row Lazzarini, Brandi S; Kataras, Theodore J

    2016-05-01

    Treadmills are appealing for gait studies, but some gait mechanics are disrupted during treadmill walking. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of speed and treadmill walking on walking smoothness and rhythmicity of 40 men and women between the ages of 70-96 years. Gait smoothness was examined during overground (OG) and treadmill (TM) walking by calculating the harmonic ratio from linear accelerations measured at the level of the lumbar spine. Rhythmicity was quantified as the stride time standard deviation. TM walking was performed at two speeds: a speed matching the natural OG walk speed (TM-OG), and a preferred TM speed (PTM). A dual-task OG condition (OG-DT) was evaluated to determine if TM walking posed a similar cognitive challenge. Statistical analysis included a one-way Analysis of Variance with Bonferroni corrected post hoc comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for non-normally distributed variables. Average PTM speed was slower than OG. Compared to OG, those who could reach the TM-OG speed (74.3% of sample) exhibited improved ML smoothness and rhythmicity, and the slower PTM caused worsened vertical and AP smoothness, but did not affect rhythmicity. PTM disrupted smoothness and rhythmicity differently than the OG-DT condition, likely due to reduced speed. The use of treadmills for gait smoothness and rhythmicity studies in older adults is problematic; some participants will not achieve OG speed during TM walking, walking at the TM-OG speed artificially improves rhythmicity and ML smoothness, and walking at the slower PTM speed worsens vertical and AP gait smoothness.

  6. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nørreslet, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five...... digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...

  7. FAST scan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anna

    FAST-skanning er en metode, der har til formål at hurtigt diagnosticere fri væske i bughulen hos traumapatienter og andre akutte patienter. Denne skanningsteknik blev først introduceret til hunde i 2004, og omfatter ultralydsskanning af specifikke punkter i bughulen, hvor der er stor chance....../sorte) områder. I dag bruges FAST-skanning meget hyppigt indenfor human og veterinær akutmedicin. Det kan ses som et værktøj for dyrlæger som ikke arbejder med ultralyd til daglig. FAST-skanning har mange fordele; proceduren er effektiv og kan tage under 3 minutter, men har alligevel høj diagnostisk værdi. Det...... nødvendigt. Det skal dog understreges, at de abdominale organer ikke undersøges specifikt. Det kan være svært at skelne mellem væske i peritonealhulen og i det retroperitoneale rum. Man kan heller ikke karakterisere væsken og derved skelne mellem f.eks. blod, pus eller urin. Siden FAST-skanning blev...

  8. Realisation of an energy efficient walking robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dertien, Edwin; Oort, van Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    In this video the walking robot ‘Dribbel’ is presented, which has been built at the Control Engineering group of the University of Twente, the Netherlands. This robot has been designed with a focus on minimal energy consumption, using a passive dynamic approach. It is a so-called four-legged 2D walk

  9. Walking (Gait), Balance, and Coordination Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seeking Services: Questions to Ask d Employment Disclosure Decisions Career Options Accommodations d Resources for Specific Populations Pediatric ... MS Navigator Program Patient Resources Contact Us d Careers in MS ... MS Symptoms Walking (Gait) Difficulties Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Walking (Gait) ...

  10. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  11. Quantum random walks and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Karthik H

    2014-01-01

    How realistic is it to adopt a quantum random walk model to account for decisions involving two choices? Here, we discuss the neural plausibility and the effect of initial state and boundary thresholds on such a model and contrast it with various features of the classical random walk model of decision making.

  12. Nordic walking improves mobility in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkeren, FJ van; Reijmers, R.S.; Kleinveld, M.J.; Minten, A.; Bruggen, J.P.; Bloem, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    Nordic walking may improve mobility in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we examined whether the beneficial effects persist after the training period. We included 19 PD patients [14 men; mean age 67.0 years (range 58-76); Hoehn and Yahr stage range 1-3] who received a 6-week Nordic walking exercise pr

  13. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  14. Getting mobile with a walking-help

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    Ethnomethodology has been one of the few fields were mundane experiences and social ordering such as walking have been a focus of interest (e.g. Ryave and Schenkein 1974). In the present paper we want to discuss how this mundane practice sometimes needs to be achieved through the help of technology...... people with acquired brain injury were introduced to a new walking help that should enable them to walk (better). Our multimodal interaction analysis (Goodwin 2000) of the data will show how the practice of walking with this specific technology is dependent on the interplay of the material affordances...... of the technology (e.g. Gaver 1996), the bodily affordances (e.g. Sheller 2011) of the user and, furthermore, the scaffolding by an accompanying helper. The paper will discuss how movement as an enabled experience can be analysed as an entanglement of these three aspects. To do that, the situations of walk...

  15. Design Issues for Hexapod Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tedeschi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hexapod walking robots have attracted considerable attention for several decades. Many studies have been carried out in research centers, universities and industries. However, only in the recent past have efficient walking machines been conceived, designed and built with performances that can be suitable for practical applications. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art on hexapod walking robots by referring both to the early design solutions and the most recent achievements. Careful attention is given to the main design issues and constraints that influence the technical feasibility and operation performance. A design procedure is outlined in order to systematically design a hexapod walking robot. In particular, the proposed design procedure takes into account the main features, such as mechanical structure and leg configuration, actuating and driving systems, payload, motion conditions, and walking gait. A case study is described in order to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed design procedure.

  16. Walk modularity and community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrle, David; Harkin, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Modularity maximization has been one of the most widely used approaches in the last decade for discovering community structure in networks of practical interest in biology, computing, social science, statistical mechanics, and more. Modularity is a quality function that measures the difference between the number of edges found within clusters minus the number of edges one would statistically expect to find based on random chance. We present a natural generalization of modularity based on the difference between the actual and expected number of walks within clusters, which we call walk-modularity. Walk-modularity can be expressed in matrix form, and community detection can be performed by finding leading eigenvectors of the walk-modularity matrix. We demonstrate community detection on both synthetic and real-world networks and find that walk-modularity maximization returns significantly improved results compared to traditional modularity maximization.

  17. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  18. Two- and 6-minute walk tests assess walking capability equally in neuromuscular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Kahr; Knak, Kirsten Lykke; Witting, Nanna;

    2016-01-01

    to participate on 2 test days, each consisting of 1 2MWT and 1 6MWT separated by a minimum 30-minute period of rest. The order of the walk tests was randomly assigned via sealed envelopes. A group of 38 healthy controls completed 1 6MWT. RESULTS: The mean walking distance for the 2MWT was 142.8 meters......OBJECTIVE: This methodologic study investigates if the 2-minute walk test (2MWT) can be a valid alternative to the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to describe walking capability in patients with neuromuscular diseases. METHODS: Patients (n = 115) with different neuromuscular diseases were invited...... and for the 6MWT 405.3 meters. The distance walked in the 2MWT was highly correlated to the distance walked in the 6MWT (r = 0.99, p minute in the 6MWT, both among patients and healthy controls, which was not evident in the 2MWT...

  19. Continuity and anomalous fluctuations in random walks in dynamic random environments: numerics, phase diagrams and conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Avena, L

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations for one dimensional continuous-time random walks in two dynamic random environments with fast (independent spin-flips) and slow (simple symmetric exclusion) decay of space-time correlations, respectively. We focus on the asymptotic speeds and the scaling limits of such random walks. We observe different behaviors depending on the dynamics of the underlying random environment and the ratio between the jump rate of the random walk and the one of the environment. We compare our data with well known results for static random environment. We observe that the non-diffusive regime known so far only for the static case can occur in the dynamic setup too. Such anomalous fluctuations emerge in a new phase diagram. Further we discuss possible consequences for general static and dynamic random environments.

  20. The application of multilevel modelling to account for the influence of walking speed in gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, David J; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Differences in gait performance can be explained by variations in walking speed, which is a major analytical problem. Some investigators have standardised speed during testing, but this can result in an unnatural control of gait characteristics. Other investigators have developed test procedures where participants walking at their self-selected slow, preferred and fast speeds, with computation of gait characteristics at a standardised speed. However, this analysis is dependent upon an overlap in the ranges of gait speed observed within and between participants, and this is difficult to achieve under self-selected conditions. In this report a statistical analysis procedure is introduced that utilises multilevel modelling to analyse data from walking tests at self-selected speeds, without requiring an overlap in the range of speeds observed or the routine use of data transformations.

  1. Walking droplets in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Boris; Mathieu, Olivier; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, coalescence may be avoided: the drop bounces permanently. Upon increasing forcing acceleration, a drop interacts with the wave it generates, and becomes a ``walker'' with a well defined velocity. In this work, we investigate the confinement of a walker in a mono-dimensional geometry. The system consists of linear submarine channels used as waveguides for a walker. By studying the dynamics of walkers in those channels, we discover some 1D-2D transition. We also propose a model based on an analogy with ``Quantum Wires.'' Finally, we consider the situation of a walker in a circular submarine channel, and examine the behavior of several walking droplets in this system. We show the quantization of the drop distances, and correlate it to their bouncing modes.

  2. Snell's law and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Pucci, Giuseppe; Aubin, Benjamin; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    Droplets walking on the surface of a vibrating bath have been shown to exhibit a number of quantum-like features. We here present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of such droplets crossing a linear step corresponding to a reduction in bath depth. When the step is sufficiently large, the walker reflects off the step; otherwise, it is refracted as it crosses the step. Particular attention is given to an examination of the regime in which the droplet obeys a form of Snell's Law, a behavior captured in accompanying simulations. Attempts to provide theoretical rationale for the dependence of the effective refractive index on the system parameters are described. Supported by NSF through CMMI-1333242.

