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Sample records for adaptive fast multipole

  1. An adaptive fast multipole accelerated Poisson solver for complex geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askham, T.; Cerfon, A. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a fast, direct and adaptive Poisson solver for complex two-dimensional geometries based on potential theory and fast multipole acceleration. More precisely, the solver relies on the standard decomposition of the solution as the sum of a volume integral to account for the source distribution and a layer potential to enforce the desired boundary condition. The volume integral is computed by applying the FMM on a square box that encloses the domain of interest. For the sake of efficiency and convergence acceleration, we first extend the source distribution (the right-hand side in the Poisson equation) to the enclosing box as a C0 function using a fast, boundary integral-based method. We demonstrate on multiply connected domains with irregular boundaries that this continuous extension leads to high accuracy without excessive adaptive refinement near the boundary and, as a result, to an extremely efficient "black box" fast solver.

  2. AFMPB: An Adaptive Fast Multipole Poisson-Boltzmann Solver for Calculating Electrostatics in Biomolecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole to local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. PMID:20532187

  3. Adaptive grouping for the higher-order multilevel fast multipole method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Jørgensen, Erik; Meincke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    functions. Results from both a uniformly and nonuniformly meshed scatterer are presented, showing how the technique is worthwhile even for regular meshes, and demonstrating that there is no loss of accuracy in spite of the large reduction in memory requirements and the relatively low computational cost.......An alternative parameter-free adaptive approach for the grouping of the basis function patterns in the multilevel fast multipole method is presented, yielding significant memory savings compared to the traditional Octree grouping for most discretizations, particularly when using higher-order basis...

  4. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-06-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Program summaryProgram title: AFMPB: Adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver Catalogue identifier: AEGB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 453 649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8 764 754 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran Computer: Any Operating system: Any RAM: Depends on the size of the discretized biomolecular system Classification: 3 External routines: Pre- and post-processing tools are required for generating the boundary elements and for visualization. Users can use MSMS ( http://www.scripps.edu/~sanner/html/msms_home.html) for pre-processing, and VMD ( http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/Research/vmd/) for visualization. Sub-programs included: An iterative Krylov subspace solvers package from SPARSKIT by Yousef Saad ( http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~saad/software/SPARSKIT/sparskit.html), and the fast multipole methods subroutines from FMMSuite ( http

  5. Scalable force directed graph layout algorithms using fast multipole methods

    KAUST Repository

    Yunis, Enas Abdulrahman

    2012-06-01

    We present an extension to ExaFMM, a Fast Multipole Method library, as a generalized approach for fast and scalable execution of the Force-Directed Graph Layout algorithm. The Force-Directed Graph Layout algorithm is a physics-based approach to graph layout that treats the vertices V as repelling charged particles with the edges E connecting them acting as springs. Traditionally, the amount of work required in applying the Force-Directed Graph Layout algorithm is O(|V|2 + |E|) using direct calculations and O(|V| log |V| + |E|) using truncation, filtering, and/or multi-level techniques. Correct application of the Fast Multipole Method allows us to maintain a lower complexity of O(|V| + |E|) while regaining most of the precision lost in other techniques. Solving layout problems for truly large graphs with millions of vertices still requires a scalable algorithm and implementation. We have been able to leverage the scalability and architectural adaptability of the ExaFMM library to create a Force-Directed Graph Layout implementation that runs efficiently on distributed multicore and multi-GPU architectures. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Scalable fast multipole accelerated vortex methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Qi

    2014-05-01

    The fast multipole method (FMM) is often used to accelerate the calculation of particle interactions in particle-based methods to simulate incompressible flows. To evaluate the most time-consuming kernels - the Biot-Savart equation and stretching term of the vorticity equation, we mathematically reformulated it so that only two Laplace scalar potentials are used instead of six. This automatically ensuring divergence-free far-field computation. Based on this formulation, we developed a new FMM-based vortex method on heterogeneous architectures, which distributed the work between multicore CPUs and GPUs to best utilize the hardware resources and achieve excellent scalability. The algorithm uses new data structures which can dynamically manage inter-node communication and load balance efficiently, with only a small parallel construction overhead. This algorithm can scale to large-sized clusters showing both strong and weak scalability. Careful error and timing trade-off analysis are also performed for the cutoff functions induced by the vortex particle method. Our implementation can perform one time step of the velocity+stretching calculation for one billion particles on 32 nodes in 55.9 seconds, which yields 49.12 Tflop/s.

  7. Performance Benchmarking of Fast Multipole Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Harthi, Noha A.

    2013-06-01

    The current trends in computer architecture are shifting towards smaller byte/flop ratios, while available parallelism is increasing at all levels of granularity – vector length, core count, and MPI process. Intel’s Xeon Phi coprocessor, NVIDIA’s Kepler GPU, and IBM’s BlueGene/Q all have a Byte/flop ratio close to 0.2, which makes it very difficult for most algorithms to extract a high percentage of the theoretical peak flop/s from these architectures. Popular algorithms in scientific computing such as FFT are continuously evolving to keep up with this trend in hardware. In the meantime it is also necessary to invest in novel algorithms that are more suitable for computer architectures of the future. The fast multipole method (FMM) was originally developed as a fast algorithm for ap- proximating the N-body interactions that appear in astrophysics, molecular dynamics, and vortex based fluid dynamics simulations. The FMM possesses have a unique combination of being an efficient O(N) algorithm, while having an operational intensity that is higher than a matrix-matrix multiplication. In fact, the FMM can reduce the requirement of Byte/flop to around 0.01, which means that it will remain compute bound until 2020 even if the cur- rent trend in microprocessors continues. Despite these advantages, there have not been any benchmarks of FMM codes on modern architectures such as Xeon Phi, Kepler, and Blue- Gene/Q. This study aims to provide a comprehensive benchmark of a state of the art FMM code “exaFMM” on the latest architectures, in hopes of providing a useful reference for deciding when the FMM will become useful as the computational engine in a given application code. It may also serve as a warning to certain problem size domains areas where the FMM will exhibit insignificant performance improvements. Such issues depend strongly on the asymptotic constants rather than the asymptotics themselves, and therefore are strongly implementation and hardware

  8. Fast Multipole-Based Preconditioner for Sparse Iterative Solvers

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2014-05-04

    Among optimal hierarchical algorithms for the computational solution of elliptic problems, the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) stands out for its adaptability to emerging architectures, having high arithmetic intensity, tunable accuracy, and relaxed global synchronization requirements. We demonstrate that, beyond its traditional use as a solver in problems for which explicit free-space kernel representations are available, the FMM has applicability as a preconditioner in finite domain elliptic boundary value problems, by equipping it with boundary integral capability for finite boundaries and by wrapping it in a Krylov method for extensibility to more general operators. Compared with multilevel methods, it is capable of comparable algebraic convergence rates down to the truncation error of the discretized PDE, and it has superior multicore and distributed memory scalability properties on commodity architecture supercomputers.

  9. Gaussian translation operator for Multi-Level Fast Multipole Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Hansen, Per Christian; Sorensen, Stig B.

    2014-01-01

    Results using a new translation operator for the Multi-Level Fast Multipole Method are presented. Based on Gaussian beams, the translation operator allows a significant portion of the plane-wave directions to be neglected, resulting in a much faster translation step.......Results using a new translation operator for the Multi-Level Fast Multipole Method are presented. Based on Gaussian beams, the translation operator allows a significant portion of the plane-wave directions to be neglected, resulting in a much faster translation step....

  10. OptiDis: A parallel Fast Multipole Dislocation Dynamics code

    OpenAIRE

    BLANCHARD, Pierre; Etcheverry, Arnaud; Coulaud, Olivier; Dupuy, Laurent; Bletry, Marc; Darve, Eric

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Among all the steps involved in DD simulations, the computation of the internal elastic forces and energy are by far the most resources consuming. However, since these are long-ranged and fast decreasing interactions, hierarchical algorithms like the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) are well suited for their fast evaluation. The relatively low accuracy required for the interaction forces between dislocations brought us to develop a more efficient approximation method for th...

  11. Data-driven execution of fast multipole methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ltaief, Hatem

    2013-09-17

    Fast multipole methods (FMMs) have O (N) complexity, are compute bound, and require very little synchronization, which makes them a favorable algorithm on next-generation supercomputers. Their most common application is to accelerate N-body problems, but they can also be used to solve boundary integral equations. When the particle distribution is irregular and the tree structure is adaptive, load balancing becomes a non-trivial question. A common strategy for load balancing FMMs is to use the work load from the previous step as weights to statically repartition the next step. The authors discuss in the paper another approach based on data-driven execution to efficiently tackle this challenging load balancing problem. The core idea consists of breaking the most time-consuming stages of the FMMs into smaller tasks. The algorithm can then be represented as a directed acyclic graph where nodes represent tasks and edges represent dependencies among them. The execution of the algorithm is performed by asynchronously scheduling the tasks using the queueing and runtime for kernels runtime environment, in a way such that data dependencies are not violated for numerical correctness purposes. This asynchronous scheduling results in an out-of-order execution. The performance results of the data-driven FMM execution outperform the previous strategy and show linear speedup on a quad-socket quad-core Intel Xeon system.Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Fast multipole preconditioners for sparse matrices arising from elliptic equations

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2017-11-09

    Among optimal hierarchical algorithms for the computational solution of elliptic problems, the fast multipole method (FMM) stands out for its adaptability to emerging architectures, having high arithmetic intensity, tunable accuracy, and relaxable global synchronization requirements. We demonstrate that, beyond its traditional use as a solver in problems for which explicit free-space kernel representations are available, the FMM has applicability as a preconditioner in finite domain elliptic boundary value problems, by equipping it with boundary integral capability for satisfying conditions at finite boundaries and by wrapping it in a Krylov method for extensibility to more general operators. Here, we do not discuss the well developed applications of FMM to implement matrix-vector multiplications within Krylov solvers of boundary element methods. Instead, we propose using FMM for the volume-to-volume contribution of inhomogeneous Poisson-like problems, where the boundary integral is a small part of the overall computation. Our method may be used to precondition sparse matrices arising from finite difference/element discretizations, and can handle a broader range of scientific applications. It is capable of algebraic convergence rates down to the truncation error of the discretized PDE comparable to those of multigrid methods, and it offers potentially superior multicore and distributed memory scalability properties on commodity architecture supercomputers. Compared with other methods exploiting the low-rank character of off-diagonal blocks of the dense resolvent operator, FMM-preconditioned Krylov iteration may reduce the amount of communication because it is matrix-free and exploits the tree structure of FMM. We describe our tests in reproducible detail with freely available codes and outline directions for further extensibility.

  13. Improved Multilevel Fast Multipole Method for Higher-Order discretizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Meincke, Peter; Jorgensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM) allows for a reduced computational complexity when solving electromagnetic scattering problems. Combining this with the reduced number of unknowns provided by Higher-Order discretizations has proven to be a difficult task, with the general conclusion...... being that going above 2nd order is not worthwhile. In this paper, we challenge this conclusion, providing results that demonstrate the potential performance gains with Higher-Order MLFMM and showing some modifications to the traditional MLFMM that can benefit both Higher-Order and standard...

  14. Multilevel Fast Multipole Method for Higher Order Discretizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar Peter; Meincke, Peter; Jorgensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The multi-level fast multipole method (MLFMM) for a higher order (HO) discretization is demonstrated on high-frequency (HF) problems, illustrating for the first time how an efficient MLFMM for HO can be achieved even for very large groups. Applying several novel ideas, beneficial to both lower...... order and higher order discretizations, results from a low-memory, high-speed MLFMM implementation of a HO hierarchical discretization are shown. These results challenge the general view that the benefits of HO and HF-MLFMM cannot be combined....

  15. Fourier-Based Fast Multipole Method for the Helmholtz Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Cecka, Cris

    2013-01-01

    The fast multipole method (FMM) has had great success in reducing the computational complexity of solving the boundary integral form of the Helmholtz equation. We present a formulation of the Helmholtz FMM that uses Fourier basis functions rather than spherical harmonics. By modifying the transfer function in the precomputation stage of the FMM, time-critical stages of the algorithm are accelerated by causing the interpolation operators to become straightforward applications of fast Fourier transforms, retaining the diagonality of the transfer function, and providing a simplified error analysis. Using Fourier analysis, constructive algorithms are derived to a priori determine an integration quadrature for a given error tolerance. Sharp error bounds are derived and verified numerically. Various optimizations are considered to reduce the number of quadrature points and reduce the cost of computing the transfer function. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  16. Fast Multipole-Based Elliptic PDE Solver and Preconditioner

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2016-12-07

    Exascale systems are predicted to have approximately one billion cores, assuming Gigahertz cores. Limitations on affordable network topologies for distributed memory systems of such massive scale bring new challenges to the currently dominant parallel programing model. Currently, there are many efforts to evaluate the hardware and software bottlenecks of exascale designs. It is therefore of interest to model application performance and to understand what changes need to be made to ensure extrapolated scalability. Fast multipole methods (FMM) were originally developed for accelerating N-body problems for particle-based methods in astrophysics and molecular dynamics. FMM is more than an N-body solver, however. Recent efforts to view the FMM as an elliptic PDE solver have opened the possibility to use it as a preconditioner for even a broader range of applications. In this thesis, we (i) discuss the challenges for FMM on current parallel computers and future exascale architectures, with a focus on inter-node communication, and develop a performance model that considers the communication patterns of the FMM for spatially quasi-uniform distributions, (ii) employ this performance model to guide performance and scaling improvement of FMM for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of uniformly distributed particles, and (iii) demonstrate that, beyond its traditional use as a solver in problems for which explicit free-space kernel representations are available, the FMM has applicability as a preconditioner in finite domain elliptic boundary value problems, by equipping it with boundary integral capability for satisfying conditions at finite boundaries and by wrapping it in a Krylov method for extensibility to more general operators. Compared with multilevel methods, FMM is capable of comparable algebraic convergence rates down to the truncation error of the discretized PDE, and it has superior multicore and distributed memory scalability properties on commodity

  17. A task parallel implementation of fast multipole methods

    KAUST Repository

    Taura, Kenjiro

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a task parallel implementation of ExaFMM, an open source implementation of fast multipole methods (FMM), using a lightweight task parallel library MassiveThreads. Although there have been many attempts on parallelizing FMM, experiences have almost exclusively been limited to formulation based on flat homogeneous parallel loops. FMM in fact contains operations that cannot be readily expressed in such conventional but restrictive models. We show that task parallelism, or parallel recursions in particular, allows us to parallelize all operations of FMM naturally and scalably. Moreover it allows us to parallelize a \\'\\'mutual interaction\\'\\' for force/potential evaluation, which is roughly twice as efficient as a more conventional, unidirectional force/potential evaluation. The net result is an open source FMM that is clearly among the fastest single node implementations, including those on GPUs; with a million particles on a 32 cores Sandy Bridge 2.20GHz node, it completes a single time step including tree construction and force/potential evaluation in 65 milliseconds. The study clearly showcases both programmability and performance benefits of flexible parallel constructs over more monolithic parallel loops. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Scalable fast multipole methods for vortex element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Qi

    2012-11-01

    We use a particle-based method to simulate incompressible flows, where the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) is used to accelerate the calculation of particle interactions. The most time-consuming kernelsâ\\'the Biot-Savart equation and stretching term of the vorticity equationâ\\'are mathematically reformulated so that only two Laplace scalar potentials are used instead of six, while automatically ensuring divergence-free far-field computation. Based on this formulation, and on our previous work for a scalar heterogeneous FMM algorithm, we develop a new FMM-based vortex method capable of simulating general flows including turbulence on heterogeneous architectures, which distributes the work between multi-core CPUs and GPUs to best utilize the hardware resources and achieve excellent scalability. The algorithm also uses new data structures which can dynamically manage inter-node communication and load balance efficiently but with only a small parallel construction overhead. This algorithm can scale to large-sized clusters showing both strong and weak scalability. Careful error and timing trade-off analysis are also performed for the cutoff functions induced by the vortex particle method. Our implementation can perform one time step of the velocity+stretching for one billion particles on 32 nodes in 55.9 seconds, which yields 49.12 Tflop/s. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. Highly Parallel Demagnetization Field Calculation Using the Fast Multipole Method on Tetrahedral Meshes with Continuous Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Palmesi, Pietro; Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The long-range magnetic field is the most time-consuming part in micromagnetic simulations. Improvements both on a numerical and computational basis can relief problems related to this bottleneck. This work presents an efficient implementation of the Fast Multipole Method [FMM] for the magnetic scalar potential as used in micromagnetics. We assume linearly magnetized tetrahedral sources, treat the near field directly and use analytical integration on the multipole expansion in the far field. This approach tackles important issues like the vectorial and continuous nature of the magnetic field. By using FMM the calculations scale linearly in time and memory.

  20. Highly parallel demagnetization field calculation using the fast multipole method on tetrahedral meshes with continuous sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmesi, P.; Exl, L.; Bruckner, F.; Abert, C.; Suess, D.

    2017-11-01

    The long-range magnetic field is the most time-consuming part in micromagnetic simulations. Computational improvements can relieve problems related to this bottleneck. This work presents an efficient implementation of the Fast Multipole Method [FMM] for the magnetic scalar potential as used in micromagnetics. The novelty lies in extending FMM to linearly magnetized tetrahedral sources making it interesting also for other areas of computational physics. We treat the near field directly and in use (exact) numerical integration on the multipole expansion in the far field. This approach tackles important issues like the vectorial and continuous nature of the magnetic field. By using FMM the calculations scale linearly in time and memory.

  1. Application of Fast Multipole Methods to the NASA Fast Scattering Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Mark H.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Fast Scattering Code (FSC) is a versatile noise prediction program designed to conduct aeroacoustic noise reduction studies. The equivalent source method is used to solve an exterior Helmholtz boundary value problem with an impedance type boundary condition. The solution process in FSC v2.0 requires direct manipulation of a large, dense system of linear equations, limiting the applicability of the code to small scales and/or moderate excitation frequencies. Recent advances in the use of Fast Multipole Methods (FMM) for solving scattering problems, coupled with sparse linear algebra techniques, suggest that a substantial reduction in computer resource utilization over conventional solution approaches can be obtained. Implementation of the single level FMM (SLFMM) and a variant of the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM) into the FSC is discussed in this paper. The culmination of this effort, FSC v3.0, was used to generate solutions for three configurations of interest. Benchmarking against previously obtained simulations indicate that a twenty-fold reduction in computational memory and up to a four-fold reduction in computer time have been achieved on a single processor.

  2. The multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) for solving large-scale computational electromagnetics problems

    CERN Document Server

    Ergul, Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    The Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) for Solving Large-Scale Computational Electromagnetic Problems provides a detailed and instructional overview of implementing MLFMA. The book: Presents a comprehensive treatment of the MLFMA algorithm, including basic linear algebra concepts, recent developments on the parallel computation, and a number of application examplesCovers solutions of electromagnetic problems involving dielectric objects and perfectly-conducting objectsDiscusses applications including scattering from airborne targets, scattering from red

  3. Development of a fast code for earthquake cycle simulation - (1) Application of Fast Multipole Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, K.; Mitsui, N.; Hori, T.

    2009-12-01

    contribution to the computation. Next, we examined the application of Fast Multipole Method (FMM). The FMM has been developed to speed up the computation of long-ranged forces in the N body-problem under the Laplace or the Helmholtz field. The operational counts of N**2 are reduced to be O(N). This algorithm has been widely used in a verity of fields in physics such as astrophysics. However, this has not been applied to the earthquake cycle simulations except for Tullis and Beeier (2008). In this study, we developed a FMM code for earthquake cycle simulation in an infinite homogeneous elastic medium. In the FMM algorithm, we need to divide the plate interface into 2**D tree structure (D is dimension and two in our case). We developed the tree-structure code following the tutorial code of Liu and Nishimura(2006). For the computation of the multipole expansion moment and the local expansion of 3-D elastostatics fundamental solution, we referred to Yoshida et al. (2001). In the presentation, we show the details of FMM algorithm in earthquake cycle simulations, and the computational accuracy and time depending on the expansion order and the tree structure.

  4. Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Three Dimensional Electromagnetic Scattering Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, S B; Xiao, J J; Lin, Z F; Chan, C T

    2012-01-01

    We developed a fast numerical algorithm for solving the three dimensional vectorial Helmholtz equation that arises in electromagnetic scattering problems. The algorithm is based on electric field integral equations and is essentially a boundary element method. Nystrom's quadrature rule with a triangular grid is employed to linearize the integral equations, which are then solved by using a right-preconditioned iterative method. We apply the fast multipole technique to accelerate the matrix-vector multiplications in the iterations. We demonstrate the broad applications and accuracy of this method with practical examples including dielectric, plasmonic and metallic objects. We then apply the method to investigate the plasmonic properties of a silver torus and a silver split-ring resonator under the incidence of an electromagnetic plane wave. We show the silver torus can be used as a trapping tool to bind small dielectric or metallic particles.

  5. Periodic boundary conditions and the error-controlled fast multipole method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadshow, Ivo

    2012-08-22

    The simulation of pairwise interactions in huge particle ensembles is a vital issue in scientific research. Especially the calculation of long-range interactions poses limitations to the system size, since these interactions scale quadratically with the number of particles. Fast summation techniques like the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) can help to reduce the complexity to O(N). This work extends the possible range of applications of the FMM to periodic systems in one, two and three dimensions with one unique approach. Together with a tight error control, this contribution enables the simulation of periodic particle systems for different applications without the need to know and tune the FMM specific parameters. The implemented error control scheme automatically optimizes the parameters to obtain an approximation for the minimal runtime for a given energy error bound.

  6. Optimizations of Patch Antenna Arrays Using Genetic Algorithms Supported by the Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Onol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present optimizations of patch antenna arrays using genetic algorithms and highly accurate full-wave solutions of the corresponding radiation problems with the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA. Arrays of finite extent are analyzed by using MLFMA, which accounts for all mutual couplings between array elements efficiently and accurately. Using the superposition principle, the number of solutions required for the optimization of an array is reduced to the number of array elements, without resorting to any periodicity and similarity assumptions. Based on numerical experiments, genetic optimizations are improved by considering alternative mutation, crossover, and elitism mechanisms. We show that the developed optimization environment based on genetic algorithms and MLFMA provides efficient and effective optimizations of antenna excitations, which cannot be obtained with array-factor approaches, even for relatively simple arrays with identical elements.

  7. The grid-based fast multipole method--a massively parallel numerical scheme for calculating two-electron interaction energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, Elias A; Losilla, Sergio A; Sundholm, Dage

    2015-12-21

    Algorithms and working expressions for a grid-based fast multipole method (GB-FMM) have been developed and implemented. The computational domain is divided into cubic subdomains, organized in a hierarchical tree. The contribution to the electrostatic interaction energies from pairs of neighboring subdomains is computed using numerical integration, whereas the contributions from further apart subdomains are obtained using multipole expansions. The multipole moments of the subdomains are obtained by numerical integration. Linear scaling is achieved by translating and summing the multipoles according to the tree structure, such that each subdomain interacts with a number of subdomains that are almost independent of the size of the system. To compute electrostatic interaction energies of neighboring subdomains, we employ an algorithm which performs efficiently on general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPU). Calculations using one CPU for the FMM part and 20 GPGPUs consisting of tens of thousands of execution threads for the numerical integration algorithm show the scalability and parallel performance of the scheme. For calculations on systems consisting of Gaussian functions (α = 1) distributed as fullerenes from C20 to C720, the total computation time and relative accuracy (ppb) are independent of the system size.

  8. Petascale molecular dynamics simulation using the fast multipole method on K computer

    KAUST Repository

    Ohno, Yousuke

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we report all-atom simulations of molecular crowding - a result from the full node simulation on the "K computer", which is a 10-PFLOPS supercomputer in Japan. The capability of this machine enables us to perform simulation of crowded cellular environments, which are more realistic compared to conventional MD simulations where proteins are simulated in isolation. Living cells are "crowded" because macromolecules comprise ∼30% of their molecular weight. Recently, the effects of crowded cellular environments on protein stability have been revealed through in-cell NMR spectroscopy. To measure the performance of the "K computer", we performed all-atom classical molecular dynamics simulations of two systems: target proteins in a solvent, and target proteins in an environment of molecular crowders that mimic the conditions of a living cell. Using the full system, we achieved 4.4 PFLOPS during a 520 million-atom simulation with cutoff of 28 Å. Furthermore, we discuss the performance and scaling of fast multipole methods for molecular dynamics simulations on the "K computer", as well as comparisons with Ewald summation methods. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining the multilevel fast multipole method with the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tzoulis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of arbitrarily shaped and electrically large objects in the same environment leads to hybridization of the Method of Moments (MoM with the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD. The computation and memory complexity of the MoM solution is improved with the Multilevel Fast Multipole Method (MLFMM. By expanding the k-space integrals in spherical harmonics, further considerable amount of memory can be saved without compromising accuracy and numerical speed. However, until now MoM-UTD hybrid methods are restricted to conventional MoM formulations only with Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE. In this contribution, a MLFMM-UTD hybridization for Combined Field Integral Equation (CFIE is proposed and applied within a hybrid Finite Element - Boundary Integral (FEBI technique. The MLFMM-UTD hybridization is performed at the translation procedure on the various levels of the MLFMM, using a far-field approximation of the corresponding translation operator. The formulation of this new hybrid technique is presented, as well as numerical results.

  10. Fast and accurate analysis of large-scale composite structures with the parallel multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergül, Özgür; Gürel, Levent

    2013-03-01

    Accurate electromagnetic modeling of complicated optical structures poses several challenges. Optical metamaterial and plasmonic structures are composed of multiple coexisting dielectric and/or conducting parts. Such composite structures may possess diverse values of conductivities and dielectric constants, including negative permittivity and permeability. Further challenges are the large sizes of the structures with respect to wavelength and the complexities of the geometries. In order to overcome these challenges and to achieve rigorous and efficient electromagnetic modeling of three-dimensional optical composite structures, we have developed a parallel implementation of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA). Precise formulation of composite structures is achieved with the so-called "electric and magnetic current combined-field integral equation." Surface integral equations are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions, and the ensuing dense matrix equations are solved iteratively with parallel MLFMA. The hierarchical strategy is used for the efficient parallelization of MLFMA on distributed-memory architectures. In this paper, fast and accurate solutions of large-scale canonical and complicated real-life problems, such as optical metamaterials, discretized with tens of millions of unknowns are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed electromagnetic solver.

  11. Solutions of large-scale electromagnetics problems involving dielectric objects with the parallel multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergül, Özgür

    2011-11-01

    Fast and accurate solutions of large-scale electromagnetics problems involving homogeneous dielectric objects are considered. Problems are formulated with the electric and magnetic current combined-field integral equation and discretized with the Rao-Wilton-Glisson functions. Solutions are performed iteratively by using the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA). For the solution of large-scale problems discretized with millions of unknowns, MLFMA is parallelized on distributed-memory architectures using a rigorous technique, namely, the hierarchical partitioning strategy. Efficiency and accuracy of the developed implementation are demonstrated on very large problems involving as many as 100 million unknowns.

  12. A performance model for the communication in fast multipole methods on high-performance computing platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2016-03-04

    Exascale systems are predicted to have approximately 1 billion cores, assuming gigahertz cores. Limitations on affordable network topologies for distributed memory systems of such massive scale bring new challenges to the currently dominant parallel programing model. Currently, there are many efforts to evaluate the hardware and software bottlenecks of exascale designs. It is therefore of interest to model application performance and to understand what changes need to be made to ensure extrapolated scalability. The fast multipole method (FMM) was originally developed for accelerating N-body problems in astrophysics and molecular dynamics but has recently been extended to a wider range of problems. Its high arithmetic intensity combined with its linear complexity and asynchronous communication patterns make it a promising algorithm for exascale systems. In this paper, we discuss the challenges for FMM on current parallel computers and future exascale architectures, with a focus on internode communication. We focus on the communication part only; the efficiency of the computational kernels are beyond the scope of the present study. We develop a performance model that considers the communication patterns of the FMM and observe a good match between our model and the actual communication time on four high-performance computing (HPC) systems, when latency, bandwidth, network topology, and multicore penalties are all taken into account. To our knowledge, this is the first formal characterization of internode communication in FMM that validates the model against actual measurements of communication time. The ultimate communication model is predictive in an absolute sense; however, on complex systems, this objective is often out of reach or of a difficulty out of proportion to its benefit when there exists a simpler model that is inexpensive and sufficient to guide coding decisions leading to improved scaling. The current model provides such guidance.

  13. Density functional theory for molecular and periodic systems using density fitting and continuous fast multipole method: Analytical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łazarski, Roman; Burow, Asbjörn Manfred; Grajciar, Lukáš; Sierka, Marek

    2016-10-30

    A full implementation of analytical energy gradients for molecular and periodic systems is reported in the TURBOMOLE program package within the framework of Kohn-Sham density functional theory using Gaussian-type orbitals as basis functions. Its key component is a combination of density fitting (DF) approximation and continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) that allows for an efficient calculation of the Coulomb energy gradient. For exchange-correlation part the hierarchical numerical integration scheme (Burow and Sierka, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation 2011, 7, 3097) is extended to energy gradients. Computational efficiency and asymptotic O(N) scaling behavior of the implementation is demonstrated for various molecular and periodic model systems, with the largest unit cell of hematite containing 640 atoms and 19,072 basis functions. The overall computational effort of energy gradient is comparable to that of the Kohn-Sham matrix formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Computation and Communication Kernels of the Fast Multipole Method on Intel Manycore Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulJabbar, Mustafa Abdulmajeed

    2017-07-31

    Manycore optimizations are essential for achieving performance worthy of anticipated exascale systems. Utilization of manycore chips is inevitable to attain the desired floating point performance of these energy-austere systems. In this work, we revisit ExaFMM, the open source Fast Multiple Method (FMM) library, in light of highly tuned shared-memory parallelization and detailed performance analysis on the new highly parallel Intel manycore architecture, Knights Landing (KNL). We assess scalability and performance gain using task-based parallelism of the FMM tree traversal. We also provide an in-depth analysis of the most computationally intensive part of the traversal kernel (i.e., the particle-to-particle (P2P) kernel), by comparing its performance across KNL and Broadwell architectures. We quantify different configurations that exploit the on-chip 512-bit vector units within different task-based threading paradigms. MPI communication-reducing and NUMA-aware approaches for the FMM’s global tree data exchange are examined with different cluster modes of KNL. By applying several algorithm- and architecture-aware optimizations for FMM, we show that the N-Body kernel on 256 threads of KNL achieves on average 2.8× speedup compared to the non-vectorized version, whereas on 56 threads of Broadwell, it achieves on average 2.9× speedup. In addition, the tree traversal kernel on KNL scales monotonically up to 256 threads with task-based programming models. The MPI-based communication-reducing algorithms show expected improvements of the data locality across the KNL on-chip network.

  16. A line integration method for the treatment of 3D domain integrals and accelerated by the fast multipole method in the BEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiao; Zhou, Wei; Cheng, Yonggang; Ma, Gang; Chang, Xiaolin

    2017-04-01

    A line integration method (LIM) is proposed to calculate the domain integrals for 3D problems. In the proposed method, the domain integrals are transformed into boundary integrals and only line integrals on straight lines are needed to be computed. A background cell structure is applied to further simplify the line integrals and improve the accuracy. The method creates elements only on the boundary, and the integral lines are created from the boundary elements. The procedure is quite suitable for the boundary element method, and we have applied it to 3D situations. Directly applying the method is time-consuming since the complexity of the computational time is O( NM), where N and M are the numbers of nodes and lines, respectively. To overcome this problem, the fast multipole method is used with the LIM for large-scale computation. The numerical results show that the proposed method is efficient and accurate.

  17. Fast Link Adaptation for MIMO-OFDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Kant, Shashi; Wehinger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    We investigate link-quality metrics (LQMs) based on raw bit-error-rate, effective signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio, and mutual information (MI) for the purpose of fast link adaptation (LA) in communication systems employing orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and multiple...

  18. Computational study of scattering of a zero-order Bessel beam by large nonspherical homogeneous particles with the multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minglin; Wu, Yueqian; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2017-12-01

    Computation of scattering of shaped beams by large nonspherical particles is a challenge in both optics and electromagnetics domains since it concerns many research fields. In this paper, we report our new progress in the numerical computation of the scattering diagrams. Our algorithm permits to calculate the scattering of a particle of size as large as 110 wavelengths or 700 in size parameter. The particle can be transparent or absorbing of arbitrary shape, smooth or with a sharp surface, such as the Chebyshev particles or ice crystals. To illustrate the capacity of the algorithm, a zero order Bessel beam is taken as the incident beam, and the scattering of ellipsoidal particles and Chebyshev particles are taken as examples. Some special phenomena have been revealed and examined. The scattering problem is formulated with the combined tangential formulation and solved iteratively with the aid of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm, which is well parallelized with the message passing interface on the distributed memory computer platform using the hybrid partitioning strategy. The numerical predictions are compared with the results of the rigorous method for a spherical particle to validate the accuracy of the approach. The scattering diagrams of large ellipsoidal particles with various parameters are examined. The effect of aspect ratios, as well as half-cone angle of the incident zero-order Bessel beam and the off-axis distance on scattered intensity, is studied. Scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 700 is also given to show the capability of the method for computing scattering by arbitrary shaped particles.

  19. Surface integral formulation of Maxwell's equations for simulation of non-destructive testing by eddy currents. Preliminary study on the implementation of the fast multipole method; Formulation integrale surfacique des equations de Maxwell pour la simulation de controles non destructifs par courant de Foucault. Etude preliminaire a la mise en oeuvre de la methode multipole rapide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, T.

    2011-04-28

    To simulate numerically a non-destructive by eddy current testing (NDT-CF), the sensor response can be modeled through a semi-analytical approach by volume integral equations. Faster than the finite element method, this approach is however restricted to the study of plane or cylindrical parts (without taking into account the edge effects) because of the complexity of the expression of the dyadic Green function for more general configurations. However, there is an industrial demand to extend the capabilities of the CF model in complex configurations (deformed plates, edges effects...). We were thus brought to formulate the electromagnetic problem differently, by setting ourselves the goal of maintaining a semi-analytical approach. The surface integral equation (SIE) expresses the volume problem by an equivalent transmission one at the interfaces (2D) between homogeneous sub-domains. This problem is approached by a linear system (by the method of moments), whose number of unknowns is reduced due to the nature of the surfacic mesh. Therefore, this system can be solved by a direct solver for small configurations. That enabled us to treat several various positions of the sensor for only one inversion of the impedance matrix. The numerical results obtained using this formulation involve plates with consideration of edge effects such as edge and corner. They are consistent with results obtained by the finite element method. For larger configurations, we conducted a preliminary study for the adaptation of an acceleration method of the matrix vector product involved in an iterative solver (fast multipole method or FMM) to define the conditions under which the FMM calculation works correctly (accuracy, convergence...) in the NDT's domain. A special attention has been given to the choice of basis functions (which have to satisfy an Hdiv conforming property) and on the evaluation of near interactions (which are weakly singular). (author) [French] Pour simuler

  20. Fast Noise Compensation and Adaptive Enhancement for Speech Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Rong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel approach to improve adaptive decorrelation filtering- (ADF- based speech source separation in diffuse noise. The effects of noise on system adaptation and separation outputs are handled separately. First, fast noise compensation (NC is developed for adaptation of separation filters, forcing ADF to focus on source separation; next, output noises are suppressed by speech enhancement. By tracking noise components in output cross-correlation functions, the bias effect of noise on the system adaptation objective function is compensated, and by adaptively estimating output noise autocorrelations, the speech separation output is enhanced. For fast noise compensation, a blockwise fast ADF (FADF is implemented. Experiments were conducted on real and simulated diffuse noises. Speech mixtures were generated by convolving TIMIT speech sources with acoustic path impulse responses measured in a real room with reverberation time  second. The proposed techniques significantly improved separation performance and phone recognition accuracy of ADF outputs.

  1. High beta multipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, S C

    1982-05-01

    Multipoles are being employed as devices to study fusion issues and plasma phenomena at high values of beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) in a controlled manner. Due to their large volume, low magnetic field (low synchrotron radiation) region, they are also under consideration as potential steady state advanced fuel (low neutron yield) reactors. Present experiments are investigating neoclassical (bootstrap and Pfirsch-Schlueter) currents and plasma stability at extremely high beta.

  2. Sox17 regulates liver lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Rommelaere

    Full Text Available Liver is a major regulator of lipid metabolism and adaptation to fasting, a process involving PPARalpha activation. We recently showed that the Vnn1 gene is a PPARalpha target gene in liver and that release of the Vanin-1 pantetheinase in serum is a biomarker of PPARalpha activation. Here we set up a screen to identify new regulators of adaptation to fasting using the serum Vanin-1 as a marker of PPARalpha activation. Mutagenized mice were screened for low serum Vanin-1 expression. Functional interactions with PPARalpha were investigated by combining transcriptomic, biochemical and metabolic approaches. We characterized a new mutant mouse in which hepatic and serum expression of Vanin-1 is depressed. This mouse carries a mutation in the HMG domain of the Sox17 transcription factor. Mutant mice display a metabolic phenotype featuring lipid abnormalities and inefficient adaptation to fasting. Upon fasting, a fraction of the PPARα-driven transcriptional program is no longer induced and associated with impaired fatty acid oxidation. The transcriptional phenotype is partially observed in heterozygous Sox17+/- mice. In mutant mice, the fasting phenotype but not all transcriptomic signature is rescued by the administration of the PPARalpha agonist fenofibrate. These results identify a novel role for Sox17 in adult liver as a modulator of the metabolic adaptation to fasting.

  3. The Adaptive Organization and Fast-slow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Hallin, Carina Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary organizations operate under turbulent business conditions and must adapt their strategies to ongoing changes. This article argues that sustainable organizational performance is achieved when top management directs and coordinates interactive processes anchored in emerging...... experiential insights from the fast response processes can be aggregated systematically from frontline employees and fed into the slow process of reasoning. When the fast and slow processes interact they form a dynamic system that adapts organizational activities to the changing conditions which identifies...... organizational opportunities and forward-looking analytics. The fast and emergent processes performed by local managers at the frontline observe and respond to environmental stimuli and the slow processes initiated by decision makers interpret events and reasons about updated strategic actions. Current...

  4. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Fast Noise Compensation and Adaptive Enhancement for Speech Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxin Zhao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel approach to improve adaptive decorrelation filtering- (ADF- based speech source separation in diffuse noise. The effects of noise on system adaptation and separation outputs are handled separately. First, fast noise compensation (NC is developed for adaptation of separation filters, forcing ADF to focus on source separation; next, output noises are suppressed by speech enhancement. By tracking noise components in output cross-correlation functions, the bias effect of noise on the system adaptation objective function is compensated, and by adaptively estimating output noise autocorrelations, the speech separation output is enhanced. For fast noise compensation, a blockwise fast ADF (FADF is implemented. Experiments were conducted on real and simulated diffuse noises. Speech mixtures were generated by convolving TIMIT speech sources with acoustic path impulse responses measured in a real room with reverberation time T60=0.3 second. The proposed techniques significantly improved separation performance and phone recognition accuracy of ADF outputs.

  6. Metabolic adaptation to intermittent fasting is independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Li

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings indicate that PPARA activation prior to acute fasting cannot ameliorate fasting-induced hepatic steatosis, whereas EODF induced metabolic adaptations to protect against fasting-induced steatosis without altering PPARA signaling. Therefore, PPARA activation does not mediate the metabolic adaptation to fasting, at least in preventing acute fasting-induced steatosis.

  7. A Fast Adaptive Receive Antenna Selection Method in MIMO System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antenna selection has been regarded as an effective method to acquire the diversity benefits of multiple antennas while potentially reduce hardware costs. This paper focuses on receive antenna selection. According to the proportion between the numbers of total receive antennas and selected antennas and the influence of each antenna on system capacity, we propose a fast adaptive antenna selection algorithm for wireless multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems. Mathematical analysis and numerical results show that our algorithm significantly reduces the computational complexity and memory requirement and achieves considerable system capacity gain compared with the optimal selection technique in the same time.

  8. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  9. Direct determination of multipole moments of Cartesian Gaussian functions in spherical polar coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Cheol Ho

    2004-02-22

    A new way of generating the multipole moments of Cartesian Gaussian functions in spherical polar coordinates has been established, bypassing the intermediary of Cartesian moment tensors. A new set of recurrence relations have also been derived for the resulting analytic integral values. The new method furnishes a conceptually simple and numerically efficient evaluation procedure for the multipole moments. The advantages over existing methods are documented. The results are relevant for the linear scaling quantum theories based on the fast multipole method. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  10. The SNAP-25 Linker as an Adaptation Toward Fast Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gábor; Milosevic, Ira; Mohrmann, Ralf; Wiederhold, Katrin; Walter, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of four soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor domains into a complex is essential for membrane fusion. In most cases, the four SNARE-domains are encoded by separate membrane-targeted proteins. However, in the exocytotic pathway, two SNARE-domains are present in one protein, connected by a flexible linker. The significance of this arrangement is unknown. We characterized the role of the linker in SNAP-25, a neuronal SNARE, by using overexpression techniques in synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) null mouse chromaffin cells and fast electrophysiological techniques. We confirm that the palmitoylated linker-cysteines are important for membrane association. A SNAP-25 mutant without cysteines supported exocytosis, but the fusion rate was slowed down and the fusion pore duration prolonged. Using chimeric proteins between SNAP-25 and its ubiquitous homologue SNAP-23, we show that the cysteine-containing part of the linkers is interchangeable. However, a stretch of 10 hydrophobic and charged amino acids in the C-terminal half of the SNAP-25 linker is required for fast exocytosis and in its absence the calcium dependence of exocytosis is shifted toward higher concentrations. The SNAP-25 linker therefore might have evolved as an adaptation toward calcium triggering and a high rate of execution of the fusion process, those features that distinguish exocytosis from other membrane fusion pathways. PMID:18579690

  11. Fast, multiphase volume adaptation to hyperosmotic shock by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Pilizota

    Full Text Available All living cells employ an array of different mechanisms to help them survive changes in extra cellular osmotic pressure. The difference in the concentration of chemicals in a bacterium's cytoplasm and the external environment generates an osmotic pressure that inflates the cell. It is thought that the bacterium Escherichia coli use a number of interconnected systems to adapt to changes in external pressure, allowing them to maintain turgor and live in surroundings that range more than two-hundred-fold in external osmolality. Here, we use fluorescence imaging to make the first measurements of cell volume changes over time during hyperosmotic shock and subsequent adaptation on a single cell level in vivo with a time resolution on the order of seconds. We directly observe two previously unseen phases of the cytoplasmic water efflux upon hyperosmotic shock. Furthermore, we monitor cell volume changes during the post-shock recovery and observe a two-phase response that depends on the shock magnitude. The initial phase of recovery is fast, on the order of 15-20 min and shows little cell-to-cell variation. For large sucrose shocks, a secondary phase that lasts several hours adds to the recovery. We find that cells are able to recover fully from shocks as high as 1 Osmol/kg using existing systems, but that for larger shocks, protein synthesis is required for full recovery.

  12. Fast Adaptive Blind MMSE Equalizer for Multichannel FIR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed-Meraim Karim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new blind minimum mean square error (MMSE equalization algorithm of noisy multichannel finite impulse response (FIR systems, that relies only on second-order statistics. The proposed algorithm offers two important advantages: a low computational complexity and a relative robustness against channel order overestimation errors. Exploiting the fact that the columns of the equalizer matrix filter belong both to the signal subspace and to the kernel of truncated data covariance matrix, the proposed algorithm achieves blindly a direct estimation of the zero-delay MMSE equalizer parameters. We develop a two-step procedure to further improve the performance gain and control the equalization delay. An efficient fast adaptive implementation of our equalizer, based on the projection approximation and the shift invariance property of temporal data covariance matrix, is proposed for reducing the computational complexity from to , where is the number of emitted signals, the data vector length, and the dimension of the signal subspace. We then derive a statistical performance analysis to compare the equalization performance with that of the optimal MMSE equalizer. Finally, simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed blind equalization algorithm.