  3. Random walks on reductive groups

    CERN Document Server

    Benoist, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The classical theory of Random Walks describes the asymptotic behavior of sums of independent identically distributed random real variables. This book explains the generalization of this theory to products of independent identically distributed random matrices with real coefficients. Under the assumption that the action of the matrices is semisimple – or, equivalently, that the Zariski closure of the group generated by these matrices is reductive - and under suitable moment assumptions, it is shown that the norm of the products of such random matrices satisfies a number of classical probabilistic laws. This book includes necessary background on the theory of reductive algebraic groups, probability theory and operator theory, thereby providing a modern introduction to the topic.

  4. Symbolic walk in regular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Leonardo; Carlo, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    We find that a symbolic walk (SW)—performed by a walker with memory given by a Bernoulli shift—is able to distinguish between the random or chaotic topology of a given network. We show this result by means of studying the undirected baker network, which is defined by following the Ulam approach for the baker transformation in order to introduce the effect of deterministic chaos into its structure. The chaotic topology is revealed through the central role played by the nodes associated with the positions corresponding to the shortest periodic orbits of the generating map. They are the overwhelmingly most visited nodes in the limit cycles at which the SW asymptotically arrives. Our findings contribute to linking deterministic chaotic dynamics with the properties of networks constructed using the Ulam approach.

  5. Reduction and technical simplification of testing protocol for walking based on repeatability analyses: An Interreg IVa pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define the most appropriate gait measurement protocols to be used in our future studies in the Mobility in Ageing project. A group of young healthy volunteers took part in the study. Each subject carried out a 10-metre walking test at five different speeds (preferred, very slow, very fast, slow, and fast. Each walking speed was repeated three times, making a total of 15 trials which were carried out in a random order. Each trial was simultaneously analysed by three observers using three different technical approaches: a stop watch, photo cells and electronic kinematic dress. In analysing the repeatability of the trials, the results showed that of the five self-selected walking speeds, three of them (preferred, very fast, and very slow had a significantly higher repeatability of the average walking velocity, step length and cadence than the other two speeds. Additionally, the data showed that one of the three technical methods for gait assessment has better metric characteristics than the other two. In conclusion, based on repeatability, technical and organizational simplification, this study helped us to successfully define a simple and reliable walking test to be used in the main study of the project.

  6. Blindman-Walking Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization methods are all implemented with the hypothesis of unknowing the mathematic express of objective objection. Using the human analogy innovative method, the one-dimension blind-walking optimal method is proposed in this paper. The theory and the algorithm of this method includes halving, doubling, reversing probing step and verifying the applicability condition. Double-step is available to make current point moving to the extremum point. Half-step is available to accelerate convergence. In order to improve the optimization, the applicability condition decides whether update current point or not. The operation process, algorithmic flow chart and characteristic analysis of the method were given. Two optimization problems with unimodal or multimodal objective function were solved by the proposed method respectively. The simulation result shows that the proposed method is better than the ordinary method. The proposed method has the merit of rapid convergence, little calculation capacity, wide applicable range, etc. Taking the method as innovative kernel, the random research method, feasible direction method and complex shape method were improved. Taking the innovative content of this paper as innovative kernel, a monograph was published. The other innovations of the monograph are listed, such as applied algorithm of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT qualifications on judging the restriction extremum point, the design step of computing software, the complementarity and derivation of Powell criterion, the method of keeping the complex shape not to deduce dimension and the analysis of gradual optimization characteristic, the reinforced wall of inner point punish function method, the analysis of problem with constrained monstrosity extremum point, the improvement of Newton method and the validation of optimization idea of blind walking repeatedly, the explanation of later-day optimization method, the conformity of seeking algorithm needing the

  7. Law of large numbers for non-elliptic random walks in dynamic random environments

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den; Sidoravicius, Vladas

    2011-01-01

    We prove a law of large numbers for a class of $\\Z^d$-valued random walks in dynamic random environments, including \\emph{non-elliptic} examples. We assume that the random environment has a mixing property called \\emph{conditional cone-mixing} and that the random walk tends to stay inside space-time cones. The proof is based on a generalization of the regeneration scheme developed by Comets and Zeitouni for static random environments, which was adapted by Avena, den Hollander and Redig to dynamic random environments. We exhibit some one-dimensional examples to which our result applies. In some cases, the sign of the speed can be determined.

  8. Theoretical analysis of the state of balance in bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmani, Flavio; Park, Edward J

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis based on classic mechanical principles of balance of forces in bipedal walking. Theories on the state of balance have been proposed in the area of humanoid robotics and although the laws of classical mechanics are equivalent to both humans and humanoid robots, the resulting motion obtained with these theories is unnatural when compared to normal human gait. Humanoid robots are commonly controlled using the zero moment point (ZMP) with the condition that the ZMP cannot exit the foot-support area. This condition is derived from a physical model in which the biped must always walk under dynamically balanced conditions, making the centre of pressure (CoP) and the ZMP always coincident. On the contrary, humans follow a different strategy characterized by a 'controlled fall' at the end of the swing phase. In this paper, we present a thorough theoretical analysis of the state of balance and show that the ZMP can exit the support area, and its location is representative of the imbalance state characterized by the separation between the ZMP and the CoP. Since humans exhibit this behavior, we also present proof-of-concept results of a single subject walking on an instrumented treadmill at different speeds (from slow 0.7 m/s to fast 2.0 m/s walking with increments of 0.1 m/s) with the motion recorded using an optical motion tracking system. In order to evaluate the experimental results of this model, the coefficient of determination (R2) is used to correlate the measured ground reaction forces and the resultant of inertial and gravitational forces (anteroposterior R² = 0.93, mediolateral R² = 0.89, and vertical R² = 0.86) indicating that there is a high correlation between the measurements. The results suggest that the subject exhibits a complete dynamically balanced gait during slow speeds while experiencing a controlled fall (end of swing phase) with faster speeds. This is quantified with the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD

  9. A novel walking speed estimation scheme and its application to treadmill control for gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jungwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual reality (VR technology along with treadmill training (TT can effectively provide goal-oriented practice and promote improved motor learning in patients with neurological disorders. Moreover, the VR + TT scheme may enhance cognitive engagement for more effective gait rehabilitation and greater transfer to over ground walking. For this purpose, we developed an individualized treadmill controller with a novel speed estimation scheme using swing foot velocity, which can enable user-driven treadmill walking (UDW to more closely simulate over ground walking (OGW during treadmill training. OGW involves a cyclic acceleration-deceleration profile of pelvic velocity that contrasts with typical treadmill-driven walking (TDW, which constrains a person to walk at a preset constant speed. In this study, we investigated the effects of the proposed speed adaptation controller by analyzing the gait kinematics of UDW and TDW, which were compared to those of OGW at three pre-determined velocities. Methods Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk in each mode (TDW, UDW, and OGW at three pre-determined speeds (0.5 m/s, 1.0 m/s, and 1.5 m/s with real time feedback provided through visual displays. Temporal-spatial gait data and 3D pelvic kinematics were analyzed and comparisons were made between UDW on a treadmill, TDW, and OGW. Results The observed step length, cadence, and walk ratio defined as the ratio of stride length to cadence were not significantly different between UDW and TDW. Additionally, the average magnitude of pelvic acceleration peak values along the anterior-posterior direction for each step and the associated standard deviations (variability were not significantly different between the two modalities. The differences between OGW and UDW and TDW were mainly in swing time and cadence, as have been reported previously. Also, step lengths between OGW and TDW were different for 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s gait velocities

  10. The Adaptive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Hallin, Carina Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary organizations operate under turbulent business conditions and must adapt their strategies to ongoing changes. This article argues that sustainable organizational performance is achieved when top management directs and coordinates interactive processes anchored in emerging organizatio......Contemporary organizations operate under turbulent business conditions and must adapt their strategies to ongoing changes. This article argues that sustainable organizational performance is achieved when top management directs and coordinates interactive processes anchored in emerging...... experiential insights from the fast response processes can be aggregated systematically from frontline employees and fed into the slow process of reasoning. When the fast and slow processes interact they form a dynamic system that adapts organizational activities to the changing conditions which identifies...... the adaptive organization....

  11. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Joh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes such as walking, bicycling and transit in auto-oriented cities such as Los Angeles. Although many past studies have analyzed changes in walking travel across the U.S., there is little clarity on the drivers of change. We address this gap by conducting a longitudinal analysis of walking travel in the greater Los Angeles area from 2001 to 2009. We use travel diary and household data from regional and national surveys to analyze changes in walking trip shares and rates across our study area. Results show that walking has significantly increased across most of Los Angeles, and that increases in walking trips generally correspond with increases in population, employment, and transit service densities. Estimates from fixed-effects regression analysis generally suggest a positive association between population density and walking, and that higher increases in transit stop density are correlated with increased walking trips to and from transit stops. These findings illustrate how regional planning efforts to pursue a coordinated land use-transit planning strategy can help promote walking in auto-oriented or vehicle adopting cities.

  12. Effects of a Flexibility and Relaxation Programme, Walking, and Nordic Walking on Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reuter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD progress despite optimized medical treatment. The present study investigated the effects of a flexibility and relaxation programme, walking, and Nordic walking (NW on walking speed, stride length, stride length variability, Parkinson-specific disability (UPDRS, and health-related quality of life (PDQ 39. 90 PD patients were randomly allocated to the 3 treatment groups. Patients participated in a 6-month study with 3 exercise sessions per week, each lasting 70 min. Assessment after completion of the training showed that pain was reduced in all groups, and balance and health-related quality of life were improved. Furthermore, walking, and Nordic walking improved stride length, gait variability, maximal walking speed, exercise capacity at submaximal level, and PD disease-specific disability on the UPDRS in addition. Nordic walking was superior to the flexibility and relaxation programme and walking in improving postural stability, stride length, gait pattern and gait variability. No significant injuries occurred during the training. All patients of the Nordic walking group continued Nordic walking after completing the study.

  13. Community walking training program improves walking function and social participation in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinKyu; Cho, KiHun; Lee, WanHee

    2014-01-01

    Stroke patients live with balance and walking dysfunction. Walking is the most important factor for independent community activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a community walking training program (CWTP) within the real environment on walking function and social participation in chronic stroke patients. Twenty-two stroke patients (13 male, 50.45 years old, post stroke duration 231.64 days) were randomly assigned to either the CWTP group or the control group. All subjects participated in the same standard rehabilitation program consisting of physical and occupational therapy for 60 min per day, five times a week, for four weeks. In addition, the CWTP group participated in CWTP for 30 min per day, five times a week, for four weeks. Walking function was assessed using the 10-m walk test (measurement for 10-meter walking speed), 6-min walk assessment (measurement of gait length for 6-minutes), and community gait assessment. Social participation was assessed using a social participation domain of stroke impact scale. In walking function, greater improvement was observed in the CWTP group compared with the control group (P participation improved more in the CWTP group compared with the control group (P participation in chronic stroke patients. Therefore, we suggest that CWTP within the real environment may be an effective method for improving walking function and social participation of chronic stroke patients when added to standard rehabilitation.

  14. Walking dreams in congenital and acquired paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurat, Marie-Thérèse; Agbakou, Maité; Attigui, Patricia; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    To test if dreams contain remote or never-experienced motor skills, we collected during 6 weeks dream reports from 15 paraplegics and 15 healthy subjects. In 9/10 subjects with spinal cord injury and in 5/5 with congenital paraplegia, voluntary leg movements were reported during dream, including feelings of walking (46%), running (8.6%), dancing (8%), standing up (6.3%), bicycling (6.3%), and practicing sports (skiing, playing basketball, swimming). Paraplegia patients experienced walking dreams (38.2%) just as often as controls (28.7%). There was no correlation between the frequency of walking dreams and the duration of paraplegia. In contrast, patients were rarely paraplegic in dreams. Subjects who had never walked or stopped walking 4-64 years prior to this study still experience walking in their dreams, suggesting that a cerebral walking program, either genetic or more probably developed via mirror neurons (activated when observing others performing an action) is reactivated during sleep.

  15. The work of walking: a calorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P; Saris, W H; Schoffelen, P F; Van Ingen Schenau, G J; Ten Hoor, F

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were designed to test the traditional assumption that during level walking all of the energy from oxidation of fuel appears as heat and no work is done. Work is force expressed through distance, or energy transferred from a man to the environment, but not as heat. While wearing a suit calorimeter in a respiration chamber, five women and five men walked for 70 to 90 min on a level treadmill at 2.5, 4.6, and 6.7 km.h-1 and pedalled a cycle ergometer for 70 to 90 min against 53 and 92 W loads. They also walked with a weighted backpack and against a horizontal load. During cycling, energy from fuel matched heat loss plus the power measured by the ergometer. During walking, however, energy from fuel exceeded that which appeared as heat, meaning that work was done. The power increased with walking speed; values were 14, 29, and 63 W, which represented 11, 12, and 13% of the incremental cost of fuel above the resting level. Vertical and horizontal loads increased the fuel cost and heat loss of walking but did not alter the power output. This work energy did not re-appear as thermal energy during 18 h of recovery. The most likely explanation of the work done is in the inter-action between the foot and the ground, such as compressing the heel of the shoe and bending the sole. We conclude that work is done in level walking.

  16. Walking With’: A Rhythmanalysis of London’s East End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I will be looking at the practice of walking through the lens of rhythmanalysis. The method is brought to attention by Lefebvre’s last book Rhythmanalysis (2004 in which he suggests a way of interrelating space and time; a phenomenological inquiry hinged on the concrete experience of lived life. My interest in the nuance of walking was initially evoked by the structural film Fergus Walking which was made by the film maker William Raban in 1978. I will explore the potential of using structural films in sensitising us to the temporal-spatial relationship of things. The main body of the paper centres around two themes: Firstly I address the primacy of movement as a mode of engaging with the world. It is through ‘muscular consciousness’ (Bachelard 1964: 11 that walking becomes a form of experiential knowing, feeling, connecting and protesting. Secondly, I examine the practices of walking in relation to the radical transformations of the Docklands’ landscape since the beginning of the 1980s. I propose that the contesting interests of different groups can be explored by analysing the rhythmic interactions of their activities. The transition and recomposition of an economy from locally based industrial activities to globalised financial services were manifested in the syncopation of regeneration rhythms to the living rhythms of the Docklands. The fast changing urban landscapes were negotiated through alternative ways of navigating the streets, hence engendering a different set of rhythms.

  17. Quantum walk public-key cryptographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachou, C.; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public-key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that the protocol is secure and analyze the complexity of public key generation and encryption/decryption procedures.

  18. Elements of random walk and diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Oliver C

    2013-01-01

    Presents an important and unique introduction to random walk theory Random walk is a stochastic process that has proven to be a useful model in understanding discrete-state discrete-time processes across a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. Elements of Random Walk and Diffusion Processes provides an interdisciplinary approach by including numerous practical examples and exercises with real-world applications in operations research, economics, engineering, and physics. Featuring an introduction to powerful and general techniques that are used in the application of physical and dynamic

  19. Scaling of random walk betweenness in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, O

    2016-01-01

    The betweenness centrality of graphs using random walk paths instead of geodesics is studied. A scaling collapse with no adjustable parameters is obtained as the graph size $N$ is varied; the scaling curve depends on the graph model. A normalized random betweenness, that counts each walk passing through a node only once, is also defined. It is argued to be more useful and seen to have simpler scaling behavior. In particular, the probability for a random walk on a preferential attachment graph to pass through the root node is found to tend to unity as $N\\rightarrow\\infty.$

  20. Limit cycle walking on a regularized ground

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Henry O

    2012-01-01

    The singular nature of contact problems, such as walking, makes them difficult to analyze mathematically. In this paper we will "regularize" the contact problem of walking by approximating the ground with a smooth repulsive potential energy and a smooth dissipative friction force. Using this model we are able to prove the existence of a limit cycle for a periodically perturbed system which consists of three masses connected by springs. In particular, this limit cycle exists in a symmetry reduced phase. In the unreduced phase space, the motion of the masses resembles walking.

  1. Exponential algorithmic speedup by quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Deotto, E; Farhi, E; Gutmann, S; Spielman, D A; Childs, Andrew M.; Cleve, Richard; Deotto, Enrico; Farhi, Edward; Gutmann, Sam; Spielman, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    We construct an oracular problem that can be solved exponentially faster on a quantum computer than on a classical computer. The quantum algorithm is based on a continuous time quantum walk, and thus employs a different technique from previous quantum algorithms based on quantum Fourier transforms. We show how to implement the quantum walk efficiently in our oracular setting. We then show how this quantum walk can be used to solve our problem by rapidly traversing a graph. Finally, we prove that no classical algorithm can solve this problem with high probability in subexponential time.

  2. Resilience through adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorn, George A. K.; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover’s distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system. PMID:28196372

  3. Using virtual reality to improve walking post-stroke: translation to individuals with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Judith E

    2011-03-01

    Use of virtual reality (VR) technology to improve walking for people post-stroke has been studied for its clinical application since 2004. The hardware and software used to create these systems has varied but has predominantly been constituted by projected environments with users walking on treadmills. Transfer of training from the virtual environment to real-world walking has modest but positive research support. Translation of the research findings to clinical practice has been hampered by commercial availability and costs of the VR systems. Suggestions for how the work for individuals post-stroke might be applied and adapted for individuals with diabetes and other impaired ambulatory conditions include involvement of the target user groups (both practitioners and clients) early in the design and integration of activity and education into the systems.

  4. Variability and stability analysis of walking of transfemoral amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, Claudine C.; Ainsworth, Erik; Polomski, Wojtek; Houdijk, Han

    2010-01-01

    Variability and stability of walking of eight transfemoral amputees and eight healthy controls was studied under four conditions walking inside on a smooth terrain walking while performing a dual-task and walking outside on (ir)regular surfaces Trunk accelerations were recorded with a tri-axial acce

  5. Symmetricity of Distribution for One-Dimensional Hadamard Walk

    CERN Document Server

    Konno, N; Soshi, T; Konno, Norio; Namiki, Takao; Soshi, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we study a one-dimensional quantum random walk with the Hadamard transformation which is often called the Hadamard walk. We construct the Hadamard walk using a transition matrix on probability amplitude and give some results on symmetricity of probability distributions for the Hadamard walk.

  6. Urban Walking and the Pedagogies of the Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon the extensive literature on urban walking and also on almost 60 years' experience of walking the streets, this article argues that there is a pressing need to re-assert the educational value of going for a walk. After a brief discussion of the social significance of the "flaneur," the historic pioneer of urban walking, the article…

  7. Sensitivity Study of Stochastic Walking Load Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Frier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    On flexible structures such as footbridges and long-span floors, walking loads may generate excessive structural vibrations and serviceability problems. The problem is increasing because of the growing tendency to employ long spans in structural design. In many design codes, the vibration...... serviceability limit state is assessed using a walking load model in which the walking parameters are modelled deterministically. However, the walking parameters are stochastic (for instance the weight of the pedestrian is not likely to be the same for every footbridge crossing), and a natural way forward...... investigates whether statistical distributions of bridge response are sensitive to some of the decisions made by the engineer doing the analyses. For the paper a selected part of potential influences are examined and footbridge responses are extracted using Monte-Carlo simulations and focus is on estimating...