  13. Description of complex time series by multipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewkowicz, M.; Levitan, J.; Puzanov, N.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new method to describe time series with a highly complex time evolution. The time series is projected onto a two-dimensional phase-space plot which is quantified in terms of a multipole expansion where every data point is assigned a unit mass. The multipoles provide an efficient char...

  14. Physiological responses to food deprivation in the house sparrow, a species not adapted to prolonged fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilieh, Anton; McCue, Marshall D; Pinshow, Berry

    2012-09-01

    Many wild birds fast during reproduction, molting, migration, or because of limited food availability. Species that are adapted to fasting sequentially oxidize endogenous fuels in three discrete phases. We hypothesized that species not adapted to long fasts have truncated, but otherwise similar, phases of fasting, sequential changes in fuel oxidization, and similar changes in blood metabolites to fasting-adapted species. We tested salient predictions in house sparrows (Passer domesticus biblicus), a subspecies that is unable to tolerate more than ~32 h of fasting. Our main hypothesis was that fasting sparrows sequentially oxidize substrates in the order carbohydrates, lipids, and protein. We dosed 24 house sparrows with [(13)C]glucose, palmitic acid, or glycine and measured (13)CO(2) in their breath while they fasted for 24 h. To ascertain whether blood metabolite levels reflect fasting-induced changes in metabolic fuels, we also measured glucose, triacylglycerides, and β-hydroxybutyrate in the birds' blood. The results of both breath (13)CO(2) and plasma metabolite analyses did not support our hypothesis; i.e., that sparrows have the same metabolic responses characteristic of fasting-adapted species, but on a shorter time scale. Contrary to our main prediction, we found that recently assimilated (13)C-tracers were oxidized continuously in different patterns with no definite peaks corresponding to the three phases of fasting and also that changes in plasma metabolite levels accurately tracked the changes found by breath analysis. Notably, the rate of recently assimilated [(13)C]glycine oxidization was significantly higher (P fast for longer than 32 h is likely related to their inability to accrue large lipid stores, separately oxidize different fuels, and/or spare protein during fasting.

  15. Influence of shell structure on multipole pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mühlhans

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the surface delta interaction as the generating two-body force, we investigate the interdependence between the composition of the multipole pair field and the multipole moments of the relevant single-particle states. A decrease of the quadrupole pair field is found in going from light to heavy rare earth nuclei. The inclusion of higher multipole moments shifts an existing backbend to higher frequency but when the force parameters are readjusted to reproduce the experimental odd-even mass difference the shift is strongly reduced.

  16. Metabolic adaptation to intermittent fasting is independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guolin; Brocker, Chad N; Yan, Tingting; Xie, Cen; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xiang, Rong; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2018-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA) is a major regulator of fatty acid oxidation and severe hepatic steatosis occurs during acute fasting in Ppara-null mice. Thus, PPARA is considered an important mediator of the fasting response; however, its role in other fasting regiments such as every-other-day fasting (EODF) has not been investigated. Mice were pre-conditioned using either a diet containing the potent PPARA agonist Wy-14643 or an EODF regimen prior to acute fasting. Ppara-null mice were used to assess the contribution of PPARA activation during the metabolic response to EODF. Livers were collected for histological, biochemical, qRT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Acute fasting activated PPARA and led to steatosis, whereas EODF protected against fasting-induced hepatic steatosis without affecting PPARA signaling. In contrast, pretreatment with Wy-14,643 did activate PPARA signaling but did not ameliorate acute fasting-induced steatosis and unexpectedly promoted liver injury. Ppara ablation exacerbated acute fasting-induced hypoglycemia, hepatic steatosis, and liver injury in mice, whereas these detrimental effects were absent in response to EODF, which promoted PPARA-independent fatty acid metabolism and normalized serum lipids. These findings indicate that PPARA activation prior to acute fasting cannot ameliorate fasting-induced hepatic steatosis, whereas EODF induced metabolic adaptations to protect against fasting-induced steatosis without altering PPARA signaling. Therefore, PPARA activation does not mediate the metabolic adaptation to fasting, at least in preventing acute fasting-induced steatosis. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to-Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to...5110P and 16 dx360M4 nodes each with one NVIDIA Kepler K20M/K40M GPU. Each node contained dual Intel Xeon E5-2670 (Sandy Bridge) central processing...kernel and as such does not employ multiple processors. This work makes use of a single processing core and a single NVIDIA Kepler K40 GK110

  18. Statistical multipole formulations for shielding problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Körber

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A multipole-based method is presented for modelling an electromagnetic field with small statistical variations inside an arbitrary enclosure. The accurate computation of the statistics of the field components from the statistical moments of the multipole amplitudes is demonstrated for two- and three-dimensional examples. To obtain the statistics of quantities which depend non-linearly on the field components, higher-order statistical moments of the latter are required.

  19. Atomic forces for geometry-dependent point multipole and gaussian multipole models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M; Perera, Lalith; Duke, Robert; Darden, Thomas; Pedersen, Lee G

    2010-11-30

    In standard treatments of atomic multipole models, interaction energies, total molecular forces, and total molecular torques are given for multipolar interactions between rigid molecules. However, if the molecules are assumed to be flexible, two additional multipolar atomic forces arise because of (1) the transfer of torque between neighboring atoms and (2) the dependence of multipole moment on internal geometry (bond lengths, bond angles, etc.) for geometry-dependent multipole models. In this study, atomic force expressions for geometry-dependent multipoles are presented for use in simulations of flexible molecules. The atomic forces are derived by first proposing a new general expression for Wigner function derivatives partial derivative D(m'm)(l)/partial derivative Omega. The force equations can be applied to electrostatic models based on atomic point multipoles or gaussian multipole charge density. Hydrogen-bonded dimers are used to test the intermolecular electrostatic energies and atomic forces calculated by geometry-dependent multipoles fit to the ab initio electrostatic potential. The electrostatic energies and forces are compared with their reference ab initio values. It is shown that both static and geometry-dependent multipole models are able to reproduce total molecular forces and torques with respect to ab initio, whereas geometry-dependent multipoles are needed to reproduce ab initio atomic forces. The expressions for atomic force can be used in simulations of flexible molecules with atomic multipoles. In addition, the results presented in this work should lead to further development of next generation force fields composed of geometry-dependent multipole models. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Efficient Compression of Far Field Matrices in Multipole Algorithms based on Spherical Harmonics and Radiating Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schroeder

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a compression of far field matrices in the fast multipole method and its multilevel extension for electromagnetic problems. The compression is based on a spherical harmonic representation of radiation patterns in conjunction with a radiating mode expression of the surface current. The method is applied to study near field effects and the far field of an antenna placed on a ship surface. Furthermore, the electromagnetic scattering of an electrically large plate is investigated. It is demonstrated, that the proposed technique leads to a significant memory saving, making multipole algorithms even more efficient without compromising the accuracy.

  1. Multipole plasmons in graphene nanoellipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihua; Song, Zhengyong

    2018-02-01

    We study multipole plasmons in graphene nanoellipses under the quasi-static approximation. The graphene is characterized by a homogeneous surface conductivity, and two coupled differential and integral equations are solved self-consistently to investigate the plasmonic modes in nanoellipses with a fixed area. With respect to the major axis, the symmetric and antisymmetric modes originally doubly degenerate in nanodisks will show different behavior as the semi-major axis increases. The eigen frequencies of the symmetric modes decrease, while those of the antisymmetric modes increase. At the edges, the phase changes of the symmetric dipole modes are linear and independent on structural changes; the phase changes of antisymmetric modes deviate from linear relationship, and the deviation depends on the semi-major axis. As a very large aspect ratio, they exhibit sharp peaks at the endpoints of the minor axis and zero phase changes at the endpoints of the major axis. The non-degenerate breathing mode shows its hot spots at the endpoints of the minor axis, and its eigen frequency gradually increases as the semi-major axis increases.

  2. Temporal partitioning of adaptive responses of the murine heart to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rachel A; Collins, Helen E; Berry, Ryan D; Brahma, Manoja K; Tirado, Brian A; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; Stanley, Haley L; Wende, Adam R; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Rajasekaran, Namakkal Soorappan; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua; Frank, Stuart J; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2018-01-30

    Recent studies suggest that the time of day at which food is consumed dramatically influences clinically-relevant cardiometabolic parameters (e.g., adiposity, insulin sensitivity, and cardiac function). Meal feeding benefits may be the result of daily periods of feeding and/or fasting, highlighting the need for improved understanding of the temporal adaptation of cardiometabolic tissues (e.g., heart) to fasting. Such studies may provide mechanistic insight regarding how time-of-day-dependent feeding/fasting cycles influence cardiac function. We hypothesized that fasting during the sleep period elicits beneficial adaptation of the heart at transcriptional, translational, and metabolic levels. To test this hypothesis, temporal adaptation was investigated in wild-type mice fasted for 24-h, or for either the 12-h light/sleep phase or the 12-h dark/awake phase. Fasting maximally induced fatty acid responsive genes (e.g., Pdk4) during the dark/active phase; transcriptional changes were mirrored at translational (e.g., PDK4) and metabolic flux (e.g., glucose/oleate oxidation) levels. Similarly, maximal repression of myocardial p-mTOR and protein synthesis rates occurred during the dark phase; both parameters remained elevated in the heart of fasted mice during the light phase. In contrast, markers of autophagy (e.g., LC3II) exhibited peak responses to fasting during the light phase. Collectively, these data show that responsiveness of the heart to fasting is temporally partitioned. Autophagy peaks during the light/sleep phase, while repression of glucose utilization and protein synthesis is maximized during the dark/active phase. We speculate that sleep phase fasting may benefit cardiac function through augmentation of protein/cellular constituent turnover. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Fast but fleeting: adaptive motor learning processes associated with aging and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewartha, Kevin M; Garcia, Angeles; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2014-10-01

    Motor learning has been shown to depend on multiple interacting learning processes. For example, learning to adapt when moving grasped objects with novel dynamics involves a fast process that adapts and decays quickly-and that has been linked to explicit memory-and a slower process that adapts and decays more gradually. Each process is characterized by a learning rate that controls how strongly motor memory is updated based on experienced errors and a retention factor determining the movement-to-movement decay in motor memory. Here we examined whether fast and slow motor learning processes involved in learning novel dynamics differ between younger and older adults. In addition, we investigated how age-related decline in explicit memory performance influences learning and retention parameters. Although the groups adapted equally well, they did so with markedly different underlying processes. Whereas the groups had similar fast processes, they had different slow processes. Specifically, the older adults exhibited decreased retention in their slow process compared with younger adults. Within the older group, who exhibited considerable variation in explicit memory performance, we found that poor explicit memory was associated with reduced retention in the fast process, as well as the slow process. These findings suggest that explicit memory resources are a determining factor in impairments in the both the fast and slow processes for motor learning but that aging effects on the slow process are independent of explicit memory declines. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413411-11$15.00/0.

  4. Fast Gravitational Field Model Using Adaptive Orthogonal Finite Element Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, A.; Macomber, B.; Woollands, R.; Probe, A.; Bai, X.; Junkins, J.

    2013-09-01

    Recent research has addressed the issue that high degree and order gravity expansions involve tens of thousands of terms in a theoretically infinite order spherical harmonic expansion (some gravity models extend to degree and order 200 with over 30,000 terms) which in principle must be computed at every integration step to obtain the acceleration consistent with the gravity model. We propose to evaluate these gravity model interpolation models and use them in conjunction with the modified Picard path approximation methods. It was decided to consider analogous orthogonal approximation methods to interpolate, an FEM model, high (degree, order) gravity fields, by replacing the global spherical harmonic series by a family of locally precise orthogonal polynomial approximations for efficient computation. Our preliminary results showed that time to compute the state of the art (degree and order 200) spherical harmonic gravity is reduced by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude while maintaining > 9 digits of accuracy. Most of the gain is due to adopting the orthogonal FEM approach, but radial adaptation of the approximation degree gains an additional order of magnitude speedup. The efficient data base storage/access of the local coefficients is studied, which utilizes porting the algorithm to the NVIDIA GPU. This paper will address the accuracy and efficiency in both a C++ serial PC architecture as well as a PC/GPU architecture. The Adaptive Orthogonal Finite Element Gravity Model (AOFEGM) is expected to have broad potential for speeding the trajectory propagation algorithms; for example, used in conjunction with orthogonal Finite Element Model (FEM) gravity approximations, the Chebyshev-Picard path approximation enables truly revolutionary speedups in orbit propagation without accuracy loss.

  5. The glucagon receptor is required for the adaptive metabolic response to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuet, Christine; Sinclair, Elaine M; Maida, Adriano; Baggio, Laurie L; Maziarz, Marlena; Charron, Maureen J; Drucker, Daniel J

    2008-11-01

    Glucagon receptor (Gcgr) signaling maintains hepatic glucose production during the fasting state; however, the importance of the Gcgr for lipid metabolism is unclear. We show here that fasted Gcgr-/- mice exhibit a significant increase in hepatic triglyceride secretion and fasting increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in wild-type (WT) but not in Gcgr-/- mice. Moreover fasting upregulated the expression of FAO-related hepatic mRNA transcripts in Gcgr+/+ but not in Gcgr-/- mice. Exogenous glucagon administration reduced plasma triglycerides in WT mice, inhibited TG synthesis and secretion, and stimulated FA beta oxidation in Gcgr+/+ hepatocytes. The actions of glucagon on TG synthesis and FAO were abolished in PPARalpha-/- hepatocytes. These findings demonstrate that the Gcgr receptor is required for control of lipid metabolism during the adaptive metabolic response to fasting.

  6. Simulation of Monopole and Multipole Seismoelectric Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Cui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a fluid-saturated porous formation, acoustics and electromagnetic waves are coupled based on Pride seismoelectric theory. An exact treatment of the nonaxisymmetric seismoelectric field excited by acoustic multipole sources is presented. The frequency wavenumber domain representations of the acoustic field and associated seismoelectric field due to acoustic multipole sources are formulated. The full waveforms of acoustic waves and electric and magnetic fields in the time domain propagation in borehole are simulated by using discrete wave number integration, and frequency versus axial-wave number responses are presented and analyzed.

  7. Multipole Analysis of Circular Cylindircal Magnetic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaggi, Jerry P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    This thesis deals with an alternate method for computing the external magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. The primary objective is to characterize the magnetic source in terms of its equivalent multipole distribution. This multipole distribution must be valid at points close to the cylindrical source and a spherical multipole expansion is ill-equipped to handle this problem; therefore a new method must be introduced. This method, based upon the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is developed as an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic expansion. A family of special functions, called the toroidal functions or Q-functions, are found to exhibit the necessary properties for analyzing circular cylindrical geometries. In particular, the toroidal function of zeroth order, which comes from the integral formulation of the free-space Green's function in cylindrical coordinates, is employed to handle magnetic sources which exhibit circular cylindrical symmetry. The toroidal functions, also called Q-functions, are the weighting coefficients in a ''Fourier series-like'' expansion which represents the free-space Green's function. It is also called a toroidal expansion. This expansion can be directly employed in electrostatic, magnetostatic, and electrodynamic problems which exhibit cylindrical symmetry. Also, it is shown that they can be used as an alternative to the Elliptic integral formulation. In fact, anywhere that an Elliptic integral appears, one can replace it with its corresponding Q-function representation. A number of problems, using the toroidal expansion formulation, are analyzed and compared to existing known methods in order to validate the results. Also, the equivalent multipole distribution is found for most of the solved problems along with its corresponding physical interpretation. The main application is to characterize the external magnetic field due to a six

  8. Fasting induces a biphasic adaptive metabolic response in murine small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelo Chris TA

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut is a major energy consumer, but a comprehensive overview of the adaptive response to fasting is lacking. Gene-expression profiling, pathway analysis, and immunohistochemistry were therefore carried out on mouse small intestine after 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of fasting. Results Intestinal weight declined to 50% of control, but this loss of tissue mass was distributed proportionally among the gut's structural components, so that the microarrays' tissue base remained unaffected. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarrays revealed that the successive time points separated into distinct branches. Pathway analysis depicted a pronounced, but transient early response that peaked at 12 hours, and a late response that became progressively more pronounced with continued fasting. Early changes in gene expression were compatible with a cellular deficiency in glutamine, and metabolic adaptations directed at glutamine conservation, inhibition of pyruvate oxidation, stimulation of glutamate catabolism via aspartate and phosphoenolpyruvate to lactate, and enhanced fatty-acid oxidation and ketone-body synthesis. In addition, the expression of key genes involved in cell cycling and apoptosis was suppressed. At 24 hours of fasting, many of the early adaptive changes abated. Major changes upon continued fasting implied the production of glucose rather than lactate from carbohydrate backbones, a downregulation of fatty-acid oxidation and a very strong downregulation of the electron-transport chain. Cell cycling and apoptosis remained suppressed. Conclusion The changes in gene expression indicate that the small intestine rapidly looses mass during fasting to generate lactate or glucose and ketone bodies. Meanwhile, intestinal architecture is maintained by downregulation of cell turnover.

  9. Adaptive integral method with fast Gaussian gridding for solving combined field integral equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakır, O.; Baǧ; Cı, H.; Michielssen, E.

    Fast Gaussian gridding (FGG), a recently proposed nonuniform fast Fourier transform algorithm, is used to reduce the memory requirements of the adaptive integral method (AIM) for accelerating the method of moments-based solution of combined field integral equations pertinent to the analysis of scattering from three-dimensional perfect electrically conducting surfaces. Numerical results that demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the AIM-FGG hybrid in comparison to an AIM-accelerated solver, which uses moment matching to project surface sources onto an auxiliary grid, are presented.

  10. Research on a Pulmonary Nodule Segmentation Method Combining Fast Self-Adaptive FCM and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD of lung cancer is to segment pathologically changed tissues fast and accurately. As pulmonary nodules are potential manifestation of lung cancer, we propose a fast and self-adaptive pulmonary nodules segmentation method based on a combination of FCM clustering and classification learning. The enhanced spatial function considers contributions to fuzzy membership from both the grayscale similarity between central pixels and single neighboring pixels and the spatial similarity between central pixels and neighborhood and improves effectively the convergence rate and self-adaptivity of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate segmentation of vascular adhesion, pleural adhesion, and ground glass opacity (GGO pulmonary nodules than other typical algorithms.

  11. Fast and robust online adaptive planning in stereotactic MR-guided adaptive radiation therapy (SMART) for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohoudi, O; Bruynzeel, A M E; Senan, S; Cuijpers, J P; Slotman, B J; Lagerwaard, F J; Palacios, M A

    2017-12-01

    To implement a robust and fast stereotactic MR-guided adaptive radiation therapy (SMART) online strategy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). SMART strategy for plan adaptation was implemented with the MRIdian system (ViewRay Inc.). At each fraction, OAR (re-)contouring is done within a distance of 3cm from the PTV surface. Online plan re-optimization is based on robust prediction of OAR dose and optimization objectives, obtained by building an artificial neural network (ANN). Proposed limited re-contouring strategy for plan adaptation (SMART3CM) is evaluated by comparing 50 previously delivered fractions against a standard (re-)planning method using full-scale OAR (re-)contouring (FULLOAR). Plan quality was assessed using PTV coverage (V95%, Dmean, D1cc) and institutional OAR constraints (e.g. V33Gy). SMART3CM required a significant lower number of optimizations than FULLOAR (4 vs 18 on average) to generate a plan meeting all objectives and institutional OAR constraints. PTV coverage with both strategies was identical (mean V95%=89%). Adaptive plans with SMART3CM exhibited significant lower intermediate and high doses to all OARs than FULLOAR, which also failed in 36% of the cases to adhere to the V33Gy dose constraint. SMART3CM approach for LAPC allows good OAR sparing and adequate target coverage while requiring only limited online (re-)contouring from clinicians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multipole Traps as Tools in Environmental Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M; Giurgiu, Liviu C; Groza, Andreea; Surmeian, Agavni; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Vasilyak, Leonid; Pecherkin, Vladimir; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Syrovatka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Trapping of microparticles, nanoparticles and aerosols is an issue of major interest for physics and chemistry. We present a setup intended for microparticle trapping in multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under Standard Ambient Temperature and Pressure (SATP) conditions. A 16-electrode linear trap geometry has been designed and tested, with an aim to confine a larger number of particles with respect to quadrupole traps and thus enhance the signal to noise ratio, as well as to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. Experimental tests and numerical simulations suggest that multipole traps are very suited for high precision mass spectrometry measurements in case of different microparticle species or to identify the presence of certain aerosols and polluting agents in the atmosphere. Particle traps represent versatile tools for environment monitoring or for the study of many-body Coulomb systems and dusty plasmas.

  13. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian S Houser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris, which fasts from food and water for periods of up to three months. During this time, ~90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM. All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures

  14. Adaptive Hybrid Visual Servo Regulation of Mobile Robots Based on Fast Homography Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the monocular camera-based mobile robot system, an adaptive hybrid visual servo regulation algorithm which is based on a fast homography decomposition method is proposed to drive the mobile robot to its desired position and orientation, even when object’s imaging depth and camera’s position extrinsic parameters are unknown. Firstly, the homography’s particular properties caused by mobile robot’s 2-DOF motion are taken into account to induce a fast homography decomposition method. Secondly, the homography matrix and the extracted orientation error, incorporated with the desired view’s single feature point, are utilized to form an error vector and its open-loop error function. Finally, Lyapunov-based techniques are exploited to construct an adaptive regulation control law, followed by the experimental verification. The experimental results show that the proposed fast homography decomposition method is not only simple and efficient, but also highly precise. Meanwhile, the designed control law can well enable mobile robot position and orientation regulation despite the lack of depth information and camera’s position extrinsic parameters.

  15. Improving GPU-accelerated adaptive IDW interpolation algorithm using fast kNN search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-nearest neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is obtained by weighted interpolating using the power parameter. In this work, we develop a fast kNN search approach based on the space-partitioning data structure, even grid, to improve the previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm. The improved algorithm is composed of the stages of kNN search and weighted interpolating. To evaluate the performance of the improved algorithm, we perform five groups of experimental tests. The experimental results indicate: (1) the improved algorithm can achieve a speedup of up to 1017 over the corresponding serial algorithm; (2) the improved algorithm is at least two times faster than our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm; and (3) the utilization of fast kNN search can significantly improve the computational efficiency of the entire GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm.

  16. A fast adaptive memetic algorithm for online and offline control design of PMSM drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponio, Andrea; Cascella, Giuseppe Leonardo; Neri, Ferrante; Salvatore, Nadia; Sumner, Mark

    2007-02-01

    A fast adaptive memetic algorithm (FAMA) is proposed which is used to design the optimal control system for a permanent-magnet synchronous motor. The FAMA is a memetic algorithm with a dynamic parameter setting and two local searchers adaptively launched, either one by one or simultaneously, according to the necessities of the evolution. The FAMA has been tested for both offline and online optimization. The former is based on a simulation of the whole system--control system and plant--using a model obtained through identification tests. The online optimization is model free because each fitness evaluation consists of an experimental test on the real motor drive. The proposed algorithm has been compared with other optimization approaches, and a matching analysis has been carried out offline and online. Excellent results are obtained in terms of optimality, convergence, and algorithmic efficiency. Moreover, the FAMA has given very robust results in the presence of noise in the experimental system.

  17. Photon decay of giant multipole resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review of the excitation of giant multipole resonances via Coulomb excitation is given which emphasizes the very large cross sections that can be realized through this reaction for both isoscalar and isovector resonances. Discussion and results where available, are provided for the measurement of the photon decay of one and two phonon giant resonances. It is pointed out throughout the presentation that the use of E1 photons as a tag'' provides a means to observe weakly excited resonances that cannot be observed in the shingles spectra. 26 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Electric multipole moments, topological multipole moment pumping, and chiral hinge states in crystalline insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benalcazar, Wladimir A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2017-12-01

    We extend the theory of dipole moments in crystalline insulators to higher multipole moments. As first formulated in Benalcazar et al. [Science 357, 61 (2017), 10.1126/science.aah6442], we show that bulk quadrupole and octupole moments can be realized in crystalline insulators. In this paper, we expand in great detail the theory presented previously [Benalcazar et al., Science 357, 61 (2017), 10.1126/science.aah6442] and extend it to cover associated topological pumping phenomena, and a class of three-dimensional (3D) insulator with chiral hinge states. We start by deriving the boundary properties of continuous classical dielectrics hosting only bulk dipole, quadrupole, or octupole moments. In quantum mechanical crystalline insulators, these higher multipole bulk moments manifest themselves by the presence of boundary-localized moments of lower dimension, in exact correspondence with the electromagnetic theory of classical continuous dielectrics. In the presence of certain symmetries, these moments are quantized, and their boundary signatures are fractionalized. These multipole moments then correspond to new symmetry-protected topological phases. The topological structure of these phases is described by "nested" Wilson loops, which we define. These Wilson loops reflect the bulk-boundary correspondence in a way that makes evident a hierarchical classification of the multipole moments. Just as a varying dipole generates charge pumping, a varying quadrupole generates dipole pumping, and a varying octupole generates quadrupole pumping. For nontrivial adiabatic cycles, the transport of these moments is quantized. An analysis of these interconnected phenomena leads to the conclusion that a new kind of Chern-type insulator exists, which has chiral, hinge-localized modes in 3D. We provide the minimal models for the quantized multipole moments, the nontrivial pumping processes, and the hinge Chern insulator, and describe the topological invariants that protect them.

  19. Concept of multipole magnetic field rotation in ECRIS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the feasibility of achieving a rotating magnetic multipole field is discussed to some extent. And it is seen that it is not beyond the capability of the scientific community in the present scenario of the advanced technology. Presently, it can be achieved for lesser field and slightly larger size of the multipole electromagnet and ...

  20. Multipole stack for the 4 rings of the PS Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The PS Booster (originally 800 MeV, now 1.4 GeV) saw first beam in 1972, routine operation began in 1973. The strive for ever higher intensities required the addition of multipoles. Manufacture of 8 stacks of multipoles was launched in 1974, for installation in 1976. For details, see 7511120X.

  1. p21Cip1 plays a critical role in the physiological adaptation to fasting through activation of PPARα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Guadamillas, Elena; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Pantoja, Cristina; Muñoz-Martin, Maribel; Martínez, Dolores; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Valverde, Angela M.; Serrano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fasting is a physiological stress that elicits well-known metabolic adaptations, however, little is known about the role of stress-responsive tumor suppressors in fasting. Here, we have examined the expression of several tumor suppressors upon fasting in mice. Interestingly, p21 mRNA is uniquely induced in all the tissues tested, particularly in liver and muscle (>10 fold), and this upregulation is independent of p53. Remarkably, in contrast to wild-type mice, p21-null mice become severely morbid after prolonged fasting. The defective adaptation to fasting of p21-null mice is associated to elevated energy expenditure, accelerated depletion of fat stores, and premature activation of protein catabolism in the muscle. Analysis of the liver transcriptome and cell-based assays revealed that the absence of p21 partially impairs the transcriptional program of PPARα, a key regulator of fasting metabolism. Finally, treatment of p21-null mice with a PPARα agonist substantially protects them from their accelerated loss of fat upon fasting. We conclude that p21 plays a relevant role in fasting adaptation through the positive regulation of PPARα. PMID:27721423

  2. Dietary and physical activity adaptations to alternate day modified fasting: implications for optimal weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klempel Monica C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternate day modified fasting (ADMF is an effective strategy for weight loss in obese adults. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the dietary and physical activity adaptations that occur during short-term ADMF, and to determine how these modulations affect rate of weight loss. Methods Sixteen obese subjects (12 women/4 men completed a 10-week trial consisting of 3 phases: 1 2-week control phase, 2 4-week ADMF controlled feeding phase, and 3 4-week ADMF self-selected feeding phase. Results Body weight decreased (P r = 0.42, P = 0.01. Dietary fat intake decreased (36% to 33% of kcal, P r = 0.38, P = 0.03. Hunger on the fast day decreased (P Conclusion These findings indicate that obese subjects quickly adapt to ADMF, and that changes in energy/macronutrient intake, hunger, and maintenance of physical activity play a role in influencing rate of weight loss by ADMF.

  3. Phenotypic plasticity and climate change: can polar bears respond to longer Arctic summers with an adaptive fast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, John P; Harlow, Henry J; Durner, George M; Regehr, Eric V; Amstrup, Steven C; Ben-David, Merav

    2018-02-01

    Plasticity in the physiological and behavioural responses of animals to prolonged food shortages may determine the persistence of species under climate warming. This is particularly applicable for species that can "adaptively fast" by conserving protein to protect organ function while catabolizing endogenous tissues. Some Ursids, including polar bears (Ursus maritimus), adaptively fast during winter hibernation-and it has been suggested that polar bears also employ this strategy during summer. We captured 57 adult female polar bears in the Southern Beaufort Sea (SBS) during summer 2008 and 2009 and measured blood variables that indicate feeding, regular fasting, and adaptive fasting. We also assessed tissue δ 13 C and δ 15 N to infer diet, and body condition via mass and length. We found that bears on shore maintained lipid and protein stores by scavenging on bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) carcasses from human harvest, while those that followed the retreating sea ice beyond the continental shelf were food deprived. They had low ratios of blood urea to creatinine (U:C), normally associated with adaptive fasting. However, they also exhibited low albumin and glucose (indicative of protein loss) and elevated alanine aminotransferase and ghrelin (which fall during adaptive fasting). Thus, the ~ 70% of the SBS subpopulation that spends summer on the ice experiences more of a regular, rather than adaptive, fast. This fast will lengthen as summer ice declines. The resulting protein loss prior to winter could be a mechanism driving the reported correlation between summer ice and polar bear reproduction and survival in the SBS.

  4. Microscopic Theory of Multipole Ordering in f-Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A microscopic framework to determine multipole ordering in f-electron systems is provided on the basis of the standard quantum field theory. For the construction of the framework, a seven-orbital Hubbard Hamiltonian with strong spin-orbit coupling is adopted as a prototype model. A type of multipole and ordering vector is determined from the divergence of multipole susceptibility, which is evaluated in a random phase approximation. As an example of the application of the present framework, a multipole phase diagram on a three-dimensional simple cubic lattice is discussed for the case of n=2, where n denotes the average f-electron number per site. Finally, future problems concerning multipole ordering and fluctuations are briefly discussed.

  5. Multipole charge conservation and implications on electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, Ali

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that conserved charges associated with a specific subclass of gauge symmetries of Maxwell electrodynamics are proportional to the well known electric mul-tipole moments. The symmetries are residual gauge transformations surviving the Lorenz gauge, with nontrivial conserved charge at spatial infinity. These "Multipole charges" receive contributions both from the charged matter and electromagnetic fields. The former is nothing but the electric multipole moment of the source. In a stationary configuration, there is a novel equipartition relation between the two contributions. The multipole charge, while conserved, can freely interpolate between the source and the electromagnetic field, and therefore can be propagated with the radiation. Using the multipole charge conservation, we obtain infinite number of constraints over the radiation produced by the dynamics of charged matter.

  6. Multipole Stack for the 800 MeV PS Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The 800 MeV PS Booster had seen first beam in its 4 superposed rings in 1972, routine operation began in 1973. In the strive for ever higher beam intensities, the need for additional multipole lenses became evident. After detailed studies, the manufacture of 8 stacks of multipoles was launched in 1974. Each stack consists of 4 superposed multipoles and each multipole has 4 concentric shells. From the innermost to the outermost shell, Type A contains octupole, skew-octupole, sextupole, skew-sextupole. Type B contains skew-octupole, skew-sextupole, vertical dipole, horizontal dipole. Completion of installation in 1976 opened the way to higher beam intensities. M. Battiaz is seen here with a multipole stack and its many electrical connections.

  7. Adaptive Changes in the Perception of Fast and Slow Movement at Different Head Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Roberto; Occhigrossi, Chiara; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Lucertini, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2017-05-01

    This paper examines the subjective sense of orientation during asymmetric body rotations in normal subjects. Self-motion perception was investigated in 10 healthy individuals during asymmetric whole-body rotation with different head orientations. Both on-vertical axis and off-vertical axis rotations were employed. Subjects tracked a remembered earth-fixed visual target while rotating in the dark for four cycles of asymmetric rotation (two half-sinusoidal cycles of the same amplitude, but of different duration). The rotations induced a bias in the perception of velocity (more pronounced with fast than with slow motion). At the end of rotation, a marked target position error (TPE) was present. For the on-vertical axis rotations, the TPE was no different if the rotations were performed with a 30° nose-down, a 60° nose-up, or a 90° side-down head tilt. With off-vertical axis rotations, the simultaneous activation of the semicircular canals and otolithic receptors produced a significant increase of TPE for all head positions. This difference between on-vertical and off-vertical axis rotation was probably partly due to the vestibular transfer function and partly due to different adaptation to the speed of rotation. Such a phenomenon might be generated in different components of the vestibular system. The adaptive process enhancing the perception of dynamic movement around the vertical axis is not related to the specific semicircular canals that are activated; the addition of an otolithic component results in a significant increase of the TPE.Panichi R, Occhigrossi C, Ferraresi A, Faralli M, Lucertini M, Pettorossi VE. Adaptive changes in the perception of fast and slow movement at different head positions. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(5):463-468.

  8. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Fast Adapting Ensemble: A New Algorithm for Mining Data Streams with Concept Drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ortíz Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of large data streams in the presence of concept drifts is one of the main challenges in the field of data mining, particularly when the algorithms have to deal with concepts that disappear and then reappear. This paper presents a new algorithm, called Fast Adapting Ensemble (FAE, which adapts very quickly to both abrupt and gradual concept drifts, and has been specifically designed to deal with recurring concepts. FAE processes the learning examples in blocks of the same size, but it does not have to wait for the batch to be complete in order to adapt its base classification mechanism. FAE incorporates a drift detector to improve the handling of abrupt concept drifts and stores a set of inactive classifiers that represent old concepts, which are activated very quickly when these concepts reappear. We compare our new algorithm with various well-known learning algorithms, taking into account, common benchmark datasets. The experiments show promising results from the proposed algorithm (regarding accuracy and runtime, handling different types of concept drifts.

  10. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqu......ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  11. Fast simulation of transport and adaptive permeability estimation in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berre, Inga

    2005-07-01

    The focus of the thesis is twofold: Both fast simulation of transport in porous media and adaptive estimation of permeability are considered. A short introduction that motivates the work on these topics is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the governing equations for one- and two-phase flow in porous media are presented. Overall numerical solution strategies for the two-phase flow model are also discussed briefly. The concepts of streamlines and time-of-flight are introduced in Chapter 3. Methods for computing streamlines and time-of-flight are also presented in this chapter. Subsequently, in Chapters 4 and 5, the focus is on simulation of transport in a time-of-flight perspective. In Chapter 4, transport of fluids along streamlines is considered. Chapter 5 introduces a different viewpoint based on the evolution of isocontours of the fluid saturation. While the first chapters focus on the forward problem, which consists in solving a mathematical model given the reservoir parameters, Chapters 6, 7 and 8 are devoted to the inverse problem of permeability estimation. An introduction to the problem of identifying spatial variability in reservoir permeability by inversion of dynamic production data is given in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, adaptive multiscale strategies for permeability estimation are discussed. Subsequently, Chapter 8 presents a level-set approach for improving piecewise constant permeability representations. Finally, Chapter 9 summarizes the results obtained in the thesis; in addition, the chapter gives some recommendations and suggests directions for future work. Part II In Part II, the following papers are included in the order they were completed: Paper A: A Streamline Front Tracking Method for Two- and Three-Phase Flow Including Capillary Forces. I. Berre, H. K. Dahle, K. H. Karlsen, and H. F. Nordhaug. In Fluid flow and transport in porous media: mathematical and numerical treatment (South Hadley, MA, 2001), volume 295 of Contemp. Math., pages 49

  12. Multipole-bound molecular negative ions

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul-Karim, H; Desfrançois, C

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a simple electrostatic model, as compared to recent experimental results, we here discuss the stability of very weakly bound molecular negative ions. In contrast with the case of conventional valence anions, the excess electron is then located in a very diffuse orbital and is mainly bound by electrostatic dipolar, quadrupolar, and polarization forces, at large distances from the neutral molecular core. By fitting a single repulsion parameter of the model to the available experimental data, it is possible to make quantitative predictions of the excess-electron binding energies in these species. Critical values of the dipole moment, quadrupole moment or polarizability required for the observation of stable multipole-bound negative ions are predicted and compared to available experimental data and ab initio calculations. Refs. 26 (author)

  13. Transferable Atomic Multipole Machine Learning Models for Small Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; Andrienko, Denis; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-07-14

    Accurate representation of the molecular electrostatic potential, which is often expanded in distributed multipole moments, is crucial for an efficient evaluation of intermolecular interactions. Here we introduce a machine learning model for multipole coefficients of atom types H, C, O, N, S, F, and Cl in any molecular conformation. The model is trained on quantum-chemical results for atoms in varying chemical environments drawn from thousands of organic molecules. Multipoles in systems with neutral, cationic, and anionic molecular charge states are treated with individual models. The models' predictive accuracy and applicability are illustrated by evaluating intermolecular interaction energies of nearly 1,000 dimers and the cohesive energy of the benzene crystal.

  14. Beamspace fast fully adaptive brain source localization for limited data sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravan, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    In the electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetoencephalogram (MEG) context, brain source localization methods that rely on estimating second order statistics often fail when the observations are taken over a short time interval, especially when the number of electrodes is large. To address this issue, in previous study, we developed a multistage adaptive processing called fast fully adaptive (FFA) approach that can significantly reduce the required sample support while still processing all available degrees of freedom (DOFs). This approach processes the observed data in stages through a decimation procedure. In this study, we introduce a new form of FFA approach called beamspace FFA. We first divide the brain into smaller regions and transform the measured data from the source space to the beamspace in each region. The FFA approach is then applied to the beamspaced data of each region. The goal of this modification is to benefit the correlation sensitivity reduction between sources in different brain regions. To demonstrate the performance of the beamspace FFA approach in the limited data scenario, simulation results with multiple deep and cortical sources as well as experimental results are compared with regular FFA and widely used FINE approaches. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the beamspace FFA method can localize different types of multiple correlated brain sources in low signal to noise ratios more accurately with limited data.

  15. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Chunhua; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-08-07

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on the graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on the CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called the column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on the GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5 x 5 mm(2) beamlet size and 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm(3) voxel size were tested to evaluate our algorithm on the GPU. It takes only 0.7-3.8 s for our implementation to generate high-quality treatment plans on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card. Our work has therefore solved a major problem in developing ultra-fast (re-)planning technologies for online ART.

  16. Heart Motion Prediction in Robotic-Assisted Beating Heart Surgery: A Nonlinear Fast Adaptive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Off-pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG surgery outperforms traditional on-pump surgery because the assisted robotic tools can alleviate the relative motion between the beating heart and robotic tools. Therefore, it is possible for the surgeon to operate on the beating heart and thus lessens post surgery complications for the patients. Due to the highly irregular and non-stationary nature of heart motion, it is critical that the beating heart motion is predicted in the model-based track control procedures. It is technically preferable to model heart motion in a nonlinear way because the characteristic analysis of 3D heart motion data through Bi-spectral analysis and Fourier methods demonstrates the involved nonlinearity of heart motion. We propose an adaptive nonlinear heart motion model based on the Volterra Series in this paper. We also design a fast lattice structure to achieve computational-efficiency for real-time online predictions. We argue that the quadratic term of the Volterra Series can improve the prediction accuracy by covering sharp change points and including the motion with sufficient detail. The experiment results indicate that the adaptive nonlinear heart motion prediction algorithm outperforms the autoregressive (AR and the time-varying Fourier-series models in terms of the root mean square of the prediction error and the prediction error in extreme cases.

  17. The Glucagon Receptor Is Required for the Adaptive Metabolic Response to Fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, Christine; Sinclair, Elaine M.; Maida, Adriano; Baggio, Laurie L.; Maziarz, Marlena; Charron, Maureen J.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Glucagon receptor (Gcgr) signaling maintains hepatic glucose production during the fasting state however the importance of the Gcgr for lipid metabolism is unclear. We show here that fasted Gcgr-/- mice exhibit a significant increase in hepatic triglyceride secretion and fasting increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in wild type (WT) but not in Gcgr-/- mice. Moreover fasting upregulated the expression of FAO-related hepatic mRNA transcripts in Gcgr+/+ but not in Gcgr-/- mice. Exogenous glucago...

  18. Endocrine response to realimentation in young northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris): Indications for development of fasting adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Rachael E; Fontaine, Christine M; Avery, Julie P

    2016-09-01

    Most organisms undergo changes in their environment, both predictably and unpredictably, which require them to alter priorities in nutrient allocation with regards to food availability. Species that more predictably encounter extended periods of limited food resources or intake while mitigating the negative effects of starvation are considered to be fasting adapted. Northern elephant seals (NES) are one such species and routinely undergo extended periods of fasting for breeding, molting, as well as a post-weaning fast at 6-8weeks of age. However, during unusual times of nutritional deprivation, animals may enter stage III fasting. While fasting and foraging in this species has been extensively studied, realimentation following fasting beyond normal life history parameters has not been investigated. In this study, changes in ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I were compared across 8weeks of realimentation following emaciation in three age classes: neonates, post-molt pups, and yearlings. Longitudinal changes in hormone profiles indicate that neonate and post-molt pups are slow to recover mass and positive energy balance despite an energy dense diet fed at 10% body mass. In addition, ghrelin and GH concentrations remained elevated in post-molt pups compared to other age classes. Changes in hormone concentrations early in realimentation indicate that yearling animals recover more rapidly from periods of nutritional deprivation than do younger animals. Overall, this suggests that the ability to regulate metabolic homeostasis with regards to nutrient allocation may develop over time, even in a species that is considered to be fasting adapted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fast, accurate, and robust frequency offset estimation based on modified adaptive Kalman filter in coherent optical communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfu; Xiang, Qian; Zhang, Qun; Zhou, Zhongqing; Jiang, Wen; He, Qianwen; Yao, Yong

    2017-09-01

    We propose a joint estimation scheme for fast, accurate, and robust frequency offset (FO) estimation along with phase estimation based on modified adaptive Kalman filter (MAKF). The scheme consists of three key modules: extend Kalman filter (EKF), lock detector, and FO cycle slip recovery. The EKF module estimates time-varying phase induced by both FO and laser phase noise. The lock detector module makes decision between acquisition mode and tracking mode and consequently sets the EKF tuning parameter in an adaptive manner. The third module can detect possible cycle slip in the case of large FO and make proper correction. Based on the simulation and experimental results, the proposed MAKF has shown excellent estimation performance featuring high accuracy, fast convergence, as well as the capability of cycle slip recovery.

  20. Atom-partitioned multipole expansions for electrostatic potential boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M., E-mail: michael.s.lee131.civ@mail.mil [Simulation Sciences Branch, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Leiter, K. [Simulation Sciences Branch, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Eisner, C. [Secure Mission Solutions, a Parsons Company (United States); Simulation Sciences Branch, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Knap, J. [Simulation Sciences Branch, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Applications such as grid-based real-space density functional theory (DFT) use the Poisson equation to compute electrostatics. However, the expected long tail of the electrostatic potential requires either the use of a large and costly outer domain or Dirichlet boundary conditions estimated via multipole expansion. We find that the oft-used single-center spherical multipole expansion is only appropriate for isotropic mesh domains such as spheres and cubes. In this work, we introduce a method suitable for high aspect ratio meshes whereby the charge density is partitioned into atomic domains and multipoles are computed for each domain. While this approach is moderately more expensive than a single-center expansion, it is numerically stable and still a small fraction of the overall cost of a DFT calculation. The net result is that when high aspect ratio systems are being studied, form-fitted meshes can now be used in lieu of cubic meshes to gain computational speedup.

  1. Geometry-dependent atomic multipole models for the water molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, O; Millot, C

    2017-10-28

    Models of atomic electric multipoles for the water molecule have been optimized in order to reproduce the electric potential around the molecule computed by ab initio calculations at the coupled cluster level of theory with up to noniterative triple excitations in an augmented triple-zeta quality basis set. Different models of increasing complexity, from atomic charges up to models containing atomic charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles, have been obtained. The geometry dependence of these atomic multipole models has been investigated by changing bond lengths and HOH angle to generate 125 molecular structures (reduced to 75 symmetry-unique ones). For several models, the atomic multipole components have been fitted as a function of the geometry by a Taylor series of fourth order in monomer coordinate displacements.

  2. Advanced multipoles for accelerator magnets theoretical analysis and their measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Schnizer, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This monograph presents research on the transversal beam dynamics of accelerators and evaluates and describes the respective magnetic field homogeneity.  The widely used cylindrical circular multipoles have disadvantages for elliptical apertures or curved trajectories, and the book also introduces new types of advanced multipole magnets, detailing their application, as well as the numerical data and measurements obtained. The research presented here provides more precise descriptions of the field and better estimates of the beam dynamics. Moreover, the effects of field inhomogeneity can be estimated with higher precision than before. These findings are further elaborated to demonstrate their usefulness for real magnets and accelerator set ups, showing their advantages over cylindrical circular multipoles. The research findings are complemented with data obtained from the new superconducting beam guiding magnet models (SIS100) for the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) project.  Lastly, the book...

  3. Transient impairment of the adaptive response to fasting in FXR-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cariou, B; van Harmelen, K; Duran-Sandoval, D; van Dijk, T; Grefhorst, A; Bouchaert, E; Fruchart, JC; Gonzalez, FJ; Kuipers, F; Staels, B

    2005-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) has been suggested to play a role in gluconeogenesis. To determine whether FXR modulates the response to fasting in vivo, FXR-deficient (FXR-/-) and wild-type mice were submitted to fasting for 48 h. Our results demonstrate that FXR modulates the kinetics of

  4. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  5. Impedance loading and radiation of finite aperture multipole sources in fluid filled boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerits, Tim W.; Kranz, Burkhard

    2017-04-01

    In the exploration of oil and gas finite aperture multipole borehole acoustic sources are commonly used to excite borehole modes in a fluid-filled borehole surrounded by a (poro-) elastic formation. Due to the mutual interaction of the constituent sources and their immediate proximity to the formation it has been unclear how and to what extent these effects influence radiator performance. We present a theory, based on the equivalent surface source formulation for fluid-solid systems that incorporates these 'loading' effects and allows for swift computation of the multipole source dimensionless impedance, the associated radiator motion and the resulting radiated wave field in borehole fluid and formation. Dimensionless impedance results are verified through a comparison with finite element modeling results in the cases of a logging while drilling tool submersed in an unbounded fluid and a logging while drilling tool submersed in a fluid filled borehole surrounded by a fast and a slow formation. In all these cases we consider a monopole, dipole and quadrupole excitation, as these cases are relevant to many borehole acoustic applications. Overall, we obtain a very good agreement.

  6. Flexibly imposing periodicity in kernel independent FMM: A multipole-to-local operator approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Shelley, Michael

    2018-02-01

    An important but missing component in the application of the kernel independent fast multipole method (KIFMM) is the capability for flexibly and efficiently imposing singly, doubly, and triply periodic boundary conditions. In most popular packages such periodicities are imposed with the hierarchical repetition of periodic boxes, which may give an incorrect answer due to the conditional convergence of some kernel sums. Here we present an efficient method to properly impose periodic boundary conditions using a near-far splitting scheme. The near-field contribution is directly calculated with the KIFMM method, while the far-field contribution is calculated with a multipole-to-local (M2L) operator which is independent of the source and target point distribution. The M2L operator is constructed with the far-field portion of the kernel function to generate the far-field contribution with the downward equivalent source points in KIFMM. This method guarantees the sum of the near-field & far-field converge pointwise to results satisfying periodicity and compatibility conditions. The computational cost of the far-field calculation observes the same O (N) complexity as FMM and is designed to be small by reusing the data computed by KIFMM for the near-field. The far-field calculations require no additional control parameters, and observes the same theoretical error bound as KIFMM. We present accuracy and timing test results for the Laplace kernel in singly periodic domains and the Stokes velocity kernel in doubly and triply periodic domains.

  7. Effects of fast, slow, and adaptive amplitude compression on children's and adults' perception of meaningful acoustic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Andrea L; Pederson, Ashley J; Rash, Madalyn A

    2014-10-01

    Fast- and slow-acting amplitude compression parameters have complementary strengths and weaknesses that limit the full benefit of this feature to hearing aid users. Adaptive time constants have been suggested in the literature as a means of optimizing the benefits of amplitude compression. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three amplitude compression release times (slow, fast, and adaptive) on children's and adults' accuracy for categorizing speech and environmental sounds. Participants were asked to categorize speech or environmental sounds embedded in short trials containing low-level playground noise. Stimulus trials included either a high-level environmental sound followed by a lower-level speech stimulus (word) or a high-level speech stimulus followed by a lower-level environmental sound. The listeners responded to the second (low-level) stimulus in each trial. The two stimuli overlapped temporally in half of the trials but not in the other half. The stimulus trials were processed to simulate amplitude compression having fast (40 msec), slow (800 msec), or adaptive release times. The adaptive-compression parameters operated in a slow fashion until a sudden increase/decrease in level required a rapid change in gain. Participants were 15 children and 26 adults with hearing loss (HL) as well as 20 children and 21 adults with normal hearing (NH). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSES: Performance (in % correct) was arcsine transformed and subjected to repeated-measures analysis of variance with pairwise comparisons of significant main effects using Bonferroni adjustments for multiple comparisons. Overall, the performance of listeners with HL was poorer than that of the listeners with NH and performance for the environmental sounds was poorer than for the speech stimuli, particularly for the adults and children with HL. Significant effects of age group, stimulus overlap, and compression speed were observed for the listeners with NH, whereas effects of

  8. Development of the Fully Adaptive Storm Tide (FAST) Model for hurricane induced storm surges and associated inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Y. C.; Kelly, D.; Li, Y.; Zhang, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new state-of-the-art model (the Fully Adaptive Storm Tide model, FAST) for the prediction of storm surges over complex landscapes is presented. The FAST model is based on the conservation form of the full non-linear depth-averaged long wave equations. The equations are solved via an explicit finite volume scheme with interfacial fluxes being computed via Osher's approximate Riemann solver. Geometric source terms are treated in a high order manner that is well-balanced. The numerical solution technique has been chosen to enable the accurate simulation of wetting and drying over complex topography. Another important feature of the FAST model is the use of a simple underlying Cartesian mesh with tree-based static and dynamic adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This permits the simulation of unsteady flows over varying landscapes (including localized features such as canals) by locally increasing (or relaxing) grid resolution in a dynamic fashion. The use of (dynamic) AMR lowers the computational cost of the storm surge model whilst retaining high resolution (and thus accuracy) where and when it is required. In additional, the FAST model has been designed to execute in a parallel computational environment with localized time-stepping. The FAST model has already been carefully verified against a series of benchmark type problems (Kelly et al. 2015). Here we present two simulations of the storm tide due to Hurricane Ike(2008) and Hurricane Sandy (2012). The model incorporates high resolution LIDAR data for the major portion of the New York City. Results compare favorably with water elevations measured by NOAA tidal gauges, by mobile sensors deployed and high water marks collected by the USGS.

  9. Interdependence of AMPK and SIRT1 for metabolic adaptation to fasting and exercise in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantó, Carles; Jiang, Lake Q; Deshmukh, Atul S

    2010-01-01

    During fasting and after exercise, skeletal muscle efficiently switches from carbohydrate to lipid as the main energy source to preserve glycogen stores and blood glucose levels for glucose-dependent tissues. Skeletal muscle cells sense this limitation in glucose availability and transform...... and lipid utilization genes. Deficient AMPK activity compromises SIRT1-dependent responses to exercise and fasting, resulting in impaired PGC-1alpha deacetylation and blunted induction of mitochondrial gene expression. Thus, we conclude that AMPK acts as the primordial trigger for fasting- and exercise...

  10. Rovibrational matrix elements of the multipole moments and of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rovibrational matrix elements of the multipole moments ℓ up to rank 10 and of the linear polarizability of the H2 molecule in the condensed phase have been computed taking into account the effect of the intermolecular potential. Comparison with gas phase matrix elements shows that the effect of solid state interactions is ...

  11. Spiralling solitons and multipole localized modes in nonlocal nonlinear media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buccoliero, Daniel; Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Skupin, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the propagation of rotating multi-soliton localized structures in optical media with spatially nonlocal nonlinearity. We demonstrate that nonlocality stabilizes the azimuthal breakup of rotating dipole as well as multipole localized soliton modes. We compare the results for two different...

  12. Electron density distribution in Si and Ge using multipole, maximum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, the local structural information has also been obtained by analyzing the atomic pair distribution function. An attempt has been made in the present work to utilize the X-ray powder data sets to refine the structure and electron density distribution using the currently available versatile methods, MEM, multipole ...

  13. Instability of reconstruction of the low CMB multipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naselsky, Pavel D.; Verkhodanov, Oleg V.; Nielsen, Mikkel T. B.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the problem of the bias of the Internal Linear Combination (ILC) CMB map and show that it is closely related to the coefficient of cross-correlation K(l) of the true CMB and the foreground for each multipole l. We present analysis of the cross-correlation for the WMAP ILC quadrupole an...

  14. On equilibria of finite pressure plasma in magnetic multipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Soboleva, T. K.

    2001-07-01

    Separable solutions of finite plasma pressure equilibrium in a point multipole are found. Using the energy principle it is demonstrated that these solutions are interchange stable for quadripole and sextipole configurations. The low and high pressure forms of the solution in sextipole configuration are explicitly displayed.

  15. The Multipole Plasma Trap-PIC Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Nathaniel; Bowman, Amanda; Godden, Katarina

    2017-10-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) multipole structure is studied via particle-in-cell computer modeling, to assess the response of quasi-neutral plasma to the imposed RF fields. Several regimes, such as pair plasma, antimatter plasma, and conventional (ion-electron) plasma are considered. In the case of equal charge-to-mass ratio of plasma species, the effects of the multipole field are symmetric between positive and negative particles. In the case of a charge-to-mass disparity, the multipole RF parameters (frequency, voltage, structure size) may be chosen such that the light species (e.g. electrons) is strongly confined, while the heavy species (e.g. positive ions) does not respond to the RF field. In this case, the trapped negative space charge creates a potential well that then traps the positive species. 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of this concept are presented, to assess plasma response and trapping dependences on multipole order, consequences of the formation of an RF plasma sheath, and the effects of an axial magnetic field. The scalings of trapped plasma parameters are explored in each of the mentioned regimes, to guide the design of prospective experiments investigating each. Supported by U.S. NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering Grant PHY-1619615.

  16. Fast spacecraft adaptive attitude tracking control through immersion and invariance design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haowei; Yue, Xiaokui; Li, Peng; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel non-certainty-equivalence adaptive control method for the attitude tracking control problem of spacecraft with inertia uncertainties. The proposed immersion and invariance (I&I) based adaptation law provides a more direct and flexible approach to circumvent the limitations of the basic I&I method without employing any filter signal. By virtue of the adaptation high-gain equivalence property derived from the proposed adaptive method, the closed-loop adaptive system with a low adaptation gain could recover the high adaptation gain performance of the filter-based I&I method, and the resulting control torque demands during the initial transient has been significantly reduced. A special feature of this method is that the convergence of the parameter estimation error has been observably improved by utilizing an adaptation gain matrix instead of a single adaptation gain value. Numerical simulations are presented to highlight the various benefits of the proposed method compared with the certainty-equivalence-based control method and filter-based I&I control schemes.

  17. Optimal/Adaptive Demodulation for M-ary FSK in Fast Fading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    adaptive Wiener filtering. Later authors, Balkrishnan 36 and Davisson ! 7 dealt with estimates of the estimation error and the problems of convergence. In...1962. 36. Balkrishnan, A. V., "An Adaptive Non-Linear Data Predictor," 1962 National Telemetering Conference Proceedings. 37. Davisson , L. D., "A

  18. Fast Spectral Velocity Estimation Using Adaptive Techniques: In-Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Udesen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window(OW) is very sbort. In this paper two adaptive techniques are tested and compared to the averaged perlodogram (Welch) for blood velocity estimation. The Blood Power s...

  19. Metabolic and endocrine adaptations to fasting in lean and obese individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examined several effects of fasting in lean and obese individuals. As expected, both the hormonal response as well as the metabolic shift from glucose towards lipid oxidation was impaired in obese individuals. At baseline, mitochondrial protein content in skeletal muscle of obese

  20. Fast characterization of two ultrasound longitudinal waves in cancellous bone using an adaptive beamforming technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Hirofumi; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The received signal in through-transmission ultrasound measurements of cancellous bone consists of two longitudinal waves, called the fast and slow waves. Analysis of these fast and slow waves may reveal characteristics of the cancellous bone that would be good indicators of osteoporosis. Because the two waves often overlap, decomposition of the received signal is an important problem in the characterization of bone quality. This study proposes a fast and accurate decomposition method based on the frequency domain interferometry imaging method with a modified wave transfer function that uses a phase rotation parameter. The proposed method accurately characterized the fast and slow waves in the experimental study, and the residual intensity, which was normalized with respect to the received signal intensity, was less than -20 dB over the bone specimen thickness range from 6 to 15 mm. In the simulation study, the residual intensity was less than -20 dB over the specimen thickness range from 3 to 8 mm. Decomposition of a single received signal takes only 5 s using a laptop personal computer with a single central processing unit. The proposed method has great potential to provide accurate and rapid measurements of indicators of osteoporosis in cancellous bone.

  1. Role of PGC-1{alpha} in exercise and fasting induced adaptations in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Tobias Nørresø; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Leick, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    induced regulation of key proteins in gluconeogenesis and metabolism in the liver. In both wild type (WT) and PGC-1a KO mice liver, the mRNA content of the gluconeogenic proteins glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was upregulated during fasting. Pyruvate...

  2. Different transcriptional responses from slow and fast growth rate strains of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska eCordero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8 ºC of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8 °C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  3. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  4. Coherent Excitation-Selective Spectroscopy of Multipole Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xu; Tseng, Ming Lun; Tsai, Din Ping; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of functional materials, from graphene to semiconductor heterostructures, and from nanomembranes to Langmuir-Blodgett films play key roles in modern technologies. For such films optical interrogation is the main and often the only practical method of characterization. Here, we show that characterization of the optical response of thin films can be greatly improved with a type of coherent spectroscopy using two counterpropagating beams of light. The spectroscopy is selective to particular types of multipole resonances that form the absorption spectrum of the film, and therefore can reveal lines that are hidden in conventional absorption spectroscopy. We explicitly demonstrate selectivity of this spectroscopy in a series of proof-of-principle experiments with plasmonic metamaterial arrays designed to exhibit different multipole resonances. We further demonstrate the analytic potential of this spectroscopy by extracting the hidden resonance from the spectrum of a complex nanostructure.

  5. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation for ultra-fast IMRT planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahl, Niklas; Bangert, Mark; Kamerling, Cornelis P.; Ziegenhein, Peter; Bol, GH|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343084309; Raaymakers, Bas W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229639410; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a trial-and-error process that usually involves tedious tweaking of optimization parameters. Here, we present an algorithm that automates part of this process, in particular the adaptation of voxel-based penalties

  6. Fast heating and cooling in nanoimprint using a spring-loaded adapter in a preheated press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schift, Helmut; Bellini, Sandro; Gobrecht, Jens

    2007-01-01

    By using a spring-loaded adapter, instant heating and cooling of wafer-type substrates was implemented in standard hot embossing equipment. This was possible by using the well-known concept of a clamped stack of stamp and substrate, pre-assembled in an alignment fixture. A number of thermoplastic...

  7. Extension of the Multipole Approach to Random Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chipouline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of the short-range lateral disorder in the meta-atoms positioning on the effective parameters of the metamaterials is investigated theoretically using the multipole approach. Random variation of the near field quasi-static interaction between metaatoms in form of double wires is shown to be the reason for the effective permittivity and permeability changes. The obtained analytical results are compared with the known experimental ones.

  8. Prediction of conformationally dependent atomic multipole moments in carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, Salvatore; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-12-15

    The conformational flexibility of carbohydrates is challenging within the field of computational chemistry. This flexibility causes the electron density to change, which leads to fluctuating atomic multipole moments. Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) allows for the partitioning of an "atom in a molecule," thus localizing electron density to finite atomic domains, which permits the unambiguous evaluation of atomic multipole moments. By selecting an ensemble of physically realistic conformers of a chemical system, one evaluates the various multipole moments at defined points in configuration space. The subsequent implementation of the machine learning method kriging delivers the evaluation of an analytical function, which smoothly interpolates between these points. This allows for the prediction of atomic multipole moments at new points in conformational space, not trained for but within prediction range. In this work, we demonstrate that the carbohydrates erythrose and threose are amenable to the above methodology. We investigate how kriging models respond when the training ensemble incorporating multiple energy minima and their environment in conformational space. Additionally, we evaluate the gains in predictive capacity of our models as the size of the training ensemble increases. We believe this approach to be entirely novel within the field of carbohydrates. For a modest training set size of 600, more than 90% of the external test configurations have an error in the total (predicted) electrostatic energy (relative to ab initio) of maximum 1 kJ mol(-1) for open chains and just over 90% an error of maximum 4 kJ mol(-1) for rings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  10. Cluster-Based Multipolling Sequencing Algorithm for Collecting RFID Data in Wireless LANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo-Yong; Chatterjee, Mainak

    2015-03-01

    With the growing use of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), it is becoming important to devise ways to read RFID tags in real time. Access points (APs) of IEEE 802.11-based wireless Local Area Networks (LANs) are being integrated with RFID networks that can efficiently collect real-time RFID data. Several schemes, such as multipolling methods based on the dynamic search algorithm and random sequencing, have been proposed. However, as the number of RFID readers associated with an AP increases, it becomes difficult for the dynamic search algorithm to derive the multipolling sequence in real time. Though multipolling methods can eliminate the polling overhead, we still need to enhance the performance of the multipolling methods based on random sequencing. To that extent, we propose a real-time cluster-based multipolling sequencing algorithm that drastically eliminates more than 90% of the polling overhead, particularly so when the dynamic search algorithm fails to derive the multipolling sequence in real time.

  11. A Fast, Efficient Domain Adaptation Technique for Cross-Domain Electroencephalography(EEG)-Based Emotion Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xin; Wang, Qisong; Zhao, Yongping; Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Dan; Liu, Xin; Bai, Ou

    2017-05-03

    Electroencephalography (EEG)-based emotion recognition is an important element in psychiatric health diagnosis for patients. However, the underlying EEG sensor signals are always non-stationary if they are sampled from different experimental sessions or subjects. This results in the deterioration of the classification performance. Domain adaptation methods offer an effective way to reduce the discrepancy of marginal distribution. However, for EEG sensor signals, both marginal and conditional distributions may be mismatched. In addition, the existing domain adaptation strategies always require a high level of additional computation. To address this problem, a novel strategy named adaptive subspace feature matching (ASFM) is proposed in this paper in order to integrate both the marginal and conditional distributions within a unified framework (without any labeled samples from target subjects). Specifically, we develop a linear transformation function which matches the marginal distributions of the source and target subspaces without a regularization term. This significantly decreases the time complexity of our domain adaptation procedure. As a result, both marginal and conditional distribution discrepancies between the source domain and unlabeled target domain can be reduced, and logistic regression (LR) can be applied to the new source domain in order to train a classifier for use in the target domain, since the aligned source domain follows a distribution which is similar to that of the target domain. We compare our ASFM method with six typical approaches using a public EEG dataset with three affective states: positive, neutral, and negative. Both offline and online evaluations were performed. The subject-to-subject offline experimental results demonstrate that our component achieves a mean accuracy and standard deviation of 80.46% and 6.84%, respectively, as compared with a state-of-the-art method, the subspace alignment auto-encoder (SAAE), which achieves values

  12. Critical loss radius in a Penning trap subject to multipole fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fajans, J; Robicheaux, F

    2008-01-01

    When particles in a Penning trap are subject to a magnetic multipole field, those beyond a critical radius will be lost. The critical radius depends on the history by which the field is applied, and can be much smaller if the particles are injected into a preexisting multipole than if the particles are subject to a ramped multipole. Both cases are relevant to ongoing experiments designed to trap antihydrogen.

  13. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  14. Life in the Fast Lane: The Evolution of an Adaptive Vehicle Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Jochem, Todd; Pomerleau, Dean

    1996-01-01

    Giving robots the ability to operate in the real world has been, and continues to be, one of the most difficult tasks in AI research. Since 1987, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have been investigating one such task. Their research has been focused on using adaptive, vision-based systems to increase the driving performance of the Navlab line of on-road mobile robots. This research has led to the development of a neural network system that can learn to drive on many road types simply...

  15. Target Localization by Resolving the Time Synchronization Problem in Bistatic Radar Systems Using Space Fast-Time Adaptive Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Madurasinghe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposed technique allows the radar receiver to accurately estimate the range of a large number of targets using a transmitter of opportunity as long as the location of the transmitter is known. The technique does not depend on the use of communication satellites or GPS systems, instead it relies on the availability of the direct transmit copy of the signal from the transmitter and the reflected paths off the various targets. An array-based space-fast time adaptive processor is implemented in order to estimate the path difference between the direct signal and the delayed signal, which bounces off the target. This procedure allows us to estimate the target distance as well as bearing.

  16. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Boutant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF. Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  17. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  19. Fast solution of geophysical inversion using adaptive mesh, space-filling curves and wavelet compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristofer; Li, Yaoguo

    2011-04-01

    Many geophysical inverse problems involve large and dense coefficient matrices that often exceed the limitations of physical memory in commonly available computers. The repeated multiplications of such matrices to vectors during processing or inversion require an immense amount of computing power. These two factors pose a significant challenge to solving large-scale inverse problems in practice and can render many realistic problems intractable. To overcome these limitations, we develop a new computational approach for this class of problems by combining an adaptive quadtree or octree model discretization and wavelet transforms on reordered parameter sets. The adaptive mesh discretizes the model region according to the required resolutions based on localized anomalies. Hilbert space-filling curves and similar ordering of the reduced parameter set then enable a higher compression of the coefficient matrix by forming its sparse representation in the 1-D wavelet domain. This combination can reduce the storage requirement by 100 to 1000 times and, therefore, also speeds up the computation during the processing stage by the same factor. As a result, problems can now be solved that were computationally prohibitive. We present the algorithm and illustrate its effectiveness with an example from equivalent source construction in potential-field processing.

  20. A Fast, Efficient Domain Adaptation Technique for Cross-Domain Electroencephalography(EEG)-Based Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xin; Wang, Qisong; Zhao, Yongping; Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Dan; Liu, Xin; Bai, Ou

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG)-based emotion recognition is an important element in psychiatric health diagnosis for patients. However, the underlying EEG sensor signals are always non-stationary if they are sampled from different experimental sessions or subjects. This results in the deterioration of the classification performance. Domain adaptation methods offer an effective way to reduce the discrepancy of marginal distribution. However, for EEG sensor signals, both marginal and conditional distributions may be mismatched. In addition, the existing domain adaptation strategies always require a high level of additional computation. To address this problem, a novel strategy named adaptive subspace feature matching (ASFM) is proposed in this paper in order to integrate both the marginal and conditional distributions within a unified framework (without any labeled samples from target subjects). Specifically, we develop a linear transformation function which matches the marginal distributions of the source and target subspaces without a regularization term. This significantly decreases the time complexity of our domain adaptation procedure. As a result, both marginal and conditional distribution discrepancies between the source domain and unlabeled target domain can be reduced, and logistic regression (LR) can be applied to the new source domain in order to train a classifier for use in the target domain, since the aligned source domain follows a distribution which is similar to that of the target domain. We compare our ASFM method with six typical approaches using a public EEG dataset with three affective states: positive, neutral, and negative. Both offline and online evaluations were performed. The subject-to-subject offline experimental results demonstrate that our component achieves a mean accuracy and standard deviation of 80.46% and 6.84%, respectively, as compared with a state-of-the-art method, the subspace alignment auto-encoder (SAAE), which achieves values

  1. A Fast, Efficient Domain Adaptation Technique for Cross-Domain Electroencephalography(EEG-Based Emotion Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG-based emotion recognition is an important element in psychiatric health diagnosis for patients. However, the underlying EEG sensor signals are always non-stationary if they are sampled from different experimental sessions or subjects. This results in the deterioration of the classification performance. Domain adaptation methods offer an effective way to reduce the discrepancy of marginal distribution. However, for EEG sensor signals, both marginal and conditional distributions may be mismatched. In addition, the existing domain adaptation strategies always require a high level of additional computation. To address this problem, a novel strategy named adaptive subspace feature matching (ASFM is proposed in this paper in order to integrate both the marginal and conditional distributions within a unified framework (without any labeled samples from target subjects. Specifically, we develop a linear transformation function which matches the marginal distributions of the source and target subspaces without a regularization term. This significantly decreases the time complexity of our domain adaptation procedure. As a result, both marginal and conditional distribution discrepancies between the source domain and unlabeled target domain can be reduced, and logistic regression (LR can be applied to the new source domain in order to train a classifier for use in the target domain, since the aligned source domain follows a distribution which is similar to that of the target domain. We compare our ASFM method with six typical approaches using a public EEG dataset with three affective states: positive, neutral, and negative. Both offline and online evaluations were performed. The subject-to-subject offline experimental results demonstrate that our component achieves a mean accuracy and standard deviation of 80.46% and 6.84%, respectively, as compared with a state-of-the-art method, the subspace alignment auto-encoder (SAAE, which

  2. Differential adaptive responses to 1- or 2-day fasting in various mouse tissues revealed by quantitative PCR analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junya; Kamata, Shotaro; Miura, Asumi; Nagata, Tomoko; Kainuma, Ryo; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Dietary or caloric restriction confers various clinical benefits. Short-term fasting of mice is a common experimental procedure that may involve systemic metabolic remodeling, which may significantly affect experimental outputs. This study evaluated adaptive cellular responses after 1- or 2-day fasting in 13 mouse tissues by quantitative PCR using 15 marker primer sets for the activation of ubiquitin–proteasome (Atrogin-1 and MuRF1), autophagy–lysosome (LC3b, p62 and Lamp2), amino acid response (Asns, Trib3, Herpud1, xCT, and Chop), Nrf2-mediated antioxidant (HO-1 and Gsta1), and amino acid transport (Slc38a2, Slc7a5, and Slc7a1) systems. Differential activation profiles obtained in seven highly (thymus, liver, spleen, and small intestine) or mildly (stomach, kidney, and colon) atrophied tissues as well as in six non-atrophied tissues (brain, eye, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, and testis) suggested tissue-specific active metabolic remodeling. PMID:25973363

  3. Fast and intuitive programming of adaptive laser cutting of lace enabled by machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaamonde, Iago; Souto-López, Álvaro; García-Díaz, Antón

    2015-07-01

    A machine vision system has been developed, validated, and integrated in a commercial laser robot cell. It permits an offline graphical programming of laser cutting of lace. The user interface allows loading CAD designs and aligning them with images of lace pieces. Different thread widths are discriminated to generate proper cutting program templates. During online operation, the system aligns CAD models of pieces and lace images, pre-checks quality of lace cuts and adapts laser parameters to thread widths. For pieces detected with the required quality, the program template is adjusted by transforming the coordinates of every trajectory point. A low-cost lace feeding system was also developed for demonstration of full process automation.

  4. Adaptive GDDA-BLAST: fast and efficient algorithm for protein sequence embedding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoojin Hong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A major computational challenge in the genomic era is annotating structure/function to the vast quantities of sequence information that is now available. This problem is illustrated by the fact that most proteins lack comprehensive annotations, even when experimental evidence exists. We previously theorized that embedded-alignment profiles (simply "alignment profiles" hereafter provide a quantitative method that is capable of relating the structural and functional properties of proteins, as well as their evolutionary relationships. A key feature of alignment profiles lies in the interoperability of data format (e.g., alignment information, physio-chemical information, genomic information, etc.. Indeed, we have demonstrated that the Position Specific Scoring Matrices (PSSMs are an informative M-dimension that is scored by quantitatively measuring the embedded or unmodified sequence alignments. Moreover, the information obtained from these alignments is informative, and remains so even in the "twilight zone" of sequence similarity (<25% identity. Although our previous embedding strategy was powerful, it suffered from contaminating alignments (embedded AND unmodified and high computational costs. Herein, we describe the logic and algorithmic process for a heuristic embedding strategy named "Adaptive GDDA-BLAST." Adaptive GDDA-BLAST is, on average, up to 19 times faster than, but has similar sensitivity to our previous method. Further, data are provided to demonstrate the benefits of embedded-alignment measurements in terms of detecting structural homology in highly divergent protein sequences and isolating secondary structural elements of transmembrane and ankyrin-repeat domains. Together, these advances allow further exploration of the embedded alignment data space within sufficiently large data sets to eventually induce relevant statistical inferences. We show that sequence embedding could serve as one of the vehicles for measurement of low

  5. Adaptive, fast walking in a biped robot under neuronal control and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate Manoonpong

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori-motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s, self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks.

  6. Estimation of pathological tremor from recorded signals based on adaptive sliding fast Fourier transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological tremor is an approximately rhythmic movement and considerably affects patients’ daily living activities. Biomechanical loading and functional electrical stimulation are proposed as potential alternatives for canceling the pathological tremor. However, the performance of suppression methods is associated with the separation of tremor from the recorded signals. In this literature, an algorithm incorporating a fast Fourier transform augmented with a sliding convolution window, an interpolation procedure, and a damping module of the frequency is presented to isolate tremulous components from the measured signals and estimate the instantaneous tremor frequency. Meanwhile, a mechanism platform is designed to provide the simulation tremor signals with different degrees of voluntary movements. The performance of the proposed algorithm and existing procedures is compared with simulated signals and experimental signals collected from patients. The results demonstrate that the proposed solution could detect the unknown dominant frequency and distinguish the tremor components with higher accuracy. Therefore, this algorithm is useful for actively compensating tremor by functional electrical stimulation without affecting the voluntary movement.

  7. A FPGA-based Fast Converging Digital Adaptive Filter for Real-time RFI Mitigation on Ground Based Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, R.; Curotto, F.; Fuentes, R.; Duan, R.; Bronfman, L.; Li, D.

    2018-02-01

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is a growing concern in the radio astronomy community. Single-dish telescopes are particularly susceptible to RFI. Several methods have been developed to cope with RF-polluted environments, based on flagging, excision, and real-time blanking, among others. All these methods produce some degree of data loss or require assumptions to be made on the astronomical signal. We report the development of a real-time, digital adaptive filter implemented on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) capable of processing 4096 spectral channels in a 1 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth. The filter is able to cancel a broad range of interference signals and quickly adapt to changes on the RFI source, minimizing the data loss without any assumption on the astronomical or interfering signal properties. The speed of convergence (for a decrease to a 1%) was measured to be 208.1 μs for a broadband noise-like RFI signal and 125.5 μs for a multiple-carrier RFI signal recorded at the FAST radio telescope.

  8. An adaptive immune optimization algorithm with dynamic lattice searching operation for fast optimization of atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xia, E-mail: xiawu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Genhua

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • A high efficient method for optimization of atomic clusters is developed. • Its performance is studied by optimizing Lennard-Jones clusters and Ag clusters. • The method is proved to be quite efficient. • A new Ag{sub 61} cluster with stacking-fault face-centered cubic motif is found. - Abstract: Geometrical optimization of atomic clusters is performed by a development of adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA) with dynamic lattice searching (DLS) operation (AIOA-DLS method). By a cycle of construction and searching of the dynamic lattice (DL), DLS algorithm rapidly makes the clusters more regular and greatly reduces the potential energy. DLS can thus be used as an operation acting on the new individuals after mutation operation in AIOA to improve the performance of the AIOA. The AIOA-DLS method combines the merit of evolutionary algorithm and idea of dynamic lattice. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the optimization of Lennard-Jones clusters within 250 atoms and silver clusters described by many-body Gupta potential within 150 atoms. Results reported in the literature are reproduced, and the motif of Ag{sub 61} cluster is found to be stacking-fault face-centered cubic, whose energy is lower than that of previously obtained icosahedron.

  9. Experimental demonstration of a surface-electrode multipole ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Maurice, Mark; Green, Dylan; Farr, Andrew; Burke, Timothy; Hilleke, Russell; Clark, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We report on the design and experimental characterization of a surface-electrode multipole ion trap. Individual microscopic sugar particles are confined in the trap. The trajectories of driven particle motion are compared with a theoretical model, both to verify qualitative predictions of the model, and to measure the charge-to-mass ratio of the confined particle. The generation of harmonics of the driving frequency is observed as a key signature of the nonlinear nature of the trap. We remark on possible applications of our traps, including to mass spectrometry.

  10. Analytical expressions for fringe fields in multipole magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. D. Muratori

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fringe fields in multipole magnets can have a variety of effects on the linear and nonlinear dynamics of particles moving along an accelerator beam line. An accurate model of an accelerator must include realistic models of the magnet fringe fields. Fringe fields for dipoles are well understood and can be modeled at an early stage of accelerator design in such codes as mad8, madx, gpt or elegant. Existing techniques for quadrupole and higher order multipoles rely either on the use of a numerical field map, or on a description of the field in the form of a series expansion about a chosen axis. Usually, it is not until the later stages of a design project that such descriptions (based on magnet modeling or measurement become available. Furthermore, series expansions rely on the assumption that the beam travels more or less on axis throughout the beam line; but in some types of machines (for example, Fixed Field Alternating Gradients or FFAGs this is not a good assumption. Furthermore, some tracking codes, such as gpt, use methods for including space charge effects that require fields to vary smoothly and continuously along a beam line: in such cases, realistic fringe field models are of significant importance. In this paper, a method for constructing analytical expressions for multipole fringe fields is presented. Such expressions allow fringe field effects to be included in beam dynamics simulations from the start of an accelerator design project, even before detailed magnet design work has been undertaken. The magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved analytically and a solution that fits all orders of multipoles is derived. Quadrupole fringe fields are considered in detail as these are the ones that give the strongest effects. The analytic expressions for quadrupole fringe fields are compared with data obtained from numerical modeling codes in two cases: a magnet in the high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider inner triplet, and a

  11. Multipole plasmon excitations of C{sub 60} dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-14

    We study the multipole plasmon mode frequencies of a pair of C{sub 60} molecules by means of the linearized hydrodynamic theory for electronic excitations on the each C{sub 60} surface. We apply the two-center spherical coordinate system for mathematical convenience and find an explicit form of the surface plasmon energies. Numerical result shows when approaching the two C{sub 60} molecules, the coupling between the bare plasmon modes leads to the appearance of additional modes having energies that are different from those of the isolated C{sub 60} molecules.

  12. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...

  13. Cluster multipole theory for anomalous Hall effect in antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.-T.; Koretsune, T.; Ochi, M.; Arita, R.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a cluster extension of multipole moments to discuss the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in both ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) states in a unified framework. We first derive general symmetry requirements for the AHE in the presence or absence of the spin-orbit coupling by considering the symmetry of the Berry curvature in k space. The cluster multipole (CMP) moments are then defined to quantify the macroscopic magnetization in noncollinear AFM states as a natural generalization of the magnetization in FM states. We identify the macroscopic CMP order which induces the AHE. The theoretical framework is applied to the noncollinear AFM states of Mn3Ir , for which an AHE was predicted in a first-principles calculation, and Mn3Z (Z =Sn ,Ge ), for which a large AHE was recently discovered experimentally. We further compare the AHE in Mn3Z and bcc Fe in terms of the CMP. We show that the AHE in Mn3Z is characterized by the magnetization of a cluster octupole moment in the same manner as that in bcc Fe characterized by the magnetization of the dipole moment.

  14. Accelerated parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction with fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm and its application in parabolic Radon domain hybrid demultiple method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-xiao; Li, Zhen-chun

    2017-08-01

    Adaptive multiple subtraction is an important step for successfully conducting surface-related multiple elimination in marine seismic exploration. 2D adaptive multiple subtraction conducted in the parabolic Radon domain has been proposed to better separate primaries and multiples than 2D adaptive multiple subtraction conducted in the time-offset domain. Additionally, the parabolic Radon domain hybrid demultiple method combining parabolic Radon filtering and parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction can better remove multiples than the cascaded demultiple method using time-offset domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction and the parabolic Radon transform method sequentially. To solve the matching filter in the optimization problem with L1 norm minimization constraint of primaries, traditional parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction uses the iterative reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, which is computationally expensive for solving a weighted LS inversion in each iteration. In this paper we introduce the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (FISTA) as a faster alternative to the IRLS algorithm for parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction. FISTA uses the shrinkage-thresholding operator to promote the sparsity of estimated primaries and solves the 2D matching filter with iterative steps. FISTA based parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction reduces the computation time effectively while achieving similar accuracy compared with IRLS based parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction. Additionally, the provided examples show that FISTA based parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction can better separate primaries and multiples than FISTA based time-offset domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction. Furthermore, we introduce FISTA based parabolic Radon domain 2D adaptive multiple subtraction into the parabolic Radon domain hybrid demultiple method to improve its computation

  15. Dynamical Aperture Control in Accelerator Lattices With Multipole Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, I

    2017-01-01

    We develop tools for symbolic representation of a non-linear accelerator model and analytical methods for description of non-linear dynamics. Information relevant to the dynamic aperture (DA) is then obtained from this model and can be used for indirect DA control or as a complement to direct numerical optimization. We apply two analytical methods and use multipole magnets to satisfy derived analytical constraints. The accelerator model is represented as a product of unperturbed and perturbed exponential operators with the exponent of the perturbed operator given as a power series in the perturbation parameter. Normal forms can be applied to this representation and the lattice parameters are used to control the normal form Hamiltonian and normal form transformation. Hamiltonian control is used to compute a control term or controlled operator. Lattice parameters are then fitted to satisfy the imposed control constraints. Theoretical results, as well as illustrative examples, are presented.

  16. Real space electrostatics for multipoles. III. Dielectric Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Lamichhane, Madan; Newman, Kathie E; Gezelter, J Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In the first two papers in this series, we developed new shifted potential (SP), gradient shifted force (GSF), and Taylor shifted force (TSF) real-space methods for multipole interactions in condensed phase simulations. Here, we discuss the dielectric properties of fluids that emerge from simulations using these methods. Most electrostatic methods (including the Ewald sum) require correction to the conducting boundary fluctuation formula for the static dielectric constants, and we discuss the derivation of these corrections for the new real space methods. For quadrupolar fluids, the analogous material property is the quadrupolar susceptibility. As in the dipolar case, the fluctuation formula for the quadrupolar susceptibility has corrections that depend on the electrostatic method being utilized. One of the most important effects measured by both the static dielectric and quadrupolar susceptibility is the ability to screen charges embedded in the fluid. We use potentials of mean force between solvated ions to...

  17. Point sources and multipoles in inverse scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Potthast, Roland

    2001-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, the growing availability of computing power has had an enormous impact on the classical fields of direct and inverse scattering. The study of inverse scattering, in particular, has developed rapidly with the ability to perform computational simulations of scattering processes and led to remarkable advances in a range of applications, from medical imaging and radar to remote sensing and seismic exploration. Point Sources and Multipoles in Inverse Scattering Theory provides a survey of recent developments in inverse acoustic and electromagnetic scattering theory. Focusing on methods developed over the last six years by Colton, Kirsch, and the author, this treatment uses point sources combined with several far-reaching techniques to obtain qualitative reconstruction methods. The author addresses questions of uniqueness, stability, and reconstructions for both two-and three-dimensional problems.With interest in extracting information about an object through scattered waves at an all-ti...

  18. Magnetic x-ray measurements using the elliptical multipole wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montano, P. A.; Li, Y.; Beno, M. A.; Jennings, G.; Kimball, C. W.

    1999-10-26

    The EMW at the BESSRC beam lines at the APS provides high photon flux at high energies with the capability of producing circular polarization on axis. The authors observe a high degree of circularly polarized x-rays at such energies. The polarization and frequency tunability of the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW) is an ideal source for many magnetic measurements from X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) to Compton scattering experiments. They performed Compton scattering measurements to determine the polarization and photon flux at the sample as a function of the deflection parameters K{sub y} and K{sub x}. They used for their measurements a Si (220) Laue monochromator providing simultaneous photon energies at 50 keV, 100 keV and 150 keV. Magnetic Compton Profiles were determined by either switching the magnet polarity or the photon helicity. The results obtained using Fe(110) single crystals were very similar.

  19. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Ching-Shiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  20. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Myronenko, A; Jordan, P [Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, United States. (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  1. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornilescu, Gabriel, E-mail: gabrielc@nmrfam.wisc.edu; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States)], E-mail: eghbalni@nmrfam.wisc.edu

    2007-08-15

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, 'High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings' (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector

  2. Pulse-Inversion Subharmonic Ultrafast Active Cavitation Imaging in Tissue Using Fast Eigenspace-Based Adaptive Beamforming and Cavitation Deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chen; Xu, Shanshan; Duan, Junbo; Jing, Bowen; Yang, Miao; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-08-01

    Pulse-inversion subharmonic (PISH) imaging can display information relating to pure cavitation bubbles while excluding that of tissue. Although plane-wave-based ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) can monitor the transient activities of cavitation bubbles, its resolution and cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) are barely satisfactory but can be significantly improved by introducing eigenspace-based (ESB) adaptive beamforming. PISH and UACI are a natural combination for imaging of pure cavitation activity in tissue; however, it raises two problems: 1) the ESB beamforming is hard to implement in real time due to the enormous amount of computation associated with the covariance matrix inversion and eigendecomposition and 2) the narrowband characteristic of the subharmonic filter will incur a drastic degradation in resolution. Thus, in order to jointly address these two problems, we propose a new PISH-UACI method using novel fast ESB (F-ESB) beamforming and cavitation deconvolution for nonlinear signals. This method greatly reduces the computational complexity by using F-ESB beamforming through dimensionality reduction based on principal component analysis, while maintaining the high quality of ESB beamforming. The degraded resolution is recovered using cavitation deconvolution through a modified convolution model and compressive deconvolution. Both simulations and in vitro experiments were performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Compared with the ESB-based PISH-UACI, the entire computation of our proposed approach was reduced by 99%, while the axial resolution gain and CTR were increased by 3 times and 2 dB, respectively, confirming that satisfactory performance can be obtained for monitoring pure cavitation bubbles in tissue erosion.

  3. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2016-04-15

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. A detailed proof of the fundamental theorem of STF multipole expansion in linearized gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Zschocke, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The linearized field equations of general relativity in harmonic coordinates are given by an inhomogeneous wave equation. In the region exterior to the matter field, the retarded solution of this wave equation can be expanded in terms of 10 Cartesian symmetric and tracefree (STF) multipoles in post-Minkowskian approximation. For such a multipole decomposition only three and rather weak assumptions are required: 1. No-incoming radiation condition. 2. The matter source is spatially compact. 3. A spherical expansion for the metric outside the matter source is possible. During the last decades, the STF multipole expansion has been established as a powerful tool in several fields of gravitational physics: celestial mechanics, theory of gravitational waves and in the theory of light propagation and astrometry. But despite its formidable importance, an explicit proof of the fundamental theorem of STF multipole expansion has not been presented thus far, while only some parts of it are distributed into several publica...