  8. Simple expressions for the long walk distance

    CERN Document Server

    Chebotarev, Pavel; Balaji, R

    2011-01-01

    The walk distances in graphs are defined as the result of appropriate transformations of the $\\sum_{k=0}^\\infty(tA)^k$ proximity measures, where $A$ is the weighted adjacency matrix of a connected weighted graph and $t$ is a sufficiently small positive parameter. The walk distances are graph-geodetic, moreover, they converge to the shortest path distance and to the so-called long walk distance as the parameter $t$ approaches its limiting values. In this paper, simple expressions for the long walk distance are obtained. They involve the generalized inverse, minors, and inverses of submatrices of the symmetric irreducible singular M-matrix ${\\cal L}=\\rho I-A,$ where $\\rho$ is the Perron root of $A.$

  9. Levy random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Quantong; Zheng, Zhiming; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Random walks constitute a fundamental mechanism for many dynamics taking place on complex networks. Besides, as a more realistic description of our society, multiplex networks have been receiving a growing interest, as well as the dynamical processes that occur on top of them. Here, inspired by one specific model of random walks that seems to be ubiquitous across many scientific fields, the Levy flight, we study a new navigation strategy on top of multiplex networks. Capitalizing on spectral graph and stochastic matrix theories, we derive analytical expressions for the mean first passage time and the average time to reach a node on these networks. Moreover, we also explore the efficiency of Levy random walks, which we found to be very different as compared to the single layer scenario, accounting for the structure and dynamics inherent to the multiplex network. Finally, by comparing with some other important random walk processes defined on multiplex networks, we find that in some region of the parameters, a ...

  10. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task like walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during...... walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 years, N = 20) could learn a specific sequence...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...

  11. Community walking in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Robyn M; Morris, Meg E; Woollacott, Marjorie H; Brauer, Sandra G

    2012-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease often have walking difficulty, and this is likely to be exacerbated while walking in places in the community, where people are likely to face greater and more varied challenges. This study aims to understand the facilitators and the barriers to walking in the community perceived by people with Parkinson's disease. This qualitative study involved 5 focus groups (n = 34) of people with Parkinson's disease and their partners residing in metropolitan and rural regions in Queensland, Australia. Results found that people with PD reported to use internal personal strategies as facilitators to community walking, but identified primarily external factors, particularly the environmental factors as barriers. The adoption of strategies or the use of facilitators allows people with Parkinson's disease to cope so that participants often did not report disability.

  12. The evolutionary transition to sideways-walking gaits in brachyurans was accompanied by a reduction in the number of motor neurons innervating proximal leg musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G; Belanger, Jim H

    2013-11-01

    The forwards-walking portly crab, Libinia emarginata is an ancient brachyuran. Its phylogenetic position and behavioral repertoire make it an excellent candidate to reveal the adaptations, which were required for brachyuran crabs to complete their transition to sideways-walking from their forwards-walking ancestors. Previously we showed that in common with other forwards-walking (but distantly related) crustaceans, L. emarginata relies more heavily on its more numerous proximal musculature to propel itself forward than its sideways-walking closer relatives. We investigated if the proximal musculature of L. emarginata is innervated by a greater number of motor neurons than that of sideways-walking brachyurans. We found the distal musculature of spider crabs is innervated by a highly conserved number of motor neurons. However, innervation of its proximal musculature is more numerous than in closely-related (sideways-walking) species, resembling in number and morphology those described for forwards-walking crustaceans. We propose that transition from forward- to sideways-walking in crustaceans involved a decreased role for the proximal leg in favor of the more distal merus-carpus joint.

  13. Holographic walking from tachyon DBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutasov, David [EFI and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Av., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lin, Jennifer, E-mail: jenlin@uchicago.edu [EFI and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Av., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Parnachev, Andrei [Institute Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University, PO Box 9506, Leiden 2300RA (Netherlands)

    2012-10-11

    We use holography to study conformal phase transitions, which are believed to be realized in four dimensional QCD and play an important role in walking technicolor models of electroweak symmetry breaking. At strong coupling they can be modeled by the non-linear dynamics of a tachyonic scalar field with mass close to the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound in anti-de Sitter spacetime. Taking the action for this field to have a tachyon-Dirac-Born-Infeld form gives rise to models that resemble hard and soft wall AdS/QCD, with a dynamically generated wall. For hard wall models, the highly excited spectrum has the KK form m{sub n}{approx}n; in the soft wall case we exhibit potentials with m{sub n}{approx}n{sup {alpha}}, 0<{alpha} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1/2. We investigate the finite temperature phase structure and find first or second order symmetry restoration transitions, depending on the behavior of the potential near the origin of field space.

  14. Design of a walking robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, William; Dowling, Kevin

    1994-01-01

    Carnegie Mellon University's Autonomous Planetary Exploration Program (APEX) is currently building the Daedalus robot; a system capable of performing extended autonomous planetary exploration missions. Extended autonomy is an important capability because the continued exploration of the Moon, Mars and other solid bodies within the solar system will probably be carried out by autonomous robotic systems. There are a number of reasons for this - the most important of which are the high cost of placing a man in space, the high risk associated with human exploration and communication delays that make teleoperation infeasible. The Daedalus robot represents an evolutionary approach to robot mechanism design and software system architecture. Daedalus incorporates key features from a number of predecessor systems. Using previously proven technologies, the Apex project endeavors to encompass all of the capabilities necessary for robust planetary exploration. The Ambler, a six-legged walking machine was developed by CMU for demonstration of technologies required for planetary exploration. In its five years of life, the Ambler project brought major breakthroughs in various areas of robotic technology. Significant progress was made in: mechanism and control, by introducing a novel gait pattern (circulating gait) and use of orthogonal legs; perception, by developing sophisticated algorithms for map building; and planning, by developing and implementing the Task Control Architecture to coordinate tasks and control complex system functions. The APEX project is the successor of the Ambler project.

  15. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuiman Matthew W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681 and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92. Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p p p > 0.05 after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition

  16. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Svendsen, Morten B; Nørreslet, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...... joint abductor moment. Several EMG parameters increased significantly when walking on high-heels. The results indicate a large increase in bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint directly caused by the increased knee joint extensor moment during high-heeled walking, which may explain the observed higher...

  17. Momentum Dynamics of One Dimensional Quantum Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, I; Sherman, P J; Naguleswaran, S; Fuss, Ian; White, langord B.; Sherman, Peter J.; Naguleswaran, Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    We derive the momentum space dynamic equations and state functions for one dimensional quantum walks by using linear systems and Lie group theory. The momentum space provides an analytic capability similar to that contributed by the z transform in discrete systems theory. The state functions at each time step are expressed as a simple sum of three Chebyshev polynomials. The functions provide an analytic expression for the development of the walks with time.

  18. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejczyk Marcin; Wiecek Magdalena; Szymura Jadwiga; Szygula Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group) and lean body mass (HLBM group). In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and maximal heart rate were me...

  19. On a directionally reinforced random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arka; Roitershtein, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We consider a generalized version of a directionally reinforced random walk, which was originally introduced by Mauldin, Monticino, and von Weizs\\"{a}cker in \\cite{drw}. Our main result is a stable limit theorem for the position of the random walk in higher dimensions. This extends a result of Horv\\'{a}th and Shao \\cite{limits} that was previously obtained in dimension one only (however, in a more stringent functional form).

  20. Balancing of the anthropomorphous robot walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaev, V. M.; Nikitina, D. V.; Fadeev, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Anthropomorphic robots are designed a human environment operates: buildings and structures, cabs and etc. The movement of these robots is carried out by walking which provides high throughput to overcome natural and manmade obstacles. The article presents some algorithm results for dynamic walking on the anthropomorphic robot AR601 example. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University.

  1. Go Naked: Diapers Affect Infant Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Whitney G.; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants’ poor balance and wide stance. We show that walking is adversely affected by old-fashioned cloth diapers, and that even modern disposable diapers—habitually worn by most infants in the sample—incur...

  2. Feedback control system for walking in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, J S; Phillips, C A; Heaton, H H

    1984-01-01

    A computer control stimulation system is described which has been successfully tested by allowing a paraplegic subject to stand and walk through closed loop control. This system is a Z80 microprocessor system with eight channels of analog to digital and 16 channels of digital to analog control. Programming is written in CPM and works quite successfully for maintaining lower body postural control in paraplegics. Further expansion of this system would enable a feedback control system for multidirectional walking in man.

  3. The Snail Takes a Walk with Me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宜鸣; 乐伟国

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 I'm a snake. Today God gives me a job-I should take a walk with the snail. The snail moves too slowly. I have to scare him. He looks at me, full of shame. I am very angry. I pull him, and even kick.The snail cries, so he stops walking. I feel quite helpless.

  4. Walking Out of the Family Towards Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    WALKING in any city or ruralarea in China today, one will seewomen with confidence andpride, with their own work and lives.There is not much difference between theurban and rural women in dress. Theirfaces portray contentment and happiness.These are significant changes which havebeen brought about by women walking outof the family over the past near 50 years,and getting involved in society, alteringtheir dependence on men and making thempeople of dignity. The government knew clearly that to

  5. A Walk in the Semantic Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob; Zerny, Ian

    2011-01-01

    To celebrate the 20th anniversary of PEPM, we are inviting you to a walk in the semantic park and to inter-derive reduction-based and reduction-free negational normalization functions.......To celebrate the 20th anniversary of PEPM, we are inviting you to a walk in the semantic park and to inter-derive reduction-based and reduction-free negational normalization functions....

  6. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  7. Factors associated with daily walking of dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Christian, Hayley E; Christley, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity is beneficial to the health of both people and animals. The role of regular exercise undertaken together, such as dog walking, is a public health interest of mutual benefit. Exploration of barriers and incentives to regular dog walking by owners is now required so that effective interventions to promote it can be designed. This study explored a well-characterised cross-sectional dataset of 276 dogs and owners from Cheshire, UK, for evidence of factors asso...