  5. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G.; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A.; MacKenzie, Duncan S.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5–7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  6. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  7. Obesity surgery and Ramadan: a prospective analysis of nutritional intake, hunger and satiety and adaptive behaviours during fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ozairi, Ebaa; Al Kandari, Jumana; AlHaqqan, Dalal; AlHarbi, Obaid; Masters, Yusuf; Syed, Akheel A

    2015-03-01

    Fasting for religious or lifestyle reasons poses a challenge to people who have undergone bariatric surgery. A total fast (abstaining from all forms of nourishment including liquids) during long summer days puts these patients at risk of dehydration and poor calorie and nutrient intake. We undertook telephone surveys of 24-h food recall, hunger and satiety scores, medication use, adverse symptoms and depression scores on a fasting day in Ramadan and a non-fasting day subsequently. We studied 207 participants (166 women) who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. The mean (standard error) age was 35.2 (0.7) years. Men and women consumed 20.4 % (P = 0.018) and 16.9 % (P fasting, respectively. There was no significant difference in the intake of fluids or incidence of adverse gastrointestinal, hypoglycaemic and sympathoadrenal symptoms. Of participants on pharmacotherapy, 89.5 % took their prescribed medications; 86.3 % made no changes to the doses, but 80.4 % changed the timing of the medications. Both women and men reported feeling less hungry and a preference for savoury foods during Ramadan. There was no difference in depression and work impairment scores. Fasting was well tolerated in persons who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. It may be advisable to raise awareness about dietary protein intake and managing medications appropriately during fasting.

  8. Multipole analysis of redshift-space distortions around cosmic voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Pisani, Alice; Aubert, Marie; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Weller, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    We perform a comprehensive redshift-space distortion analysis based on cosmic voids in the large-scale distribution of galaxies observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. To this end, we measure multipoles of the void-galaxy cross-correlation function and compare them with standard model predictions in cosmology. Merely considering linear-order theory allows us to accurately describe the data on the entire available range of scales and to probe void-centric distances down to about 2 h-1Mpc. Common systematics, such as the Fingers-of-God effect, scale-dependent galaxy bias, and nonlinear clustering do not seem to play a significant role in our analysis. We constrain the growth rate of structure via the redshift-space distortion parameter β at two median redshifts, β(bar z=0.32)=0.599+0.134-0.124 and β(bar z=0.54)=0.457+0.056-0.054, with a precision that is competitive with state-of-the-art galaxy-clustering results. While the high-redshift constraint perfectly agrees with model expectations, we observe a mild 2σ deviation at bar z=0.32, which increases to 3σ when the data is restricted to the lowest available redshift range of 0.15

  9. Partial atomic multipoles for internally consistent microelectrostatic calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snamina, Mateusz; Mazur, Grzegorz; Petelenz, Piotr

    2017-10-30

    An extension of the extant microelectrostatic methodologies, based on the concept of distributed generalized polarizability matrix derived from the Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) equations, is proposed for self-consistent calculation of charge carrier and charge-transfer (CT) state electrostatic energies in molecular solids, including the doped, defected and disordered ones. The CPHF equations are solved only once and the generalized molecular polarizability they yield enables low cost iterations that mutually adjust the molecular electronic distributions and the local electric field in which the molecules are immersed. The approach offers a precise picture of molecular charge densities, accounting for atomic partial multipoles up to order 2, which allows one to reproduce the recently reported large charge-quadrupole contributions to CT state energies in low-symmetry local environments. It is particularly well suited for repetitive calculations for large clusters (up to 300,000 atoms), and may potentially be useful for describing electrostatic solvent effects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. a Detailed Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of STF Multipole Expansion in Linearized Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Sven

    2014-10-01

    The linearized field equations of general relativity in harmonic coordinates are given by an inhomogeneous wave equation. In the region exterior to the matter field, the retarded solution of this wave equation can be expanded in terms of 10 Cartesian symmetric and tracefree (STF) multipoles in post-Minkowskian approximation. For such a multipole decomposition only three and rather weak assumptions are required: (1) No-incoming-radiation condition. (2) The matter source is spatially compact. (3) A spherical expansion for the metric outside the matter source is possible. During the last decades, the STF multipole expansion has been established as a powerful tool in several fields of gravitational physics: celestial mechanics, theory of gravitational waves and in the theory of light propagation and astrometry. But despite its formidable importance, an explicit proof of the fundamental theorem of STF multipole expansion has not been presented so far, while only some parts of it are distributed into several publications. In a technical but more didactical form, an explicit and detailed mathematical proof of each individual step of this important theorem of STF multipole expansion is represented.

  11. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  12. Fast growth phenotype of E. coli K-12 from adaptive laboratory evolution does not require intracellular flux rewiring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Christopher P.; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E.; Feist, Adam M.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) is a widely-used method for improving the fitness of microorganisms in selected environmental conditions. It has been applied previously to Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 during aerobic exponential growth on glucose minimal media, a frequently used model organism...... principal components. The distance between measured and flux balance analysis predicted fluxes was also investigated. It suggested a relatively wide range of similar stoichiometric optima, which opens new questions about the path-dependency of adaptive evolution....

  13. Fast Multipole Method as a Matrix-Free Hierarchical Low-Rank Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Yokota, Rio

    2018-01-03

    There has been a large increase in the amount of work on hierarchical low-rank approximation methods, where the interest is shared by multiple communities that previously did not intersect. This objective of this article is two-fold; to provide a thorough review of the recent advancements in this field from both analytical and algebraic perspectives, and to present a comparative benchmark of two highly optimized implementations of contrasting methods for some simple yet representative test cases. The first half of this paper has the form of a survey paper, to achieve the former objective. We categorize the recent advances in this field from the perspective of compute-memory tradeoff, which has not been considered in much detail in this area. Benchmark tests reveal that there is a large difference in the memory consumption and performance between the different methods.

  14. Well-Conditioned Multi-Level Fast Multipole Modeling of Military Communication Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carin, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    ...) propagation over terrain. Those features of the terrain to be included are geographic scales of surface elevation, surface roughness, variable electrical constitutive properties, and vegetation cover (e.g...

  15. Productive Large Scale Personal Computing: Fast Multipole Methods on GPU/CPU Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To be used naturally in design optimization, parametric study and achieve quick total time-to-solution, simulation must naturally and personally be available to the...

  16. Whole transcriptome analysis of the fasting and fed Burmese python heart: insights into extreme physiological cardiac adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher E; Cozza, Steven; Riquelme, Cecilia A; McCombie, W Richard; Heimiller, Joseph K; Marr, Thomas G; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The infrequently feeding Burmese python (Python molurus) experiences significant and rapid postprandial cardiac hypertrophy followed by regression as digestion is completed. To begin to explore the molecular mechanisms of this response, we have sequenced and assembled the fasted and postfed Burmese python heart transcriptomes with Illumina technology using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome as a reference. In addition, we have used RNA-seq analysis to identify differences in the expression of biological processes and signaling pathways between fasted, 1 day postfed (DPF), and 3 DPF hearts. Out of a combined transcriptome of ∼2,800 mRNAs, 464 genes were differentially expressed. Genes showing differential expression at 1 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for biological processes involved in metabolism and energetics, while genes showing differential expression at 3 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for processes involved in biogenesis, structural remodeling, and organization. Moreover, we present evidence for the activation of physiological and not pathological signaling pathways in this rapid, novel model of cardiac growth in pythons. Together, our data provide the first comprehensive gene expression profile for a reptile heart.

  17. Adaptive changes in transmembrane transport and metabolism of triiodothyronine in perfused livers of fed and fasted hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Jong (Marcel); R. Docter (Roel); H.J. van der Hoek (H.); E.P. Krenning (Eric); G. Hennemann

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe transport and subsequent metabolism of triiodothyronine (T3) were studied in isolated perfused livers of euthyroid, hypothyroid, and hyperthyroid rats, both fed and 48-hour-fasted. T3 kinetics (transport and metabolism) during perfusion were evaluated by a two-pool model, whereas the

  18. Multipole correction of atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution. I. Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Keller, D. A.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The defects in atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution have been analyzed for several model-blocked peptides and compared with accurate quantum chemical values. The results indicate that the angular characteristics of the molecular electrostatic potential around functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds can be considerably distorted within various models relying upon isotropic atomic charges only. It is shown that these defects can be corrected by augmenting the atomic point charge models by cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs). Alternatively, sets of off-center atomic point charges could be automatically derived from respective multipoles, providing approximately equivalent corrections. For the first time, correlated atomic multipoles have been calculated for N-acetyl, N'-methylamide-blocked derivatives of glycine, alanine, cysteine, threonine, leucine, lysine, and serine using the MP2 method. The role of the correlation effects in the peptide molecular charge distribution are discussed.

  19. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    , likely due to the comparatively limited standing variation within gene bodies at the time the population was founded. Genes involved in hair development, body size, and metabolic and hormone signaling pathways represent an essential part of the Yakutian horse adaptive genetic toolkit. Finally, we find......Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below −70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations...

  20. Can barley (Hordeum vulgare L. s.l.) adapt to fast climate changes? A controlled selection experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemayehu, Fikadu Reta; Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The projected future climate will affect the global agricultural production negatively, however, to keep abreast of the expected increase in global population, the agricultural production must increase. Therefore, to safeguard the future crop yield and quality, the adaptive potential of crops...

  1. Fast optimal wavefront reconstruction for multi-conjugate adaptive optics using the Fourier domain preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Curtis R; Yang, Qiang

    2006-08-21

    We present two different implementations of the Fourier domain preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm (FD-PCG) to efficiently solve the large structured linear systems that arise in optimal volume turbulence estimation, or tomography, for multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO). We describe how to deal with several critical technical issues, including the cone coordinate transformation problem and sensor subaperture grid spacing. We also extend the FD-PCG approach to handle the deformable mirror fitting problem for MCAO.

  2. Generalized coarse-grained model based on point multipole and Gay-Berne potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkov, Pavel A; Ren, Pengyu

    2006-08-14

    This paper presents a general coarse-grained molecular mechanics model based on electric point multipole expansion and Gay-Berne [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)] potential. Coarse graining of van der Waals potential is achieved by treating molecules as soft uniaxial ellipsoids interacting via a generalized anisotropic Gay-Berne function. The charge distribution is represented by point multipole expansion, including point charge, dipole, and quadrupole moments placed at the center of mass. The Gay-Berne and point multipole potentials are combined in the local reference frame defined by the inertial frame of the all-atom counterpart. The coarse-grained model has been applied to rigid-body molecular dynamics simulations of molecular liquids including benzene and methanol. The computational efficiency is improved by several orders of magnitude, while the results are in reasonable agreement with all-atom models and experimental data. We also discuss the implications of using point multipole for polar molecules capable of hydrogen bonding and the applicability of this model to a broad range of molecular systems including highly charged biopolymers.

  3. Generalization of the optical theorem to multipole sources in the scattering theory of electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, Yu. A.; Sveshnikov, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Energy relations are used to generalize the Optical Theorem to the case of a local body excited by a multipole source, including in the presence of a half-space. It is shown that the extinction cross section can be represented in an explicit analytical form. This circumstance considerably facilitates the computation of the fluorescence quantum yield or the efficiency of an optical antenna.

  4. Multipole expansion of the retarded interatomic potential energy: induction energy for degenerate ground-state atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, M.A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1972-01-01

    The inductive contribution to the retarded interatomic potential energy of two atoms in degenerate ground states is calculated up to all multipole orders on the basis of quantum electrodynamics. The result, which is found to have nonretarded character, is written in such a way as to show the

  5. Electron self-energy calculation using a general multi-pole approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Soininen, J A; Shirley, E L

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for calculating the inverse of the dielectric matrix in a solid using a band Lanczos algorithm. The method produces a multi-pole approximation for the inverse dielectric matrix with an arbitrary number of poles. We discuss how this approximation can be used to calculate the screened Coulomb interaction needed for electron self-energy calculations in solids.

  6. Paradoxical regulation of human FGF21 by both fasting and feeding signals: is FGF21 a nutritional adaptation factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Uebanso

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 has recently emerged as a metabolic hormone involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in mouse, but the regulatory mechanisms and actions of FGF21 in humans remain unclear. Here we have investigated the regulatory mechanisms of the human FGF21 gene at the transcriptional level. A deletion study of the human FGF21 promoter (-1672 to +230 bp revealed two fasting signals, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα and glucagon signals, that independently induced human FGF21 gene transcription in mouse primary hepatocytes. In addition, two feeding signals, glucose and xylitol, also dose-dependently induced human FGF21 gene transcription and mRNA expression in both human HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. FGF21 protein expression and secretion were also induced by high glucose stimulation. The human FGF21 promoter (-1672 to +230 bp was found to have a carbohydrate-responsive element at -380 to -366 bp, which is distinct from the PPAR response element (PPRE. Knock-down of the carbohydrate response element binding protein by RNAi diminished glucose-induced human FGF21 transcription. Moreover, we found that a region from -555 to -443 bp of the human FGF21 promoter region exerts an important role in the activation of basic transcription. In conclusion, human FGF21 gene expression is paradoxically and independently regulated by both fasting and feeding signals. These regulatory mechanisms suggest that human FGF21 is increased with nutritional crisis, including starvation and overfeeding.

  7. Fast algorithms for Quadrature by Expansion I: Globally valid expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachh, Manas; Klöckner, Andreas; O'Neil, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The use of integral equation methods for the efficient numerical solution of PDE boundary value problems requires two main tools: quadrature rules for the evaluation of layer potential integral operators with singular kernels, and fast algorithms for solving the resulting dense linear systems. Classically, these tools were developed separately. In this work, we present a unified numerical scheme based on coupling Quadrature by Expansion, a recent quadrature method, to a customized Fast Multipole Method (FMM) for the Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. The method allows the evaluation of layer potentials in linear-time complexity, anywhere in space, with a uniform, user-chosen level of accuracy as a black-box computational method. Providing this capability requires geometric and algorithmic considerations beyond the needs of standard FMMs as well as careful consideration of the accuracy of multipole translations. We illustrate the speed and accuracy of our method with various numerical examples.

  8. Late gestation over- and undernutrition predispose for visceral adiposity in response to a post-natal obesogenic diet, but with differential impacts on glucose-insulin adaptations during fasting in lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khanal, Prabhat; Husted, Sanne Vinter; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen

    2014-01-01

    -fat or a moderate diet until 6 months of age (around puberty), where metabolic and endocrine adaptability to fasting was examined, and subgroups of animals were killed. Results: Animals exposed to either prenatal under- or overnutrition had reduced subcutaneous fat deposition when fed a high-fat diet, resulting...... of subcutaneous adipose tissue and induced differential physiological adaptations to fasting. This study does not suggest that exposure to gestational overnutrition will provide a protective effect against development of hyperglycaemia later in life. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society....

  9. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Bradley M.; Ramjan, Zachary H.; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-01-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4). Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1 μs-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a −3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class. PMID:27782467

  10. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    CERN Document Server

    Dickson, Bradley M; Ramjan, Zachary H; Xu, H Eric; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4. Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1{\\mu}second-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  11. Cheaper Synthesis Of Multipole-Brushless-dc-Motor Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Howard, David E.

    1994-01-01

    Circuit converts output of single two-phase shaft-angle resolver to that of multi-speed three-phase shaft-angle resolver. Converter circuit applicable to generation of multispeed, multiphase shaft-angle-resolver signals from single two-phase shaft-angle resolver. Combination of converter circuit and single two-phase shaft-angle resolver offer advantages in cost, weight, size, and complexity. Design readily adaptable to two-phase motor.

  12. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Rainer

    2013-08-20

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  13. Nuclear fission and the widths of the isoscalar giant multipole resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Radyionov, S V

    2002-01-01

    The dissipative collective motion in nuclei is investigated within the Fermi-liquid model. In the case of large-amplitude collective motion, the macroscopic equations for the nuclear shape parameter are derived from the pressure tensor, the velocity field, and the requisition of motion for the nuclear density. The approach is used both for the description of induced symmetric nuclear fission and isoscalar giant multipole resonances in nuclei. The widths of giant quadrupole resonances are calculated with the obtained value of the viscosity coefficient. The calculated widths are about two times smaller than the experimental values. Therefore, the width of a giant multipole resonance is formed not only by ordinary two-body viscosity but also by a nondissipative contribution that absents on the definition of the dissipative energy during the nuclear descent from the fission barrier.

  14. Rapid modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipoles for a masked density field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Taylor, A. N.; de la Torre, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we reformulate the forward modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipole moments for a masked density field, as encountered in galaxy redshift surveys. Exploiting the symmetries of the redshift-space correlation function, we provide a masked-field generalization of the Hankel transform relation between the multipole moments in real and Fourier space. Using this result, we detail how a likelihood analysis requiring computation for a broad range of desired P(k) models may be executed 103-104 times faster than with other common approaches, together with significant gains in spectral resolution. We present a concrete application to the complex angular geometry of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey PDR-1 release and discuss the validity of this technique for finite-angle surveys.

  15. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Rainer

    2016-05-24

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  16. Tune shift effect due to the multipole longitudinal periodic structure in the superconducting dipole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, G.; Chen, S.

    1991-10-01

    Neglecting the curvature terms, the magnetic field and the vector potential which generate the multipole longitudinal periodic structure in a superconducting dipole magnet are found. Using this field and the standard Hamiltonian perturbation theory, the tune shifts due to this periodic pattern in the superconducting dipole magnets are estimated for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) machine. The results suggest that this tune shift is very small for most of the multipoles and could be ignored for the SSC. However, for the quadrupole longitudinal oscillation pattern, the tune shift relative to the amplitude of this oscillation could be of the order of 10{sup {minus}5} and may not be ignored. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Efficient evaluation of antenna fields by a time-domain multipole analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The contribution describes a systematic method to efficiently determine frequency-domain electromagnetic antenna fields and characteristics for a broad spectrum via a single time-domain (e.g., Finite-Difference Time-Domain, FDTD calculation. From a time-domain simulation of an antenna driven by a wide-band signal, a single modified Fourier transformation yields the frequency-domain multipole amplitudes. The corresponding multipole expansions are valid for the entire spectrum of the input pulse and at any point outside a minimum sphere enclosing the antenna. This allows a computationally cheap and elegant post-processing of arbitrary antenna characteristics. As an example of use the method is applied to determine high-resolution three-dimensional radiation patterns of an antipodal Vivaldi antenna.

  18. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarizability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilizing both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  19. A GAUGE-INVARIANT MULTIPOLE EXPANSION SCHEME FOR HEAVY-QUARK SYSTEMS IN QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuya, Ken-ichi

    1980-09-01

    Separation of short-distance and long-distance dynamics for heavy quark-antiquark systems interacting with color gluons is investigated through a classification of gluons according to their ranges. A gauge-invariant double-multipole expansion scheme is constructed which takes into account color fluctuation of heavy-quark systems. Hadronic transitions between heavy quark-antiquark bound states as well as the static quark-antiquark potential are studied within this framework.

  20. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate structure factors are extracted from synchrotron powder diffraction data measured on crystalline diamond based on a novel multipole model division of overlapping reflection intensities. The approach limits the spherical-atom bias in structure factors extracted from overlapping powder data...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  1. An analytical method based on multipole moment expansion to calculate the flux distribution in Gammacell-220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, P.; Ataenia, V.; Shafiei, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the flux of photons inside the irradiation cell of the Gammacell-220 is calculated using an analytical method based on multipole moment expansion. The flux of the photons inside the irradiation cell is introduced as the function of monopole, dipoles and quadruples in the Cartesian coordinate system. For the source distribution of the Gammacell-220, the values of the multipole moments are specified by direct integrating. To confirm the validation of the presented methods, the flux distribution inside the irradiation cell was determined utilizing MCNP simulations as well as experimental measurements. To measure the flux inside the irradiation cell, Amber dosimeters were employed. The calculated values of the flux were in agreement with the values obtained by simulations and measurements, especially in the central zones of the irradiation cell. In order to show that the present method is a good approximation to determine the flux in the irradiation cell, the values of the multipole moments were obtained by fitting the simulation and experimental data using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The present method leads to reasonable results for the all source distribution even without any symmetry which makes it a powerful tool for the source load planning.

  2. Fast Adaptive Maneuvering Experiment (Fame)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-29

    flrir and an area cleared to insure unimpeded flight of the helicopter. If a permanent mounting cannot be made, two or more 25 lb bags of lead shot have...DecoueAndStoreServoString(void); void InitServos(void); void SendPuleePA PS(int OCnum, int PAnum , int PBnum); void OC3_ISR(void); void OC4_ISR(void); void 0C5 ISR(void...optional RAM is installed, then modify the limits accordingly SFAMEIAFOSR Hintz. March 29, 1992 check endof(.heap) >- Oxlfff fatal ",C:!e area tco large

  3. Accurate charge density of trialanine: a comparison of the multipole formalism and the maximum entropy method (MEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Netzel, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2007-04-01

    An accurate charge density study of trialanine is presented with the maximum entropy method (MEM), on the basis of the same reflection data as was used for a multipole refinement [Rödel et al. (2006). Org. Biomol. Chem. 4, 475-481]. With the MEM, the optimum fit to the data is found to correspond to a final value of chi(2) which is less than its statistical expectation value N(Ref), where N(Ref) is the number of reflections. A refinement strategy is presented that determines the optimal goal for chi(2). It is shown that the MEM and the multipole method are on a par with regard to the reproduction of atomic charges and volumes, general topological features and trends in the charge density in the bond critical points (BCPs). Regarding the values of the charge densities in the BCPs, agreement between quantum chemical calculations, the multipole method and MEM is good, but not perfect. In the case of the Laplacians, the coincidence is not as good and especially the Laplacians of the C-O bonds differ strongly. One of the reasons for the observed differences in the topological parameters in the BCPs is the fact that MEM densities still include the effects of thermal motion, whereas multipole densities are free from the effects of thermal motion. Hydrogen bonds are more convincingly reproduced by the MEM than by multipole models.

  4. Point charges optimally placed to represent the multipole expansion of charge distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu Anandakrishnan

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for approximating electrostatic charge distributions with a small number of point charges to optimally represent the original charge distribution. By construction, the proposed optimal point charge approximation (OPCA retains many of the useful properties of point multipole expansion, including the same far-field asymptotic behavior of the approximate potential. A general framework for numerically computing OPCA, for any given number of approximating charges, is described. We then derive a 2-charge practical point charge approximation, PPCA, which approximates the 2-charge OPCA via closed form analytical expressions, and test the PPCA on a set of charge distributions relevant to biomolecular modeling. We measure the accuracy of the new approximations as the RMS error in the electrostatic potential relative to that produced by the original charge distribution, at a distance 2x the extent of the charge distribution--the mid-field. The error for the 2-charge PPCA is found to be on average 23% smaller than that of optimally placed point dipole approximation, and comparable to that of the point quadrupole approximation. The standard deviation in RMS error for the 2-charge PPCA is 53% lower than that of the optimal point dipole approximation, and comparable to that of the point quadrupole approximation. We also calculate the 3-charge OPCA for representing the gas phase quantum mechanical charge distribution of a water molecule. The electrostatic potential calculated by the 3-charge OPCA for water, in the mid-field (2.8 Å from the oxygen atom, is on average 33.3% more accurate than the potential due to the point multipole expansion up to the octupole order. Compared to a 3 point charge approximation in which the charges are placed on the atom centers, the 3-charge OPCA is seven times more accurate, by RMS error. The maximum error at the oxygen-Na distance (2.23 Å is half that of the point multipole expansion up to the octupole

  5. Report of the SSC workshop on distributed multipole correction coils. Task force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, R. [ed.

    1988-01-01

    The SSC Workshop on Distributed Multipole Correction Coils was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on October 13 and 14, 1987. This Workshop was organized by the SSC Central Design Group, and its purpose was to discuss the present status of specifications, designs, and R&D plans for distributed, actively-powered multipole correction coils for the SSC. The Workshop was organized into four consecutive sessions to discuss the following topics: requirements for distributed correction coils, distributed connection coil designs, materials issues, and plans for future R&D. The following conclusions were drawn from the workshop: Accelerator physics considerations indicate that distributed multipole correction coils represent a feasible and flexible method to correct magnetic field errors in the SSC. Considerable progress has been made by Brookhaven National Laboratory in collaboration with industry to develop a possible fabrication technique for distributed correction coils. This technique consists of imbedding superconducting wire in a flexible plastic substrate. Its feasibility for the SSC still needs to be demonstrated. BNL has presented a preliminary plan for the necessary R&D. A successful technique has been developed to manufacture distributed correction coils for HERA. The coil performance is excellent. As yet, no plan has been proposed to study this type of correction coil for the SSC. The results from an experiment to study radiation damage to organic materials, although still preliminary, am providing guidance in selecting the most radiation resistant materials to use in correction coils. The test samples in this experiment were subjected to much larger radiation doses than expected at the SSC. Considerable information on radiation damage is available in the literature.

  6. Multipole modes and spin features in the Raman spectrum of nanoscopic quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emperador, Agustí; Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Lipparini, Enrico

    2001-10-01

    We present a systematic study of ground state and spectroscopic properties of many-electron nanoscopic quantum rings. Addition energies at zero magnetic field (B) and electrochemical potentials as a function of B are given for a ring hosting up to 24 electrons. We find discontinuities in the excitation energies of multipole spin and charge density modes, and a coupling between the charge and spin density responses that allow to identify the formation of ferromagnetic ground states in narrow magnetic field regions. These effects can be observed in Raman experiments, and are related to the fractional Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the energy and of the persistent current in the ring.

  7. Creation, destruction, and transfer of atomic multipole moments by electron scattering: Quantum-mechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanak, G.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2008-12-01

    Using the wave-packet propagation method of Rodberg and Thaler and the density matrix method of Fano and Blum, we have defined by completely quantum-mechanical methods the cross sections for the creation, destruction, and transfer of atomic multipole moments by both elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons by atomic targets. All cross sections obtained quantum mechanically, except for the coherence transfer cross sections, agree in form with those obtained semiclassically by Fujimoto and co-workers. We also used the converged close-coupling (CCC) method to calculate numerically some of the above cross sections for selected transitions in electron scattering from hydrogen and barium atoms.

  8. Lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator with force cancellation system based on multipole monolithic magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Ryota; Kagamihata, Akihiro; Seike, Takamitsu; Kishimoto, Hikaru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    A lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator (LCVGU) having the force-cancellation system based on the multipole monolithic magnets (MMMs) has been developed. The LCVGU is free from the heavy mechanical frames, which is a fundamental element specific to conventional variable-gap undulators (VGUs) because of a strong attractive force, and thus the cost and time for construction and installation are expected to be significantly reduced; the MMMs counteract the strong attractive force in a cost-effective manner. Results of mechanical tests and magnetic-field measurements of two prototype LCVGUs equipped with the proposed force cancellation system have revealed the comparable performance with the conventional VGUs.

  9. Geometry Effects on Multipole Components and Beam Optics in High-Velocity Multi-Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [ODU, JLAB; Deitrick, Kirsten E. [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01

    Velocity-of-light, multi-spoke cavities are being proposed to accelerate electrons in a compact light-source. There are strict requirements on the beam quality which require that the linac have only small non-uniformities in the accelerating field. Beam dynamics simulations have uncovered varying levels of focusing and defocusing in the proposed cavities, which is dependent on the geometry of the spoke in the vicinity of the beam path. Here we present results for the influence different spoke geometries have on the multipole components of the accelerating field and how these components, in turn, impact the simulated beam properties.

  10. Enhancing monochromatic multipole emission by a subwavelength enclosure of degenerate Mie resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun

    2017-07-06

    Sound emission is inefficient at low frequencies as limited by source size. This letter presents enhancing emission of monochromatic monopole and multipole sources by enclosing the source with a subwavelength circular enclosure filled of an anisotropic material of a low radial sound speed. The anisotropy is associated with an infinite tangential density along the azimuth. Numerical simulations show that emission gain is produced at frequencies surrounding degenerate Mie resonant frequencies of the enclosure, and meanwhile the radiation directivity pattern is well preserved. The degeneracy is theoretically analyzed. A realization of the material is suggested by using a space-coiling structure.

  11. Plasma confinement time in trimix-M galatea multipole magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sigov, A. S.; Kharchevnikov, V. K.

    2010-05-01

    The confinement time of hydrogen plasma trapped in a Trimix-M magnetic multipole galatea was studied in a range of plasma densities (1 × 1016 - 6 × 1018 m-3) and ion energies (˜100-300 eV). It is established that (i) the confinement time increases with decreasing plasma density in the trap and (ii) as the barrier magnetic field is increased, the plasma confinement time grows faster than according to a linear law. The obtained results are indicative of a collisional character of plasma diffusion through the barrier field in the trap.

  12. Search for astrophysical point sources with IceCube using a multipole analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuermann, Martin; Reimann, Rene; Scheel, Max; Schukraft, Anne; Wiebusch, Christopher [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). III. Physikalisches Inst.; Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The search for astrophysical point sources of high energy neutrinos is one of the key tasks the IceCube Neutrino Observatory was set up for. Beside the direct search looking for temporal or spatial clustering of measured neutrino directions, a multipole analysis is another promising method to detect a point source signal. Therefor, the sky map of arrival directions is expanded in spherical harmonics. A large number of point sources, which individually are too weak to be detected, would leave a characteristic imprint on the spectrum of observed expansion coefficients. This talk presents the application of this analysis to the data taken with IceCube in its 79-string configuration.

  13. Dual Killing-Yano symmetry and multipole moments in electromagnetism and mechanics of continua

    OpenAIRE

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Dubovik, V. M.; Misicu, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we introduce the Killing-Yano symmetry on the phase space and we investigate the symplectic structure on the space of Killing-Yano tensors. We perform the detailed analyze of the $n$-dimensional flat space and the Riemaniann manifolds with constant scalar curvature. We investigate the form of some multipole tensors, which arise in the expansion of a system of charges and currents, in terms of second-order Killing-Yano tensors in the phase space of classical mechanics. We find som...

  14. Trapping ions from a fast beam in a radio-frequency ion trap: Exploring the energy exchange with the longitudinal radio-frequency field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Annette; Lammich, Lutz; Vad Andersen, John Erik

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of injecting ions from an initially fast moving beam into a multipole radio-frequency (RF) ion trap without the use of buffer gas is described. The chosen trap geometry gives rise to an oscillating electric field along the direction of the incoming ions, and through an analytical...

  15. Proposed Advanced Reactor Adaptation of the Standard Review Plan NUREG-0800 Chapter 4 (Reactor) for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors and Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Moe, Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report proposes adaptation of the previous regulatory gap analysis in Chapter 4 (Reactor) of NUREG 0800, Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR [Light Water Reactor] Edition. The proposed adaptation would result in a Chapter 4 review plan applicable to certain advanced reactors. This report addresses two technologies: the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (mHTGR). SRP Chapter 4, which addresses reactor components, was selected for adaptation because of the possible significant differences in advanced non-light water reactor (non-LWR) technologies compared with the current LWR-based description in Chapter 4. SFR and mHTGR technologies were chosen for this gap analysis because of their diverse designs and the availability of significant historical design detail.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Multipole Theory in Electromagnetism: Classical, Quantum and Symmetry Aspects, with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvola, Ari

    2005-03-01

    `Good reasons must, of force, give place to better', observes Brutus to Cassius, according to William Shakespeare in Julius Caesar. Roger Raab and Owen de Lange seem to agree, as they cite this sentence in the concluding chapter of their new book on the importance of exact multipole analysis in macroscopic electromagnetics. Very true and essential to remember in our daily research work. The two scientists from the University of Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa (presently University of KwaZulu-Natal) have been working for a very long time on the accurate description of electric and magnetic response of matter and have published much of their findings in various physics journals. The present book gives us a clear and coherent exposition of many of these results. The important message of Raab and de Lange is that in the macroscopic description of matter, a correct balance between the various orders of electric and magnetic multipole terms has to be respected. If the inclusion of magnetic dipole terms is not complemented with electric quadrupoles, there is a risk of losing the translational invariance of certain important quantities. This means that the values of these quantities depend on the choice of the origin! `It canÂ't be Nature, for it is not sense' is another of the apt literary citations in the book. Often monographs written by researchers look like they have been produced using a cut-and-paste technique; earlier published articles are included in the same book but, unfortunately, too little additional effort is expended into moulding the totality into a unified story. This is not the case with Raab and de Lange. The structure and the text flow of the book serve perfectly its important message. After the obligatory introduction of material response to electromagnetic fields, constitutive relations, basic quantum theory and spacetime properties, a chapter follows with transmission and scattering effects where everything seems to work well with the `old

  17. Dynamic black holes through gravitational collapse: Analysis of multipole moment of the curvatures on the horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Saijo, Motoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated several properties of rapidly rotating dynamic black holes generated by gravitational collapse of rotating relativistic stars. At present, numerical simulations of the binary black hole merger are able to produce a Kerr black hole of J_final / M_final^2 up to = 0.91, of gravitational collapse from uniformly rotating stars up to J_final / M_final^2 ~ 0.75, where J_final is the total angular momentum and M_final the total gravitational mass of the hole. We have succeeded in producing a dynamic black hole of spin J_final / M_final^2 ~ 0.95 through the collapse of differentially rotating relativistic stars. We have investigated those dynamic properties through diagnosing multipole moment of the horizon, and found the following two features. Firstly, two different definitions of the angular momentum of the hole, the approximated Killing vector approach and dipole moment of the current multipole approach, make no significant difference to our computational results. Secondly, dynamic hole approa...

  18. Local geometry of electromagnetic fields and its role in molecular multipole transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Cohen, Adam E

    2011-05-12

    Electromagnetic fields with complex spatial variation routinely arise in Nature. We study the response of a small molecule to monochromatic fields of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. First, we consider the allowed configurations of the fields and field gradients at a single point in space. Many configurations cannot be generated from a single plane wave, regardless of polarization, but any allowed configuration can be generated by superposition of multiple plane waves. There is no local configuration of the fields and gradients that requires near-field effects. Second, we derive a set of local electromagnetic quantities, each of which couples to a particular multipole transition. These quantities are small or zero in plane waves, but can be large in regions of certain superpositions of plane waves. Our findings provide a systematic framework for designing far-field and near-field experiments to drive multipole transitions. The proposed experiments provide information on molecular structure that is inaccessible to other spectroscopic techniques and open the possibility for new types of optical control of molecules.

  19. Design, simulation and testing of a novel radial multi-pole multi-layer magnetorheological brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xuezheng; Yao, Jin

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a novel radial multi-pole multi-layer magnetorheological (MR) brake. This MR brake has an innovative structural design with superposition principle of two magnetic fields generated by the inner coils and the outer coils. The MR brake has several media layers of magnetorheological (MR) fluid located between the inner coils and the outer coils, and it can provide higher torque and higher torque density than conventional single-disk or multi-disk or multi-pole single-layer MR brakes can. In this paper, a brief introduction to the structure of the proposed MR brake was given first. Then, theoretical analysis of the magnetic circuit and the braking torque was conducted. In addition, a 3D electromagnetic model of the MR brake was developed to simulate and examine the magnetic flux intensity and corresponding braking torque. A prototype of the brake was fabricated and several tests were carried out to validate its torque capacity. The results show that the proposed MR brake can produce a maximum braking torque of 133 N m and achieve a high torque density of 25.0 kN m‑2, a high torque range of 42 and a high torque-to-power ratio of 0.95 N m W‑1.

  20. L 1 generalized inverse beam-forming algorithm resolving coherent/incoherent, distributed and multipole sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takao

    2011-11-01

    To resolve coherent/incoherent, distributed/compact, and multipole aerodynamic-sound sources with phased-array pressure data, a new source-detection algorithm is developed based on L1 generalized inverse techniques. To extract each coherent signal, a cross spectral matrix is decomposed into eigenmodes. Subsequently, the complex source-amplitude distribution that recovers each eigenmode is solved using generalized inverse techniques with reference solutions which include multipoles as well as a monopole. Namely, the source distribution consisting of pre-defined source types is solved as an L1 norm problem using iteratively re-weighted least squares (IRLS). The capabilities of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated using various benchmark problems to compare the results with several existing beam-forming algorithms, and it is found that distributed sources as well as dipoles with arbitrary orientation can be identified regardless of coherency with another source. The resolution is comparable to existing deconvolution techniques, such as DAMAS or CLEAN, and the computational cost is only several times more than that of DAMAS2. The proposed algorithm is also examined using previous model-scale test data taken in an open-jet wind-tunnel for a study on jet-flap interaction, and some indication of dipole radiation is discerned near the flap edge.

  1. Predicting K0Λ photoproduction observables by using the multipole approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, T.; Rusli, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present an isobar model for kaon photoproduction on the proton γ p\\to K^+Λ that can nicely reproduce the available experimental data from threshold up to W=2.0 GeV. The background amplitude of the model is constructed from a covariant Feynman diagrammatic method, whereas the resonance one is formulated by using the multipole approach. All unknown parameters in both background and resonance amplitudes are extracted by adjusting the calculated observables to experimental data. With the help of SU(3) isospin symmetry and some information obtained from the Particle Data Group we estimate the cross section and polarization observables for the neutral kaon photoproduction on the neutron γ n\\to K^0Λ. The result indicates no sharp peak in the K^0Λ total cross section. The predicted differential cross section exhibits resonance structures only at cosθ=-1. To obtain sizable observables the present work recommends measurement of the K^0Λ cross section with W≳ 1.70 GeV, whereas for the recoiled Λ polarization measurement with W≈ 1.65-1.90 GeV would be advised, since the predictions of existing models show a large variance at this kinematics. The predicted electric and magnetic multipoles are found to be mostly different from those obtained in previous works. For W=1.75 and 1.95 GeV it is found that most of the single and double polarization observables demonstrate large asymmetries.

  2. Multipole Theory in Electromagnetism: Classical, Quantum and Symmetry Aspects, with Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihvola, Ari [Helsinki University of Technology (Finland)

    2005-03-11

    'Good reasons must, of force, give place to better', observes Brutus to Cassius, according to William Shakespeare in Julius Caesar. Roger Raab and Owen de Lange seem to agree, as they cite this sentence in the concluding chapter of their new book on the importance of exact multipole analysis in macroscopic electromagnetics. Very true and essential to remember in our daily research work. The two scientists from the University of Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa (presently University of KwaZulu-Natal) have been working for a very long time on the accurate description of electric and magnetic response of matter and have published much of their findings in various physics journals. The present book gives us a clear and coherent exposition of many of these results. The important message of Raab and de Lange is that in the macroscopic description of matter, a correct balance between the various orders of electric and magnetic multipole terms has to be respected. If the inclusion of magnetic dipole terms is not complemented with electric quadrupoles, there is a risk of losing the translational invariance of certain important quantities. This means that the values of these quantities depend on the choice of the origin{exclamation_point} 'It can't be Nature, for it is not sense' is another of the apt literary citations in the book. Often monographs written by researchers look like they have been produced using a cut-and-paste technique; earlier published articles are included in the same book but, unfortunately, too little additional effort is expended into moulding the totality into a unified story. This is not the case with Raab and de Lange. The structure and the text flow of the book serve perfectly its important message. After the obligatory introduction of material response to electromagnetic fields, constitutive relations, basic quantum theory and spacetime properties, a chapter follows with transmission and scattering effects where

  3. Linear Absorption and Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectra of N-Methylacetamide in Chloroform Revisited : Polarizability and Multipole Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solvent polarizability and multipole effects on the amide I vibrational spectra of a peptide unit is investigated. Four molecular dynamics force fields of increasing complexity for the solvent are used to model both the linear absorption and two-dimensional infrared spectra. It is

  4. The Analysis of Likert Scales Using State Multipoles: An Application of Quantum Methods to Behavioral Sciences Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camparo, James; Camparo, Lorinda B.

    2013-01-01

    Though ubiquitous, Likert scaling's traditional mode of analysis is often unable to uncover all of the valid information in a data set. Here, the authors discuss a solution to this problem based on methodology developed by quantum physicists: the state multipole method. The authors demonstrate the relative ease and value of this method by…

  5. A fast-multipole domain decomposition integral equation solver for characterizing electromagnetic wave propagation in mine environments

    KAUST Repository

    Yücel, Abdulkadir C.

    2013-07-01

    Reliable and effective wireless communication and tracking systems in mine environments are key to ensure miners\\' productivity and safety during routine operations and catastrophic events. The design of such systems greatly benefits from simulation tools capable of analyzing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in long mine tunnels and large mine galleries. Existing simulation tools for analyzing EM wave propagation in such environments employ modal decompositions (Emslie et. al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 23, 192-205, 1975), ray-tracing techniques (Zhang, IEEE Tran. Vehic. Tech., 5, 1308-1314, 2003), and full wave methods. Modal approaches and ray-tracing techniques cannot accurately account for the presence of miners and their equipments, as well as wall roughness (especially when the latter is comparable to the wavelength). Full-wave methods do not suffer from such restrictions but require prohibitively large computational resources. To partially alleviate this computational burden, a 2D integral equation-based domain decomposition technique has recently been proposed (Bakir et. al., in Proc. IEEE Int. Symp. APS, 1-2, 8-14 July 2012). © 2013 IEEE.

  6. High-multipole excitations of atoms by twisted photons near phase singularity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasev, Andrei; Carlson, Carl E.; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-09-01

    We calculate transition amplitudes and cross sections for excitation of hydrogen-like atoms by the twisted photon states, or photon states with more than one unit of angular momentum projection along the direction of propagation. If the target atom is located at distances of the order of atomic size near the vortex center, the transitions rates into l_f>1 states become comparable with the rates for standard electric dipole transitions. It is shown that when the transition rates are normalized to the local photon flux, the resulting cross sections for l_f>1 are singular near the optical vortex center, i.e., high-multipole excitations take place in the region of zero field intensity near phase singularity. Relation to the "quantum core" concept introduced by Berry and Dennis is discussed.

  7. Wave-vector dependence of spin and density multipole excitations in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Manuel; Colletti, Leonardo; Lipparini, Enrico; Emperador, Agustí; Pi, Martí; Serra, Llorenç

    2000-03-01

    We have employed time-dependent local-spin density-functional theory to analyze the multipole spin and charge density excitations in GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs quantum dots. The on-plane transferred momentum degree of freedom has been taken into account, and the wave-vector dependence of the excitations is discussed. In agreement with previous experiments, we have found that the energies of these modes do not depend on the transferred wave vector, although their intensities do. Comparison with a recent resonant Raman scattering experiment [C. Schüller et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 2673 (1998)] is made. This allows us to identify the angular momentum of several of the observed modes as well as to reproduce their energies.

  8. Influence of Azimuthal Coil Size on Skew Multipoles in the LHC Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Vanenkov, I

    2003-01-01

    The field quality in superconducting accelerator magnets is strongly influenced by the azimuthal dimension of the superconducting coil. Asymmetries between the upper and lower poles steer skew harmonics that can endanger the beam dynamics stability. We present dimensional measurements of a large number of coils that have been carried out in one of the three manufacturers of the main LHC dipoles. A magneto-static model is then used to work out the influence of coil non-nominalites on field harmonics. Comparison to magnetic measurements carried out at room temperature shows that skew harmonics can be partly traced back to azimuthal coil dimensions. We focus on harmonics, which are more critical with respect to the beam dynamics limits (a2 and a4). Finally some strategies are presented, like the sorting of individual coil poles in order to reduce the detrimental effects on these multipoles.

  9. Multipole electrodynamic ion trap geometries for microparticle confinement under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M., E-mail: bogdan.mihalcea@inflpr.ro; Vişan, Gina T.; Ganciu, Mihai [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR), Atomiştilor Str. Nr. 409, 077125 Măgurele, Ilfov (Romania); Giurgiu, Liviu C. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Atomistilor Str. Nr. 405, 077125 Măgurele (Romania); Stan, Cristina [Department of Physics, Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independenţei, RO-060042 Bucharest (Romania); Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitrucho@yandex.ru; Deputatova, Lidiya; Syrovatka, Roman [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya Str. 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-21

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in case of multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions. An 8- and 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap is mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics is simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  10. Multipole plasmons and their disappearance in few-nanometre silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Christensen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy can be used for detailed spatial and spectral characterization of optical excitations in metal nanoparticles. In previous electron energy-loss experiments on silver nanoparticles with radii smaller than 20 nm, only the dipolar surface plasmon resonance was assumed...... to play a role. Here, applying electron energy-loss spectroscopy to individual silver nanoparticles encapsulated in silicon nitride, we observe besides the usual dipole resonance an additional surface plasmon resonance corresponding to higher angular momenta for nanoparticle radii as small as 4 nm. We...... theoretical predictions. Unlike in optical spectra, multipole surface plasmons are important in electron energy-loss spectra even of ultrasmall metallic nanoparticles....

  11. Cumulative atomic multipole moments complement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate electrostatic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of several atomic charge models based on different definitions has been analyzed using cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMM). This formalism can generate higher atomic moments starting from any atomic charges, while preserving the corresponding molecular moments. The atomic charge contribution to the higher molecular moments, as well as to the electrostatic potentials, has been examined for CO and HCN molecules at several different levels of theory. The results clearly show that the electrostatic potential obtained from CAMM expansion is convergent up to R-5 term for all atomic charge models used. This illustrates that higher atomic moments can be used to supplement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate description of electrostatic properties.

  12. A compensated multi-pole linear ion trap mercury frequency standard for ultra-stable timekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A; Diener, William A; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2008-12-01

    The multi-pole linear ion trap frequency standard (LITS) being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has demonstrated excellent short- and long-term stability. The technology has now demonstrated long-term field operation providing a new capability for timekeeping standards. Recently implemented enhancements have resulted in a record line Q of 5 x 10(12) for a room temperature microwave atomic transition and a short-term fractional frequency stability of 5 x 10(-14)/tau(1/2). A scheme for compensating the second order Doppler shift has led to a reduction of the combined sensitivity to the primary LITS systematic effects below 5 x 10(-17) fractional frequency. Initial comparisons to JPL's cesium fountain clock show a systematic floor of less than 2 x 10(-16). The compensated multi-pole LITS at JPL was operated continuously and unattended for a 9-mo period from October 2006 to July 2007. During that time it was used as the frequency reference for the JPL geodetic receiver known as JPLT, enabling comparisons to any clock used as a reference for an International GNSS Service (IGS) site. Comparisons with the laser-cooled primary frequency standards that reported to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) over this period show a frequency deviation less than 2.7 x 10(-17)/day. In the capacity of a stand-alone ultra-stable flywheel, such a standard could be invaluable for long-term timekeeping applications in metrology labs while its methodology and robustness make it ideal for space applications as well.

  13. Mapping the Drude polarizable force field onto a multipole and induced dipole model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2017-10-01

    The induced dipole and the classical Drude oscillator represent two major approaches for the explicit inclusion of electronic polarizability into force field-based molecular modeling and simulations. In this work, we explore the equivalency of these two models by comparing condensed phase properties computed using the Drude force field and a multipole and induced dipole (MPID) model. Presented is an approach to map the electrostatic model optimized in the context of the Drude force field onto the MPID model. Condensed phase simulations on water and 15 small model compounds show that without any reparametrization, the MPID model yields properties similar to the Drude force field with both models yielding satisfactory reproduction of a range of experimental values and quantum mechanical data. Our results illustrate that the Drude oscillator model and the point induced dipole model are different representations of essentially the same physical model. However, results indicate the presence of small differences between the use of atomic multipoles and off-center charge sites. Additionally, results on the use of dispersion particle mesh Ewald further support its utility for treating long-range Lennard Jones dispersion contributions in the context of polarizable force fields. The main motivation in demonstrating the transferability of parameters between the Drude and MPID models is that the more than 15 years of development of the Drude polarizable force field can now be used with MPID formalism without the need for dual-thermostat integrators nor self-consistent iterations. This opens up a wide range of new methodological opportunities for polarizable models.

  14. Local ensemble transform Kalman filter, a fast non-stationary control law for adaptive optics on ELTs: theoretical aspects and first simulation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Morgan; Petit, Cyril; Rodionov, Sergey; Bocquet, Marc; Bertino, Laurent; Ferrari, Marc; Fusco, Thierry

    2014-08-25

    We propose a new algorithm for an adaptive optics system control law, based on the Linear Quadratic Gaussian approach and a Kalman Filter adaptation with localizations. It allows to handle non-stationary behaviors, to obtain performance close to the optimality defined with the residual phase variance minimization criterion, and to reduce the computational burden with an intrinsically parallel implementation on the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs).

  15. System for fast and accurate filling of a two-phase cooling device, notably a heat pipe, adapted for use in an automated process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Ten Hoeve, Harm Jan; Te Riele Gert, Jan; Van Es, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The current invention relates to a system for fast and accurate filling of a two-phase cooling device, comprising a binding device (30) intended to be hermetically mounted onto the cooling device, the binding device (30) comprising a through-hole (32) able to be in fluid contact with the cooling

  16. SYSTEM FOR FAST AND ACCURATE FILLING OF A TWO-PHASE COOLING DEVICE, NOTABLY A HEAT PIPE, ADAPTED FOR USE IN AN AUTOMATED PROCESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Ten Hoeve, Harm Jan; Te Riele Gert, Jan; Van Es, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The current invention relates to a system for fast and accurate filling of a two- phase cooling device, comprising a binding device (30) intended to be hermetically mounted onto the cooling device, the binding device (30) comprising a through-hole (32) able to be in fluid contact with the cooling

  17. SYSTEM FOR FAST AND ACCURATE FILLING OF A TWO-PHASE COOLING DEVICE, NOTABLY A HEAT PIPE, ADAPTED FOR USE IN AN AUTOMATED PROCESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Ten Hoeve, Harm Jan; Te Riele Gert, Jan; Van Es, Johannes; Wits, Wessel Willems; Ten Hoeve, Harm Jan; Te Riele, Gerhardus Wilhelmus; Van Es, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The current invention relates to a system for fast and accurate filling of a two-phase cooling device, comprising a binding device (30) intended to be hermetically mounted onto the cooling device, the binding device (30) comprising a through-hole (32) able to be in fluid contact with the cooling

  18. On Fast Fourier Transform

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His research areas are adaptive signal processing, multirate filtering and wavelets, space-time signal processing for wireless communation. v U Redc!y. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) is an efficient algorithm for computing the discrete Fourier transform. The discovery of the FFT algorithm paved the way for widespread use of.

  19. Cafeteria diet overfeeding in young male rats impairs the adaptive response to fed/fasted conditions and increases adiposity independent of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, H; Pomar, C A; Picó, C; Sánchez, J; Palou, A

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed the effects of a short exposure to a cafeteria diet during early infancy in rats on their metabolic response to fed/fasting conditions in key tissues involved in energy homeostasis. Ten-day-old male pups were fed a control or a cafeteria diet for 12 days and then killed under ad libitum feeding conditions or 12 h fasting. The expression of key genes related to energy metabolism in liver, retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT) and hypothalamus were analyzed. Despite no differences in body weight, cafeteria-fed animals had almost double the fat mass of control rats. They also showed higher food intake, higher leptinemia and altered hypothalamic expression of Neuropetide Y, suggesting a dysfunction in the control of food intake. Unlike controls, cafeteria-fed animals did not decrease WAT expression of Pparg, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 or Cidea under fasting conditions, and displayed lower Pnpla2 expression than controls. In liver, compared with controls, cafeteria animals presented: (i) lower expression of genes related with fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis under ad libitum-fed conditions; (ii) higher expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and glucokinase under fasting conditions; (iii) greater expression of leptin and insulin receptors; and higher protein levels of insulin receptor and the pAMPK/AMPK ratio. A short period of exposure to a cafeteria diet in early infancy in rat pups is enough to disturb the metabolic response to fed/fasting conditions in key tissues involved in energy homeostasis, particularly in WAT, and hence induces an exacerbated body fat accumulation and increased metabolic risk, with no apparent effects on body weight.

  20. On the Use of Multipole Expansion in Time Evolution of Non-linear Dynamical Systems and Some Surprises Related to Superradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Csizmadia, Peter; Racz, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    A new numerical method is introduced to study the problem of time evolution of generic non-linear dynamical systems in four-dimensional spacetimes. It is assumed that the time level surfaces are foliated by a one-parameter family of codimension two compact surfaces with no boundary and which are conformal to a Riemannian manifold C. The method is based on the use of a multipole expansion determined uniquely by the induced metric structure on C. The approach is fully spectral in the angular directions. The dynamics in the complementary 1+1 Lorentzian spacetime is followed by making use of a fourth order finite differencing scheme with adaptive mesh refinement. In checking the reliability of the introduced new method the evolution of a massless scalar field on a fixed Kerr spacetime is investigated. In particular, the angular distribution of the evolving field in to be superradiant scattering is studied. The primary aim was to check the validity of some of the recent arguments claiming that the Penrose process,...

  1. Calculation of the multipole coefficients of 2-dimensional magnetic fields from the spectrum analysis computed by FLUX2D

    CERN Document Server

    Gyr, Marcel

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional fields in regions with constant material properties (magnetic permeability, dielectric permittivity, heat conductivity, etc.) can be derived from a complex potential function W, where the real and imaginary parts correspond to the scalar potential function F and the stream function Y respectively. In source-free regions (no currents, electric charges, heat sinks, etc.), the field, is conservative and its complex potential W is a harmonic function where F and Y satisfy the Laplace equation. In such regions W can be expressed as a power series, the coefficients of which being the, multipole components of the field with respect to the origin of the series expansion. This note describes how these multipole coefficients are related to the amplitudes and phase angles as computed by, FLUX2D in the spectrum analysis of the magnetic vector potential. In the case of electrical or thermal problems, these same considerations apply by analogy.

  2. Creatine loading elevates the intracellular phosphorylation potential and alters adaptive responses of rat fast-twitch muscle to chronic low-frequency stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Charles T; Gallo, Maria; Martins, Karen J B; MacLean, Ian M; Jendral, Michelle J; Gordon, Tessa; Syrotuik, Daniel G; Dixon, Walter T

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that elevating the intracellular phosphorylation potential (IPP = [ATP]/[ADP]free) within rat fast-twitch tibialis anterior muscles by creatine (Cr) loading would prevent fast-to-slow fibre transitions induced by chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation (CLFS, 10 Hz, 12 h/day). Creatine-control and creatine-CLFS groups drank a solution of 1% Cr + 5% dextrose, ad libitum, for 10 days before and during 10 days of CLFS; dextrose-control and dextrose-CLFS groups drank 5% dextrose. Cr loading increased total Cr (P creatine-CLFS than in dextrose-CLFS. Higher IPP was confirmed by a 58% reduction in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase α (Thr172) (P creatine-CLFS, MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa mRNA were unchanged and MyHC-IIb mRNA decreased by 75% (P creatine-CLFS, but reciprocal reductions in glycolytic reference enzymes occurred only in dextrose-CLFS (P creatine-CLFS coincided with prolonged time to peak tension and half-rise time (P < 0.01). These results highlight the IPP as an important physiological regulator of muscle fibre plasticity and demonstrate that training-induced changes typically associated with improvements in muscular endurance or increased power output are not mutually exclusive in Cr-loaded muscles.

  3. Fast Hearing-Threshold Estimation Using Multiple Auditory Steady-State Responses with Narrow-Band Chirps and Adaptive Stimulus Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Mühler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the estimation of hearing thresholds in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects on the basis of multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs. The ASSR was measured using two new techniques: (i adaptive stimulus patterns and (ii narrow-band chirp stimuli. ASSR thresholds in 16 normal-hearing and 16 hearing-impaired adults were obtained simultaneously at both ears at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000?Hz, using a multiple-frequency stimulus built up of four one-octave-wide narrow-band chirps with a repetition rate of 40?Hz. A statistical test in the frequency domain was used to detect the response. The recording of the steady-state responses was controlled in eight independent recording channels with an adaptive, semiautomatic algorithm. The average differences between the behavioural hearing thresholds and the ASSR threshold estimate were 10, 8, 13, and 15?dB for test frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000?Hz, respectively. The average overall test duration of 18.6 minutes for the threshold estimations at the four frequencies and both ears demonstrates the benefit of an adaptive recording algorithm and the efficiency of optimised narrow-band chirp stimuli.

  4. Comparison of FDTD numerical computations and analytical multipole expansion method for plasmonics-active nanosphere dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Anuj; Norton, Stephen J; Gerhold, Michael D; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-06-08

    This paper describes a comparative study of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and analytical evaluations of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of dimers of metallic nanospheres of plasmonics-active metals. The results of these two computational methods, to determine electromagnetic field enhancement in the region often referred to as "hot spots" between the two nanospheres forming the dimer, were compared and a strong correlation observed for gold dimers. The analytical evaluation involved the use of the spherical-harmonic addition theorem to relate the multipole expansion coefficients between the two nanospheres. In these evaluations, the spacing between two nanospheres forming the dimer was varied to obtain the effect of nanoparticle spacing on the electromagnetic fields in the regions between the nanostructures. Gold and silver were the metals investigated in our work as they exhibit substantial plasmon resonance properties in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regimes. The results indicate excellent correlation between the two computational methods, especially for gold nanosphere dimers with only a 5-10% difference between the two methods. The effect of varying the diameters of the nanospheres forming the dimer, on the electromagnetic field enhancement, was also studied.

  5. Using Huygens Multipole Arrays to Realize Unidirectional Needle-Like Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W. Ziolkowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available For nearly a century, the concept of needle radiation has captured the attention of the electromagnetics communities in both physics and engineering, with various types of contributions reoccurring every decade. With the near-term needs for highly directive, electrically small radiators and scatterers for a variety of communications and sensor applications, superdirectivity has again become a topic of interest. While it is well known that superdirective solutions exist and suffer ill-posedness issues in principle, a detailed needle solution has not been reported previously. We demonstrate explicitly, for the first time, how needle radiation can be obtained theoretically from currents driven on an arbitrary spherical surface, and we explain why such a result can only be attained in practice with electrically large spheres. On the other hand, we also demonstrate, more practically, how broadside radiating Huygens source multipoles can be combined into an end-fire array configuration to achieve needle-like radiation performance without suffering the traditional problems that have previously plagued superdirectivity.

  6. Gay-Berne and electrostatic multipole based coarse-grain potential in implicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Johnny; Zhen, Xia; Shen, Hujun; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2011-10-21

    A general, transferable coarse-grain (CG) framework based on the Gay-Berne potential and electrostatic point multipole expansion is presented for polypeptide simulations. The solvent effect is described by the Generalized Kirkwood theory. The CG model is calibrated using the results of all-atom simulations of model compounds in solution. Instead of matching the overall effective forces produced by atomic models, the fundamental intermolecular forces such as electrostatic, repulsion-dispersion, and solvation are represented explicitly at a CG level. We demonstrate that the CG alanine dipeptide model is able to reproduce quantitatively the conformational energy of all-atom force fields in both gas and solution phases, including the electrostatic and solvation components. Replica exchange molecular dynamics and microsecond dynamic simulations of polyalanine of 5 and 12 residues reveal that the CG polyalanines fold into "alpha helix" and "beta sheet" structures. The 5-residue polyalanine displays a substantial increase in the "beta strand" fraction relative to the 12-residue polyalanine. The detailed conformational distribution is compared with those reported from recent all-atom simulations and experiments. The results suggest that the new coarse-graining approach presented in this study has the potential to offer both accuracy and efficiency for biomolecular modeling. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Nucleic Acids Using Anisotropic Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohui; Shen, Hujun; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Yan; Wang, Honglei

    2016-02-09

    In this work, we attempt to apply a coarse-grained (CG) model, which is based on anisotropic Gay-Berne and electric multipole (EMP) potentials, to the modeling of nucleic acids. First, a comparison has been made between the CG and atomistic models (AMBER point-charge model) in the modeling of DNA and RNA hairpin structures. The CG results have demonstrated a good quality in maintaining the nucleic acid hairpin structures, in reproducing the dynamics of backbone atoms of nucleic acids, and in describing the hydrogen-bonding interactions between nucleic acid base pairs. Second, the CG and atomistic AMBER models yield comparable results in modeling double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules. It is encouraging that our CG model is capable of reproducing many elastic features of nucleic acid base pairs in terms of the distributions of the interbase pair step parameters (such as shift, slide, tilt, and twist) and the intrabase pair parameters (such as buckle, propeller, shear, and stretch). Finally, The GBEMP model has shown a promising ability to predict the melting temperatures of DNA duplexes with different lengths.

  8. MULTIPOLE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AND HIGH-ORDER PERTURBATIONS ON THE QUADRUPOLE LENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Z.; Lin, W. P. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, G. L. [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Kang, X., E-mail: chuzhe@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn [Partner Group of MPI for Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-03-10

    An arbitrary surface mass density of the gravitational lens can be decomposed into multipole components. We simulate the ray tracing for the multipolar mass distribution of the generalized Singular Isothermal Sphere model based on deflection angles, which are analytically calculated. The magnification patterns in the source plane are then derived from an inverse shooting technique. As has been found, the caustics of odd mode lenses are composed of two overlapping layers for some lens models. When a point source traverses this kind of overlapping caustics, the image numbers change by {+-}4, rather than {+-}2. There are two kinds of caustic images. One is the critical curve and the other is the transition locus. It is found that the image number of the fold is exactly the average value of image numbers on two sides of the fold, while the image number of the cusp is equal to the smaller one. We also focus on the magnification patterns of the quadrupole (m = 2) lenses under the perturbations of m = 3, 4, and 5 mode components and found that one, two, and three butterfly or swallowtail singularities can be produced, respectively. With the increasing intensity of the high-order perturbations, the singularities grow up to bring sixfold image regions. If these perturbations are large enough to let two or three of the butterflies or swallowtails make contact, then eightfold or tenfold image regions can be produced as well. The possible astronomical applications are discussed.

  9. Monte Carlo configuration interaction applied to multipole moments, ionisation energies and electron affinities

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P; Paterson, M J

    2013-01-01

    The method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction (MCCI) [1,2] is applied to the calculation of multipole moments. We look at the ground and excited state dipole moments in carbon monoxide. We then consider the dipole of NO, the quadrupole of the nitrogen molecule and of BH. An octupole of methane is also calculated. We consider experimental geometries and also stretched bonds. We show that these non-variational quantities may be found to relatively good accuracy when compared with FCI results, yet using only a small fraction of the full configuration interaction space. MCCI results in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis are seen to generally have reasonably good agreement with experiment. We also investigate the performance of MCCI when applied to ionisation energies and electron affinities of atoms in an aug-cc-pVQZ basis. We compare the MCCI results with full configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo [3,4] and `exact' non-relativistic results [3,4]. We show that MCCI could be a useful alternative for the calculati...

  10. Solar oscillations, gravitational multipole field of the sun and the solar neutrino paradox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, H.A.; Rosenwald, R.D.

    1986-11-04

    The visual solar oblateness work and the solar seismological work on the internal rotation of the sun are reviewed and their implications concerning the static gravitational multipole moments of the sun are discussed. The results of this work are quite deviant which is indicative of the complexity encountered and of the necessity for continued studies based on a diverse set of observing techniques. The evidence for phase-locked internal gravity modes of the sun is reviewed and the implications for the solar neutrino paradox are discussed. The rather unique possibility for testing the relevance which the phase-locked gravity modes have to this paradox is also noted. The oscillating perturbations in the sun's gravitational field produced by the classified internal gravity modes and the phase-locked modes are inferred from the observed temperature eigenfunctions. Strains of the order of 10/sup -18/ in gravitational radiation detectors based on free masses are inferred for frequencies near 100 ..mu..Hz. The relevance of these findings is discussed in terms of a new technique for use in solar seismological studies and of producing background signals in studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. 64 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Using Huygens Multipole Arrays to Realize Unidirectional Needle-Like Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2017-07-01

    For nearly a century, the concept of needle radiation has captured the attention of the electromagnetics communities in both physics and engineering, with various types of contributions reoccurring every decade. With the near-term needs for highly directive, electrically small radiators and scatterers for a variety of communications and sensor applications, superdirectivity has again become a topic of interest. While it is well known that superdirective solutions exist and suffer ill-posedness issues in principle, a detailed needle solution has not been reported previously. We demonstrate explicitly, for the first time, how needle radiation can be obtained theoretically from currents driven on an arbitrary spherical surface, and we explain why such a result can only be attained in practice with electrically large spheres. On the other hand, we also demonstrate, more practically, how broadside radiating Huygens source multipoles can be combined into an end-fire array configuration to achieve needle-like radiation performance without suffering the traditional problems that have previously plagued superdirectivity.

  12. Conceptual design of a 14 cm period multipole wiggler at PLS

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D E; Suh, H S; Jung, Y G; Park, K H; Bak, J S

    2001-01-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) is developing a Multipole Wiggler (MPW14) to utilize high-energy (approx 30 keV) synchrotron radiation at Pohang Light Source (PLS). The MPW14 is a hybrid type device to achieve maximum peak flux density and wide beam fan that can serve two beamlines. PLS MPW14-features period of 14 cm, minimum gap of 14 mm, 20 full field periods, maximum flux density of 2.06 T, 3036 mm total magnetic structure length. The peak flux density is very high compared to the other wigglers of similar pole gap and the period. The high peak flux density was possible using advanced new magnetic material and optimized magnetic geometry. The MPW14 will be used in hard X-ray region of 10-30 keV at 2.5 GeV electron energy. The total photon power is 6.19 kW and the peak power density is 5.27 kW/mrad sup 2 at 2.5 GeV, 150 mA. To withstand the big magnetic loads with minimum deflections, C-type support structure is designed with detailed FEM structural analysis. In this article, all the conceptual design e...

  13. A Polarizable Atomic Multipole-Based Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Anionic Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huiying; Peng, Xiangda; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Guohui

    2017-12-31

    In all of the classical force fields, electrostatic interaction is simply treated and explicit electronic polarizability is neglected. The condensed-phase polarization, relative to the gas-phase charge distributions, is commonly accounted for in an average way by increasing the atomic charges, which remain fixed throughout simulations. Based on the lipid polarizable force field DMPC and following the same framework as Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for BiomoleculAr (AMOEBA) simulation, the present effort expands the force field to new anionic lipid models, in which the new lipids contain DMPG and POPS. The parameters are compatible with the AMOEBA force field, which includes water, ions, proteins, etc. The charge distribution of each atom is represented by the permanent atomic monopole, dipole and quadrupole moments, which are derived from the ab initio gas phase calculations. Many-body polarization including the inter- and intramolecular polarization is modeled in a consistent manner with distributed atomic polarizabilities. Molecular dynamics simulations of the two aqueous DMPG and POPS membrane bilayer systems, consisting of 72 lipids with water molecules, were then carried out to validate the force field parameters. Membrane width, area per lipid, volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, electron density profile, electrostatic potential difference between the center of the bilayer and water are all calculated, and compared with limited experimental data.

  14. Adaptive effects of the beta2-agonist clenbuterol on expression of beta2-adrenoceptor mRNA in rat fast-twitch fiber-rich muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Nomura, Sachiko; Kawano, Fuuun; Tanihata, Jun; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2010-03-01

    Administration of the beta(2)-agonist clenbuterol has been shown to reduce the expression of beta(2)-adrenoceptor (AR) mRNA in fast-twitch fiber-rich (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) muscle without changing that in slow-twitch fiber-rich (soleus, SOL) muscle in rats. However, the regulatory mechanism for muscle fiber type-dependent down-regulation of the expression of beta(2)-AR mRNA induced by clenbuterol is still unclear. Therefore, mRNA expression of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory factors for beta(2)-AR mRNA levels in fast-twitch fiber-rich (EDL and plantaris, PLA) and slow-twitch fiber-rich (SOL) muscles in clenbuterol-administered (1.0 mg/kg body weight/day for 10 days, subcutaneous) rats was studied by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Administration of clenbuterol significantly reduced expression of beta(2)-AR mRNA in EDL and PLA muscles without changing that in SOL muscle. Administration of clenbuterol also significantly reduced the mRNA expression of transcriptional regulatory factor (glucocorticoid receptor) and mRNA stabilizing factor (Hu antigen R) in EDL and PLA muscles without changing those in SOL muscle. These results suggest that muscle fiber type-dependent effects of clenbuterol on expression of beta(2)-AR mRNA are closely related to the down-regulation of mRNA expression of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory factors for beta(2)-AR mRNA levels.

  15. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Thomas Townsley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing inherent properties of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries.

  16. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y. [Mayo Clinic Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  17. Monte Carlo configuration interaction applied to multipole moments, ionisation energies and electron affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jeremy P; Taylor, Daniel J; Paterson, Martin J

    2013-05-15

    The method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction (MCCI) (Greer, J. Chem. Phys. 1995a, 103, 1821; Tong, Nolan, Cheng, and Greer, Comp. Phys. Comm. 2000, 142, 132) is applied to the calculation of multipole moments. We look at the ground and excited state dipole moments in carbon monoxide. We then consider the dipole of NO, the quadrupole of N2 and of BH. An octupole of methane is also calculated. We consider experimental geometries and also stretched bonds. We show that these nonvariational quantities may be found to relatively good accuracy when compared with full configuration interaction results, yet using only a small fraction of the full configuration interaction space. MCCI results in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis are seen to generally have reasonably good agreement with experiment. We also investigate the performance of MCCI when applied to ionisation energies and electron affinities of atoms in an aug-cc-pVQZ basis. We compare the MCCI results with full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (Booth and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 132, 174104; Cleland, Booth, and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 024112) and "exact" nonrelativistic results (Booth and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 132, 174104; Cleland, Booth, and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 024112). We show that MCCI could be a useful alternative for the calculation of atomic ionisation energies however electron affinities appear much more challenging for MCCI. Due to the small magnitude of the electron affinities their percentage errors can be high, but with regards to absolute errors MCCI performs similarly for ionisation energies and electron affinities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-21

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green's function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4-16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A

  19. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-01

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green's function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4-16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A

  20. Coarse-grained simulations for organic molecular liquids based on Gay-Berne and electric multipole potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peijun; Shen, Hujun; Yang, Lu; Ding, Yang; Li, Beibei; Shao, Ying; Mao, Yingchen; Li, Guohui

    2013-02-01

    Coarse-grained studies of CH(3)SH, CH(3)CHO and CHCl(3) liquids, based on anisotropic Gay-Berne (GB) and electric multipole potentials (EMP), demonstrate that the coarse-grained model is able to qualitatively reproduce the results obtained from the atomistic model (AMOEBA polarizable force field) and allows for significant saving in computation time. It should be pointed out that the accuracy of the coarse-grained model is very sensitive to how well the anisotropic GB particle is defined and how satisfactorily the EMP sites are chosen.

  1. Multi-pole permanent magnet synchronous generator wind turbines' grid support capability in uninterrupted operation during grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Michalke, G.

    2009-01-01

    Emphasis in this paper is on the fault ride-through and grid support capabilities of multi-pole permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) wind turbines with a full-scale frequency converter. These wind turbines are announced to be very attractive, especially for large offshore wind farms...... and discussed by means of simulations with the use of a transmission power system generic model developed and delivered by the Danish Transmission System Operator Energinet.dk. The simulation results show how a PMSG wind farm equipped with an additional voltage control can help a nearby active stall wind farm...

  2. Multipole analysis of IceCube data to search for dark matter accumulated in the Galactic halo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, School of Chemistry and Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Gora, D.; Jacobi, E.; Kaminsky, B.; Karg, T.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Schoenwald, A.; Shanidze, R.; Spiering, C.; Stoessl, A.; Terliuk, A.; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J.; Brown, A.M.; Hickford, S.; Macias, O. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Altmann, D.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T.; Rameez, M.; Vallecorsa, S. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Geneva (Switzerland); Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; BenZvi, S.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Eisch, J.; Fadiran, O.; Feintzeig, J.; Gladstone, L.; Halzen, F.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kopper, C.; Kurahashi, N.; Larsen, D.T.; Maruyama, R.; McNally, F.; Middlemas, E.; Morse, R.; Rees, I.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J.P.; Santander, M.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Santen, J.; Weaver, C.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Danninger, M.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T.C.; De Andre, J.P.A.M.; DeYoung, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Groh, J.C.; Huang, F.; Quinnan, M.; Smith, M.W.E.; Stanisha, N.A.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Blumenthal, J.; Gier, D.; Gretskov, P.; Haack, C.; Hallen, P.; Heinen, D.; Hellwig, D.; Jagielski, K.; Koob, A.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Leuermann, M.; Paul, L.; Penek, Oe.; Puetz, J.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schukraft, A.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wichary, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Zierke, S. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Baum, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Koepke, L.; Kroll, G.; Luenemann, J.; Sander, H.G.; Schatto, K.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Fedynitch, A.; Kroll, M.; Saba, S.M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Unger, E. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Helbing, K.; Hoffmann, R.; Klaes, J.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D.; Tepe, A. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Christy, B.; Felde, J.; Goodman, J.A.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Meagher, K.; Olivas, A.; Redl, P.; Richman, M.; Schmidt, T.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Gross, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Leute, J.; Resconi, E.; Schulz, O.; Sestayo, Y. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Ha, C.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boersma, D.J.; Botner, O.; Euler, S.; Hallgren, A.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Stroem, R.; Taavola, H. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden); Bose, D.; Rott, C. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter which is bound in the Galactic halo might self-annihilate and produce a flux of stable final state particles, e.g. high energy neutrinos. These neutrinos can be detected with IceCube, a cubic-kilometer sized Cherenkov detector. Given IceCube's large field of view, a characteristic anisotropy of the additional neutrino flux is expected. In this paper we describe a multipole method to search for such a large-scale anisotropy in IceCube data. This method uses the expansion coefficients of a multipole expansion of neutrino arrival directions and incorporates signal-specific weights for each expansion coefficient. We apply the technique to a high-purity muon neutrino sample from the Northern Hemisphere. The final result is compatible with the nullhypothesis. As no signal was observed, we present limits on the self-annihilation cross-section averaged over the relative velocity distribution left angle σ{sub A}υ right angle down to 1.9 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a dark matter particle mass of 700-1,000 GeV and direct annihilation into ν anti ν. The resulting exclusion limits come close to exclusion limits from γ-ray experiments, that focus on the outer Galactic halo, for high dark matter masses of a few TeV and hard annihilation channels. (orig.)

  3. Influence of the multipole order of the source on the decay of an inertial wave beam in a rotating fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicoane, Nathanael; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Voisin, Bruno; Moisy, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    Inertial wave beams emitted from localized sources are relevant to a broad range of geo and astrophysical flows. These beams are excited at critical lines, where the local slope of solid boundaries equals the propagation angle of the wave, in rotating fluid domains affected by a global harmonic forcing (e.g. precession, libration, tidal motion). We show here theoretically and experimentally that the decay of the amplitude of such wave beams depends on the multipole order of the source. We analyze the far-field viscous decay of a two-dimensional inertial wave beam emitted by a harmonic line source in a rotating fluid. By identifying the relevant conserved quantities along the wave beam, we show how the beam structure and decay exponent are governed by the multipole order of the source. Two wavemakers are considered experimentally, a pulsating and an oscillating cylinder, aiming to produce a monopole and a dipole source, respectively. The relevant conserved quantity which discriminates between these two sources is the instantaneous flow rate along the wave beam, which is non-zero for the monopole and zero for the dipole. For each source, the beam structure and decay exponent, measured using particle image velocimetry, are found in good agreement with the predictions.

  4. Real-time digital signal recovery for a multi-pole low-pass transfer function system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jhinhwan

    2017-08-01

    In order to solve the problems of waveform distortion and signal delay by many physical and electrical systems with multi-pole linear low-pass transfer characteristics, a simple digital-signal-processing (DSP)-based method of real-time recovery of the original source waveform from the distorted output waveform is proposed. A mathematical analysis on the convolution kernel representation of the single-pole low-pass transfer function shows that the original source waveform can be accurately recovered in real time using a particular moving average algorithm applied on the input stream of the distorted waveform, which can also significantly reduce the overall delay time constant. This method is generalized for multi-pole low-pass systems and has noise characteristics of the inverse of the low-pass filter characteristics. This method can be applied to most sensors and amplifiers operating close to their frequency response limits to improve the overall performance of data acquisition systems and digital feedback control systems.

  5. Real-time digital signal recovery for a multi-pole low-pass transfer function system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jhinhwan

    2017-08-01

    In order to solve the problems of waveform distortion and signal delay by many physical and electrical systems with multi-pole linear low-pass transfer characteristics, a simple digital-signal-processing (DSP)-based method of real-time recovery of the original source waveform from the distorted output waveform is proposed. A mathematical analysis on the convolution kernel representation of the single-pole low-pass transfer function shows that the original source waveform can be accurately recovered in real time using a particular moving average algorithm applied on the input stream of the distorted waveform, which can also significantly reduce the overall delay time constant. This method is generalized for multi-pole low-pass systems and has noise characteristics of the inverse of the low-pass filter characteristics. This method can be applied to most sensors and amplifiers operating close to their frequency response limits to improve the overall performance of data acquisition systems and digital feedback control systems.

  6. The Wisdom of Networks: A General Adaptation and Learning Mechanism of Complex Systems: The Network Core Triggers Fast Responses to Known Stimuli; Innovations Require the Slow Network Periphery and Are Encoded by Core-Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csermely, Peter

    2018-01-01

    I hypothesize that re-occurring prior experience of complex systems mobilizes a fast response, whose attractor is encoded by their strongly connected network core. In contrast, responses to novel stimuli are often slow and require the weakly connected network periphery. Upon repeated stimulus, peripheral network nodes remodel the network core that encodes the attractor of the new response. This "core-periphery learning" theory reviews and generalizes the heretofore fragmented knowledge on attractor formation by neural networks, periphery-driven innovation, and a number of recent reports on the adaptation of protein, neuronal, and social networks. The core-periphery learning theory may increase our understanding of signaling, memory formation, information encoding and decision-making processes. Moreover, the power of network periphery-related "wisdom of crowds" inventing creative, novel responses indicates that deliberative democracy is a slow yet efficient learning strategy developed as the success of a billion-year evolution. Also see the video abstract here: https://youtu.be/IIjP7zWGjVE. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fast care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoppstock Sabrina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The project fast care is working on a real-time capable sensor data analysis-framework in the fields of "Ambient Assisted Living" (AAL, "Human-Technology Interaction" (MTI and "eHealth". The aim is to provide a medical valid - integrated real-time picture of the patient’s situation by using an ad hoc interconnected sensor – actor infrastructure with a latency period of less than 10 ms.

  8. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Protein Helices Reconciled with Three-Centered Hydrogen Bonds and Multipole Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These torsional angles preserve the atomic positions of α-β carbons of the classic Pauling α-helix while allowing the amide carbonyls to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds as first suggested by Némethy et al. in 1967. Molecular dynamics simulations of a capped 12-residue oligoalanine in water with AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications), a second-generation force field that includes multipole electrostatics and polarizability, reproduces the experimentally observed high-resolution helical conformation and correctly reorients the amide-bond carbonyls into bifurcated hydrogen bonds. This simple modification of backbone torsional angles reconciles experimental and theoretical views to provide a unified view of amide three-centered hydrogen bonds as crucial components of protein helices. The reason why they have been overlooked by structural biologists depends on the small crankshaft-like changes in orientation of the amide bond that allows maintenance of the overall helical parameters (helix pitch (p) and residues per turn (n)). The Pauling 3.613 α-helix fits the high-resolution experimental data with the minor exception of the amide-carbonyl electron density, but the previously associated backbone torsional angles (Φ, Ψ) needed slight modification to be reconciled with three-atom centered H-bonds and multipole electrostatics. Thus, a new standard helix, the 3.613/10-, Némethy- or N-helix, is proposed. Due to the use of constraints from monopole

  9. High-resolution crystal structures of protein helices reconciled with three-centered hydrogen bonds and multipole electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Daniel J; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These torsional angles preserve the atomic positions of α-β carbons of the classic Pauling α-helix while allowing the amide carbonyls to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds as first suggested by Némethy et al. in 1967. Molecular dynamics simulations of a capped 12-residue oligoalanine in water with AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications), a second-generation force field that includes multipole electrostatics and polarizability, reproduces the experimentally observed high-resolution helical conformation and correctly reorients the amide-bond carbonyls into bifurcated hydrogen bonds. This simple modification of backbone torsional angles reconciles experimental and theoretical views to provide a unified view of amide three-centered hydrogen bonds as crucial components of protein helices. The reason why they have been overlooked by structural biologists depends on the small crankshaft-like changes in orientation of the amide bond that allows maintenance of the overall helical parameters (helix pitch (p) and residues per turn (n)). The Pauling 3.6(13) α-helix fits the high-resolution experimental data with the minor exception of the amide-carbonyl electron density, but the previously associated backbone torsional angles (Φ, Ψ) needed slight modification to be reconciled with three-atom centered H-bonds and multipole electrostatics. Thus, a new standard helix, the 3.6(13/10)-, Némethy- or N-helix, is proposed. Due to the use of constraints from

  10. Fast fundamental frequency determination via adaptive autocorrelation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staudacher, Michael; Steixner, Viktor; Griessner, Andreas; Zierhofer, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    .... The method is based on an autocorrelation of a signal with a segment of the same signal. During operation, frequency estimates are calculated and the segment is updated whenever a period of the signal is detected...

  11. Experimental verification and analytical approach to influence stator skew on electromagnetic performance of permanent magnet generators with multipole rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang-Young; Jang, Seok-Myeong; Ko, Kyoung-Jin

    2009-04-01

    This paper deals with experimental verification and analytical approach to influence stator skew on electromagnetic performance of a permanent magnet generator (PMG) with multipole rotor. The analytical expressions for magnetic field distributions are due to permanent magnets and the two-dimensional permeance function considering skew effects are established. On the basis of these analytical solutions, the analytical solutions for cogging torque and back-emf considering skew effects are also derived. Then, by applying estimated electrical parameters to a simple equivalent circuit of one phase for the PMG, output performances of the PMG with/without a skewed stator are investigated. Finally, by confirming that all analytical results are validated extensively by nonlinear finite element calculations and measurements, the validity of analysis methods presented in this paper is verified, and the influence stator skew on cogging torque, back-emf, and output performances of the PMG is also clearly described.

  12. Multifunctional all-dielectric nano-optical systems using collective multipole Mie resonances: Towards on-chip integrated nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Chattaraj, Swarnabha

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the optical response of a class of on-chip integrated nano-photonic systems comprising all-dielectric building block based multifunctional light manipulating units (LMU) integrated with quantum dot (QD) light sources. The multiple functions (such as focusing excitation light, QD emission rate enhancement, photon guidance, and lossless propagation) are simultaneously realized using the collective Mie resonances of dipole and higher order multipole modes of the dielectric building blocks (DBBs) constituting a single structural unit, the LMU. Using analytical formulation based on Mie theory we demonstrate enhancement of the excitation light simultaneously with the guiding and propagation of the emitted light from a QD emitter integrated with the DBB based LMU. The QD-DBB integrated structures can serve as the basic element for building nano-optical active circuits for optical information processing in both classical and quantum realms.

  13. Search for dark matter in the galactic halo with a multipole analysis of IceCube data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagla, Martin; Bissok, Martin; Leuermann, Martin; Raedel, Leif; Reimann, Rene; Schimp, Michael; Schoenen, Sebastian; Wiebusch, Christopher [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Self-annihilating or decaying Dark Matter in the galactic halo may contribute to an observable flux of high-energy neutrinos. These neutrinos can be detected with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer-sized Cherenkov detector at the geographic South Pole. This neutrino flux depends on the density of Dark Matter in the direction of sight and exhibits a large-scale anisotropy depending on the angular distance towards the galactic center. In a muon neutrino event sample, such an anisotropy would leave a characteristic imprint on multipole expansion coefficients of the observed set of arrival directions. An initial analysis of data taken with the IceCube 79-string configuration was published by the IceCube Collaboration (arXiv:1406.6868). We investigate possible improvements, e.g. by using energy estimators and extending the analysis to multiple years of data.

  14. Fast food tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High blood pressure - fast food; Hypertension - fast food; Cholesterol - fast food; Hyperlipidemia - fast food ... high-fat items. Dressing, bacon bits, and shredded cheese all add fat and calories. Choose lettuce and ...

  15. Fast mixing condensation nucleus counter

    OpenAIRE

    Flagan, Richard C.; Wang, Jian

    2003-01-01

    A fast mixing condensation nucleus counter useful for detecting particles entrained in a sample gas stream is provided. The fast mixing condensation nucleus counter comprises a detector and a mixing condensation device having a mixing chamber adapted to allow gas to flow from an inlet to an outlet, wherein the outlet directs the gas flow to the detector. The mixing chamber has an inlet for introducing vapor-laden gas into the chamber and at least one nozzle for introducing a sample gas having...

  16. Fast iterative boundary element methods for high-frequency scattering problems in 3D elastodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillat, Stéphanie; Darbas, Marion; Le Louër, Frédérique

    2017-07-01

    The fast multipole method is an efficient technique to accelerate the solution of large scale 3D scattering problems with boundary integral equations. However, the fast multipole accelerated boundary element method (FM-BEM) is intrinsically based on an iterative solver. It has been shown that the number of iterations can significantly hinder the overall efficiency of the FM-BEM. The derivation of robust preconditioners for FM-BEM is now inevitable to increase the size of the problems that can be considered. The main constraint in the context of the FM-BEM is that the complete system is not assembled to reduce computational times and memory requirements. Analytic preconditioners offer a very interesting strategy by improving the spectral properties of the boundary integral equations ahead from the discretization. The main contribution of this paper is to combine an approximate adjoint Dirichlet to Neumann (DtN) map as an analytic preconditioner with a FM-BEM solver to treat Dirichlet exterior scattering problems in 3D elasticity. The approximations of the adjoint DtN map are derived using tools proposed in [40]. The resulting boundary integral equations are preconditioned Combined Field Integral Equations (CFIEs). We provide various numerical illustrations of the efficiency of the method for different smooth and non-smooth geometries. In particular, the number of iterations is shown to be completely independent of the number of degrees of freedom and of the frequency for convex obstacles.

  17. Fasting: molecular mechanisms and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Valter D; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-02-04

    Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but, only recently, studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism, and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity, in part, by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease, and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps reduce obesity, hypertension, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, fasting has the potential to delay aging and help prevent and treat diseases while minimizing the side effects caused by chronic dietary interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fasting: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Valter D.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but only recently studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity in part by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps reduce obesity, hypertension, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, fasting has the potential to delay aging and help prevent and treat diseases while minimizing the side effects caused by chronic dietary interventions. PMID:24440038

  19. Multipole expansion for transient electric and magnetic fields in an internally excited spherical cavity containing dampers of finite thickness with distributed electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B. P.

    1981-10-01

    The multipole expansion coefficients needed to calculate transient electromagnetic fields and cavity frequency response in an internally excited, damped cavity are derived for an arbitrary but centralized distribution of source currents and an arbitrary number of dampers which have finite width. A block matrix procedure is devised to solve the N damper boundary value problems, but specific solutions are presented for the cases of zero, one, and two dampers. Also, the TM wave multipole coefficients for an uncapped biconical antenna used as excitation source are obtained in closed form, with use of Schelkunoff's mode solution for the antenna currents. Finally, coupled integrodifferential equations for the current distribution in the end caps and the conical sections of a capped bicone source are presented. This entire theory will be encoded to permit analysis of AEDC experiments.