  8. Design with the feet: walking methods and participatory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille; Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of walking methods and their relation to participatory design (PD). The paper includes a study of walking methods found in the literature and an empirical study of transect walks in a PD project. From this analysis, we identify central attributes of, and challenges...... to, PD walks. Walking with people in the context of design is a natural activity for the participatory designer, who acknowledges the importance of immersion and relationships in design. However, the various intentions of walking approaches indicate an underacknowledged awareness of walking methods....... With this study, we take a step towards a methodological framework for "design with the feet" in PD....

  9. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2011-03-15

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 min of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-min training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed.

  10. Rhythm Pattern of Sole through Electrification of the Human Body When Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Kiyoaki; Wada, Takayuki; Tohyama, Shigeki

    The rhythm of automatic cyclic movements such as walking is known to be generated by a rhythm generator called CPG in the spinal cord. The measurement of rhythm characteristics in walking is considered to be important for analyzing human bipedal walking and adaptive walking on irregular terrain. In particular, the soles that contact the terrain surface perform flexible movements similar to the movement of the fins of a lungfish, which is considered to be the predecessor of land animals. The sole movements are believed to be a basic movement acquired during prehistoric times. The detailed rhythm pattern of sole motion is considered to be important. We developed a method for measuring electrification without installing device on a subject's body and footwear for stabilizing the electrification of the human body. We measured the rhythm pattern of 20 subjects including 4 infants when walking by using this system and the corresponding equipment. Therefore, we confirmed the commonality of the correlative rhythm patterns of 20 subjects. Further, with regard to an individual subject, the reproducibility of a rhythm pattern with strong correlation coefficient > 0.93 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD) concerning rhythms of trials that are differently conducted on adult subjects could be confirmed.

  11. A comparison of multi-segment foot kinematics during level overground and treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchin, Kirsten; Orendurff, Michael; Karol, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Previous work comparing treadmill and overground walking has focused on lower extremity motion and kinetics, with few identified differences. However, a comparison of multi-segment foot kinematics between these conditions has not been previously reported. Sagittal ankle motion using a single rigid body foot model and three-dimensional hindfoot and forefoot kinematics were compared during barefoot, level, overground walking at a self-selected speed and treadmill walking at a similar speed for 20 healthy adults. Slight differences were seen in ankle plantarflexion and hindfoot plantarflexion during first rocker, as well as peak forefoot eversion and abduction, however all changes were less than 3 degrees , and most were within the day-to-day repeatability. These results indicate that foot mechanics as determined using a multi-segment foot model were similar between overground and treadmill walking at similar speeds in healthy adults. Treadmill protocols may provide a controlled method to analyze a patient's ability to adapt to walking at different speeds and surface slopes, which are encountered often during ambulation of daily living.

  12. Gait Parameter Adjustments for Walking on a Treadmill at Preferred, Slower, and Faster Speeds in Older Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of ligamentous laxity, hypotonia, and decrements associated with aging lead to stability-enhancing foot placement adaptations during routine overground walking at a younger age in adults with Down syndrome (DS compared to their peers with typical development (TD. Our purpose here was to examine real-time adaptations in older adults with DS by testing their responses to walking on a treadmill at their preferred speed and at speeds slower and faster than preferred. We found that older adults with DS were able to adapt their gait to slower and faster than preferred treadmill speeds; however, they maintained their stability-enhancing foot placements at all speeds compared to their peers with TD. All adults adapted their gait patterns similarly in response to faster and slower than preferred treadmill-walking speeds. They increased stride frequency and stride length, maintained step width, and decreased percent stance as treadmill speed increased. Older adults with DS, however, adjusted their stride frequencies significantly less than their peers with TD. Our results show that older adults with DS have the capacity to adapt their gait parameters in response to different walking speeds while also supporting the need for intervention to increase gait stability.

  13. Noisy quantum walks of two indistinguishable interacting particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siloi, Ilaria; Benedetti, Claudia; Piccinini, Enrico; Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Bordone, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of continuous-time two-particle quantum walks on a one-dimensional noisy lattice. Depending on the initial condition, we show how the interplay between particle indistinguishability and interaction determines distinct propagation regimes. A realistic model for the environment is considered by introducing non-Gaussian noise as time-dependent fluctuations of the tunneling amplitudes between adjacent sites. We observe that the combined effect of particle interaction and fast noise (weak coupling with the environment) provides a faster propagation compared to the noiseless case. This effect can be understood in terms of the band structure of the Hubbard model, and a detailed analysis as a function of both noise and system parameters is presented.

  14. A simplified analytical random walk model for proton dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weiguang; Merchant, Thomas E.; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an analytical random walk model for proton dose calculation in a laterally homogeneous medium. A formula for the spatial fluence distribution of primary protons is derived. The variance of the spatial distribution is in the form of a distance-squared law of the angular distribution. To improve the accuracy of dose calculation in the Bragg peak region, the energy spectrum of the protons is used. The accuracy is validated against Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with either air gaps or a slab of bone inserted. The algorithm accurately reflects the dose dependence on the depth of the bone and can deal with small-field dosimetry. We further applied the algorithm to patients’ cases in the highly heterogeneous head and pelvis sites and used a gamma test to show the reasonable accuracy of the algorithm in these sites. Our algorithm is fast for clinical use.

  15. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Godfrey; Knott, Paul; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv, E-mail: V.Kendon@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line), we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunnelling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear in the number of steps down to zero as the percolation probability decreases towards the critical point. This provides an example of fractional scaling in quantum-walk dynamics.

  16. Levy Walks Suboptimal under Predation Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato S Abe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in movement ecology is to understand how animals move in nature. Previous studies have predicted that animals should perform a special class of random walks, called Lévy walk, to obtain more targets. However, some empirical studies did not support this hypothesis, and the relationship between search strategy and ecological factors is still unclear. We focused on ecological factors, such as predation risk, and analyzed whether Lévy walk may not be favored. It was remarkable that the ecological factors often altered an optimal search strategy from Lévy walk to Brownian walk, depending on the speed of the predator's movement, density of predators, etc. This occurred because higher target encounter rates simultaneously led searchers to higher predation risks. Our findings indicate that animals may not perform Lévy walks often, and we suggest that it is crucial to consider the ecological context for evaluating the search strategy performed by animals in the field.

  17. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  18. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio /2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio /2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  19. Exploring scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L; Roland, J; Acevedo, Olga Lopez; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2006-01-01

    A quantum walk, \\emph{i.e.}, the quantum evolution of a particle on a graph, is termed \\emph{scalar} if the internal space of the moving particle (often called the coin) has a dimension one. Here, we study the existence of scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs, which are built from the generators of a group. After deriving a necessary condition on these generators for the existence of a scalar quantum walk, we present a general method to express the evolution operator of the walk, assuming homogeneity of the evolution. We use this necessary condition and the subsequent constructive method to investigate the existence of scalar quantum walks on Cayley graphs of various groups presented with two or three generators. In this restricted framework, we classify all groups -- in terms of relations between their generators -- that admit scalar quantum walks, and we also derive the form of the most general evolution operator. Finally, we point out some interesting special cases, and extend our study to a few examples ...

  20. Walking in postpoliomyelitis syndrome: The relationships between time-scored tests, walking in daily life and perceived mobility problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.D. Horemans (Herwin); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); A. Beelen (Anita); H.J. Stam (Henk); F. Nollet (Frans)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare walking test results with walking in daily life, and to investigate the relationships between walking tests, walking activity in daily life, and perceived mobility problems in patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. Subjects: Twenty-four ambulant patients with po

  1. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Macleod

    Full Text Available Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation.

  2. Spatial and temporal gait characteristics of elderly individuals during backward and forward walking with shoes and barefoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elboim-Gabyzon, Michal; Rotchild, Shira

    2017-02-01

    Backward walking (BW) is an inherent component of mobility and function in daily activities, particularly indoors, when it is more likely that a person is barefoot. No studies to date have compared the spatio-temporal characteristics of BW with and without shoes in elderly individuals. This study compared spatio-temporal measures of BW and forward walking (FW) among elderly individuals while barefoot or wearing shoes. Forty-seven elderly individuals (13 men and 34 women, 76.7±7.7years of age) were evaluated. Participants were requested to walk at a comfortable, self-selected pace across the GAITRite(®) walkway for three trials under each of four conditions: walking forward (FW) and BW wearing their own comfortable low-heeled walking shoes and FW and BW walking without shoes. Gait speed, stride length and cadence were significantly reduced in BW versus FW, with an increase in double limb support (DLS), both with and without shoes. Barefoot BW resulted in significantly increased gait speed and cadence, and decreased DLS compared to BW with shoes. BW stride length was not affected by footwear. While barefoot FW was also associated with a significant increase in cadence and decrease in DLS time compared to walking with shoes, it decreased stride length and had no detrimental effect on gait speed. Assessment of the spatio-temporal parameters of walking barefoot and with shoes during FW and BW can contribute to our understanding of the ability of elderly individuals to adapt to changing walking conditions, and should be included in the assessment of functional mobility of elderly individuals.