  20. A general formula for the rate of resonant transfer of energy between two electric multipole moments of arbitrary order using molecular quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, A

    2005-01-22

    A general expression is derived for the matrix element for the resonant transfer of energy between an initially excited donor species and an acceptor moiety in the ground state, with each entity possessing an electric multipole moment of arbitrary order. In the quantum electrodynamical framework employed, the coupling between the pair is mediated by the exchange of a single virtual photon. The probability amplitude found from second-order perturbation theory is a product of the electric moments located at each center and the resonant multipole-multipole interaction tensor. Using the Fermi golden rule, a general formula for the rate of energy transfer is obtained. As an illustration of the efficacy of the theory developed, rates of excitation energy exchange are calculated for systems interacting through dipole-quadrupole, dipole-octupole, quadrupole-quadrupole, and the familiar dipole-dipole coupling. For each of the cases examined, the near- and far-zone limits of the migration rate are calculated from the result valid for all donor-acceptor separations beyond wave function overlap. Expression of the octupole contribution to the transfer rate in terms of its irreducible components of weights 1 and 3 leads to new features. The octupole weight-1 term is found to contribute only when the interaction is retarded, while the dipole-octupole weight-1 contribution appears as a higher-order correction term to the dipole-dipole rate. Order of magnitude estimates are given for the contributions of dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octupole terms relative to the leading dipole-dipole rate for near-, intermediate-, and far-zone separations to further understand the role played by higher multipole moments in the transfer of excitation and the mechanism dominating the process. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Acoustic multipole sources for the regularized lattice Boltzmann method: Comparison with multiple-relaxation-time models in the inviscid limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Congshan; Sagaut, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a variant of the acoustic multipole source (AMS) method is proposed within the framework of the lattice Boltzmann method. A quadrupole term is directly included in the stress system (equilibrium momentum flux), and the dependency of the quadrupole source in the inviscid limit upon the fortuitous discretization error reported in the works of E. M. Viggen [Phys. Rev. E 87, 023306 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.023306] is removed. The regularized lattice Boltzmann (RLB) method with this variant AMS method is presented for the 2D and 3D acoustic problems in the inviscid limit, and without loss of generality, the D3Q19 model is considered in this work. To assess the accuracy and the advantage of the RLB scheme with this AMS for acoustic point sources, the numerical investigations and comparisons with the multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) models and the analytical solutions are performed on the 2D and 3D acoustic multipole point sources in the inviscid limit, including monopoles, x dipoles, and x x quadrupoles. From the present results, the good precision of this AMS method is validated, and the RLB scheme exhibits some superconvergence properties for the monopole sources compared with the MRT models, and both the RLB and MRT models have the same accuracy for the simulations of acoustic dipole and quadrupole sources. To further validate the capability of the RLB scheme with AMS, another basic acoustic problem, the acoustic scattering from a solid cylinder presented at the Second Computational Aeroacoustics Workshop on Benchmark Problems, is numerically considered. The directivity pattern of the acoustic field is computed at r =7.5 ; the present results agree well with the exact solutions. Also, the effects of slip and no-slip wall treatments within the regularized boundary condition on this pure acoustic scattering problem are tested, and compared with the exact solution, the slip wall treatment can present a better result. All simulations demonstrate that the

  2. An Anisotropic Coarse-Grained Model for Proteins Based On Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hujun; Li, Yan; Ren, Pengyu; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Guohui

    2014-02-10

    Gay-Berne anisotropic potential has been widely used to evaluate the non-bonded interactions between coarse-grained particles being described as elliptical rigid bodies. In this paper, we are presenting a coarse-grained model for twenty kinds of amino acids and proteins, based on the anisotropic Gay-Berne and point electric multipole (EMP) potentials. We demonstrate that the anisotropic coarse-grained model, namely GBEMP model, is able to reproduce many key features observed from experimental protein structures (Dunbrack Library) as well as from atomistic force field simulations (using AMOEBA, AMBER and CHARMM force fields) while saving the computational cost by a factor of about 10~200 depending on specific cases and atomistic models. More importantly, unlike other coarse-grained approaches, our framework is based on the fundamental intermolecular forces with explicit treatment of electrostatic and repulsion-dispersion forces. As a result, the coarse-grained protein model presented an accurate description of non-bonded interactions (particularly electrostatic component) between hetero-/homo-dimers (such as peptide-peptide, peptide-water). In addition, the encouraging performance of the model was reflected by the excellent correlation between GBEMP and AMOEBA models in the calculations of the dipole moment of peptides. In brief, the GBEMP model given here is general and transferable, suitable for simulating complex biomolecular systems.

  3. Toward transferable interatomic van der Waals interactions without electrons: The role of multipole electrostatics and many-body dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereau, Tristan, E-mail: bereau@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany and Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland and Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    We estimate polarizabilities of atoms in molecules without electron density, using a Voronoi tesselation approach instead of conventional density partitioning schemes. The resulting atomic dispersion coefficients are calculated, as well as many-body dispersion effects on intermolecular potential energies. We also estimate contributions from multipole electrostatics and compare them to dispersion. We assess the performance of the resulting intermolecular interaction model from dispersion and electrostatics for more than 1300 neutral and charged, small organic molecular dimers. Applications to water clusters, the benzene crystal, the anti-cancer drug ellipticine—intercalated between two Watson-Crick DNA base pairs, as well as six macro-molecular host-guest complexes highlight the potential of this method and help to identify points of future improvement. The mean absolute error made by the combination of static electrostatics with many-body dispersion reduces at larger distances, while it plateaus for two-body dispersion, in conflict with the common assumption that the simple 1/R{sup 6} correction will yield proper dissociative tails. Overall, the method achieves an accuracy well within conventional molecular force fields while exhibiting a simple parametrization protocol.

  4. GT SD and high multipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decays and astro neutrino nuclear interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) for GT (Gamow Teller), spin dipole (SD) and higher multipole transitions are associated with double beta decays and astro neutrino nuclear interactions. They are reduced with respect to quasi-particle (QP) NMEs by a factor k ≈ 0.2-0.3. The reduction coefficient k is discussed in terms of the nucleonic spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic nuclear medium effects. The latter may be incorporated by the effective (quenching) factor gAe f f/gAf r e e . The SD NMEs derived from the (3He,t) charge exchange reactions (CERs) are consistent with the empirical NMEs M(S D) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant k. The SD NMEs derived from CERs are reduced uniformly in the wide momentum range of q ≈20-100 MeV/c. Impacts of the universal reduction(quenching) on NMEs for neutrino-less DBDs and low and medium energy astro neutrinos are discussed.

  5. Fast Poisson Solvers for Self-Consistent Beam-Beam and Space-Charge Field Computation in Multiparticle Tracking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    We present two different approaches to solve the 2-dimensional electrostatic problem with open boundary conditions to be used in fast tracking codes for beam-beam and space charge simulations in high energy accelerators. We compare a fast multipoles method with a hybrid Poisson solver based on the fast Fourier transform and finite differences in polar coordinates. We show that the latter outperforms the first in terms of execution time and precision, allowing for a reduction of the noise in the tracking simulation. Furthermore the new algorithm is shown to scale linearly on parallel architectures with shared memory. We conclude by effectively replacing the HFMM by the new Poisson solver in the COMBI code.

  6. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  7. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Lawrence

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU’s Not Unix Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics makes FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format. Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  8. Viewer preferences for adaptive playout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sachin

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive media playout techniques are used to avoid buffer underflow in a dynamic streaming environment where the available bandwidth may be fluctuating. In this paper we report human perceptions from audio quality studies that we performed on speech and music samples for adaptive audio playout. Test methods based on ITU-R BS. 1534-1 recommendation were used. Studies were conducted for both slow playout and fast playout. Two scales - a coarse scale and a finer scale was used for the slow and fast audio playout factors. Results from our study can be used to determine acceptable slow and fast playout factors for speech and music content. An adaptive media playout algorithm could use knowledge of these upper and lower bounds on playback speeds to decide its adaptive playback schedule.

  9. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Angeler

    Full Text Available The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011 data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  10. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  11. Fast algorithm for transient current through open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, King Tai; Fu, Bin; Yu, Zhizhou; Wang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Transient current calculation is essential to study the response time and capture the peak transient current for preventing meltdown of nanochips in nanoelectronics. Its calculation is known to be extremely time consuming with the best scaling T N3 where N is the dimension of the device and T is the number of time steps. The dynamical response of the system is usually probed by sending a steplike pulse and monitoring its transient behavior. Here, we provide a fast algorithm to study the transient behavior due to the steplike pulse. This algorithm consists of two parts: algorithm I reduces the computational complexity to T0N3 for large systems as long as T fast multipole technique and achieves scaling T0N3 whenever T

  12. Stem Cells Matter in Response to Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badi Sri Sailaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular processes underlying intestinal adaptation to fasting and re-feeding remain largely uncharacterized. In this issue of Cell Reports, Richmond et al. report that dormant intestinal stem cells are regulated by PTEN and nutritional status.

  13. A fast integral equation based scheme for computing magneto-static fields and its application to NDE problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Shanker, B.; Udpa, L.

    2001-04-01

    Integral equation (IE)-based techniques have been widely used for computing the magneto-static field in both the linear and non-linear regime. One disadvantage of IE-based techniques is that they result in dense matrices, the solution of which is computationally prohibitive. Indeed, both the computational time and memory scale as O(N2), where N is the number of spatial unknowns that the body is discretized into. The computational complexity has been the primary hurdle towards the popularity of such solvers. Our goal is to develop a fast solution scheme for magneto-static field computations. In this paper, a novel integral equation formulation has been used and a version of the fast multipole algorithm has been incorporated in the overall solution procedure.

  14. HCUP Fast Stats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HCUP Fast Stats provides easy access to the latest HCUP-based statistics for health information topics. HCUP Fast Stats uses visual statistical displays in...

  15. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  16. Fast food (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  17. Fast food tips (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  18. Physiology of Ramadan fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Shokoufeh Bonakdaran

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emphasis of Islam on the importance of fasting, Muslims attempt to fast from dawn until sunset during the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting is associated with several benefits for normal and healthy individuals. However, it could pose high risks to the health of diabetic patients due to certain physiological changes. This study aimed to compare the physiological changes associated with fasting in healthy individuals and diabetic patients during Ramadan. Furthermore, we reviewed t...

  19. Is fast food addictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  20. Ramadan, fasting and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Urfan Zahoor; Lykke, Jacob Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In Islam, the month of Ramadan is a period of fasting lasting 29 or 30 days. Epidemiological studies among Muslims in Denmark have not been conducted, but studies show, that fasting among pregnant Muslim women is common. Fasting does not increase the risk of growth restriction or preterm delivery...

  1. An anisotropic coarse-grained model based on Gay-Berne and electric multipole potentials and its application to simulate a DMPC bilayer in an implicit solvent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hujun; Li, Yan; Xu, Peijun; Li, Xiaofang; Chu, Huiying; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Guohui

    2015-06-05

    In this work, we aim at optimizing the performance of the anisotropic GBEMP model, which adopts a framework by combining a Gay-Berne (GB) anisotropic potential with an electric multipole (EMP) potential, in simulating a DMPC lipid bilayer in an implicit solvent model. First, the Gay-Berne parameters were initially obtained by fitting to atomistic profiles of van der Waals interactions between homodimers of molecular fragments while EMP parameters was directly derived from the expansion of point multipoles at predefined EMP sites. Second, the GB and EMP parameters for DMPC molecule were carefully optimized to be comparable to AMBER atomistic model in the calculations of the dipole moments of DMPC monomers adopting different conformations as well as the nonbonded interactions between two DMPC molecules adopting different conformations and separated at various distances. Finally, the GB parameters for DMPC were slightly adjusted in simulating a 72 DMPC bilayer system so that our GBEMP model would be able to reproduce a few important structural properties, namely, thickness (DHH), area per lipid ( AL) and volume per lipid ( VL). Meanwhile, the atomistic and experimental results for electron density profiles and order parameters were reproduced reasonably well by the GBEMP model, demonstrating the promising feature of GBEMP model in modeling lipid systems. Finally, we have shown that current GBEMP model is more efficient by a factor of about 25 than AMBER atomistic point charge model. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Adaptation and implementation of the TRACE code for transient analysis on designs of cooled lead fast reactors; Adaptacion y aplicacion del codigo TRACE para el analisis de transitorios en disenos de reactores rapidos refrigerados por plomo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, A.; Ammirabile, L.; Martorell, S.

    2014-07-01

    The article describes the changes implemented in the TRACE code to include thermodynamic tables of liquid lead drawn from experimental results. He then explains the process for developing a thermohydraulic model for the prototype ALFRED and analysis of a selection of representative transient conducted within the framework of international research projects. The study demonstrates the applicability of TRACE code to simulate designs of cooled lead fast reactors and exposes the high safety margins are there in this technology to accommodate the most severe transients identified in their security study. (Author)

  3. ZARA-INDITEX AND THE GROWTH OF FAST FASHION

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie O. Crofton; Luis G. Dopico

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the “fastfashion” model, its historical development, and its prospects. Fast fashion departs from traditional norms of designer-led fashion seasons, using instead designers who adapt their creations to customer demands on an ongoing basis. From its origins in Galicia, Spain, in the 1960s fast fashion changed the fashion industry. With annual sales of $8 billion in 2005, Inditex, the leading practitioner of fast fashion, is now the second-largest fashion company in the worl...

  4. Ramadan, faste og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Urfan Zahoor; Lykke, Jacob Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In Islam, the month of Ramadan is a period of fasting lasting 29 or 30 days. Epidemiological studies among Muslims in Denmark have not been conducted, but studies show, that fasting among pregnant Muslim women is common. Fasting does not increase the risk of growth restriction or preterm delivery......, but there are reports of decreased foetal movements. Furthermore, the fasting may have long-term health consequences for the offspring, especially when they reach their middle age. According to Islam and the interpretation, pregnant and breast-feeding women are allowed to postpone the fasting of the month of Ramadan...

  5. Adaptation and implementation of the TRACE code for transient analysis in designs lead cooled fast reactors; Adaptacion y aplicacion del codigo TRACE para el analisis de transitorios en disenos de reactores rapidos refrigerados por plomo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, A.; Ammirabile, L.; Martorell, S.

    2015-07-01

    Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) has been identified as one of promising future reactor concepts in the technology road map of the Generation IVC International Forum (GIF)as well as in the Deployment Strategy of the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII), both aiming at improved sustainability, enhanced safety, economic competitiveness, and proliferation resistance. This new nuclear reactor concept requires the development of computational tools to be applied in design and safety assessments to confirm improved inherent and passive safety features of this design. One approach to this issue is to modify the current computational codes developed for the simulation of Light Water Reactors towards their applicability for the new designs. This paper reports on the performed modifications of the TRACE system code to make it applicable to LFR safety assessments. The capabilities of the modified code are demonstrated on series of benchmark exercises performed versus other safety analysis codes. (Author)

  6. Performance of Fast AMC in E-UTRAN Uplink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosa, Claudio; López Villa, Dimas; Úbeda Castellanos, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Evolved (E-) UTRA is currently being standardized as a long term evolution (LTE) of the 3GPP radio access technology. One of the goals of E-UTRA is to achieve 2-4 times the spectral efficiency and user throughputs compared to HSUPA/HSDPA [1]. Support for fast link adaptation based on adaptive mod...

  7. Modeling the Performance of Fast Mulipole Method on HPC platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2012-04-06

    The current trend in high performance computing is pushing towards exascale computing. To achieve this exascale performance, future systems will have between 100 million and 1 billion cores assuming gigahertz cores. Currently, there are many efforts studying the hardware and software bottlenecks for building an exascale system. It is important to understand and meet these bottlenecks in order to attain 10 PFLOPS performance. On applications side, there is an urgent need to model application performance and to understand what changes need to be made to ensure continued scalability at this scale. Fast multipole methods (FMM) were originally developed for accelerating N-body problems for particle based methods. Nowadays, FMM is more than an N-body solver, recent trends in HPC have been to use FMMs in unconventional application areas. FMM is likely to be a main player in exascale due to its hierarchical nature and the techniques used to access the data via a tree structure which allow many operations to happen simultaneously at each level of the hierarchy. In this thesis , we discuss the challenges for FMM on current parallel computers and future exasclae architecture. Furthermore, we develop a novel performance model for FMM. Our ultimate aim of this thesis is to ensure the scalability of FMM on the future exascale machines.

  8. The effects of fasting on physiological status and gene expression; an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Afzal Javan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction through ingesting no or minimal amounts of food and caloric beverages for periods of time is called fasting. Fasting can affect body through changing in physical and metabolic adaptations, as well as mineral and hormonal status. However, psychological effects and sometimes medical complications are likely in case of inappropriate fasting. Fasting is associated with changes in expression of different genes and signaling pathways. In this brief review, physiological effects of fasting, affected pathways during fasting and potential applications of fasting are discussed.

  9. Islamic fasting and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Fereidoun

    2010-01-01

    Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset during the month of Ramadan, the 9th lunar month. The duration of fasting varies from 13 to 18 h/day. Fasting includes avoidance of drinking liquids and eating foods. The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting. Related abstracts from 1960 to 2009 were obtained from Medline and local journals in Islamic countries. One hundred and thirteen articles meeting the criteria for paper selection were reviewed in depth to identify details of related materials. During the fasting days of Ramadan glucose homeostasis is maintained by meals taken before dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and depend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well-controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting, but fasting is not recommended for type 1, noncompliant, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. There are no adverse effects of Ramadan fasting on the heart, lung, liver, kidney, eyes, hematologic profile, endocrine and neuropsychiatric functions. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals, those with various diseases should consult their physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  10. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases......Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...

  11. Experimental verification and analytical approach to cogging torque calculation and reduction of permanent magnet generators with multipole rotor for wind power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang-Young; Jang, Seok-Myeong

    2008-04-01

    This paper deals with the experimental verification and analytical approach to cogging torque calculation and reduction of permanent magnet generators (PMGs) with multipole rotor for wind power applications. Using energy methods with Fourier series expansion, cogging torque is analytically determined with air-gap flux density due to permanent magnets (PMs) and two-dimensional permeance function. The analytical results are validated extensively by nonlinear finite element (FE) results for various values of pole arc ratio (αp) of PMs. It shows that there exists optimum αp which minimizes cogging torque. However, we confirm that measured value for cogging torque of the PMG with optimum αp is twice higher than predicted value. The reason for an error between measured and predicted cogging torques is discussed fully in terms of a shape of PMs and is proved experimentally. The influence of stator skew on cogging torque is also presented using analytical, nonlinear FE and experimental methods.

  12. The impact of new polarization data from Bonn, Mainz and Jefferson Laboratory on γp → πN multipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisovich, A.V.; Nikonov, V.; Sarantsev, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der, Bonn (Germany); PNPI, NRS ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Beck, R.; Gottschall, M.; Hartmann, J.; Klempt, E.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Wunderlich, Y. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der, Bonn (Germany); Doering, M. [George Washington University, Department of Physics, Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kashevarov, V.; Ostrick, M.; Tiator, L. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Meissner, Ulf G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Bonn, Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, JARA FAME and JARA HPC, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Roenchen, D. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Bonn, Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Strakovsky, I.; Workman, R. [George Washington University, Department of Physics, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-15

    New data on pion-photoproduction off the proton have been included in the partial-wave analyses Bonn-Gatchina and SAID and in the dynamical coupled-channel approach Juelich-Bonn. All reproduce the recent new data well: the double-polarization data for E, G, H, P and T in γp → π{sup 0}p from ELSA, the beam asymmetry Σ for γp → π{sup 0}p and π{sup +}n from Jefferson Laboratory, and the precise new differential cross section and beam asymmetry data Σ for γp → π{sup 0}p from MAMI. The new fit results for the multipoles are compared with predictions not taking into account the new data. The mutual agreement is improved considerably but still far from being perfect. (orig.)

  13. [Medical aspects of fasting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrankapetanović, F

    1997-01-01

    Fasting (arabic-savm) was proclaimed through islam, and thus it is an obligation for Holly Prophet Muhammad s.a.v.s.-Peace be to Him-in the second year after Hijra (in 624 after Milad-born of Isa a.s.). There is a month of fasting-Ramadan-each lunar (hijra) year. So, it was 1415th fasting this year. Former Prophets have brought obligative messages on fasting to their people; so there are also certain forms of fasting with other religions i.e. with Catholics, Jews, Orthodox. These kinds of fasting above differ from muslim fasting, but they also appear obligative. All revelations have brought fasting as obligative. From medical point of view, fasting has two basical components: psychical and physical. Psychical sphere correlate closely with its fundamental ideological message. Allah dz.s. says in Quran: "... Fasting is obligative for you, as it was obligative to your precedents, as to avoid sins; during very few days (II, II, 183 & 184)." Will strength, control of passions, effort and self-discipline makes a pure faithfull person, who purify its mind and body through fasting. Thinking about The Creator is more intensive, character is more solid; and spirit and will get stronger. We will mention the hadith saying: "Essaihune humus saimun!" That means: "Travellers at the Earth are fasters (of my ummet)." The commentary of this hadith, in the Collection of 1001 hadiths (Bin bir hadis), number 485, says: "There are no travelling dervishs or monks in islam; thus there is no such a kind of relligousity in islam. In stead, it is changed by fasting and constant attending of mosque. That was proclaimed as obligation, although there were few cases of travelling in the name of relligousity, like travelling dervishs and sheichs." In this paper, the author discusses medical aspects of fasting and its positive characteristics in the respect of healthy life style and prevention of many sicks. The author mentions positive influence of fasting to certain system and organs of human

  14. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Airfoil-based electromagnetic energy harvester containing parallel array motion between moving coil and multi-pole magnets towards enhanced power density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Ming; Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, the airfoil-based electromagnetic energy harvester containing parallel array motion between moving coil and trajectory matching multi-pole magnets was investigated. The magnets were aligned in an alternatively magnetized formation of 6 magnets to explore enhanced power density. In particular, the magnet array was positioned in parallel to the trajectory of the tip coil within its tip deflection span. The finite element simulations of the magnetic flux density and induced voltages at an open circuit condition were studied to find the maximum number of alternatively magnetized magnets that was required for the proposed energy harvester. Experimental results showed that the energy harvester with a pair of 6 alternatively magnetized linear magnet arrays was able to generate an induced voltage (Vo) of 20 V, with an open circuit condition, and 475 mW, under a 30 Ω optimal resistance load operating with the wind speed (U) at 7 m/s and a natural bending frequency of 3.54 Hz. Compared to the traditional electromagnetic energy harvester with a single magnet moving through a coil, the proposed energy harvester, containing multi-pole magnets and parallel array motion, enables the moving coil to accumulate a stronger magnetic flux in each period of the swinging motion. In addition to the comparison made with the airfoil-based piezoelectric energy harvester of the same size, our proposed electromagnetic energy harvester generates 11 times more power output, which is more suitable for high-power-density energy harvesting applications at regions with low environmental frequency.

  16. Fast protein folding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  17. Islamic Fasting and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Azizi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting in normal individuals and diabetics. During fasting days of Ramadan, glucose homeostasis is maintained by meal taken bepore dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and defend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting; but fasting is not recommended for type 1, non complaint, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals and well controlled diabetics, those with uncontrolled diabetics and diabetics with complications should consult physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  18. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  19. Protective effect of intermittent fasting on the mortality of gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubik, A.; Pospisil, M.

    1982-12-01

    The effect of 1 to 6 weeks' adaptation to intermittent fasting (alternating periods of 24 h fasting and subsequent 24 h feeding) on the manifestations of radioresistance of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation was studied. A favourable effect of this feeding regimen on the survival of irradiated animals was observed. The optimal redioprotective effect was achieved in mice adapted to intermittent fasting for 2 to 3 weeks and irradiated after 24 h of food intake. Furthermore, it was shown that the radioresistance of the adapted organism depends on the momentary state of food intake. After renewal of the normal ad libitum feeding the adaptively induced radioresistance decreases.

  20. Fast methods for long-range interactions in complex systems. Lecture notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutmann, Godehard; Gibbon, Paul; Lippert, Thomas (eds.)

    2011-10-13

    Parallel computing and computer simulations of complex particle systems including charges have an ever increasing impact in a broad range of fields in the physical sciences, e.g. in astrophysics, statistical physics, plasma physics, material sciences, physical chemistry, and biophysics. The present summer school, funded by the German Heraeus-Foundation, took place at the Juelich Supercomputing Centre from 6 - 10 September 2010. The focus was on providing an introduction and overview over different methods, algorithms and new trends for the computational treatment of long-range interactions in particle systems. The Lecture Notes contain an introduction into particle simulation, as well as five different fast methods, i.e. the Fast Multipole Method, Barnes-Hut Tree Method, Multigrid, FFT based methods, and Fast Summation using the non-equidistant FFT. In addition to introducing the methods, efficient parallelization of the methods is presented in detail. This publication was edited at the Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) which is an integral part of the Institute for Advanced Simulation (IAS). The IAS combines the Juelich simulation sciences and the supercomputer facility in one organizational unit. It includes those parts of the scientific institutes at Forschungszentrum Juelich which use simulation on supercomputers as their main research methodology. (orig.)

  1. Practical adaptive quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granade, Christopher; Ferrie, Christopher; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-11-01

    We introduce a fast and accurate heuristic for adaptive tomography that addresses many of the limitations of prior methods. Previous approaches were either too computationally intensive or tailored to handle special cases such as single qubits or pure states. By contrast, our approach combines the efficiency of online optimization with generally applicable and well-motivated data-processing techniques. We numerically demonstrate these advantages in several scenarios including mixed states, higher-dimensional systems, and restricted measurements. http://cgranade.com complete data and source code for this work are available online [1], and can be previewed at https://goo.gl/koiWxR.

  2. Fast mutual-information-based contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Yu, Lifang; Tian, Huawei; Huang, Xianglin; Wang, Yongbin

    2017-07-01

    Recently, T. Celik proposed an effective image contrast enhancement (CE) method based on spatial mutual information and PageRank (SMIRANK). According to the state-of-the-art evaluation criteria, it achieves the best visual enhancement quality among existing global CE methods. However, SMIRANK runs much slower than the other counterparts, such as histogram equalization (HE) and adaptive gamma correction. Low computational complexity is also required for good CE algorithms. In this paper, we novelly propose a fast SMIRANK algorithm, called FastSMIRANK. It integrates both spatial and gray-level downsampling into the generation of pixel value mapping function. Moreover, the computation of rank vectors is speeded up by replacing PageRank with a simple yet efficient row-based operation of mutual information matrix. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed FastSMIRANK could accelerate the processing speed of SMIRANK by about 20 times, and is even faster than HE. Comparable enhancement quality is preserved simultaneously.

  3. ADAPT Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) Project Lead: Scott Poll Subject Fault diagnosis in electrical power systems Description The Advanced...

  4. Adaptive skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staša Stropnik

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive skills are defined as a collection of conceptual, social and practical skills that are learned by people in order to function in their everyday lives. They include an individual's ability to adapt to and manage her or his surroundings to effectively function and meet social or community expectations. Good adaptive skills promote individual's independence in different environments, whereas poorly developed adaptive skills are connected to individual's dependency and with greater need for control and help with everyday tasks. Assessment of adaptive skills is often connected to assessment of intellectual disability, due to the reason that the diagnosis of intellectual disability includes lower levels of achievements on standardized tests of intellectual abilities as well as important deficits in adaptive skills. Assessment of adaptive behavior is a part of standard assessment battery with children and adults with different problems, disorders or disabilities that affect their everyday functioning. This contribution also presents psychometric tools most regularly used for assessment of adaptive skills and characteristics of adaptive skills with individual clinical groups.

  5. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  6. Brug af faste vendinger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Bjærge, Esben

    Ordbogen indelholder tekstproduktionsangivelser til ca. 17.000 idiomer, ordsprog, bevingede ord og andre faste vendinger. Det drejer sig bl.a. om angivelser til betydningen, grammatik, kollokationer, eksempler, synonymer og antonymer....

  7. CMS Fast Facts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has developed a new quick reference statistical summary on annual CMS program and financial data. CMS Fast Facts includes summary information on total program...

  8. Ramadan fasting in pregnancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sim Tin; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2015-01-01

      [1] Firouzbakht et al. reported that "Midwifes and other health workers need to learn as much as possible about the multicultural best practices and research-driven information about fasting in order to help Muslim women...

  9. Calorie count - fast food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000887.htm Calorie count - fast food To use the sharing features on this page, ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  10. Pregnancy and fasting in women with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Faruque

    2015-05-01

    Fasting during the Holy month of Ramadan is one of the obligatory prayer for all normal healthy Muslims. There are a few special situations as pregnant and breastfeeding women, who are exempted from fasting. Different surveys observed that 70-90% pregnant women prefer not to accept this fiqh. A complex series of metabolic and hormonal changes occur in pregnancy and this is augmented from fed to starvation stage during fasting from dawn to sunset. Adaptive metabolism is established by balance of insulin and other counter- regulatory hormones. This adaptive metabolism is decompensated by relative or absolute lack of insulin and exaggerated insulin resistance (IR) on preexisting defect altered by foeto-placental hormones. Thus in both fasting and fed states high blood glucose, triglycerides, free fatty acids and ketones are encountered. Unregulated fat catabolism with increased FFA and ketones can alter embryonic and foetal development. There is no definite consensus guideline on how to manage blood glucose during fasting in pregnant women with diabetes. Most authors advocate insulin therapy to manage diabetes. Pregnant women with diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan must be aware of symptoms and signs of foetal and maternal distress, and must terminate the fast if these occur. More practical approach, with empathy, might be helpful instead of imposing absolute ban on fasting in women with pregnancy and diabetes.

  11. Fasting and Urinary Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fasting is considered as one of the most important practices of Islam, and according to Prophet Mohammad, fasting is obligatory upon Muslims. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of fasting on urinary stones. Materials and Methods: Very few studies have been carried out on urinary stones and the effect of Ramadan fasting. The sources of the present study are Medline and articles presented by local and Muslim researchers. Meanwhile, since we are acquainted with three well-known researchers in the field of urology, we contacted them via email and asked for their professional opinions. Results: The results of studies about the relationship of urinary stones and their incidence in Ramadan are not alike, and are even sometimes contradictory. Some believe that increased incidence of urinary stones in Ramadan is related not to fasting, but to the rise of weather temperature in hot months, and an increase in humidity. Conclusion: Numerous biological and behavioral changes occur in people who fast in Ramadan and some researchers believe that urinary stone increases during this month.

  12. Fasting and urinary stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fasting is considered as one of the most important practices of Islam, and according to Prophet Mohammad, fasting is obligatory upon Muslims. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of fasting on urinary stones. Materials and Methods:Very few studies have been carried out on urinary stones and the effect of Ramadan fasting. The sources of the present study are Medline and articles presented by local and Muslim researchers. Meanwhile, since we are acquainted with three well-known researchers in the field  of urology, we contacted them via email and asked for their professional opinions. Results:The results of studies about the relationship of urinary stones and their incidence in Ramadan are not alike, and are even sometimes contradictory. Some believe that increased incidence of urinary stones in Ramadan is related not to fasting, but to the rise of weather temperature in hot months, and an increase in humidity. Conclusion: Numerous biological and behavioral changes occur in people who fast in Ramadan and some researchers believe that urinary stone increases during this month.

  13. Adaptive Controller Effects on Pilot Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.; Hempley, Lucas E.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive control provides robustness and resilience for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic. Some of the recent flight experiences of pilot-in-the-loop with an adaptive controller have exhibited unpredicted interactions. In retrospect, this is not surprising once it is realized that there are now two adaptive controllers interacting, the software adaptive control system and the pilot. An experiment was conducted to categorize these interactions on the pilot with an adaptive controller during control surface failures. One of the objectives of this experiment was to determine how the adaptation time of the controller affects pilots. The pitch and roll errors, and stick input increased for increasing adaptation time and during the segment when the adaptive controller was adapting. Not surprisingly, altitude, cross track and angle deviations, and vertical velocity also increase during the failure and then slowly return to pre-failure levels. Subjects may change their behavior even as an adaptive controller is adapting with additional stick inputs. Therefore, the adaptive controller should adapt as fast as possible to minimize flight track errors. This will minimize undesirable interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controller and maintain maneuvering precision.

  14. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: Analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-01

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ˜ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  15. Ambiguous Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Lyngsie, Jacob

    We investigate why some exchange relationships terminate prematurely. We argue that investments in informal governance structures induce premature termination in relationships already governed by formal contracts. The formalized adaptive behavior of formal governance structures and the flexible...... and reciprocal adaptation of informal governance structure create ambiguity in situations of contingencies, which, subsequently, increases the likelihood of premature relationship termination. Using a large sample of exchange relationships in the global service provider industry, we find support for a hypothesis...

  16. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan: does it affect sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Ahmed S; Almushailhi, Khalid; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M

    2014-02-01

    Islamic intermittent fasting is distinct from regular voluntary or experimental fasting. We hypothesised that if a regimen of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake is followed during intermittent fasting, the effects of fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness will be minimal. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of Islamic intermittent fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness. Eight healthy volunteers reported to the Sleep Disorders Centre on five occasions for polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests: (1) during adaptation; (2) 3 weeks before Ramadan, after having performed Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting); (3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline); (4) 2 weeks into Ramadan (Ramadan); and (5) 2 weeks after Ramadan (non-fasting; Recovery). Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the multiple sleep latency test. The participants had a mean age of 26.6 ± 4.9 years, a body mass index of 23.7 ± 3.5 kg m(-2) and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 7.3 ± 2.7. There was no change in weight or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in the four study periods. The rapid eye movement sleep percentage was significantly lower during fasting. There was no difference in sleep latency, non-rapid eye movement sleep percentage, arousal index and sleep efficiency. The multiple sleep latency test analysis revealed no difference in the sleep latency between the 'non-fasting baseline', 'baseline fasting', 'Ramadan' and 'Recovery' time points. Under conditions of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake, Islamic intermittent fasting results in decreased rapid eye movement sleep with no impact on other sleep stages, the arousal index or daytime sleepiness. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  17. Fast and ultrafast endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the main endocytic pathway supporting housekeeping functions in cells. However, CME may be too slow to internalize proteins from the cell surface during certain physiological processes such as reaction to stress hormones ('fight-or-flight' reaction), chemotaxis or compensatory endocytosis following exocytosis of synaptic vesicles or hormone-containing vesicles. These processes take place on a millisecond to second timescale and thus require very rapid cellular reaction to prevent overstimulation or exhaustion of the response. There are several fast endocytic processes identified so far: macropinocytosis, activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ABDE), fast-endophilin-mediated endocytosis (FEME), kiss-and-run and ultrafast endocytosis. All are clathrin-independent and are not constitutively active but may use different molecular mechanisms to rapidly remove receptors and proteins from the cell surface. Here, we review our current understanding of fast and ultrafast endocytosis, their functions, and molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adopting preoperative fasting guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan; Comrie, Rhonda

    2009-07-01

    In 1999, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted preoperative fasting guidelines to enhance the quality and efficiency of patient care. Guidelines suggest that healthy, non-pregnant patients should fast six hours from solids and two hours from liquids. Although these guidelines are in place, studies suggest that providers are still using the blanket statement "NPO after midnight" without regard to patient characteristics, the procedure, or the time of the procedure. Using theory to help change provider's beliefs may help make change more successful. Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations can assist in changing long-time practice by laying the groundwork for an analysis of the benefits and disadvantages of proposed changes, such as changes to fasting orders, while helping initiate local protocols instead of additional national guidelines.

  19. The fast code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads on a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees of freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting, occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good. (au)

  20. ZARA-INDITEX AND THE GROWTH OF FAST FASHION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie O. Crofton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the “fastfashion” model, its historical development, and its prospects. Fast fashion departs from traditional norms of designer-led fashion seasons, using instead designers who adapt their creations to customer demands on an ongoing basis. From its origins in Galicia, Spain, in the 1960s fast fashion changed the fashion industry. With annual sales of $8 billion in 2005, Inditex, the leading practitioner of fast fashion, is now the second-largest fashion company in the world and operates over 2,700 stores in over sixty countries. As Inditex grows, many other fashion companies are copying its unique business model.

  1. A Fast Hermite Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibon, Gregory; Rockmore, Daniel N; Park, Wooram; Taintor, Robert; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2008-12-17

    We present algorithms for fast and stable approximation of the Hermite transform of a compactly supported function on the real line, attainable via an application of a fast algebraic algorithm for computing sums associated with a three-term relation. Trade-offs between approximation in bandlimit (in the Hermite sense) and size of the support region are addressed. Numerical experiments are presented that show the feasibility and utility of our approach. Generalizations to any family of orthogonal polynomials are outlined. Applications to various problems in tomographic reconstruction, including the determination of protein structure, are discussed.

  2. fastNGSadmix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørsboe, Emil; Hanghøj, Kristian Ebbesen; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Motivation Estimation of admixture proportions and principal component analysis (PCA) are fundamental tools in populations genetics. However, applying these methods to low- or mid-depth sequencing data without taking genotype uncertainty into account can introduce biases. Results Here we present...... at low sequencing depth and corrects for the biases introduced by small reference populations....... fastNGSadmix, a tool to fast and reliably estimate admixture proportions and perform PCA from next generation sequencing data of a single individual. The analyses are based on genotype likelihoods of the input sample and a set of predefined reference populations. The method has high accuracy, even...

  3. Moms og fast ejendom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    I artiklen gives et overblik over, hvorledes fast ejendom behandles momsmæssigt. Derfor findes en kort skitsering af reglerne for moms på byggearbejder, afgrænsningen mellem momspligtig og momsfri udlejning, muligheden for frivillig registrering af udlejning samt opgørelse af reguleringsforpligte......I artiklen gives et overblik over, hvorledes fast ejendom behandles momsmæssigt. Derfor findes en kort skitsering af reglerne for moms på byggearbejder, afgrænsningen mellem momspligtig og momsfri udlejning, muligheden for frivillig registrering af udlejning samt opgørelse af...

  4. ATLAS Fast Physics Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Koeneke, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is recording data from proton-proton collisions with 7 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2010. The integrated luminosity has grown nearly exponentially since then and continues to rise fast. The ATLAS collaboration has set up a framework to automatically run over the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2-3 days after data taking). Hints of potentially interesting physics signals obtained this way are followed up by physics groups.

  5. Robust Diagnosis Method Based on Parameter Estimation for an Interturn Short-Circuit Fault in Multipole PMSM under High-Speed Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jewon Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a diagnosis method for a multipole permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM under an interturn short circuit fault. Previous works in this area have suffered from the uncertainties of the PMSM parameters, which can lead to misdiagnosis. The proposed method estimates the q-axis inductance (Lq of the faulty PMSM to solve this problem. The proposed method also estimates the faulty phase and the value of G, which serves as an index of the severity of the fault. The q-axis current is used to estimate the faulty phase, the values of G and Lq. For this reason, two open-loop observers and an optimization method based on a particle-swarm are implemented. The q-axis current of a healthy PMSM is estimated by the open-loop observer with the parameters of a healthy PMSM. The Lq estimation significantly compensates for the estimation errors in high-speed operation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can estimate the faulty phase, G, and Lq besides exhibiting robustness against parameter uncertainties.

  6. Robust Diagnosis Method Based on Parameter Estimation for an Interturn Short-Circuit Fault in Multipole PMSM under High-Speed Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jewon; Moon, Seokbae; Jeong, Hyeyun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-11-20

    This paper proposes a diagnosis method for a multipole permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) under an interturn short circuit fault. Previous works in this area have suffered from the uncertainties of the PMSM parameters, which can lead to misdiagnosis. The proposed method estimates the q-axis inductance (Lq) of the faulty PMSM to solve this problem. The proposed method also estimates the faulty phase and the value of G, which serves as an index of the severity of the fault. The q-axis current is used to estimate the faulty phase, the values of G and Lq. For this reason, two open-loop observers and an optimization method based on a particle-swarm are implemented. The q-axis current of a healthy PMSM is estimated by the open-loop observer with the parameters of a healthy PMSM. The Lq estimation significantly compensates for the estimation errors in high-speed operation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can estimate the faulty phase, G, and Lq besides exhibiting robustness against parameter uncertainties.

  7. Comparison of Langmuir probe and multipole resonance probe measurements in argon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen mixtures in a double ICP discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Oberberg, Moritz; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-07-01

    The results of a Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP) are compared to a Langmuir probe in measuring the electron density in Ar, H2, N2, and O2 mixtures. The MRP was designed for measurements in industry processes, i.e., coating or etching. To evaluate a possible influence on the MRP measurement due to molecular gases, different plasmas with increasing molecular gas content in a double inductively coupled plasma at 5 Pa and 10 Pa at 500 W are used. The determined electron densities from the MRP and the Langmuir probe slightly differ in H2 and N2 diluted argon plasmas, but diverge significantly with oxygen. In pure molecular gas plasmas, electron densities measured with the MRP are always higher than those measured with the Langmuir Probe, in particular, in oxygen containing mixtures. The differences can be attributed to etching of the tungsten wire in the Ar:O2 mixtures and rf distortion in the pure molecular discharges. The influence of a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function, negative ions or secondary electron emission seems to be of no or only minor importance.

  8. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Kongshaug, Jesper; Søndergaard, Karin

    2015-01-01

    offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...... to be static, and no longer acts as a kind of spatial constancy maintaining stability and order? Moreover, what new potentials open in lighting design? This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research project entitled LED Lighting; Interdisciplinary LED Lighting Research...

  9. Viden om faste vendinger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Bjærge, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Ordbogen indeholder ca. 17.000 idiomer, ordsprog, bevingede ord og andre faste vendinger, som der oplyses mest muligt om. Hertil hører oplysninger om betydningen, grammatik, kollokationer, synonymer, stil, ordforbindelsestype, etymologiske angivelser og andre baggrundsoplysninger, links til relev...

  10. Fast Fourier orthogonalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ducas (Léo); T. Prest; S.A. Abramov; E.V. Zima; X-S. Gao

    2016-01-01

    htmlabstractThe classical fast Fourier transform (FFT) allows to compute in quasi-linear time the product of two polynomials, in the {\\em circular convolution ring} R[x]/(x^d−1) --- a task that naively requires quadratic time. Equivalently, it allows to accelerate matrix-vector products when the

  11. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking).

  12. CMS Fast Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmat, Rahmat

    2012-01-01

    A framework for Fast Simulation of particle interactions in the CMS detector has been developed and implemented in the overall simulation, reconstruction and analysis framework of CMS. It produces data samples in the same format as the one used by the Geant4-based (henceforth Full) Simulation and Reconstruction chain; the output of the Fast Simulation of CMS can therefore be used in the analysis in the same way as other ones. The Fast Simulation has been used already for several physics analyses in CMS, in particular those requiring a generation of many samples to scan an extended parameter space of the physics model (e.g. SUSY). Other use cases dealt with by the Fast Simulation of CMS are those involving the generation of large cross-section backgrounds, and samples of manageable size can only be produced by events skimming based on the final reconstructed objects, or those for which in general a large computation time is foreseen. An important issue, related with the high luminosity achieved by the LHC acce...

  13. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU...

  14. Adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Eriksen, Mette Rose

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  15. [Energy metabolism in fasting and subsequent refeeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H L; Kirchgessner, M

    1984-03-01

    A metabolism trial with six adult sows was conducted to study the effect of fasting and realimentation on heat production, energy retention, and utilization of energy. Complete balance measurements by indirect calorimetry (CN-method, RQ-method) were carried out from the 8th to the 10th day of fasting, and thereafter from the 1st to the 7th day and from the 33rd to the 36th day of the realimentation phase. Previous to fasting and during the time of refeeding the energy supply was adapted to maintenance requirement. Heat production rose by 20% after refeeding the animals. This heat increment corresponded to 2.2 MJ/kg feed dry matter, or 12% of the energy intake, respectively. The stimulation of heat production induced by refeeding occurred spontaneously within one day. After the first day of refeeding a plateau was reached, which in the course of the steady energy supply was still present even after the 5th week of realimentation. Residual effects of fasting in the mode of a compensatory heat production were not observed. Therefore, a constant utilization of efficiency of metabolizable energy for maintenance was estimated at 82%. The change of body energy during the entire experimental period resulted in a loss of 198 MJ corresponding to about 5% of the body weight.

  16. Organizational Adaptive Capacity: How Much, How Fast, and How Often

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-25

    tension between civil and military organizations and accelerates during conditions of external conflict where civilian leadership prevails.10 Stephen...15 John P. Kotter , Leading change Harvard Business School Press, Boston, Mass., 1996. 16 U.S. Department of the Army, Operations, Army Field

  17. A simple and fast item selection procedure for adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, W.J.J.; Veerkamp, Wim J.J.; Berger, Martijn; Berger, Martijn P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Items with the highest discrimination parameter values in a logistic item response theory (IRT) model do not necessarily give maximum information. This paper shows which discrimination parameter values (as a function of the guessing parameter and the distance between person ability and item

  18. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  19. Procrastination as a Fast Life History Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Bin Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research has revealed that procrastination—the purposive delay of an intended course of action—is a maladaptive behavior. However, by drawing on an evolutionary life history (LF approach, the present study proposes that procrastination may be an adaptive fast LF strategy characterized by prioritizing immediate benefits with little regard to long-term consequences. A total of 199 undergraduate students completed measures of procrastination and future orientation and the Mini-K scale, which measures the slow LF strategy. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as predicted, procrastination was negatively associated with a slow LF strategy both directly and indirectly through the mediation of future orientation. These results define the fast LF origin of procrastination.

  20. The oxidative debt of fasting: evidence for short- to medium-term costs of advanced fasting in adult king penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schull, Quentin; Viblanc, Vincent A; Stier, Antoine; Saadaoui, Hédi; Lefol, Emilie; Criscuolo, François; Bize, Pierre; Robin, Jean-Patrice

    2016-10-15

    In response to prolonged periods of fasting, animals have evolved metabolic adaptations helping to mobilize body reserves and/or reduce metabolic rate to ensure a longer usage of reserves. However, those metabolic changes can be associated with higher exposure to oxidative stress, raising the question of how species that naturally fast during their life cycle avoid an accumulation of oxidative damage over time. King penguins repeatedly cope with fasting periods of up to several weeks. Here, we investigated how adult male penguins deal with oxidative stress after an experimentally induced moderate fasting period (PII) or an advanced fasting period (PIII). After fasting in captivity, birds were released to forage at sea. We measured plasmatic oxidative stress on the same individuals at the start and end of the fasting period and when they returned from foraging at sea. We found an increase in activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase along with fasting. However, PIII individuals showed higher oxidative damage at the end of the fast compared with PII individuals. When they returned from re-feeding at sea, all birds had recovered their initial body mass and exhibited low levels of oxidative damage. Notably, levels of oxidative damage after the foraging trip were correlated to the rate of mass gain at sea in PIII individuals but not in PII individuals. Altogether, our results suggest that fasting induces a transitory exposure to oxidative stress and that effort to recover in body mass after an advanced fasting period may be a neglected carryover cost of fasting. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Adaptation Insights

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    be given greater access to relevant information to help them adapt their farming practices and socio- economic strategies to climate change? To address this challenge, the project “InfoClim,” led by Senegal's. Ecological Monitoring Centre. (CSE) with support from the. CCAA program, aims at improving the access of farmers ...

  2. Adaptation Insights

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and local adaptive capacity. During a monitoring and evaluation session, farmers indicated that the downscaled climate outlook has helped them to make more appropriate on-farm decisions. Figure 2 illustrates the effects of seasonal forecasts on the decisions farmers made in regards to the type/ variety of seeds to plant.

  3. Adaptive ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berth, Mette

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of an adaptive ethnography when studying such phenomena as young people's use of mobile media in a learning perspective. Mobile media such as PDAs and mobile phones have a number of affordances which make them potential tools for learning. However, before we begin...

  4. Countermeasures to Enhance Sensorimotor Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. C.; Miller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We have conducted a series of studies that have shown: Training using a combination of modified visual flow and support surface motion during treadmill walking enhances locomotor adaptability to a novel sensorimotor environment. Trained individuals become more proficient at performing multiple competing tasks while walking during adaptation to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. Trained subjects can retain their increased level of adaptability over a six months period. SA training is effective in producing increased adaptability in a more complex over-ground ambulatory task on an obstacle course. This confirms that for a complex task like walking, treadmill training contains enough of the critical features of overground walking to be an effective training modality. The structure of individual training sessions can be optimized to promote fast/strategic motor learning. Training sessions that each contain short-duration exposures to multiple perturbation stimuli allows subjects to acquire a greater ability to rapidly reorganize appropriate response strategies when encountering a novel sensory environment. Individual sensory biases (i.e. increased visual dependency) can predict adaptive responses to novel sensory environments suggesting that customized training prescriptions can be developed to enhance

  5. A fast template periodogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This proceedings contribution presents a novel, non-linear extension to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that allows periodograms to be generated for arbitrary signal shapes. Such periodograms are already known as “template periodograms” or “periodic matched filters,” but current implementations are computationally inefficient. The “fast template periodogram” presented here improves existing techniques by a factor of ∼a few for small test cases (O(10 observations, and over three orders of magnitude for lightcurves containing O(104 observations. The fast template periodogram scales asymptotically as O(HNf log HNf + H4Nf, where H denotes the number of harmonics required to adequately approximate the template and Nf is the number of trial frequencies. Existing implementations scale as O(NobsNf, where Nobs is the number of observations in the lightcurve. An open source Python implementation is available on GitHub.

  6. A fast template periodogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John; VanderPlas, Jake; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár

    2017-09-01

    This proceedings contribution presents a novel, non-linear extension to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram that allows periodograms to be generated for arbitrary signal shapes. Such periodograms are already known as "template periodograms" or "periodic matched filters," but current implementations are computationally inefficient. The "fast template periodogram" presented here improves existing techniques by a factor of ˜a few for small test cases (O(10) observations), and over three orders of magnitude for lightcurves containing O(104) observations. The fast template periodogram scales asymptotically as O(HNf log HNf + H4Nf), where H denotes the number of harmonics required to adequately approximate the template and Nf is the number of trial frequencies. Existing implementations scale as O(NobsNf), where Nobs is the number of observations in the lightcurve. An open source Python implementation is available on GitHub.

  7. Fast, Accurate and Detailed NoC Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkotte, P.T.; Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Kellenberger, P.

    Network-on-Chip (NoC) architectures have a wide variety of parameters that can be adapted to the designer's requirements. Fast exploration of this parameter space is only possible at a high-level and several methods have been proposed. Cycle and bit accurate simulation is necessary when the actual

  8. PHENIX Fast TOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Chiu, Mickey [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mannel, Eric [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stoll, Sean [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lynch, Don [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Boose, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Northacker, Dave [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alfred, Marcus [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Lindesay, James [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Chujo, Tatsuya [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Inaba, Motoi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Nonaka, Toshihiro [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Sato, Wataru [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Sakatani, Ikumi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Hirano, Masahiro [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Choi, Ihnjea [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of PHENIX Fast TOF group who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The goals for this test beam experiment are to verify the timing performance of the two types of time-of-flight detector prototypes.

  9. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU......) and Spencer C. Sorenson (ET). The theory which decribes in detail the overall dynamic chracteristics of the sensor was developed at IAU, DTU....

  10. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  11. ADT fast losses MD

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua Ferrando, BM; Sapinski, M; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The fast beam losses in the order of 1 ms are expected to be a potential major luminosity limitation for higher beam energies after the LHC long shutdown (LS1). Therefore a Quench Test is planned in the winter 2013 to estimate the quench limit in this timescale and revise the current models. This experiment was devoted to determination the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT) as a system for fast losses induction. A non-standard operation of the ADT was used to develop the beam oscillation instead of suppressing them. The sign flip method had allowed us to create the fast losses within several LHC turns at 450 GeV during the previous test (26th March 2012). Thus, the ADT could be potentially used for the studies of the UFO ("Unidentied Falling Object") impact on the cold magnets. Verification of the system capability and investigations of the disturbed beam properties were the main objectives of this MD. During the experiment, the pilot bunches of proton beam were excited independently in the horizontal and vertical ...

  12. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  13. Dark adaptation during transient hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Stig Kragelund; Jackson, Gregory R; Larsen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    adaptometry was measured in one eye, chosen at random, using a computer-controlled dark adaptometer. Dark adaptation and capillary blood glucose were measured at baseline and 80 minutes into the OGTT/fasting test. Blood glucose remained stable throughout the examination in the 12 fasting subjects, whereas...

  14. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person's immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person's perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - within that person's neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant's neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely effective

  15. Adaptation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-11-15

    Efforts to help the world's poor will face crises in coming decades as climate change radically alters conditions. Action Research for Community Adapation in Bangladesh (ARCAB) is an action-research programme on responding to climate change impacts through community-based adaptation. Set in Bangladesh at 20 sites that are vulnerable to floods, droughts, cyclones and sea level rise, ARCAB will follow impacts and adaptation as they evolve over half a century or more. National and international 'research partners', collaborating with ten NGO 'action partners' with global reach, seek knowledge and solutions applicable worldwide. After a year setting up ARCAB, we share lessons on the programme's design and move into our first research cycle.

  16. Hedonic "adaptation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available People live in a world in which they are surrounded by potential disgust elicitors such as ``used'' chairs, air, silverware, and money as well as excretory activities. People function in this world by ignoring most of these, by active avoidance, reframing, or adaptation. The issue is particularly striking for professions, such as morticians, surgeons, or sanitation workers, in which there is frequent contact with major disgust elicitors. In this study, we study the ``adaptation'' process to dead bodies as disgust elicitors, by measuring specific types of disgust sensitivity in medical students before and after they have spent a few months dissecting a cadaver. Using the Disgust Scale, we find a significant reduction in disgust responses to death and body envelope violation elicitors, but no significant change in any other specific type of disgust. There is a clear reduction in discomfort at touching a cold dead body, but not in touching a human body which is still warm after death.

  17. Adaptive VFH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, Iñigo; Lazkano, Elena; Sierra, Basi

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates the improvement of the Vector Field Histogram (VFH) local planning algorithm for mobile robot systems. The Adaptive Vector Field Histogram (AVFH) algorithm has been developed to improve the effectiveness of the traditional VFH path planning algorithm overcoming the side effects of using static parameters. This new algorithm permits the adaptation of planning parameters for the different type of areas in an environment. Genetic Algorithms are used to fit the best VFH parameters to each type of sector and, afterwards, every section in the map is labelled with the sector-type which best represents it. The Player/Stage simulation platform has been chosen for making all sort of tests and to prove the new algorithm's adequateness. Even though there is still much work to be carried out, the developed algorithm showed good navigation properties and turned out to be softer and more effective than the traditional VFH algorithm.

  18. Adaptive ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berth, Mette

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of an adaptive ethnography when studying such phenomena as young people's use of mobile media in a learning perspective. Mobile media such as PDAs and mobile phones have a number of affordances which make them potential tools for learning. However, before we begin...... formal and informal learning contexts. The paper also proposes several adaptive methodological techniques for studying young people's interaction with mobiles....... to design and develop educational materials for mobile media platforms we must first understand everyday use and behaviour with a medium such as a mobile phone. The paper outlines the research design for a PhD project on mobile learning which focuses on mobile phones as a way to bridge the gap between...

  19. Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of theoretical contributions that have influenced the discourse around strategic adaptation including contingency perspectives, strategic fit reasoning, decision structure, information processing, corporate entrepreneurship, and strategy process. The related conc....... This model incorporates elements of central strategizing, autonomous entrepreneurial behavior, interactive information processing, and open communication systems that enhance the organization's ability to observe exogenous changes and respond effectively to them....

  20. ADAPTATION EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn PETERS, M.Sc.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty subjects with lower limb disabilities participated in a simulator study. The purpose of the study was to investigate how an Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC system together with two different hand controls for accelerator and brake influenced workload, comfort and driving behaviour and to further develop a method to evaluate vehicle adaptations for drivers with disabilities. The installed ACC system could maintain a constant speed selected and set by the driver and it also adapted speed in order to keep a safe distance to a leading vehicle. Furthermore, it included a stop-and-go function. Two common types of hand controls for accelerator and brake were used. The hand controls were different both with respect to function, single or dual levers, and position, on the steering column or between the front seats. The subjects were all experienced drivers of adapted cars equipped with hand controls. All subjects drove 100km at two occasions, with and without the ACC system available but with the same hand control. Subjective workload was found to be significantly lower and performance better for the ACC condition. The difference in speed variation between manual and ACC supported driving increased with the distance driven which seems to support the previous finding. The subjects thought they could control both speed and distance to leading vehicles better while the ACC was available. ACC driving did not influence reaction time, speed level, lateral position or variation in lateral position. Headway during car following situations was shorter for the ACC condition compared to manual driving. The ACC was well received, trusted and wanted. It was concluded that the ACC system substantially decreased workload, increased comfort and did not influence safety negatively. The only difference found between the two types of hand controls was that drivers using the dual lever system had less variation in lateral position. The applied evaluation method proved

  1. Role of fast ignitor in fast-shock ignition concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghasemi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the role of fast ignitor in fast-shock ignition (FSI concept. The semi-analytical model indicates that the FSI target gain is a function of fast ignitor laser wavelength. If the energy of fast ignitor driver is and the laser wavelength is less than 0.53 micron, then with a fuel mass about 2 mg the FSI has a considerable advantage over pure shock ignition and the figure of merit is better than 1.2. When the wavelength of fast ignitor becomes shorter, the approaches , and for wavelengths shorter than 0.25 micron no additional is advantage is obtained.

  2. Serum Lipid Profile: Fasting or Non-fasting?

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    Serum lipid profile has now become almost a routine test. It is usually done in fasting state due to certain limitations in non-fasting serum sample. In the recent past efforts have been made to simplify blood sampling by replacing fasting lipid profile with non-fasting lipid profile. However, fasting specimen is preferred if cardiovascular risk assessment is based on total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol or non-HDL cholesterol. A lot has yet to be done in this area. Till then we have to believe...

  3. Locomotor adaptation and locomotor adaptive learning in Parkinson's disease and normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, Ryan T; Nocera, Joe R; Stegemöller, Elizabeth L; Hassan, Anhar; Okun, Michael S; Hass, Chris J

    2014-02-01

    Locomotor adaptation enables safe, efficient navigation among changing environments. We investigated how healthy young (HYA) and older (HOA) adults and persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) adapt to walking on a split-belt treadmill, retain adapted gait parameters during re-adaptation, and store aftereffects to conventional treadmill walking. Thirteen PD, fifteen HYA, and fifteen HOA walked on a split-belt treadmill for ten minutes with one leg twice as fast as the other. Participants later re-adapted to the same conditions to assess retention of the split-belt gait pattern. After re-adaptation, we assessed aftereffects of this pattern during conventional treadmill walking. Persons with PD exhibited step length asymmetry throughout many adaptation and adaptive learning conditions. Early adaptation was similar across groups, though HYA and HOA continued to adapt into late adaptation while PD did not. Despite pervasive step length asymmetry among conditions which were symmetric in HYA and HOA, persons with PD demonstrated significant step length aftereffects during conventional treadmill walking after split-belt walking. Though they may exhibit a default asymmetry under various walking conditions, persons with PD can adapt and store new walking patterns. Locomotor adaptation therapy may be effective in ameliorating asymmetric gait deficits in persons with PD. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fast reactor programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Fast reactor programme in India. P Chellapandi P R ... Keywords. Sodium fast reactor; design challenges; construction challenges; emerging safety criteria; passive shutdown and decay heat removal systems; fast breeder reactors in India.

  5. Evidence-based surgical care and the evolution of fast-track surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H.; Wilmore, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimization of postoperative outcome requires the application of evidence-based principles of care carefully integrated into a multimodal rehabilitation program. OBJECTIVE: To assess, synthesize, and discuss implementation of "fast-track" recovery programs. DATA SOURCES: Medline MBASE......, despite being based on a combination of evidence-based unimodal principles of care, recent surveys have demonstrated slow adaptation and implementation of the fast-track methodology. CONCLUSION: Multimodal evidence-based care within the fast-track methodology significantly enhances postoperative recovery...

  6. Influence of Fasting during Moult on the Faecal Microbiota of Penguins

    OpenAIRE

    Dewar, Meagan L.; Arnould, John P. Y.; Krause, Lutz; Trathan, Phil; Dann, Peter; Smith, Stuart C.

    2014-01-01

    Many seabirds including penguins are adapted to long periods of fasting, particularly during parts of the reproductive cycle and during moult. However, the influence of fasting on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota has not been investigated in seabirds. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the microbial composition and diversity of the GI microbiota of fasting little (Eudyptula minor) and king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) penguins during early and late moult. The results from...

  7. Adaptation: resources now to plan and implement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-11-15

    Wealthy nations have committed to support developing countries to establish National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) that identify long-term priorities for responding to climate change challenges. But how and when will this support be given? Past experience suggests that national adaptation planning in expectation of future international funding is fraught with difficulties. Contributors to fast-start climate finance should release funds to developing countries straight away. These funds must be sufficient to plan longer-term adaptation strategies as well as implement immediate priorities. Equally importantly, recipients of these funds must decide for themselves how best to spend it.

  8. An Approximate Algorithm for Robust Adaptive Beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomoaki; Iiguni, Youji

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents an adaptive weight computation algorithm for a robust array antenna based on the sample matrix inversion technique. The adaptive array minimizes the mean output power under the constraint that the mean square deviation between the desired and actual responses satisfies a certain magnitude bound. The Lagrange multiplier method is used to solve the constrained minimization problem. An efficient and accurate approximation is then used to derive the fast and recursive computation algorithm. Several simulation results are presented to support the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive computation algorithm.

  9. Fast & Confident Probabilistic Categorization

    OpenAIRE

    Goutte, Cyril

    2007-01-01

    We describe NRC's submission to the Anomaly Detection/Text Mining competition organised at the Text Mining Workshop 2007. This submission relies on a straightforward implementation of the probabilistic categoriser described in (Gaussier et al., ECIR'02). This categoriser is adapted to handle multiple labelling and a piecewise-linear confidence estimation layer is added to provide an estimate of the labelling confidence. This technique achieves a score of 1.689 on the test data.

  10. Post-fasting olfactory, transcriptional, and feeding responses in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadian, Shelli F; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cho, Christine E; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2012-01-18

    The sensation of hunger after a period of fasting and of satiety after eating is crucial to behavioral regulation of food intake, but the biological mechanisms regulating these sensations are incompletely understood. We studied the behavioral and physiological adaptations to fasting in the vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Here we show that both male and female flies increased their rate of food intake transiently in the post-fasted state. Although the basal feeding rate was higher in females than males, the magnitude of the post-fasting feeding response was the same in both sexes. Flies returned to a stable baseline feeding rate within 12 h after return to food for males and 24 h for females. This modulation in feeding was accompanied by a significant increase in the size of the crop organ of the digestive system, suggesting that fasted flies responded both by increasing their food intake and storing reserve food in their crop. Flies demonstrated increased behavioral attraction to an attractive odor when food-deprived. Expression profiling of head, body, and chemosensory tissues by microarray analysis revealed 415 genes regulated by fasting after 24 h and 723 genes after 48 h, with downregulated genes outnumbering upregulated genes in each tissue and fasting time point. These transcriptional changes showed rich temporal dynamics and affected genes across multiple functional gene ontology categories. These observations suggest that a coordinated transcriptional response to internal physiological state may regulate both ingestive behaviors and chemosensory perception of food. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomass fast pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgewater Anthony V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy is now accepted as having the potential to provide the major part of the projected renewable energy provisions of the future. Fast pyrolysis is one of the three main thermal routes, with gasification and combustion, to providing a useful and valuable biofuel. It is one of the most recent renewable energy processes to have been introduced and offers the advantages of a liquid product bio-oil that can be readily stored and trans ported, and used as a fuel, an energy carrier and a source of chemicals. Fast pyrolysis has now achieved commercial success for production of some chemicals, liquid fuel and electricity. Bio-oils have been success fully tested in engines turbines and boilers, and have been upgraded to high quality hydrocarbon fuels although at a presently unacceptable energetic and financial cost. This review concentrates on the technology of pyrolysis and applications for the liquid product. The basic pyrolysis process and the characteristics of the main liquid product bio-oil are first summarized followed by a review of applications for bio-oil. The main technical and non-technical barriers to implementation are identified.

  12. Adaptive Single-Pole Autoreclosure Scheme Based on Wavelet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adaptive autoreclosing is a fast emerging technology for improving power system marginal sta-bility during faults. It avoids reclosing unto permanent faults and recloses unto transient faults only after the secondary arc has extinguished. The challenges that come with the application of the adaptive autoreclosing technology ...

  13. Effects of fasting and feeding on the fast-start swimming performance of southern catfish Silurus meridionalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, G J; He, X K; Cao, Z D; Fu, S J

    2015-01-21

    This study investigated the effects of fasting and feeding on the fast-start escape swimming performance of juvenile southern catfish Silurus meridionalis, a sit-and-wait forager that encounters extreme fasting and famine frequently during its lifespan. Ten to 30 days of fasting resulted in no significant change in most of the variables measured in the fast-start response except a 20-30% decrease in the escape distance during the first 120 ms (D120ms ) relative to the control group (48 h after feeding). The ratio of the single-bend (SB) response (lower energetic expenditure) to the double-bend (DB) response increased significantly from 0% in the control group to 75 and 82·5% in the 20 and 30 day fasting groups, respectively. Satiated feeding (25% of body mass) resulted in a significantly lower (36·6%) maximum linear velocity (Vmax ) and a significantly lower (43·3%) D120ms than in non-fed fish (control group, 48 h after feeding). Half-satiated feeding (12·5% of body mass), however, showed no significant effects on any of the measured variables of the fast-start response relative to control fish. It is suggested that the increase in the ratio of SB:DB responses with fasting in S. meridionalis may reflect a trade-off between energy conservation and maintaining high Vmax , while variables of fast-start performance were more sensitive to feeding than fasting might be an adaptive strategy to their foraging mode and food availability in their habitat. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Ramadan fasting, pregnancy and lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khoshniat Nikoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fasting and malnutrition during pregnancy is associated with deleterious consequences such as hypoglycemia, ketonemia, impaired fetal IQ, low birth weight and even abortion. Comparison of pregnancy length and year duration shows that about 75% of pregnancies coincided with Ramadan. Also, fasting during Ramadan is not equivalent to hunger and malnutrition, however, knowledge of the effects of Ramadan fasting on pregnancy outcome is important. In this review, the results of all studies related to the possible effects of Ramadan fasting in pregnancy and lactation have been collected. Material and Methods: Keywords such as "Ramadan", "Ramadan Fasting", "Islamic Fasting", "Fasting in Ramadan "and Fasting with words Pregnancy, Birth Weight, Lactation, Preterm, Milk Composition, Breast Milk were searched in PubMed Database, SID (Scientific Information Database, and some regional journals and 40 related articles (descriptive cross - sectional, cohort, clinical trial and review articles from 1968 to 2010 were studied. Results: Based on available information, if the maternal nutrition during Ramadan is good, the normal process of pregnancy will be maintained and Ramadan fasting would not have deleterious effects on fetal physical and mental growth. Conclusion: Considering nutritional tips, nursing mothers could also fast during Ramadan.

  15. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  16. A non-destructive screenable marker, OsFAST, for identifying transgenic rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Takashi; Ogawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2011-10-01

    The production of transgenic plants has contributed greatly to plant research. Previously, an improved method for screening transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seeds using the FAST (Fluorescence-Accumulating-Seed Technology) method and FAST marker was reported. Arabidopsis seeds containing the FAST marker may be visually screened using a fluorescence stereomicroscope or blue LED handy-type instrument. Although the FAST method was originally designed for Arabidopsis screens, this study endeavors to adapt this method for the screening of other plants. Here, an optimized technology, designated the OsFAST method, is presented as a useful tool for screening transgenic rice seeds. The OsFAST method is based on the expression of the OsFAST-G marker under the control of a seed-embryo-specific promoter, similar to the Arabidopsis FAST-G marker. The OsFAST method provides a simple and non-destructive method for identifying transgenic rice seeds. It is proposed that the FAST method is adaptable to various plant species and will enable a deeper analysis of the floral-dip method. 

  17. Fast estimation of false alarm probabilities of STAP detectors - the AMF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivasan, R.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an attempt to harness the power of adaptive importance sampling techniques for estimating false alarm probabilities of detectors that use space-time adaptive processing. Fast simulation using these techniques have been notably successful in the study of conventional constant

  18. Mass Loss Rates of Fasting Polar Bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilfold, Nicholas W; Hedman, Daryll; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E; Lunn, Nicholas J; Richardson, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have adapted to an annual cyclic regime of feeding and fasting, which is extreme in seasonal sea ice regions of the Arctic. As a consequence of climate change, sea ice breakup has become earlier and the duration of the open-water period through which polar bears must rely on fat reserves has increased. To date, there is limited empirical data with which to evaluate the potential energetic capacity of polar bears to withstand longer fasts. We measured the incoming and outgoing mass of inactive polar bears (n = 142) that were temporarily detained by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship during the open-water period near the town of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, in 2009-2014. Polar bears were given access to water but not food and held for a median length of 17 d. Median mass loss rates were 1.0 kg/d, while median mass-specific loss rates were 0.5%/d, similar to other species with high adiposity and prolonged fasting capacities. Mass loss by unfed captive adult males was identical to that lost by free-ranging individuals, suggesting that terrestrial feeding contributes little to offset mass loss. The inferred metabolic rate was comparable to a basal mammalian rate, suggesting that while on land, polar bears can maintain a depressed metabolic rate to conserve energy. Finally, we estimated time to starvation for subadults and adult males for the on-land period. Results suggest that at 180 d of fasting, 56%-63% of subadults and 18%-24% of adult males in this study would die of starvation. Results corroborate previous assessments on the limits of polar bear capacity to withstand lengthening ice-free seasons and emphasize the greater sensitivity of subadults to changes in sea ice phenology.

  19. Adaptive management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Lucy; Campbell, Bruce Morgan; Frost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive management (AM) emerged in the literature in the mid-1970s in response both to a realization of the extent of uncertainty involved in management, and a frustration with attempts to use modelling to integrate knowledge and make predictions. The term has since become increasingly widely used...... in scientific articles, policy documents and management plans, but both understanding and application of the concept is mixed. This paper reviews recent literature from conservation and natural resource management journals to assess diversity in how the term is used, highlight ambiguities and consider how...... the concept might be further assessed. AM is currently being used to describe many different management contexts, scales and locations. Few authors define the term explicitly or describe how it offers a means to improve management outcomes in their specific management context. Many do not adhere to the idea...

  20. Not so fast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marras, Stefano; Noda, Takuji; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2015-01-01

    Billfishes are considered among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Despite early estimates of extremely high speeds, more recent work showed that these predators (e.g., blue marlin) spend most of their time swimming slowly, rarely exceeding 2 m s(-1). Predator-prey interactions provide a context...... within which one may expect maximal speeds both by predators and prey. Beyond speed, however, an important component determining the outcome of predator-prey encounters is unsteady swimming (i.e., turning and accelerating). Although large predators are faster than their small prey, the latter show higher......, it is an open question whether such supposedly very fast swimmers do use high-speed bursts when feeding on evasive prey, in addition to using their bill for slashing prey. Here, we measured the swimming behavior of sailfish by using high-frequency accelerometry and high-speed video observations during predator...

  1. Fast Harmonic Chirp Summation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    The harmonic chirp signal model has only very recently been in- troduced for modelling approximately periodic signals with a time- varying fundamental frequency. A number of estimators for the pa- rameters of this model have already been proposed, but they are ei- ther inaccurate, non-robust to n......The harmonic chirp signal model has only very recently been in- troduced for modelling approximately periodic signals with a time- varying fundamental frequency. A number of estimators for the pa- rameters of this model have already been proposed, but they are ei- ther inaccurate, non......-robust to noise, or very computationally inten- sive. In this paper, we propose a fast algorithm for the harmonic chirp summation method which has been demonstrated in the liter- ature to be accurate and robust to noise. The proposed algorithm is orders of magnitudes faster than previous algorithms which is also...

  2. Fast ion atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, H.G.; Young, L.; Goodman, L.S.; Somerville, L.P.; Hardis, J.; Neek, D.

    1984-01-01

    We have set up two collinear fast beam/laser excitation systems, one at the Argonne Dynamitron Accelerator (0.5 to 5.0 MeV beam energy) and another at a small electrostatic accelerator (20 to 130 keV). Our objective is to study fine structure, hyperfine structure and QED effects in ions of a few electrons. Initial projects underway include studies of multi-excited transitions in Li/sup -/ and Li/sup 0/, and transitions to high Rydberg states in H/sup 0/ and He/sup 0/. We have simultaneously excited a sodium jet with a laser at the resonance wavelength (D/sub 1/ or D/sub 2/ lines) and a 1-MeV He/sup +/ beam to produce excitation to autoionizing Na and Na/sup +/ states. The Auger electron spectra are compared to spectra obtained without laser excitation, and indicate strong variations in final state populations. 17 references.

  3. Materials analysis fast ions

    CERN Document Server

    Denker, A; Rauschenberg, J; Röhrich, J; Strub, E

    2006-01-01

    Materials analysis with ion beams exploits the interaction of ions with the electrons and nuclei in the sample. Among the vast variety of possible analytical techniques available with ion beams we will restrain to ion beam analysis with ion beams in the energy range from one to several MeV per mass unit. It is possible to use either the back-scattered projectiles (RBS – Rutherford Back Scattering) or the recoiled atoms itself (ERDA – Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) from the elastic scattering processes. These techniques allow the simultaneous and absolute determination of stoichiometry and depth profiles of the detected elements. The interaction of the ions with the electrons in the sample produces holes in the inner electronic shells of the sample atoms, which recombine and emit X-rays characteristic for the element in question. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) has shown to be a fast technique for the analysis of elements with an atomic number above 11.

  4. Fast proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2010-10-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5)×U(1)X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p→eπ from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  5. Chemistry of fast electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Head-Gordon, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy ≳ 0.5−1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1−3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4−6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of some conduction electrons to the surface via a reduction reaction, 0.5 O2 + δe− → Oδ− (Red); the delocalization of some surface electrons into a conduction band in an oxidation reaction, Oδ− + CO → CO2δ− → CO2 + δe− (Ox); and relaxation without charge transfer (Rel). Juxtaposition of Red, Ox, and Rel produces a daunting variety of metal electronic excitations, but only those that originate from CO2 reactive desorption are long-range and fast enough to dominate the chemicurrent. The chemicurrent yield depends on the universality class of the desorption process and the distribution of the desorption thresholds. This analysis implies a power-law relation with exponent 2.66 between the chemicurrent and the heat of adsorption, which is consistent with experimental findings for a range of systems. This picture also applies to other oxidation-reduction reactions over high work function metal surfaces. PMID:19561296

  6. A multilevel fast spectral domain algorithm for electromagnetic analysis of infinite periodic arrays with large unit cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Eibert

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A multilevel fast spectral domain algorithm (MLFSDA is introduced for the efficient evaluation of the matrix vector products due to the boundary integral (BI operator within a hybrid finite element - BI (FEBI method for the analysis of infinite periodic arrays. The MLFSDA utilizes the diagonalization property of the spectral domain (SD BI representation and handles the large numbers of Floquet modes required for large (with respect to wavelength periodic unit cells by similar hierarchical techniques as applied in the multilevel fast multipole method/algorithm (MLFMM/MLFMA. With the capability of the MLFSDA to handle very large periodic unit cells, it becomes possible to model finite antennas and scatterers with the infinite periodic array model. For a cavity-backed antenna element and for a semi-finite array of 4 cavity-backed antenna elements in the finite direction, the dependence of the input impedances on the unit cell sizes is investigated and it is found that array resonances disappear for reasonably large unit cell dimensions. Finally, a semi-finite array of antipodal Vivaldi antenna elements is considered and simulation results for infinite periodic, finite, and semi-finite array configurations are compared to measured data.

  7. Characterizing dynamic balance during adaptive locomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S; Finley, J M

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, adaptation to walking on a split-belt treadmill has been used as a common paradigm to explore how humans and other vertebrates adapt to walking in an asymmetric environment. When people walk on a split-belt treadmill, they initially walk with an asymmetry characterized by steps of unequal length, then gradually adopt a symmetric walking pattern characterized by steps of the same length. Although it has been proposed that the adoption of a symmetric walking pattern may result from a desired to maintain dynamic balance, this has yet to be investigated. Therefore, we used a model and experiment to explore how dynamic balance is influenced by spatiotemporal asymmetry during walking on a split-belt treadmill. The model was constructed based on a two-state exponential model which updates foot placement at each step based on the asymmetry from the previous. In the experiment, participants adapted to walking on a split-belt treadmill with the left belt moving at 1.5 m/s and the right belt moving at 0.5 m/s. Retroreflective markers were used to measure lower extremity kinematics and to compute spatiotemporal metrics such as step length, dynamic margins of stability, and time-to-contact. We found that people showed greater margins of stability on the fast belt than on the slow belt during adaptation. This was accomplished by adjusting the angle of the leading limb, which determined the placement of their feet relative to the body's center of mass. The results also showed greater times to contact on the slow belt than on the fast belt during adaptation and the difference between the fast and slow belt decayed during adaptation. These experimental results were consistent with the simulation using the computational model. Our results help to improve our understanding of the role of biomechanics in driving adaptive changes to coordination when walking in novel environments.

  8. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.

  9. Fast Aerial Video Stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly efficient and robust stitching of aerial video captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs is a challenging problem in the field of robot vision. Existing commercial image stitching systems have seen success with offline stitching tasks, but they cannot guarantee high-speed performance when dealing with online aerial video sequences. In this paper, we present a novel system which has an unique ability to stitch high-frame rate aerial video at a speed of 150 frames per second (FPS. In addition, rather than using a high-speed vision platform such as FPGA or CUDA, our system is running on a normal personal computer. To achieve this, after the careful comparison of the existing invariant features, we choose the FAST corner and binary descriptor for efficient feature extraction and representation, and present a spatial and temporal coherent filter to fuse the UAV motion information into the feature matching. The proposed filter can remove the majority of feature correspondence outliers and significantly increase the speed of robust feature matching by up to 20 times. To achieve a balance between robustness and efficiency, a dynamic key frame-based stitching framework is used to reduce the accumulation errors. Extensive experiments on challenging UAV datasets demonstrate that our approach can break through the speed limitation and generate an accurate stitching image for aerial video stitching tasks.

  10. Fast convolutions meet Montgomery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Preda

    2008-06-01

    Arithmetic in large ring and field extensions is an important problem of symbolic computation, and it consists essentially of the combination of one multiplication and one division in the underlying ring. Methods are known for replacing one division by two short multiplications in the underlying ring, which can be performed essentially by using convolutions. However, while using school-book multiplication, modular multiplication may be grouped into 2 mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) operations (where mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) denotes the number of operations of one multiplication in the underlying ring), the short multiplication problem is an important obstruction to convolution. It raises the costs in that case to 3 mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) . In this paper we give a method for understanding and bypassing this problem, thus reducing the costs of ring arithmetic to roughly 2mathsf{M}(mathbf{R}) when also using fast convolutions. The algorithms have been implemented with results which fit well the theoretical prediction and which shall be presented in a separate paper.

  11. Fasting and nonfasting lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events.......Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events....

  12. Oil Analysis by Fast DSC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetten, I.A.; Herwaarden, A.W.; Splinter, R.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal analysis of Olive and Sunflower Oil is done by Fast DSC to evaluate its potential to replace DSC for adulteration detection. DSC measurements take hours, Fast DSC minutes. Peak temperatures of the crystallisation peak in cooling for different Olive and Sunflower Oils are both comparable to

  13. Fast Pedestrian Recognition Based on Multisensor Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast pedestrian recognition algorithm based on multisensor fusion is presented in this paper. Firstly, potential pedestrian locations are estimated by laser radar scanning in the world coordinates, and then their corresponding candidate regions in the image are located by camera calibration and the perspective mapping model. For avoiding time consuming in the training and recognition process caused by large numbers of feature vector dimensions, region of interest-based integral histograms of oriented gradients (ROI-IHOG feature extraction method is proposed later. A support vector machine (SVM classifier is trained by a novel pedestrian sample dataset which adapt to the urban road environment for online recognition. Finally, we test the validity of the proposed approach with several video sequences from realistic urban road scenarios. Reliable and timewise performances are shown based on our multisensor fusing method.

  14. REVIEW ARTICLE: Fast Foods and their Impact on Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ashakiran; Deepthi R

    2012-01-01

    Eat healthy and live healthy is one of the essential requirements for long life. Unfortunately, todays world has been adapted to a system of consumption of foods which has several adverse effects on health. Lifestyle changes has compelled us so much that one has so little time to really think what we are eating is right Globalisation and urbanisation have greatly affected ones eating habits and forced many people to consume fancy and high calorie fast foods, popularly known as Junk foods. Res...

  15. Adaptive Dynamics of Regulatory Networks: Size Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinetz Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To accomplish adaptability, all living organisms are constructed of regulatory networks on different levels which are capable to differentially respond to a variety of environmental inputs. Structure of regulatory networks determines their phenotypical plasticity, that is, the degree of detail and appropriateness of regulatory replies to environmental or developmental challenges. This regulatory network structure is encoded within the genotype. Our conceptual simulation study investigates how network structure constrains the evolution of networks and their adaptive abilities. The focus is on the structural parameter network size. We show that small regulatory networks adapt fast, but not as good as larger networks in the longer perspective. Selection leads to an optimal network size dependent on heterogeneity of the environment and time pressure of adaptation. Optimal mutation rates are higher for smaller networks. We put special emphasis on discussing our simulation results on the background of functional observations from experimental and evolutionary biology.

  16. Fast parallel event reconstruction

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    On-line processing of large data volumes produced in modern HEP experiments requires using maximum capabilities of modern and future many-core CPU and GPU architectures.One of such powerful feature is a SIMD instruction set, which allows packing several data items in one register and to operate on all of them, thus achievingmore operations per clock cycle. Motivated by the idea of using the SIMD unit ofmodern processors, the KF based track fit has been adapted for parallelism, including memory optimization, numerical analysis, vectorization with inline operator overloading, and optimization using SDKs. The speed of the algorithm has been increased in 120000 times with 0.1 ms/track, running in parallel on 16 SPEs of a Cell Blade computer.  Running on a Nehalem CPU with 8 cores it shows the processing speed of 52 ns/track using the Intel Threading Building Blocks. The same KF algorithm running on an Nvidia GTX 280 in the CUDA frameworkprovi...

  17. Fast food: unfriendly and unhealthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, S; Dyerberg, J; Astrup, A

    2007-06-01

    Although nutrition experts might be able to navigate the menus of fast-food restaurant chains, and based on the nutritional information, compose apparently 'healthy' meals, there are still many reasons why frequent fast-food consumption at most chains is unhealthy and contributes to weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Fast food generally has a high-energy density, which, together with large portion sizes, induces over consumption of calories. In addition, we have found it to be a myth that the typical fast-food meal is the same worldwide. Chemical analyses of 74 samples of fast-food menus consisting of French fries and fried chicken (nuggets/hot wings) bought in McDonalds and KFC outlets in 35 countries in 2005-2006 showed that the total fat content of the same menu varies from 41 to 65 g at McDonalds and from 42 to 74 g at KFC. In addition, fast food from major chains in most countries still contains unacceptably high levels of industrially produced trans-fatty acids (IP-TFA). IP-TFA have powerful biological effects and may contribute to increased weight gain, abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The food quality and portion size need to be improved before it is safe to eat frequently at most fast-food chains.

  18. Smooth pursuit eye movements and motion perception share motion signals in slow and fast motion mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Pursuit eye movements correlate with perceived motion in both velocity and direction, even without retinal motion. Cortical cells in the monkey medial temporal region generate signals for initiating pursuit eye movements and respond to retinal motion for perception. However, recent studies suggest multiple motion processes, fast and slow, even for low-level motion. Here we investigated whether the relationship with pursuit eye movements is different for fast and slow motion processes, using a motion aftereffect technique with superimposed low- and high-spatial-frequency gratings. A previous study showed that the low- and high-spatial-frequency gratings adapt the fast and slow motion processes, respectively, and that a static test probes the slow motion process and a flicker test probes the fast motion process (Shioiri & Matsumiya, 2009). In the present study, an adaptation stimulus was composed of two gratings with different spatial frequencies and orientations but the same temporal frequency, moving in the orthogonal direction of ±45° from the vertical. We measured the directions of perceived motion and pursuit eye movements to a test stimulus presented after motion adaptation with changing relative contrasts of the two adapting gratings. Pursuit eye movements were observed in the same direction as that of the motion aftereffects, independent of the relative contrasts of the two adapting gratings, for both the static and flicker tests. These results suggest that pursuit eye movements and perception share motion signals in both slow and fast motion processes.

  19. [Fast food promotes weight gain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Steen; Dyerberg, Jørn; Astrup, Arne V

    2007-05-07

    The total amounts of fat in a fast food menu consisting of French fries and fried Chicken Nuggets from McDonald's and KFC, respectively, bought in 35 different countries vary from 41 to 71 gram. In most countries the menu contained unacceptably high amounts of industrially-produced trans fat which contributes to an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, weight gain, abdominal fat accumulation and type 2 diabetes. The quality of the ingredients in fast food ought to be better and the size of the portions smaller and less energy-dense so that frequent fast food meals do not increase the risk of obesity and diseases among customers.

  20. [Fast-track hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Gromov, Kirill; Kristensen, Billy B; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-12-18

    Fast-track surgery implies a coordinated perioperative approach aimed at reducing surgical stress and facilitating post-operative recovery. The fast-track programme has reduced post-operative length of stay and has led to shorter convalescence with more rapid functional recovery and decreased morbidity and mortality in total hip arthroplasty. It should now be a standard total hip arthroplasty patient pathway, but fine tuning of the multiple factors in the fast-track pathway is still needed in patients with special needs or high comorbidity burden.

  1. Molecular adaptation during adaptive radiation in the Hawaiian endemic genus Schiedea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V Kapralov

    Full Text Available "Explosive" adaptive radiations on islands remain one of the most puzzling evolutionary phenomena. The rate of phenotypic and ecological adaptations is extremely fast during such events, suggesting that many genes may be under fairly strong selection. However, no evidence for adaptation at the level of protein coding genes was found, so it has been suggested that selection may work mainly on regulatory elements. Here we report the first evidence that positive selection does operate at the level of protein coding genes during rapid adaptive radiations. We studied molecular adaptation in Hawaiian endemic plant genus Schiedea (Caryophyllaceae, which includes closely related species with a striking range of morphological and ecological forms, varying from rainforest vines to woody shrubs growing in desert-like conditions on cliffs. Given the remarkable difference in photosynthetic performance between Schiedea species from different habitats, we focused on the "photosynthetic" Rubisco enzyme, the efficiency of which is known to be a limiting step in plant photosynthesis.We demonstrate that the chloroplast rbcL gene, encoding the large subunit of Rubisco enzyme, evolved under strong positive selection in Schiedea. Adaptive amino acid changes occurred in functionally important regions of Rubisco that interact with Rubisco activase, a chaperone which promotes and maintains the catalytic activity of Rubisco. Interestingly, positive selection acting on the rbcL might have caused favorable cytotypes to spread across several Schiedea species.We report the first evidence for adaptive changes at the DNA and protein sequence level that may have been associated with the evolution of photosynthetic performance and colonization of new habitats during a recent adaptive radiation in an island plant genus. This illustrates how small changes at the molecular level may change ecological species performance and helps us to understand the molecular bases of extremely

  2. Personalized Adaptive Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravcik, Milos; Specht, Marcus; Naeve, Ambjorn

    2009-01-01

    Kravcik, M., Specht, M., & Naeve, A. (2008). Personalized Adaptive Learning. Presentation of PROLEARN WP1 Personalized Adaptive Learning at the final review meeting. February, 27, 2008, Hannover, Germany.

  3. A Rapid Introduction to Adaptive Filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Vega, Leonardo Rey

    2013-01-01

    In this book, the authors provide insights into the basics of adaptive filtering, which are particularly useful for students taking their first steps into this field. They start by studying the problem of minimum mean-square-error filtering, i.e., Wiener filtering. Then, they analyze iterative methods for solving the optimization problem, e.g., the Method of Steepest Descent. By proposing stochastic approximations, several basic adaptive algorithms are derived, including Least Mean Squares (LMS), Normalized Least Mean Squares (NLMS) and Sign-error algorithms. The authors provide a general framework to study the stability and steady-state performance of these algorithms. The affine Projection Algorithm (APA) which provides faster convergence at the expense of computational complexity (although fast implementations can be used) is also presented. In addition, the Least Squares (LS) method and its recursive version (RLS), including fast implementations are discussed. The book closes with the discussion of severa...

  4. FastStats: Body Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Body Measurements Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... 7 MB] Related FastStats Obesity/Overweight Related Links Body Mass Index table CDC Growth Charts National Health ...

  5. Fast Picometer Mirror Mount Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a 6DOF controllable mirror mount with high dynamic range and fast tip/tilt capability for space based applications. It will enable the...