  3. Angular momentum in human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh; Popovic, Marko

    2008-02-01

    Angular momentum is a conserved physical quantity for isolated systems where no external moments act about a body's center of mass (CM). However, in the case of legged locomotion, where the body interacts with the environment (ground reaction forces), there is no a priori reason for this relationship to hold. A key hypothesis in this paper is that angular momentum is highly regulated throughout the walking cycle about all three spatial directions [|Lt| approximately 0], and therefore horizontal ground reaction forces and the center of pressure trajectory can be explained predominantly through an analysis that assumes zero net moment about the body's CM. Using a 16-segment human model and gait data for 10 study participants, we found that calculated zero-moment forces closely match experimental values (Rx2=0.91; Ry2=0.90). Additionally, the centroidal moment pivot (point where a line parallel to the ground reaction force, passing through the CM, intersects the ground) never leaves the ground support base, highlighting how closely the body regulates angular momentum. Principal component analysis was used to examine segmental contributions to whole-body angular momentum. We found that whole-body angular momentum is small, despite substantial segmental momenta, indicating large segment-to-segment cancellations ( approximately 95% medio-lateral, approximately 70% anterior-posterior and approximately 80% vertical). Specifically, we show that adjacent leg-segment momenta are balanced in the medio-lateral direction (left foot momentum cancels right foot momentum, etc.). Further, pelvis and abdomen momenta are balanced by leg, chest and head momenta in the anterior-posterior direction, and leg momentum is balanced by upper-body momentum in the vertical direction. Finally, we discuss the determinants of gait in the context of these segment-to-segment cancellations of angular momentum.

  4. Cochlea segmentation using iterated random walks with shape prior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Pujadas, Esmeralda; Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Ceresa, Mario; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear implants can restore hearing to deaf or partially deaf patients. In order to plan the intervention, a model from high resolution µCT images is to be built from accurate cochlea segmentations and then, adapted to a patient-specific model. Thus, a precise segmentation is required to build such a model. We propose a new framework for segmentation of µCT cochlear images using random walks where a region term is combined with a distance shape prior weighted by a confidence map to adjust its influence according to the strength of the image contour. Then, the region term can take advantage of the high contrast between the background and foreground and the distance prior guides the segmentation to the exterior of the cochlea as well as to less contrasted regions inside the cochlea. Finally, a refinement is performed preserving the topology using a topological method and an error control map to prevent boundary leakage. We tested the proposed approach with 10 datasets and compared it with the latest techniques with random walks and priors. The experiments suggest that this method gives promising results for cochlea segmentation.

  5. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group = 21, walking group = 18, patient education group = 17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Domestic cat walking parallels human constrained optimization: optimization strategies and the comparison of normal and sensory deficient individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, John E A; Gutmann, Anne; Randev, Jabina; Hulliger, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate how fundamental gait parameters used in walking (stride length, frequency, speed) are selected by cats we compared stride characteristics selected when walking on a solid surface to those selected when they were constrained to specific stride lengths using a pedestal walkway. Humans spontaneously select substantially different stride length-stride frequency-speed relationships in walking when each of these parameters is constrained, as in walking to a metronome beat (frequency constrained), evenly spaced floor markers (stride length constrained) or on a treadmill (speed constrained). In humans such adjustments largely provide energetic economy under the prescribed walking conditions. Cats show a similar shift in gait parameter selection between conditions as observed in humans. This suggests that cats (and by extension, quadrupedal mammals) also select gait parameters to optimize walking cost-effectiveness. Cats with a profound peripheral sensory deficit (from pyridoxine overdose) appeared to parallel the optimization seen in healthy cats, but without the same level of precision. Recent studies in humans suggest that gait optimization may proceed in two stages - a fast perception-based stage that provides the initial gait selection strategy which is then fine-tuned by feedback. The sensory deficit cats appeared unable to accomplish the feedback-dependent aspect of this process.

  7. Kinematic evaluation of virtual walking trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Gabriel; Olivier, Anne-Hélène; Marchal, Maud; Pettré, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Virtual walking, a fundamental task in Virtual Reality (VR), is greatly influenced by the locomotion interface being used, by the specificities of input and output devices, and by the way the virtual environment is represented. No matter how virtual walking is controlled, the generation of realistic virtual trajectories is absolutely required for some applications, especially those dedicated to the study of walking behaviors in VR, navigation through virtual places for architecture, rehabilitation and training. Previous studies focused on evaluating the realism of locomotion trajectories have mostly considered the result of the locomotion task (efficiency, accuracy) and its subjective perception (presence, cybersickness). Few focused on the locomotion trajectory itself, but in situation of geometrically constrained task. In this paper, we study the realism of unconstrained trajectories produced during virtual walking by addressing the following question: did the user reach his destination by virtually walking along a trajectory he would have followed in similar real conditions? To this end, we propose a comprehensive evaluation framework consisting on a set of trajectographical criteria and a locomotion model to generate reference trajectories. We consider a simple locomotion task where users walk between two oriented points in space. The travel path is analyzed both geometrically and temporally in comparison to simulated reference trajectories. In addition, we demonstrate the framework over a user study which considered an initial set of common and frequent virtual walking conditions, namely different input devices, output display devices, control laws, and visualization modalities. The study provides insight into the relative contributions of each condition to the overall realism of the resulting virtual trajectories.

  8. Assessing walking behaviors of selected subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Masurier, Guy C; Bauman, Adrian E; Corbin, Charles B; Konopack, James F; Umstattd, Renee M; VAN Emmerik, Richard E A

    2008-07-01

    Recent innovations in physical activity (PA) assessment have made it possible to assess the walking behaviors of a wide variety of populations. Objective measurement methods (e.g., pedometers, accelerometers) have been widely used to assess walking and other prevalent types of PA. Questionnaires suitable for international populations (e.g., the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire) and measurement techniques for the assessment of gait patterns in disabled populations allow for the study of walking and its health benefits among many populations. Results of studies using the aforementioned techniques indicate that children are more active than adolescents and adolescents are more active than adults. Males, particularly young males, are typically more active than females. The benefits associated with regular participation in PA for youth and walking for older adults have been well documented, although improvements in the assessments of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial parameters must be made if we are to fully understand the benefits of walking for people of all ages. Most youth meet appropriate age-related PA activity recommendations, but adults, particularly older adults and adults with disabilities, are less likely to meet PA levels necessary for the accrual of health benefits. International studies indicate variation in walking by culture. It is clear, however, that walking is a prevalent form of PA across countries and a movement form that has great potential in global PA promotion. Continued development of measurement techniques that allow for the study of individualized gait patterns will help us add to the already rich body of knowledge on chronically disabled populations and allow for individual prescriptions for these populations.

  9. Energy efficient walking with central pattern generators: from passive dynamic walking to biologically inspired control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, B.W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2009-01-01

    Like human walking, passive dynamic walking—i.e. walking down a slope with no actuation except gravity—is energy efficient by exploiting the natural dynamics. In the animal world, neural oscillators termed central pattern generators (CPGs) provide the basic rhythm for muscular activity in locomotion

  10. The associated random walk and martingales in random walks with stationary increments

    CERN Document Server

    Grey, D R

    2010-01-01

    We extend the notion of the associated random walk and the Wald martingale in random walks where the increments are independent and identically distributed to the more general case of stationary ergodic increments. Examples are given where the increments are Markovian or Gaussian, and an application in queueing is considered.

  11. Does walking strategy in older people change as a function of walking distance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najafi, Bijan; Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates whether the spatio-temporal parameters of gait in the elderly vary as a function of walking distance. The gait pattern of older subjects (n = 27) over both short (SWD <10 m) and long (LWD > 20 in) walking was evaluated using an ambulatory device consisting of body-worn sensor

  12. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  13. Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Rutgers, AWF; Van Weerden, TW

    1998-01-01

    Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, effects of changes in voluntary control were studied by asking PD patients and age-matched healthy subjects to adapt their walking pattern to visual cues result

  14. Motor adaptation training for faster relearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Laura A; Vasudevan, Erin V L; Bastian, Amy J

    2011-10-19

    Adaptation is an error-driven motor learning process that can account for predictable changes in the environment (e.g., walking on ice) or in ourselves (e.g., injury). Our ability to recall and build upon adapted motor patterns across days is essential to this learning process. We investigated how different training paradigms affect the day-to-day memory of an adapted walking pattern. Healthy human adults walked on a split-belt treadmill, and returned the following day to assess recall, relearning rate, and performance. In the first experiment, one group adapted and de-adapted (i.e., washed-out the learning) several times on day 1 to practice the initial stage of learning where errors are large; another group adapted only one time and then practiced in the adapted ("learned") state where errors were small. On day 2, they performed washout trials before readapting. The group that repeatedly practiced the initial portion of adaptation where errors are large showed the fastest relearning on the second day. In fact, the memory was nearly as strong as that of a third group that was left overnight in the adapted state and was not washed-out before reexposure on the second day. This demonstrates that alternating exposures to early adaptation and washout can enhance readaptation. In the second experiment, we tested whether the opposite split-belt pattern interferes with day 2 relearning. Surprisingly, it did not, and instead was similar to practicing in the adapted state. These results show that the structure of the initial phase of learning influences the ease of motor relearning.

  15. Le logiciel FastCart

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    FastCart est un logiciel destiné à l'enseignement de la géographie. Il permet aux élèves de créer leurs propres documents d'études: histogrammes, cartes en hachures, cartes de classification de l'espace. Sa rapidité d'exécution et sa facilité d'utilisation en font un outil adapté aux exigences des enseignants.

  16. A wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Tsai, An-Chih; Chang, Cha-Wei; Ho, Ka-Hou; Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Ta-Te

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, both hardware and software design to develop a wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis are presented. For hardware, the mechanism proposed is adaptive to different individuals to wear, and the portability of the design makes it easy to perform outdoor experiments. Four force sensors and two angle displacement sensors were used to measure plantar force distribution and the angles of hip and knee joints. For software design, a novel algorithm was developed to detect different gait phases and the four gait periods during the stance phase. Furthermore, the center of ground contact force was calculated based on the relationships of the force sensors. The results were compared with the VICON motion capture system and a force plate for validation. Experiments showed the behavior of the joint angles are similar to VICON system, and the average error in foot strike time is less than 90 ms.