  6. Allegheny County Fast Food Establishments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Allegheny County Health Department has generated this list of fast food restaurants by exporting all chain restaurants without an alcohol permit from the...

  7. FastStats: Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women’s Health State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health Notice Regarding FastStats Mobile ... 9.8 MB] Health insurance coverage Percent of males under age 65 without health insurance coverage: 11. ...

  8. vysmaw: Fast visibility stream muncher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Martin; Law, Casey J.

    2017-10-01

    The vysmaw client library facilitates the development of code for processes to tap into the fast visibility stream on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array correlator back-end InfiniBand network.

  9. The price of fast fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The fashion industry has changed rapidly in recent years with the increased prevalence of fast fashion, impacting the environment. Efforts to green this polluting industry require action from businesses and consumers.

  10. A Method to Teach Age-Specific Demography with Field Grown Rapid Cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin G.; Terrana, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that rapid cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants) can be used in inquiry-based, student ecological fieldwork. We are the first to describe age-specific survival for field-grown Fast Plants and identify life history traits associated with individual survival. This experiment can be adapted by educators as a…

  11. Savings in locomotor adaptation explained by changes in learning parameters following initial adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawase, Firas; Shmuelof, Lior; Bar-Haim, Simona; Karniel, Amir

    2014-04-01

    Faster relearning of an external perturbation, savings, offers a behavioral linkage between motor learning and memory. To explain savings effects in reaching adaptation experiments, recent models suggested the existence of multiple learning components, each shows different learning and forgetting properties that may change following initial learning. Nevertheless, the existence of these components in rhythmic movements with other effectors, such as during locomotor adaptation, has not yet been studied. Here, we study savings in locomotor adaptation in two experiments; in the first, subjects adapted to speed perturbations during walking on a split-belt treadmill, briefly adapted to a counter-perturbation and then readapted. In a second experiment, subjects readapted after a prolonged period of washout of initial adaptation. In both experiments we find clear evidence for increased learning rates (savings) during readaptation. We show that the basic error-based multiple timescales linear state space model is not sufficient to explain savings during locomotor adaptation. Instead, we show that locomotor adaptation leads to changes in learning parameters, so that learning rates are faster during readaptation. Interestingly, we find an intersubject correlation between the slow learning component in initial adaptation and the fast learning component in the readaptation phase, suggesting an underlying mechanism for savings. Together, these findings suggest that savings in locomotion and in reaching may share common computational and neuronal mechanisms; both are driven by the slow learning component and are likely to depend on cortical plasticity.

  12. Fast Access Data Acquisition System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Vladimir Katsman

    1998-03-17

    Our goal in this program is to develop Fast Access Data Acquisition System (FADAS) by combining the flexibility of Multilink's GaAs and InP electronics and electro-optics with an extremely high data rate for the efficient handling and transfer of collider experimental data. This novel solution is based on Multilink's and Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) unique components and technologies for extremely fast data transfer, storage, and processing.

  13. Quantifying Cricket Fast Bowling Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feros, Simon A; Young, Warren B; O'Brien, Brendan J

    2017-09-27

    To evaluate the current evidence regarding the quantification of cricket fast bowling skill. Studies that assessed fast bowling skill (bowling speed and accuracy) were identified from searches in SPORTDiscus (EBSCO) in June 2017. The reference lists of identified papers were also examined for relevant investigations. Sixteen papers matched the inclusion criteria, and discrepancies in assessment procedures were evident. Differences in: test environment, pitch and cricket ball characteristics, the warm-up prior to test, test familiarisation procedures, permitted run-up lengths, bowling spell length, delivery sequence, test instructions, collection of bowling speed data, collection and reportage of bowling accuracy data were apparent throughout the literature. The reliability and sensitivity of fast bowling skill measures has rarely been reported across the literature. Only one study has attempted to assess the construct validity of their skill measures. There are several discrepancies in how fast bowling skill has been assessed and subsequently quantified in the literature to date. This is a problem, as comparisons between studies are often difficult. Therefore, a strong rationale exists for the creation of match-specific standardised fast bowling assessments that offer greater ecological validity while maintaining acceptable reliability and sensitivity of the skill measures. If prospective research can act on the proposed recommendations from this review, then coaches will be able to make more informed decisions surrounding player selection, talent identification, return to skill following injury, and the efficacy of short- and long-term training interventions for fast bowlers.

  14. Fast Calorimeter Simulation in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schaarschmidt, Jana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Producing the very large samples of simulated events required by many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector using the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Fast simulation tools are a useful way of reducing CPU requirements when detailed detector simulations are not needed. During the LHC Run-1, a fast calorimeter simulation (FastCaloSim) was successfully used in ATLAS. FastCaloSim provides a simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level, taking into account the detailed particle shower shapes and the correlations between the energy depositions in the various calorimeter layers. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software, and it can be tuned to data more easily than GEANT4. It is 500 times faster than full simulation in the calorimeter system. Now an improved version of FastCaloSim is in development, incorporating the experience with the version used during Run-1. The new FastCaloSim makes use of mach...

  15. Upgrading ATLAS Fast Calorimeter Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, Matthew Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Producing the very large samples of simulated events required by many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector using the full GEANT4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Fast simulation tools are a useful way of reducing CPU requirements when detailed detector simulations are not needed. During the LHC Run-1, a fast calorimeter simulation (FastCaloSim) was successfully used in ATLAS. FastCaloSim provides a simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level, taking into account the detailed particle shower shapes and the correlations between the energy depositions in the various calorimeter layers. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software, and it can be tuned to data more easily than Geant4. Now an improved version of FastCaloSim is in development, incorporating the experience with the version used during Run-1. The new FastCaloSim aims to overcome some limitations of the first version by improving the description of s...

  16. Theory of Fast Electron Transport for Fast Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A P L; Davies, J R; Gremillet, L; Honrubia, J J; Johzaki, T; Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Solodov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion is a variant of inertial fusion in which DT fuel is first compressed to high density and then ignited by a relativistic electron beam generated by a fast (< 20 ps) ultra-intense laser pulse, which is usually brought in to the dense plasma via the inclusion of a re-entrant cone. The transport of this beam from the cone apex into the dense fuel is a critical part of this scheme, as it can strongly influence the overall energetics. Here we review progress in the theory and numerical simulation of fast electron transport in the context of Fast Ignition. Important aspects of the basic plasma physics, descriptions of the numerical methods used, a review of ignition-scale simulations, and a survey of schemes for controlling the propagation of fast electrons are included. Considerable progress has taken place in this area, but the development of a robust, high-gain FI `point design' is still an ongoing challenge.

  17. Adaptation illustrations: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Matt St. Pierre; Linda. Parker

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how the Adaptation Workbook (Chapter 3) can be used with the Adaptation Strategies and Approaches (Chapter 2) to develop adaptation tactics for two real-world management issues. The two illustrations in this chapter are intended to provide helpful tips to managers completing the Adaptation Workbook, as well as to show how the anticipated...

  18. Staining clinical specimens for acid-fast bacilli by means of a mechanical conveyor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, G V; Joseph, N; Taylor, C E

    1978-02-01

    A Cyto-Tek staining machine designed for Papanicolau staining of cervical smears has been adapted for auramine staining of smears of sputum and other clinical specimens for acid-fast bacilli. The results compared favourably with those obtained by a manual method of staining. Contamination of negative smears by acid-fast bacilli from positive smears was not found. Since this study the machine has continued to be in routine use with a considerable saving in labour.

  19. Preoperative fasting time in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adeel, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of preoperative fasting is to prevent regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration while limiting potential problems of thirst, dehydration and hypoglycaemia. The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) has suggested guidelines for preoperative fasting for children undergoing elective surgery. We did a postal survey to determine the current practice regarding these guidelines amongst all specialist registrars in anaesthesia in Ireland. A questionnaire was sent to all specialist registrars in anaesthesia (90 in total), 60 (67%) were returned and analysed. The question asked was how long children should be kept fasting before elective surgery. The results of our survey suggest that most of the respondents are following the ASA guidelines for clear fluids and solids however there were differing opinion regarding the duration of fasting for formula milk and breast milk. In conclusion, we would recommend greater awareness and collaboration between anaesthetists, nurses and surgeons to ensure that fasting instructions are consistent with the ASA guidelines and that patient and their parents understand these directives as well.

  20. Identifying product development crises: The potential of adaptive heuristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münzberger, C.; Stingl, Verena; Oehmen, Josef

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces adaptive heuristics as a tool to identify crises in design projects and highlights potential applications of these heuristics as decision support tool for crisis identification. Crises may emerge slowly or suddenly, and often have ambiguous signals. Thus the identification...... of a project crisis is often difficult. Yet, to allow fast crisis response, timely identification is critical for successful crisis management. Adaptive heuristics are judgement strategies that can strive in circumstances of limited and ambiguous information. This article presents a theoretical proposition...... for the application of heuristics in design sciences. To achieve this, the paper compares crises to 'business as usual', and presents sixteen indicators for emerging crises. These indicators are potential cues for adaptive heuristics. Specifically three adaptive heuristics, One-single-cue, Fast...

  1. A parallel implementation of multilevel recursive spectral bisection for application to adaptive unstructured meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, S.T.; Simon, H. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The design of a parallel implementation of multilevel recursive spectral bisection is described. The goal is to implement a code that is fast enough to enable dynamic repartitioning of adaptive meshes.

  2. A Parallel Implementation of Multilevel Recursive Spectral Bisection for Application to Adaptive Unstructured Meshes. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Stephen T.; Simon, Horst; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The design of a parallel implementation of multilevel recursive spectral bisection is described. The goal is to implement a code that is fast enough to enable dynamic repartitioning of adaptive meshes.

  3. Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST) motivates and prepares talented students with disabilities to further their education and achieve High Tech and professional employment. The FAST program is managed by local professionals, business, and industry leaders; it is modeled after High School High Tech project TAKE CHARGE started in Los Angeles in 1983. Through cooperative efforts of Alabama Department of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult and Children Services, and the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, north central Alabama was chosen as the second site for a High School High Tech project. In 1986 local business, industry, education, government agencies, and rehabilitation representatives started FAST. The program objectives and goals, results and accomplishments, and survey results are included.

  4. Properties of fast solitary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Ergun

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present detailed observations of electromagnetic waves and particle distributions from the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST satellite which reveal many important properties of large-amplitude, spatially-coherent plasma structures known as "fast solitary structures" or "electron phase space holes". Similar structures have been observed in several regions of the magnetosphere including the auroral zone, plasma sheet boundary layer, and bow shock. There has been rapid theoretical progress in understanding these structures. Solitary structures can develop from bidirectional electron beams. Once developed, the one-dimensional properties parallel to the magnetic field can be adequately described by analytical treatment as BGK structures. There remains, however, several unanswered questions. The origin of the bidirectional electron beams, the development of two-or three-dimensional structures, and the observed association with the ion cyclotron frequency are not well understood.

  5. ATLAS FTK: Fast Track Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Amerio, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Andreazza, A; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Bevacqua, V; Bogdan, M; Bossini, E; Boveia, A; Cavaliere, V; Canelli, F; Blazey, G; Cervigni, F; Cheng, Y; Citterio, M; Crescioli, F; Dell’Orso, M; Drake, G; Dunford, M; Giannetti, P; Giorgi, F; Hoff, J; Kapliy, A; Kasten, M; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Lanza, A; Liberali, V; Liu, T; Magalotti, D; McCarn, A; Melachrinos, C; Meroni, C; Negri, A; Neubauer, M; Penning, B; Piendibene, M; Proudfoot, J; Riva, M; Roda, C; Sabatini, F; Sacco, I; Shochet, M; Stabile, A; Tang, F; Tang, J; Tripiccione, R; Tuggle, J; Vercesi, V; Verzocchi, M; Villa, M; Vitillo, R A; Volpi, G; Webster, J; Wu, J; Yorita, K; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    A track reconstruction system for the trigger of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is described. The Fast Tracker is a highly parallel hardware system designed to operate at the Level-1 trigger output rate. It will provide high-quality tracks reconstructed over the entire inner detector by the start of processing in the Level-2 trigger. The system is based on associative memories for pattern recognition and fast FPGA’s for track reconstruction. Its design and expected performance under instantaneous luminosities up to 3 × 10^34/cm^2/s are discussed.

  6. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  7. Dark adaptation during transient hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Stig Kraglund; Jackson, Gregory R; Larsen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It was the purpose of the present study to examine dark adaptation in subjects with type 2 diabetes during transient hyperglycemia. Twenty-four subjects with type 2 diabetes and minimal diabetic retinopathy were randomized to undergo an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or to remain fasting. Dark...... glycemia increased in the 12 OGTT subjects, from 8.6±2.1 at baseline to 21.1±3.6 mM after 80 min. In the OGTT group, four out of seven subjects with delayed dark adaptation at baseline reached normal values during hyperglycemia. All examined aspects of rod adaptation were accelerated by hyperglycemia (time...... to rod-cone break -26%; time to rod intercept -16%, rod sensitivity recovery slope (log units/min) +35%), whereas no measurable change in cone adaptation was seen. The results are consistent with rod adaptation being limited by glycemia and with rod adaptation being delayed in subjects with diabetes...

  8. Detection of fast neutrons with the Medipix-2 pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, J.; Jakubek, J.; Koster, U.; Lebel, C.; Leroy, C.; Pospisil, S.; Skoda, R.; Vykydal, Z.

    2008-06-01

    Neutron radiography using thermal and fast neutrons is becoming increasingly important for scientific, technical, security and other applications. In the past, the Medipix-2 imaging detector was successfully adapted for thermal neutron imaging by our group by adding a 6LiF neutron converter covering the surface of the active part of the detector. Recently, the Medipix-2 detector was also adapted and used for fast neutron imaging. Fast neutrons are detected through proton recoil from a 1 mm thick polyethylene layer placed on the detector surface. Basic detection and imaging properties of the detector were calculated, simulated and measured. The measurements were done using an AmBe neutron source, as well as external neutron beams of the Sparrow reactor at the Czech Technical University in Prague and of the high-flux reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble. The detector provided a reasonable signal-to-background ratio of about eight at the neutron beam of ILL's Neutrograph neutron radiography and tomography station. The estimated spatial resolution was at a level of 100 μm.

  9. Causes And Effects Of Fast Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Al-Saad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast food affects our life in many aspects. In fact There are many reasons that have been shown why people continuing eating fast food while they knew about its negative effects on their health and family because of eating fast food. The commercial advertisements play a major role in consuming fast food. In this research I will focus on causes and effects of eating fast food.

  10. Causes And Effects Of Fast Food

    OpenAIRE

    Eman Al-Saad

    2015-01-01

    Fast food affects our life in many aspects. In fact There are many reasons that have been shown why people continuing eating fast food while they knew about its negative effects on their health and family because of eating fast food. The commercial advertisements play a major role in consuming fast food. In this research I will focus on causes and effects of eating fast food.

  11. How adaptation shapes spike rate oscillations in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eAugustin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural mass signals from in-vivo recordings often show oscillations with frequencies ranging from <1 Hz to 100 Hz. Fast rhythmic activity in the beta and gamma range can be generated by network based mechanisms such as recurrent synaptic excitation-inhibition loops. Slower oscillations might instead depend on neuronal adaptation currents whose timescales range from tens of milliseconds to seconds. Here we investigate how the dynamics of such adaptation currents contribute to spike rate oscillations and resonance properties in recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Based on a network of sparsely coupled spiking model neurons with two types of adaptation current and conductance based synapses with heterogeneous strengths and delays we use a mean-field approach to analyze oscillatory network activity. For constant external input, we find that spike-triggered adaptation currents provide a mechanism to generate slow oscillations over a wide range of adaptation timescales as long as recurrent synaptic excitation is sufficiently strong. Faster rhythms occur when recurrent inhibition is slower than excitation and oscillation frequency increases with the strength of inhibition. Adaptation facilitates such network based oscillations for fast synaptic inhibition and leads to decreased frequencies. For oscillatory external input, adaptation currents amplify a narrow band of frequencies and cause phase advances for low frequencies in addition to phase delays at higher frequencies. Our results therefore identify the different key roles of neuronal adaptation dynamics for rhythmogenesis and selective signal propagation in recurrent networks.

  12. Educational Multimedia Profiling Recommendations for Device-Aware Adaptive Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Arghir-Nicolae; Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning is seeing a fast adoption with the increasing availability and affordability of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. As the creation and consumption of educational multimedia content on mobile devices is also increasing fast, educators and mobile learning providers are faced with the challenge to adapt multimedia type…

  13. Optimizing the transient Fast Agro-mediated Seedling Transformation (FAST) method in Catharanthus roseus seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jessica; Goklany, Sheba; Rizvi, Noreen; Cram, Erin J; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2014-01-01

    An Agro-mediated transformation method has been adapted in Catharanthus roseus seedlings for transient overexpression. Our results suggest that Agro-mediated methods may induce defense-related genes, which should be considered in its application. The Fast Agro-mediated Seedling Transformation (FAST) method, which involves the co-cultivation and transient transformation of young seedlings with Agrobacterium, was adapted and optimized in Catharanthus roseus. We investigated the optimal conditions for Gus expression by varying the Agrobacterium density (OD600 = 0.29 and 0.50), A. rhizogenes strain (15834 and R1000), and co-cultivation time in liquid (2, 12, or 24 h) followed by incubation time on solid media (1 or 2 days). Transformation efficiency was assessed quantitatively in terms of average GUS intensity per cotyledon surface area and percentage of cotyledons transformed. GUS staining was observed in 100% of cotyledons co-cultivated with A. rhizogenes (OD600 = 0.50) co-transformed with the Mas promoter-driven Gus and pSoup helper plasmids, in the presence of 0.01% v/v Silwet L-77 for 24 h in liquid followed by 2-days on solid media. In addition, we observed that co-cultivation with Agrobacterium strongly induced Zct1 and Orca3, two transcription factors known to regulate defense-related alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus. Homologous transcription factors regulate defense responses in many plant species. Therefore, possible induction of defense-related genes by Agro-mediated transformation should be a consideration in experimental design.

  14. A fast platform for simulating semi-flexible fiber suspensions applied to cell mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan, E-mail: ehssan@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Computational Biology, Simons Foundation, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Rahimian, Abtin, E-mail: arahimian@acm.org [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Zorin, Denis, E-mail: dzorin@cs.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Shelley, Michael, E-mail: shelley@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Computational Biology, Simons Foundation, New York, NY 10010 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    We present a novel platform for the large-scale simulation of three-dimensional fibrous structures immersed in a Stokesian fluid and evolving under confinement or in free-space in three dimensions. One of the main motivations for this work is to study the dynamics of fiber assemblies within biological cells. For this, we also incorporate the key biophysical elements that determine the dynamics of these assemblies, which include the polymerization and depolymerization kinetics of fibers, their interactions with molecular motors and other objects, their flexibility, and hydrodynamic coupling. This work, to our knowledge, is the first technique to include many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs), and the resulting fluid flows, in cellular assemblies of flexible fibers. We use non-local slender body theory to compute the fluid–structure interactions of the fibers and a second-kind boundary integral formulation for other rigid bodies and the confining boundary. A kernel-independent implementation of the fast multipole method is utilized for efficient evaluation of HIs. The deformation of the fibers is described by nonlinear Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and their polymerization is modeled by the reparametrization of the dynamic equations in the appropriate non-Lagrangian frame. We use a pseudo-spectral representation of fiber positions and implicit time-stepping to resolve large fiber deformations, and to allow time-steps not excessively constrained by temporal stiffness or fiber–fiber interactions. The entire computational scheme is parallelized, which enables simulating assemblies of thousands of fibers. We use our method to investigate two important questions in the mechanics of cell division: (i) the effect of confinement on the hydrodynamic mobility of microtubule asters; and (ii) the dynamics of the positioning of mitotic spindle in complex cell geometries. Finally to demonstrate the general applicability of the method, we simulate the sedimentation of a

  15. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fast reactor programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... criteria; passive shutdown and decay heat removal systems; fast breeder reactors in India. PACS No. 28.41.−i. 1. ... water reactors, mainly pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) to extract ∼10 GWe capacity for ..... commissioning phase and most of the supporting systems have been commissioned and.

  17. Fast data processing with Spark

    CERN Document Server

    Sankar, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Fast Data Processing with Spark - Second Edition is for software developers who want to learn how to write distributed programs with Spark. It will help developers who have had problems that were too big to be dealt with on a single computer. No previous experience with distributed programming is necessary. This book assumes knowledge of either Java, Scala, or Python.

  18. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  19. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Percent of women aged 15-44 currently using male sterilization: 4.5% Source: Key Statistics from the National Survey of Family Growth (data are for 2011-2015) Related FastStats Infertility Reproductive Health More data Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use Among Teenagers in the United States, 2011– ...

  20. FastStats: Prostate Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women’s Health State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health Notice Regarding FastStats Mobile ... prostate cancer: 27,682 Deaths per 100,000 males from prostate cancer: 17.8 Source: Deaths: Final ...

  1. Fast and Objective MRTD measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de; Bakker, S.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Manufacturers and Users of the Thermal Imagers have spent very much time upon the definition and measurement of the generally accepted performance curve: MRTD (Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference). The need for a cheap and fast, objective measurement method has considerably increased since the

  2. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Rodney J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  3. A fast fractional difference algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Noack; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    2014-01-01

    We provide a fast algorithm for calculating the fractional difference of a time series. In standard implementations, the calculation speed (number of arithmetic operations) is of order T 2, where T is the length of the time series. Our algorithm allows calculation speed of order T log...

  4. A Fast Fractional Difference Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Noack; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We provide a fast algorithm for calculating the fractional difference of a time series. In standard implementations, the calculation speed (number of arithmetic operations) is of order T 2, where T is the length of the time series. Our algorithm allows calculation speed of order T log...

  5. Climate adaptation futures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palutikof, J. P

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is the poor cousin of the climate change challenge - the glamour of international debate is around global mitigation agreements, while the bottom-up activities of adaptation, carried out...

  6. Adaptive Modular Playware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Þorsteinsson, Arnar Tumi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the concept of adaptive modular playware, where the playware adapts to the interaction of the individual user. We hypothesize that there are individual differences in user interaction capabilities and styles, and that adaptive playware may adapt to the individual user...... test set, the results are important as a proof of existence of differences and of the need for adaptation. The fact that there are individual differences makes the results significant for the development of games and interaction. It indicates that it is necessary to adapt the game and interaction......, if we desire to make the most appropriate game and interaction for the individual. Hence, we investigate adaptation as an important issue for playware. With simple playware games, we show that the adaptation will speed the game up and down to find the appropriate level that matches the reaction speed...

  7. Adaptive Rationality, Adaptive Behavior and Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic literature focused on understanding decision-making and choice processes reveals a vast collection of approaches to human rationality. Theorists’ attention has moved from absolutely rational, utility-maximizing individuals to boundedly rational and adaptive ones. A number of economists have criticized the concepts of adaptive rationality and adaptive behavior. One of the recent trends in the economic literature is to consider humans irrational. This paper offers an approach which examines adaptive behavior in the context of existing institutions and constantly changing institutional environment. It is assumed that adaptive behavior is a process of evolutionary adjustment to fundamental uncertainty. We emphasize the importance of actors’ engagement in trial and error learning, since if they are involved in this process, they obtain experience and are able to adapt to existing and new institutions. The paper aims at identifying relevant institutions, adaptive mechanisms, informal working rules and practices that influence actors’ behavior in the field of Higher Education in Russia (Rostov Region education services market has been taken as an example. The paper emphasizes the application of qualitative interpretative methods (interviews and discourse analysis in examining actors’ behavior.

  8. Principles of adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tyson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    History and BackgroundIntroductionHistoryPhysical OpticsTerms in Adaptive OpticsSources of AberrationsAtmospheric TurbulenceThermal BloomingNonatmospheric SourcesAdaptive Optics CompensationPhase ConjugationLimitations of Phase ConjugationArtificial Guide StarsLasers for Guide StarsCombining the LimitationsLinear AnalysisPartial Phase ConjugationAdaptive Optics SystemsAdaptive Optics Imaging SystemsBeam Propagation Syst

  9. Adaptation to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmin, J.; Tierney, K.; Chu, E.; Hunter, L.M.; Roberts, J.T.; Shi, L.; Dunlap, R.E.; Brulle, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change adaptation involves major global and societal challenges such as finding adequate and equitable adaptation funding and integrating adaptation and development programs. Current funding is insufficient. Debates between the Global North and South center on how best to allocate the

  10. Model instruments of effective segmentation of the fast food market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mityaeva Tetyana L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of optimisation step-type calculations of economic effectiveness of promotion of fast food with consideration of key parameters of assessment of efficiency of the marketing strategy of segmentation. The article justifies development of a mathematical model on the bases of 3D-presentations and three-dimensional system of management variables. The modern applied mathematical packages allow formation not only of one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays and analyse links of variables, but also of three-dimensional, besides, the more links and parameters are taken into account, the more adequate and adaptive are results of modelling and, as a result, more informative and strategically valuable. The article shows modelling possibilities that allow taking into account strategies and reactions on formation of the marketing strategy under conditions of entering the fast food market segments.

  11. Fast swept-volume distance for robust collision detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.

    1997-04-01

    The need for collision detection arises in several robotics areas, including motion-planning, online collision avoidance, and simulation. At the heart of most current methods are algorithms for interference detection and/or distance computation. A few recent algorithms and implementations are very fast, but to use them for accurate collision detection, very small step sizes can be necessary, reducing their effective efficiency. We present a fast, implemented technique for doing exact distance computation and interference detection for translationally-swept bodies. For rotationally swept bodies, we adapt this technique to improve accuracy, for any given step size, in distance computation and interference detection. We present preliminary experiments that show that the combination of basic and swept-body calculations holds much promise for faster accurate collision detection.

  12. Adaptive control of saccades via internal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Joiner, Wilsaan M; Ethier, Vincent; Zee, David S; Shadmehr, Reza

    2008-03-12

    Ballistic movements like saccades require the brain to generate motor commands without the benefit of sensory feedback. Despite this, saccades are remarkably accurate. Theory suggests that this accuracy arises because the brain relies on an internal forward model that monitors the motor commands, predicts their sensory consequences, and corrects eye trajectory midflight. If control of saccades relies on a forward model, then the forward model should adapt whenever its predictions fail to match sensory feedback at the end of the movement. Using optimal feedback control theory, we predicted how this adaptation should alter saccade trajectories. We trained subjects on a paradigm in which the horizontal target jumped vertically during the saccade. With training, the final position of the saccade moved toward the second target. However, saccades became increasingly curved, i.e., suboptimal, as oculomotor commands were corrected on-line to steer the eye toward the second target. The adaptive response had two components: (1) the motor commands that initiated the saccades changed slowly, aiming the saccade closer to the jumped target. The adaptation of these earliest motor commands displayed little forgetting during the rest periods. (2) Late in saccade trajectory, another adaptive response steered it still closer to the jumped target, producing curvature. Adaptation of these late motor commands showed near-complete forgetting during the rest periods. The two components adapted at different timescales, with the late-acting component displaying much faster rates. It appears that in controlling saccades, the brain relies on an internal feedback that has the characteristics of a fast-adapting forward model.

  13. The Fast-Casual Conundrum: Fast-Casual Restaurant Entrées Are Higher in Calories than Fast Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffman, Danielle E; Davidson, Charis R; Hales, Sarah B; Crimarco, Anthony E; Dahl, Alicia A; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M

    2016-10-01

    Frequently eating fast food has been associated with consuming a diet high in calories, and there is a public perception that fast-casual restaurants (eg, Chipotle) are healthier than traditional fast food (eg, McDonald's). However, research has not examined whether fast-food entrées and fast-casual entrées differ in calorie content. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the caloric content of entrées at fast-food restaurants differed from that found at fast-casual restaurants. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of secondary data. Calorie information from 2014 for lunch and dinner entrées for fast-food and fast-casual restaurants was downloaded from the MenuStat database. Mean calories per entrée between fast-food restaurants and fast-casual restaurants and the proportion of restaurant entrées that fell into different calorie ranges were assessed. A t test was conducted to test the hypothesis that there was no difference between the average calories per entrée at fast-food and fast-casual restaurants. To examine the difference in distribution of entrées in different calorie ranges between fast-food and fast-casual restaurants, χ(2) tests were used. There were 34 fast-food and 28 fast-casual restaurants included in the analysis (n=3,193 entrées). Fast-casual entrées had significantly more calories per entrée (760±301 kcal) than fast-food entrées (561±268; Pfast-casual entrées compared with fast-food entrées exceeded the median of 640 kcal per entrée (Pfast-casual entrées contained more calories than fast-food entrées in the study sample, future studies should compare actual purchasing patterns from these restaurants to determine whether the energy content or nutrient density of full meals (ie, entrées with sides and drinks) differs between fast-casual restaurants and fast-food restaurants. Calorie-conscious consumers should consider the calorie content of entrée items before purchase, regardless of restaurant type. Copyright

  14. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of step size adaptation rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause, Oswin; Glasmachers, Tobias; Igel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    We present a comparison of step size adaptation methods for evolution strategies, covering recent developments in the field. Following recent work by Hansen et al. we formulate a concise list of performance criteria: a) fast convergence of the mean, b) near-optimal fixed point of the normalized s...... that cumulative step size adaptation (CSA) and twopoint adaptation (TPA) provide reliable estimates of the optimal step size. We further find that removing the evolution path of CSA still leads to a reliable algorithm without the computational requirements of CSA....

  15. Fast Image Texture Classification Using Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Texture analysis would permit improved autonomous, onboard science data interpretation for adaptive navigation, sampling, and downlink decisions. These analyses would assist with terrain analysis and instrument placement in both macroscopic and microscopic image data products. Unfortunately, most state-of-the-art texture analysis demands computationally expensive convolutions of filters involving many floating-point operations. This makes them infeasible for radiation- hardened computers and spaceflight hardware. A new method approximates traditional texture classification of each image pixel with a fast decision-tree classifier. The classifier uses image features derived from simple filtering operations involving integer arithmetic. The texture analysis method is therefore amenable to implementation on FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware. Image features based on the "integral image" transform produce descriptive and efficient texture descriptors. Training the decision tree on a set of training data yields a classification scheme that produces reasonable approximations of optimal "texton" analysis at a fraction of the computational cost. A decision-tree learning algorithm employing the traditional k-means criterion of inter-cluster variance is used to learn tree structure from training data. The result is an efficient and accurate summary of surface morphology in images. This work is an evolutionary advance that unites several previous algorithms (k-means clustering, integral images, decision trees) and applies them to a new problem domain (morphology analysis for autonomous science during remote exploration). Advantages include order-of-magnitude improvements in runtime, feasibility for FPGA hardware, and significant improvements in texture classification accuracy.

  16. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths.

  17. Behavioural strategy: Adaptability context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piórkowska Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is embedded in the following fields: strategic management in terms of behavioural strategy concept, adaptability construct, and micro-foundations realm as well as organizational theory and psychology. Moreover, the paper concerns to some extent a multi-level approach in strategic management involving individual, team, and organizational level. The aim of the paper is to contribute to extend, on one hand, the ascertainment set in the field of behavioural strategy as behavioural strategy encompasses a mindboggling diversity of topics and methods and its conceptual unity has been hard to achieve (Powell, Lovallo, Fox 2011, p. 1371, and on the other hand, to order mixed approaches to adaptability especially to gain insights on micro-level adapting processes (individual adaptability and adaptive performance in terms of the multi-level approach. The method that has been used is literature studies and the interference is mostly deductive. The structure of the manuscript is four-fold. The first part involves the considerations in the field of adaptability and adaptive performance at the individual level. The issues of adaptability and adaptive performance at the team level have been presented in the second part. The third part encompasses the organizational adaptability assertions. Finally, the conclusion, limitations of the considerations highlighted as well as the future research directions have been emphasized. The overarching key finding is that the behavioural strategy concept may constitute the boundary spanner in exploring and explaining adaptability phenomenon at different levels of analysis.

  18. LSHPlace: fast phylogenetic placement using locality-sensitive hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel G; Truszkowski, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of phylogenetic placement, in which large numbers of sequences (often next-generation sequencing reads) are placed onto an existing phylogenetic tree. We adapt our recent work on phylogenetic tree inference, which uses ancestral sequence reconstruction and locality-sensitive hashing, to this domain. With these ideas, new sequences can be placed onto trees with high fidelity in strikingly fast runtimes. Our results are two orders of magnitude faster than existing programs for this domain, and show a modest accuracy tradeoff. Our results offer the possibility of analyzing many more reads in a next-generation sequencing project than is currently possible.

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FAST FOOD CONSUMPTION AND HEALTH OF LATE CHILDHOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Nirmal Kaur; Miss Neha Qumar; Shubhi Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Eat healthy and live healthy is one of the essential requirements for long life. Unfortunately, today’s world has been adapted to a system of consumption of foods which has several adverse effects on health. Lifestyle changes has compelled us so much that one has so little time to really think what we are eating is right or not. Globalization and urbanization have greatly affected one’s eating habits and forced many people to consume fancy and high calorie fast foods, popularly kn...

  20. Why are idioms recognized fast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabossi, Patrizia; Fanari, Rachele; Wolf, Kinou

    2009-06-01

    It is an established fact that idiomatic expressions are fast to process. However, the explanation of the phenomenon is controversial. Using a semantic judgment paradigm, where people decide whether a string is meaningful or not, the present experiment tested the predictions deriving from the three main theories of idiom recognition-the lexical representation hypothesis, the idiom decomposition hypothesis, and the configuration hypothesis. Participants were faster at judging decomposable idioms, nondecomposable idioms, and clichés than at judging their matched controls. The effect was comparable for all conventional expressions. The results were interpreted as suggesting that, as posited by the configuration hypothesis, the fact that they are known expressions, rather than idiomaticity, explains their fast recognition.

  1. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  3. ATLAS FTK: The Fast Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    T, Iizawa; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Fast TracKer (FTK) will perform global track reconstruction after each Level-1 trigger accept to enable the software-based High Level Trigger to have early access to tracking information. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memory (AM). FTK provides global track reconstruction in the full inner silicon detector in approximately 100 microseconds with resolution comparable to the offline algorithms. It allows a fast and precise detection of the primary and secondary vertex information. The track and vertex information is then used by the High Level Trigger algorithms, allowing highly improved trigger performance for the important signatures such as b-jets. In this paper, the architecture and the hardware development status of FT...

  4. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R and D topics are discussed. -- Highlights: •We are proposing thin pixel silicon sensors with 10's of picoseconds time resolution. •Fast charge collection is coupled with internal charge multiplication. •The truly 4-D sensors will revolutionize imaging and particle counting in many applications.

  5. Target Response Adaptation for Correlation Filter Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Bibi, Adel Aamer

    2016-09-16

    Most correlation filter (CF) based trackers utilize the circulant structure of the training data to learn a linear filter that best regresses this data to a hand-crafted target response. These circularly shifted patches are only approximations to actual translations in the image, which become unreliable in many realistic tracking scenarios including fast motion, occlusion, etc. In these cases, the traditional use of a single centered Gaussian as the target response impedes tracker performance and can lead to unrecoverable drift. To circumvent this major drawback, we propose a generic framework that can adaptively change the target response from frame to frame, so that the tracker is less sensitive to the cases where circular shifts do not reliably approximate translations. To do that, we reformulate the underlying optimization to solve for both the filter and target response jointly, where the latter is regularized by measurements made using actual translations. This joint problem has a closed form solution and thus allows for multiple templates, kernels, and multi-dimensional features. Extensive experiments on the popular OTB100 benchmark show that our target adaptive framework can be combined with many CF trackers to realize significant overall performance improvement (ranging from 3 %-13.5% in precision and 3.2 %-13% in accuracy), especially in categories where this adaptation is necessary (e.g. fast motion, motion blur, etc.). © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

  6. Intermittent fasting does not affect whole-body glucose, lipid, or protein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Maarten R.; Lammers, Nicolette M.; Dubbelhuis, Peter F.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Jonkers-Schuitema, Cora F.; Fliers, Eric; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Aerts, Johannes M.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intermittent fasting (IF) was shown to increase whole-body insulin sensitivity, but it is uncertain whether IF selectively influences intermediary metabolism. Such selectivity might be advantageous when adapting to periods of food abundance and food shortage. Objective: The objective was

  7. MediaMill: Fast and effective video search using the ForkBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, O.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this technical demonstration we showcase the MediaMill ForkBrowser for video retrieval. It embeds multiple query methods into a single browsing environment. We show that users can switch query methods on demand without the need to adapt to a different interface. This allows for fast and effective

  8. Application of washed rumen technique for rapid determination of fasting heat production in steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a washed rumen technique as an alternative approach for determining fasting HP in cattle. In Exp. 1, 8 Holstein steers (322±30 kg) were adapted to a cubed alfalfa-based diet (1.5xNEm) for 10 d. After which steers were placed into individual hea...

  9. A predator-2 prey fast-slow dynamical system for rapid predator evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltz, Sofia Helena; Veerman, Frits; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider adaptive change of diet of a predator population that switches its feeding between two prey populations. We develop a novel 1 fast-3 slow dynamical system to describe the dynamics of the three populations amidst continuous but rapid evolution of the predator's diet choice. The two ext...

  10. Type 2 Iodothyronine Deiodinase in Skeletal Muscle: Effects of Hypothyroidism and Fasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, Karen A.; Soeters, Maarten R.; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; van Doorn, Martijn B.; van der Klaauw, Agatha A.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.; Visser, Theo J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The iodothyronine deiodinases D1, D2, and D3 enable tissue-specific adaptation of thyroid hormone levels in response to various conditions, such as hypothyroidism or fasting. The possible expression of D2 mRNA in skeletal muscle is intriguing because this enzyme could play a role in

  11. ATLAS fast physics monitoring: TADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, G.; Elsing, M.; Gumpert, C.; Kamioka, S.; Moyse, E.; Nairz, A.; Eifert, T.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has been recording data from proton-proton collisions with 13 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2015. The collaboration is using a fast physics monitoring framework (TADA) to automatically perform a broad range of fast searches for early signs of new physics and to monitor the data quality across the year with the full analysis level calibrations applied to the rapidly growing data. TADA is designed to provide fast feedback directly after the collected data has been fully calibrated and processed at the Tier-0. The system can monitor a large range of physics channels, offline data quality and physics performance quantities. TADA output is available on a website accessible by the whole collaboration. It gets updated twice a day with the data from newly processed runs. Hints of potentially interesting physics signals or performance issues identified in this way are reported to be followed up by physics or combined performance groups. The note reports as well about the technical aspects of TADA: the software structure to obtain the input TAG files, the framework workflow and structure, the webpage and its implementation.

  12. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  13. ATLAS Fast Physics Monitoring: TADA

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00375930; The ATLAS collaboration; Elsing, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is recording data from proton-proton collisions with 13 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2015. The collaboration is using a fast physics monitoring framework (TADA) to automatically perform a broad range of fast searches for early signs of new physics and to monitor the data quality across the year with the full analysis level calibrations applied to the rapidly growing data.TADA is designed to provide fast feedback directly after the collected data has been fully calibrated and processed at the Tier-0, the CERN Data Center. The system can monitor a large range of physics channels, offline data quality and physics performance quantities nearly final analysis level object calibrations. TADA output is available on a website accessible by the whole collaboration that gets updated twice a day with the data from newly processed runs. Hints of potentially interesting physics signals or performance issues identified in this way are reported to be followed up by physics or combin...

  14. ATLAS Fast Physics Monitoring: TADA

    CERN Document Server

    Elsing, Markus; The ATLAS collaboration; Sabato, Gabriele; Kamioka, Shusei; Nairz, Armin Michael; Moyse, Edward; Gumpert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment at the LHC is recording data from proton-proton collisions with 13 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2015. The collaboration is using a fast physics monitoring framework (TADA) to automatically perform a broad range of fast searches for early signs of new physics and to monitor the data quality across the year with the full analysis level calibrations applied to the rapidly growing data. TADA is designed to provide fast feedback directly after the collected data has been fully calibrated and processed at the Tier-0. The system can monitor a large range of physics channels, offline data quality and physics performance quantities nearly final analysis level object calibrations. TADA output is available on a website accessible by the whole collaboration that gets updated twice a day with the data from newly processed runs. Hints of potentially interesting physics signals or performance issues identified in this way are reported to be followed up by physics or combined performance groups...

  15. Fleet Assistance and Support Team (FAST) Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FAST team was established by PMA-264 for introduction of multistatic ASW systems into the Fleet.FAST provides Air ASW mission planning, tactics/tactical sensor...

  16. Predictors of Ramadan fasting during pregnancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Bilsen, Lily A; Savitri, Ary I; Amelia, Dwirani; Baharuddin, Mohammad; Grobbee, Diederick E; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2016-01-01

    Although the health effects of Ramadan fasting during pregnancy are still unclear, it is important to identify the predictors and motivational factors involved in women's decision to observe the fast...

  17. Gluconeogenesis and fasting in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thien, H.; Ackermans, M. T.; Weverling, G. J.; Dang Vinh, T.; Endert, E.; Kager, P. A.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In healthy subjects after an overnight fast, glucose production is for approximately 50% derived from glycogenolysis. If the fast is prolonged, glucose production decreases due to a decline in glycogenolysis, while gluconeogenesis remains stable. In cerebral malaria, glucose production

  18. The Fast Simulation Chain for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Basalaev, Artem; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to generate the huge number of Monte Carlo events that will be required by the ATLAS experiment over the next several runs, a very fast simulation is critical. Fast detector simulation alone, however, is insufficient: with very high numbers of simultaneous proton-proton collisions expected in Run 3 and beyond, the digitization (detector response emulation) and event reconstruction time quickly become comparable to the time required for detector simulation. The ATLAS Fast Chain simulation has been developed to solve this problem. Modules are implemented for fast simulation, fast digitization, and fast track reconstruction. The application is sufficiently fast -- several orders of magnitude faster than the standard simulation -- that the simultaneous proton-proton collisions can be generated during the simulation job, so Pythia8 also runs concurrently with the rest of the algorithms. The Fast Chain has been built to be extremely modular and flexible, so that each sample can be custom-tailored to match ...

  19. Exact e-e (exchange) correlations of 2-D quantum dots in magnetic field: Size extensive N = 3 , 4 , … , ‧ n ‧ -electron systems via multi-pole expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Singh, Sunny; Kaur, Harsimran; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of coulomb interaction emerges with the complexity of either convergence of integrals or separation of variables of Schrödinger equations. For an N-electron system, interaction terms grow by N(N-1)/2 factors. Therefore, 2-e system stands as fundamental basic unit for generalized N-e systems. For the first time, we have evaluated e-e correlations in very simple and absolutely terminating finite summed hypergeometric series for 2-D double carrier parabolic quantum dot in both zero and arbitrary non-zero magnetic field (symmetric gauge) and have appraised these integrals in variational methods. The competitive role among confinement strength, magnetic field, mass of the carrier and dielectric constant of the medium on energy level diagram, level-spacing statistics, heat capacities (Cv at 1 K) and magnetization (T ∼ (0-1)K) is studied on systems spanning over wide range of materials (GaAs,Ge,CdS,SiO2 and He, etc). We have also constructed an exact theory for generalized correlated N-e 2-D quantum dots via multi-pole expansion but for the sake of compactness of the article we refrain from data.

  20. Adaptive Distributed Data Structure Management for Parallel CFD Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Frisch, Jerome

    2013-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations require a lot of computing resources in terms of CPU time and memory in order to compute with a reasonable physical accuracy. If only uniformly refined domains are applied, the amount of computing cells is growing rather fast if a certain small resolution is physically required. This can be remedied by applying adaptively refined grids. Unfortunately, due to the adaptive refinement procedures, errors are introduced which have to be taken into account. This paper is focussing on implementation details of the applied adaptive data structure management and a qualitative analysis of the introduced errors by analysing a Poisson problem on the given data structure, which has to be solved in every time step of a CFD analysis. Furthermore an adaptive CFD benchmark example is computed, showing the benefits of an adaptive refinement as well as measurements of parallel data distribution and performance. © 2013 IEEE.