  17. Interlimb communication to the knee flexors during walking in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Andersen, Jacob Buus;

    2013-01-01

    in the right leg following unexpected unilateral knee joint rotations during locomotion in either the flexion or extension direction. Strong reflex responses in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle with a mean onset latency of 76 ± 6 ms were evoked only from ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations......A strong coordination between the two legs is important for maintaining a symmetric gait pattern and adapting to changes in the external environment. In humans as well as animals, receptors arising from the quadriceps muscle group influence the activation of ipsilateral muscles. Moreover, strong...... that the cBF reflex response may be a preparation of the contralateral leg for early load bearing, slowing the forward progression of the body in order to maintain dynamic equilibrium during walking....

  18. Vection in depth during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, April; Palmisano, Stephen; Apthorp, Deborah; Allison, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Vection has typically been induced in stationary observers (ie conditions providing visual-only information about self-motion). Two recent studies have examined vection during active treadmill walking--one reported that treadmill walking in the same direction as the visually simulated self-motion impaired vection (Onimaru et al, 2010 Journal of Vision 10(7):860), the other reported that it enhanced vection (Seno et al, 2011 Perception 40 747-750; Seno et al, 2011 Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 1467-1476). Our study expands on these earlier investigations of vection during observer active movement. In experiment 1 we presented radially expanding optic flow and compared the vection produced in stationary observers with that produced during walking forward on a treadmill at a 'matched' speed. Experiment 2 compared the vection induced by forward treadmill walking while viewing expanding or contracting optic flow with that induced by viewing playbacks of these same displays while stationary. In both experiments subjects' tracked head movements were either incorporated into the self-motion displays (as simulated viewpoint jitter) or simply ignored. We found that treadmill walking always reduced vection (compared with stationary viewing conditions) and that simulated viewpoint jitter always increased vection (compared with constant velocity displays). These findings suggest that while consistent visual-vestibular information about self-acceleration increases vection, biomechanical self-motion information reduces this experience (irrespective of whether it is consistent or not with the visual input).

  19. Scaling Argument of Anisotropic Random Walk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bing-Zhen; JIN Guo-Jun; WANG Fei-Feng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we analytically discuss the scaling properties of the average square end-to-end distance for anisotropic random walk in D-dimensional space ( D ≥ 2), and the returning probability Pn(ro) for the walker into a certain neighborhood of the origin. We will not only give the calculating formula for and Pn (ro), but also point out that if there is a symmetric axis for the distribution of the probability density of a single step displacement, we always obtain ~ n, where ⊥ refers to the projections of the displacement perpendicular to each symmetric axes of the walk; in D-dimensional space with D symmetric axes perpendicular to each other, we always have ~ n and the random walk will be like a purely random motion; if the number of inter-perpendicular symmetric axis is smaller than the dimensions of the space, we must have ~ n2 for very large n and the walk will be like a ballistic motion. It is worth while to point out that unlike the isotropic random walk in one and two dimensions, which is certain to return into the neighborhood of the origin, generally there is only a nonzero probability for the anisotropic random walker in two dimensions to return to the neighborhood.

  20. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Godfrey; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well-studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line) we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunneling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear to square root in the number of steps, as the ...

  1. Asymptotically Stable Walking of a Five-Link Underactuated 3D Bipedal Robot

    CERN Document Server

    Chevallereau, Christine; Shih, Ching-Long; 10.1109/TRO.2008.2010366

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents three feedback controllers that achieve an asymptotically stable, periodic, and fast walking gait for a 3D (spatial) bipedal robot consisting of a torso, two legs, and passive (unactuated) point feet. The contact between the robot and the walking surface is assumed to inhibit yaw rotation. The studied robot has 8 DOF in the single support phase and 6 actuators. The interest of studying robots with point feet is that the robot's natural dynamics must be explicitly taken into account to achieve balance while walking. We use an extension of the method of virtual constraints and hybrid zero dynamics, in order to simultaneously compute a periodic orbit and an autonomous feedback controller that realizes the orbit. This method allows the computations to be carried out on a 2-DOF subsystem of the 8-DOF robot model. The stability of the walking gait under closed-loop control is evaluated with the linearization of the restricted Poincar\\'e map of the hybrid zero dynamics. Three strategies are explo...

  2. Photonics walking up a human hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Martella, Daniele; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Burresi, Matteo; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2016-03-01

    While animals have access to sugars as energy source, this option is generally not available to artificial machines and robots. Energy delivery is thus the bottleneck for creating independent robots and machines, especially on micro- and nano- meter length scales. We have found a way to produce polymeric nano-structures with local control over the molecular alignment, which allowed us to solve the above issue. By using a combination of polymers, of which part is optically sensitive, we can create complex functional structures with nanometer accuracy, responsive to light. In particular, this allowed us to realize a structure that can move autonomously over surfaces (it can "walk") using the environmental light as its energy source. The robot is only 60 μm in total length, thereby smaller than any known terrestrial walking species, and it is capable of random, directional walking and rotating on different dry surfaces.

  3. Modeling, simulation and optimization of bipedal walking

    CERN Document Server

    Berns, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The model-based investigation of motions of anthropomorphic systems is an important interdisciplinary research topic involving specialists from many fields such as Robotics, Biomechanics, Physiology, Orthopedics, Psychology, Neurosciences, Sports, Computer Graphics and Applied Mathematics. This book presents a study of basic locomotion forms such as walking and running is of particular interest due to the high demand on dynamic coordination, actuator efficiency and balance control. Mathematical models and numerical simulation and optimization techniques are explained, in combination with experimental data, which can help to better understand the basic underlying mechanisms of these motions and to improve them. Example topics treated in this book are Modeling techniques for anthropomorphic bipedal walking systems Optimized walking motions for different objective functions Identification of objective functions from measurements Simulation and optimization approaches for humanoid robots Biologically inspired con...

  4. Gaussian Networks Generated by Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We propose a random walks based model to generate complex networks. Many authors studied and developed different methods and tools to analyze complex networks by random walk processes. Just to cite a few, random walks have been adopted to perform community detection, exploration tasks and to study temporal networks. Moreover, they have been used also to generate scale-free networks. In this work, we define a random walker that plays the role of "edges-generator". In particular, the random walker generates new connections and uses these ones to visit each node of a network. As result, the proposed model allows to achieve networks provided with a Gaussian degree distribution, and moreover, some features as the clustering coefficient and the assortativity show a critical behavior. Finally, we performed numerical simulations to study the behavior and the properties of the cited model.

  5. Quantum walk search through potential barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-12-01

    An ideal quantum walk transitions from one vertex to another with perfect fidelity, but in physical systems, the particle may be hindered by potential energy barriers. Then the particle has some amplitude of tunneling through the barriers, and some amplitude of staying put. We investigate the algorithmic consequence of such barriers for the quantum walk formulation of Grover’s algorithm. We prove that the failure amplitude must scale as O(1/\\sqrt{N}) for search to retain its quantum O(\\sqrt{N}) runtime; otherwise, it searches in classical O(N) time. Thus searching larger ‘databases’ requires increasingly reliable hop operations or error correction. This condition holds for both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks.

  6. Real-time Walking Pattern Generation for a Biped Robot with Hybrid CPG-ZMP Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biped robots have better mobility than conventional wheeled robots. The bio-inspired method based on a central pattern generator (CPG can be used to control biped robot walking in a manner like human beings. However, to achieve stable locomotion, it is difficult to modulate the parameters for the neural networks to coordinate every degree of freedom of the walking robot. The zero moment point (ZMP method is very popular for the stability control of biped robot walking. However, the reference trajectories have low energy efficiency, lack naturalness and need significant offline calculation. This paper presents a new method for biped real-time walking generation using a hybrid CPG-ZMP control algorithm. The method can realize a stable walking pattern by combining the ZMP criterion with rhythmic motion control. The CPG component is designed to generate the desired motion for each robot joint, which is modulated by phase resetting according to foot contact information. By introducing the ZMP location, the activity of the CPG output signal is adjusted to coordinate the limbs’ motion and allow the robot to maintain balance during the process of locomotion. The numerical simulation results show that, compared with the CPG method, the new hybrid CPG-ZMP algorithm can enhance the robustness of the CPG parameters and improve the stability of the robot. In addition, the proposed algorithm is more energy efficient than the ZMP method. The results also demonstrate that the control system can generate an adaptive walking pattern through interactions between the robot, the CPG and the environment.

  7. CanWalk: a feasibility study with embedded randomised controlled trial pilot of a walking intervention for people with recurrent or metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsianakas, Vicki; Ream, Emma; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Purushotham, Arnie; Mucci, Lorelei; Green, James S A; Fewster, Jacquetta; Armes, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Walking is an adaptable, inexpensive and accessible form of physical activity. However, its impact on quality of life (QoL) and symptom severity in people with advanced cancer is unknown. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a community-based walking intervention to enhance QoL in people with recurrent/metastatic cancer. Design We used a mixed-methods design comprising a 2-centre RCT and nested qualitative interviews. Participants Patients with advanced breast, prostate, gynaecological or haematological cancers randomised 1:1 between intervention and usual care. Intervention The intervention comprised Macmillan's ‘Move More’ information, a short motivational interview with a recommendation to walk for at least 30 min on alternate days and attend a volunteer-led group walk weekly. Outcomes We assessed feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and RCT by evaluating study processes (rates of recruitment, consent, retention, adherence and adverse events), and using end-of-study questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) assessing QoL, activity, fatigue, mood and self-efficacy were completed at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Results We recruited 42 (38%) eligible participants. Recruitment was lower than anticipated (goal n=60), the most commonly reported reason being unable to commit to walking groups (n=19). Randomisation procedures worked well with groups evenly matched for age, sex and activity. By week 24, there was a 45% attrition rate. Most PROMs while acceptable were not sensitive to change and did not capture key benefits. Conclusions The intervention was acceptable, well tolerated and the study design was judged acceptable and feasible. Results are encouraging and demonstrate that exercise was popular and conveyed benefit to participants. Consequently, an effectiveness RCT is warranted, with some modifications to the

  8. Dynamic Locomotion of a Biomorphic Quadruped ‘Tekken’ Robot Using Various Gaits: Walk, Trot, Free-Gait and Bound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fukuoka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous quadruped walking and running robots have been developed to date. Each robot walks by means of a crawl, walk, trot or pace gait, or runs by means of a bound and/or gallop gait. However, it is very difficult to design a single robot that can both walk and run because of problems related to mechanisms and control. In response to this, we adapted a biological control method for legged locomotion in order to develop a dog-like quadruped robot we have named ‘Tekken’. Tekken has a control system that incorporates central pattern generators, reflexes and responses as well as a mechanism that makes the most of the control system. Tekken, which is equipped with a single mechanism, an unchangeable control method, and modifiable parameters, is capable of achieving walking and trotting on flat terrain, can walk using a free gait on irregular terrain, and is capable of running on flat terrain using a bounding gait. In this paper, we describe the mechanism, the control method and the experimental results of our new development.

  9. 仿人机器人动态步行控制综述%Survey on dynamic walking control of humanoid robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成军; 李祖枢; 薛方正

    2009-01-01

    This paper surveys the history and current research on dynamic walking control of humanoid robot.The characteristics of dynamic walking are summarized and the stability criteria of dynamic walking are also analyzed.Posture stability criterion based on ZMP(Zero Moment Point) and gait stability criterion based on Poincaré map are introduced.The learning methods and adaptation capabilities of dynamic walking on a complex terrain are presented and the typical solutions of dynamic walking con-trol are reviewed.Several problems of dynamic walking control which need to be solved are listed and the development directions are presented.%综述了仿人机器人动态步行的研究历史和研究现状.归纳了动态步行的特点,分析了动态步行稳定性判定方法,介绍了基于ZMP的姿态稳定判据和基于庞加莱映射(Poincaré Map)的步态稳定判据.总结了仿人机器人学习适应复杂地面环境步行的方法,概述了动态步行控制实现的典型解决方案,指出了动态步行控制中待解决的问题,并探讨了未来的发展方向.

  10. Metabolic cost of lateral stabilization during walking in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, J H; Wu, M; Gordon, K E

    2015-02-01

    People with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) expend considerable energy to walk, which can lead to rapid fatigue and limit community ambulation. Selecting locomotor patterns that enhance lateral stability may contribute to this population's elevated cost of transport. The goal of the current study was to quantify the metabolic energy demands of maintaining lateral stability during gait in people with iSCI. To quantify this metabolic cost, we observed ten individuals with iSCI walking with and without external lateral stabilization. We hypothesized that with external lateral stabilization, people with iSCI would adapt their gait by decreasing step width, which would correspond with a substantial decrease in cost of transport. Our findings support this hypothesis. Subjects significantly (p<0.05) decreased step width by 22%, step width variability by 18%, and minimum lateral margin of stability by 25% when they walked with external lateral stabilization compared to unassisted walking. Metabolic cost of transport also decreased significantly (p<0.05) by 10% with external lateral stabilization. These findings suggest that this population is capable of adapting their gait to meet changing demands placed on balance. The percent reduction in cost of transport when walking with external lateral stabilization was strongly correlated with functional impairment level as assessed by subjects' scores on the Berg Balance Scale (r=0.778) and lower extremity motor score (r=0.728). These relationships suggest that as functional balance and strength decrease, the amount of metabolic energy used to maintain lateral stability during gait will increase.

  11. Knee joint kinematics during walking influences the spatial cartilage thickness distribution in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Rylander, Jonathan H; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2011-04-29

    The regional adaptation of knee cartilage morphology to the kinematics of walking has been suggested as an important factor in the evaluation of the consequences of alteration in normal gait leading to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of spatial cartilage thickness distributions of the femur and tibia in the knee to the knee kinematics during walking. Gait data and knee MR images were obtained from 17 healthy volunteers (age 33.2 ± 9.8 years). Cartilage thickness maps were created for the femoral and tibial cartilage. Locations of thickest cartilage in the medial and lateral compartments in the femur and tibia were identified using a numerical method. The flexion-extension (FE) angle associated with the cartilage contact regions on the femur, and the anterior-posterior (AP) translation and internal-external (IE) rotation associated with the cartilage contact regions on the tibia at the heel strike of walking were tested for correlation with the locations of thickest cartilage. The locations of the thickest cartilage had relatively large variation (SD, 8.9°) and was significantly associated with the FE angle at heel strike only in the medial femoral condyle (R(2)=0.41, pknee kinematics and contact surface shapes seem to affect the functional adaptation of knee articular cartilage morphology. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to kinematics at the knee during walking suggests that regional cartilage thickness variations are influenced by both loading and the number of loading cycles. Thus walking is an important consideration in the analysis of the morphological variations of articular cartilage, since it is the dominant cyclic activity of daily living. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to gait kinematics is also important in understanding the etiology and pathomechanics of osteoarthritis.

  12. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Phuc Huu; Lee, Jinwook; Kwon, Ae-Ran; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk. PMID:27271634

  13. Stride Counting in Human Walking and Walking Distance Estimation Using Insole Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Huu Truong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method of estimating walking distance based on a precise counting of walking strides using insole sensors. We use an inertial triaxial accelerometer and eight pressure sensors installed in the insole of a shoe to record walkers’ movement data. The data is then transmitted to a smartphone to filter out noise and determine stance and swing phases. Based on phase information, we count the number of strides traveled and estimate the movement distance. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we created two walking databases on seven healthy participants and tested the proposed method. The first database, which is called the short distance database, consists of collected data from all seven healthy subjects walking on a 16 m distance. The second one, named the long distance database, is constructed from walking data of three healthy subjects who have participated in the short database for an 89 m distance. The experimental results show that the proposed method performs walking distance estimation accurately with the mean error rates of 4.8% and 3.1% for the short and long distance databases, respectively. Moreover, the maximum difference of the swing phase determination with respect to time is 0.08 s and 0.06 s for starting and stopping points of swing phases, respectively. Therefore, the stride counting method provides a highly precise result when subjects walk.

  14. Movement Behavior of High-Heeled Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter Christian; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2012-01-01

    The human locomotor system is flexible and enables humans to move without falling even under less than optimal conditions. Walking with high-heeled shoes constitutes an unstable condition and here we ask how the nervous system controls the ankle joint in this situation? We investigated the movement...... behavior of high-heeled and barefooted walking in eleven female subjects. The movement variability was quantified by calculation of approximate entropy (ApEn) in the ankle joint angle and the standard deviation (SD) of the stride time intervals. Electromyography (EMG) of the soleus (SO) and tibialis...

  15. Random walk term weighting for information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, R.; Lioma, Christina

    2007-01-01

    We present a way of estimating term weights for Information Retrieval (IR), using term co-occurrence as a measure of dependency between terms.We use the random walk graph-based ranking algorithm on a graph that encodes terms and co-occurrence dependencies in text, from which we derive term weights...... that represent a quantification of how a term contributes to its context. Evaluation on two TREC collections and 350 topics shows that the random walk-based term weights perform at least comparably to the traditional tf-idf term weighting, while they outperform it when the distance between co-occurring terms...

  16. On d-Walk Regular Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Ernesto; de la Pena, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a graph with set of vertices 1,...,n and adjacency matrix A of size nxn. Let d(i,j)=d, we say that f_d:N->N is a d-function on G if for every pair of vertices i,j and k>=d, we have a_ij^(k)=f_d(k). If this function f_d exists on G we say that G is d-walk regular. We prove that G is d-walk regular if and only if for every pair of vertices i,j at distance

  17. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...

  18. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  19. Environmental factors influencing older adults’ walking for transportation: a study using walk-along interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cauwenberg Jelle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current knowledge on the relationship between the physical environment and walking for transportation among older adults (≥ 65 years is limited. Qualitative research can provide valuable information and inform further research. However, qualitative studies are scarce and fail to include neighborhood outings necessary to study participants’ experiences and perceptions while interacting with and interpreting the local social and physical environment. The current study sought to uncover the perceived environmental influences on Flemish older adults’ walking for transportation. To get detailed and context-sensitive environmental information, it used walk-along interviews. Methods Purposeful convenience sampling was used to recruit 57 older adults residing in urban or semi-urban areas. Walk-along interviews to and from a destination (e.g. a shop located within a 15 minutes’ walk from the participants’ home were conducted. Content analysis was performed using NVivo 9 software (QSR International. An inductive approach was used to derive categories and subcategories from the data. Results Data were categorized in the following categories and subcategories: access to facilities (shops & services, public transit, connectivity, walking facilities (sidewalk quality, crossings, legibility, benches, traffic safety (busy traffic, behavior of other road users, familiarity, safety from crime (physical factors, other persons, social contacts, aesthetics (buildings, natural elements, noise & smell, openness, decay and weather. Conclusions The findings indicate that to promote walking for transportation a neighborhood should provide good access to shops and services, well-maintained walking facilities, aesthetically appealing places, streets with little traffic and places for social interaction. In addition, the neighborhood environment should evoke feelings of familiarity and safety from crime. Future quantitative studies should

  20. A REVIEW OF ADAPTIVE AUTORECLOSURE TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHILIP YAW OKYERE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive autoreclosing is a fast emerging technology for improving power system marginal stability during faults. It avoids reclosing untopermanent faults and recloses unto transient faults only after the secondary arc has extinguished. This paper presents a comprehensive review of various adaptive autoreclosure techniques. It aims at providing a broad perspective on adaptive autoreclosing techniques to researchers and application engineers.